Company Quick10K Filing
Ameri Holdings
Price-0.00 EPS-0
Shares63 P/E0
MCap-0 P/FCF0
Net Debt-0 EBIT-3
TEV-0 TEV/EBIT0
TTM 2019-09-30, in MM, except price, ratios
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8-K 2008-09-27

AMHI 10K Annual Report

Part I
Item 1. Business
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 2. Properties
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Part II
Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6. Selected Financial Data
Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures
Item 9B. Other Information
Part III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11. Executive Compensation
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners, Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence
Item 14. Principal Accountants Fees and Services
Part IV
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules
Note 1. Description of Business:
Note 2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies:
Note 3. Equity Transactions:
Note 4. Business Combinations:
Note 5. Intangible Assets:
Note 6. Goodwill:
Note 7. Share - Based Compensation:
Note 8. Equity Compensation Plans:
Note 9. Warrants:
Note 10. Earnings / (Loss) per Share:
Note 11. Debt:
Note 12. Accrued Expenses and Other Current Liabilities:
Note 13. Employee Benefit Plan:
Note 14. Income Taxes:
Note 15. Commitments and Contingencies:
Note 16. Fair Value Measurement:
Note 17. Subsequent Events:
EX-4.5 ex4_5.htm
EX-21.1 ex21_1.htm
EX-23.1 ex23_1.htm
EX-31.1 ex31_1.htm
EX-31.2 ex31_2.htm
EX-32.1 ex32_1.htm
EX-32.2 ex32_2.htm

Ameri Holdings Earnings 2019-12-31

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow
554332211002012201420172020
Assets, Equity
1511730-42015201620182020
Rev, G Profit, Net Income
10.07.34.72.0-0.6-3.32012201420172020
Ops, Inv, Fin

10-K 1 form10k.htm 10-K

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549



FORM 10-K
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019
Commission file number 001-38286

AMERI Holdings, Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware
 
95-4484725
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
     
5000 Research Court, Suite 750, Suwanee, Georgia
 
30024
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (770) 935-4152

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of Each Class
Trading Symbol
Name of Each Exchange On Which Registered
Common Stock $0.01 par value per share
AMRH
The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC
Warrants to Purchase Common Stock
AMRHW
The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 the Securities Act.  Yes   No

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes   No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the last 90 days.  Yes     No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).  Yes    No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer
 
Accelerated filer
Non-accelerated filer
 
Smaller reporting company
Emerging growth company
     

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes   No

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of June 28, 2019 (the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter) was approximately $15.76 million based on the closing bid price of the registrant’s common stock of $8.7525 per share on that date. All executive officers and directors of the registrant and all 10% or greater stockholders have been deemed, solely for the purpose of the foregoing calculation, to be “affiliates” of the registrant.

As of March 22, 2020, 3,246,705 shares of the registrant’s common stock were issued and outstanding.



AMERI Holdings, Inc.
ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K
FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Item 1.
1
     
Item 1A.
9
     
Item 1B.
27
     
Item 2.
27
     
Item 3.
27
     
Item 4.
27
     
Item 5.
28
     
Item 6.
28
     
Item 7.
29
     
Item 7A.
37
   
Item 8.
37
   
Item 9.
37
   
Item 9A.
37
   
Item 9B.
39
   
Item 10.
39
   
Item 11.
42
   
Item 12.
45
   
Item 13.
46
   
Item 14.
46
   
Item 15.
48
     
 
F-1

PART I
 
ITEM 1. BUSINESS
 
This annual report contains forward-looking statements. These statements relate to either future events or our future financial performance. In some cases, you may be able to identify forward-looking statements by terms such as “may,” “should,” “expects,” “plans,” “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “potential” or “continue,” the negative of these terms or other synonymous terminology. These statements are only predictions and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, including the risks in the section entitled “Risk Factors,” that may cause our or our industry’s actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. Any forward-looking statements made by or on our behalf are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995.

Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements. Except as required by applicable law, including the securities laws of the United States, we do not intend, and we do undertake any obligation, to revise or update any of the forward-looking statements to match actual results. Readers are urged to carefully review and consider the various disclosures made in this report, which aim to inform interested parties of the risks factors that may affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Our financial statements are stated in United States Dollars (US$) and are prepared in accordance with United States Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP).

As used in this annual report, the terms the “Company,” “we,” “us,” “our” and similar references refer to AMERI Holdings Inc., and its subsidiaries together, unless the context indicates otherwise.

Our Company

We specialize in delivering SAP cloud, digital and enterprise services to clients worldwide.  SAP is a leader in providing enterprise resource planning (“ERP”) software and technologies to enterprise customers worldwide. We deliver a wide range of solutions and services across multiple domains and industries. Our services center around SAP and include technology consulting, business intelligence, cloud services, application development/integration and maintenance, implementation services, infrastructure services, and independent validation services, all of which can be delivered as a set of managed services or on an on-demand service basis, or a combination of both.

Our SAP focus allows us to provide technological solutions to a broad base of clients. We are headquartered in Suwanee, Georgia, and have offices across the United States, which are supported by offices in India and Canada. Our model inverts the conventional global delivery model wherein offshore information technology (“IT”) service providers are based abroad and maintain a minimal presence in the United States. With a strong SAP focus, our client partnerships anchor around SAP cloud and digital services. In 2017, we signed a strategic partnership agreement with NEC America to offer SAP S/4 HANA (a next generation enterprise system) migration services. This partnership will allow us to offer our clients a broader spectrum of services.

Our primary business objective is to provide our clients with a competitive advantage by enhancing their business capabilities and technologies with our expanding consulting services portfolio. Our strategic acquisitions allow us to bring global service delivery, SAP S/4 HANA, SAP Business Intelligence, SAP Success Factors, SAP Hybris and high-end SAP consulting capabilities to a broader geographic market and customer base. We continue to leverage our growing geographical footprint and technical expertise to simultaneously expand our service and product offering. Our goal is to identify business synergies that will allow us to bring new services and products from one subsidiary to customers at our other subsidiaries. While we generate revenues from the consulting businesses of each of our acquired subsidiaries, we believe that additional revenues will be generated through new business relationships and services developed through our business combinations.

Background

We were incorporated under the laws of the State of Delaware in February 1994 as Spatializer Audio Laboratories, Inc., which was a shell company immediately prior to our completion of a “reverse merger” transaction on May 26, 2015, in which we caused Ameri100 Acquisition, Inc., a Delaware corporation and our newly created, wholly owned subsidiary, to be merged with and into Ameri and Partners Inc. (“Ameri and Partners”), a Delaware corporation (the “Merger”). As a result of the Merger, Ameri and Partners became our wholly owned subsidiary with Ameri and Partners’ former stockholders acquiring a majority of the outstanding shares of our common stock. The Merger was consummated under Delaware law, pursuant to an Agreement of Merger and Plan of Reorganization, dated as of May 26, 2015 (the “Merger Agreement”), and in connection with the Merger we changed our name to AMERI Holdings, Inc. and do business under the brand name “Ameri100”.

Ameri Holdings, Inc., along with its eleven subsidiaries, Ameri and Partners, Ameri Consulting Service Private Ltd., Ameri100 Georgia Inc. (“Ameri Georgia”), Bellsoft India Solutions Private Ltd., Ameri100 Canada Inc. (formerly BSI Global IT Solutions Inc.), Linear Logics, Corp., Ameri100 Virtuoso Inc. (“Virtuoso”), Ameri100 Arizona LLC (“Ameri Arizona”), Bigtech Software Private Limited (“Bigtech”), Ameri100 California Inc. (“Ameri California) and Ameritas Technologies India Private Limited, provides SAP cloud, digital and enterprise services to clients worldwide.

Organizational Chart

Recent Developments

Spin-Off Transaction
 
Stock Purchase Agreement

On January 10, 2020, we and Ameri100 Inc. (“Buyer”) entered into a Stock Purchase Agreement (the “Agreement”) pursuant to which, among other things and subject to the satisfaction or waiver of specified conditions, the Company will sell to Buyer and Buyer will purchase from the Company one hundred percent (100%) of the outstanding equity interests (the “Purchased Shares”) of Ameri100 Holdco, Inc. (“Holdco”) (the “Spin-Off”).

Prior to the Spin-Off Closing (as defined below), the Company will consummate a reorganization (the “Reorganization”) pursuant to which it will contribute, transfer and convey to Holdco all of the issued and outstanding equity interests of the existing subsidiaries of the Company, constituting the entire business and operations of the Company and its subsidiaries (the “Transferred Legacy Business”). At the Spin-Off Closing, in exchange for the Purchased Shares, all of the issued and outstanding shares of Series A preferred stock of the Company shall be redeemed for a number of shares of Series A preferred stock of Buyer (“Buyer Preferred Stock”) equal to the sum of (a) 431,333 shares of Buyer Preferred Stock plus (b) an additional number of payable-in-kind shares of Buyer Preferred Stock based on a 2% annual interest rate, compounding quarterly, from January 1, 2020 through and including the date of the Spin-Off Closing on the number of shares set forth in clause (a).

Each party’s obligation to consummate the Spin-Off is subject to certain conditions including, but not limited to the consummation of the Reorganization and the consummation of the Amalgamation (as defined below).

Exchange Agreements

In connection with the Agreement, on January 10, 2020, the Company entered into Exchange Agreements (each, an “Exchange Agreement”) with certain creditors of the Company and its subsidiaries (each, a “Converted Debt Holder”), pursuant to which the Company issued in a private offering a total of 599,600 shares of its common stock (the “Exchange Shares”) to such Converted Debt Holders at a price per share of $2.495 in satisfaction of $1,496,000 of the obligations owed by the Company to such Converted Debt Holders, with the remaining $1,000,000 owed to such Converted Debt Holders, plus interest (at an increased rate), due at the closing of the Amalgamation (or the earlier of the termination of the Amalgamation Agreement (as defined below) or 181 days after the date of the Amalgamation Agreement.

Amalgamation Transaction
 
Amalgamation Agreement
 
On January 10, 2020, the Company entered into an Amalgamation Agreement (the “Amalgamation Agreement”) with Jay Pharma Merger Sub, Inc. a company organized under the laws of Canada and a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company (“Merger Sub”), Jay Pharma Inc., a company organized under the laws of Canada (“Jay Pharma”), Jay Pharma ExchangeCo., Inc. a company organized under the laws of British Columbia and a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company (“ExchangeCo”), and Barry Kostiner, as the Company Representative.
 
The Amalgamation Agreement provides that, upon the terms and subject to the satisfaction or waiver of the conditions set forth therein, Merger Sub and Jay Pharma will be amalgamated and will continue as one corporation (“AmalCo”) under the terms and conditions prescribed in the Amalgamation Agreement (the “Amalgamation”), AmalCo shall be a direct wholly-owned subsidiary of ExchangeCo and an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company.
 
At the effective time of the Amalgamation (the “Effective Time”), all outstanding shares of Jay Pharma (the “Jay Pharma Shares”) will be converted into the right to receive such number of shares of common stock of the Company representing approximately 84% of the post-closing company’s issued and outstanding shares of common stock (calculated prior to the issuance of those new shares of common stock) (“Resulting Issuer Common Stock”). The Jay Pharma Shares will initially be converted into either (a) ExchangeCo Exchangeable Shares (as defined in the Amalgamation Agreement) or (b) ExchangeCo Special Shares (as defined in the Amalgamation Agreement) which in turn will be exchangeable into freely-trading shares of Resulting Issuer Common Stock. Additionally, each outstanding Jay Pharma stock option will be converted into and become an option to purchase the number of shares of Resulting Issuer Common Stock equal to the Exchange Ratio (as defined in the Amalgamation Agreement) and each outstanding Jay Pharma warrant will be converted into and become a warrant to purchase the number of shares of Resulting Issuer Common Stock equal to the Exchange Ratio.
 
The Amalgamation Agreement also contains covenants regarding the Company and Jay Pharma using their respective reasonable best efforts to obtain all required governmental and regulatory consents and approvals.
 
Each party’s obligation to consummate the Amalgamation is subject to certain conditions including, but not limited to:
 
 
the approval of each of the Company’s and Jay Pharma’s shareholders;
 
the consummation of the Spin-Off;
 
the entering into of certain ancillary agreements by and between the Company and ExchangeCo;
 
the approval of the NASDAQ to approve for listing the common stock of the resulting company.

The Amalgamation Agreement contains certain customary termination rights by either the Company or Jay Pharma, including if the Amalgamation is not consummated within 180 days of the date of the Amalgamation Agreement.
 
If the Amalgamation Agreement is terminated under certain circumstances, the Company may be obligated reimburse Jay Pharma for expenses incurred in an amount not to exceed $500,000.

Ameri Industry

Background

We operate in an intensely competitive IT outsourcing services industry, which competes on quality, service and costs.  Though we are able to differentiate our company on all of these axes, our India-based capabilities ensure that labor arbitrage is our fundamental differentiator. Most offshore IT services providers have undertaken a “forward integration” to boost their capabilities and presence in their client geographies (large offshore presence with a small local presence). Conversely, large U.S. system integrators focus on “backward integration” to scale and boost their offshore narrative (offshore being the “back office” for the local operations).  Today, the IT services industry is marked by the following characteristics:

Characteristic
 
Description
Mature Market
 
      Most large global companies have already outsourced what they wanted to outsource.
 
Commoditized Business Model
 
      North America and Europe continue to be the markets with attractive spending potential. However, increased regulations and visa dependencies prove to be a major drawback of the model.
   
    The benefits realized from the business model are largely based on labor arbitrage, productivity benefits and portfolio restructuring. These contours have changed due to commoditization.
Insourcing
 
      Extremely rapid changes in technology are forcing IT services–traditionally an outsourcing business—to adopt an insourcing model.
Rapid Technology Shifts
 
      Cloud services, robotic process automation, artificial intelligence and internet of things are increasingly in demand as part of outsourcing engagements. Smart robots increasingly operate in the cloud, and a ‘labor-as-a-service’ approach has emerged, as clients and providers find that intelligent tools and virtual agents can be easily and flexibly hosted on cloud platforms.
   
      Social media, cloud computing, mobility and big data will continue to be mainstays for any IT ecosystem.
   
     The convergence of cloud computing, virtualization (applications and infrastructure) and utility computing is around the corner. The ability of a vendor to offer an integrated basket of services on a SaaS model, will be a key differentiator.
   
      Enterprises are becoming more digital. There is a strong convergence of human and machine intelligence thanks to drivers like advanced sensors and machine learning. Operations and technology are converging.
Contracts & Decision Making
 
      Large multi-year contracts will be renegotiated and broken down into shorter duration contracts and will involve multiple vendors rather than sole sourcing.
   
    The ability to demonstrate value through Proof of Concepts (POCs) and willingness to offer outcome based pricing are becoming critical considerations for decision making, Requests for Proposal (RFP)-driven decisions are increasingly rare.
 
The SAP Industry
 
SAP as an ERP and Cloud product has become an industry by itself. The core SAP enterprise offering has been reinforced with cloud-based products that make the entire SAP ecosystem extremely attractive from our perspective due to the following attributes:
 
 
The alignment of SAP to enterprises is extremely strong.  Given the reliance of enterprises on applications, clients tend to make long-term bets on SAP as an enterprise solution.

 
According to the September 2014 “HfS Blueprint Report” from by HfS Research Ltd., the SAP market is a multi-billion-dollar market that is very fragmented (there are over 5,000 consulting firms), with the three largest service providers capturing an increasing share of the market.

 
A significant number of SAP customers must move to S/4 HANA by 2025.
 
Our Approach

Our solutions deliver significant business efficiency outcomes through turnkey projects, consulting and offshore services. We believe that our strategic service portfolio, deep industry experience and strong global talent pool offer a compelling proposition to clients. In 2017 we acquired ATCG Technology Solutions, Inc., which has become our wholly-owned subsidiary Ameri California.  In 2016, we acquired three companies: Virtuoso, L.L.C. and DC&M Partners, L.L.C.in the U.S. (now Virtuoso and Ameri Arizona, respectively) and Bigtech in India. These strategic acquisitions have brought offshore delivery, SAP S/4 HANA, SAP SuccessFactors, SAP Hybris and high-end SAP consulting capabilities to our service portfolio.
 
Our Portfolio of Service Offerings
 
Our portfolio of service offerings expanded significantly since 2016 with our acquisitions of Ameri Georgia, Ameri Arizona, Ameri California, Virtuoso and Bigtech.
 
Our current portfolio of services is divided into three categories:
 
Cloud Services
 
An increasing trend in the IT services market is the adoption of cloud services. Historically, clients have resorted to on-premise software solutions, which required capital investments in infrastructure and data centers. Cloud services enable clients to build and host their applications at much lower costs.  Our services offerings leverage the low cost and flexibility of cloud computing.
 
We have expertise in deploying SAP’s public, private and hybrid cloud services, as well as SAP S/4 HANA, SAP SuccessFactors and SAP Hybris cloud migration services. Our teams are experienced in the rapid delivery of cloud services. We perform SAP application and cloud support and SAP cloud development. Additionally, we provide cloud automation solutions that focus on business objectives and organizational growth.
 
Digital Services
 
We have developed several cutting-edge mobile solutions, including Simple Advance Planning and Optimization (“APO”) and SAP IBP/S&OP Mobile Analytics App. The Simple APO mobile application (app) provides sales professionals with real-time collaboration capabilities and customer data, on their mobile devices. It increases the efficiency of the sales process and the accuracy of customer needs forecasting. The SAP IBP mobile app enables the real-time management and analysis of sales and operations planning (S&OP) related data from mobile devices. SAP is an implementation partner for this app. SAP has recognized the app’s value to the ecosystem, as S&OP apps are complex and difficult to design.
 
We are also active in robotic process automation (“RPA”), which leverages the capability of artificially intelligent software agents for business process automation.  We have expertise in automating disparate and redundant data entry tasks by configuring software robots that seamlessly integrate with existing software systems. We also provide RPA solutions for reporting and analysis and deliver insights into business functions by translating large data into structured reports. Lastly, we have a working partnership with Blue Prism, a leading RPA solutions provider, which makes it possible for us to automate up to one-third of all standard back-office operations.
 
Enterprise Services
 
We design, implement and manage Business Intelligence (“BI”) and analytics solutions. BI helps our clients navigate the market better by identifying new trends and by targeting top-selling products. We also enable clients to use BI for generating instant financial reports and analytics of customer, product and cost information over time.  In addition, we provide solutions for metadata repository, master data management and data quality. Finally, we determine BI demands across various platforms.
 
Other key enterprise services that we offer include consulting services for global and regional SAP implementations, SAP/IT solution advisory and architectural services, project management services, IT/ERP strategy and vendor selection services.  Often clients have relied on us to deliver services in non-SAP packages, as well.
 
Strategy

The integration of each of our acquisitions into our business enterprise requires establishing our company’s standard operating procedures at each acquired entity, seamlessly transitioning each acquired entity’s branding to the “Ameri100” brand and assessing any necessity to transition account management. The integration process also requires us to evaluate any product-line expansions made possible by the acquired entity and how to bring new product lines to the broader customer base of the entire Company. With the integration of each acquisition, we face challenges of maintaining cross-company visibility and cooperation, creating a cohesive corporate culture, handling unexpected customer reactions and changes and aligning the interests of the acquired entity’s leadership with the interests of the Company.
 
Sales and Marketing
 
We combine traditional sales with our strength in industries and technology. Our sales function is composed of direct sales and inside sales professionals. Both work closely with our solutions directors to identify potential opportunities within each account. We currently have over 100+ active clients. Using a consultative selling methodology (working with clients to prescribe a solution that suits their need in terms of efficiency, cost and timelines), target prospects are identified and a pursuit plan is developed for each key account. We utilize a blended sales model that combines consultative selling with traditional sales methods. Once the customer has engaged us, the sales, solutions and marketing teams monitor and manage the relationship with the help of customer relationship management software.
 
Our marketing strategy is to build a strong, sustainable brand image for our company, position us in the SAP arena and facilitate business opportunities. We use a variety of marketing programs across traditional and social channels to target our prospective and current customers, including webinars, targeted email campaigns, co-sponsoring customer events with SAP to create customer and prospect awareness, search engine marketing and advertising to drive traffic to our web properties, and website development to engage and educate prospects and generate interest through white papers, case studies and marketing collateral.
 
Revenues and Customers
 
We generate revenue primarily through consulting services performed in the fulfillment of written service contracts. The service contracts we enter into generally fall into two categories: (1) time-and-materials contracts and (2) fixed-price contracts.
 
When a customer enters into a time-and-materials or fixed-price, (or a periodic retainer-based) contract, we recognize revenue in accordance with an evaluation of the deliverables in each contract. If the deliverables represent separate units of accounting, we then measure and allocate the consideration from the arrangement to the separate units, based on vendor-specific objective evidence of the value for each deliverable.
 
The revenue under time-and-materials contracts is recognized as services are rendered and performed at contractually agreed upon rates. Revenue pursuant to fixed-price contracts is recognized under the proportional performance method of accounting. We routinely evaluate whether revenue and profitability should be recognized in the current period. We estimate the proportional performance on our fixed-price contracts on a monthly basis utilizing hours incurred to date as a percentage of total estimated hours to complete the project.
 
For the twelve months ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, sales to five major customers accounted for approximately 48% and 39% of our total revenue, respectively.

Technology Research and Development
 
We regard our services and solutions and related software products as proprietary. We rely primarily on a combination of copyright, trademark and trade secret laws of general applicability, employee confidentiality and invention assignment agreements, distribution and software protection agreements and other intellectual property protection methods to safeguard our technology and software products. We have not applied for patents on any of our technology. We also rely upon our efforts to design and produce new applications and upon improvements to existing software products to maintain a competitive position in the marketplace.
 
We did not make any material expenditures on research or development activities for the twelve months ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018.
 
Strategic Alliances
 
Through our Lean Enterprise Architecture Partnership (“LEAP”) methodology, we have strategic alliances with technology specialists who perform services on an as-needed basis for clients. We partner with niche specialty firms globally to obtain specialized resources to meet client needs. Our business partners include executive recruiters, staffing firms and niche technology companies. The terms of each strategic alliance arrangement depend on the nature of the particular partnership. Such alliance arrangements typically set forth deliverables, scope of the services to be delivered, costs of services and terms and conditions of payment (generally 45 to 90 days for payment to be made). Each alliance arrangement also typically includes terms for indemnification of our company, non-solicitation of each partner’s employees by the other partner and dispute resolution by arbitration.
 
Alliances and partnerships broaden our offerings and make us a one-stop solution for clients. Our team constantly produces services that complement our portfolio and build strategic partnerships. Our partner companies range from digital marketing strategy consulting firms to large infrastructure players.
 
On any given project we evaluate a client’s needs and make our best effort to meet them with our full-time specialists. However, in certain circumstances, we may need to go outside the Company, and in this case we approach our strategic partners to tap into their pools of technology specialists. Project teams are usually composed of a mix of our full time employees and outside technology specialists. Occasionally, a project team may consist of a Company manager and a few outside technology specialists. While final accountability for any of our projects rests with the Company, the outside technology specialists are incentivized to successfully complete a project with project completion payments that are in addition to hourly billing rates we pay the outside technology specialists.

Competition

The large number of competitors and the speed of technology change make IT services and outsourcing a challenging business. Competitors in this market include systems integration firms, contract programming companies, application software companies, traditional large consulting firms, professional services groups of computer equipment companies and facilities management and outsourcing companies. Examples of our competitors in the IT services industry include Accenture, Cartesian Inc., Cognizant, Hexaware Technologies Limited, Infosys Technologies Limited, Mindtree Limited, RCM Technologies Inc., Tata Consultancy Services Limited, Virtusa, Inc. and Wipro Limited.
 
We believe that the principal factors for success in the IT services and outsourcing market include performance and reliability; quality of technical support, training and services; responsiveness to customer needs; reputation and experience; financial stability and strong corporate governance; and competitive pricing.
 
Some of our competitors have significantly greater financial, technical and marketing resources and/or greater name recognition, but we believe we are well positioned to capitalize on the following competitive strengths to achieve future growth:
 

well-developed recruiting, training and retention model;


successful service delivery model;


broad referral base;


continual investment in process improvement and knowledge capture;


investment in research and development;


strong corporate governance; and


custom strategic partnerships to provide breadth and depth of services.

Employees
 
As of December 31, 2019, our total headcount was 397, which includes employees and billable subcontractors. Our employees are not part of a collective bargaining arrangement and we believe our relations with our employees are good.

Government Regulations
 
In the United States and India, we are subject to or affected by international, federal, state and local laws, regulations and policies, including anti-bribery rules, trade sanctions, data privacy requirements, labor laws and anti-competition regulations, which are constantly subject to change. The descriptions of the laws, regulations and policies that follow are summaries and should be read in conjunction with the texts of the laws and regulations. The descriptions do not purport to describe all present and proposed laws, regulations and policies that affect our businesses.

We believe that we are in compliance with these laws, regulations and policies. Although we cannot predict the effect of changes to the existing laws, regulations and policies or of the proposed laws, regulations and policies that are described below, we are not aware of proposed changes or proposed new laws, regulations and policies that will have a material adverse effect on our business.

We operate in jurisdictions in which local business practices may be inconsistent with international regulatory requirements, including anti-corruption and anti-bribery regulations prescribed under the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”), which, among other things, prohibits giving or offering to give anything of value with the intent to influence the awarding of Government contracts. Also, India’s Prevention of Corruption (Amendment) Bill 2013 (“PCA”) prohibits giving bribe to a public servant. To help ensure compliance with these laws and regulations, we have adopted specific risk management and compliance practices and policies, including a specific policy addressing the FCPA.

Jay Pharma Business Overview
 
Jay Pharma is an evidence-based pharmaceutical company, dedicated to developing innovative cannabinoid-based products and combination therapies to improve the quality of life for those living with serious and chronic conditions, initially focusing on oncology care. Jay Pharma seeks to improve the lives of persons suffering from cancer, initially by developing cancer care and wellness products for persons suffering from certain side effects of cancer and cancer treatment. Jay Pharma currently intends to offer such palliative cancer care and wellness products, once approved for commercialization in the United States, if ever. Jay Pharma is also aiming to advance a pipeline of novel cannabinoid combination therapies for hard-to-treat cancers, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Jay Pharma intends to bring leading oncology clinicians and researchers, academic and industry partners, proprietary products and data, and eventually a robust pipeline of product candidates, to improve quality of life and provide symptomatic relief to cancer patients.

In developing its product candidates, Jay Pharma intends to focus solely on cannabinoids derived from hemp and synthetic materials containing no tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in order to comply with U.S. federal regulations.  Of the potential cannabinoids to be used in therapeutic formulations, THC, which is responsible for the psychoactive properties of marijuana, can result in undesirable mood effects. Cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabigerol (CBG), on the other hand, are not psychotropic and are therefore more attractive candidates for translation into therapeutic practice.  In the future, Jay Pharma may utilize cannabinoids that are derived from cannabis plants, which may contain THC; however, Jay Pharma only intends to do so in jurisdictions where THC is legal.

Available Information
 
Our executive office is located at 5000 Research Court, Suite 750, Suwanee, Georgia 30024. Our telephone number is (770) 935-4152 and our website is www.ameri100.com. We provide free access to various reports that we file with or furnish to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission through our website, as soon as reasonably practicable after they have been filed or furnished.
 
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS
 
In addition to the information set forth at the beginning of Management’s Discussion and Analysis entitled “Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Information”, investors should consider that there are numerous and varied risks, known and unknown, that may prevent us from achieving our goals.  If any of these risks actually occur, our business, financial condition or results of operation may be materially and adversely affected.  In such case, the trading price of our common stock could decline and investors could lose all or part of their investment.
 
Risks Relating to Our Business and Industry
 

If the requirements of our indebtedness are not satisfied, a default could be deemed to occur and our lenders or the holders of our notes could accelerate the payment of the outstanding indebtedness.

As of December 31, 2019, we had an outstanding aggregate of $1 million in 8% Convertible Unsecured Promissory Notes (the “2017 Notes”), which were issued to one of our accredited investor, including one of the Company’s then-directors, Dhruwa N. Rai, and David Luci, who became a director of the Company in February 2018. The 2017 Notes bear interest at 8% per annum and matured in March 2020. We have not repaid the 2017 Notes and do not currently have sufficient funds available to meet these obligations.

We recorded a net loss for the twelve months ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018 and there can be no assurance that our future operations will result in net income.

For the twelve months ended December 31, 2019, and December 31, 2018, we had net revenue of $40 million and $43 million, respectively, and we had comprehensive net loss of $6.1 million and $19.4 million, respectively. At December 31, 2019, we had stockholders’ equity of approximately $10.6 million and an accumulated deficit of approximately $40.5 million. There can be no assurance that our future operations will result in net income. Our failure to increase our revenues or improve our gross margins will harm our business. We may not be able to sustain or increase profitability on a quarterly or annual basis in the future. If our revenues grow more slowly than we anticipate, our gross margins fail to improve or our operating expenses exceed our expectations, our operating results will suffer. The fee we charge for our solutions and services may decrease, which would reduce our revenues and harm our business. If we are unable to sell our solutions at acceptable prices relative to our costs, or if we fail to develop and introduce new solutions on a timely basis and services from which we can derive additional revenues, our financial results will suffer.

We and our subsidiaries have limited operating histories and therefore we cannot ensure the long-term successful operation of our business or the execution of our business plan.

Our prospects must be considered in light of the risks, expenses and difficulties frequently encountered by growing companies in new and rapidly evolving markets, such as the technology consulting markets in which we operate. We must meet many challenges including:

 
establishing and maintaining broad market acceptance of our solutions and services and converting that acceptance into direct and indirect sources of revenue;

 
establishing and maintaining adoption of our technology solutions in a wide variety of industries and on multiple enterprise architectures;

 
timely and successfully developing new solutions and services and increasing the functionality and features of existing solutions and services;

 
developing solutions and services that result in high degree of enterprise client satisfaction and high levels of end-customer usage;

 
successfully responding to competition, including competition from emerging technologies and solutions;

 
developing and maintaining strategic relationships to enhance the distribution, features, content and utility of our solutions and services; and

 
identifying, attracting and retaining talented personnel at reasonable market compensation rates in the markets in which we employ.

Our business strategy may be unsuccessful and we may be unable to address the risks we face in a cost-effective manner, if at all. If we are unable to successfully address these risks our business will be harmed.

 
We face working capital constraints and may not have sufficient working capital in the long term and there is no assurance that we will be able to obtain additional financing, which could negatively impact our business.
 
We have incurred significant and recurring operational losses as a result of our ongoing acquisition strategy. As of December 31, 2019, we had outstanding cash payment obligations related to our past acquisitions of approximately $2.5 million and which amount is currently reduced to $1 Million.  If our current cash position does not improve significantly, we will not have sufficient cash on hand to meet these obligations.  Due to our working capital constraints, we are not current in all payments to all our unsecured noteholders. We are working with certain of our unsecured noteholders to negotiate payment terms until we are able to raise more capital.

There can be no assurance that we will be able to secure additional sources of capital or that cost savings will provide sufficient working capital.  If we continue to be unable to pay all outstanding payments under our unsecured notes, the unpaid noteholders may take legal action against us, they may accelerate the payment of the principal under the applicable notes, and our senior secured lender may call a cross-default under our existing credit facility, which could result in the acceleration of the obligations thereunder and have a negative impact on our revenue and financial results.  Should we be unable to raise sufficient debt or equity capital, we could be forced to cease operations. Our plan regarding these matters is to work to raise additional debt and/or equity financing to allow us the ability to cover our current cash flow requirements and meet our obligations as they become due. There can be no assurances that financing will be available or if available, that such financing will be available under favorable terms.

The economic environment, pricing pressures, and decreased employee utilization rates could negatively impact our revenues and operating results.

Spending on technology products and services is subject to fluctuations depending on many factors, including the economic environment in the markets in which our clients operate.

Reduced ERP spending in response to a challenging economic environment leads to increased pricing pressure from our clients, which may adversely impact our revenue, gross profits, operating margins and results of operations.

In addition to the business challenges and margin pressure resulting from economic slowdown in the markets in which our clients operate and the response of our clients to such slowdown, there is also a growing trend among consumers of ERP services towards consolidation of technology service providers in order to improve efficiency and reduce costs. Our success in the competitive bidding process for new projects or in retaining existing projects is dependent on our ability to fulfil client expectations relating to staffing, delivery of services and more stringent service levels. If we fail to meet a client’s expectations in such projects, this would likely adversely impact our business, revenues and operating margins. In addition, even if we are successful in winning the mandates for such projects, we may experience significant pressure on our operating margins as a result of the competitive bidding process.

Moreover, our ability to maintain or increase pricing is restricted as clients often expect that as we do more business with them, they will receive volume discounts or lower rates. In addition, existing and new customers are also increasingly using third-party consultants with broad market knowledge to assist them in negotiating contractual terms. Any inability to maintain or increase pricing on account of this practice may also adversely impact our revenues, gross profits, operating margins and results of operations.

Uncertain global SAP consulting market conditions may continue to adversely affect demand for our services.

We rely heavily on global demand for ERP services, especially SAP consulting by customers. Any weakness for these ERP services by global customers will adversely affect our revenue projections and hence our profits. SAP AG is adapting itself to the changes in the market especially towards cloud offerings. These changes may lead to SAP losing its market share to other competitors like Oracle, Microsoft, Salesforce and Workday among many other newer players. With these setbacks to SAP, we may face uncertain future due to dramatic changes in the market place which in turn will affect our revenues and profits.

Our success depends largely upon our highly-skilled technology professionals and our ability to hire, attract, motivate, retain and train these personnel.

Our ability to execute projects, maintain our client relationships and acquire new clients depends largely on our ability to attract, hire, train, motivate and retain highly skilled technology professionals, particularly project managers and other mid-level professionals. If we cannot hire, motivate and retain personnel, our ability to bid for projects, obtain new projects and expand our business will be impaired and our revenues could decline.

Increasing worldwide competition for skilled technology professionals and increased hiring by technology companies may affect our ability to hire and retain an adequate number of skilled and experienced technology professionals, which may in turn have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

In addition, the demands of changes in technology, evolving standards and changing client preferences may require us to redeploy and retrain our technology professionals. If we are unable to redeploy and retrain our technology professionals to keep pace with continuing changes in technology, evolving standards and changing client preferences, this may adversely affect our ability to bid for and obtain new projects and may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We face intense competition from other service providers.

We are subject to intense competition in the industry in which we operate which may adversely affect our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. We operate in a highly competitive industry, which is served by numerous global, national, regional and local firms. Our industry has experienced rapid technological developments, changes in industry standards and customer requirements. The principal competitive factors in the IT markets include the range of services offered, size and scale of service provider, global reach, technical expertise, responsiveness to client needs, speed in delivery of IT solutions, quality of service and perceived value. Many companies also choose to perform some or all of their back-office IT and IT-enabled operations internally. Such competitiveness requires us to keep pace with technological developments and maintains leadership; enhance our service offerings, including the breadth of our services and portfolio, and address increasingly sophisticated customer requirements in a timely and cost-effective manner.

We market our service offerings to large and medium-sized organizations. Generally, the pricing for the projects depends on the type of contract, which includes time and material contracts, annual maintenance contracts (fixed time frame), fixed price contracts and transaction price based contracts. The intense competition and the changes in the general economic and business conditions can put pressure on us to change our prices. If our competitors offer deep discounts on certain services or provide services that the marketplace considers more valuable, we may need to lower prices or offer other favorable terms in order to compete successfully. Any broad-based change to our prices and pricing policies could cause revenues to decline and may reduce margins and could adversely affect results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. Some of our competitors may bundle software products and services for promotional purposes or as a long-term pricing strategy or provide guarantees of prices and product implementations. These practices could, over time, significantly constrain the prices that we can charge for certain services. If we do not adapt our pricing models to reflect changes in customer use of our services or changes in customer demand, our revenues and cash flows could decrease.

Our competitors may have significantly greater financial, technical and marketing resources and greater name recognition and, therefore, may be better able to compete for new work and skilled professionals. Similarly, if our competitors are successful in identifying and implementing newer service enhancements in response to rapid changes in technology and customer preferences, they may be more successful at selling their services. If we are unable to respond to such changes our results of operations may be harmed. Further, a client may choose to use its own internal resources rather than engage an outside firm to perform the types of services we provide. We cannot be certain that we will be able to sustain our current levels of profitability or growth in the face of competitive pressures, including competition for skilled technology professionals and pricing pressure from competitors employing an on-site/offshore business model.

In addition, we may face competition from companies that increase in size or scope as the result of strategic alliances such as mergers or acquisitions. These transactions may include consolidation activity among hardware manufacturers, software companies and vendors and service providers. The result of any such vertical integration may be greater integration of products and services that were once offered separately by independent vendors. Our access to such products and services may be reduced as a result of such an industry trend, which could adversely affect our competitive position. These types of events could have a variety of negative effects on our competitive position and our financial results, such as reducing our revenue, increasing our costs, lowering our gross margin percentage and requiring us to recognize impairments on our assets.

Our business could be adversely affected if we do not anticipate and respond to technology advances in our industry and our clients’ industries.

The IT and global outsourcing and SAP consulting services industries are characterized by rapid technological change, evolving industry standards, changing client preferences and new product introductions. Our success will depend in part on our ability to develop IT solutions that keep pace with industry developments. We may not be successful in addressing these developments on a timely basis or at all. In addition, products or technologies developed by others may not render our services noncompetitive or obsolete. Our failure to address these developments could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.

A significant number of organizations are attempting to migrate business applications to advanced technologies. As a result, our ability to remain competitive will be dependent on several factors, including our ability to develop, train and hire employees with skills in advanced technologies, breadth and depth of process and technology expertise, service quality, knowledge of industry, marketing and sales capabilities. Our failure to hire, train and retain employees with such skills could have a material adverse impact on our business. Our ability to remain competitive will also be dependent on our ability to design and implement, in a timely and cost- effective manner, effective transition strategies for clients moving to advanced architectures. Our failure to design and implement such transition strategies in a timely and cost-effective manner could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.

Our operations and assets in India expose us to regulatory, economic, political and other uncertainties in India, which could harm our business.

We have an offshore presence in India where a number of our technical professionals are located. In the past, the Indian economy has experienced many of the problems confronting the economies of developing countries, including high inflation and varying gross domestic product growth. Salaries and other related benefits constitute a major portion of our total operating costs. Many of our employees based in India where our wage costs have historically been significantly lower than wage costs in the United States and Europe for comparably skilled professionals, and this has been one of our competitive advantages. However, wage increases in India or other countries where we have our operations may prevent us from sustaining this competitive advantage if wages increase. We may need to increase the levels of our employee compensation more rapidly than in the past to retain talent. If such events occur, we may be unable to continue to increase the efficiency and productivity of our employees and wage increases in the long term may reduce our profit margins.

Our clients may seek to reduce their dependence on India for outsourced IT services or take advantage of the services provided in countries with labor costs similar to or lower than India.

Clients which presently outsource a significant proportion of their IT services requirements to vendors in India may, for various reasons, including in response to rising labor costs in India and to diversify geographic risk, seek to reduce their dependence on one country. We expect that future competition will increasingly include firms with operations in other countries, especially those countries with labor costs similar to or lower than India, such as China, the Philippines and countries in Eastern Europe. Since wage costs in our industry in India are increasing, our ability to compete effectively will become increasingly dependent on our reputation, the quality of our services and our expertise in specific industries. If labor costs in India rise at a rate that is significantly greater than labor costs in other countries, our reliance on the labor in India may reduce our profit margins and adversely affect our ability to compete, which would, in turn, have a negative impact on our results of operations.

Our business could be materially adversely affected if we do not or are unable to protect our intellectual property or if our services are found to infringe upon or misappropriate the intellectual property of others.

Our success depends in part upon certain methodologies and tools we use in designing, developing and implementing applications systems in providing our services. We rely upon a combination of nondisclosure and other contractual arrangements and intellectual property laws to protect confidential information and intellectual property rights of ours and our third parties from whom we license intellectual property. We enter into confidentiality agreements with our employees and limit distribution of proprietary information. The steps we take in this regard may not be adequate to deter misappropriation of proprietary information and we may not be able to detect unauthorized use of, protect or enforce our intellectual property rights. At the same time, our competitors may independently develop similar technology or duplicate our products or services. Any significant misappropriation, infringement or devaluation of such rights could have a material adverse effect upon our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.

Litigation may be required to enforce our intellectual property rights or to determine the validity and scope of the proprietary rights of others. Any such litigation could be time consuming and costly. Although we believe that our services do not infringe or misappropriate on the intellectual property rights of others and that we have all rights necessary to utilize the intellectual property employed in our business, defense against these claims, even if not meritorious, could be expensive and divert our attention and resources from operating our company. A successful claim of intellectual property infringement against us could require us to pay a substantial damage award, develop non-infringing technology, obtain a license or cease selling the products or services that contain the infringing technology. Such events could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Any disruption in the supply of power, IT infrastructure and telecommunications lines to our facilities could disrupt our business process or subject us to additional costs.

Any disruption in basic infrastructure, including the supply of power, could negatively impact our ability to provide timely or adequate services to our clients. We rely on a number of telecommunications service and other infrastructure providers to maintain communications between our various facilities and clients in India, the United States and elsewhere. Telecommunications networks are subject to failures and periods of service disruption, which can adversely affect our ability to maintain active voice and data communications among our facilities and with our clients. Such disruptions may cause harm to our clients’ business. We do not maintain business interruption insurance and may not be covered for any claims or damages if the supply of power, IT infrastructure or telecommunications lines is disrupted. This could disrupt our business process or subject us to additional costs, materially adversely affecting our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.

System security risks and cyber-attacks could disrupt our information technology services provided to customers, and any such disruption could reduce our expected revenue, increase our expenses, damage our reputation and adversely affect our stock price and the value of our warrants.

Security and availability of IT infrastructure is of the utmost concern for our business, and the security of critical information and infrastructure necessary for rendering services is also one of the top priorities of our customers.

System security risks and cyber-attacks could breach the security and disrupt the availability of our IT services provided to customers. Any such breach or disruption could allow the misuse of our information systems, resulting in litigation and potential liability for us, the loss of existing or potential clients, damage to our reputation and diminished brand value and could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition.

Our network and our deployed security controls could also be penetrated by a skilled computer hacker or intruder. Further, a hacker or intruder could compromise the confidentiality and integrity of our protected information, including personally identifiable information; deploy malicious software or code like computer viruses, worms or Trojan horses, etc. may exploit any security vulnerabilities, known or unknown, of our information system; cause disruption in the availability of our information and services; and attack our information system through various other mediums.

We also procure software or hardware products from third party vendors that provide, manage and monitor our services. Such products may contain known or unfamiliar manufacturing, design or other defects which may allow a security breach or cyber-attack, if exploited by a computer hacker or intruder, or may be capable of disrupting performance of our IT services and prevent us from providing services to our clients.

In addition, we manage, store, process, transmit and have access to significant amounts of data and information that may include our proprietary and confidential information and that of our clients. This data may include personal information, sensitive personal information, personally identifiable information or other critical data and information, of our employees, contractors, officials, directors, end customers of our clients or others, by which any individual may be identified or likely to be identified. Our data security and privacy systems and procedures meet applicable regulatory standards and undergo periodic compliance audits by independent third parties and customers. However, if our compliance with these standards is inadequate, we may be subject to regulatory penalties and litigation, resulting in potential liability for us and an adverse impact on our business.

We are still susceptible to data security or privacy breaches, including accidental or deliberate loss and unauthorized disclosure or dissemination of such data or information. Any breach of such data or information may lead to identity theft, impersonation, deception, fraud, misappropriation or other offenses in which such information may be used to cause harm to our business and have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, business, results of operations and cash flows.

We must effectively manage the growth of our operations, or our company will suffer.

Our ability to successfully implement our business plan requires an effective planning and management process. If funding is available, we intend to increase the scope of our operations and acquire complimentary businesses. Implementing our business plan will require significant additional funding and resources. If we grow our operations, we will need to hire additional employees and make significant capital investments. If we grow our operations, it will place a significant strain on our existing management and resources. If we grow, we will need to improve our financial and managerial controls and reporting systems and procedures, and we will need to expand, train and manage our workforce. Any failure to manage any of the foregoing areas efficiently and effectively would cause our business to suffer.

Our revenues are concentrated in a limited number of clients and our revenues may be significantly reduced if these clients decrease their IT spending.

Our client contracts are based on time and materials expenses. We do not have long-term client contracts. Our client contracts contain standard payment terms, and our clients only pay us for services rendered. We have limited exposure for non-payment by our clients and do not have any unresolved client debts. While our client contracts can be terminated with little or no notice, it is uncommon for our clients to terminate an engagement in the middle of the implementation of services.

For the twelve-month period ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, sales to five major customers accounted for approximately 48% and 39%, respectively, of our total revenue.  Consequently, if our top clients reduce or postpone their IT spending significantly, this may lower the demand for our services and negatively affect our revenues and profitability. Further, any significant decrease in the growth of the financial services or other industry segments on which we focus may reduce the demand for our services and negatively affect our revenues, profitability and cash flows.

Our client contracts can typically be terminated without cause and with little or no notice or penalty, which could negatively impact our revenues and profitability.

Our clients typically retain us on a non-exclusive, project-by-project basis. Many of our client contracts can be terminated with or without cause. Our business is dependent on the decisions and actions of our clients, and there are a number of factors relating to our clients that are outside of our control which might lead to termination of a project or the loss of a client, including:

 
·
financial difficulties for a client;

 
·
a change in strategic priorities, resulting in a reduced level of technology spending;

 
·
a demand for price reductions; or an unwillingness to accept higher pricing due to various factors such as higher wage costs, higher cost of doing business;

 
·
a change in outsourcing strategy by moving more work to the client’s in-house technology departments or to our competitors;

 
·
the replacement by our clients of existing software with packaged software supported by licensors;

 
·
mergers and acquisitions;

 
·
consolidation of technology spending by a client, whether arising out of mergers and acquisitions, or otherwise; and

 
·
sudden ramp-downs in projects due to an uncertain economic environment.

Our inability to control the termination of client contracts could have a negative impact on our financial condition and results of operations.

Our engagements with customers are typically singular in nature and do not necessarily provide for subsequent engagements.

Our clients generally retain us on a short-term, engagement-by-engagement basis in connection with specific projects, rather than on a recurring basis under long-term contracts. Although a substantial majority of our revenues are generated from repeat business, which we define as revenues from a client who also contributed to our revenues during the prior fiscal year, our engagements with our clients are typically for projects that are singular in nature. Therefore, we must seek out new engagements when our current engagements are successfully completed or terminated, and we are constantly seeking to expand our business with existing clients and secure new clients for our services. In addition, in order to continue expanding our business, we may need to significantly expand our sales and marketing group, which would increase our expenses and may not necessarily result in a substantial increase in business. If we are unable to generate a substantial number of new engagements for projects on a continual basis, our business and results of operations would likely be adversely affected.

Our results of operations may fluctuate from quarter to quarter, which could affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our results of operations may fluctuate from quarter to quarter depending upon several factors, some of which are beyond our control. These factors include the timing and number of client projects commenced and completed during the quarter, the number of working days in a quarter, employee hiring, attrition and utilization rates and the mix of time-and-material projects versus fixed price deliverable projects and maintenance projects during the quarter. Additionally, periodically our cost increases due to both the hiring of new employees and strategic investments in infrastructure in anticipation of future opportunities for revenue growth.

These and other factors could affect our business, financial condition and results of operations, and this makes the prediction of our financial results on a quarterly basis difficult. Also, it is possible that our quarterly financial results may be below the expectations of public market analysts.

We are heavily dependent on our senior management, and a loss of a member of our senior management team could cause our stock price and the value of our warrants to suffer.

If we lose members of our senior management, we may not be able to find appropriate replacements on a timely basis, and our business could be adversely affected. Our existing operations and continued future development depend to a significant extent upon the performance and active participation of certain key individuals. We do not currently maintain key man insurance. If we were to lose any of our key personnel, we may not be able to find appropriate replacements on a timely basis and our financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

Our international sales and operations are subject to applicable laws relating to trade, export controls and foreign corrupt practices, the violation of which could adversely affect its operations.

We must comply with all applicable international trade, customs, export controls and economic sanctions laws and regulations of the United States and other countries. We are also subject to the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and other anti-bribery laws that generally bar bribes or unreasonable gifts to foreign governments or officials. Changes in trade sanctions laws may restrict our business practices, including cessation of business activities in sanctioned countries or with sanctioned entities, and may result in modifications to compliance programs. Violation of these laws or regulations could result in sanctions or fines and could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Our income tax returns are subject to review by taxing authorities, and the final determination of our tax liability with respect to tax audits and any related litigation could adversely affect our financial results.

Although we believe that our tax estimates are reasonable and that we prepare and submit our tax filings on a timely basis and in accordance with all applicable tax laws, the final determination with respect to any tax audits, and any related litigation, could be materially different from our estimates or from our historical income tax provisions and accruals. The results of an audit or litigation could have a material effect on operating results and/or cash flows in the periods for which that determination is made. In addition, future period earnings may be adversely impacted by litigation costs, settlements, penalties and/or interest assessments.

Failure of our customers to pay the amounts owed to us in a timely manner may adversely affect our financial condition and operating results.

We generally provide payment terms ranging from 30 to 60 days. As a result, we generate significant accounts receivable from sales to our customers, representing approximately 84% of current assets as of December 31, 2019 and approximately 78% of current assets as of December 31, 2018. Accounts receivable from sales to customers were $6.4 million as of December 31, 2019 and $7.9 million as of December,31 2018. As of December 31, 2019, the largest amount owed by a single customer was approximately 11% of total accounts receivable. As of December 31, 2019, we had an allowance of $85,430 for doubtful accounts. If any of our significant customers have insufficient liquidity, we could encounter significant delays or defaults in payments owed to us by such customers, and we may need to extend our payment terms or restructure the receivables owed to us, which could have a significant adverse effect on our financial condition. Any deterioration in the financial condition of our customers will increase the risk of uncollectible receivables. Global economic uncertainty could also affect our customers’ ability to pay our receivables in a timely manner or at all or result in customers going into bankruptcy or reorganization proceedings, which could also affect our ability to collect our receivables.

If we are unable to collect our dues or receivables from or invoice our unbilled services to our clients, our results of operations and cash flows could be adversely affected.

Our business depends on our ability to successfully obtain payments from our clients of the amounts they owe us for work performed. We evaluate the financial condition of our clients and usually bill and collect on relatively short cycles. Macroeconomic conditions, such as a potential credit crisis in the global financial system, could result in financial difficulties for our clients, including limited access to the credit markets, insolvency or bankruptcy. Such conditions could cause clients to delay payment, request modifications of their payment terms, or default on their payment obligations to us, all of which could increase our receivables. If we experience delays in the collection of, or are unable to collect, our client balances, our results of operations and cash flows could be adversely affected. In addition, if we experience delays in billing and collection for our services, our cash flows could be adversely affected.

Goodwill that we carry on our balance sheet could give rise to significant impairment charges in the future.

Goodwill is subject to impairment review at least annually. Impairment testing under standards as issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board may lead to impairment charges in the future. Any significant impairment charges could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

Our revenue and operating results may be affected by the rate of growth in the use of technology in business and the type and level of technology spending by our clients.

Our business depends, in part, upon continued reliance on the use of technology in business by our clients and prospective clients as well as their customers and suppliers. In particular, the success of our new service offerings requires continued demand for such services and our ability to meet this demand in a cost-effective manner. In challenging economic environments, our clients may reduce or defer their spending on new technologies in order to focus on other priorities and prospective clients may decide not to engage our services. Also, many companies have already invested substantial resources in their current means of conducting commerce and exchanging information, and they may be reluctant or slow to adopt new approaches that could disrupt existing personnel, processes and infrastructures. If the growth of technology usage in business, or our clients’ spending on such technology, declines, or if we cannot convince our clients or potential clients to embrace new technological solutions, our revenue and operating results could be adversely affected.

Our business will suffer if we fail to anticipate and develop new services and enhance existing services in order to keep pace with rapid changes in technology and the industries on which we focus.

The ERP services market is characterized by rapid technological changes, evolving industry standards, changing client preferences and new product and service introductions. Our future success will depend on our ability to anticipate these advances and enhance our existing offerings or develop new product and service offerings to meet client needs. We may not be successful in anticipating or responding to these advances on a timely basis, or, if we do respond, the services or technologies we develop may not be successful in the marketplace. We may also be unsuccessful in stimulating customer demand for new and upgraded products, or seamlessly managing new product introductions or transitions. Further, products, services or technologies that are developed by our competitors may render our services non-competitive or obsolete. Our failure to address the demands of the rapidly evolving information technology environment, particularly with respect to digital technology, the internet of things, artificial intelligence, cloud computing and storage, mobility and applications and analytics, could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Changes in laws or regulations, or a failure to comply with any laws and regulations, may adversely affect our business, investments and results of operations.

We are subject to laws and regulations enacted by national, regional and local governments, including non-U.S. governments. In particular, we are required to comply with certain SEC and other legal requirements. Compliance with, and monitoring of, applicable laws and regulations may be difficult, time consuming and costly. Those laws and regulations and their interpretation and application may also change from time to time and those changes could have a material adverse effect on our business, investments and results of operations. In addition, a failure to comply with applicable laws or regulations, as interpreted and applied, could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

Our international operations subject us to exposure to foreign currency fluctuations.

We have operations in three countries and as we expand our international operations, more of our customers pay us in foreign currencies. Transactions in currencies other than U.S. dollars subject us to fluctuations in currency exchange rates. Accordingly, changes in exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and other currencies could have a material adverse effect on our revenues and net income, which may in turn have a negative impact on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. The exchange rate between the U.S. dollar and other currencies has changed substantially in recent years and may fluctuate in the future. We expect that the vast majority of our revenues will continue to be generated in U.S. dollars for the foreseeable future and that a significant portion of our expenses, including personnel costs, as well as capital and operating expenditures, will continue to be denominated in other currencies such as Indian Rupee. The hedging strategies that we may implement in the future to mitigate foreign currency exchange rate risks may not reduce or completely offset our exposure to foreign exchange rate fluctuations and may expose our business to unexpected market, operational and counterparty credit risks. Accordingly, we may incur losses from our use of foreign exchange derivate contracts that could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Acquisitions, expansions or infrastructure investments may require us to increase our level of indebtedness or issue additional equity.

As we continue to consummate additional acquisition opportunities, undertake additional expansion activities or make substantial investments in our infrastructure, our capital needs continue to expand. Accordingly, we may need to draw down additional borrowings under our credit facility or access public or private debt or equity markets. There can be no assurance, however, that we will be successful in raising additional debt or equity, or that we will be able to raise such funds on terms that we would consider acceptable.

An increase in the level of indebtedness, if any, could, among other things:

 
make it difficult for us to obtain financing in the future for acquisitions, working capital, capital expenditures, debt service requirements or other purposes;

 
limit our flexibility in planning for or reacting to changes in our business;

 
limit our ability to pay dividends;

 
make us more vulnerable in the event of a downturn in our business; and

 
affect certain financial covenants with which we must comply in connection with our credit facilities.

Additionally, any further equity offering would dilute your ownership interest in our company.

Our earnings and financial condition may be negatively impacted by certain tax related matters.

We are subject to income taxes in the United States and numerous foreign jurisdictions. Our provision for income taxes and cash tax liability could be adversely affected by numerous factors, including income before taxes being lower than anticipated in countries with lower statutory tax rates and higher than anticipated in countries with higher statutory tax rates, changes in the valuation of deferred tax assets and liabilities, changes in accounting principles or interpretations and changes in tax laws. Certain jurisdictions, including the United States, are actively contemplating tax reform and tax policy changes. Any of these changes could adversely impact our results of operations and financial condition in future periods. In addition, our income tax returns are subject to examination in the jurisdictions in which we operate. An unfavorable outcome of one or more of these examinations may have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Global health crises may adversely affect our planned operations.

Our business could be materially and adversely affected by the risks, or the public perception of the risks, related to a pandemic or other health crisis, such as the recent outbreak of novel coronavirus (COVID-19). A significant outbreak of contagious diseases in the human population could result in a widespread health crisis that could adversely affect our planned operations. Such events could result in the complete or partial closure of one or more of our offices or the operations of our customers which could impact our operations. In addition, it could impact economies and financial markets, resulting in an economic downturn that could impact our ability to raise capital or slow down potential business opportunities.

International hostilities, terrorist activities, other violence or war, natural disasters, pandemics and infrastructure disruptions, could delay or reduce the number of new service orders we receive and impair our ability to service our customers, thereby adversely affecting our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Hostilities involving acts of terrorism, violence or war, natural disasters, global health risks or pandemics or the threat or perceived potential for these events could materially adversely affect our operations and our ability to provide services to our customers. Such events may cause customers to delay their decisions on spending for information technology, consulting, and business process services and give rise to sudden significant changes in regional and global economic conditions and cycles. These events also pose significant risks to our personnel and to our and our customers’ physical facilities and operations around the world. Additionally, by disrupting communications and travel, giving rise to travel restrictions, and increasing the difficulty of obtaining and retaining highly-skilled and qualified personnel, these events could make it difficult or impossible for us to deliver services to some or all of our customers. The majority of our employees are located in India, and the vast majority of our technical professionals in the United States and Canada are Indian nationals who are able to work in the United States and Europe only because they hold current visas and work permits. Any inability to travel could cause us to incur additional unexpected costs and expenses or could impair our ability to retain the skilled professionals we need for our operations. In addition, any extended disruptions of electricity, other public utilities or network services at our facilities could also adversely affect our ability to serve our customers.

Hostilities involving the United States, Canada and India where we provide services to our customers, and other acts of terrorism, violence or war, natural disasters, global health risks or pandemics may reduce the demand for our services and negatively affect our revenues. If we fail to defend against any of these occurrences, we might be unable to protect our people, facilities and systems. If these disruptions prevent us from effectively serving our customers, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected.

Anti-outsourcing legislation, if adopted, and negative perceptions associated with offshore outsourcing could impair our ability to service our customers and adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

The issue of companies outsourcing services to organizations operating in other countries is a topic of political discussion in the United States, which is our largest market. For example, a number of measures aimed at limiting or restricting outsourcing by U.S. companies have been put forward for consideration by the U.S. Congress and in various state legislatures to address concerns over the perceived association between offshore outsourcing and the loss of jobs domestically. Further, the current U.S. administration or Congress may seek to limit outsourcing by U.S. companies. If enacted, such measures may broaden existing restrictions on outsourcing by federal and state government agencies and on government contracts with firms that outsource services directly or indirectly, or impact private industry with measures that include tax disincentives, fees or penalties, intellectual property transfer restrictions, mandatory government audit requirements, and new standards that have the effect of restricting the use of certain business and/or work visas. In the event that any of these measures become law, our ability to provide services to our customers could be impaired, which could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

In addition, from time to time there has been publicity about negative experiences associated with offshore outsourcing, such as domestic job loss and theft and misappropriation of sensitive customer data, particularly involving service providers in India. Current or prospective customers may elect to perform certain services themselves or may be discouraged from utilizing global service delivery providers due to negative perceptions that may be associated with using global service delivery models or firms. Any slowdown or reversal of existing industry trends toward global service delivery would seriously harm our ability to compete effectively with competitors that provide the majority of their services from within the country in which our customers operate.

Restrictions on immigration may affect our ability to compete for and provide services to customers, which could hamper our growth and cause our revenues to decline.

Our future success continues to depend on our ability to attract and retain employees with technical and project management skills, including those from developing countries, especially India. The ability of foreign nationals to work in the United States, depends on their and our ability to obtain the necessary visas and work permits for our personnel who need to travel internationally. If we are unable to obtain such visas or work permits, or if their issuance is delayed or if their length is shortened, we may not be able to provide services to our customers or to continue to provide services on a timely and cost-effective basis, receive revenues as early as expected or manage our delivery centers as efficiently as we otherwise could, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Immigration and work permit laws and regulations in the countries in which we have customers are subject to legislative and administrative changes as well as changes in the application of standards and enforcement. For example, the U.S. Congress has been actively considering various proposals that would make extensive changes to U.S. immigration laws regarding the admission of high-skilled temporary and permanent workers. Further, the current U.S. administration or Congress may seek to limit the admission of high-skilled temporary and permanent workers and has issued and may continue to issue executive orders designed to limit immigration. Any such provisions may increase our cost of doing business in the United States and may discourage customers from seeking our services. Our international expansion strategy and our business, results of operations and financial condition may be materially adversely affected if changes in immigration and work permit laws and regulations or the administration or enforcement of such laws or regulations impair our ability to staff projects with professionals who are not citizens of the country where the work is to be performed.

Risk Factors Relating to Our Indebtedness

We have a substantial amount of indebtedness, which may limit our operating flexibility and could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

As of December 31, 2019, we had approximately $2.9 million in borrowings outstanding under our senior secured credit facility (the “Credit Facility”), which provided for up to $8 million in principal for revolving loans (the “Revolving Loans”) for general working capital purposes.

On January 23, 2019, certain subsidiaries of the Company, including Ameri100 Arizona LLC, Ameri100 Georgia, Inc., Ameri100 California, Inc. and Ameri and Partners, Inc., as borrowers (individually and collectively, “Borrower”) entered into a Loan and Security Agreement (the “Loan Agreement”), with North Mill Capital LLC, as lender (the “Lender”). The Loan Agreement has an initial term of two years from the closing date, with renewal thereafter if Lender, at its option, agrees in writing to extend the term for additional one year periods (the “Term”). The Loan Agreement is collateralized by a first-priority security interest in all of the assets of Borrower. In addition, (i) pursuant to a Corporate Guaranty entered into by the Company in favor of the Lender (the “Corporate Guaranty”), the Company has guaranteed the Borrower’s obligations under the Credit Facility and (ii) pursuant to a Security Agreement entered into between the Company and Lender (the “Security Agreement”), the Company granted a first-priority security interest in all of its assets to Lender.

The Borrowers received an initial advance on January 23, 2019 in an amount of approximately $2.85 million (the “Initial Advance”). Borrowings under the Credit Facility accrue interest at the prime rate (as designated by Wells Fargo Bank, National Association) plus one and three quarters percentage points (1.75%), but in no event shall the interest rate be less than seven and one-quarter percent (7.25%). Notwithstanding anything to the contrary contained in the Loan Documents, the minimum monthly interest payable by Borrower on the Advances (as defined in the Loan Agreement) in any month shall be calculated based on an average Daily Balance (as defined in the Loan Agreement) of Two Million Dollars ($2,000,000) for such month.  For the first year of the Term, Borrower shall pay to Lender a facility fee equal to $50,000, due in equal monthly installments, with additional facility fees due to Lender in the event borrowings exceed certain thresholds and with additional facility fees due and payable in later years or upon later milestones. In addition, Borrower shall pay to Lender a monthly fee (the “Servicing Fee”) in an amount equal to one-eighth percent (.125%) of the average Daily Balance (as defined in the Loan Agreement) during each month on or before the first day of each calendar month during the Term.

The Company used approximately $2.75 million of the Initial Advance to repay all of its outstanding obligations under the Credit Facility of Sterling National Bank. Upon payment, the Company’s obligations under the erstwhile Credit Facility were terminated.

Borrower also agreed to certain negative covenants in the Loan Agreement, including that they will not, without the prior written consent of Lender, enter into any extraordinary transactions, dispose of assets, merge, acquire, or consolidate with or into any other business organization or restructure.

If an Event of Default (as defined in the Loan Agreement) occurs, Lender may, among other things, (i) declare all obligations immediately due and payable in full; (ii) cease advancing money or extending credit to or for the benefit of Borrower; and/or (iii) terminate the Loan Agreement as to any future liability or obligation of Lender, without affecting Lender’s right to repayment of all obligations and Lender’s security interests.

In addition, as of December 31, 2019, we had an outstanding aggregate of $1 million in 5% Convertible Unsecured Debentures (the “Debentures”), which were issued to one of accredited investors. The Debentures bear interest at 5% per annum and are convertible at $0.109 per share.

In addition, as of December 31, 2019, we have an outstanding aggregate of $1 million in 8% Convertible Unsecured Promissory Notes (the “2017 Notes”), which were issued to one of our accredited investor, including one of the Company’s then-directors, Dhruwa N. Rai, and David Luci, who became a director of the Company in February 2018. The 2017 Notes bear interest at 8% per annum until maturity in March 2020, with interest being paid annually on the first, second and third anniversaries of the issuance of the 2017 Notes beginning in March 2018. From and after an event of default and for so long as the event of default is continuing, the 2017 Notes will bear default interest at the rate of 10% per annum. The 2017 Notes can be prepaid by us at any time without penalty.

The 2017 Notes are convertible into shares of our common stock at a conversion price equal to $70. The holders of the 2017 Notes have the right, at their option, at any time and from time to time to convert, in part or in whole, the outstanding principal amount and all accrued and unpaid interest under the 2017 Notes into shares of the Company’s common stock at the then applicable conversion price.

The 2017 Notes rank junior to our secured credit facility with Sterling National Bank. The 2017 Notes also include certain negative covenants including, without the investors’ approval, restrictions on dividends and other restricted payments and reclassification of its stock.

Our level of indebtedness and the operating restrictions imposed by such indebtedness may make it difficult to service our debt and may adversely affect our ability to obtain additional financing, use operating cash flow in other areas of our business or otherwise adversely affect our operations.

Risks Relating to Our Securities

Our stock price may be volatile, which could result in substantial losses for investors.

The market price of our common stock may be volatile and could fluctuate widely in response to various factors, many of which are beyond our control, including the following:

 
technological innovations or new products and services by us or our competitors;

 
additions or departures of key personnel;

 
sales of our common stock, including management shares;

 
limited availability of freely-tradable “unrestricted” shares of our common stock to satisfy purchase orders and demand;

 
our ability to execute our business plan;

 
operating results that fall below expectations;

 
loss of any strategic relationship;

 
industry developments;

 
economic and other external factors;

 
our ability to manage the costs of maintaining adequate internal financial controls and procedures in connection with the acquisition of additional businesses; and

 
period-to-period fluctuations in our financial results.

In addition, the securities markets have from time to time experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that are unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies. These market fluctuations may also significantly affect the market price of our common stock.

Our common stock may be delisted if we fail to comply with continued listing standards.
 
If we fail to meet any of the continued listing standards of The Nasdaq Capital Market, our common stock could be delisted from The Nasdaq Capital Market. These continued listing standards include specifically enumerated criteria, such as:
 
• a $1.00 minimum closing bid price;
• stockholders’ equity of $2.5 million;
• 500,000 shares of publicly-held common stock with a market value of at least $1 million;
• 300 round-lot stockholders; and
• compliance with Nasdaq’s corporate governance requirements, as well as additional or more stringent criteria that may be applied in the exercise of Nasdaq’s discretionary authority.

If we fail to comply with Nasdaq’s continued listing standards, we may be delisted and our common stock will trade, if at all, only on the over-the-counter market, such as the OTC Bulletin Board or OTCQX market, and then only if one or more registered broker-dealer market makers comply with quotation requirements. In addition, delisting of our common stock could depress our stock price, substantially limit liquidity of our common stock and materially adversely affect our ability to raise capital on terms acceptable to us, or at all. Finally, delisting of our common stock could result in our common stock becoming a “penny stock” under the Exchange Act.

Holders of our warrants will have no rights as a common stockholder until they exercise their warrants and acquire our common stock.

Until a holder of our warrants acquires shares of our common stock upon exercise of such warrants, such holder will have no rights with respect to shares of our common stock issuable upon exercise of the warrants. Upon exercise of warrants by, the holder shall become entitled to exercise the rights of a common stockholder only as to matters for which the record date occurs after the exercise date.

We do not expect to pay dividends in the future. As a result, any return on investment may be limited to the value of our common stock.

We have never paid cash dividends on our common stock and do not anticipate paying cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. The payment of dividends on our common stock will depend on our earnings, financial condition and other business and economic factors as our board of directors may consider relevant. In addition, no dividends will be declared or paid or set apart for payment on our common stock unless all accumulated accrued and unpaid dividends in respect of our Series A Preferred Stock are contemporaneously declared and paid in cash or declared and a sum of cash sufficient for the payment thereof set apart for such payment on the Series A Preferred Stock for all past dividend periods with respect to which full dividends were not paid on the Series A Preferred Stock in cash. If we do not pay dividends, our common stock may be less valuable because a return on your investment will only occur if our stock price appreciates.

We currently have Series A Preferred Stock outstanding and our certificate of incorporation authorizes our board of directors to create new series of preferred stock without further approval by our stockholders, which could adversely affect the rights of the holders of our common stock.

Our board of directors has the authority to fix and determine the relative rights and preferences of preferred stock. Our board of directors also has the authority to issue preferred stock without further stockholder approval. We currently have 424,938 shares of Series A Preferred Stock outstanding. The Series A Preferred Stock Certificate of Designation provides for (a) the payment in-kind in additional shares of Series A Preferred of dividends for all dividend periods from April 1, 2018 through March 31, 2020 at a rate of 2% per annum of the liquidation preference (the “Adjusted Rate”); and, commencing April 1, 2020, we will pay cash dividends per share at a rate per annum equal to the Adjusted Rate multiplied by the liquidation preference; provided, however, dividends for periods ending after April 1, 2020 may be paid at the election of the Company’s board of directors in-kind through the issuance of additional shares of Series A Preferred for up to four dividend periods in any consecutive 36-month period, determined on a rolling basis. Our Series A Preferred Stock gives its holders the preferred right to our assets upon liquidation, the right to receive dividend payments before dividends are distributed to the holders of common stock and the right to the redemption of the shares, together with a premium, prior to the redemption of our common stock. In addition, our board of directors could authorize the issuance of additional series of preferred stock with such rights preferential to the rights of our common stock, including the issuance of a series of preferred stock that has greater voting power than our common stock or that is convertible into our common stock, which could decrease the relative voting power of our common stock or result in dilution to our existing stockholders.

Because certain of our stockholders control a significant number of shares of our common stock, they may have effective control over actions requiring stockholder approval.

A small number of our stockholders, and their respective affiliates, collectively, control the majority of our voting securities. Accordingly, such stockholders, and their respective affiliates, will have significant influence on the ability to control the Company and the outcome of issues submitted to our stockholders.

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our stock price and trading volume could decline.

The trading market for our common stock will depend in part on the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us or our business. We currently have limited research coverage by securities and industry analysts and you should not invest in our common stock in anticipation that we will obtain additional analyst coverage. If one or more of the analysts who covers us downgrades our stock or publishes inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our stock price would likely decline. If one or more of these analysts ceases coverage of us or fails to publish reports on us regularly, demand for our stock could decrease, which could cause our stock price and trading volume to decline.

If the benefits of any proposed acquisition do not meet the expectations of investors, stockholders or financial analysts, the market price of our common stock may decline.

If the benefits of any proposed acquisition do not meet the expectations of investors or securities analysts, the market price of our common stock prior to the closing of the proposed acquisition may decline. The market values of our common stock at the time of the proposed acquisition may vary significantly from their prices on the date the acquisition target was identified.

In addition, broad market and industry factors may materially harm the market price of our common stock irrespective of our operating performance. The stock market in general has experienced price and volume fluctuations that have often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of the particular companies affected. The trading prices and valuations of these stocks, and of our securities, may not be predictable. A loss of investor confidence in the market for retail stocks or the stocks of other companies which investors perceive to be similar to us could depress our stock price regardless of our business, prospects, financial conditions or results of operations. A decline in the market price of our securities also could adversely affect our ability to issue additional securities and our ability to obtain additional financing in the future.

Changes in accounting principles and guidance, or their interpretation, could result in unfavorable accounting charges or effects, including changes to our previously filed financial statements, which could cause our stock price to decline.

We prepare our consolidated financial statements in accordance with GAAP. These principles are subject to interpretation by the SEC and various bodies formed to interpret and create appropriate accounting principles and guidance. A change in these principles or guidance, or in their interpretations, may have a significant effect on our reported results and retroactively affect previously reported results.

Being a public company results in additional expenses, diverts management’s attention and could also adversely affect our ability to attract and retain qualified directors.

As a public reporting company, we are subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). These requirements generate significant accounting, legal and financial compliance costs and make some activities more difficult, time consuming or costly and may place significant strain on our personnel and resources. The Exchange Act requires, among other things, that we maintain effective disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting. In order to establish the requisite disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting, significant resources and management oversight are required.

As a result, management’s attention may be diverted from other business concerns, which could have an adverse and even material effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. These rules and regulations may also make it more difficult and expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance. If we are unable to obtain appropriate director and officer insurance, our ability to recruit and retain qualified officers and directors, especially those directors who may be deemed independent, could be adversely impacted.

We are an “emerging growth company” and our election to delay adoption of new or revised accounting standards applicable to public companies may result in our financial statements not being comparable to those of some other public companies. As a result of this and other reduced disclosure requirements applicable to emerging growth companies, our securities may be less attractive to investors.

As a public reporting company with less than $1,070,000,000 in revenue during our last fiscal year, we qualify as an “emerging growth company” under the Jumpstart our Business Startups Act of 2012 (the “JOBS Act”). An emerging growth company may take advantage of certain reduced reporting requirements and is relieved of certain other significant requirements that are otherwise generally applicable to public companies. In particular, as an emerging growth company we:

 
are not required to obtain an attestation and report from our auditors on our management’s assessment of our internal control over financial reporting pursuant to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002;

 
are not required to provide a detailed narrative disclosure discussing our compensation principles, objectives and elements and analyzing how those elements fit with our principles and objectives (commonly referred to as “compensation discussion and analysis”);

 
are not required to obtain a non-binding advisory vote from our stockholders on executive compensation or golden parachute arrangements (commonly referred to as the “say-on-pay,” “say-on-frequency” and “say-on-golden-parachute” votes);

 
are exempt from certain executive compensation disclosure provisions requiring a pay-for-performance graph and CEO pay ratio disclosure;

 
may present only two years of audited financial statements and only two years of related Management’s Discussion & Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (“MD&A”); and

 
are eligible to claim longer phase-in periods for the adoption of new or revised financial accounting standards under §107 of the JOBS Act.

We intend to take advantage of all of these reduced reporting requirements and exemptions, including the longer phase-in periods for the adoption of new or revised financial accounting standards under §107 of the JOBS Act. Our election to use the phase-in periods may make it difficult to compare our financial statements to those of non-emerging growth companies and other emerging growth companies that have opted out of the phase-in periods under §107 of the JOBS Act.

Certain of these reduced reporting requirements and exemptions were already available to us due to the fact that we also qualify as a “smaller reporting company” under SEC rules. For instance, smaller reporting companies are not required to obtain an auditor attestation and report regarding management’s assessment of internal control over financial reporting; are not required to provide a compensation discussion and analysis; are not required to provide a pay-for-performance graph or Chief Executive Officer pay ratio disclosure; and may present only two years of audited financial statements and related MD&A disclosure.

Under the JOBS Act, we may take advantage of the above-described reduced reporting requirements and exemptions for up to five years after our initial sale of common equity pursuant to a registration statement declared effective under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), or such earlier time that we no longer meet the definition of an emerging growth company. In this regard, the JOBS Act provides that we would cease to be an “emerging growth company” if we have more than $1,070,000,000 in annual revenues, have more than $700 million in market value of our common stock held by non-affiliates, or issue more than $1.0 billion in principal amount of non-convertible debt over a three-year period. Further, under current SEC rules we will continue to qualify as a “smaller reporting company” for so long as we have a public float (i.e., the market value of common equity held by non-affiliates) of less than $250 million as of the last business day of our most recently completed second fiscal quarter.

We cannot predict if investors will find our securities less attractive due to our reliance on these exemptions.

Failure to establish and maintain effective internal controls in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act could have a material adverse effect on our business, stock price and the value of our warrants.

We are required to comply with the SEC’s rules implementing Sections 302 and 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, which require management to certify financial and other information in our quarterly and annual reports and provide an annual management report on the effectiveness of controls over financial reporting. We are required to disclose changes made in our internal controls and procedures on a quarterly basis, and we are required to make internal annual assessments of our internal control over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404. However, as an emerging growth company, our independent registered public accounting firm will not be required to formally attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404 until we no longer qualify as an emerging growth company. At such time, our independent registered public accounting firm may issue a report that is adverse in the event it is not satisfied with the level at which our controls are documented, designed or operating.

To comply with the requirements of being a public company, we have undertaken various actions, and may need to take additional actions, such as implementing new internal controls and procedures and hiring additional accounting or internal audit staff. Testing and maintaining internal control can divert our management’s attention from other matters that are important to the operation of our business. Additionally, when evaluating our internal control over financial reporting, we may identify material weaknesses that we may not be able to remediate in time to meet the applicable deadline imposed upon us for compliance with the requirements of Section 404. If we identify any material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting or are unable to comply with the requirements of Section 404 in a timely manner or assert that our internal control over financial reporting is effective, or if our independent registered public accounting firm is unable to express an opinion as to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting once we are no longer an emerging growth company, investors may lose confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports and the market price of our common stock could be negatively affected, and we could become subject to investigations by the Financial Industry Regulatory Agency, the SEC or other regulatory authorities, which could require additional financial and management resources.

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) of the Exchange Act. Our internal control over financial reporting includes maintaining records that in reasonable detail accurately and fairly reflect our transactions and dispositions of our assets; providing reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary for preparation of our financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles; providing reasonable assurance that receipts and expenditures are made in accordance with authorizations of management and our directors; and providing reasonable assurance that unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of our assets that could have a material effect on our financial statements would be prevented or detected on a timely basis. As a result of this assessment, our management concluded that, as of December 31, 2019, our internal control over financial reporting was not yet effective in providing reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. This is largely due to the fact that we have in the past acquired a number of privately held companies as part of our growth strategy and implementing our control procedures over all acquired subsidiaries takes time. We are working to improve and harmonize our financial reporting controls and procedures across all of our companies.

Anti-takeover provisions contained in our certificate of incorporation and bylaws, as well as provisions of Delaware law, could impair a takeover attempt.

The Company’s certificate of incorporation and bylaws contain provisions that could have the effect of delaying or preventing changes in control or changes in our management without the consent of our board of directors. These provisions include:

 
no cumulative voting in the election of directors, which limits the ability of minority stockholders to elect director candidates;

 
the exclusive right of our board of directors to elect a director to fill a vacancy created by the expansion of the board of directors or the resignation, death, or removal of a director, which prevents stockholders from being able to fill vacancies on our board of directors;

 
the ability of our board of directors to determine whether to issue shares of our preferred stock and to determine the price and other terms of those shares, including preferences and voting rights, without stockholder approval, which could be used to significantly dilute the ownership of a hostile acquirer;

 
limiting the liability of, and providing indemnification to, our directors and officers;

 
controlling the procedures for the conduct and scheduling of stockholder meetings; and

 
advance notice procedures that stockholders must comply with in order to nominate candidates to our board of directors or to propose matters to be acted upon at a stockholders’ meeting, which may discourage or deter a potential acquirer from conducting a solicitation of proxies to elect the acquirer’s own slate of directors or otherwise attempting to obtain control of the Company.

Risks Related to the Proposed Amalgamation
 
There is no assurance when or if the amalgamation will be completed. Any delay in completing the amalgamation may substantially reduce the intended benefits that Ameri and Jay Pharma expect to obtain from the amalgamation.

Completion of the amalgamation is subject to the satisfaction or waiver of a number of conditions as set forth in the Amalgamation Agreement, including the approval by Ameri’s stockholders and Jay Pharma’s shareholders, approval by NASDAQ of Ameri’s application for the listing of common stock in connection with the amalgamation, and other customary closing conditions. There can be no assurance that Ameri and Jay Pharma will be able to satisfy the closing conditions or that closing conditions of the amalgamation beyond their control will be satisfied or waived. If such conditions are not satisfied or waived, the amalgamation may not occur or will be delayed, and Ameri and Jay Pharma each may lose some or all of the intended benefits of the amalgamation. In addition, if the Amalgamation Agreement is terminated under certain circumstances, Ameri or Jay Pharma may be required to pay a termination fee of $500,000. Moreover, each of Ameri and Jay Pharma has incurred and expect to continue to incur significant expenses related to the amalgamation, such as legal and accounting fees, some of which must be paid even if the amalgamation is not completed.

In addition, if the Amalgamation Agreement is terminated and Ameri’s or Jay Pharma’s board of directors determines to seek another business combination, it may not be able to find a third party willing to provide equivalent or more attractive consideration than the consideration to be provided by each party in the amalgamation. In such circumstances, Ameri’s board of directors may elect to, among other things, divest all or a portion of Ameri’s business, or take the steps necessary to liquidate all of Ameri’s business and assets, and in either such case, the consideration that Ameri receives may be less attractive than the consideration to be received by Ameri pursuant to the Amalgamation Agreement.

The amalgamation will substantially dilute the voting power of current Ameri stockholders. Having a minority share position may reduce the influence that current stockholders have on the management of Ameri.

Upon completion of the amalgamation and the transactions contemplated in the Amalgamation Agreement, the issuance of the shares Ameri common stock to Jay Pharma equity holders in the amalgamation will significantly reduce the ownership stake and relative voting power of each share of Ameri common stock held by current Ameri stockholders. Consequently, following the amalgamation, the ability of Ameri’s current stockholders to influence the management of Ameri will be substantially reduced.

The announcement and pendency of the amalgamation could have an adverse effect on Ameri’s or Jay Pharma’s business, financial condition, results of operations or business prospects.
 
The announcement and pendency of the amalgamation could disrupt Ameri’s and/or Jay Pharma’s businesses in the following ways, among others:

 
Ameri’s or Jay Pharma’s current and prospective employees could experience uncertainty about their future roles within the resulting company; and, this uncertainty might adversely affect Ameri’s or Jay Pharma’s ability to retain, recruit and motivate key personnel;
 
the attention of Ameri’s or Jay Pharma’s management may be directed towards the completion of the amalgamation and other transaction-related considerations and may be diverted from the day-to-day business operations of Ameri or Jay Pharma, as applicable, and matters related to the amalgamation may require commitments of time and resources that could otherwise have been devoted to other opportunities that might have been beneficial to Ameri or Jay Pharma, as applicable;
 
customers, prospective customers, suppliers, collaborators and other third parties with business relationships with Ameri or Jay Pharma may decide not to renew or may decide to seek to terminate, change or renegotiate their relationships with Ameri or Jay Pharma as a result of the amalgamation, whether pursuant to the terms of their existing agreements with Ameri or Jay Pharma; and

Should they occur, any of these matters could adversely affect the businesses of, or harm the financial condition, results of operations or business prospects of, Ameri or Jay Pharma.

During the pendency of the amalgamation, Ameri or Jay Pharma may not be able to enter into a business combination with another party and will be subject to contractual limitations on certain actions because of restrictions in the Amalgamation Agreement.

Covenants in the Amalgamation Agreement impede the ability of Ameri or Jay Pharma to make acquisitions or complete other transactions that are not in the ordinary course of business pending completion of the amalgamation other than the Spin-Off. As a result, if the amalgamation is not completed, the parties may be at a disadvantage to their competitors. In addition, while the Amalgamation Agreement is in effect and subject to limited exceptions, each party is prohibited from soliciting, initiating, encouraging or taking actions designed to facilitate any inquiries or the making of any proposal or offer that could lead to the entering into certain extraordinary transactions with any third party, such as a sale of assets, an acquisition, a tender offer, a amalgamation or other business combination outside the ordinary course of business. These restrictions may prevent each of Ameri and Jay Pharma from pursuing otherwise attractive business opportunities or other capital structure alternatives and making other changes to its business or executing certain of its business strategies prior to the completion of the amalgamation, which could be favorable to Ameri stockholders or Jay Pharma shareholders.

Risks Related to the Business of Jay Pharma

Jay Pharma is dependent on the success of its product candidates, which are in early stages of development, and there can be no assurances that its product candidates will reach a particular stage in clinical development, receive regulatory approval or be successfully commercialized.

Jay Pharma’s success will depend on its ability to successfully develop and commercialize its product candidates through its development programs. Jay Pharma may never be able to develop products which receive regulatory approval in the U.S. or elsewhere. There can be no assurance that the FDA or any other regulatory authority will approve these product candidates.

In the United States, the FDA regulates drugs under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, or “FDCA,” and implementing regulations. Drugs are also subject to other federal, state and local statutes and regulations. The process of obtaining regulatory approvals and the subsequent compliance with appropriate federal, state, local and foreign statutes and regulations require the expenditure of substantial time and financial resources. The process required by the FDA before a drug or biological product may be marketed in the United States generally involves the following:


Completion of preclinical laboratory tests, animal studies, and formulation studies according to Good Laboratory Practices and other applicable regulations;
 

Submission to the FDA of an Investigational New Drug Application, or an “IND,” which must become effective before human clinical trials may begin in the United States;
 

Performance of adequate and well-controlled human clinical trials according to the FDA’s current good clinical practices, or GCPs, which sufficiently demonstrate the safety and efficacy of the proposed drug or biologic for its intended uses;
 

Submission to the FDA of a New Drug Application, or an NDA, for a new drug product;
 

Satisfactory completion of an FDA inspection of the manufacturing facility or facilities where the drug or biologic is to be produced to assess compliance with the FDA’s current good manufacturing practice standards, or cGMP, to assure that the facilities, methods and controls are adequate to preserve the drug’s or biologic’s identity, strength, quality and purity;
 

Potential FDA audit of the nonclinical and clinical trial sites that generated the data in support of the NDA or biologics license application; and
 

FDA review and, potentially, approval of the NDA.
 
The lengthy process of seeking required approvals and the continuing need for compliance with applicable statutes and regulations require the expenditure of substantial resources. There can be no certainty that approvals will be granted.

Jay Pharma depends substantially on the data, expertise and products of Tikun Olam, one of its collaboration partners.

Jay Pharma relies heavily on the data, expertise and products of Tikun Olam, its collaboration partner, to advance its product candidates. Jay Pharma’s ability to successfully develop its product candidates largely depends on the expertise and skills of its collaboration partners. Tikun Olam has the right, under certain circumstances, to terminate its agreements with Jay Pharma. A failure by Jay Pharma’s partners to successfully perform the applicable services in relation to the development of its product candidates, or the termination of agreements with its partners, would have a material adverse effect on its business, results of operations and financial condition. In addition to collaboration, Jay Pharma is party to several contractual arrangements, including license agreements, with Tikun Olam and its affiliates.

ITEM 1B.  UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
 
None.
 
ITEM 2.  PROPERTIES
 
Our principal executive office is located in approximately 3,269 square feet of office space in Suwanee, Georgia and is situated within an office that also serves as the principal office of Ameri Georgia. We currently pay rent of $4,683 per month for this principal office. We also lease administrative, marketing and support facilities in Dallas, Texas; Atlanta, Georgia; and Chandler, Arizona in the U.S. and Bangalore in India. We believe our present facilities are suitable and adequate for our current operating needs.

ITEM 3.  LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
 
We are not currently a party to any pending legal proceeding, nor is our property the subject of a pending legal proceeding, that is not in the ordinary course of business or otherwise material to the financial condition of our business.

ITEM 4.  MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
 
Not applicable.

PART II
 
ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
 
Common Stock Information

Our shares of common stock trade on The Nasdaq Capital Market under the ticker symbol “AMRH.” .

A 1-for-25 reverse share split of our outstanding common stock was effected on November 25, 2019 as approved by our Board of Directors and a majority of our shareholders. The reverse share split reduced the number of common shares issued and outstanding from approximately 62.8 million to 2.5 million as of December 31, 2019. As such, all references to share and per share amounts in this Annual Report on Form 10-K have been retroactively restated to reflect the 1-for-25 reverse share split, except for the authorized number of shares of our common stock and the par value per share, which were not affected.

Holders

As of March 1, 2020, we had 579 stockholders of record of our common stock. This number does not include beneficial owners whose shares are held in the names of various securities brokers, dealers and registered clearing agencies.

Dividend Policy

Holders of our common stock are entitled to receive ratably such dividends, if any, as may be declared by our board of directors out of funds legally available. We have not paid any dividends since our inception, and we presently anticipate that all earnings, if any, will be retained for development of our business. The Certificate of Designation for our Series A Preferred Stock prohibits the payment of dividends at any time that we are not current in the payment of dividends with respect to the Series A Preferred Stock. There are no other restrictions in our certificate of incorporation or by-laws that prevent us from declaring dividends. Any future disposition of dividends will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend upon, among other things, our future earnings, operating and financial condition, capital requirements and other factors.
 
ITEM 6.  SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
 
Not applicable.

ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
 
Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Information

The following discussion and analysis is provided to increase the understanding of, and should be read in conjunction with, our consolidated financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this report.  Historical results and percentage relationships among any amounts in these financial statements are not necessarily indicative of trends in operating results for any future period. This report contains “forward-looking statements.”  The statements, which are not historical facts contained in this report, including this Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, and notes to our consolidated financial statements, particularly those that utilize terminology such as “may” “will,” “should,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “estimates,” “believes,” or “plans” or comparable terminology are forward-looking statements. Such statements are based on currently available operating, financial and competitive information, and are subject to various risks and uncertainties. Future events and our actual results may differ materially from the results reflected in these forward-looking statements. Factors that might cause such a difference include, but are not limited to, our ability to raise additional funding, our ability to maintain and grow our business, variability of operating results, our ability to maintain and enhance our brand, our development and introduction of new products and services, the successful integration of acquired companies, technologies and assets into our portfolio of software and services, marketing and other business development initiatives, competition in the industry, general government regulation, economic conditions, dependence on key personnel, the ability to attract, hire and retain personnel who possess the technical skills and experience necessary to meet the service requirements of our clients, our ability to protect our intellectual property, the potential liability with respect to actions taken by our existing and past employees, risks associated with international sales and other risks described herein and in our other filings with the SEC.

All forward-looking statements in this document are based on information currently available to us as of the date of this report, and we assume no obligation to update any forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause the actual results to differ materially from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements.

Company History

We were incorporated under the laws of the State of Delaware in February 1994 as Spatializer Audio Laboratories, Inc., which had been a shell company until May of 2015. On May 26, 2015, we completed a “reverse merger” transaction, in which we caused Ameri100 Acquisition, Inc., a Delaware corporation as our newly created, wholly owned subsidiary, to be merged with and into Ameri and Partners (doing business as Ameri100), a Delaware corporation. As a result of the Merger, Ameri and Partners became our wholly owned subsidiary with Ameri and Partners’ former stockholders acquiring a majority of the outstanding shares of our common stock. The Merger was consummated under Delaware law, pursuant to the Merger Agreement, and in connection with the Merger we changed our name to AMERI Holdings, Inc. Since the Merger, we have been an active holding company headquartered in Suwanee, Georgia, with offices across the United States that are supported by offices in India.

Overview

We specialize in delivering SAP cloud, digital and enterprise services to clients worldwide. Our SAP focus allows us to provide technological solutions to a broad and growing base of clients. Our model inverts the conventional global delivery model wherein offshore IT service providers are based abroad and maintain a minimal presence in the United States. With a strong SAP focus, our client partnerships anchor around SAP cloud and digital services.

We generate revenue by providing consulting services under written service contracts with our customers. The service contracts we enter into generally fall into two categories: (1) time-and-materials contracts and (2) fixed-price contracts.

When a customer enters into a time-and-materials or fixed-price (or a periodic retainer-based) contract, the revenue is recognized in accordance with the deliverables of each contract. If the deliverables involve separate units of accounting, the consideration from the arrangement is measured and allocated to the separate units, based on vendor specific objective evidence of the value for each deliverable.

The revenue under time and materials contracts is recognized as services are rendered and performed at contractually agreed upon rates. Revenue pursuant to fixed-price contracts is recognized under the proportional performance method of accounting. We routinely evaluate whether revenue and profitability should be recognized in the current period. We estimate the proportional performance on fixed-price contracts on a monthly basis utilizing hours incurred to date as a percentage of total estimated hours to complete the project.

For the years ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, sales to five major customers accounted for approximately 48% and 39% of our total revenue, respectively. For the year ended December 31, 2019, three of our customers contributed 14%, 13% and 10% of our revenue, and for the year ended December 31, 2018, two of our customers contributed 14% and 10% of our revenue.

We have obtained financing and additional capital from the sale of equity and incurrence of indebtedness in the past, and we continue to consider capital raising and financing from the sale of various types of equity and incurrence of indebtedness to provide capital for our business plans and operations in the future.

Matters that May or Are Currently Affecting Our Business

The main challenges and trends that could affect or are affecting our financial results include:

 
Our ability to enter into additional technology-management and consulting agreements, to diversify our client base and to expand the geographic areas we serve;

 
Our ability to attract competent, skilled professionals and on-demand technology partners for our operations at acceptable prices to manage our overhead;

 
Our ability to acquire other technology services companies and integrate them with our existing business;

 
Our ability to raise additional equity capital, if and when we needed;

 
We may incur an impairment of the goodwill acquired from our prior business acquisitions if our acquired entities do not experience growth; and

 
Our ability to control our costs of operation as we expand our organization and capabilities.

We have incurred significant and recurring operational losses as a result of our ongoing acquisition strategy. We have outstanding cash payment obligations related to our past acquisitions of approximately $2.5 million. Notwithstanding our working capital constraints, we are current in all payments to all our unsecured noteholders. We are working with certain of our unsecured noteholders to negotiate payment terms until we are able to raise more capital.

There can be no assurance that we will be able to secure additional sources of capital or that cost savings will provide sufficient working capital.  If we continue to be unable to pay all outstanding payments under our unsecured notes, the unpaid noteholders may take legal action against us, they may accelerate the payment of the principal under the applicable notes, and our senior secured lender may call a cross-default under our existing credit facility, which could result in the acceleration of the obligations thereunder and have a negative impact on our revenue and financial results.  Should we be unable to raise sufficient debt or equity capital, we could be forced to cease operations. Our plan regarding these matters is to work to raise additional debt and/or equity financing to allow us the ability to cover our current cash flow requirements and meet our obligations as they become due. There can be no assurances that financing will be available or if available, that such financing will be available under favorable terms.

Recent Developments

On January 10, 2020, we entered into the Stock Purchase Agreement with respect to the Spin-Off and the Amalgamation Agreement with respect to the Amalgamation. See “Business-Recent Developments” on page 2 above.

Result of Operations

Results of Operations for the Year Ended December 31, 2019 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2018

   
Twelve Months
Ended December 31,
 
   
2019
 

  2018  
           
Net revenue
 
$
39,914,675
 

$
42,998,280
 
Cost of revenue
   
31,763,955
     
34,014,776
 
Gross profit
   
8,150,720
     
8,983,504
 
                 
Operating expenses:
               
Selling, general and administration
   
12,210,317
     
10,794,822
 
Depreciation and amortization
   
2,265,297
     
2,903,662
 
Acquisition related expenses
   
-
     
333,237
 
Changes in estimate for consideration payable
   
-
     
(6,940,310
)
Impairment charges on goodwill and intangible assets
   
-
     
9,038,553
 
Operating expenses
   
14,475,614
     
16,129,964
 
Operating Income (loss):
   
(6,324,894
)
   
(7,146,460
)
                 
Interest expense
   
(691,138
)
   
(729,896
)
Other income
   
4,540
     
88,161
 
Change in fair value of warrant liability
   
1,796,174
     
(2,760,819
)
Total other income /(expenses)
   
1,109,576
     
(3,402,554
)
Income (loss) before income taxes
   
(5,215,318
)
   
(10,549,014
)
Income tax benefit
   
(388,657
)
   
(6,348,502
)
Net Income (loss)
   
(5,603,975
)
   
(16,897,516
)
Dividend on preferred stock
   
(426,003
)
   
(2,583,185
)
Net (loss) attributable to common stock holders
   
(6,029,978
)
   
(19,480,701
)
Other comprehensive income/ (loss), net of tax:
               
Foreign exchange translation adjustment
   
(26,985
)
   
50,122
 
Total comprehensive income (loss)
 
$
(6,056,963
)
   
(19,430,579
)
Comprehensive (loss) attributable to the Company
   
(6,056,963
)
   
(19,430,579
)
Comprehensive (loss) attributable to the non-controlling interest
   
-
     
-
 
     
(6,056,963
)
   
(19,430,579
)
Basic income (loss) per share
 
$
(2.83
)
 
$
(20.47
)
Diluted income (loss) per share
 
$
(2.83
)
 
$
(20.47
)
                 
Basic weighted average number of shares
   
2,128,806
     
951,601
 
Diluted weighted average number of shares
   
2,128,806
     
951,601
 

Revenues
 
Revenues for the year ended December 31, 2019 decreased by $3.1 million, or 6%, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2018, mainly because we did not pursue certain low margin professional services business during the year ended December 31, 2019.

For the years ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, sales to five major customers accounted for approximately 48% and 39% of our total revenue, respectively. For the year ended December 31, 2019, three of our customers contributed 14%, 13% and 10% of our revenue, and for the year ended December 31, 2018, two of our customers contributed 14% and 10% of our revenue.

We derived most of our revenues from our customers located in North America for the years ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018.

Gross Margin

Our gross margin was 20% and 21% for the year ended December 31, 2019 and December 31 2018 respectively.

Our target gross margins in future periods are anticipated to be in the range of 20% to 25% based on a mix of project revenues and professional service revenues. However, there is no assurance that we will achieve such anticipated gross margins.

Selling, General and Administration Expenses

Selling, general and administration (“SG&A”) expenses include all costs, including rent costs, which are not directly associated with revenue-generating activities, as well as the non-cash expense for stock based compensation. These include employee costs, corporate costs and facilities costs. Employee costs include administrative salaries and related employee benefits, travel, recruiting and training costs. Corporate costs include reorganization costs, legal, accounting and outside consulting fees. Facilities costs primarily include rent and communications costs.

SG&A expenses for the year ended December 31, 2019 were $12.2 million, as compared to $10.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2018.  SG&A expenses increased by $1.4 million. The increase was mainly due to new sales initiatives taken by the company, including recruiting and compensating a new sales team.

Depreciation and Amortization

Depreciation and amortization expense amounted to $2.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, as compared to $2.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2018. We capitalized the customer lists acquired during various acquisitions, resulting in increased amortization costs. The customer lists from each acquisition are amortized over a period of 60 months.  Our amortization schedule is as follows:

Year ending December 31,
   
Amount
 
2020
     
2,075,610
 
2021
     
1,383,611
 
2022
     
125,000
 
Total
   
$
3,584,221
 

Changes in Estimates

During the year ended December 30, 2018 the Company recognized a one-time non-cash gain in the amount of $6.9 million as a result of the Company’s change in estimate of its consideration payable related to its acquisition of Ameri Arizona. The Company had previously accounted for total equity consideration payable of $10.4 million, which was reduced to $3.3 million as a result of two former members of Ameri Arizona electing to receive approximately $2.5 million in cash and the issuance of equity valued at $0.8 million to the third former member Ameri Arizona who had not elected to receive cash.

Impairment on goodwill and intangibles

As a result of our annual impairment testing on goodwill and of triggering events identified with respect to certain intangible assets, we recorded impairment charges of $0 and $9.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018 respectively with respect to the goodwill of certain of our reporting units and certain customer lists.

Operating Income (loss)

Our operating loss was $6.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, as compared to $7.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2018. This decrease was mainly due to the decrease in Impairment charges on goodwill and intangibles.

Interest Expense

Our interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018 was $0.7 million.

Changes in fair value of warrant liability

In connection with a private placement transaction during 2018 as described further below, we issued warrants that were determined to be derivative financial instruments, and accordingly require adjustments to remeasure them to fair value upon certain events as described below. During the year ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, we recognized $1.8 million and $(2.8) Million in changes in fair value from the initial issuance date through the end of the year.

Income Taxes

The total tax expenses were $(0.4) million and $(6.3) million for the year ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018 respectively.

 Acquisition Related Expenses

We had acquisition related expenditures of $0 and $0.3 million during the years ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively. These expenses included legal, professional services, valuation and due diligence services and other acquisition related fees incurred in connection with our acquisitions. The decrease was due to the decline in acquisition related activities in the year ended December 31, 2019 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2018.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Our cash position was $0.4 million as of December 31, 2019, as compared to $1.4 million as of December 31, 2018.

Cash used for operating activities was $2.4 million during the years ended December 31, 2019 and $2.6 million during the year ended December 31, 2018.  We were able to control the level of cash used for operating activities from year to year through cost-cutting measures that reduced working capital requirements. Cash used in investing activities was $0.3 million during the year ended December 31, 2019. Cash provided by financing activities was $1.8 million during the year ended December 31, 2019 and was attributable to the exercise of series A warrants , issue of debentures and net bank borrowings.

Liquidity Concerns

As of December 31, 2019, we had negative working capital of $6.8 million and cash of $0.4 million. Our principal sources of cash have included bank borrowings, the private placement of shares and net bank borrowings. To increase revenues, our operating expenses are likely to continue to grow and, as a result, we will need to generate significant additional revenues to cover such expenses.

Our financial statements as of December 31, 2019 have been prepared under the assumption that we will continue as a going concern. Our ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon our ability to raise additional funding through the issuance of equity or debt securities, as well as to attain further operating efficiencies and, ultimately, to generate additional revenues. Our financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty. We can give no assurances that additional capital that we are able to obtain, if any, will be sufficient to meet our needs. The foregoing conditions raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

Available Credit Facility, Borrowings and Repayment of Debt

As of December 31, 2019, we had approximately $2.9 million in borrowings outstanding under our senior secured credit facility (the “Credit Facility”), which provided for up to $8 million in principal for revolving loans (the “Revolving Loans”) for general working capital purposes.

On January 23, 2019, certain subsidiaries of the Company, including Ameri100 Arizona LLC, Ameri100 Georgia, Inc., Ameri100 California, Inc. and Ameri and Partners, Inc., as borrowers (individually and collectively, “Borrower”) entered into a Loan and Security Agreement (the “Loan Agreement”), with North Mill Capital LLC, as lender (the “Lender”). The Loan Agreement has an initial term of two years from the closing date, with renewal thereafter if Lender, at its option, agrees in writing to extend the term for additional one year periods (the “Term”). The Loan Agreement is collateralized by a first-priority security interest in all of the assets of Borrower. In addition, (i) pursuant to a Corporate Guaranty entered into by the Company in favor of the Lender (the “Corporate Guaranty”), the Company has guaranteed the Borrower’s obligations under the Credit Facility and (ii) pursuant to a Security Agreement entered into between the Company and Lender (the “Security Agreement”), the Company granted a first-priority security interest in all of its assets to Lender.

The Borrowers received an initial advance on January 23, 2019 in an amount of approximately $2.85 million (the “Initial Advance”). Borrowings under the Credit Facility accrue interest at the prime rate (as designated by Wells Fargo Bank, National Association) plus one and three quarters percentage points (1.75%), but in no event shall the interest rate be less than seven and one-quarter percent (7.25%). Notwithstanding anything to the contrary contained in the Loan Documents, the minimum monthly interest payable by Borrower on the Advances (as defined in the Loan Agreement) in any month shall be calculated based on an average Daily Balance (as defined in the Loan Agreement) of Two Million Dollars ($2,000,000) for such month.  For the first year of the Term, Borrower shall pay to Lender a facility fee equal to $50,000, due in equal monthly installments, with additional facility fees due to Lender in the event borrowings exceed certain thresholds and with additional facility fees due and payable in later years or upon later milestones. In addition, Borrower shall pay to Lender a monthly fee (the “Servicing Fee”) in an amount equal to one-eighth percent (.125%) of the average Daily Balance (as defined in the Loan Agreement) during each month on or before the first day of each calendar month during the Term.

The Company used approximately $2.75 million of the Initial Advance to repay all of its outstanding obligations under the Credit Facility of Sterling National Bank. Upon payment, the Company’s obligations under the erstwhile credit facility were terminated.

Borrower also agreed to certain negative covenants in the Loan Agreement, including that they will not, without the prior written consent of Lender, enter into any extraordinary transactions, dispose of assets, merge, acquire, or consolidate with or into any other business organization or restructure.

If an Event of Default (as defined in the Loan Agreement) occurs, Lender may, among other things, (i) declare all obligations immediately due and payable in full; (ii) cease advancing money or extending credit to or for the benefit of Borrower; and/or (iii) terminate the Loan Agreement as to any future liability or obligation of Lender, without affecting Lender’s right to repayment of all obligations and Lender’s security interests.

In addition, we have an outstanding aggregate of $1.5 million in 5% Convertible Unsecured Debentures (the “Debentures”), which were issued to one of accredited investors. The Debentures bear interest at 5% per annum and are convertible at $2.70 per share.

Effective February 27, 2020, we entered into a note purchase and security agreement with an investor for the sale of a $1,000,000 secured promissory note, which accrues interest at rate of 7.25% and is due on August 31, 2020.

In addition, as of December 31, 2019, we have an outstanding aggregate of $1 million in 8% Convertible Unsecured Promissory Notes (the “2017 Notes”), which were issued to one of our accredited investor, including one of the Company’s then-directors, Dhruwa N. Rai, and David Luci, who became a director of the Company in February 2018. The 2017 Notes bear interest at 8% per annum and became due in March 2020. We have not repaid the 2017 Notes and do not currently have sufficient funds available to meet these obligations.

Future Sources of Liquidity
 
We expect our primary sources of cash to be customer collections and external financing. We also continue to work on cost reductions, and we have initiated steps to reduce our overhead to improve cash savings. We may raise additional capital through the sale of equity or debt securities or borrowings from financial institutions or third parties or a combination of the foregoing. Capital raised will be used to implement our business plan, grow current operations, make acquisitions or start new vertical businesses among some of the possible uses.
 
Accounts Receivable

Accounts receivable for the year ended December 31, 2019 were $6.4 million as compared to $7.9 million as on December 31, 2018 due to decrease in revenue.

Accounts Payable

Accounts payable for the year ended December 31, 2019 were $4.7 million as compared to $4.4 million as on December 31, 2018.

Foreign Currency Risk
 
Overall, we believe that we have limited currency risk resulting from movement in foreign currency exchange rates as most of our revenues are derived from customers located in North America.
 
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
 
We do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements.
 
Impact of Inflation
 
We do not believe that inflation had a significant impact on our results of operations for the periods presented. On an ongoing basis, we attempt to minimize any effects of inflation on our operating results by controlling operating costs and, whenever possible, seeking to ensure that billing rates reflect increases in costs due to inflation.
 
Critical Accounting Policies
 
Revenue Recognition. We recognize revenue in accordance with the Accounting Standard Codification 606 “Revenue Recognition.” Revenue is recognized when all of the following criteria are met: (1) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, (2) delivery has occurred or services have been rendered, (3) the seller’s price to buyer is fixed and determinable, and (4) collectability is reasonably assured. We recognize revenue from information technology services as the services are provided. Service revenues are recognized based on contracted hourly rates, as services are rendered or upon completion of specified contracted services and acceptance by the customer.
 
Stock-Based Compensation. Stock-based compensation expense for awards of equity instruments to employees and non-employee directors is determined based on the grant-date fair value of those awards. We recognize these compensation costs net of an estimated forfeiture rate over the requisite service period of the award. Forfeitures are estimated on the date of grant and revised if actual or expected forfeiture activity differs materially from original estimates.

Warrant Liability

The Company accounts for the warrants issued in July 2018 in accordance with the guidance on Accounting for Certain Financial Instruments with Characteristics of both Liabilities and Equity, which provides that the Company classifies the warrant instrument as a liability at its fair value and adjusts the instrument to fair value at each reporting period. This liability is subject to re-measurement at each balance sheet date until exercised, and any change in fair value is recognized in the Company’s statement of operations. The fair value of warrants issued by the Company in connection with private placements of securities has been estimated using the warrants quoted market price.

Impairment. Long-lived assets, which include property, plant and equipment, and certain other assets to be held and used by us, are reviewed when events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the assets may not be recoverable based on estimated future cash flows. If this assessment indicates that the carrying values will not be recoverable, as determined based on undiscounted cash flows over the remaining useful lives, an impairment loss is recognized based on the fair value of the asset.

Income Taxes. We provide for income taxes utilizing the asset and liability method of accounting. Under this method, deferred income taxes are recorded to reflect the tax consequences in future years of differences between the tax basis of assets and liabilities and their financial reporting amounts at each balance sheet date, based on enacted tax laws and statutory tax rates applicable to the periods in which the differences are expected to affect taxable income. If it is determined that it is more likely than not that future tax benefits associated with a deferred income tax asset will not be realized, a valuation allowance is provided. The effect on deferred income tax assets and liabilities of a change in the tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. Tax benefits earned on employee stock awards in excess of recorded stock-based compensation expense are credited to additional paid-in capital. Our provision for income taxes also includes the impact of provisions established for uncertain income tax positions, as well as the related interest.

Accounts Receivable. We extend credit to clients based upon management’s assessment of their credit-worthiness on an unsecured basis. We provide an allowance for uncollectible accounts based on historical experience and management evaluation of trend analysis. We include any balances that are determined to be uncollectible in allowance for doubtful accounts.

Business Combination. We account for business combinations using the acquisition method, which requires the identification of the acquirer, the determination of the acquisition date and the allocation of the purchase price paid by the acquirer to the identifiable tangible and intangible assets acquired, the liabilities assumed, including any contingent consideration and any non-controlling interest in the acquiree at their acquisition date fair values. Goodwill represents the excess of the purchase price over the fair value of net assets acquired, including the amount assigned to identifiable intangible assets. Identifiable intangible assets with finite lives are amortized over their useful lives. Acquisition-related costs are expensed in the periods in which the costs are incurred. The results of operations of acquired businesses are included in our consolidated financial statements from the acquisition date.

Goodwill and Purchased Intangibles. We evaluate goodwill and purchased intangible assets for impairment at least annually, or as circumstances warrant. Goodwill is evaluated at the reporting unit level by comparing the fair value of the reporting unit with its carrying amount. For purchased intangible assets, if our annual qualitative assessment indicates possible impairment, we test the assets for impairment by comparing the fair value of such assets to their carrying value. In determining the fair value, we utilize various estimates and assumptions, including discount rates and projections of future cash flows. If an impairment is indicated, a write down to the implied fair value of goodwill or fair value of intangible asset is recorded.

Valuation of Contingent Earn-out Consideration. Acquisitions may include contingent consideration payments based on the achievement of certain future financial performance measures of the acquired company. Contingent consideration is required to be recognized at fair value as of the acquisition date. We estimate the fair value of these liabilities based on financial projections of the acquired companies and estimated probabilities of achievement. We believe our estimates and assumptions are reasonable, however, there is significant judgment involved. We evaluate, on a routine, periodic basis, the estimated fair value of the contingent consideration and changes in estimated fair value, subsequent to the initial fair value estimate at the time of the acquisition, will be reflected in income or expense in the consolidated statements of operations. Changes in the fair value of contingent consideration obligations may result from changes in discount periods and rates, changes in the timing and amount of revenue and/or earnings estimates and changes in probability assumptions with respect to the likelihood of achieving the various earn-out criteria. Any changes in the estimated fair value of contingent consideration may have a material impact on our operating results.
 
Foreign Currency Translation

The Company translates the foreign currency financial statements into U.S. Dollars using the year or reporting period end or average exchange rates in accordance with the requirements of ASC 830, Foreign Currency Matters. Assets and liabilities are translated at exchange rates as of the balance sheet date. Revenues and expenses are translated at average rates in effect for the periods presented. The cumulative translation adjustment is included in the accumulated other comprehensive gain (loss) within stockholders’ equity (deficit).
 
Recent Accounting Pronouncements
 

a.

In August 2018, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (the “FASB”) issued ASU No. 2018-13, “Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820), Disclosure Framework – Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement”. This ASU removed the following disclosure requirements: (1) the amount of and reasons for transfers between Level 1 and Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy; (2) the policy for timing of transfers between levels; and (3) the valuation processes for Level 3 fair value measurements. Additionally, this update added the following disclosure requirements: (1) the changes in unrealized gains and losses for the period included in other comprehensive income and loss for recurring Level 3 fair value measurements held at the end of the reporting period; (2) the range and weighted average of significant unobservable inputs used to develop Level 3 fair value measurements. For certain unobservable inputs, an entity may disclose other quantitative information (such as the median or arithmetic average) in lieu of the weighted average if the entity determines that other quantitative information would be a more reasonable and rational method to reflect the distribution of unobservable inputs used to develop Level 3 fair value measurements. ASU No. 2018-13 will be effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019 with early adoption permitted.

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-13, “Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments”. This ASU requires that credit losses be reported using an expected losses model rather than the incurred losses model that is currently used, and establishes additional disclosures related to credit risks. For available-for-sale debt securities with unrealized losses, this standard now requires allowances to be recorded instead of reducing the amortized cost of the investment. ASU 2016-13 limits the amount of credit losses to be recognized for available-for-sale debt securities to the amount by which carrying value exceeds fair value and requires the reversal of previously recognized credit losses if fair value increases. ASU 2016-13 will be effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019 with early adoption permitted, and requires adoption using a modified retrospective approach, with certain exceptions. Based on the composition of the Company’s investment portfolio as of September 30, 2019, current market conditions and historical credit loss activity, the adoption of this standard is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements. Additionally, for trade receivables, due to their short duration and the credit profile of the Company’s customers, the effect of transitioning from the incurred losses model to the expected losses model is not expected to be material.

New Standards to Be Implemented

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, “Leases (Topic 842)”. This new standard replaces the existing guidance on leases and requires the lessee to recognize a right-of-use asset and a lease liability for all leases with lease terms equal to or greater than twelve months. For finance leases, the lessee would recognize interest expense and amortization of the right-of-use asset, and for operating leases, the lessee would recognize total lease expense on a straight-line basis. This standard is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning on or after December 15, 2018. Upon adoption, entities will be required to use a modified retrospective transition which provides for certain practical expedients. Entities are required to apply the new standard at the beginning of the earliest comparative period presented. Early adoption of this new standard is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the effect this new standard will have on its consolidated financial statements and related disclosures. The Company does not expect the requirement to recognize a right-of-use asset and a lease liability for operating leases to have a material impact on the presentation of its consolidated statements of financial position.

On November 17, 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Restricted Cash, which is intended to reduce diversity in the presentation of restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents in the statement of cash flows. This new standard requires that restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents be included as components of total cash and cash equivalents as presented on the statement of cash flows. As a result, entities will no longer present transfers between cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents in the statement of cash flows. ASU 2016-18 is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017 including interim periods within those fiscal years, but earlier adoption is permitted.  The Company does not believe the adoption of this new standard will have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-04, simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment. Under this new standard, goodwill impairment would be measured as the amount by which a reporting unit’s carrying value exceeds its fair value, not to exceed the carrying value of goodwill. This ASU eliminates existing guidance that requires an entity to determine goodwill impairment by calculating the implied fair value of goodwill by hypothetically assigning the fair value of a reporting unit to all of its assets and liabilities as if that reporting unit had been acquired in a business combination. This update is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within those periods. Early adoption is permitted for interim or annual goodwill impairment test performed on testing dates after January 1, 2017. Based on the Company’s preliminary assessment of the foregoing update, it does not anticipate such update will have a material impact its financial statements.

Standards Implemented

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments (ASU 2016-15), which clarifies how companies present and classify certain cash receipts and cash payments in the statement of cash flows. The guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those fiscal years. The company has implemented the above standard effective this quarter and has made the respective disclosures in Statement of Cash Flow.

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (the “FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2014-09, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606),” which supersedes the revenue recognition requirements in “Revenue Recognition (Topic 605).” This ASU requires an entity to recognize revenue when goods are transferred or services are provided to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled to in exchange for those goods or services. This ASU also requires disclosures enabling users of financial statements to understand the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from contracts with customers. In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-14, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), deferral of the Effective Date.” With the issuance of ASU 2015-14, the new revenue guidance ASU 2014-09 will be effective for annual periods, and interim periods within those annual periods, beginning after December 15, 2018, using one of two prescribed retrospective methods. In April 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-10, “Revenue from Contracts with Customer (Topic 606), Identifying Performance Obligations and Licensing.” The guidance is applicable from the date of applicability of ASU 2014-09. This ASU finalizes the amendments to the guidance on the new revenue standard on the identification of performance obligations and accounting for licenses of intellectual property. In December 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-20, “Technical Corrections and Improvements (Topic 606)” which is applicable from the date of applicability of ASU 2014-09. This guidance provides optional exemptions from the disclosure requirement for remaining performance obligations for specific situations in which an entity need not estimate variable consideration to recognize revenue. In May 2016, FASB issued ASU No. 2016-12, “Narrow-Scope Improvements and Practical Expedients”. This amendment clarified certain aspects of Topic 606 and will be applicable from the date of applicability of ASU 2014-09. The company has implemented the above standard.
 
ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
 
Not applicable.

ITEM 8.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
 
The response to this Item is submitted as a separate section of this report beginning on page F-1.

ITEM 9.  CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE
 
None.

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
 
Management’s Report on Disclosure Controls and Procedures
 
We maintain disclosure controls and procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, to allow for timely decisions regarding required disclosure. In designing and evaluating our disclosure controls and procedures, our management recognizes that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving the desired control objectives, and our management is required to apply its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures. Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Therefore, even those systems determined to be effective can provide only reasonable assurance with respect to financial statement preparation and presentation. Projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
 
As required by Rule 13a-15 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as of the end of the period covered by this annual report, being December 31, 2019, we have carried out an evaluation of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our Company’s disclosure controls and procedures. This evaluation was carried out under the supervision and with the participation of our Company’s management, including our Company’s Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer. Based upon that evaluation, our company’s Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that our company’s disclosure controls and procedures are not yet effective as of the end of the period covered by this report as noted below in management’s report on internal control over financial reporting. This is largely due to the fact that we have in the past acquired a number of privately held companies as part of our growth strategy and our control procedures over all acquired subsidiaries have taken time to implement.  We are working to improve and harmonize our financial reporting controls and procedures across all of our companies.
 
Disclosure controls and procedures and other procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed or submitted under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time period specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is accumulated and communicated to management including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.
 
Our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, does not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures or our internal controls will prevent all error or fraud. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Due to the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, have been detected.
 
Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Our management has assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2019, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Our internal control over financial reporting includes maintaining records that in reasonable detail accurately and fairly reflect our transactions and dispositions of our assets; providing reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary for preparation of our financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles; providing reasonable assurance that receipts and expenditures are made in accordance with authorizations of management and our directors; and providing reasonable assurance that unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of our assets that could have a material effect on our financial statements would be prevented or detected on a timely basis. As a result of this assessment, our management concluded that, as of December 31, 2019, our internal control over financial reporting was not yet effective in providing reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.  This is largely due to the fact that we have in the past acquired a number of privately held companies as part of our growth strategy and our control procedures over all acquired subsidiaries have taken time to implement.  We are working to improve and harmonize our financial reporting controls and procedures across all of our companies.

This annual report does not include an attestation report of our independent auditors regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management’s report was not subject to attestation by our independent auditors pursuant to rules of the SEC that permit our company to provide only management’s report in this annual report.
 
Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting
 
There was no change in our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in the Exchange Act, Rules 13a-15(f)) that occurred during the quarter ended December 31, 2019 that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION
 
None.

PART III
 
ITEM 10.  DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
 
The names and ages of our current executive officers and directors, and their positions with us, are as follows:

Name
Age
Position
Srinidhi “Dev” Devanur
54
Executive Chairman of the Board
Brent Kelton
49
Chief Executive Officer
Barry Kostiner
49
Chief Financial Officer
Dimitrios J. Angelis
50
Director
Thoranath Sukumaran
68
Director
Carmo Martella
53
Director

Srinidhi “Dev” Devanur became our Executive Vice Chairman and a member of our Board in May 2015. He became our Executive Chairman in December 2018. Srinidhi “Dev” Devanur is the founder of Ameri and Partners on the representative on the Board. He is a seasoned technology entrepreneur who has more than 20 years of experience in the IT services industry with a specialization in sales and resource management. He has built businesses from ground up and has successfully executed acquisitions, mergers and corporate investments. He has managed the sales function by working closely with various Fortune 500 customers in the United States and India to sell software solutions, support and staff augmentation related services. Srinidhi “Dev” Devanur co-founded Ivega Company in 1997, an international niche IT consulting company with special focus on financial services which merged with TCG in 2004, creating a 1,000+ person focused differentiator in the IT consulting space. Following this, he founded SaintLife Bio-pharma Pvt. Ltd., which was acquired by a Nasdaq listed company. Srinidhi “Dev” Devanur has a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the University of Bangalore, India and has also attended a Certificate program in Strategic Sales Management at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.

Brent Kelton became our Chief Executive Officer in December 2017. Mr. Kelton previously joined the Company in March 2017 through its acquisition of Ameri100 California Inc. (formerly ATCG Technology Solutions, Inc. (ATCG)) as a wholly-owned operating subsidiary of the Company, which Mr. Kelton led. Prior to joining Ameri, he previously led Fujitsu’s North American SAP business unit and KPIT Technologies Limited’s SAP strategic business unit, at which he grew KPIT to over 1,600 employees globally with annual revenues of $125 million. Mr. Kelton has also held leadership positions at several technology service providers focused on implementation services and support of SAP solutions. Mr. Kelton holds a bachelor of science degree in business analysis and management information systems from Texas A&M University and has completed executive education courses at the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Barry Kostiner became our Chief Financial Officer in October 2018. Prior to joining Ameri, Mr. Kostiner served as an advisor on capital markets and business development to LinKay Technologies, Inc. a company specializing in artificial intelligence technologies, which Mr. Kostiner joined in April 2017. From November 2017 to October 2018, Mr. Kostiner also served as a consultant on data analytics and mergers and acquisition strategy to Cypress Skilled Nursing, a skilled nursing services company. From January 2011 to October 2018, Mr. Kostiner served as a principal at Three Pillars Energy, a consulting company. From June 2013 to March 2015, he was a portfolio manager with Platinum Management, a multi-strategy hedge fund. Mr. Kostiner holds a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering and a master of science degree in operations research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Dimitrios J. Angelis became a member of our Board in May 2015. Mr. Angelis currently works with the Life Sciences Law Group, providing outside General Counsel advice to pharmaceutical, medical device and biologics companies. He is also a director of Digirad Inc. (NASDAQ: DRAD) a leader in the field of nuclear gamma cameras for use in cardiology, women’s health, pediatric and other imaging and neuropathy diagnostics applications. Previously, he has served as the Chief Executive Officer of OTI America Inc., the U.S.-based subsidiary of publicly-held On Track Innovations Ltd., a pioneer of cashless payment technology, since December 2013. His role was to oversee and monetize the extensive patent portfolio of over 100 U.S. and international patents. Mr. Angelis has served as a director of On Track Innovations since December 2012, and served as its Chairman of the Board from April 2013 until February 2015. From October 2012 until December 2013, Mr. Angelis served as the General Counsel of Wockhardt Pharmaceuticals Inc., an international biologics and pharmaceutical company. From October 2008 to October 2012, Mr. Angelis was a senior counsel at Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories, Ltd., a publicly-traded pharmaceutical company, and during 2008 he was the Chief Legal Officer and Corporate Secretary of Osteotech, Inc., a publicly-traded medical device company, with responsibility for managing the patent portfolio of approximately 42 patents. Prior to that, Mr. Angelis worked in the pharmaceutical industry in various corporate, strategic and legal roles. In addition, he worked for McKinsey & Company, Merrill Lynch and the Japanese government more than five years ago. He began his legal career as a transactional associate with the New York office of the law firm Mayer Brown. Mr. Angelis holds a B.A. degree in Philosophy and English from Boston College, an M.A. in Behavioral Science and Negotiation from California State University and a J.D. from New York University School of Law. The Board believes that Mr. Angelis’ substantial experience as an accomplished attorney, negotiator and general counsel to public and private companies in the healthcare field will enable him to bring a wealth of strategic, legal and business acumen to the Board, well qualifying him to serve as a director.

Thoranath Sukumaran became a member of our Board in December 2018. Mr. Sukumaran has been the President of Oakwood Strategy Consulting, Inc, a consulting firm based in New Jersey, focusing on providing strategy and advisory services to middle market companies since 2012. He has held no directorships over the past five years. Prior to Oakwood, Mr. Sukumaran was a Senior Vice President at Morgan Stanley in New York. Prior to that, he had held senior positions in wealth management and corporate banking with Smith Barney and American Express Bank. Mr. Sukumaran has a Master’s Degree in Economics from Kerala University in India. Mr. Sukumaran is active in numerous Indo-US trade associations and is the past President of the US-India American Chamber of Commerce, a trade group focusing on Indo-US cross border trade and investment activities of middle market companies.

Carmo Martella became a member of our Board in April 2019. Mr. Martella previously served as Chief Technology Officer of MedData from January 2017 through January 2019. Prior to MedData, he was a Senior Director for Amtrak from August 2014 through January 2017. Prior to that he held positions at Broto Legal (2013-2014) and IBM (1999-2013). He received his B.A. in education from Illinois College and his MA-ABD from the University of Illinois at Springfield.

All directors hold office until the expiration of their term at each year’s annual meeting of stockholders and the election and qualification of their successors. Officers serve at the discretion of the Board.

Code of Business Conduct and Ethics

We have established a Code of Ethics and Business Conduct and a Code of Ethics for our Chief Executive Officer and Senior Financial Officers (the “Ethics Codes”) that apply to our officers, directors, employees and contractors. The Ethics Codes contain general guidelines for conducting our business consistent with the highest standards of business ethics and compliance with applicable law, and is intended to qualify as “codes of ethics” within the meaning of Section 406 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and Item 406 of Regulation S-K. Day-to-day compliance with the Ethics Codes is overseen by the Company compliance officer appointed by our Board of Directors. If we make any amendments to the Ethics Codes or grant any waiver from a provision of the Ethics Codes to any director or executive officer, we will promptly disclose the nature of the amendment or waiver on the “Investors” section of the Company’s website (www.ameri100.com) under the tab “Corporate Governance.”

Corporate Governance

Our Board of Directors currently has three standing committees. The current members of our committees are identified below:

   
Committees
 
Director
 
Audit
   
Compensation
   
Nominations and
Corporate
Governance
 
                   
Dimitrios J. Angelis
    X

    X

    X

Thoranath Sukumaran
    X

    X

       
Carmo Martella
    X

   
         
Srinidhi “Dev” Devanur
                       

Audit Committee. The Audit Committee consists of Messrs. Angelis, Sukumaran and Martella. All members of the Audit Committee (i) are independent directors (as currently defined in Rule 5605(a)(2) of the NASDAQ listing rules); (ii) meet the criteria for independence set forth in Rule 10A-3(b)(1) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”); (iii) have not participated in the preparation of the financial statements of the Company or any current subsidiary of the Company at any time during the past three years; and (iv) are able to read and understand fundamental financial statements. Mr. Angelis qualifies as an “Audit Committee financial expert” as defined in the rules and regulations established by the SEC. The Audit Committee is governed by a written charter approved by our Board of Directors. The functions of the Audit Committee include, among other things:


Meeting with our management periodically to consider the adequacy of our internal controls and the objectivity of our financial reporting;


Meeting with our independent registered public accounting firm and with internal financial personnel regarding the adequacy of our internal controls and the objectivity of our financial reporting;


Recommending to our Board of Directors the engagement of our independent registered public accounting firm;


Reviewing our quarterly and audited consolidated financial statements and reports and discussing the statements and reports with our management, including any significant adjustments, management judgments and estimates, new accounting policies and disagreements with management; and


Reviewing our financial plans and reporting recommendations to our full Board of Directors for approval and to authorize action.

Both our independent registered public accounting firm and internal financial personnel regularly meet privately with our Audit Committee and have unrestricted access to the Audit Committee.

Communications with our Board of Directors

Any stockholder may send correspondence to our Board of Directors c/o Corporate Secretary, Ameri Holdings, Inc., 5000 Research Court, Suite 750, Suwanee, Georgia, 30024. Our Corporate Secretary will review all correspondence addressed to our Board of Directors, or any individual director, and forward all such communications to our Board of Directors or the appropriate director prior to the next regularly scheduled meeting of our Board of Directors following the receipt of the communication, unless the corporate secretary decides the communication is more suitably directed to Company management and forwards the communication to Company management. Our Corporate Secretary will summarize all stockholder correspondence directed to our Board of Directors that is not forwarded to our Board of Directors and will make such correspondence available to our Board of Directors for its review at the request of any member of our Board of Directors.

Family Relationships

There are no family relationships among our directors and executive officers.

ITEM 11.  EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
 
Role and Authority of Compensation Committee

The Compensation Committee currently consists of Messrs. Angelis and Sukumaran. Messrs. Angelis and Sukumaran are each a “non-employee director” within the meaning of Rule 16b-3 under the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934 and an “outside director” within the meaning of Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code. Messrs. Angelis and Sukumaran and satisfy the independence requirements imposed by the NASDAQ Stock Market.

The Compensation Committee is responsible for discharging the responsibilities of the Board of Directors with respect to the compensation of our executive officers. The Compensation Committee recommends overall compensation of our executive officers to the Board of Directors. The Board of Directors approves all compensation of our executive officers. The Compensation Committee also periodically reviews director compensation.

The charter of the Compensation Committee permits the Compensation Committee to engage outside consultants and to consult with our human resources department when appropriate to assist in carrying out its responsibilities. Compensation consultants have not been engaged by the Company to recommend or assist in determining the amount or form of compensation for any current executive officers or directors of the Company.

The Committee may also obtain advice and assistance from internal or external legal, accounting, or other advisers selected by the Committee.

Elements of Executive Compensation

Our executive compensation consists of the following elements:


Base salary;


Annual Incentive Bonus;


Long-Term Incentives; and


Retirement benefits under a 401(k) plan and generally available benefit programs.

Base Salary. The base salary for each executive is initially established through negotiation at the time the executive is hired, taking into account his or her scope of responsibilities, qualifications, experience, prior salary, and competitive salary information within our industry. Year-to-year adjustments to each executive officer’s base salary are determined by an assessment of his or her sustained performance against individual goals, including leadership skills and the achievement of high ethical standards, the individual’s impact on our business and financial results, current salary in relation to the salary range designated for the job, experience, demonstrated potential for advancement, and an assessment against base salaries paid to executives for comparable jobs in the marketplace..

Annual Bonus. Annual bonus payments under our executive employment agreements are based on the discretion of our Board of Directors. We believe that such bonuses provide our executives with an incentive to achieve goals that are aligned with our stockholders’ interests, with the achievement of such goals being measurable in terms of revenue and income or other financial objectives. An executive officer’s failure to achieve measurable performance goals can affect his or her bonus amount. We believe that offering significant potential income in the form of bonuses allows us to attract and retain executives and to align their interests with those of our stockholders.

Long-Term Incentives. The Compensation Committee has the ability to grant equity instruments to our executives under our 2015 Equity Incentive Award Plan. The Compensation Committee has the ability to issue a variety of instruments, but equity grants will typically be in the form of stock options and restricted stock units. We believe that our executive compensation program must include long-term incentives such as stock options and restricted stock units if we wish to hire and retain high-level executive talent. We also believe that stock options and restricted stock units help to provide a balance to the overall executive compensation program as base salary and bonus awards focus only on short-term compensation. In addition, the vesting period of stock options and restricted stock units encourages executive retention and the preservation of stockholder value. Finally, we believe that aligning at least a portion of restricted stock units vesting provisions to financial performance measures further aligns executive compensation to stockholder value; if performance targets are not achieved, then the awards do not vest. We base the number of equity units granted on the type and responsibility level of the executive’s position, the executive’s performance in the prior year and the executive’s potential for continued sustained contributions to our long-term success and the long-term interests of our stockholders.

401(k) and Other Benefits. During 2019, our executive officers were eligible to receive certain benefits generally available to all our employees on the same terms, including medical, dental and vision insurance, long-term and short-term disability insurance, life and accidental death and dismemberment insurance, health and dependent care flexible spending accounts, educational and employee assistance, paid-time-off, and certain other benefits. During 2015, we also maintained a tax-qualified 401(k) Plan, which provides for broad-based employee participation. During 2019, under the 401(k) Plan, at the Company’s discretion, all employees were eligible to receive matching contributions from Ameri of (i) 100% of their first 3% of employee contributions and (ii) 50% of the next 2% of employee contributions up to an aggregate maximum of $10,600 per employee, per year, subject to vesting provisions.

Compensation Risk Assessment. In establishing and reviewing our overall compensation program, the Compensation Committee considers whether the program and its various elements encourage or motivate our executives or other employees to take excessive risks. We believe that our compensation program and its elements are designed to encourage our employees to act in the long-term best interests of the Company and are not reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on our business.

The Impact of Tax and Accounting Treatments on Elements of Compensation

We have elected to award non-qualified stock options instead of incentive stock options to all our employees, directors and consultants to allow the corporation to take advantage of the more favorable tax advantages associated with non-qualified stock options.

Internal Revenue Code Section 162(m) precludes us from deducting compensation in excess of $1.0 million for certain employees. To date, we have not exceeded the $1.0 million limit for those employees, and the Compensation Committee has not defined a policy that all compensation must be deductible. However, since stock-based awards comprise a significant portion of total compensation, the Compensation Committee has taken appropriate steps to preserve deductibility for such awards in the future, when appropriate.

Summary Compensation Table

The following table provides information regarding the compensation earned during the years ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018 by our Chief Executive Officer and our two other most highly compensated executive officers (our “Named Executive Officers”) who were employed by us during such years.

Name &
Principal
Transition
Period
or Fiscal
Year
 
Salary
   
Bonus
   
Stock
Awards
   
Option
Awards
   
Non-Equity
Incentive
Plan
Compensation
   
Non-Qualified
Deferred
Compensation
Earnings
   
All Other
Compensation
   
Total
 
Position
Ended
 
($)
   
($)
   
($)
   
($)
   
($)
   
($)
   
($)
   
($)
 
Brent
12/31/2019
   
250,000
     
-
     
     
     
     
     
     
250,000
 
Kelton
12/31/2018
   
250,000
     
100,000
     
     
     
     
     
     
350,000
 
Chief
                                                                 
Executive
                                                                 
Officer
                                                                 
                                                                   
Barry
12/31/2019
   
200,000
     
-
     
     
     
     
     
     
200,000
 
Kostiner
12/31/2018
   
50,000
     
10,000
     
     
     
     
     
     
60,000
 
Chief
                                                                 
Financial
                                                                 
Officer
                                                                 
Srinidhi (Dev)
12/31/2019
   
250,000
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
250,000
 
Devanur
12/31/2018
   
250,000
     
50,000
     
     
     
     
     
     
300,000
 
Executive
                                                                 
Chairman
                                                                 

Grants of Plan-Based Awards

During the year ended 2019 the company did not grant any  options to purchase shares of our common stock to employees and directors.

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End

As of December 31, 2019, there were no outstanding equity incentive awards held by any of our named executive officers pursuant to our equity incentive plans.

Employment Agreements; Potential Payments Upon Termination or Change of Control Under Employment Agreements

In connection with the appointment of Mr. Devanur as Executive Chairman, the Company and Mr. Devanur entered into an amended and restated employment agreement (the “Employment Agreement”), pursuant to which the Company agreed to pay Mr. Devanur a base salary of $250,000 per year. The term of the Employment Agreement is initially for three years. Additionally, Mr. Devanur shall be eligible to earn a bonus of up to 100% of his base salary upon the achievement of pre-established performance targets set by the Board.

On October 17, 2018, pursuant to an employment letter (the “Employment Letter”), Mr. Kostiner will receive an annual base salary of $200,000 and be eligible for bonus payments of up to an aggregate of $50,000 as determined by the Board of Directors, based on meeting and exceeding mutually agreed upon annual performance goals. Additionally, Mr. Kostiner received an option to purchase 6,000 shares of common stock with an exercise price based on the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the grant date and expiring on the fifth anniversary of the grant date. The option vests in thirds on each of the first through third anniversaries of October 17, 2018, the grant date.

Mr. Kostiner’s Employment Letter has a term lasting through December 31, 2019, subject to automatic one-year renewals thereafter, unless the Company or Mr. Kostiner delivers written notice of non-renewal to the other party at least 60 days prior to the relevant renewal date. In addition, the Employment Letter is subject to early termination by him or the Company in accordance with the terms of the Employment Letter. The Employment Letter also contains covenants restricting Mr. Kostiner from soliciting the Company’s employees or customers for a period of two years after the termination of Mr. Kostiner’s employment with the Company, and prohibiting him from disclosure of confidential information regarding the Company at any time.

Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans

On April 20, 2015, our Board and the holder of a majority of our outstanding shares of common stock approved the adoption of our 2015 Equity Incentive Award Plan (the “Plan”) and a grant of discretionary authority to the executive officers to implement and administer the Plan. The Plan allows for the issuance of up to 160,000 shares of our common stock for award grants (all of which can be incentive stock options). The Plan provides equity-based compensation through the grant of cash-based awards, nonqualified stock options, incentive stock options, stock appreciation rights, restricted stock, restricted stock units, performance shares, performance units and other stock-based awards. As of December 31, 2019, no restricted stock units and options for the purchase of shares of our common stock had been granted. The Board of Directors adopted the Plan to provide a means by which our employees, directors, officers and consultants may be granted an opportunity to purchase our common stock, to assist in retaining the services of such persons, to secure and retain the services of persons capable of filling such positions and to provide incentives for such persons to exert maximum efforts for our success.

Under Plan, our board of directors determines the exercise price to be paid for the shares, the period within which each option may be exercised, and the terms and conditions of each option. The exercise price of the incentive and non-qualified stock options may not be less than 100% of the fair market value per share of our common stock on the grant date. If an individual owns stock representing more than 10% of the outstanding shares, the price of each share of an incentive stock option must be equal to or exceed 110% of fair market value.

The following table sets forth information regarding our equity compensation plans as of December 31, 2019:

Plan Category
 
Number of securities to
be issued upon exercise
of outstanding options,
warrants and rights
   
Weighted-average
exercise price of
outstanding options,
warrants and rights
   
Number of securities remaining
available for future issuance under
equity compensation plans (excluding
securities reflected in column (a))
 
   
(a)
   
(b)
   
(c)
 
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders
   
109,938
   
$
29.25
     
42,114
 
Warrants and options issued outside of our equity compensation Plan
                   
 
Total
   
109,938
   
$
29.25
     
42,114
 

DIRECTOR COMPENSATION

Directors are expected to timely and fully participate in all regular and special board meetings, and all meetings of committees that they serve on.

The following table sets forth the cash compensation, as well as certain other compensation earned by each person who served as a director of our company, during the year ended December 31, 2019:

Name
 
Fees
Earned
or Paid
in Cash
   
Stock
Awards
   
RSU & Option
Awards
   
All Other
Compensation
   
Total
 
   
($)
   
($)
   
($)
   
($)
   
($)
 
                               
Srinidhi “Dev” Devanur
         
-
     
-
     
-
     
-
 
Dimitrios J. Angelis
   
72,000
     
-
                     
72,000
 
Carmo Martella
   
64,000
     
-
                     
64,000
 
James Shad*
   
17,000
     
-
                     
17,000
 
David Luci**
   
14,000
     
-
                     
14,000
 
Thoranath Sukumaran
   
70,000
     
-
                     
70,000
 
TOTAL
   
237,000
     
-
                     
237,000
 

*Resigned from Board  effective  February 11, 2019.
** Resigned from Board  effective  March 28, 2019.

ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS, MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS
 
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management

The following table sets forth information as of March 11, 2020 regarding the beneficial ownership of our common stock by (i) each person we know to be the beneficial owner of 5% or more of our common stock, (ii) each of our current executive officers, (iii) each of our directors, and (iv) all of our current executive officers and directors as a group. Information with respect to beneficial ownership has been furnished by each director, executive officer or 5% or more stockholder, as the case may be. The address for all executive officers and directors is c/o Ameri Holdings, Inc., 5000 Research Court, Suite 750, Suwanee, Georgia, 30024.

Percentage of beneficial ownership in the table below is calculated based on 3,246,705 shares of common stock outstanding as of March 11, 2020. Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules of the SEC, which generally attribute beneficial ownership of securities to persons who possess sole or shared voting power or investment power with respect to those securities and includes shares of our common stock issuable pursuant to the exercise of stock options, warrants or other securities that are immediately exercisable or convertible or exercisable or convertible within 60 days of March 11, 2020. Unless otherwise indicated, the persons or entities identified in this table have sole voting and investment power with respect to all shares shown as beneficially owned by them.

Name(1)
 
Number of Shares
Beneficially Owned
   
Percentage of
Shares
Beneficially
Owned
 
             
Executive Officers and Directors:
           
             
Srinidhi “Dev” Devanur
   
251,055
     
7.73
%
Brent Kelton
   
43,386
     
1.34
%
Barry Kostiner
   
-
     
-
 
Dimitrios J. Angelis 
   
1,642
     
*
 
Thoranath Sukumaran
   
-
     
-
 
Carmo Martella
   
-
     
-
 
All executive officers and directors as a group (6 persons)
   
296,083
     
9.12
%
*
Less than one percent of outstanding shares.

(1)
Unless otherwise indicated, the address of each person or entity is c/o AMERI Holdings, Inc., 5000 Research Court, Suite 750, Suwanee, Georgia, 30024.

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE
 
The following represent transactions or series of similar transactions, since January 1, 2018 to which we have been a participant in which the amount involved exceeded or will exceed the lesser of (a) $120,000 or (b) 1% of our average total assets at year end for the last two completed fiscal years, and in which any of our director, executive officer, holder of more than 5% of our capital stock, promotor or certain control person or any member of their immediate family had or will have a direct or indirect material interest.

Director Independence

Our Board of Directors has determined that all directors, except for Srinidhi Devanur, our Executive Chairman, are independent directors (as currently defined in Rule 5605(a)(2) of the NASDAQ listing rules). In determining the independence of our directors, the Board of Directors considered all transactions in which the Company and any director had any interest, including those discussed under “Related Transactions.”

ITEM 14.  PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANTS FEES AND SERVICES
 
In May 2015, the Board selected Ram Associates as its independent accountant to audit the registrant’s financial statements. Since they were retained, there have been (1) no disagreements between us and Ram Associates on any matters of accounting principle or practices, financial statement disclosure, or auditing scope or procedures and (2) no reportable events within the meaning set forth in Item 304(a)(1)(v) of Regulation S-K. Ram Associates has not issued any reports on our financial statements during the previous two fiscal years that contained any adverse opinion or a disclaimer of opinion or were qualified or modified as to uncertainty, audit scope or accounting principle. In connection with the audit of the 2015 financial statements, we entered into an engagement agreement with Ram Associates which sets forth the terms by which Ram Associates has performed audit and related professional services for us.

The following table sets forth the aggregate accounting fees paid by us for the year ended December 31, 2019 and the year ended December 31, 2018. The below fees were paid to the firm Ram Associates. All non-audit related services in the table were pre-approved and/or ratified by the Audit Committee of our Board of Directors.

Type of Fees
 
Year Ended
December 31,
2019
   
Year Ended
December
31,
2018
 
Audit Fees
 
$
85,000
   
$
85,000
 
Audit Related Fees
   
     
 
Tax Fees
   
11,500
     
 
All Other Fees
   
     
-
 
Total
 
$
96,500
   
$
85,000
 

Types of Fees Explanation

Audit Fees. Audit fees were incurred for accounting services rendered for the audit of our consolidated financial statements for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 and reviews of quarterly consolidated financial statements.

Tax Fees. Tax fees were incurred for Preparation and filing of consolidated state and federal tax returns.

Audit Committee Pre-Approval of Services by Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

Section 10A(i)(1) of the Exchange Act and related SEC rules require that all auditing and permissible non-audit services to be performed by our principal accountants be approved in advance by the Audit Committee of the Board. Pursuant to Section 10A(i)(3) of the Exchange Act and related SEC rules, the Audit Committee has established procedures by which the Chairman of the Audit Committee may pre-approve such services provided that the pre-approval is detailed as to the particular service or category of services to be rendered and the Chairman reports the details of the services to the full Audit Committee at its next regularly scheduled meeting.

The audit committee has considered the services provided by RAM Associates as disclosed above in the captions “audit fees” and “all other fees” and has concluded that such services are compatible with the independence of RAM Associates as our principal accountant.

Our Board has considered the nature and amount of fees billed by our independent auditors and believes that the provision of services for activities unrelated to the audit is compatible with maintaining our independent auditors’ independence.

PART IV
 
ITEM 15.  EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES


Exhibit
Description
   
Share Purchase Agreement, dated as of November 20, 2015, by and among Ameri Holdings, Inc., Bellsoft, Inc., and all of the shareholders of Bellsoft (filed as Exhibit 2.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on November 23, 2015 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Agreement of Merger and Plan of Reorganization, dated as of July 22, 2016, by and among Ameri Holdings, Inc., Virtuoso Acquisition Inc., Ameri100 Virtuoso Inc., Virtuoso, L.L.C. and the sole member of Virtuoso, L.L.C. (filed as Exhibit 2.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on July 27, 2016 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Membership Interest Purchase Agreement, dated as of July 29, 2016, by and among Ameri Holdings, Inc., DC&M Partners, L.L.C., all of the members of DC&M Partners, L.L.C., Giri Devanur and Srinidhi “Dev” Devanur (filed as Exhibit 2.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on August 1, 2016 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Share Purchase Agreement, dated as of March 10, 2017, by and among Ameri Holdings, Inc., ATCG Technology Solutions, Inc., all of the stockholders of ATCG Technology Solutions, Inc., and the stockholders’ representative (filed as Exhibit 2.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on March 13, 2017 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Share Purchase Agreement, dated January 10, 2020, by and between AMERI Holdings, Inc. and Ameri100, Inc.* (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 2.1 to the Company’s current report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on January 13, 2020)
   
Amalgamation Agreement, dated January 10, 2020, by and between AMERI Holdings, Inc., Jay Pharma Merger Sub, Inc., Jay Pharma Inc., Jay Pharma ExchangeCo., Inc. and Barry Kostiner.* (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 2.2 to the Company’s current report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on January 13, 2020)
   
Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation of Ameri Holdings, Inc. (filed as Exhibit 3.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on June 23, 2016 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Certificate of Amendment of Certificate of Incorporation, dated November 21, 2019 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s current report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on November 22, 2019)
   
Amended and Restated Certificate of Designation of Rights and Preferences of 9.00% Series A Cumulative Preferred Stock (filed as Exhibit 3.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on August 17, 2018 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Amended and Restated Bylaws of Ameri Holdings, Inc. (filed as Exhibit 3.2 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on June 23, 2016 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Warrant Agent Agreement dated November 17, 2017 between Ameri Holdings, Inc. and Corporate Stock Transfer, Inc. (includes form of Warrant) (filed as Exhibit 4.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on November 17, 2017 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Form of Certificate Representing Shares of Common Stock of Registrant (filed as Exhibit 4.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 filed with the SEC on December 17, 2015 and incorporated herein by reference).

Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant issued by Ameri Holdings, Inc. to Lone Star Value Investors, LP, dated May 26, 2015 (filed as Exhibit 4.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on June 1, 2015 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Common Stock Purchase Warrant, dated May 12, 2016, issued by Ameri Holdings, Inc. to Lone Star Value Investors, LP, dated May 12, 2016 (filed as Exhibit 4.3 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the SEC on May 16, 2016 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Description of Securities
   
Form of 8% Convertible Unsecured Promissory Note due March 2020 (filed as Exhibit 10.2 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on March 8, 2017 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Form of 6% Unsecured Promissory Note (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on March 13, 2017 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Form of Warrant issued in July 2018 Financing (filed as Exhibit 4.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on July 30, 2018 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Form of Placement Agent Warrant issued in July 2018 Financing (filed as Exhibit 4.2 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on July 30, 2018 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Warrant Agent Agreement dated August 16, 2018 between Ameri Holdings, Inc. and Corporate Stock Transfer, Inc. (includes form of Warrant) (filed as Exhibit 4.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on August 17, 2018 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Securities Purchase Agreement, dated as of May 26, 2015, by and between Ameri Holdings, Inc. and Lone Star Value Investors, LP. (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on June 1, 2015 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Form of Director Indemnification Agreement. (filed as Exhibit 10.6 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on June 1, 2015 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Form of Option Grant Letter. (filed as Exhibit 10.7 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on June 1, 2015 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
2015 Equity Incentive Award Plan. (filed as Exhibit 10.8 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on June 1, 2015 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Form of Restricted Stock Unit Agreement (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the SEC on November 23, 2015 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Exchange Agreement, dated as of December 30, 2016, between Ameri Holdings, Inc. and Lone Star Value Investors, LP (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on January 4, 2017 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Amendment to 6% Unsecured Promissory Note and Waiver Agreement, dated February 28, 2018, by and between Ameri Holdings, Inc. and Moneta Ventures Fund I, L.P. (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on March 2, 2018 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Amendment Agreement, dated as of June 22, 2018, by and between Ameri Holdings, Inc. and Lone Star Value Investors, LP. (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on June 26, 2018 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
First Amendment to the Ameri Holdings, Inc. 2015 Equity Incentive Award Plan. (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on August 17, 2018 and incorporated herein by reference).

Employment Letter, dated October 17, 2018, between Ameri and Partners Inc and Barry Kostiner (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on October 17, 2018 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Employment Agreement between Srinidhi “Dev” Devanur and the Company, effective December 11, 2018 (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on December 14, 2018 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Loan and Security Agreement, dated January 23, 2019, by and between (i) Ameri100 Arizona LLC, (ii) Ameri100 Georgia, Inc., (iii) Ameri100 California, Inc. and (iv) Ameri and Partners, Inc. and North Mill Capital LLC (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on January 25, 2019 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Revolving Credit Master Promissory Note, dated January 23, 2019 (filed as Exhibit 10.2 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on January 25, 2019 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Corporate Guaranty, dated January 23, 2019, by Ameri Holdings, Inc. in favor of North Mill Capital LLC (filed as Exhibit 10.3 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on January 25, 2019 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Security Agreement, dated January 23, 2019, by and between Ameri Holdings, Inc. and North Mill Capital LLC (filed as Exhibit 10.4 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on January 25, 2019 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Form of Guarantor Indemnification Agreement (filed as Exhibit 10.5 to Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on January 25, 2019 and incorporated herein by reference).
   
Form of Exchange Agreement (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s current report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on September 20, 2019)
   
Form of Securities Purchase Agreement (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s current report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on November 25, 2019)
   
Form of Convertible Debenture (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s current report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on November 25, 2019)
   
Form of Exchange Agreement, by and among AMERI Holdings, Inc., Ameri100, Inc. and each Converted Debt Holder* (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s current report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on January 13, 2020)
   
Note Purchase and Security Agreement (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s current report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on March 4, 2020)
   
Secured Promissory Note (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s current report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on March 4, 2020)
   
List of Subsidiaries.
   
Consent of Ram Associates, CPA.
   
Section 302 Certification of Principal Executive Officer
   
Section 302 Certification of Principal Financial and Accounting Officer
   
Section 906 Certification of Principal Executive Officer
   
Section 906 Certification of Principal Financial and Accounting Officer
   
101*
The following materials from Ameri Holdings, Inc.’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the twelve months ended December 31, 2017 are formatted in XBRL (eXtensible Business Reporting Language):  (i) the Consolidated Balance Sheets, (ii) the Consolidated Statements of Operations, (iii) the Consolidated Statement of Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit), (iv) the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flow, and (iv) Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.



*
Filed herewith.

**
In accordance with Item 601of Regulation S-K, this Exhibit is hereby furnished to the SEC as an accompanying document and is not deemed “filed” for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 or otherwise subject to the liabilities of that Section, nor shall it be deemed incorporated by reference into any filing under the Securities Act of 1933.

INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 
PAGE
CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF AMERI HOLDINGS, INC. AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018 AND FOR THE YEARS THEN ENDED
 
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
F-2
Consolidated Balance Sheets
F-3
Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss)
F-4
Consolidated Statement of Changes in Stockholders’ Equity From December 31, 2017 to December 31, 2019
F-5
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018
F-6
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
F-7

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

The Board of Directors and Stockholders
AMERI Holdings, Inc.
 
Opinion on the Financial Statements
 
We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Ameri Holdings, Inc. and subsidiaries (the Company) as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, and the related consolidated statements of operations, comprehensive income, stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended December 31, 2019, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the financial statements). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended December 31, 2019, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.
 
Basis for Opinion
 
These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.
 
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.
 
Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

Ram Associates

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2015.

Hamilton, NJ

March 25, 2020.

AMERI HOLDINGS, INC.
 CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

   
December 31,
2019
   
December 31,
2018
 
Assets
 
Current assets:
           
Cash and cash equivalents
 
$
431,400
   
$
1,371,331
 
Accounts receivable
   
6,384,148
     
7,871,422
 
Other current assets
   
783,606
     
818,600
 
Total current assets
   
7,599,154
     
10,061,353
 
Other assets:
               
Property and equipment, net
   
83,128
     
58,892
 
Intangible assets, net
   
3,584,221
     
5,778,036
 
Goodwill
   
13,729,770
     
13,729,770
 
Deferred income tax assets, net
   
8,879
     
9,399
 
Total other assets
   
17,405,998
     
19,576,097
 
Total assets
 
$
25,005,152
   
$
29,637,450
 
                 
Liabilities
               
Current liabilities:
               
Line of credit
 
$
2,881,061
   
$
3,950,681
 
Accounts payable
   
4,696,352
     
4,377,794
 
Other accrued expenses
   
1,989,894
     
1,697,636
 
Current portion - long-term notes
   
-
     
6,450
 
Convertible notes
   
1,000,000
     
1,250,000
 
Debentures
   
1,000,000
     
-
 
Consideration payable – cash
   
2,496,000
     
2,696,000
 
Consideration payable – equity
   
-
     
605,223
 
Dividend payable – Preferred stock
   
320,298
     
105,181
 
Total current liabilities
   
14,383,605
     
14,688,965
 
Long-term liabilities:
               
Warrant liability
   
-
     
4,189,388
 
Total long-term liabilities
   
-
     
4,189,388
 
Total liabilities
   
14,383,605
     
18,878,353
 
                 
Stockholders’ equity:
               
Preferred stock, $0.01 par value; 1,000,000 authorized, 424,938 and 420,720 issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively
   
4,249
     
4,207
 
Common stock, $0.01 par value; 100,000,000 shares authorized, 2,522,095 and 1,693,165 issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively
   
25,221
     
16,932
 
Additional paid-in capital
   
51,040,296
     
45,129,214
 
Accumulated deficit
   
(40,508,231
)
   
(34,478,253
)
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)
   
60,012
     
86,997
 
Total stockholders’ equity
   
10,621,547
     
10,759,097
 
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
 
$
25,005,152
   
$
29,637,450
 
 
  See notes to the consolidated financial statements.

AMERI HOLDINGS, INC.
 
 CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

 
 
Twelve Months
Ended December 31,
 
 
 
2019
 
2018
 
 
         
Net revenue
 
$
39,914,675
    $
42,998,280
 
Cost of revenue
   
31,763,955
     
34,014,776
 
Gross profit
   
8,150,720
     
8,983,504
 
 
               
Operating expenses:
               
Selling, general and administration
   
12,210,317
     
10,794,822
 
Depreciation and amortization
   
2,265,297
     
2,903,662
 
Acquisition related expenses
   
-
     
333,237
 
Changes in estimate for consideration payable
   
-
     
(6,940,310
)
Impairment charges on goodwill and intangible assets
   
-
     
9,038,553
 
Operating expenses
   
14,475,614
     
16,129,964
 
Operating Income (loss):
   
(6,324,894
)
   
(7,146,460
)
 
               
Interest expense
   
(691,138
)
   
(729,896
)
Other income
   
4,540
     
88,161
 
Change in fair value of warrant liability
   
1,796,174
     
(2,760,819
)
Total other income /(expenses)
   
1,109,576
     
(3,402,554
)
Income (loss) before income taxes
   
(5,215,318
)
   
(10,549,014
)
Income tax benefit
   
(388,657
)
   
(6,348,502
)
Net Income (loss)
   
(5,603,975
)
   
(16,897,516
)
Dividend on preferred stock
   
(426,003
)
   
(2,583,185
)
Net (loss) attributable to common stock holders
   
(6,029,978
)
   
(19,480,701
)
Other comprehensive income/ (loss), net of tax:
               
Foreign exchange translation adjustment
   
(26,985
)
   
50,122
 
Total comprehensive income (loss)
 
$
(6,056,963
)
   
(19,430,579
)
Comprehensive (loss) attributable to the Company
   
(6,056,963
)
   
(19,430,579
)
Comprehensive (loss) attributable to the non-controlling interest
   
-
     
-
 
     
(6,056,963
)
   
(19,430,579
)
Basic income (loss) per share
 
$
(2.83
)
 
$
(20.47
)
Diluted income (loss) per share
 
$
(2.83
)
 
$
(20.47
)
 
               
Basic weighted average number of shares
   
2,128,806
     
951,601
 
Diluted weighted average number of shares
   
2,128,806
     
951,601
 

See notes to the consolidated financial statements.
 
AMERI HOLDINGS, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
DECEMBER 31, 2019

   
Common Stock
   
Preferred Stock
                         
   
Shares
   
Par
Value at
$0.01
   
Shares
   
Par Value
at $0.01
   
Additional
paid-in
capital
   
Foreign
Currency
Translation
Reserve
   
Retained
earnings
   
Total
stockholders'
equity
 
Balance at Dec 31, 2017
   
726,509
   
$
7,265
     
405,395
   
$
4,054
   
$
34,397,541
   
$
36,877
   
$
(14,997,552
)
 
$
19,448,185
 
Net Loss for the period
                                                   
(19,480,701
)
   
(19,480,701
)
Other comprehensive income (loss)
                                           
50,120
             
50,120
 
Warrants conversion to shares
   
781,486
     
7,815
                     
698,453
                     
706,268
 
Shares Issued as consideration for acquisition of Subsidiary (ATCG)