Company Quick10K Filing
Air Lease
10-K 2020-12-31 Filed 2021-02-22
10-Q 2020-09-30 Filed 2020-11-09
10-Q 2020-06-30 Filed 2020-08-06
10-Q 2020-03-31 Filed 2020-05-07
10-K 2019-12-31 Filed 2020-02-14
10-Q 2019-09-30 Filed 2019-11-07
10-Q 2019-06-30 Filed 2019-08-08
10-Q 2019-03-31 Filed 2019-05-09
10-K 2018-12-31 Filed 2019-02-21
10-Q 2018-09-30 Filed 2018-11-08
10-Q 2018-06-30 Filed 2018-08-09
10-Q 2018-03-31 Filed 2018-05-10
10-K 2017-12-31 Filed 2018-02-22
10-Q 2017-09-30 Filed 2017-11-09
10-Q 2017-06-30 Filed 2017-08-03
10-Q 2017-03-31 Filed 2017-05-04
10-K 2016-12-31 Filed 2017-02-23
10-Q 2016-09-30 Filed 2016-11-03
10-Q 2016-06-30 Filed 2016-08-04
10-Q 2016-03-31 Filed 2016-05-05
10-K 2015-12-31 Filed 2016-02-25
10-Q 2015-09-30 Filed 2015-11-05
10-Q 2015-06-30 Filed 2015-08-06
10-Q 2015-03-31 Filed 2015-05-07
10-K 2014-12-31 Filed 2015-02-26
10-Q 2014-09-30 Filed 2014-11-06
10-Q 2014-06-30 Filed 2014-08-07
10-Q 2014-03-31 Filed 2014-05-08
10-K 2013-12-31 Filed 2014-02-27
10-Q 2013-09-30 Filed 2013-11-07
10-Q 2013-06-30 Filed 2013-08-08
10-Q 2013-03-31 Filed 2013-05-09
10-Q 2012-09-30 Filed 2012-11-08
10-Q 2012-06-30 Filed 2012-08-09
10-Q 2012-03-31 Filed 2012-05-14
10-K 2011-12-31 Filed 2012-03-09
10-Q 2011-09-30 Filed 2011-11-10
10-Q 2011-06-30 Filed 2011-08-12
10-Q 2011-03-31 Filed 2011-05-16
8-K 2021-02-22
8-K 2021-01-26
8-K 2020-12-15
8-K 2020-11-24
8-K 2020-11-09
8-K 2020-11-09
8-K 2020-08-17
8-K 2020-08-06
8-K 2020-08-06
8-K 2020-06-24
8-K 2020-05-07
8-K 2020-05-07
8-K 2020-05-06
8-K 2020-03-25
8-K 2020-02-14
8-K 2020-02-14
8-K 2020-01-14
8-K 2019-12-20
8-K 2019-12-17
8-K 2019-12-05
8-K 2019-11-19
8-K 2019-11-07
8-K 2019-11-07
8-K 2019-09-16
8-K 2019-08-08
8-K 2019-08-08
8-K 2019-06-05
8-K 2019-06-03
8-K 2019-05-23
8-K 2019-05-09
8-K 2019-05-09
8-K 2019-05-08
8-K 2019-05-03
8-K 2019-03-05
8-K 2019-02-26
8-K 2019-02-21
8-K 2019-02-21
8-K 2019-01-23
8-K 2019-01-08
8-K 2018-11-29
8-K 2018-11-20
8-K 2018-11-14
8-K 2018-11-08
8-K 2018-11-08
8-K 2018-11-07
8-K 2018-09-17
8-K 2018-09-10
8-K 2018-08-09
8-K 2018-08-09
8-K 2018-06-18
8-K 2018-06-11
8-K 2018-05-10
8-K 2018-05-10
8-K 2018-05-09
8-K 2018-05-02
8-K 2018-03-26
8-K 2018-02-22
8-K 2018-02-22
8-K 2018-01-16
8-K 2018-01-08
8-K 2018-01-05

AL 10K Annual Report

Part I
Item 1. Business
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 2. Properties
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Part II
Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6. Selected Financial Data
Item 7. Management'S Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Note 1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Note 2. Debt Financing
Note 3. Interest Expense
Note 4. Shareholders' Equity
Note 5. Rental Income
Note 6. Concentration of Risk
Note 7. Income Taxes
Note 8. Commitments and Contingencies
Note 9. Net Earnings per Share
Note 10. Fair Value Measurements
Note 11. Stock - Based Compensation
Note 12. Aircraft Under Management
Note 13. Flight Equipment Held for Sale
Note 14. Quarterly Financial Data (Unaudited)
Note 15. Impact of Covid - 19 Pandemic
Note 16. Subsequent Events
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures
Item 9B. Other Information
Part III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11. Executive Compensation
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services
Part IV
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules
Item 16. Form 10 - K Summary
EX-10.31 al-20201231xex10d31.htm
EX-10.91 al-20201231xex10d91.htm
EX-10.92 al-20201231xex10d92.htm
EX-10.93 al-20201231xex10d93.htm
EX-10.122 al-20201231xex10d122.htm
EX-10.123 al-20201231xex10d123.htm
EX-10.136 al-20201231xex10d136.htm
EX-10.137 al-20201231xex10d137.htm
EX-10.142 al-20201231xex10d142.htm
EX-10.145 al-20201231xex10d145.htm
EX-10.170 al-20201231xex10d170.htm
EX-10.171 al-20201231xex10d171.htm
EX-21.1 al-20201231xex21d1.htm
EX-23.1 al-20201231xex23d1.htm
EX-31.1 al-20201231xex31d1.htm
EX-31.2 al-20201231xex31d2.htm
EX-32.1 al-20201231xex32d1.htm
EX-32.2 al-20201231xex32d2.htm

Air Lease Earnings 2020-12-31

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

11335026711385289600P1Y113852896113350267--12-312020FY0001487712false10000000100000001000000010000000000001487712us-gaap:SubsequentEventMember2021-02-220001487712us-gaap:CommonClassAMember2020-11-050001487712us-gaap:PreferredStockMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:AccumulatedOtherComprehensiveIncomeMember2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember2019-12-310001487712us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember2019-12-310001487712us-gaap:AccumulatedOtherComprehensiveIncomeMember2019-12-310001487712us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember2018-12-310001487712us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember2018-12-310001487712us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember2017-12-310001487712us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember2017-12-310001487712us-gaap:CommonClassAMemberus-gaap:CommonStockMember2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:PreferredStockMember2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:CommonClassAMemberus-gaap:CommonStockMember2019-12-310001487712us-gaap:PreferredStockMember2019-12-310001487712us-gaap:CommonClassAMemberus-gaap:CommonStockMember2018-12-310001487712us-gaap:CommonClassAMemberus-gaap:CommonStockMember2017-12-310001487712us-gaap:EmployeeStockOptionMember2017-01-012017-12-310001487712us-gaap:EmployeeStockOptionMember2017-12-310001487712al:EquityIncentivePlan2010Member2014-05-072014-05-070001487712al:EquityIncentivePlan2014Member2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:RestrictedStockUnitsRSUMember2019-12-310001487712srt:MinimumMemberal:RestrictedStockWithBookValueConditionsMemberus-gaap:ShareBasedCompensationAwardTrancheTwoMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712srt:MaximumMemberal:RestrictedStockWithBookValueConditionsMemberus-gaap:ShareBasedCompensationAwardTrancheTwoMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712srt:MinimumMemberal:RestrictedStockWithTotalShareholderReturnConditionsMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712srt:MaximumMemberal:RestrictedStockWithTotalShareholderReturnConditionsMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712srt:MinimumMemberus-gaap:RestrictedStockUnitsRSUMemberus-gaap:ShareBasedCompensationAwardTrancheTwoMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712srt:MaximumMemberus-gaap:RestrictedStockUnitsRSUMemberus-gaap:ShareBasedCompensationAwardTrancheTwoMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712us-gaap:RestrictedStockUnitsRSUMemberus-gaap:ShareBasedCompensationAwardTrancheOneMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:RestrictedStockWithBookValueConditionsMemberus-gaap:ShareBasedCompensationAwardTrancheTwoMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:RestrictedStockWithBookValueConditionsMemberus-gaap:ShareBasedCompensationAwardTrancheOneMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712srt:EuropeMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-12-310001487712country:CNus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-12-310001487712al:UnitedStatesOfAmericaAndCanadaMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-12-310001487712al:PacificAustraliaNewZealandMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-12-310001487712al:MiddleEastAndAfricaMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-12-310001487712al:CentralAmericaSouthAmericaAndMexicoMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-12-310001487712al:AsiaExcludingChinaMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-12-310001487712srt:EuropeMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-12-310001487712country:CNus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-12-310001487712al:UnitedStatesOfAmericaAndCanadaMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-12-310001487712al:PacificAustraliaNewZealandMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-12-310001487712al:MiddleEastAndAfricaMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-12-310001487712al:CentralAmericaSouthAmericaAndMexicoMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-12-310001487712al:AsiaExcludingChinaMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-12-310001487712us-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-12-310001487712al:DividendPayableBeginningOn15March2024Member2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:SeriesAPreferredStockMember2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:SeriesAPreferredStockMember2019-12-310001487712us-gaap:SeriesAPreferredStockMember2019-03-050001487712us-gaap:SeriesAPreferredStockMemberus-gaap:SubsequentEventMember2021-02-192021-02-190001487712us-gaap:SeriesAPreferredStockMember2020-12-152020-12-150001487712us-gaap:SeriesAPreferredStockMember2020-09-152020-09-150001487712us-gaap:SeriesAPreferredStockMember2020-06-152020-06-150001487712us-gaap:SeriesAPreferredStockMember2020-03-152020-03-150001487712us-gaap:SeriesAPreferredStockMember2019-03-052019-03-050001487712us-gaap:SeriesAPreferredStockMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712us-gaap:AccumulatedOtherComprehensiveIncomeMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712us-gaap:AccumulatedOtherComprehensiveIncomeMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712us-gaap:StateAndLocalJurisdictionMember2020-12-310001487712al:ThirdPartyInvestorsMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:FinancialInstitutionMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:ThunderboltAircraftLeaseLimitedIiMember2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:RevolvingCreditFacilityMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:SyndicatedUnsecuredRevolvingCreditFacilityMatureOn5May2023Member2020-12-310001487712al:SyndicatedUnsecuredRevolvingCreditFacilityMatureOn5May2022Member2020-12-310001487712al:SyndicatedUnsecuredRevolvingCreditFacilityMatureOn5may2021Member2020-12-310001487712al:MediumTermNoteProgramDue2021Member2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:ThunderboltAircraftLeaseMember2020-12-310001487712al:BlackbirdCapitalILlcAndBlackbirdCapitalIiLlcMember2020-12-310001487712al:ThunderboltAircraftLeaseMember2019-12-310001487712al:BlackbirdCapitalILlcAndBlackbirdCapitalIiLlcMember2019-12-310001487712al:BlackbirdCapitalILLCMember2020-12-310001487712al:BlackbirdCapitalIILLCMember2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:EmployeeStockOptionMember2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:EmployeeStockOptionMember2019-12-310001487712us-gaap:EmployeeStockOptionMember2018-12-3100014877122020-10-012020-12-3100014877122020-07-012020-09-3000014877122020-04-012020-06-3000014877122020-01-012020-03-3100014877122019-10-012019-12-3100014877122019-07-012019-09-3000014877122019-04-012019-06-3000014877122019-01-012019-03-310001487712us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember2018-01-012018-12-310001487712al:AircraftsMember2020-12-310001487712al:AircraftsMember2019-12-310001487712us-gaap:DomesticCountryMember2020-12-310001487712al:UnsecuredTermFinancingOneMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:UnsecuredTermFinancing3.00PercentMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:MediumTermNoteProgramDue2021Member2020-12-310001487712srt:MinimumMemberus-gaap:SeniorNotesMember2020-12-310001487712srt:MinimumMemberal:UnsecuredTermFinancingMember2020-12-310001487712srt:MaximumMemberus-gaap:SeniorNotesMember2020-12-310001487712srt:MaximumMemberal:UnsecuredTermFinancingMember2020-12-310001487712al:MediumTermNoteProgramDue2021Memberal:ThreeMonthLondonInterbankOfferedRateLiborMember2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:LondonInterbankOfferedRateLIBORMember2020-12-310001487712srt:MinimumMemberus-gaap:SeniorNotesMember2019-12-310001487712srt:MaximumMemberus-gaap:SeniorNotesMember2019-12-310001487712us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel2Member2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:CarryingReportedAmountFairValueDisclosureMember2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel2Member2019-12-310001487712us-gaap:CarryingReportedAmountFairValueDisclosureMember2019-12-310001487712al:MediumTermNoteProgram0.70PercentDue2024Member2021-01-310001487712al:UnsecuredTermFinancingOneMember2020-12-310001487712al:UnsecuredTermFinancing3.00PercentMember2020-12-310001487712al:MediumTermNoteProgramMember2020-12-310001487712al:MediumTermNoteProgram3.375PercentDue2025Member2020-12-310001487712al:MediumTermNoteProgram3.125PercentDue2030Member2020-12-310001487712al:MediumTermNoteProgram3.00PercentDue2030Member2020-12-310001487712al:MediumTermNoteProgram2.875PercentDue2026Member2020-12-310001487712al:MediumTermNoteProgram2.30PercentDue2025Member2020-12-310001487712al:ExportCreditFinancingMember2013-03-310001487712srt:WeightedAverageMemberus-gaap:ConvertibleNotesPayableMemberus-gaap:CommonClassAMember2011-11-300001487712us-gaap:UnsecuredDebtMember2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:SeniorNotesMember2020-12-310001487712al:UnsecuredTermFinancingMember2020-12-310001487712al:FloatingRateTermLoanMember2020-12-310001487712al:FixedRateTermLoanMember2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:UnsecuredDebtMember2019-12-310001487712us-gaap:SeniorNotesMember2019-12-310001487712us-gaap:RevolvingCreditFacilityMember2019-12-310001487712al:UnsecuredTermFinancingMember2019-12-310001487712al:FloatingRateTermLoanMember2019-12-310001487712al:FixedRateTermLoanMember2019-12-310001487712al:ExportCreditFinancingMember2019-12-310001487712us-gaap:ConvertibleNotesPayableMember2011-11-300001487712srt:MinimumMemberal:UnsecuredTermFinancingMemberus-gaap:LondonInterbankOfferedRateLIBORMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712srt:MinimumMemberal:FloatingRateTermLoanMemberus-gaap:LondonInterbankOfferedRateLIBORMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712srt:MaximumMemberal:UnsecuredTermFinancingMemberus-gaap:LondonInterbankOfferedRateLIBORMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712srt:MaximumMemberal:FloatingRateTermLoanMemberus-gaap:LondonInterbankOfferedRateLIBORMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712us-gaap:SeniorNotesMemberus-gaap:LondonInterbankOfferedRateLIBORMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712us-gaap:SeniorNotesMemberal:ThreeMonthLondonInterbankOfferedRateLiborMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712us-gaap:RevolvingCreditFacilityMemberus-gaap:LondonInterbankOfferedRateLIBORMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712us-gaap:RevolvingCreditFacilityMemberus-gaap:BaseRateMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:UnsecuredTermFinancingOneMemberus-gaap:LondonInterbankOfferedRateLIBORMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:SeniorUnsecuredNotes1.125PercentDue2022Member2020-01-012020-12-310001487712srt:MinimumMemberal:FloatingRateTermLoanMemberus-gaap:LondonInterbankOfferedRateLIBORMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712srt:MaximumMemberal:FloatingRateTermLoanMemberus-gaap:LondonInterbankOfferedRateLIBORMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712us-gaap:ConvertibleNotesPayableMemberus-gaap:CommonClassAMember2011-11-012011-11-300001487712srt:EuropeMemberus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712srt:EuropeMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712country:CNus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712country:CNus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:UnitedStatesOfAmericaAndCanadaMemberus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:UnitedStatesOfAmericaAndCanadaMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:PacificAustraliaNewZealandMemberus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:PacificAustraliaNewZealandMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:MiddleEastAndAfricaMemberus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:MiddleEastAndAfricaMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:CentralAmericaSouthAmericaAndMexicoMemberus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:CentralAmericaSouthAmericaAndMexicoMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:AsiaExcludingChinaMemberus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:AsiaExcludingChinaMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712us-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712us-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712srt:EuropeMemberus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712srt:EuropeMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712country:CNus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712country:CNus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712al:UnitedStatesOfAmericaAndCanadaMemberus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712al:UnitedStatesOfAmericaAndCanadaMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712al:PacificAustraliaNewZealandMemberus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712al:PacificAustraliaNewZealandMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712al:MiddleEastAndAfricaMemberus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712al:MiddleEastAndAfricaMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712al:CentralAmericaSouthAmericaAndMexicoMemberus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712al:CentralAmericaSouthAmericaAndMexicoMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712al:AsiaExcludingChinaMemberus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712al:AsiaExcludingChinaMemberus-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712us-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712us-gaap:NetAssetsGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712srt:EuropeMemberus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2018-01-012018-12-310001487712country:CNus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2018-01-012018-12-310001487712al:UnitedStatesOfAmericaAndCanadaMemberus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2018-01-012018-12-310001487712al:PacificAustraliaNewZealandMemberus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2018-01-012018-12-310001487712al:MiddleEastAndAfricaMemberus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2018-01-012018-12-310001487712al:CentralAmericaSouthAmericaAndMexicoMemberus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2018-01-012018-12-310001487712al:AsiaExcludingChinaMemberus-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2018-01-012018-12-310001487712us-gaap:SalesMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2018-01-012018-12-310001487712us-gaap:CommonClassBMember2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:CommonClassAMember2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:CommonClassBMember2019-12-310001487712us-gaap:CommonClassAMember2019-12-310001487712us-gaap:CommonClassAMember2010-12-310001487712us-gaap:CommonClassAMemberus-gaap:SubsequentEventMember2021-02-192021-02-1900014877122018-12-3100014877122017-12-310001487712us-gaap:RestrictedStockUnitsRSUMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712us-gaap:RestrictedStockUnitsRSUMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712us-gaap:RestrictedStockUnitsRSUMember2018-01-012018-12-310001487712us-gaap:EmployeeStockOptionMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712us-gaap:EmployeeStockOptionMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712us-gaap:EmployeeStockOptionMember2018-01-012018-12-310001487712us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember2018-01-012018-12-310001487712al:MaintenanceRightAssetsMember2020-12-310001487712al:MaintenanceRightAssetsMember2019-12-310001487712us-gaap:SeriesAPreferredStockMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712us-gaap:CommonClassAMember2020-01-012020-12-3100014877122020-06-3000014877122021-02-190001487712al:Covid19Member2020-10-012020-12-310001487712us-gaap:CommonClassAMemberus-gaap:CommonStockMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712us-gaap:CommonClassAMemberus-gaap:CommonStockMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712us-gaap:CommonClassAMemberus-gaap:CommonStockMember2018-01-012018-12-310001487712al:RestrictedStockWithTotalShareholderReturnConditionsMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:RestrictedStockWithBookValueConditionsMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712us-gaap:RestrictedStockUnitsRSUMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712us-gaap:RestrictedStockUnitsRSUMember2020-12-310001487712al:AircraftHeldForSaleMember2019-12-310001487712al:DividendPayableBeginningOn15March2024Memberus-gaap:SeriesAPreferredStockMemberal:ThreeMonthLondonInterbankOfferedRateLiborMember2019-03-052019-03-050001487712al:DividendPayableBeginningOn15June2019Memberus-gaap:SeriesAPreferredStockMember2019-03-052019-03-050001487712srt:B737MaxMemberus-gaap:SubsequentEventMember2021-02-222021-02-220001487712srt:EuropeMemberal:NumberOfCustomersGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712country:CNal:NumberOfCustomersGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:UnitedStatesOfAmericaAndCanadaMemberal:NumberOfCustomersGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:PacificAustraliaNewZealandMemberal:NumberOfCustomersGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:MiddleEastAndAfricaMemberal:NumberOfCustomersGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:CentralAmericaSouthAmericaAndMexicoMemberal:NumberOfCustomersGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:AsiaExcludingChinaMemberal:NumberOfCustomersGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:NumberOfCustomersGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712srt:EuropeMemberal:NumberOfCustomersGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712country:CNal:NumberOfCustomersGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712al:UnitedStatesOfAmericaAndCanadaMemberal:NumberOfCustomersGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712al:PacificAustraliaNewZealandMemberal:NumberOfCustomersGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712al:MiddleEastAndAfricaMemberal:NumberOfCustomersGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712al:CentralAmericaSouthAmericaAndMexicoMemberal:NumberOfCustomersGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712al:AsiaExcludingChinaMemberal:NumberOfCustomersGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712al:NumberOfCustomersGeographicAreaMemberus-gaap:GeographicConcentrationRiskMember2019-01-012019-12-310001487712al:ThunderboltAircraftLeaseMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712us-gaap:AssetsLeasedToOthersMember2020-12-310001487712al:AircraftImprovementAssetsMember2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:AssetsLeasedToOthersMember2019-12-310001487712al:AircraftImprovementAssetsMember2019-12-310001487712us-gaap:SecuredDebtMember2020-12-310001487712al:TermLoanMember2020-12-310001487712al:ExportCreditFinancingMember2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:SecuredDebtMember2019-12-310001487712al:TermLoanMember2019-12-310001487712al:A330900NeoMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:B787910Member2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:Boeing737789MaxMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:AirbusA3509001000Member2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:AircraftsMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:AirbusA320321NEOMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:A220300Member2020-01-012020-12-310001487712us-gaap:RevolvingCreditFacilityMemberus-gaap:SubsequentEventMember2021-02-010001487712al:UnsecuredTermFinancing1.125PercentMember2020-12-310001487712us-gaap:RevolvingCreditFacilityMember2020-12-310001487712al:SyndicatedUnsecuredRevolvingCreditFacilityMatureOn5May2020Member2020-05-050001487712srt:B777200Member2020-12-310001487712srt:B737800Member2020-12-310001487712srt:B737700Member2020-12-310001487712srt:A330200Member2020-12-310001487712srt:A320200Member2020-12-310001487712al:EmbraerE190100Member2020-12-310001487712al:Boeing7879Member2020-12-310001487712al:Boeing78710Member2020-12-310001487712al:Boeing7378MaxMember2020-12-310001487712al:B767300ERMember2020-12-310001487712al:AirbusA350900Member2020-12-310001487712al:AirbusA3501000Member2020-12-310001487712al:AirbusA330900NeoMember2020-12-310001487712al:AirbusA321200NeoMember2020-12-310001487712al:AirbusA321200Member2020-12-310001487712al:AirbusA320200NeoMember2020-12-310001487712al:AirbusA319100Member2020-12-310001487712al:A330300Member2020-12-310001487712al:BlackbirdCapitalIILLCMember2020-12-310001487712al:Covid19Member2020-01-012020-12-3100014877122020-12-3100014877122019-12-310001487712srt:MinimumMemberus-gaap:SeniorNotesMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712srt:MinimumMemberal:UnsecuredTermFinancingMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712srt:MinimumMemberal:SecuredTermFinancingMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712srt:MaximumMemberus-gaap:SeniorNotesMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712srt:MaximumMemberal:UnsecuredTermFinancingMember2020-01-012020-12-310001487712srt:MaximumMemberal:SecuredTermFinancingMember2020-01-012020-12-3100014877122019-01-012019-12-3100014877122018-01-012018-12-310001487712srt:MaximumMemberal:AirbusA220Member2020-01-012020-12-310001487712al:BlackbirdCapitalILlcAndBlackbirdCapitalIiLlcMember2020-01-012020-12-3100014877122020-01-012020-12-31al:itemal:aircraftiso4217:USDxbrli:pureal:leaseal:customerxbrli:sharesiso4217:USDxbrli:sharesal:country

Table of Contents

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

(Mark One)

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from to

Commission File Number 001-35121

AIR LEASE CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)

27-1840403
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

2000 Avenue of the Stars, Suite 1000N
Los Angeles, California
(Address of principal executive offices)

90067
(Zip Code)

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code): (310553-0555

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class

    

Trading Symbol(s)

    

Name of each exchange
on which registered

Class A Common Stock

AL

New York Stock Exchange

6.150% Fixed-to-Floating Rate Non-Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock, Series A

AL PRA

New York Stock Exchange

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes  No 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act. Yes  No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes  No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes  No 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer 

Accelerated filer 

Non-accelerated filer 

Smaller reporting company 

Emerging growth company 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the Registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management's assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report. Yes  No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes    No 

The aggregate market value of registrant’s voting stock held by non-affiliates was approximately $3.1 billion on June 30, 2020, based upon the last reported sales price on the New York Stock Exchange. As of February 19, 2021, there were 113,873,911 shares of Class A common stock outstanding.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Designated portions of the Proxy Statement relating to registrant’s 2021 Annual Meeting of Shareholders have been incorporated by reference into Part III of this report.

Table of Contents

Form 10-K

For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2020

INDEX

TABLE OF CONTENTS

    

Page

PART I.

Item 1.

Business

4

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

14

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

28

Item 2.

Properties

28

Item 3.

Legal Proceedings

30

Item 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

30

PART II

Item 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

31

Item 6.

Selected Financial Data

33

Item 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

37

Item 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

59

Item 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

61

Item 9.

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

92

Item 9A.

Controls and Procedures

92

Item 9B.

Other Information

92

PART III

Item 10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

93

Item 11.

Executive Compensation

93

Item 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management Related Stockholder Matters

93

Item 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

93

Item 14.

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

93

PART IV

Item 15.

Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules

94

Item 16.

Form 10-K Summary

113

2

Table of Contents

FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Annual Report on Form 10-K and other publicly available documents may contain or incorporate statements that constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Those statements appear in a number of places in this Form 10-K and include statements regarding, among other matters, the state of the airline industry, our access to the capital markets, our ability to restructure leases and repossess aircraft, the structure of our leases, regulatory matters pertaining to compliance with governmental regulations, and other factors affecting our financial condition or results of operations. Words such as “can,” “could,” “may,” “predicts,” “potential,” “will,” “projects,” “continuing,” “ongoing,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “plans,” “believes,” “seeks,” “estimates” and “should,” and variations of these words and similar expressions, are used in many cases to identify these forward-looking statements. Any such forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve risks, uncertainties, and other factors that may cause our actual results, performance or achievements, or industry results to vary materially from our future results, performance or achievements, or those of our industry, expressed or implied in such forward-looking statements. Such factors include, among others, general commercial aviation industry, economic, and business conditions, which will, among other things, affect demand for aircraft, availability, and creditworthiness of current and prospective lessees, lease rates, availability and cost of financing and operating expenses, governmental actions and initiatives, and environmental and safety requirements, as well as the factors discussed under “Summary Risk Factors” and “Item 1A. Risk Factors” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. You are therefore cautioned not to place undue reliance on such statements. Any forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date on which it is made, and we do not intend and undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking information to reflect actual results or future events or circumstances.

3

Table of Contents

PART I

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

Overview

Air Lease Corporation (the “Company”, “ALC”, “we”, “our” or “us”) is a leading aircraft leasing company that was founded by aircraft leasing industry pioneer, Steven F. Udvar-Házy. We are principally engaged in purchasing new commercial jet aircraft directly from aircraft manufacturers, such as The Boeing Company (“Boeing”) and Airbus S.A.S. (“Airbus”), and leasing those aircraft to airlines throughout the world with the intention to generate attractive returns on equity. In addition to our leasing activities, we sell aircraft from our operating lease portfolio to third parties, including other leasing companies, financial services companies, airlines and other investors. We also provide fleet management services to investors and owners of aircraft portfolios for a management fee. Our operating performance is driven by the growth of our fleet, the terms of our leases, the interest rates on our debt, and the aggregate amount of our indebtedness, supplemented by gains from aircraft sales and our management fees.

We currently have relationships with over 200 airlines across 70 countries. We operate our business on a global basis, providing aircraft to airline customers in every major geographical region, including markets such as Asia, Europe, the Middle East and Africa, U.S. and Canada, the Pacific, Australia and New Zealand, and Central America, South America and Mexico. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, many of these markets were experiencing increased demand for passenger airline travel and have lower market saturation than more mature markets such as the United States and Western Europe. We expect that these markets will also present significant replacement opportunities in upcoming years as many airlines look to replace aging aircraft with new, modern technology, fuel efficient jet aircraft. An important focus of our strategy is meeting the needs of this replacement market. Airlines in some of these markets have fewer financing alternatives, enabling us to command relatively higher lease rates compared to those in more mature markets.

We mitigate the risks of owning and leasing aircraft through careful management and diversification of our leases and lessees by geography, lease term, and aircraft age and type. We believe that diversification of our operating lease portfolio reduces the risks associated with individual lessee defaults and adverse geopolitical and regional economic events. We mitigate the risks associated with cyclical variations in the airline industry by managing customer concentrations and lease maturities in our operating lease portfolio to minimize periods of concentrated lease expirations. In order to maximize residual values and minimize the risk of obsolescence, our strategy is to own an aircraft during the first third of its expected 25-year useful life.

During the year ended December 31, 2020, we purchased and took delivery of 26 aircraft from our new order pipeline, purchased 15 incremental aircraft in the secondary market, and sold eight aircraft, ending the period with a total of 332 aircraft in our operating lease portfolio with a net book value of $20.4 billion. The weighted average lease term remaining on our operating lease portfolio was 6.9 years and the weighted average age of our fleet was 4.1 years as of December 31, 2020. The net book value of our fleet grew by 9.0% to $20.4 billion as of December 31, 2020 compared to $18.7 billion as of December 31, 2019. Our managed fleet decreased slightly to 81 aircraft as compared to the prior year primarily due to aircraft sales from our managed fleet. We have a globally diversified customer base comprised of 112 airlines in 60 countries. Our lease utilization rate for the fourth quarter of 2020 was 99.8%.

As of December 31, 2020, we had commitments to purchase 361 aircraft from Boeing and Airbus for delivery through 2027, with an estimated aggregate commitment of $23.9 billion. We ended 2020 with $26.8 billion in committed minimum future rental payments. We have placed 92% of our orderbook on long-term leases for aircraft delivering through the end of 2022 and 73% through the end of 2023. We have $13.6 billion in contracted minimum rental payments on the aircraft in our existing fleet and $13.2 billion in minimum future rental payments related to aircraft which will deliver between 2021 and 2025.

We finance the purchase of aircraft and our business with available cash balances, internally generated funds from our aircraft leasing and sales activities, and debt financings. Our debt financing strategy is focused on raising unsecured debt in the global bank and debt capital markets, with a limited utilization of government guaranteed export

4

Table of Contents

credit or other forms of secured financing. In 2020, we issued $4.5 billion in aggregate principal amount of senior unsecured notes with maturities ranging from 2025 to 2030 with a weighted average interest rate of 2.93%. We ended 2020 with total debt outstanding, net of discounts and issuance costs, of $16.5 billion, of which 93.0% was at a fixed rate and 98.2% of which was unsecured. As of December 31, 2020, our composite cost of funds was 3.13%.

Our total revenues for the year ended December 31, 2020 decreased by 0.1% to $2.0 billion as compared to 2019. Despite the continued growth of our fleet, our revenues decreased due to a reduction in our aircraft sales, trading and other activity. Additionally, we were not able to recognize $49.4 million of rental revenue because collection was not reasonably assured for certain of our leases. Finally, we entered into lease restructurings, which typically included lease extensions, resulting in a decrease of approximately $49.2 million in revenue for the year ended December 31, 2020. During the year ended December 31, 2020, our net income available to common stockholders was $500.9 million compared to $575.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2019. Our diluted earnings per share for the full year 2020 was $4.39 compared to $5.09 for the full year 2019. The decrease in net income available to common stockholders in 2020 as compared to 2019 was primarily due to the decrease in revenues as discussed above and an increase in depreciation and interest expense from the growth of our fleet and due to our increased liquidity position, partially offset by a decrease in selling, general and administrative expenses. See “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” for more information on our financial results for the year ended December 31, 2020.

Our adjusted net income before income taxes excludes the effects of certain non-cash items, one-time or non-recurring items that are not expected to continue in the future and certain other items. Our adjusted net income before income taxes for the year ended December 31, 2020 was $692.0 million or $6.07 per diluted share, compared to $781.2 million, or $6.91 per diluted share for the year ended December 31, 2019. As discussed above, the decrease in our adjusted net income before income taxes was principally driven by the decrease in revenues and an increase in depreciation and interest expense, partially offset by a decrease in selling, general and administrative expenses. Adjusted net income before income taxes and adjusted diluted earnings per share before income taxes are measures of financial and operational performance that are not defined by U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (“GAAP”). See Note 3 in “Item 6. Selected Financial Data” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for a discussion of adjusted net income before income taxes and adjusted diluted earnings per share before income taxes as non-GAAP measures and a reconciliation of these measures to net income available to common stockholders.

Industry Outlook

COVID-19 has caused disruption to the commercial airline industry resulting in a significant decline in air travel, negatively impacting airlines, aircraft manufacturers, and other related businesses. The International Air Transport Association (“IATA”) reported that passenger traffic fell 66% year-over-year in calendar year 2020. While domestic and regional airline traffic have improved since the industry low in April 2020, passenger traffic remains challenged, especially with respect to international and business air travel demand.

Despite these negative impacts of COVID-19 on the aviation industry throughout 2020 and in 2021 to date, we believe that the fundamental drivers that have historically benefited our business will do so again in the future. Those drivers include: the growth of passenger traffic over time; the increased role of lessors over the past fifty years; and the need and desire for airlines to replace aging aircraft. The replacement cycle of aging aircraft has been accelerated during the pandemic as airlines adapt to lower levels of passenger traffic and focus on environmental sustainability initiatives. In addition to these historical drivers, certain placements of our new aircraft and lease extensions of aircraft in our existing fleet have been driven by airlines accommodating manufacturer delays. We expect that this may continue so long as production delays persist.

Moving forward, we believe that certain secular tailwinds that have supported air travel in the past will ultimately drive demand for air travel and our aircraft going forward, including: the potential for growth in the middle class worldwide, a shift in spending habits to prioritize experiences, and the cost of air travel which can often be lower than other expenditures largely driven by fares offered by low-cost carriers. We believe that the broader recovery of passenger traffic is reliant on key initiatives and milestones occurring around the world, including: the implementation and understanding of safety measures by passengers, such as wearing masks and rapid testing; the approval and

5

Table of Contents

application of effective vaccines for the treatment of COVID-19 and successful distribution of those vaccines; and finally, removal of travel restrictions which will allow the free flow of passenger traffic once again.

Though passenger traffic currently remains restrained by the virus resurgence, border closures and government travel restrictions as of February 22, 2021, at various points in 2020 we saw indications in domestic traffic data that the desire for the public to travel by air remains. Based on these indicators and historical trends, we expect that domestic and leisure traffic will recover before business traffic, and that the return of business travel may occur in phases.

Operations to Date

Current Fleet

The net book value of our fleet increased by 9.0% to $20.4 billion as of December 31, 2020 compared to $18.7 billion as of December 31, 2019. As of December 31, 2020, we owned 332 aircraft in our flight equipment subject to operating leases portfolio, comprised of 236 narrowbody aircraft and 96 widebody aircraft, with a weighted average age of 4.1 years. As of December 31, 2019, we owned 292 aircraft, comprised of 203 narrowbody aircraft and 89 widebody aircraft, with a weighted average age of 3.5 years. Our managed fleet decreased slightly to 81 aircraft as compared to the prior year primarily due to aircraft sales from our managed fleet.

Geographic Diversification

Over 95% of our aircraft are operated internationally. The following table sets forth the dollar amount and percentage of our Rental of flight equipment revenues attributable to the respective geographical regions based on each airline’s principal place of business:

Year Ended

Year Ended

Year Ended

 

December 31, 2020

December 31, 2019

December 31, 2018

Amount of

Amount of

Amount of

 

Rental

Rental

Rental

 

Region

    

Revenue

    

% of Total

    

Revenue

    

% of Total

    

Revenue

    

% of Total

 

(in thousands, except percentages)

 

Asia (excluding China)

$

573,722

 

29.5

%  

$

484,017

 

25.3

%  

$

412,465

 

25.3

%

Europe

 

525,543

 

27.0

%  

 

531,778

 

27.7

%  

 

476,515

 

29.2

%

China

341,121

17.5

%  

357,278

18.6

%  

329,977

20.2

%

The Middle East and Africa

 

220,017

 

11.3

%  

 

226,932

 

11.8

%  

 

179,497

 

11.0

%

U.S. and Canada

 

106,694

 

5.5

%  

 

98,627

 

5.1

%  

 

77,678

 

4.8

%

Pacific, Australia, and New Zealand

 

91,410

 

4.7

%  

 

93,387

 

4.9

%  

 

46,332

 

2.8

%

Central America, South America, and Mexico

 

88,113

 

4.5

%  

 

124,850

 

6.6

%  

 

108,736

 

6.7

%

Total

$

1,946,620

 

100.0

%  

$

1,916,869

 

100.0

%  

$

1,631,200

 

100.0

%

6

Table of Contents

The following table sets forth the regional concentration based on each airline’s principal place of business of our flight equipment subject to operating leases based on net book value as of December 31, 2020 and 2019:

December 31, 2020

December 31, 2019

 

    

Net Book 

    

    

Net Book

    

 

Region

Value

% of Total

Value

% of Total

 

(in thousands, except percentages)

 

Europe

$

6,413,557

 

31.4

%  

$

5,438,775

 

29.0

%

Asia (excluding China)

 

5,513,498

 

27.1

%  

 

4,985,525

 

26.7

%

China

2,766,543

13.5

%  

2,930,752

15.7

%

The Middle East and Africa

 

2,356,418

 

11.6

%  

 

2,242,215

 

12.0

%

U.S. and Canada

 

1,298,974

 

6.4

%  

 

996,398

 

5.3

%

Central America, South America, and Mexico

 

1,074,792

 

5.3

%  

 

1,116,814

 

6.0

%

Pacific, Australia, and New Zealand

 

956,568

 

4.7

%  

 

993,858

 

5.3

%

Total

$

20,380,350

 

100.0

%  

$

18,704,337

 

100.0

%

At December 31, 2020 and 2019, we owned and managed leased aircraft to customers in the following regions based on each airline's principal place of business:

December 31, 2020

December 31, 2019

    

Number of

    

    

Number of

    

    

Region

Customers(1)

% of Total

Customers(1)

% of Total

Europe

 

48

 

42.9

%  

43

 

40.6

%  

Asia (excluding China)

 

20

 

17.8

%  

19

 

17.9

%  

The Middle East and Africa

14

12.5

%  

13

12.3

%  

U.S. and Canada

 

11

 

9.8

%  

10

 

9.4

%  

China

 

9

 

8.0

%  

9

 

8.5

%  

Central America, South America, and Mexico

 

7

 

6.3

%  

9

 

8.5

%  

Pacific, Australia, and New Zealand

 

3

 

2.7

%  

3

 

2.8

%  

Total

 

112

 

100.0

%  

106

 

100.0

%  

(1)A customer is an airline with its own operating certificate.

For the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019, and 2018, China was the only individual country that represented at least 10% of our rental revenue based on each airline’s principal place of business. In 2020, 2019, and 2018, no rental revenue from any individual airline represented 10% or more of our rental revenue. Our customer base is highly diversified, with our average customer representing approximately 1.1% of our fleet net book value as of December 31, 2020.

Aircraft Acquisition Strategy

We seek to acquire the most highly in demand and widely distributed, modern technology, fuel efficient narrowbody and widebody commercial jet aircraft. Our strategy is to order new aircraft directly from the manufacturers. When placing new aircraft orders with the manufacturers, we strategically target the replacement of aging aircraft with modern technology aircraft. Additionally, we look to supplement our order pipeline with opportunistic purchases of aircraft in the secondary market and participate in sale-leaseback transactions with airlines.

Prior to ordering aircraft, we evaluate the market for specific types of aircraft. We consider the overall demand for the aircraft type in the marketplace based on our deep knowledge of the aviation industry and our customer relationships. It is important to assess the airplane’s economic viability, the operating performance characteristics, engine variant options, intended utilization by our customers, and which aircraft types it will replace or compete with in the global market. Additionally, we study the effects of global airline passenger traffic growth in order to determine the likely demand for our new aircraft upon delivery.

7

Table of Contents

For new aircraft deliveries, we source many components separately, which include seats, safety equipment, avionics, galleys, cabin finishes, engines, and other equipment. Oftentimes, we are able to achieve lower pricing through direct bulk purchase contracts with the component manufacturers than would be achievable if we relied on the airframe manufacturers to source the components for the aircraft themselves. Airframe manufacturers such as Boeing and Airbus install this buyer furnished equipment in our aircraft during the final assembly process at their facilities. With this purchasing strategy, we are able to both meet specific customer configuration requirements and lower our total acquisition cost of the aircraft.

Aircraft Leasing Strategy

The airline industry is a complex industry with constantly evolving competition, code shares (where two or more airlines share the same flight), alliances, and passenger traffic patterns. This requires frequent updating and flexibility within an airline’s fleet. The operating lease allows airlines to effectively adapt and manage their fleets through varying market conditions without bearing the full financial risk associated with these capital intensive assets which have an expected useful life of 25 years. This fleet flexibility enables airlines to more effectively operate and compete in their respective markets. We work closely with our airline customers throughout the world to help optimize their long-term aircraft fleet strategies. We may also, from time to time, work with our airline customers to assist them in obtaining financing for aircraft.

We work to mitigate the risks associated with owning and leasing aircraft and cyclical variations in the airline industry through careful management of our fleet, including managing customer concentrations by geography and region, entering into long-term leases, staggering lease maturities, balancing aircraft type exposures, and maintaining a young fleet age. We believe that diversification of our operating lease portfolio reduces the risks associated with individual customer defaults and the impact of adverse geopolitical and regional economic events. In order to maximize residual values and minimize the risk of obsolescence, our strategy is generally to own an aircraft for approximately the first third of its expected 25 year useful life.

Our management team identifies prospective airline customers based upon industry knowledge and long-standing relationships. Prior to leasing an aircraft, we evaluate the competitive positioning of the airline, the strength and quality of the management team, and the financial performance of the airline. Management obtains and reviews relevant business materials from all prospective customers before entering into a lease agreement. Under certain circumstances, the customer may be required to obtain guarantees or other financial support from a sovereign entity or a financial institution. We work closely with our existing customers and potential lessees to develop customized lease structures that address their specific needs. We typically enter into a lease agreement 18 to 36 months in advance of the delivery of a new aircraft from our orderbook. Once the aircraft has been delivered and operated by the airline, we look to remarket the aircraft and sign a follow-on lease six to 12 months ahead of the scheduled expiry of the initial lease term.

Our leases are typically structured as operating leases with fixed rates and terms and require cash security deposits and maintenance reserve payments. In addition, our leases are all structured as triple net leases, whereby the lessee is responsible for all operating costs, including taxes, insurance and maintenance and also contain provisions which require payment whether or not the aircraft is operated, irrespective of the circumstances. Substantially all of our leases require payments to be made in U.S. dollars.

In addition, our leases require the lessee to be responsible for compliance with applicable laws and regulations with respect to the aircraft. We require our lessees to comply with the standards of either the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (“FAA”) or its equivalent in foreign jurisdictions. As a function of these laws and the provisions in our lease contracts, the lessees are responsible for performing all maintenance of the aircraft and returning of the aircraft and its components in a specified return condition. Generally, we receive a cash deposit and maintenance reserves as security for the lessee’s performance of its obligations under the lease and the condition of the aircraft upon return. In addition, most leases contain extensive provisions regarding our remedies and rights in the event of a default by a lessee. The lessee generally is required to continue to make lease payments under all circumstances, including periods during which the aircraft is not in operation due to maintenance or grounding.

8

Table of Contents

Some foreign countries have currency and exchange laws regulating the international transfer of currencies. When necessary, we may require, as a condition to any foreign transaction, that the lessee or purchaser in a foreign country obtain the necessary approvals of the appropriate government agency, finance ministry, or central bank for the remittance of all funds contractually owed in U.S. dollars. We attempt to minimize our currency and exchange risks by negotiating the designated payment currency in our leases to be U.S. dollars. To meet the needs of certain of our airline customers, we have agreed to accept certain lease payments in a foreign currency. After we agree to the rental payment currency with an airline, the negotiated currency typically remains for the term of the lease. We may enter into contracts to mitigate our foreign currency risk, but we expect that the economic risk arising from foreign currency denominated leases will be immaterial to us.

We may, in connection with the lease of used aircraft, agree to contribute specific additional amounts to the cost of certain first major maintenance events or modifications, which usually reflect the usage of the aircraft prior to the commencement of the lease. We may be obligated under the leases to make reimbursements of maintenance reserves previously received to lessees for expenses incurred for certain planned major maintenance. We also, on occasion, may contribute towards aircraft modifications and recover any such costs over the life of the lease.

Monitoring

During the lease term, we closely follow the operating and financial performance of our lessees. We maintain a high level of communication with the lessee and frequently evaluate the state of the market in which the lessee operates, including the impact of changes in passenger air travel and preferences, the impact of delivery delays, changes in general economic conditions, emerging competition, new government regulations, regional catastrophes, and other unforeseen shocks that are relevant to the airline’s market. This enables us to identify lessees that may be experiencing operating and financial difficulties. This identification assists us in assessing the lessee’s ability to fulfill its obligations under the lease. This monitoring also identifies candidates, where appropriate, to restructure the lease prior to the lessee’s insolvency or the initiation of bankruptcy or similar proceedings. Once an insolvency or bankruptcy occurs, we typically have less control over, and would most likely incur greater costs in connection with, the restructuring of the lease or the repossession of the aircraft.

During the life of the lease, situations, such as the current pandemic, may lead us to restructure leases with our lessees. When we repossess an aircraft leased in a foreign country, we generally expect to export the aircraft from the lessee’s jurisdiction. In some very limited situations, the lessees may not fully cooperate in returning the aircraft. In those cases, we will take appropriate legal action, a process that could ultimately delay the return and export of the aircraft. In addition, in connection with the repossession of an aircraft, we may be required to pay outstanding mechanics’ liens, airport charges, navigation fees and other amounts secured by liens on the repossessed aircraft. These charges could relate to other aircraft that we do not own but were operated by the lessee.

Remarketing

Our lease agreements are generally structured to require lessees to notify us nine to 12 months in advance of the lease’s expiration if a lessee desires to renew or extend the lease. Requiring lessees to provide us with such advance notice provides our management team with an extended period of time to consider a broad set of alternatives with respect to the aircraft, including assessing general market and competitive conditions and preparing to remarket or sell the aircraft. If a lessee fails to provide us with notice, the lease will automatically expire at the end of the term, and the lessee will be required to return the aircraft pursuant to the conditions in the lease. As discussed above, our leases contain detailed provisions regarding the required condition of the aircraft and its components upon return at the end of the lease term.

Aircraft Sales & Trading Strategy

Our strategy is to maintain a portfolio of young aircraft with a widely diversified customer base. In order to achieve this profile, we primarily order new planes directly from the manufacturers, place them on long-term leases, and sell the aircraft when they near the end of the first third of their expected 25-year economic useful lives. We typically sell aircraft that are currently operated by an airline with multiple years of lease term remaining on the contract, in order

9

Table of Contents

to achieve the maximum disposition value of the aircraft. Buyers of the aircraft may include other leasing companies, financial institutions, airlines and other investors. We also, from time to time, buy and sell aircraft on an opportunistic basis for trading profits. Additionally, as discussed below, we may provide management services to buyers of our aircraft assets for a fee.

Aircraft Management Strategy

We supplement our core business model by providing fleet management services to third-party investors and owners of aircraft portfolios for a management fee. This allows us to better serve our airline customers and expand our existing airline customer base by providing additional leasing opportunities beyond our own aircraft portfolio, new order pipeline, and customer or regional concentration limits. As of December 31, 2020, we had a managed fleet of 81 aircraft.

Financing Strategy

We finance the purchase of aircraft and our business with available cash balances, internally generated funds, including through aircraft sales and trading activity and debt financings. We have structured the Company to have investment-grade credit metrics and our debt financing strategy has focused on funding our business on an unsecured basis. Unsecured financing provides us with operational flexibility when selling or transitioning aircraft from one airline to another. We have in the past, and we may in the future, utilize government guaranteed export credit or other forms of secured financing.

Insurance

We require our lessees to carry those types of insurance that are customary in the air transportation industry, including comprehensive liability insurance, aircraft all-risk hull insurance, and war-risk insurance covering risks such as hijacking, terrorism (but excluding coverage for weapons of mass destruction and nuclear events), confiscation, expropriation, seizure, and nationalization. We generally require a certificate of insurance from the lessee’s insurance broker prior to delivery of an aircraft. Generally, all certificates of insurance contain a breach of warranty endorsement so that our interests are not prejudiced by any act or omission of the lessee. Lease agreements generally require hull and liability limits to be in U.S. dollars, which are shown on the certificate of insurance.

Insurance premiums are to be paid by the lessee, with coverage acknowledged by the broker or carrier. The territorial coverage, in each case, should be suitable for the lessee’s area of operations. We generally require that the certificates of insurance contain, among other provisions, a provision prohibiting cancellation or material change without at least 30 days’ advance written notice to the insurance broker (who would be obligated to give us prompt notice), except in the case of hull war insurance policies, which customarily only provide seven days’ advance written notice for cancellation and may be subject to shorter notice under certain market conditions. Furthermore, the insurance is primary and not contributory, and we require that all insurance carriers be required to waive rights of subrogation against us.

The stipulated loss value schedule under aircraft hull insurance policies is on an agreed-value basis acceptable to us and usually exceeds the book value of the aircraft. In cases where we believe that the agreed value stated in the lease is not sufficient, we make arrangements to cover such deficiency, which would include the purchase of additional “Total Loss Only” coverage for the deficiency.

Aircraft hull policies generally contain standard clauses covering aircraft engines. The lessee is required to pay all deductibles. Furthermore, the hull war policies generally contain full war risk endorsements, including, but not limited to, confiscation (where available), seizure, hijacking and similar forms of retention or terrorist acts.

The comprehensive liability insurance listed on certificates of insurance generally include provisions for bodily injury, property damage, passenger liability, cargo liability, and such other provisions reasonably necessary in commercial passenger and cargo airline operations. We expect that such certificates of insurance list combined comprehensive single liability limits of not less than $500.0 million for Airbus and Boeing aircraft. As a standard in the industry, airline operator’s policies contain a sublimit for third-party war risk liability generally in the amount of at least

10

Table of Contents

$150.0 million. We require each lessee to purchase higher limits of third-party war risk liability or obtain an indemnity from its respective government.

The international aviation insurance market has exclusions for physical damage to aircraft hulls caused by dirty bombs, bio-hazardous materials, and electromagnetic pulsing. Exclusions for the same type of perils could be introduced into liability policies in the future.

We cannot assure you that our lessees will be adequately insured against all risks, that lessees will at all times comply with their obligations to maintain insurance, that any particular claim will be paid, or that lessees will be able to obtain adequate insurance coverage at commercially reasonable rates in the future.

Separately, we purchase contingent liability insurance and contingent hull insurance on all aircraft in our fleet and maintain other insurance covering the specific needs of our business operations. While we believe our insurance is adequate both as to coverages and amounts, we cannot assure you that we are adequately insured against all risks.

Competition

The leasing, remarketing, and sale of aircraft is highly competitive. While we are one of the largest aircraft lessors operating on a global scale, the aircraft leasing industry is diversified with a large number of competitors. We face competition from aircraft manufacturers, banks, financial institutions, other leasing companies, aircraft brokers and airlines. Some of our competitors may have greater operating and financial resources and access to lower capital costs than we have. Competition for leasing transactions is based on a number of factors, including delivery dates, lease rates, lease terms, other lease provisions, aircraft condition, and the availability in the marketplace of the types of aircraft required to meet the needs of airline customers. Competition in the purchase and sale of used aircraft is based principally on the availability of used aircraft, price, the terms of the lease to which an aircraft is subject, and the creditworthiness of the lessee, if any.

Government Regulation

The air transportation industry is highly regulated. We do not operate commercial jet aircraft, and thus may not be directly subject to many industry laws and regulations, such as regulations of the U.S. Department of State (the “DOS”), the U.S. Department of Transportation, or their counterpart organizations in foreign countries regarding the operation of aircraft for public transportation of passengers and property. As discussed below, however, we are subject to government regulation in a number of respects. In addition, our lessees are subject to extensive regulation under the laws of the jurisdictions in which they are registered or operate. These laws govern, among other things, the registration, operation, maintenance, and condition of the aircraft.

We are required to register our aircraft with an aviation authority mutually agreed upon with our lessee. Each aircraft registered to fly must have a Certificate of Airworthiness, which is a certificate demonstrating the aircraft’s compliance with applicable government rules and regulations and that the aircraft is considered airworthy. Each airline we lease to must have a valid operation certificate to operate our aircraft. Our lessees are obligated to maintain the Certificates of Airworthiness for the aircraft they lease.

Our involvement with the civil aviation authorities of foreign jurisdictions consists largely of requests to register and deregister our aircraft on those countries’ registries.

We are also subject to the regulatory authority of the DOS and the U.S. Department of Commerce (the “DOC”) to the extent such authority relates to the export of aircraft for lease and sale to foreign entities and the export of parts to be installed on our aircraft. We may be required to obtain export licenses for parts installed in aircraft exported to foreign countries. The DOC and the U.S. Department of the Treasury (through its Office of Foreign Assets Control, or “OFAC”) impose restrictions on the operation of U.S. made goods, such as aircraft and engines, in sanctioned countries, as well as on the ability of U.S. companies to conduct business with entities in those countries and with other entities or individuals subject to blocking orders. The U.S. Patriot Act of 2001 (the “Patriot Act”) prohibits financial transactions by U.S. persons, including U.S. individuals, entities, and charitable organizations, with individuals and organizations designated

11

Table of Contents

as terrorists and terrorist supporters by the U.S. Secretary of State or the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury. The U.S. Customs and Border Protection, a law enforcement agency of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, enforces regulations related to the import of aircraft into the United States for maintenance or lease and the importation of parts into the U.S. for installation.

Jurisdictions in which aircraft are registered as well as jurisdictions in which they operate may impose regulations relating to noise and emission standards. In addition, most countries’ aviation laws require aircraft to be maintained under an approved maintenance program with defined procedures and intervals for inspection, maintenance and repair. To the extent that aircraft are not subject to a lease or a lessee is not in compliance, we are required to comply with such requirements, possibly at our own expense.

Human Capital Resources

Culture and Values

We strive to conduct our business with integrity and in an honest and responsible manner and to build and maintain long-term, mutually beneficial relationships with our customers, suppliers, shareholders, employees and other stakeholders. We are also committed to fostering, cultivating and preserving a culture of diversity, equity, and inclusion. We believe that a diverse and inclusive culture helps maintain our position as a preeminent aircraft leasing company. Our values and priorities are further specified in our code of conduct and our ethics-related compliance policies, procedures, trainings, and programs. Ethical and inclusive behavior is strongly promoted by the management team and these values are reflected in our long-term strategy and our way of doing business.

Employees, Compensation and Benefits

Pay equity is central to our mission to attract and retain the best talent. Our compensation philosophy and reward structure are designed to compensate employees equitably and free of any bias. We demonstrate our commitment to pay equity by regularly reviewing our compensation practices for all our employees. Further, the health and wellness of our employees is a priority, and we offer employee benefits including a competitive compensation philosophy with comprehensive benchmarking analysis. Other benefits for which our employees in the United States, and to the extent practicable outside of the United States, are eligible for include but are not limited to: cash bonus programs, our long-term incentive plan, employee-funded 401(k) programs with company matching, education reimbursement, company-paid medical, dental and vision insurance, company-life insurance, reimbursement accounts and remote healthcare services among other health and wellness offerings. As of December 31, 2020, we had 120 full-time employees. On average, our senior management team has approximately 29 years of experience in the commercial aviation industry. None of our employees are represented by a union or collective bargaining agreements.

Access to Our Information

We file annual, quarterly, current reports, proxy statements and other information with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). We make our public SEC filings available, at no cost, through our website at www.airleasecorp.com as soon as reasonably practicable after the report is electronically filed with, or furnished to, the SEC. The information contained on or connected to our website is not incorporated by reference into this Annual Report on Form 10-K and should not be considered part of this or any other report filed with the SEC. We will also provide these reports in electronic or paper format free of charge upon written request made to Investor Relations at 2000 Avenue of the Stars, Suite 1000N, Los Angeles, California 90067. Our SEC filings are also available free of charge on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.

Corporate Information

Our website is http://www.airleasecorp.com. We may post information that is important to investors on our website. Information included or referred to on, or otherwise accessible through, our website is not intended to form a part of or be incorporated by reference into this report.

12

Table of Contents

Information about our Executive Officers

Set forth below is certain information concerning each of our executive officers as of February 22, 2021, including his/her age, current position with the Company and business experience during the past five years.

Name

    

Age

    

Company Position

    

Prior Positions

Steven F. Udvar-Házy

74

Executive Chairman of the Board of Directors (since July 2016)

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, February 2010-June 2016

John L. Plueger

66

Chief Executive Officer, President and Director (since July 2016)

President, Chief Operating Officer and Director, March 2010-June 2016

Carol H. Forsyte

58

Executive Vice President, General Counsel, Corporate Secretary and Chief Compliance Officer (since September 2012)

Gregory B. Willis

42

Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer (since July 2016)

Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, March 2012-June 2016

Jie Chen

57

Executive Vice President and Managing Director of Asia (since August 2010)

Alex A. Khatibi

60

Executive Vice President (since April 2010)

Kishore Korde

47

Executive Vice President, Marketing (since May 2015)

Grant A. Levy

58

Executive Vice President, Marketing and Commercial Affairs (since September 2012)

John D. Poerschke

59

Executive Vice President of Aircraft Procurement and Specifications (since February 2017)

Senior Vice President of Aircraft Procurement and Specifications, March 2010-February 2017

13

Table of Contents

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

The following important risk factors, and those risk factors described elsewhere in this report or in our other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, could cause our actual results to differ materially from those stated in forward-looking statements contained in this document and elsewhere. These risks are not presented in order of importance or probability of occurrence. Further, the risks described below are not the only risks that we face. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently deem immaterial may also impair our business operations. Any of these risks may have a material adverse effect on our business, reputation, financial condition, results of operations, profitability, cash flows or liquidity.

Risks relating to the COVID-19 pandemic

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and related efforts to mitigate its spread have had an adverse impact on our results of operation and may continue to have an adverse impact on our business.

The global pandemic resulting from the coronavirus (“COVID-19”) has resulted in a decrease in travel and has materially impacted airline traffic and operations throughout the world, our operations and the operations of our lessees and aircraft manufacturers and suppliers, including reducing the manufacturing output at Boeing and Airbus’ final assembly facilities. Part of the decreased demand in travel has been caused by governmental authorities around the world implementing numerous measures to try to contain the virus, such as travel bans and restrictions, border closures, quarantines, shelter in place or total lock-down orders and business limitations and shutdowns. These measures may remain in place for a significant amount of time.

While we cannot currently reasonably estimate the extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic will ultimately impact our business, the pandemic has already impacted our financial results and operations and its impact on our business and financial results may worsen over the next several months as a result of the resurgence of COVID-19 globally and related actions to combat the virus. We have negotiated lease deferrals and other accommodations with our customers. As of February 22, 2021, we have agreed to accommodations with approximately 61% of our lessees. The majority of these accommodations have been in the form of partial lease deferrals. As of February 22, 2021, our total deferrals, net of repayments, was $144.3 million. To date, we have agreed to defer approximately $240.4 million in lease payments, of which $96.1 million or 40% of the total deferrals have been repaid. These lease deferrals have negatively impacted our cash flow provided by operating activities. While the majority of the accommodations are in the form of lease deferrals, we have also entered into some lease restructurings, which typically included lease extensions, resulting in a decrease of approximately $49.2 million in revenue for the year ended December 31, 2020. We remain in active discussions with our airline customers and may continue to provide accommodations on a case-by-case basis. Our aircraft sales program has been impacted by the pandemic, primarily because we elected to sell fewer aircraft in 2020 because of additional delivery delays of our new orderbook aircraft from Boeing and Airbus. We had no aircraft sales during the fourth quarter of 2020. During 2020, we experienced delays in some of our planned sales and we may face delays in completing any aircraft sales in 2021.

In addition to lease deferrals and other lease concessions, we may also experience financial losses from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic due to a number of other factors, including:

delays in our ability to remarket aircraft or otherwise re-lease aircraft on a timely basis at favorable rates;
defaults, bankruptcies or reorganizations of our lessees;
defaults, bankruptcies or reorganizations of airlines adversely impacting aircraft values and lease rates generally;
further delays in delivery of aircraft in our orderbook from Boeing and Airbus, including due to delays or bankruptcies of Boeing and Airbus suppliers;
a decline in placements of aircraft in our orderbook for long-term leases;
aircraft value impairments;
increased costs of borrowing, including if our credit ratings are ultimately downgraded;
delays and other adverse impacts on our plans to grow the size of our operating fleet; and
weaker demand for used aircraft.

14

Table of Contents

These factors may remain prevalent for a significant period of time, particularly if the resurgence of the COVID-19 virus continues or if the vaccines introduced to combat the virus are not effective. We expect our business, results of operations and financial condition will continue to be negatively impacted in the near term, and the pandemic could have a larger impact on our results of operations in 2021. Furthermore, the impact of the pandemic may continue to adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition even after the COVID-19 pandemic has subsided.

Risks relating to our capital requirements and debt financings

We have substantial indebtedness and we require significant capital to refinance our outstanding indebtedness and to acquire aircraft; our inability to make our debt payments and obtain incremental capital may have a material adverse effect on our business.

We and our subsidiaries have a significant amount of indebtedness. As of December 31, 2020, our total consolidated indebtedness, net of discounts and issuance costs, was approximately $16.5 billion and our interest payments were $449.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, and we expect these amounts to grow as we acquire more aircraft. Our level of debt could have important consequences, including making it more difficult for us to satisfy our debt payment obligations and requiring a substantial portion of our cash flows to be dedicated to debt service payments; limiting our ability to obtain additional financing; increasing our vulnerability to negative economic and industry conditions; increasing our interest rate risk; and limiting our flexibility in planning for and reacting to changes in our industry.

Growing our fleet will require us to obtain substantial capital through additional financing, which may not be available to us on favorable terms or at all. As of December 31, 2020, we had 361 new aircraft on order with an estimated aggregate purchase price of approximately $23.9 billion. In addition to utilizing cash flow from operations to meet these commitments and to maintain an adequate level of unrestricted cash, we will need to raise additional funds by accessing committed debt facilities, securing additional financing from banks and through capital markets transactions. We also need to maintain access to the capital and credit markets and other sources of financing in order to repay or refinance our outstanding debt obligations.

Our access to financing sources depends upon a number of factors over which we have limited control, including general market conditions and interest rate fluctuations; periods of unexpected market disruption and volatility; the market's view of the quality of our assets, perception of our growth potential and assessment of our credit risk; the relative attractiveness of alternative investments; and the trading prices of our debt securities and preferred and common equity securities. Depending on market conditions at the time and our access to capital, we may also have to rely more heavily on additional equity issuances or on less efficient forms of debt financing that require a larger portion of our cash flow from operations, thereby reducing funds available for our operations, future business opportunities and other purposes. Further, the issuance of additional shares of Series A Preferred Stock or any other preferred stock approved by our board of directors pursuant to our charter may result in such preferred stockholders having rights, preferences or privileges senior to existing stockholders, who would not have the ability to approve such issuance. These alternative measures may not be successful and may not permit us to make payments on our debt or to meet our aircraft purchase commitments as they come due and other cash needs. The issuance of additional equity may be dilutive to existing shareholders or otherwise may be on terms not favorable to us or existing shareholders.

If we are unable to generate sufficient cash flows from operations and cannot obtain capital on terms acceptable to us, we may be forced to seek alternatives, such as to reduce or delay investments and aircraft purchases, or to sell aircraft. We also may not be able to satisfy funding requirements for any aircraft acquisition commitments then in place, which could force us to forfeit our deposits and/or expose us to potential breach of contract claims by our lessees and manufacturers.

As a result of these risks and repercussions, our inability to make our debt payments and/or obtain incremental capital to fund future aircraft purchases may have a material adverse effect on our business.

An increase in our cost of borrowing or changes in interest rates may adversely affect our net income and/or our ability to compete in the marketplace.

We finance our business through a combination of short-term and long-term debt financings, with most bearing interest at a fixed rate and some bearing interest at a floating rate that varies with changes in the applicable reference rate. As of December 31, 2020, we had $15.5 billion of fixed rate debt and $1.2 billion of floating rate debt outstanding. Any increase in our cost of borrowing directly impacts our net income. If our composite interest rate were to increase by 1.0%, we would expect to incur additional interest expense on our existing indebtedness as of December 31, 2020, of approximately $11.7 million on an annualized basis. Our cost of borrowing is affected primarily by the market’s assessment of our credit risk and fluctuations in interest rates and general market conditions. Interest rates that we obtain on our debt financings can fluctuate based on, among other things, changes in views of our credit risk, fluctuations in U.S. Treasury rates and LIBOR rates, as applicable, changes in credit spreads, and the duration of the debt being issued. Increased interest rates prevailing in the market at the time of our incurrence of new debt will also increase our interest expense.

15

Table of Contents

Moreover, if interest rates were to rise sharply, we would not be able to immediately offset the negative impact on our net income by increasing lease rates, even if the market were able to bear the increased lease rates. Our leases are generally for multiple years with fixed lease rates over the life of the lease and, therefore, lags will exist because our lease rates with respect to a particular aircraft cannot generally be increased until the expiration of the lease. Higher interest expense and the need to offset higher borrowing costs by increasing lease rates may ultimately impact our ability to compete with other aircraft leasing companies in the marketplace, especially if those companies have lower cost of funding.

Decreases in interest rates may also adversely affect our business. Since our fixed rate leases are based, in part, on prevailing interest rates at the time we enter into the lease, if interest rates decrease, new fixed rate leases we enter into may be at lower lease rates and our lease revenue will be adversely affected.

In addition, certain of our debt instruments and equity securities that accrue dividends at a floating rate include the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) as the benchmark or reference rate. The Chief Executive of the U.K. Financial Conduct Authority (the “FCA”), which regulates LIBOR, has announced it intends to phase out certain LIBOR publications by the end of 2021 and all LIBOR publications after June 30, 2023. The U.S. Federal Reserve and the Bank of England have begun publishing a Secured Overnight Funding Rate and a reformed Sterling Overnight Index Average, respectively, which are intended to serve as alternative reference rates to LIBOR. At this time, it is not possible to predict the effect of any such changes, any establishment of alternative reference rates or any other reforms to LIBOR that may be implemented in the United Kingdom or elsewhere. Uncertainty as to the nature or the timing and manner of implementation of such changes, alternative reference rates or other reforms may adversely affect our floating-rate indebtedness determined by reference to LIBOR and any of our equity securities that accrue dividends at a floating rate determined by reference to LIBOR. In addition, any alternative reference rates could result in interest and dividend payments that do not correlate over time with the payments that would have been made on our indebtedness or equity securities, as applicable, if LIBOR was available in its current form. Further, if there is no acceptable alternative reference rate when LIBOR is discontinued, some of our floating rate debt, including our senior unsecured notes issued under our Medium-Term Note Program, will effectively become fixed rate debt. As a result, the cost of this debt would increase to us if and as interest rates decreased.

If any of these circumstances occurs, our net income and/or our ability to compete in the marketplace may be adversely affected.

Negative changes in our credit ratings may limit our ability to obtain financing or increase our borrowing costs, which may adversely impact our net income and/or our ability to compete in the marketplace.

We are currently subject to periodic review by independent credit rating agencies S&P, Fitch and Kroll, each of which currently maintains an investment grade rating with respect to us, and we may become subject to periodic review by other independent credit rating agencies in the future. Our ability to obtain debt financing and our cost of debt financing is dependent, in part, on our credit ratings. Maintaining our credit ratings depends in part on strong financial results and in part on other factors, including the outlook of the rating agencies on our sector and on the market generally. A credit rating downgrade could negatively impact our ability to obtain financing and increase our borrowing costs.

As a result of COVID-19, in March and April of 2020, S&P, Fitch and Kroll each changed their outlook on our long-term issuer and senior unsecured debt ratings from “stable” to “negative.” Such change in outlook may ultimately lead to a downgrade in our credit rating.

We cannot assure you that these credit ratings will remain in effect or that a rating will not be lowered, suspended or withdrawn. Ratings are not a recommendation to buy, sell or hold any security, and each agency’s rating should be evaluated independently of any other agency’s rating. Actual or anticipated changes or downgrades in our credit ratings, including any announcement that our ratings are under review for a downgrade, could increase our borrowing costs and limit our access to the capital markets, which may adversely impact our net income and/or our ability to compete in the marketplace.

Certain of our debt agreements contain covenants that impose restrictions on us and our subsidiaries that may limit our flexibility to operate our business.

Some of the agreements governing our indebtedness contain financial and non-financial covenants. For instance, our unsecured revolving credit facility requires us to comply with certain financial maintenance covenants (measured at the end of each fiscal quarter) including a maximum consolidated leverage ratio, minimum consolidated shareholders’ equity, and minimum consolidated unencumbered assets, as well as an interest coverage test that is suspended when the unsecured revolving credit facility or certain of our other indebtedness is rated investment grade (as defined in the unsecured revolving credit facility). Complying with such covenants may at times necessitate that we forego other opportunities. Moreover, our failure to comply with any of these covenants could constitute a default and could accelerate some, if not all, of the indebtedness outstanding under such agreements and could create cross-defaults under other debt agreements, which would have a negative effect on our business and our ability to continue as a going concern. In addition, for our secured

16

Table of Contents

debt, if we are unable to repay such indebtedness when due and payable, the lenders under our secured debt could proceed against, among other things, the aircraft or other assets securing such indebtedness.

As the result of the existence of these financial and non-financial covenants and our need to comply with them, the flexibility we have to operate our business may be limited.

Operational risks relating to our business

We may be unable to generate sufficient returns on our aircraft investments which may have an adverse impact on our net income.

Our business model and results are driven by our ability to acquire strategically attractive commercial passenger aircraft, profitably lease and re-lease them, and finally sell such aircraft in order to generate sufficient revenues to finance our growth and operations, pay our debt service obligations and meet our other corporate and contractual obligations. We rely on our ability to negotiate and enter into leases with favorable lease terms and to evaluate the ability of lessees to perform their obligations to us prior to receiving the delivery of our orderbook aircraft from the manufacturers. When our leases expire or our aircraft are returned prior to the date contemplated in the lease, we bear the risk of re-leasing or selling the aircraft. Because our leases are predominantly operating leases, only a portion of an aircraft’s value is recovered by the revenues generated from the lease and we may not be able to realize the aircraft’s residual value after lease expiration. Our ability to profitably purchase, lease, re-lease, sell or otherwise dispose of our aircraft will depend on conditions in the airline industry and general market and competitive conditions at the time of purchase, lease and disposition. In addition to factors linked to the aviation industry in general, other factors that may affect our ability to generate adequate returns from our aircraft include the maintenance and operating history of the airframe and engines, the number of operators using the particular type of aircraft, and aircraft age. If we are unable to generate sufficient returns on our aircraft due to any of the above factors within or outside of our control, it may have an adverse impact on our net income.

Failure to close our aircraft acquisition commitments would negatively affect our ability to further grow our fleet and net income.

As of December 31, 2020, we had entered into binding purchase commitments to acquire a total of 361 new aircraft for delivery through 2027. If we are unable to complete the purchase of such aircraft, we would face several risks, including forfeiting deposits and progress payments and having to pay and expense certain significant costs relating to these commitments; not realizing any of the benefits of completing the acquisitions; damage to our reputation and relationship with aircraft manufacturers; and defaulting on our lease commitments, which could result in monetary damages and damage to our reputation and relationships with lessees. If we determine that the capital required to satisfy these commitments is not available on terms we deem attractive, we may eliminate or reduce any then-existing dividend program to preserve capital to apply to such commitments. These risks, whether financial or reputational, would negatively affect our ability to further grow our fleet and net income.

The failure of an aircraft or engine manufacturer to meet its delivery obligations to us may negatively impact our ability to grow our fleet and our earnings.

The supply of commercial aircraft is dominated by a limited number of airframe and engine manufacturers. As a result, we depend on these manufacturers to remain financially stable, produce products and related components which meet the airlines' demands and fulfill any contractual obligations they have to us. If the manufacturers fail to do so, we may experience:

missed or late aircraft deliveries and potential inability to meet our contractual delivery obligations owed to our lessees, resulting in potential lost or delayed revenues, and strained customer relationships;
an inability to acquire aircraft and engines resulting in lower growth or contraction of our aircraft fleet;
reduced demand for a particular manufacturer's product, which may lead to reduced market lease rates and lower aircraft residual values and may affect our ability to remarket or sell at a profit, or at all, some of the aircraft in our fleet; and
technical or other difficulties with aircraft or engines after delivery that subject aircraft to operating restrictions or groundings, resulting in a decline in residual value and lease rates of such aircraft and impair our ability to lease or dispose of such aircraft on favorable terms or at all.

There have been recent well-publicized delivery delays by airframe and engine manufacturers. We have experienced delivery delays for Boeing’s 737 MAX as a result of its grounding and subsequent manufacturing shutdown, and while production of 737 MAXs resumed in the fall of 2020, delivery of the aircraft into markets yet to approve the aircraft’s return to service will likely remain on hold. We also experienced delivery delays for our Airbus A320neo family aircraft and to a lesser extent, A330neo aircraft. Further, during the fourth quarter of 2020, deliveries of our Boeing 787 aircraft have been temporarily delayed as a product of expanded quality-control

17

Table of Contents

checks by the manufacturer. We had 140 and 106 A320neo family and 737 MAX aircraft, respectively, in our orderbook as of December 31, 2020. Further, the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in delivery delays for aircraft scheduled for delivery in 2020 and we anticipate additional delivery delays throughout 2021. Our leases and purchase agreements with Boeing and Airbus typically provide for cancellation rights starting at one year after the original contractual delivery date, regardless of cause. If there are delivery delays greater than one year for aircraft that we have made future lease commitments, some or all of our affected lessees could elect to cancel their lease with respect to such delayed aircraft. Any such cancellation could strain our relationship with such lessee going forward and would negatively affect our business. As of February 22, 2021, we have canceled our orders for 20 737 MAX aircraft with Boeing. We believe that the majority of our 737 MAX aircraft and some of our 787 aircraft deliveries in our orderbook will be delayed more than 12 months, which would give us, our airline customers and Boeing the right to cancel these aircraft commitments.

Should the severity of the delivery delays from the manufacturers continue or worsen, or should new delays arise, such delays may negatively impact our ability to grow our fleet and our earnings.

If our aircraft become obsolete or experience a decline in customer demand, our ability to lease and remarket those aircraft and our results of operations may be negatively impacted and may result in impairment charges.

Aircraft are long-lived assets, requiring long lead times to develop and manufacture, with models becoming obsolete or less in demand over time, in particular when newer, more advanced aircraft are manufactured.

Our fleet, as well as the aircraft that we have ordered, have exposure to a decline in customer demand or obsolescence, particularly if unanticipated events occur which shorten the life cycle of such aircraft types, including: the introduction of superior aircraft or technology, such as new airframes or engines with higher fuel efficiency; the entrance of a new manufacturer which could offer an aircraft that is more attractive to our target lessees; the advent of alternative transportation technologies which could make travel by air less desirable; government regulations, including those limiting noise and emissions and the age of aircraft operating in a jurisdiction; the costs of operating an aircraft, including maintenance which increases with aircraft age; and compliance with airworthiness directives. Obsolescence of certain aircraft may also trigger impairment charges, increase depreciation expense or result in losses related to aircraft asset value guarantees, if we provide such guarantees.

The demand for our aircraft is also affected by other factors outside of our control, including: air passenger demand; airline financial health; changes in fuel costs, interest rates, foreign currency, inflation and general economic conditions; technical problems associated with a particular aircraft model; airport and air traffic control infrastructure constraints; and the availability and cost of financing.

As a result of various impacts of COVID-19 including border restrictions and other travel limitations particularly on long-haul intercontinental travel, we have seen further reduced demand for certain widebody aircraft in our fleet. Due to the grounding of the Boeing 737 MAX and other narrow body delivery delays, our fleet currently has a greater concentration of widebody aircraft than we typically target.

As demand for particular aircraft declines, lease rates for that type of aircraft are likely to correspondingly decline, the residual values of that type of aircraft could be negatively impacted, and we may be unable to lease such aircraft on favorable terms, if at all. In addition, the risks associated with a decline in demand for a particular aircraft model or type increase if we acquire a high concentration of such aircraft.

If demand declines for a model or type of aircraft of which we own or of which we have a relatively high concentration, or should the aircraft model or type become obsolete, our ability to lease and remarket those aircraft and our results of operations may be negatively impacted and may result in impairment charges.

The value and lease rates for aircraft that we own or acquire could decline resulting in an impact to our earnings and cash flows.

From time to time, aircraft values and lease rates have experienced sharp decreases due to a variety of factors outside of our control that may impact the aviation industry generally or are more specific to certain aircraft in our fleet. For example, the COVID-19 pandemic and Boeing 737 MAX grounding have each impacted, and may continue to impact, our ability to lease certain aircraft in our fleet. Other factors include, but are not limited to, the following: manufacturer production levels and technological innovation; the number of airlines operating the aircraft; our lessees’ failure to maintain our aircraft; the regulatory authority under which the aircraft is operated and any applicable airworthiness directives, service bulletins or other regulatory action that could prevent or limit utilization of the aircraft. As a result of these factors, our earnings and cash flows may be impacted by any decrease in the value of aircraft that we own or acquire or decrease in market rates for leases for these aircraft.

18

Table of Contents

Aircraft have limited economic useful lives and depreciate over time and we may be required to record an impairment charge or sell aircraft for a price less than its depreciated book value which may impact our financial results.

We depreciate our aircraft for accounting purposes on a straight-line basis to the aircraft’s residual value over its estimated useful life. Our management team evaluates on a quarterly basis the need to perform an impairment test whenever facts or circumstances indicate a potential impairment has occurred. An assessment is performed whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an aircraft may not be recoverable from their expected future undiscounted net cash flow. We develop the assumptions used in the recoverability assessment based on management's knowledge of, and historical experience in, the aircraft leasing market and aviation industry, as well as from information received from third-party industry sources. Factors considered in developing estimates for this assessment include changes in contracted lease rates, economic conditions, technology, and airline demand for a particular aircraft type. Any of our assumptions and estimates may prove to be inaccurate, which could adversely impact forecasted cash flow. In the event that an aircraft does not meet the recoverability test, the aircraft will be recorded at fair value, resulting in an impairment charge. Deterioration of future lease rates and the residual values of our aircraft could result in impairment charges which may have a significant impact on our financial results. For a description of our impairment policy, see the section titled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Critical Accounting Policies—Flight equipment.”

If we record an impairment charge on aircraft, or if we dispose of aircraft for a price that is less than its depreciated book value on our balance sheet, it will reduce our total assets and shareholders' equity. A reduction in our shareholders' equity may negatively impact our ability to comply with covenants in certain of our agreements governing our indebtedness requiring us to maintain a minimum net worth and maximum debt-to-equity ratio, and could result in an event of default under such agreements. For these reasons, our financial results may be impacted.

A large number of our lessees are concentrated in China and, therefore, we have concentrated exposure to political, legal and economic risks associated with China and any adverse event involving China may have an adverse effect on our financial condition.

Through our lessees and the countries in which they operate, we are exposed to the specific economic and political conditions and associated risks of those jurisdictions. Approximately 14% of our aircraft, based on net book value, are operated by lessees operated in China, giving us increased exposure to economic and political conditions in China, including trade disputes and trade barriers. Risks related to concentrated exposure can include economic recessions, financial, public health and political emergencies, burdensome local regulations, trade disputes, and increased risks of requisition of our aircraft. An adverse political or economic event in in China could affect the ability of our lessees in country to meet their obligations to us, or expose us to various legal or political risks associated, which could have an adverse effect on our financial condition.

We are dependent on the ability of our lessees to perform their payment and other obligations to us under our leases and their failure to do so may materially and adversely affect our financial results and cash flows.

We generate substantially all of our revenue from leases of aircraft to commercial airlines, with our lessees concentrated in certain geographical regions, and our financial performance is driven by the ability of our lessees to perform their payment and other obligations to us under our leases. The airline industry is also cyclical, economically sensitive and highly competitive, and our lessees are affected by several factors over which we and they have limited control, including: air passenger demand; changes in fuel costs, interest rates, foreign currency, inflation and general economic conditions; geopolitical events such as changes in national policy or imposition of trade barriers or tariffs, as well as events leading to political or economic instability such as war, prolonged armed conflict and acts of terrorism; epidemics and natural disasters; availability of financing, including availability of governmental support; airline financial health; labor difficulties, including pilot shortages or labor actions; increases in other operating costs, such as increased insurance costs; aircraft accidents, in particular a loss if the aircraft is damaged or destroyed by an event specifically excluded from insurance policies such as dirty bombs, biohazardous materials and electromagnetic pulsing; and governmental regulation and associated fees affecting the air transportation business.

The factors above could cause our lessees to incur higher costs and to generate lower revenues which could adversely affect their ability to make lease payments. In addition, lease default levels will likely increase over time if economic conditions deteriorate. Further, most of our airline customers do not have investment-grade credit profiles, and we may not correctly assess the credit risk of a lessee.

If a lessee delays, reduces, or fails to make lease payments when due, or has advised us that it will do so in the future, we may elect or be required to grant a lease payment deferral or restructure or terminate the lease. For instance, the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted the airline industry, including our lessees. A majority of our lessees have requested lease deferrals or other accommodations during the pandemic. If in the event we are unable to agree on a lease payment deferral or lease restructuring and we terminate the lease, we may not receive all or any payments still outstanding, and we may be unable to re-lease the aircraft promptly and at favorable rates, if at all. We have initiated/agreed to deferrals, restructurings and terminations in the ordinary course of our business, and

19

Table of Contents

we expect more will occur in the future. If we perform a significant number of restructurings and terminations specifically, the associated reduction in lease revenue may materially and adversely affect our financial results and cash flows.

Lessee defaults and reorganizations, bankruptcies or similar proceedings, may result in loss revenues and additional costs.

From time to time, an airline may seek reorganization or protection from creditors under its local laws or may go into liquidation. Some of our lessees have defaulted on their lease obligations or filed for bankruptcy or otherwise sought protection from creditors (collectively referred to as “bankruptcy”). Based on historical rates of airline defaults and bankruptcies, we expect that we will experience additional lessee defaults and bankruptcies and, depending on the length of the COVID-19 pandemic, lessee defaults and bankruptcies may increase in the near term.

When a lessee defaults on its lease or files for bankruptcy, we typically incur significant additional costs, including legal and other expenses associated with court or other governmental proceedings. We could also incur substantial maintenance, refurbishment or repair costs if a defaulting lessee fails to pay such costs when necessary to put the aircraft in suitable condition for remarketing or sale. We may also incur storage costs associated with aircraft that we repossess and are unable to place immediately with another lessee, and we may not ultimately be able to re-lease the aircraft at a similar or favorable lease rate. It may also be necessary to pay off liens including fleet liens, taxes and other governmental charges on the aircraft to obtain clear possession and to remarket the aircraft effectively, including, in some cases, liens that the lessee might have incurred in connection with the operation of its other aircraft. We could also incur other costs in connection with the physical possession of the aircraft.

When a lessee defaults on its lease or files for bankruptcy, the lessee may not make lease payments or may return aircraft to us before the lease expires. When a lessee files for bankruptcy with the intent of reorganizing its business, we may agree to adjust our lease terms, including reducing lease payments by a significant amount. Certain jurisdictions give rights to the trustee in a bankruptcy to assume or reject the lease or to assign it to a third party, or entitle the lessee or another third party to retain possession of the aircraft without paying lease rentals or performing all or some of the obligations under the relevant lease. If one or more airline bankruptcies result in a larger number of aircraft being available for purchase or lease over a short period of time, aircraft values and aircraft lease rates may be depressed, and additional grounded aircraft and lower market values could adversely affect our ability to sell our aircraft or lease or remarket our aircraft at favorable rates or at all.

Our rights upon a lessee default will vary significantly depending upon the jurisdiction and the applicable law, including the need to obtain a court order for repossession of the aircraft and/or consents for deregistration or export of the aircraft. When a defaulting lessee is in bankruptcy additional limitations may apply. There can be no assurance that jurisdictions that have adopted the Cape Town Convention, which provides for uniformity and certainty for repossession of aircraft, will enforce it as written. In addition, certain of our lessees are owned, in whole or in part, by government-related entities, which could complicate our efforts to repossess our aircraft in that government’s jurisdiction. Accordingly, we may be delayed in, or prevented from, enforcing certain of our rights under a lease and in remarketing the affected aircraft.

If we repossess an aircraft, we may not be able to export or deregister and profitably redeploy the aircraft in a timely manner or at all. Before an aviation authority will register an aircraft that has previously been registered in another country, it must receive confirmation that the aircraft has been deregistered by that country’s aviation authority. In order to deregister an aircraft, the lessee must comply with applicable laws and regulations, and the relevant governmental authority must enforce these laws and regulations. For instance, where a lessee or other operator flies only domestic routes in the jurisdiction in which the aircraft is registered, repossession may be more difficult, especially if the jurisdiction permits the lessee or the other operator to resist deregistration. We may also incur significant costs in retrieving or recreating aircraft records required for registration of the aircraft, and in obtaining a certificate of airworthiness for an aircraft. Upon a lessee default, we may incur significant costs in connection with repossessing our aircraft and we may be delayed in repossessing our aircraft or are unable to obtain possession of our aircraft.

As a result of the time and process involved with lessee defaults, reorganizations, bankruptcies or similar proceedings as described above, which can vary by airline and jurisdiction among other factors, we may experience loss revenues and additional costs.

We may experience increased competition from other aircraft lessors which may impact our ability to execute our long-term strategy.

The aircraft leasing industry is highly competitive. Some of our competitors have greater resources, lower capital costs or provide financial or maintenance services, or other inducements to potential lessees or buyers that we cannot, which could make them able to compete more effectively in certain markets we operate in. In addition, some competitors may have higher risk tolerances, lower investment return expectations or different risk or residual value assessments, which could allow them to consider a wider variety of investments, establish more relationships, bid more aggressively on aviation assets available for sale and offer lower lease rates or sale prices than we can. Our primary competitors are other aircraft leasing companies, but may include other entities in the acquisition, leasing and selling of aircraft. Additionally, the barriers to entry in the aircraft acquisition and leasing market are comparatively low, and new

20

Table of Contents

entrants with private equity, hedge fund, Asian bank or other funding sources appear from time to time.

Lease competition is driven by lease rates, delivery dates, lease terms, reputation, management expertise, aircraft condition, specifications and configuration and the availability of the types of aircraft necessary to meet the customer’s needs. Competition in the used aircraft market is driven by price, the terms of the lease to which an aircraft is subject and the creditworthiness of the lessee, if any. Our inability to compete successfully with our competitors may impact our ability to execute our long-term strategy.

Our lessees may fail to adequately insure our aircraft or fulfill their indemnity obligations which may result in increased costs and liabilities.

When an aircraft is on lease, we do not directly control its operation. Nevertheless, because we hold title to the aircraft, we could be sued or held strictly liable for losses resulting from the operation of such aircraft, or may be held liable for those losses on other legal theories or claims may be made against us as the owner of an aircraft requiring us to expend resources in our defense. We require our lessees to obtain specified levels of insurance and indemnify us for, and insure against, liabilities arising out of the lessee’s use and operation of the aircraft. Lessees are also required to maintain public liability, property damage and all risk hull and war risk insurance on the aircraft at agreed upon levels. Some lessees may fail to maintain adequate insurance coverage during a lease term, which, although in contravention of the lease terms, would necessitate our taking some corrective action such as terminating the lease or securing insurance for the aircraft. Moreover, even if our lessees retain specified levels of insurance, and indemnify us for, and insure against, liabilities arising out of their use and operation of the aircraft, we cannot assure you that we will not have any liability.

In addition, there are certain risks or liabilities that our lessees may face, for which insurers may be unwilling to provide coverage or the cost to obtain such coverage may be prohibitively expensive. For example, following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, non-government aviation insurers significantly reduced the amount of insurance coverage available for claims resulting from acts of terrorism, war, dirty bombs, bio-hazardous materials, electromagnetic pulsing or similar events. At the same time, they significantly increased the premiums for such third-party war risk and terrorism liability insurance and coverage in general. Accordingly, our lessees’ insurance or other coverage could be insufficient to cover all claims that could be asserted against us arising from the operation of our aircraft by our lessees. Inadequate insurance coverage or default by lessees in fulfilling their indemnification or insurance obligations will reduce the proceeds that would be received by us if we are sued and are required to make payments to claimants. Moreover, our lessees’ insurance coverage is dependent on the financial condition of insurance companies, which might not be able to pay claims.

The failure of our lessees to adequately insure our aircraft or fulfill their indemnity obligations to us, which could result in a reduction in insurance proceeds otherwise payable to us in certain cases, may result in increased costs and liabilities for our business.

We may experience the death, incapacity or departure of one of our key officers which may negatively impact our business.

We believe our senior management’s reputation and relationships with lessees, manufacturers, buyers and financiers of aircraft are a critical element to the success of our business. We depend on the diligence, skill and network of business contacts of our management team. Our future success will depend, to a significant extent, upon the continued service of our senior management team, particularly: Mr. Udvar-Házy, our founder, and Executive Chairman of the Board; Mr. Plueger, our Chief Executive Officer and President; and our other senior officers, each of whose services are critical to the success of our business strategies. We do not have employment agreements with Mr. Udvar-Házy or Mr. Plueger. If we were to lose the services of any of the members of our senior management team, it may negatively impact our business.

A cyberattack could lead to a material disruption of our information technology (“IT”) systems or the IT systems of our third-party providers and the loss of business information, which may hinder our ability to conduct our business effectively and may result in lost revenues and additional costs.

We depend on our and our third-party provider’s IT systems to conduct our operations. Such systems are subject to damage or interruption from power outages, computer and telecommunications failures, computer viruses, security breaches, fire and natural disasters. Damage or interruption to such IT systems may require significant investment to fix or replace, and we may suffer operational interruptions. Potential interruptions associated with the implementation of new or upgraded systems and technology or with maintenance of existing systems could also disrupt or reduce operational efficiency.

Parts of our business depend on the secure operation of our and our third-party providers’ IT systems to manage, process, store, and transmit aircraft leasing information. We have, from time to time, experienced threats to our data and systems, including malware and computer virus attacks. A cyberattack could adversely impact our daily operations and lead to the loss of sensitive information, including our proprietary information and that of our customers, suppliers and employees. Such losses could harm our reputation and result in competitive disadvantages, litigation, regulatory enforcement actions, lost revenues, additional costs and liabilities. While we devote substantial resources to maintaining adequate levels of cyber-security, our resources and technical sophistication may be unable to prevent

21

Table of Contents

all types of cyberattacks. A cyberattack leading to a significant disruption of our IT systems or of those of our third-party providers may hinder our ability to conduct our business effectively and may result in lost revenues and additional costs.

Conflicts of interest between us and clients utilizing our fleet management services could arise which may result in legal challenges or reputational harm.

Conflicts of interest may arise between us and third-party aircraft owners, financiers and operating lessors who hire us to perform fleet management services such as leasing, remarketing, lease management and sales services. These conflicts may arise because services we provide for these clients are also services which we provide for our own fleet, including placement of aircraft with lessees. Our current fleet management services agreements provide, and we expect our future fleet management services agreements to provide, that we will use our reasonable commercial efforts in providing services, but, to the extent that we are in competition with the client for leasing opportunities, we will give priority to our own fleet. Nevertheless, despite these contractual waivers, competing with our fleet management clients in practice may result in strained relationships with them. Any conflicts of interest that arise between us and the clients which utilize our fleet management services may result in legal challenges or reputational harm to our business.

We may encounter disputes, deadlock or other conflicts of interest with investment partners of entities in which we have minority interests and for which we serve as manager of the aircraft owned by the entities which may result in legal challenges, reputational harm or loss of fee income.

We own non-controlling interests in entities that invest in commercial aircraft and lease them to airlines around the world and/or facilitate the sale and continued management of aircraft assets to investors. Additionally, we may acquire interests in similar entities controlled or owned by third parties in order to take advantage of favorable financing opportunities or tax benefits, to share capital and/or operating risk, and/or to earn fleet management fees. Such interests involve significant risks that may not be present with other methods of ownership, including that:

we may not realize a satisfactory return on our investment;
the investment may divert management’s attention from our core business;
our investment partners could have investment goals that are not consistent with our investment objectives, including the timing, terms and strategies for any investments;
our investment partners might fail to fund their share of required capital contributions or fail to fulfill their other obligations; and
our investment partners may have competing interests in our markets that could create conflict of interest issues, particularly if aircraft owned by the applicable investment entity are being marketed for lease or sale at a time when we also have comparable aircraft available for lease or sale.

The agreements governing these entities typically provide the non-managing investment partner certain veto rights over various significant actions and the right to remove us as the manager under certain circumstances. If we were to be removed as the manager from a managed fleet portfolio, our reputation may be harmed and we would lose the benefit of future management fees. In addition, we might reach an impasse that could require us to dissolve the investment entity at a time and in a manner that could result in our losing some or all of our original investment in such entity, which may result in losses on our investment and potential legal challenges or reputational harm.

Macroeconomic and global risks relating to our business

Aircraft oversupply in the industry could decrease the value and lease rates of the aircraft in our fleet resulting in an impact to our earnings and cash flows.

The aircraft leasing business has experienced periods of aircraft oversupply at various times in the past, including during the COVID-19 pandemic, during and after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and during and after the 2008 financial crisis. The oversupply of a specific type of aircraft is likely to depress the lease rates for, and the value of, that type of aircraft, including upon sale. Further, over recent years, the airline industry has committed to a significant number of aircraft deliveries through order placements with manufacturers, and in response, aircraft manufacturers have generally raised their production output. Increases in the production levels could result in an oversupply of relatively new aircraft if growth in airline traffic does not meet airline industry expectations. Additionally, if overall lending capacity to purchasers of aircraft does not increase in line with the increased aircraft production levels, the cost of lending or ability to obtain debt to finance aircraft purchases could be negatively affected. Oversupply may produce sharp and prolonged

22

Table of Contents

decreases in market lease rates and residual values and may affect our ability to remarket or sell at a profit, or at all, some of the aircraft in our fleet which would impact our earnings and cash flows.

Increased tariffs and other potential export restrictions may impact where we can place and deliver our aircraft and negatively impact our ability to execute on our long-term strategy.

Our leases are primarily structured as triple net leases, whereby the lessee is responsible for all operating costs including the costs associated with the importation of the aircraft. As a result, increased tariffs will result in a higher cost for imported aircraft that our lessees may not be willing to assume and which could adversely impact demand for aircraft, creating an oversupply of aircraft and potentially placing downward pressure on lease rates and aircraft market values.

In October 2019, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative announced a 10% tariff on new aircraft imported from Europe, including Airbus aircraft. In March 2020, the tariffs on aircraft were raised to 15%. The U.S. government has recently made statements and taken certain actions that have led to, and may lead to, further changes to U.S. and international trade policies, including recently imposed tariffs affecting certain products exported by a number of U.S. trading partners, such as Europe and China. In response, many U.S. trading partners, including Europe and China, have imposed or proposed new or higher tariffs on U.S. products. In November 2020, the E.U. announced a 15% tariff on new aircraft imported into the E.U. from the U.S., including Boeing aircraft, effective November 10, 2020.

We cannot predict what further actions may ultimately be taken with respect to tariffs or trade relations between the U.S. and U.S. trading partners. Accordingly, it is difficult to predict exactly how, and to what extent, such actions may impact our business, or the business of our lessees or aircraft manufacturers. Any unfavorable government policies on international trade, such as capital controls or tariffs, may affect the demand for aircraft, increase the cost of aircraft components, further delay production, impact the competitive position of certain aircraft manufacturers or prevent aircraft manufacturers from being able to sell aircraft in certain countries. In turn, this may impact where we can place and deliver our aircraft which may negatively impact our ability to execute on our long-term strategy.

We are subject to many of the economic and political risks associated with doing business in emerging markets, which may expose our business to a greater number of customer defaults resulting in loss revenues and additional costs.

Our business strategy involves leasing aircraft to airlines in emerging market countries. Emerging market countries typically have less developed economies and infrastructure and are often more vulnerable to economic and geopolitical challenges and may experience significant fluctuations in gross domestic product, interest rates and currency exchange rates, as well as civil disturbances, government instability, nationalization and expropriation of private assets and the imposition of unexpected taxes or other charges by government authorities. This can result in economic instability which could negatively affect the ability of our lessees to meet their lease obligations leading to higher default rates compared to lessees that operate in developed countries. We also may experience challenges in leasing or re-leasing aircraft in emerging markets experiencing economic instability. In addition, legal systems in emerging market countries may be less developed, less predictable and have different liability standards than those in advanced economies, which could make it more difficult for us to enforce our legal rights in such countries. As a result of these factors, doing business in emerging markets may expose us to a greater number of customer defaults resulting in loss revenues and additional costs.

Changes in fuel costs could negatively affect our lessees and by extension the demand for our aircraft which may impact our ability to execute on our long-term strategy.

Historically, fuel prices have fluctuated widely depending primarily on international market conditions, geopolitical and environmental events, and currency exchange rates. The cost of fuel represents a major expense to airlines that is not within their control, and significant increases in fuel costs or hedges that inaccurately assess the direction of fuel costs can materially and adversely affect their operating results. Due to the competitive nature of the aviation industry, operators may be unable to pass on increases in fuel prices to their customers by increasing fares in a manner that fully offsets increased fuel costs. In addition, they may not be able to manage this risk by appropriately hedging their exposure to fuel price fluctuations. Airlines that do hedge their fuel costs can also be adversely affected by swift movements in fuel prices if such airlines are required as a result to post cash collateral under hedge agreements. Therefore, if fuel prices materially increase or show significant volatility, our lessees are likely to incur higher costs or generate lower revenues, which may affect their ability to meet their obligations to us. A sustained period of lower fuel costs may also adversely affect regional economies that depend on oil revenue, including those in which certain of our lessees operate. Should changes in fuel costs negatively affect our lessees or demand for our aircraft, our ability to execute our long-term strategy may be impacted.

23

Table of Contents

The appreciation of the U.S. dollar could negatively impact our lessees’ ability to honor the terms of their leases, which are generally denominated in U.S. dollars, and may result in lost revenues and reduced net income.

Many of our lessees are exposed to currency risk due to the fact that they earn revenues in their local currencies while a significant portion of their liabilities and expenses are denominated in U.S. dollars, including their lease payments to us, as well as fuel, debt service, and other expenses. For the year ended December 31, 2020, more than 95% of our revenues were derived from customers who have their principal place of business outside the U.S. and most leases designated payment currency is U.S. dollars. The ability of our lessees to make lease payments to us in U.S. dollars may be adversely impacted in the event of an appreciating U.S. dollar. Our lessees may not be able to increase their revenues sufficiently to offset the impact of exchange rates on their lease payments and other expenses denominated in U.S. dollars. This is particularly true for non-U.S. airlines whose operations are primarily domestic. Shifts in foreign exchange rates can be significant, are difficult to predict, and can occur quickly. Should our lessees be unable to honor the terms of their leases due to the appreciation of the U.S. dollar, we may experience lost revenues and reduced net income.

Events outside of our control, such as the threat or realization of epidemic diseases in addition to COVID-19, natural disasters, terrorist attacks, war or armed hostilities between countries or non-state actors, may adversely affect the demand for air travel, the financial condition of our lessees and of the aviation industry more broadly, and ultimately may our impact our business.

Air travel has historically been disrupted, sometimes severely, by the occurrence of unexpected events outside of our control, and outside of the control of our lessees. For example, passenger demand for air travel is currently being severely impacted by COVID-19 and, in the past, has been negatively impacted by other epidemic diseases, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome, bird flu, swine flu, the Zika virus, and Ebola. Future epidemic diseases and other diseases, or the fear of such events and governmental responses to such events, especially after the COVID-19 pandemic, could provoke responses that negatively affect passenger air travel. Air travel has also been disrupted in the past by natural disasters and other natural phenomena, such as extreme weather conditions, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions, and by terrorist attacks, war or armed hostilities between countries or non-state actors, or the fear of such events.

The occurrence of any such event, or multiple such events, could cause our lessees to experience decreased passenger demand, to incur higher costs and to generate lower revenues, which could adversely affect their ability to make lease payments to us or to obtain the types and amounts of insurance we require. This in turn could lead to lease restructurings and repossessions, impair our ability to remarket or otherwise dispose of aircraft on favorable terms or at all, or reduce the proceeds we receive for our aircraft in a disposition which may ultimately impact our business.

Economic conditions and regulatory changes in the United Kingdom and Europe could result in decreased travel in the region which may have an adverse effect on our business in the region.

Airlines whose principal place of business is Europe, including the U.K., represented 27.0% and 27.7% of our total revenue for the years ending December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The U.K. left the EU on January 31, 2020, with a transition period until December 31, 2020 during which time the U.K. followed EU rules and a U.K.-EU trade agreement was negotiated governing EU and U.K. relations from January 1, 2021 resulting in a Trade and Cooperation Agreement together with a Political Declaration covering a number of areas. As the partnership of the European Union and United Kingdom continues its transition, new potential risks for our business may arise. These risks may include, but are not limited to: reduced demand for our aircraft if air travel in the E.U. declines and fluctuations in market lease rates and lease margins which may have an adverse effect on our business in the region.

Regulatory, tax and legal risks relating to our business

Our multi-jurisdiction operations subject us to a wide range of income and other taxes that could negatively affect our business and operating results.

We operate in multiple jurisdictions and may become subject to a wide range of income and other taxes. If we are unable to execute our business in jurisdictions with favorable tax treatment, our operations may be subject to significant income and other taxes. Moreover, as our aircraft are operated by our lessees in multiple states and foreign jurisdictions, we may have nexus or taxable presence as a result of our aircraft landings in various states or foreign jurisdictions. Such landings may result in us being subject to various foreign, state and local taxes in such states or foreign jurisdictions. Further, any changes in tax laws in any of the jurisdictions that subject us to income or other taxes, such as increases in tax rates or limitations on our ability to deduct certain expenses from taxable income, such as depreciation expense and interest expense, could materially affect our tax obligations and effective tax rate. To the extent such changes are within the United States, we may be disproportionately impacted as compared to our competitor aircraft lessors.

24

Table of Contents

Environmental regulations, fees and taxes, and other concerns may negatively affect demand for our aircraft, reduce travel and ultimately impact the operating results of our customers.

The airline industry is subject to increasingly stringent environmental laws, regulations, fees and taxes concerning emissions to the air, discharges to surface and subsurface waters, safe drinking water, aircraft noise, the management of hazardous substances, oils and waste materials and other regulations affecting aircraft operations. Governmental regulations regarding aircraft and engine noise and emissions levels apply based on where the relevant aircraft is registered and operated. These regulations could limit the economic life of the aircraft and engines, reduce their value, limit our ability to lease or sell the non-compliant aircraft and engines or, if engine modifications are permitted, require us to make significant additional investments in the aircraft and engines to make them compliant.

Further, compliance with current or future regulations, fees and taxes imposed to deal with environmental concerns could cause lessees to incur higher costs and to generate lower revenues, which could adversely affect their ability to make lease payments to us.

The airline industry has come under increased scrutiny by the press, the public and investors regarding the environmental impact of air travel. If such scrutiny results in reduced air travel, it may negatively affect demand for our aircraft, lessees’ ability to make lease payments and reduce the value we receive for our aircraft upon any disposition.

Corporate responsibility, specifically related to environmental, social and governance (“ESG”) matters, may impose additional costs and expose us to new risks.

Public ESG and sustainability reporting is becoming more broadly expected by investors, shareholders and other third parties. Certain organizations that provide corporate governance and other corporate risk information to investors and shareholders have developed, and others may in the future develop, scores and ratings to evaluate companies and investment funds based upon ESG or “sustainability” metrics. Many investment funds focus on positive ESG business practices and sustainability scores when making investments and may consider a company’s ESG or sustainability scores as a reputational or other factor in making an investment decision. In addition, investors, particularly institutional investors, use these scores to benchmark companies against their peers and if a company is perceived as lagging, these investors may engage with such company to improve ESG disclosure or performance and may also make voting decisions, or take other actions, to hold these companies and their boards of directors accountable. Board diversity is an ESG topic that is, in particular, receiving heightened attention by investors, shareholders, lawmakers and listing exchanges. Certain states, including California where we maintain our principal executive offices, have passed laws requiring companies to meet certain gender and ethnic diversity requirements on their boards of directors. If we are unable to recruit, attract and/or retain qualified members of our board of directors to maintain compliance with the diversity requirements of this California mandate within the prescribed timelines, we could be exposed to financial penalties. We may also face reputational damage in the event our corporate responsibility initiatives or objectives, including with respect to board diversity, do not meet the standards set by our investors, shareholders, lawmakers, listing exchanges or other constituencies, or if we are unable to achieve an acceptable ESG or sustainability rating from third party rating services. A low ESG or sustainability rating by a third-party rating service could also result in the exclusion of our common stock from consideration by certain investors who may elect to invest with our competition instead. Ongoing focus on corporate responsibility matters by investors and other parties as described above may impose additional costs or expose us to new risks.

Risks and requirements related to transacting business in foreign countries may result in increased liabilities including penalties and fines as well as reputational harm.

Our international operations expose us to trade and economic sanctions and other restrictions imposed by the United States or other governments or organizations. The U.S. Departments of Justice, Commerce, State and Treasury and other foreign agencies and authorities have a broad range of civil and criminal penalties they may seek to impose against corporations and individuals for violations of economic sanctions laws, export control laws, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”) and other federal statutes and regulations, including the International Traffic in Arms Regulations and those established by the Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”), laws and regulations applicable to our operations in Ireland and Hong Kong and, increasingly, similar or more restrictive foreign laws, rules and regulations, including the U.K. Bribery Act (“UKBA”), which may also apply to us. Under these laws and regulations, the government may require export licenses, or impose restrictions that would require modifications to business practices, including cessation of business activities in sanctioned countries or with sanctioned persons or entities, and modifications to compliance programs, which may increase compliance costs. Failure to implement changes may subject us to fines, penalties and other sanctions.

We have in place training programs for our employees with respect to FCPA, OFAC, UKBA, export controls and similar laws and regulations, but we cannot assure that our employees, consultants, sales agents, or associates will not engage in unlawful conduct for which we may be held responsible or that our business partners will not engage in conduct that could affect their ability to perform their contractual obligations and result in our being held liable for such conduct. Violation of laws or regulations may result in increased liabilities including penalties and fines as well as reputational harm.

25

Table of Contents

Our lessees may fail to obtain required licenses, consents and approvals, which could negatively affect our ability to remarket or sell aircraft.

Airlines are subject to extensive regulation in the jurisdictions in which they are registered and operate. As a result, we expect some of our leases will require licenses, consents or approvals, including consents from governmental or regulatory authorities for certain payments under our leases and for the import, export or deregistration of aircraft. Subsequent changes in applicable law or administrative practice may require additional licenses and consents or result in revocation of prior licenses and consents. Furthermore, consents needed in connection with our repossession or sale of an aircraft may be withheld. Any of these events could negatively affect our ability to remarket or sell aircraft.

Data privacy risks, including evolving laws and regulations and compliance efforts, may result in business interruption and increased costs and liabilities.

Laws and regulations relating to personal data constantly evolve, as federal, state and foreign governments continue to adopt new measures addressing data privacy and processing (including collection, storage, transfer, disposal, disclosure, security and use) of personal data, and the interpretation and application of many existing privacy and data protection laws and regulations in the U.S., Europe (including the E.U.’s General Data Protection Regulation and the California Consumer Privacy Act) and elsewhere are uncertain and fluid. Such laws and regulations may be interpreted or applied in a manner that is inconsistent with our existing data management practices. Evolving compliance and operational requirements under the privacy laws of the jurisdictions in which we operate have become increasingly burdensome and complex. Privacy-related claims or lawsuits initiated by governmental bodies, customers or other third parties, irrespective of the merits, could be time consuming, result in costly regulatory proceedings, litigation, penalties and fines, require us to change our business practices or cause business interruptions and may lead to administrative, civil, or criminal liability.

General risk factors relating to investment in our stock

Provisions in Delaware law and our restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated bylaws may inhibit a takeover of us, which could entrench management or cause the price of our Class A common stock to decline.

Our restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated bylaws contain provisions that may discourage unsolicited takeover proposals that stockholders may consider to be in their best interests, including the ability of our board of directors to issue new series of preferred stock, a prohibition on stockholders calling special meetings, and advance notice requirements for stockholder proposals and director nominations. In addition, we have not opted out of Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law, which prohibits a public Delaware corporation from engaging in certain business combinations with an “interested stockholder” (as defined in such section) for three years following the time that such stockholder became an interested stockholder without the prior consent of our board of directors. Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law, and these charter and bylaws provisions, may make the removal of management more difficult, impede a merger or other business combination or discourage a potential acquirer from making a tender offer for our Class A common stock, which could reduce the market price of our Class A common stock.

Our amended and restated bylaws provide that the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware will be the sole and exclusive forum for substantially all disputes between us and our stockholders, which could limit our stockholders’ ability to obtain a favorable judicial forum for disputes with us or our directors, officers or other employees or stockholders.

Our amended and restated bylaws provide that, unless we consents in writing to the selection of an alternative forum, the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware is the sole and exclusive forum for (i) any derivative action or proceeding brought on behalf of us, (ii) any action or proceeding asserting a claim of breach of a fiduciary duty owed by any of our current or former directors, officers or other employees or stockholders, (iii) any action asserting a claim arising pursuant to any provision of the Delaware General Corporation Law, or our restated certificate of incorporation or amended and restated bylaws, or as to which the Delaware General Corporation Law confers jurisdiction on the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware, or (iv) any action asserting a claim governed by the internal affairs doctrine. This exclusive forum provision is intended to apply to claims arising under Delaware state law and would not apply to claims brought pursuant to the Exchange Act of 1934 or Securities Act of 1933, each as amended, or any other claim for which the federal courts have exclusive jurisdiction. The exclusive forum provision in our amended and restated bylaws will not relieve us of our duties to comply with the federal securities laws and the rules and regulations thereunder, and our stockholders will not be deemed to have waived our compliance with these laws, rules and regulations. This exclusive forum provision may limit a stockholder's ability to bring a claim in a judicial forum of its choosing for disputes with us or our directors, officers or other employees or stockholders, which may discourage lawsuits against us and our directors, officers and other employees and stockholders. In addition, stockholders who do bring a claim in the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware could face additional litigation costs in pursuing any such claim, particularly if they do not reside in or near Delaware. The Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware may also reach different judgments or results than would other courts, including courts where a stockholder would otherwise choose to bring the action, and such judgments or results may be more

26

Table of Contents

favorable to us than to our stockholders. However, the enforceability of similar exclusive forum provisions in other companies' certificates of incorporation has been challenged in legal proceedings, and it is possible that a court could find this type of provision to be inapplicable to, or unenforceable in respect of, one or more of the specified types of actions or proceedings. If a court were to find the exclusive forum provision contained in our amended and restated bylaws to be inapplicable or unenforceable in an action, we might incur additional costs associated with resolving such action in other jurisdictions.

Future offerings of debt or equity securities by us may adversely affect the market price of our Class A common stock.

We may attempt to obtain financing or further increase our capital resources by issuing additional shares of Class A common stock, Series A Preferred Stock or offering debt or additional equity securities, including commercial paper, medium-term notes, senior or subordinated notes, or new convertible or preferred securities. Issuing additional shares of Class A common stock or other equity may dilute the economic and voting rights of our existing stockholders or reduce the market price of our Class A common stock. Upon liquidation, holders of such debt securities, our Series A Preferred Stock and any new series of preferred shares, if issued, and lenders with respect to other borrowings, would receive a distribution of our available assets prior to the holders of our Class A common stock. Our Series A Preferred Stock has a preference with respect to liquidating distributions and dividend payments which limits our ability to pay dividends to our Class A common stockholders, subject to certain conditions. Any new series of preferred shares could also have similar or different preferences. Our decision to issue securities in the future will depend on market conditions and we cannot predict the amount, timing or nature of such issuances, which could be dilutive to Class A stockholders and reduce the market price of our Class A common stock.

We may not be able to continue, or may elect to discontinue, paying dividends which may adversely affect our stock price.

Current dividends may not be indicative of future dividends and our ability to continue to pay or increase dividends to our shareholders is subject to our board of director’s discretion and depends on our ability to comply with covenants in our financing agreements and our Series A Preferred Stock that limit our ability to pay dividends and make certain restricted payments; difficulties in raising additional capital and our ability to finance our aircraft acquisition commitments; our ability to re-finance our long-term debt before excess cash flows are no longer made available to us to pay dividends and for other purposes; our ability to negotiate favorable lease rates and other contractual terms; demand for our aircraft; the economic condition of the commercial aviation industry generally; the financial condition and liquidity of our lessees; unexpected or increased expenses; the level and timing of aircraft investments, principal repayments and other capital needs; the value of our aircraft portfolio; our results of operations and general business conditions; legal restrictions on the payment of dividends; and other factors that our board of directors deems relevant. In the future we may elect not to pay dividends, be unable to pay dividends or maintain or increase our current level of dividends, which may negatively affect our stock price.

Future sales of our Class A Common Stock by directors, executive officers or significant stockholders of Air Lease, or the perception these sales may occur, may cause our stock price to decline.

If our existing stockholders, in particular our directors, executive officers or other affiliates, sell substantial amounts of our Class A Common Stock in the public market, or are perceived by the public market as intending to sell, the trading price of our Class A Common Stock could decline. In addition, shares underlying any outstanding options and restricted stock units will become eligible for sale upon exercise or vesting, subject to Rule 144 of the Securities Act. All shares of Class A Common Stock subject to stock options and restricted stock units outstanding and reserved for issuance under the Air Lease Corporation 2014 Equity Incentive Plan have been registered on Form S-8 under the Securities Act and are eligible for sale in the public markets, subject to Rule 144 limitations applicable to affiliates. Sale of these shares could impair our ability to raise capital through the sale of equity or equity related securities. A significant number of shares of our Class A Common Stock may be sold in the public market by any selling stockholders listed in a prospectus we may file with the Securities and Exchange Commission and such sales, or the perception they may occur, could adversely affect market prices for our Class A Common Stock.

27

Table of Contents

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

Flight Equipment

As of December 31, 2020, we owned 332 aircraft in our flight equipment subject to operating leases portfolio, comprised of 236 narrowbody aircraft and 96 widebody aircraft, with a weighted average age of 4.1 years.

The following table shows the scheduled lease terminations (for the minimum non-cancellable period which does not include contracted unexercised lease extension options) of our operating lease portfolio, excluding one aircraft currently off lease, as of December 31, 2020, updated through February 22, 2021:

Aircraft Type

    

2021

    

2022

    

2023

    

2024

    

2025

    

Thereafter

    

Total

Airbus A319-100

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

1

Airbus A320-200

 

6

 

7

 

3

 

6

 

7

 

1

 

30

Airbus A320-200neo

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

18

 

19

Airbus A321-200

 

3

 

1

 

4

 

5

 

2

 

13

 

28

Airbus A321-200neo

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

45

 

49

Airbus A330-200

1

2

2

1

1

6

13

Airbus A330-300

 

 

1

 

2

 

 

1

 

4

 

8

Airbus A330-900neo

1

7

8

Airbus A350-900

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

 

11

Airbus A350-1000

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

2

Boeing 737-700

2

2

4

Boeing 737-800

 

9

 

9

 

11

 

7

 

18

 

34

 

88

Boeing 737-8 MAX

 

 

 

 

1

 

6

 

8

 

15

Boeing 777-200ER

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

1

Boeing 777-300ER

 

 

7

 

 

 

2

 

15

 

24

Boeing 787-9

1

22

23

Boeing 787-10

6

6

Embraer E190

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

1

Total

 

21

 

27

 

25

 

26

 

40

 

192

 

331

Commitments

As of December 31, 2020, we had committed to purchase the following new aircraft at an estimated aggregate purchase price (including adjustment for anticipated inflation) of approximately $23.9 billion for delivery as shown below. The table is subject to change based on Airbus and Boeing delivery delays. As noted below, we expect delivery delays for some aircraft deliveries in our orderbook. We remain in discussions with Boeing and Airbus to determine the extent and duration of delivery delays; however, we are not yet able to determine the full impact of the delivery delays. See “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Our Fleet—

28

Table of Contents

Aircraft Delivery Delays” for more information. The recorded basis of aircraft may be adjusted upon delivery to reflect changes in, among other items, actual inflation and the final cost of buyer furnished equipment.

Aircraft Type

    

2021

    

2022

    

2023

    

2024

    

2025

    

Thereafter

    

Total

Airbus A220-300 (1)

 

 

3

 

14

 

12

 

11

 

10

 

50

Airbus A320/321neo(1)

 

30

 

23

 

22

 

26

 

19

 

20

 

140

Airbus A330-900neo

 

3

 

7

 

4

 

 

 

 

14

Airbus A350-900/1000

 

4

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

1

 

 

17

Boeing 737-7/8/9 MAX(2)

 

21

 

23

 

25

 

29

 

8

 

 

106

Boeing 787-9/10

 

14

 

8

 

7

 

5

 

 

 

34

Total

 

72

 

67

 

76

 

77

 

39

 

30

 

361

(1)In addition to our commitments, as of December 31, 2020, we had options to acquire up to 25 Airbus A220 aircraft. If exercised, deliveries of these aircraft are scheduled to commence in 2023 and continue through 2028.
(2)Our Airbus A320/321neo aircraft orders include 40 long-range variants and 29 extra long-range variants.
(3)The table above reflects our estimate of future Boeing 737 MAX aircraft delivery delays based on information currently available to us.

New Aircraft Placements

The following table, which is subject to change based on Airbus and Boeing delivery delays, shows the number of new aircraft scheduled to be delivered as of December 31, 2020, along with the lease placements of such aircraft as of February 22, 2021. We expect delivery delays for some aircraft deliveries in our orderbook. We remain in discussions with Boeing and Airbus to determine the extent and duration of delivery delays; however, we are not yet able to determine the full impact of these delays. See "Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations--Our Fleet--Aircraft Delivery Delays" for more information.

    

Number of

    

Number

    

 

Delivery Year

Aircraft

Leased

% Leased

 

2021

 

72

71

 

98.6

%

2022

 

67

57

 

85.1

%

2023

 

76

29

 

38.2

%

2024

 

77

11

 

14.3

%

2025

 

39

1

 

2.6

%

Thereafter

 

30

 

%

Total

 

361

169

Our lease commitments for 71 of the 72 aircraft to be delivered in 2021 are all comprised of binding leases. Our lease commitments for 57 of the 67 aircraft to be delivered in 2022 are comprised of 50 binding leases and seven non-binding letters of intent. Our lease commitments for 29 of the 76 aircraft to be delivered in 2023 are comprised of 23 binding leases and six non-binding letters of intent. Our lease commitments for 11 of the 77 aircraft to be delivered in 2024 are comprised of all binding leases. Finally, our lease commitment for one of the 39 aircraft to be delivered in 2025 is a binding lease. While our management’s historical experience is that non-binding letters of intent for aircraft leases generally lead to binding contracts, we cannot be certain that we will ultimately execute binding agreements for all or any of the letters of intent. While we actively seek lease placements for all aircraft in our orderbook, in making our lease placement decisions, we also take into consideration the anticipated growth in the aircraft leasing market and anticipated improvements in lease rates, which could lead us to determine that entering into particular lease arrangements at a later date would be more beneficial to us.

Facilities

We lease our principal executive office at 2000 Avenue of the Stars, Suite 1000N, Los Angeles, California 90067, USA. We also lease offices in Ireland, Hong Kong and Texas. We do not own any real estate. We believe our current facilities are adequate for our current needs and for the foreseeable future.

29

Table of Contents

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

From time to time, we may be involved in litigation and claims incidental to the conduct of our business in the ordinary course. Our industry is also subject to scrutiny by government regulators, which could result in enforcement proceedings or litigation related to regulatory compliance matters. We are not presently a party to any enforcement proceedings or litigation related to regulatory compliance matters or material legal proceedings. We maintain insurance policies in amounts and with the coverage and deductibles we believe are adequate, based on the nature and risks of our business, historical experience and industry standards.

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.

30

Table of Contents

PART II

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Market Information

Our Class A common stock has been quoted on the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) under the symbol “AL” since April 19, 2011. Prior to that time, there was no public market for our stock. As of December 31, 2020, there were 113,852,896 shares of Class A common stock outstanding. As of February 5, 2021, shares of our Class A common stock outstanding were held by approximately 74 holders of record.

Dividends

The following table sets forth the dividends declared on our outstanding common stock for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018:

    

Year Ended

    

Year Ended

    

Year Ended

December 31, 2020

December 31, 2019

December 31, 2018

Dividends declared per share

$

0.61

$

0.54

$

0.43

The Board of Directors approved quarterly cash dividends on our outstanding common stock in 2020 and expects to continue approving a quarterly cash dividend on our outstanding common stock of $0.16 per share for the foreseeable future. However, our cash dividend policy can be changed at any time at the discretion of our Board of Directors. On February 19, 2021, our Board of Directors approved a quarterly cash dividend of $0.16 per share on our outstanding common stock. The dividend will be paid on April 7, 2021 to holders of record of our common stock as of March 19, 2021.

Stock Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans

Set forth below is certain information about the Class A common stock authorized for issuance under the Company’s equity compensation plan.

    

    

    

Number of securities

remaining available for

future issuance under

Number of securities to be

Weighted-average

equity compensation plans

issued upon exercise of

exercise price of

(excluding securities

Plan Category

outstanding options

outstanding options

reflected in column (a))

 

(a)  

 

(b)  

 

(c)  

Equity compensation plans approved by security holders

 

50,000

$

28.80

 

4,860,870

Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders

 

 

 

Total

 

50,000

$

28.80

 

4,860,870

Performance Graph

The graph below compares the 5-year cumulative return of the Company’s Class A common stock, the S&P Midcap 400 Index, the Russell 2000 Index, the Russell MidCap Index and a customized peer group. The Company's market capitalization now more closely approximates that of the median of the Russell MidCap index, therefore, this index will replace the previously utilized Russell 2000 Index for the purposes of the Performance Graph. The peer group consists of three companies: Aircastle Limited (NYSE: AYR), AerCap Holdings NV (NYSE: AER) and FLY Leasing Limited (NYSE: FLY). The peer group investment is weighted by market capitalization as of December 31, 2015, and is adjusted monthly. As of March 27, 2020, Aircastle Limited has been removed from our peer group as it is no longer publicly traded. An investment of $100, with reinvestment of all dividends, is assumed to have been made in our Class A common stock, in the peer group and in the S&P Midcap 400 Index and in the Russell MidCap Index on December 31,

31

Table of Contents

2015, and the relative performance of each is tracked through December 31, 2020. The stock price performance shown in the graph is not necessarily indicative of future stock price performance.

Comparison of 5 Year Cumulative Total Return

Assumes Initial Investment of $100

December 31, 2020

Graphic

Company Purchases of Stock

On November 5, 2020, the Company's board of directors authorized a share repurchase program of up to $100.0 million of Class A common stock that expires on June 15, 2021. During the period between November 5, 2020 to February 22, 2021, the Company did not purchase any shares of its Class A common stock under this program.

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

None

32

Table of Contents

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The following selected consolidated financial data should be read in conjunction with “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our consolidated financial statements and the related notes appearing in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

    

Year Ended

    

Year Ended

    

Year Ended

    

Year Ended

    

Year Ended

 

December 31, 

December 31, 

December 31, 

December 31, 

December 31, 

 

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

(in thousands, except share and per share amounts)

 

Operating data:

Rentals of flight equipment

$

1,946,620

$

1,916,869

$

1,631,200

$

1,450,735

$

1,339,002

Aircraft sales, trading and other

 

68,819

 

100,035

 

48,502

 

65,645

 

80,053

Total revenues

 

2,015,439

 

2,016,904

 

1,679,702

 

1,516,380

 

1,419,055

Expenses

 

1,368,761

 

1,281,219

 

1,039,564

 

906,850

 

838,817

Income before taxes

 

646,678

 

735,685

 

640,138

 

609,530

 

580,238

Income tax (expense)/benefit(1)

 

(130,414)

 

(148,564)

 

(129,303)

 

146,622

 

(205,313)

Net income

$

516,264

$

587,121

$

510,835

$

756,152

$

374,925

Preferred stock dividends

(15,375)

(11,958)

Net income available to common stockholders

$

500,889

$

575,163

$

510,835

$

756,152

$

374,925

Earnings per share of common stock:

Basic

$

4.41

$

5.14

$

4.88

$

7.33

$

3.65

Diluted

$

4.39

$

5.09

$

4.60

$

6.82

$

3.44

Weighted average shares of common stock outstanding:

Basic

113,684,782

111,895,433

104,716,301

103,189,175

102,801,161

Diluted

114,014,021

113,086,323

112,363,331

111,657,564

110,798,727