Company Quick10K Filing
Artelo Biosciences
Price1.10 EPS-1
Shares2 P/E-1
MCap2 P/FCF-1
Net Debt-0 EBIT-2
TEV2 TEV/EBIT-1
TTM 2019-05-31, in MM, except price, ratios
10-Q 2020-05-31 Filed 2020-07-13
10-Q 2020-02-29 Filed 2020-04-13
10-Q 2019-11-30 Filed 2020-01-14
10-K 2019-08-31 Filed 2019-11-25
10-Q 2019-05-31 Filed 2019-07-15
S-1 2019-04-01 Public Filing
10-Q 2019-02-28 Filed 2019-04-15
10-Q 2018-11-30 Filed 2019-01-14
S-1 2018-09-27 Public Filing
10-K 2018-08-31 Filed 2018-11-29
10-Q 2018-05-31 Filed 2018-07-13
10-Q 2018-02-28 Filed 2018-04-16
S-1 2018-01-29 Public Filing
10-Q 2017-11-30 Filed 2018-01-16
10-K 2017-08-31 Filed 2017-11-29
10-Q 2017-05-31 Filed 2017-07-21
10-Q 2017-02-28 Filed 2017-04-14
10-Q 2016-11-30 Filed 2017-01-10
10-K 2016-08-31 Filed 2016-11-29
10-Q 2016-05-31 Filed 2016-07-05
10-Q 2016-02-29 Filed 2016-04-01
10-Q 2015-11-30 Filed 2016-01-14
10-K 2015-08-31 Filed 2015-12-11
10-Q 2015-05-31 Filed 2015-07-15
10-Q 2015-02-28 Filed 2015-04-14
8-K 2020-07-14 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2020-06-22 Other Events
8-K 2020-06-19
8-K 2020-04-13
8-K 2020-03-06
8-K 2020-02-05
8-K 2020-01-14
8-K 2019-12-02
8-K 2019-11-14
8-K 2019-08-30
8-K 2019-07-15
8-K 2019-06-21
8-K 2019-04-24
8-K 2019-03-06
8-K 2019-03-01
8-K 2018-10-09
8-K 2018-09-12
8-K 2018-05-30
8-K 2018-01-26
8-K 2018-01-18

ARTL 10Q Quarterly Report

Part I - Financial Information
Item 1. Financial Statements
Note 1 - Organization and Description of Business
Note 2 - Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Note 3 - Going Concern
Note 4 - Related Party Transactions
Note 5 - Intangible Asset
Note 6 - Equity
Note 7 - Commitments and Contingencies
Note 8 - Derivative Liability and Fair Value Measurements
Note 9 - Subsequent Events
Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition or Plan of Operation
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 4. Controls and Procedures
Part II - Other Information
Item 1. Legal Proceedings
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Item 5. Other Information
Item 6. Exhibits
EX-31.1 artl_ex311.htm
EX-32.1 artl_ex321.htm

Artelo Biosciences Earnings 2020-05-31

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow
1.20.80.40.1-0.3-0.72013201520172020
Assets, Equity
0.0-0.0-0.0-0.1-0.1-0.12015201620172018
Rev, G Profit, Net Income
1.10.70.3-0.0-0.4-0.82013201520172020
Ops, Inv, Fin

10-Q 1 artl_10q.htm FORM 10-Q artl_10q.htm

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

Form 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

 

x

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

For the quarterly period ended: May 31, 2020

 

or

 

¨

TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

For the transition period from ___________ to ___________

 

Commission File Number: 001-38951

 

ARTELO BIOSCIENCES, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada

 

33-1220924

(State or other jurisdiction of

 incorporation or organization)

 

(IRS Employer

Identification No.)

 

 

888 Prospect Street, Suite 210, La Jolla, CA USA

92037

(Address of principal executive offices)

(Zip Code)

 

(760) 943-1689

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

N/A

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

Trading Symbol(s)

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, $0.001 par value per share

ARTL

Nasdaq

Warrants

ARTLW

Nasdaq

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  x YES    ¨ NO

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).  x YES    ¨ NO

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

¨

Accelerated filer

¨

Non-accelerated filer

x

Smaller reporting company

x

Emerging growth company

x

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act)  ¨ YES     x NO

 

APPLICABLE ONLY TO ISSUERS INVOLVED IN BANKRUPTCY

PROCEEDINGS DURING THE PRECEDING FIVE YEARS

 

Check whether the registrant has filed all documents and reports required to be filed by Sections 12, 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act after the distribution of securities under a plan confirmed by a court. ¨ YES     ¨ NO

 

APPLICABLE ONLY TO CORPORATE ISSUERS

 

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date.

 

4,496,366 shares of common stock issued and outstanding as of July 10, 2020.

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 
2

 

 

PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements

 

ARTELO BIOSCIENCES, INC.

Consolidated Balance Sheets

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

May 31,

 

 

August 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current Assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$ 1,279,256

 

 

$ 4,423,965

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

74,655

 

 

 

18,623

 

Deferred offering costs

 

 

98,715

 

 

 

-

 

Total Current Assets

 

 

1,452,626

 

 

 

4,442,588

 

Equipment, net of accumulated depreciation of $1,144 and $792, respectively

 

 

1,484

 

 

 

721

 

Intangible asset

 

 

2,039,417

 

 

 

2,039,417

 

TOTAL ASSETS

 

 

3,493,527

 

 

 

6,482,726

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

 

$ 255,632

 

 

$ 348,863

 

Due to related party

 

 

12,825

 

 

 

3,732

 

Derivative liability

 

 

-

 

 

 

29,501

 

Stock payable

 

 

-

 

 

 

639,417

 

Total Current Liabilities

 

 

268,457

 

 

 

1,021,513

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred Stock, par value $0.001, 6,250,000 shares authorized, 0 and 0 shares issued and outstanding, respectively

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Common Stock, par value $0.001, 18,750,000 shares authorized, 3,733,604 and 3,353,616 shares issued and outstanding, respectively

 

 

3,734

 

 

 

3,354

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

11,609,266

 

 

 

10,278,421

 

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(8,438,434 )

 

 

(4,810,756 )

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)

 

 

50,504

 

 

 

(9,806 )

Total Stockholders’ Equity

 

 

3,225,070

 

 

 

5,461,213

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUIITY

 

$ 3,493,527

 

 

$ 6,482,726

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited financial statements.

 

 
3

Table of Contents

   

ARTELO BIOSCIENCES, INC.

Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

Three months ended

 

 

Nine months ended

 

 

 

May 31,

 

 

May 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OPERATING EXPENSES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General and administrative

 

$ 382,543

 

 

$ 402,803

 

 

$ 1,225,952

 

 

$ 666,226

 

Professional fees

 

 

303,524

 

 

 

354,038

 

 

 

785,133

 

 

 

731,277

 

Research and development

 

 

265,204

 

 

 

184,204

 

 

 

1,646,920

 

 

 

858,224

 

Depreciation

 

 

124

 

 

 

243

 

 

 

372

 

 

 

383

 

Total Operating Expenses

 

 

951,395

 

 

 

941,288

 

 

 

3,658,377

 

 

 

2,256,110

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loss from Operations

 

 

(951,395 )

 

 

(941,288 )

 

 

(3,658,377 )

 

 

(2,256,110 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other income

 

 

204

 

 

 

32,439

 

 

 

1,198

 

 

 

32,439

 

Change in fair value of derivative liabilities

 

 

-

 

 

 

563,966

 

 

 

29,501

 

 

 

897,096

 

Total other income

 

 

204

 

 

 

596,405

 

 

 

30,699

 

 

 

929,535

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Provision for income taxes

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NET LOSS

 

$ (951,191 )

 

$ (344,883 )

 

 

(3,627,678 )

 

$ (1,326,575 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foreign currency translation adjustments

 

 

34,547

 

 

 

771

 

 

 

60,310

 

 

 

2,053

 

Total Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)

 

 

34,547

 

 

 

771

 

 

 

60,310

 

 

 

2,053

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL COMPREHENSIVE LOSS

 

$ (916,644 )

 

$ (344,112 )

 

$ (3,567,368 )

 

$ (1,324,522 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and Diluted Loss per Common Share

 

$ (0.27 )

 

$ (0.17 )

 

$ (1.06 )

 

$ (0.70 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and Diluted Weighted Average Common Shares Outstanding

 

 

3,466,385

 

 

 

2,058,929

 

 

 

3,418,148

 

 

 

1,898,263

 

  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited financial statements.

 

 

 

 
4

Table of Contents

  

ARTELO BIOSCIENCES, INC.

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

 

 

Additional

 

 

 

 

Accumulated Other

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock

 

 

Paid-in

 

 

Accumulated

 

 

Comprehensive

 

 

 

 

 

Shares

 

 

Amount

 

 

Capital

 

 

Deficit

 

 

Income (loss)

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance, August 31, 2019

 

 

3,353,616

 

 

$ 3,354

 

 

$ 10,278,421

 

 

$ (4,810,756 )

 

$ (9,806 )

 

$ 5,461,213

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock issuance costs

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(15,151 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(15,151 )

Common shares issued for services - officers

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

13,000

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

13,000

 

Common shares issued for acquisition of license

 

 

61,297

 

 

 

61

 

 

 

539,356

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

539,417

 

Common shares issued for settlement of debt

 

 

11,363

 

 

 

11

 

 

 

99,989

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

100,000

 

Refund for fractional stock

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(117 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(117 )

Stock option expense

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

155,019

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

155,019

 

Net loss for the period

 

 

 

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(1,306,361 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

(1,306,361 )

Foreign currency translation adjustments

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

16,344

 

 

 

16,344

 

Balance, November 30, 2019

 

 

3,426,276

 

 

 

3,426

 

 

 

11,070,517

 

 

 

(6,117,117 )

 

 

6,538

 

 

 

4,963,364

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional common shares issued

 

 

7,373

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

(7 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Common shares issued for services - officers

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

10,500

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

10,500

 

Cancellation of common shares

 

 

(6,250 )

 

 

(6 )

 

 

(2,494 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(2,500 )

Stock option expense

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

97,397

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

97,397

 

Net loss for the period

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(1,370,126 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

(1,370,126 )

Foreign currency translation adjustments

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

9,419

 

 

 

9,419

 

Balance, February 29, 2020

 

 

3,427,399

 

 

 

3,427

 

 

 

11,175,913

 

 

 

(7,487,243 )

 

 

15,957

 

 

 

3,708,054

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common shares issued for cash

 

 

306,205

 

 

 

307

 

 

 

380,371

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

380,678

 

Common shares issued for services - officers

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

10,500

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

10,500

 

Stock option expense

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

42,482

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

42,482

 

Net loss for the period

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(951,191 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

(951,191 )

Foreign currency translation adjustments

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

34,547

 

 

 

34,547

 

Balance, May 31, 2020

 

 

3,733,604

 

 

$ 3,734

 

 

$ 11,609,266

 

 

$ (8,438,434 )

 

$ 50,504

 

 

$ 3,225,070

 

 

 
5

Table of Contents

    

 

 

 

 

Additional

 

 

 

 

Accumulated Other

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock

 

 

Paid-in

 

 

Accumulated

 

 

Comprehensive

 

 

 

 

 

Shares

 

 

Amount

 

 

Capital

 

 

Deficit

 

 

Income (loss)

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance, August 31, 2018

 

 

1,750,268

 

 

$ 1,750

 

 

$ 2,514,136

 

 

$ (2,638,580 )

 

$ (12,280 )

 

$ (134,974 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common shares issued for cash

 

 

29,290

 

 

 

29

 

 

 

170,745

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

170,774

 

Common shares issued for services - officers

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

13,000

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

13,000

 

Stock option granted for services

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

28,051

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

28,051

 

Net loss for the period

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

-

 

 

 

(556,903 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

(556,903 )

Foreign currency translation adjustments

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

4,888

 

 

 

4,888

 

Balance, November 30, 2018

 

 

1,779,558

 

 

 

1,779

 

 

 

2,725,932

 

 

 

(3,195,483 )

 

 

(7,392 )

 

 

(475,164 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common shares issued for cash

 

 

180,345

 

 

 

181

 

 

 

1,086,950

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

1,087,131

 

Common shares issued for services - officers

 

 

 

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

13,000

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

13,000

 

Reclass of warrant derivative liability from equity

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(918,050 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(918,050 )

Stock option granted for services

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

29,304

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

29,304

 

Net loss for the period

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(424,789 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

(424,789 )

Foreign currency translation adjustments

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(3,606 )

 

 

(3,606 )

Balance, February 28, 2019

 

 

1,959,903

 

 

 

1,960

 

 

 

2,937,136

 

 

 

(3,620,272 )

 

 

(10,998 )

 

 

(692,174 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common shares issued for cash

 

 

54,940

 

 

 

55

 

 

 

417,677

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

417,732

 

Common shares issued for services - officers

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

13,000

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

13,000

 

Common shares issued for services - related party

 

 

25,000

 

 

 

25

 

 

 

239,975

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

240,000

 

Common shares issued for deposit of acquisition of license

 

 

61,297

 

 

 

61

 

 

 

539,356

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

539,417

 

Reclass of warrant derivative liability from equity

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(79,224 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(79,224 )

Stock option granted for services

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

39,740

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

39,740

 

Net loss for the period

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(344,883 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

(344,883 )

Foreign currency translation adjustments

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

771

 

 

 

771

 

Balance, May 31, 2019

 

 

2,101,140

 

 

$ 2,101

 

 

$ 4,107,660

 

 

$ (3,965,155 )

 

$ (10,227 )

 

$ 134,379

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited financial statements

 

 
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ARTELO BIOSCIENCES, INC.

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

Nine months ended

 

 

 

May 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$ (3,627,678 )

 

$ (1,326,575 )

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock based compensation

 

 

326,398

 

 

 

376,095

 

Depreciation

 

 

372

 

 

 

383

 

Change in fair value of derivative liabilities

 

 

(29,501 )

 

 

(897,096 )

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

(56,027 )

 

 

24,142

 

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

 

 

(88,231 )

 

 

91,471

 

Net cash used in operating activities

 

 

(3,474,667 )

 

 

(1,731,580 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchase of equipment

 

 

(1,176 )

 

 

(688 )

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

(1,176 )

 

 

(688 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from issuance of common shares for cash

 

 

380,678

 

 

 

1,675,637

 

Payment of stock issuance costs

 

 

(113,866 )

 

 

-

 

Refund for fractional stock

 

 

(117 )

 

 

-

 

Advance from related parties

 

 

7,116

 

 

 

12,222

 

Repayments to related parties

 

 

(3,040 )

 

 

(8,087 )

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 

270,771

 

 

 

1,679,772

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Effects on changes in foreign exchange rate

 

 

60,363

 

 

 

1,511

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net change in cash and cash equivalents

 

 

(3,144,709 )

 

 

(50,985 )

Cash and cash equivalents - beginning of period

 

 

4,423,965

 

 

 

337,424

 

Cash and cash equivalents - end of period

 

$ 1,279,256

 

 

$ 286,439

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supplemental Cash Flow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash paid for interest

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

Cash paid for income taxes

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NON-CASH FINANCING AND INVESTING ACTIVITIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reclass of warrant derivative liability from equity

 

$ -

 

 

$ 997,274

 

Common shares issued for deposit of exercise of the license

 

$ -

 

 

$ 539,417

 

Deferred offering costs incurred

 

$ -

 

 

$ 291,670

 

Common shares issued for acquisition of license offset against stock payable

 

$ 539,417

 

 

$ -

 

Common shares issued for settlement of stock payable

 

$ 100,000

 

 

$ -

 

Additional issuance of Series D shares per the terms of the subscription agreements

 

$ 7

 

 

$ -

 

Cancellation of common shares

 

$ 6

 

 

$ -

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited financial statements.

 

 
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ARTELO BIOSCIENCES, INC.

Notes to the Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

For the Nine Months Ended May 31, 2020

 

NOTE 1 - ORGANIZATION AND DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS

 

ARTELO BIOSCIENCES, INC. (“we”, “us”, “our”, the “Company”) is a Nevada corporation incorporated on May 2, 2011. It is based in San Diego County, California. The accounting and reporting policies of the Company conform to accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, and the Company’s fiscal year end is August 31.

 

Effective on February 10, 2017, the Company changed its name from “Knight Knox Development Corp.,” to “Reactive Medical Inc.” On April 14, 2017, the Company changed its name from “Reactive Medical Inc.” to “Artelo Biosciences, Inc.”

 

The Company registered fully owned subsidiaries in Ireland, Trinity Reliant Ventures Limited, on November 11, 2016 and in the UK, Trinity Research & Development Limited, on June 2, 2017. On January 8, 2020 Trinity Research and Development Limited changed its name to Artelo Biosciences Limited. The Company incorporated a fully owned subsidiary in Canada, Artelo Biosciences Corporation, on March 18, 2020. Operations in the subsidiaries have been consolidated in the financial statements.

 

The Company intends to license, develop and commercialize novel cannabinoid therapeutic treatments.

 

Reverse stock split

 

The Company filed a Certificate of Change with the Secretary of State of Nevada, pursuant to which, effective on June 20, 2019, the Company effected a one-for-eight reverse split of its authorized and issued and outstanding common stock (the “Reverse Stock Split”). The number of authorized shares of common stock was reduced from 150,000,000 to 18,750,000. The Company’s authorized Preferred Stock was reduced from 50,000,000 to 6,250,000. All share and per share information in these financial statements retroactively reflect this reverse stock split.

 

NOTE 2 - SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The Company prepares its financial statements in accordance with rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) and GAAP in the United States of America. The accompanying interim financial statements have been prepared in accordance with GAAP for interim financial information in accordance with Article 8 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by GAAP for complete financial statements. In the Company’s opinion, all adjustments (consisting of normal recurring accruals) considered necessary for a fair presentation have been included. Operating results for the nine months ended May 31, 2020 are not necessarily indicative of the results for the full year. While management of the Company believes that the disclosures presented herein are adequate and not misleading, these interim financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited financial statements and the footnotes thereto for the year ended August 31, 2019 contained in the Company’s Form 10-K filed on November 25, 2019.

 

Basis of Consolidation

 

The financial statements have been prepared on a consolidated basis, with the Company’s wholly-owned subsidiaries, Trinity Reliant Ventures Limited, Artelo Biosciences Limited and Artelo Biosciences Corporation.

 

Operating Leases

 

The Company determines if an arrangement is a lease at inception in accordance with ASC 842 - Leases. Operating leases are included in operating lease right-of-use (“ROU”) assets, other current liabilities, and operating lease liabilities in our balance sheets. Finance leases are included in property and equipment, other current liabilities, and other long-term liabilities in our balance sheets. As all of the Company’s leases are month to month, no ROU nor operating lease liabilities have been recorded as of May 31, 2020. The new accounting standards related to ASC – 842 were effective for the Company on September 1, 2019. Adoption of the standard did not have any impact on the Company due to the month to month nature of the Company’s existing leases.

 

 
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Loss per Share

 

Basic earnings per share (“EPS”) is computed based on the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period. Diluted EPS is computed based on the weighted average number of shares of common stock plus the effect of dilutive potential common shares outstanding during the period using the treasury stock method and as if converted method. Dilutive potential common shares include outstanding stock options and warrants.

 

For the nine months ended May 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively, the following common stock equivalents were excluded from the computation of diluted net loss per share as the result was anti-dilutive.

 

 

 

May 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Stock options

 

 

281,834

 

 

 

50,000

 

Warrants

 

 

2,334,937

 

 

 

732,351

 

 

 

 

2,616,771

 

 

 

782,351

 

 

Covid 19

 

As the COVID-19 pandemic is still evolving at this time and much of its impact remains unknown, the Company is not able to predict the impact it may have on the development of the its product candidates and business. The severity of the COVID-19 pandemic could also negatively impact the Company’s access to its existing supply chain by delaying the delivery of key raw materials used in its product candidates and therefore delay the delivery of such products for use in its clinical trials. Any of these results could have a material adverse impact to our business.

 

Reclassification

 

Certain reclassifications have been made to the prior year financial statements to conform to the current period presentation. The reclassification had no impact on previously reported net loss or accumulated deficit.

 

NOTE 3 - GOING CONCERN

 

The Company’s financial statements are prepared using GAAP applicable to a going concern which contemplates the realization of assets and liquidation of liabilities in the normal course of business. During the nine months ended May 31, 2020, the Company had a net loss of $3,627,678. As of May 31, 2020, the Company had an accumulated deficit of $8,438,434. The Company has not established any revenue to cover its operating costs, and will require additional capital to continue its operating plan. The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern is dependent on the Company obtaining adequate capital to fund operating losses until it becomes profitable. If the Company is unable to obtain adequate capital, it could be forced to cease operations. These factors raise substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern.

 

In order to continue as a going concern, the Company will need, among other things, additional capital resources. Management’s plan to obtain such resources for the Company includes: sales of equity instruments; traditional financing, such as loans; and obtaining capital from management and significant stockholders sufficient to meet its minimum operating expenses. However, management cannot provide any assurance that the Company will be successful in accomplishing this plan.

 

There is no assurance that the Company will be able to obtain sufficient additional funds when needed or that such funds, if available, will be obtainable on terms satisfactory to the Company. In addition, profitability will ultimately depend upon the level of revenues received from business operations. However, there is no assurance that the Company will attain profitability. The accompanying financial statements do not include any adjustments that might be necessary if the Company is unable to continue as a going concern.

 

 
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NOTE 4 - RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

During the nine months ended May 31, 2020, the president and an officer of the Company incurred $1,428 of expenses on behalf of the Company that were not reimbursed. The amount owed to this related party as of May 31, 2020 and August 31, 2019 is $5,160 and $3,732, respectively. The amounts are non-interest bearing and have no terms of repayment.

 

During the nine months ended May 31, 2020, the Senior Vice President, European Operations, who is a major shareholder, incurred $5,688 of expenses on behalf of the Company. $3,040, including foreign exchange loss of $17 of this amount was repaid during the nine months ended May 31, 2020. The amount owed to this related party as of May 31, 2020 and August 31, 2019 is $2,665 and $0, respectively. The amounts are non-interest bearing and have no terms of repayment.

 

During the nine months ended May 31, 2020, a company owned by the Senior Vice President, European Operations, who is a major shareholder, provided consulting services worth $49,000 of which., $5,000 was outstanding. as of May 31, 2020

 

NOTE 5 – INTANGIBLE ASSET

 

During the year ended August 31, 2019, the Company made a $1,500,000 payment and recorded stock payable of 61,297 shares of common stock, valued at $539,417 for the exercise of an option for an exclusive worldwide license to develop and commercialize products comprising or containing the compound NEO1940. During the nine months ended May 31, 2020, the Company issued 61,297 shares of common stock (Note 6). The Company has capitalized the costs associated with acquiring the worldwide license as an intangible asset at a value of $2,039,417 as of May 31, 2020 and August 31, 2019. During the quarter ended May 31, 2020, no subsequent costs incurred met the criteria for capitalization as an intangible asset.

 

NOTE 6 - EQUITY

 

Preferred shares

 

The Company has authorized 6,250,000 shares of preferred stock with a par value of $0.001 per share.

 

During the nine months ended May 31, 2020, there were no issuances of preferred stock.

 

Common Shares

 

The Company has authorized 18,750,000 shares of common stock with a par value of $0.001 per share. Each share of common stock entitles the holder to one vote, in person or proxy, on any matter on which an action of the stockholders of the Company is sought.

 

During the nine months ended May 31, 2020, the Company issued 386,238 shares of common stock as follows:

 

 

·

61,297 shares of common stock were issued for the exercise of an option for an exclusive worldwide license to develop and commercialize products comprising or containing the compound NEO1940

 

·

11,363 shares of common stock were issued for the settlement of stock payable of $100,000

 

·

7,373 shares of common stock were issued for additional issuance of Series D per the terms of the subscription agreements.

 

·

306,205 shares of common stock were issued for cash of $380,678, of which 45,834 shares were issued to our officers and directors for $55,000 and 260,371 shares were sold in connection with the Company’s at -the-market equity program (see below) for proceeds net of offering costs of $358,198. The Company also deferred offering costs of $98,715 and incurred stock issuance costs of $15,151 related to shares sold in the prior period.

 

 
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On December 2, 2019, 6,250 shares of common stock previously issued to a director of the Company were cancelled upon the resignation of the director from the Company. As a result, the Company reversed an expense of $2,500 which was recorded in prior quarter.

 

During the nine months ended May 31, 2020, the Company recorded $31,500 of stock compensation expense for four members of the Company’s Board of Directors. The unamortized value of the stock-based compensation as of May 31, 2020 is $44,333.

 

Equity Distribution

 

On April 13, 2020, the Company entered into an Equity Distribution Agreement with Maxim Group LLC (the “Agent”) to create an at-the-market equity program under which it may sell up to an aggregate of $1,475,000 of shares of the Company’s common stock (the “Shares”) from time to time through the Agent, as sales agent, subject to any applicable limits when using Form S-3. The Agent will be entitled to compensation at a commission rate of 2.0% of the gross sales price per sold share of common stock.

   

Warrants

 

A summary of activity during the nine months ended May 31, 2020 follows:

 

 

 

Number of

shares

 

 

Weighted
Average

Exercise

Price

 

 

Weighted

Average

Life (years)

 

Outstanding, August 31, 2019

 

 

2,334,937

 

 

$ 8.12

 

 

 

4.31

 

Granted

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Forfeited

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Exercised

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Outstanding, May 31, 2020

 

 

2,334,937

 

 

$ 8.12

 

 

 

3.55

 

 

The intrinsic value of the warrants as of May 31, 2020 is $0. All of the outstanding warrants are exercisable as of May 31, 2020.

 

Stock Options

 

2018 Equity Incentive Plan

 

On December 2, 2019, 22,250 shares of common stock previously granted to a director of the Company in the form of a stock option were cancelled upon the resignation of the director from the board of directors.

 

On December 6, 2019, the Company granted 10,000 shares of common stock to a director of the Company in the form of a stock option valued at $24,401. The exercise price per share is $2.65 and the stock options expire on December 6, 2029. The shares vest 1/24th monthly over a period of two years from the grant date.

 

On December 6, 2019, the Company granted 40,000 shares of common stock to a director of the Company in the form of a stock option valued at $97,606. The exercise price per share is $2.65 and the stock options expire on December 6, 2029. The shares vest 1/48th monthly over a period of four years from the grant date.

 

On January 1, 2020, the Company granted 24,000 shares of common stock to a consultant in the form of a stock option valued at $67,976 in connection with the Company further amending and restating the consultant’s a prior amended and restated Consulting Agreement dated as of August 17, 2018. The exercise price per share is $2.12 and the stock options expire on December 13, 2029. The shares vest 1/48th monthly over a period of four years, beginning on January 31, 2020 and on the last day of each month thereafter.

 

 
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The Company utilizes the Black-Scholes model to value the stock options. The Company utilized the following assumptions:

 

 

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

Year Ended

 

 

 

May 31,

 

 

August 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Expected term

 

4.34 - 5 years

 

 

5 years

 

Expected average volatility

 

 

155 %

 

 

158 %

Expected dividend yield

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Risk-free interest rate

 

1.66%-1.67

%

 

1.40-1.78

%

 

During the nine months ended May 31, 2020, $294,898 was expensed, and as of May 31, 2020, $449,833 remains unamortized. The intrinsic value of the 281,834 options as of May 31, 2020 is $0, and the weighted average value of the remaining life of the options is 9.15 years.

 

The following is a summary of stock option activity during the nine months ended May 31, 2020:

 

 

 

Options Outstanding

 

 

Weighted Average

 

 

 

Number

of

 

 

Weighted

Average

 

 

Remaining

life

 

 

 

Options

 

 

Exercise Price

 

 

(years)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outstanding, August 31, 2019

 

 

234,000

 

 

$ 3.88

 

 

$ 9.78

 

Granted

 

 

74,000

 

 

 

2.48

 

 

 

10.00

 

Exercised

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Forfeited/canceled

 

 

(26,166 )

 

$ 3.31

 

 

 

9.10

 

Outstanding, May 31, 2020

 

 

281,834

 

 

$ 3.57

 

 

$ 9.15

 

 

The following table summarizes information relating to exercisable stock options as of May 31, 2020:

 

Options Outstanding

 

 

Options Exercisable

 

 

 

Weighted Average

Remaining

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number

of

Options

 

 

Contractual

life
(in years)

 

 

Weighted

Average

Exercise Price

 

 

Number

of

Shares

 

 

Weighted

Average

Exercise Price

 

46,084

 

 

 

8.22

 

 

$ 10.80

 

 

 

30,244

 

 

$ 10.80

 

2,500

 

 

 

9.14

 

 

$ 3.12

 

 

 

2,500

 

 

$ 3.12

 

159,250

 

 

 

9.25

 

 

$ 1.99

 

 

 

98,317

 

 

$ 1.99

 

50,000

 

 

 

9.52

 

 

$ 2.65

 

 

 

6,250

 

 

$ 2.65

 

24,000

 

 

 

9.54

 

 

$ 2.12

 

 

 

2,500

 

 

$ 2.12

 

281,834

 

 

 

9.15

 

 

 

3.57

 

 

 

139,811

 

 

 

3.95

 

 

 
12

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NOTE 7 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

The Company has certain financial commitments in relation to Research and Development contracts as of May 31, 2020, as follows:

 

 

The Company is invoiced monthly and quarterly in connection with several Research and Development contracts.

 

The Company may be obligated to make additional payments related to Research and Development contracts entered into, dependent on the progress and milestones achieved through the programs.

 

Our principal executive office is currently located at 888 Prospect Street, Suite 210, La Jolla, CA, 92037, U.S. Additionally, we have an office located at 29 Fitzwilliam Street Upper, Dublin 2 Ireland which serves as administrative space for managing our European subsidiaries: Trinity Reliant Ventures, Ltd (Ireland) and Artelo Biosciences Limited (U.K.). We do not currently own any properties, laboratories, or manufacturing facilities. The leases for our office space are month-to-month.

 

NOTE 8 – DERIVATIVE LIABILITY AND FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS

 

The Company recognized a derivative liability related to the purchase price protection clause associated with a previous a private placement offering. Additional units would be issued to the unit holder if the Company should issue common stock or the equivalent at a share price less than $7.60. In accordance with ASC 815-10- Derivatives and Hedging we measured the derivative liability using a Monte Carlo pricing model. Accordingly, at the end of each quarterly reporting date, the derivative fair market value is re-measured and adjusted to current market value.

 

Changes in the fair value of the warrant liability were as follows:

 

Fair value – August 31, 2019

 

$ 29,501

 

 

 

 

 

 

Change in fair value for the period of warrant derivative liability

 

 

(29,501 )

Fair value – May 31, 2020

 

 

-

 

 

As of May 31, 2020, there is no derivative liability associated with the shares of common stock issued pursuant to the Series E private offering as they no longer meet the criteria for price protection.

 

NOTE 9 – SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

Subsequent to May 31, 2020, we sold an aggregate of 762,762 shares of common stock under the ATM Offering at an average price of $1.45 per common share for net proceeds of $1,087,118.

 

On June 22, 2020, the Company executed and delivered a Project Invention Exercise Notice to The Research Foundation for the State University of New York (the “Foundation”) indicating that the Company wishes to obtain a commercial license to the Foundation rights in the certain compounds (together, the “Project Invention”). The Company shall pay a $25,000 fee to the Foundation, upon which the Foundation shall expand the definition of Licensed Patents in the License Agreement with Stony Brook University, by and between the Company and Stony Brook University, dated January 18, 2018, to include the Project Invention.

 

 
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Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition or Plan of Operation

 

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

These statements contain forward-looking statements that are based on management’s beliefs and assumptions and on information currently available to management. Some of the statements in the section captioned “Risk Factors,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” “Business,” and elsewhere contain forward-looking statements. In some cases, you can identify these statements by terms such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “could,” “estimate,” “expects,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “potential,” “predict,” “project,” “should,” “will,” “would” or the negative of these terms or other comparable expressions that convey uncertainty of future events or outcomes, although not all forward-looking statements contain these terms.

 

These statements involve risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from the information expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements about:

 

 

·

our plans to obtain funding for our operations, including funding necessary to develop, manufacture and commercialize our products candidates;

 

·

the size and growth of the markets for our product candidates;

 

·

our commercialization, marketing, and manufacturing capabilities and strategy;

 

·

our ability to compete with companies currently producing alternative treatment methods;

 

·

the cost, timing and outcomes of any potential litigation involving our product candidates;

 

·

our expectation that our capital resources will not be sufficient to fund our operations for at least the next 12 months;

 

·

regulatory developments in the U.S. and in non-U.S. countries;

 

·

the development, regulatory approval, efficacy and commercialization of competing product candidates;

 

·

our ability to retain key scientific or management personnel;

 

·

the scope of protection we are able to establish and maintain for intellectual property rights covering our products and technology;

 

·

the terms and conditions of licenses granted to us and our ability to license additional intellectual property related to our product candidates, as appropriate;

 

·

our expectations regarding our ability to obtain and maintain intellectual property protection for our product candidates;

 

·

potential claims related to our intellectual property;

 

·

the accuracy of our estimates regarding expenses, future revenue, capital requirements and needs for additional financing;

 

·

our expectations regarding the period during which we qualify as an emerging growth company under the JOBS Act;

 

·

our ability to develop and maintain our corporate infrastructure, including our internal controls;

 

·

our ability to develop innovative new product candidates; and

 

·

our financial performance.

   

In addition, you should refer to the “Risk Factors” section for a discussion of other important factors that may cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. As a result of these factors, we cannot assure you that the forward-looking statements will prove to be accurate. Furthermore, if the forward-looking statements prove to be inaccurate, the inaccuracy may be material. In light of the significant uncertainties in these forward-looking statements, you should not regard these statements as a representation or warranty by us or any other person that we will achieve our objectives and plans in any specified time frame, or at all. We undertake no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law.

 

In addition, statements that “we believe” and similar statements reflect our beliefs and opinions on the relevant subject. These statements are based upon information available to us as of the date of this filing, and while we believe such information forms a reasonable basis for such statements, such information may be limited or incomplete, and our statements should not be read to indicate that we have conducted an exhaustive inquiry into, or review of, all potentially available relevant information. These statements are inherently uncertain, and investors are cautioned not to unduly rely upon these statements.

 

 
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Our unaudited financial statements are stated in United States Dollars (US$) and are prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”). The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and the related notes that appear elsewhere in this quarterly report. The following discussion contains forward-looking statements that reflect our plans, estimates and beliefs. Our actual results could differ materially from those discussed in the forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, those discussed below and elsewhere in this quarterly report.

 

In this quarterly report, unless otherwise specified, all dollar amounts are expressed in United States dollars and all references to “common shares” refer to the common shares in our capital stock.

 

As used in this quarterly report, the terms “we”, “us”, “our” and “our company” mean Artelo Biosciences, Inc., and our wholly owned subsidiaries, Trinity Reliant Ventures Limited, in Ireland, Artelo Biosciences Limited, in England and Wales, and Artelo Biosciences Corporation, in Canada unless otherwise indicated.

 

General Overview

 

We are a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing treatments intended to modulate the endocannabinoid system (the “ECS”) and related signaling pathways, including a solid-state composition of cannabidiol (“CBD cocrystal”), with improved pharmaceutical-like properties which could have a meaningful impact on cannabinoid-based drug development. Our board of directors and management team is highly experienced and has a successful history of development, regulatory approval and commercialization of pharmaceuticals.

 

Our product candidate pipeline broadly leverages leading scientific methodologies to ECS modulation, balances risk across mechanism of action and stages of development and represents a comprehensive approach in utilizing the power of the ECS to develop pharmaceuticals for patients with unmet healthcare needs. In addition to our cocrystal program, we are currently developing ART27.13 as treatment for anorexia associated with cancer in a planned Phase 1b/2a trial and ART26.12, which is being studied as an endocannabinoid modulator and cancer therapeutic and is in the late pre-clinical stage. The COVID-19 global pandemic has created uncertainties in the expected timelines for clinical stage biopharmaceutical companies such as us, and because of such uncertainties, we are unable to accurately predict our expected timelines at this time.

 

The crystal structure of cannabidiol (“CBD”) is known to exhibit polymorphism, or the ability to manifest in different forms. Polymorphism can adversely affect stability, dissolution, and bioavailability of a drug product and thus affect its quality, safety, and efficacy. We have developed a proprietary cocrystal composition of CBD, which we have designated as ART12.11. We believe our cocrystal exists as a single crystal form and as such is anticipated to have advantages over other forms of CBD that exhibit polymorphism. Anticipated advantages of this single crystal structure include improved stability, solubility, and a more consistent absorption profile. We believe these features will result in more consistent bioavailability and may lead to improved safety and efficacy.

 

Presently, we have one U.S. patent, one U.S. patent application, and two foreign patent applications directed to our cocrystal composition of CBD. Composition claims are generally known in the pharmaceutical industry as the most desired type of intellectual property and should provide for long lasting market exclusivity for our CBD cocrystal drug product candidate. In addition, due to the reasons outlined above, we believe that our CBD cocrystal will have superior pharmaceutical properties compared to non-cocrystal CBD products under development at other competing companies to treat Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and other indications.

 

In addition to our own internal discovery research, we are currently developing two patent protected product candidates that we obtained through our in-licensing activities. Our first program is a synthetic small molecule program, ART27.13, being developed for cancer-related anorexia. ART27.13 is a peripherally-restricted high-potency dual CB1 and CB2 receptor agonist which was originally developed by AstraZeneca plc (“AstraZeneca”). We have exercised our option to exclusively license this product candidate through the NEOMED Institute, a Canadian not-for-profit corporation, renamed adMare in June 2019 (“NEOMED”). In Phase 1 single dose studies in healthy volunteers and a multiple ascending dose study in otherwise healthy patients with back pain conducted by AstraZeneca, ART27.13 exhibited an attractive pharmacokinetic and absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion profile and was well tolerated within the target exposure range. It also exhibited dose-dependent and potentially clinically meaningful increases in body weight. Importantly, the changes in body weight were not associated with fluid retention or other adverse effects and occurred at exposures without central nervous system (“CNS”) side effects. Discussions with U.K. regulators indicate there is a potential pathway for development of ART27.13 for the treatment of cancer-related anorexia, which affects approximately 60% of advanced stage cancer patients. We are planning to initiate a Phase 1b/2a clinical study of cancer-related anorexia with ART27.13 upon successful completion of manufacturing new study material and when the regulatory authorities in the U.K. permit initiations of new clinical studies which are currently paused due to the global coronavirus pandemic, COVID-19.

 

 
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Our second in-licensed program is a platform of small-molecule inhibitors for fatty acid binding protein 5 (“ FABP5”), based upon scientific developments achieved at Stony Brook University (“SBU”) which we have designated ART26.12. To date, SBU has received nearly $4 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health to begin developing these candidates. Fatty acid binding proteins (“FABPs”) are attractive therapeutic targets, however, their high degree of similarity among the various types has proven challenging to the creation of drugs targeting specific FABPs. FABP5 is believed to specifically target and regulate one of the body’s endogenous cannabinoids, anandamide (“AEA”). While searching for a FABP5 inhibitor to regulate AEA, we believe researchers at SBU discovered the chemistry for creating a highly specific and potent small molecule inhibitor for FABP5. In addition to its potential as an endocannabinoid modulator, FABP5 is also an attractive target for cancer drug development. Large amounts of human clinical epidemiological and animal model data support FABP5 as a well validated oncology therapeutic target, especially for triple negative breast cancer and castration-resistant prostate cancer. We licensed exclusive world-wide rights to these inhibitors from SBU. The program is in the final stages of lead optimization, and we plan to initiate regulatory enabling studies thereafter. We anticipate clinical studies in cancer could begin in the second half of 2021 or the first half of 2022 depending on the impact of COVID-19. The COVID-19 global pandemic has created uncertainties in the expected timelines for clinical stage biopharmaceutical companies such as us, and because of such uncertainties, we are unable to accurately predict our expected timelines at this time.

 

We are developing our product candidates in accordance with traditional drug development standards and plan to make them available to the general public via prescription or physician orders only after obtaining marketing authorization from a regulatory authority, such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (the “FDA”). Our management team has experience developing and commercializing ethical pharmaceutical products, including several first-in-class therapeutics. Based upon our current management’s capabilities and the future talent we may attract, we expect to retain rights to internally develop and commercialize products, however, we may seek collaborations with partners in the biopharmaceutical industry when that strategy serves to maximize value for our stockholders.

 

Product Candidate Pipeline:

 

Product Candidate

Target Indications

Development Phase

Market Size

ART27.13 – Cannabinoid Agonist

Anorexia associated with cancer

Phase 1

Cancer anorexia cachexia syndrome: $2 billion

ART12.11 – CBD Cocrystal

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Pre-clinical

IBD: $7 billion

PTSD: $7 billion

ART26.12 – FABP5 inhibitor

Prostate cancer and Breast cancer

Pre-clinical

Prostate cancer: $9 billion

Breast cancer: $18 billion

 

Therapeutics market size based upon total global annual prescription drug sales in 2016, 2017 or 2018

 

Sources: http://wiseawareness.com/cancer-cachexia-market/; http://www.openpr.com/wiki/global-breast-cancer-therapeutics-market;http://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2018/09/24/1575060/0/en/Global-Prostate-Cancer-Therapeutics-Market-Will-Reach-USD-17-200-Million-By-2024-Zion-Market-Research.html; http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-global-inflammatory-bowel-diseases-ibd-drug-market-is-estimated-at-6-7bn-in-2017-and-7-6bn-in-2023--300688523.html; http://www.credenceresearch.com/report/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-therapeutics-market

 

 
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Background

 

The ECS is composed of cannabinoid receptors, endogenous receptor ligands (“endocannabinoids”) and their associated transporter mechanisms, as well as enzymes responsible for the synthesis and degradation of endocannabinoids, and has emerged as a considerable target for pharmacotherapy approaches of numerous human diseases. As a widespread modulatory system, the ECS plays important roles in the CNS, development, synaptic plasticity, and the response to endogenous and environmental factors.

 

The modulation of the ECS can be effected by using selective or non-selective agonists, partial agonists, inverse agonists, and antagonists of the cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. The CB1 receptor is distributed in brain areas associated with motor control, emotional responses, motivated behavior and energy homeostasis. In the periphery, CB1 is ubiquitously expressed in the adipose tissue, pancreas, liver, gastrointestinal tract, skeletal muscles, heart and the reproductive system. The CB2 receptor is mainly expressed in the immune system regulating its functions, and is upregulated in response to tissue stress or damage in most cell types. The ECS is therefore involved in pathophysiological conditions in both the central and peripheral tissues.

 

The actions of endogenous ligands can be enhanced or attenuated by targeting mechanisms that are associated with their transport within the cellular and extra cellular matrix as well as their synthesis and breakdown. Small molecule chemical modulators of the ECS can be derived from the cannabis plant (“phytocannabinoids”), can be semi-synthetic derivatives of phytocannabinoids or endocannabinoids, or can be completely synthetic new chemical entities. We plan to develop approaches within our portfolio that address receptor binding and endocannabinoid transport modulation using only synthetic new chemical entities. Future approaches may also involve targeting synthesis or breakdown enzymes.

 

ECS targeting cannabinoid-based medicines are already approved and used to treat numerous medical conditions. The ECS is further implicated in many disease states within the peer reviewed literature including conditions which involve the regulation of food intake, central nervous system, pain, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, immune and inflammation, behavioral, antiproliferative and reproductive functions. These areas of ECS pathophysiology are aligned with our therapeutic areas of focus: pain, inflammation, anorexia, and cancer.

 

Business Strategy

 

Our objective is to develop and commercialize ethical pharmaceutical products that provide physicians access to the therapeutic potential of cannabinoid therapeutics and other modulators of the ECS for their patients. We intend to pursue technologies and compounds that offer promising therapeutic approaches to cannabinoid-based therapies, including mimetics of naturally-occurring cannabinoids and fully synthetic cannabinoids, as well as compounds that promote the effectiveness of the ECS.

 

 
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Results of Operations

 

The following summary of our results of operations, for the three and nine months ended May 31, 2020 and 2019, should be read in conjunction with our interim financial statements, as included in this Form 10-Q and our audited financial statements for the year ended August 31, 2019, as included in Form 10-K filed with the SEC on November 25, 2019.

 

Our Company does not have any revenue. We classify our operating expenses into research and development, professional fees, and selling, general and administrative expenses. Research and development expense consists of expenses incurred while performing research and development activities to discover and develop our product candidates. This includes conducting preclinical studies and clinical trials, development efforts and activities related to regulatory filings for product candidates. We recognize research and development expenses as they are incurred. Our research and development expense primarily consists of costs incurred in research and development partnerships, preliminary studies, development of potential intellectual property, and research initiatives.

 

Our financial statements have been prepared assuming that we will continue as a going concern and, accordingly, do not include adjustments relating to the recoverability and realization of assets and classification of liabilities that might be necessary should we be unable to continue in operation. We expect we will require additional capital to meet our long-term operating requirements. We expect to raise additional capital through, among other things, the sale of equity or debt securities, but we cannot guarantee that we will be able to achieve same.

 

The following table provides selected financial data about the Company as of May 31, 2020 and August 31, 2019.

 

 

 

May 31,

 

 

August 31,

 

 

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash

 

$ 1,279,256

 

 

$ 4,423,965

 

 

$ (3,144,709 )

Total Assets

 

$ 3,493,527

 

 

$ 6,482,726

 

 

$ (2,989,199 )

Total Liabilities

 

$ 268,457

 

 

$ 1,021,513

 

 

$ (753,056 )

Stockholders’ Equity

 

$ 3,225,070

 

 

$ 5,461,213

 

 

$ (2,236,143 )

 

Balance Sheet Data

 

We have not generated any revenues since inception through May 31, 2020. The decrease in cash was primarily due to an increase in general and administrative expenses, professional fees, and research and development costs.

 

For the Three Months Ended May 31, 2020 Compared to the Three Months May 31, 2019

 

 

 

Three months ended

 

 

 

 

 

May 31,

 

 

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

Change

 

Operating Expenses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General and administrative expense

 

$ 382,543

 

 

$ 402,803

 

 

$ (20,260 )

Professional fees

 

 

303,524

 

 

 

354,038

 

 

 

(50,514 )

Research and development

 

 

265,204

 

 

 

184,204

 

 

 

81,000

 

Depreciation

 

 

124

 

 

 

243

 

 

 

(119 )

Total Operating Expenses

 

 

951,395

 

 

 

941,288

 

 

 

10,107

 

Loss from Operations

 

 

(951,395 )

 

 

(941,288 )

 

 

(10,107 )

Other income

 

 

204

 

 

 

32,439

 

 

 

(32,235 )

Change in fair value of derivative liabilities

 

 

-

 

 

 

563,966

 

 

 

(563,966 )

Net Loss

 

$ (951,191 )

 

$ (344,883 )

 

$ (606,308 )

 

 
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Our operating expenses, for the three months ended May 31, 2020 were $951,395 compared to $941,288 for the same period in 2019. The Company’s operating expenses were primarily related to professional fees for ongoing regulatory requirements, research and development and general and administrative expenses. Change in fair value of derivatives was $0 for the three months ended May 31, 2020, compared to a gain of $563,966 for the three months ended May 31, 2019.

 

For the Nine Months Ended May 31, 2020 Compared to the Nine Months May 31, 2019

 

 

 

Nine months ended

 

 

 

 

 

May 31,

 

 

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

Change

 

Operating Expenses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General and administrative expense

 

$ 1,225,952

 

 

$ 666,226

 

 

$ 559,726

 

Professional fees

 

 

785,133

 

 

 

731,277

 

 

 

53,856

 

Research and development

 

 

1,646,920

 

 

 

858,224

 

 

 

788,696

 

Depreciation

 

 

372

 

 

 

383

 

 

 

(11 )

Total Operating Expenses

 

 

3,658,377

 

 

 

2,256,110

 

 

 

1,402,267

 

Loss from Operations

 

 

(3,658,377 )

 

 

(2,256,110 )

 

 

(1,402,267 )

Other income

 

 

1,198

 

 

 

32,439

 

 

 

(31,241 )

Change in fair value of derivative liabilities

 

 

29,501

 

 

 

897,096

 

 

 

(867,595 )

Net Loss

 

$ (3,627,678 )

 

$ (1,326,575 )

 

$ (2,301,103 )

 

Our operating expenses, for the nine months ended May 31, 2020 were $3,658,377 compared to $2,256,110 for the same period in 2019. The Company’s operating expenses were primarily related to professional fees for ongoing regulatory requirements, research and development and general and administrative expenses. Change in fair value of derivatives was a gain of $29,501 for the nine months ended May 31, 2020, compared to a gain of $897,096 for the nine months ended May 31, 2019.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Working Capital

 

 

 

May 31,

 

 

August 31,

 

 

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

Change

 

Current Assets

 

$ 1,452,626

 

 

$ 4,442,588

 

 

$ (2,989,962 )

Current Liabilities

 

 

268,457

 

 

 

1,021,513

 

 

 

(753,056 )

Working Capital

 

$ 1,184,169

 

 

$ 3,421,075

 

 

$ (2,236,906 )

 

Cash Flows

 

 

 

Nine months ended

 

 

 

 

 

May 31,

 

 

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

Change

 

Cash Flows used in operating activities

 

$ (3,474,667 )

 

$ (1,731,580 )

 

$ (1,743,087 )

Cash Flows used in investing activities

 

 

(1,176 )

 

 

(688 )

 

 

(488 )

Cash Flows provided by financing activities

 

 

270,771

 

 

 

1,679,772

 

 

 

(1,409,001 )

Effects on changes in foreign exchange rate

 

 

60,363

 

 

 

1,511

 

 

 

58,852

 

Net change in cash and cash equivalents during the period

 

$ (3,144,709 )

 

$ (50,985 )

 

$ (3,093,724 )

 

 
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Our total current assets as of May 31, 2020 were $1,452,626 as compared to total current assets of $4,442,588 as of August 31, 2019. The decrease in current assets is primarily due to continued operating expenses.

 

Our total current liabilities as of May 31, 2020 were $268,457 as compared to total current liabilities of $1,021,513 as of August 31, 2019. The decrease in current liabilities was primarily due to stock payable of $639,417 as of August 31, 2019 which was settled through the issuance of shares as of May 31, 2020.

 

The report of our auditors on our audited consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended August 31, 2019, contains a going concern qualification as we have suffered losses since our inception. We have minimal assets and have achieved no operating revenues since our inception. We have been dependent on sales of equity securities to conduct operations. Unless and until we commence material operations and achieve material revenues, we will remain dependent on financings to continue our operations.

 

Cash Flow from Operating Activities

 

During the nine months ended May 31, 2020, cash used in operating activities was $3,474,667 compared to cash used in operating activities of $1,731,580 during the period ended May 31, 2019. The cash used from operating activities was primarily attributed to net loss of $3,627,678 offset by stock-based compensation of 326,398 and a decrease in accounts payable and accrued liabilities of $88,231 for the nine months ended May 31, 2020. The cash used from operating activities was primarily attributed to net loss of $1,326,575 and change in fair value of derivative of $897,096, offset by stock-based compensation of $376,095, and an increase in accounts payable and accrued liabilities of $91,471 for the nine months ended May 31, 2019.

 

Cash Flow from Investing Activities

 

The Company used $1,176 and $688 for purchase of equipment for the nine months ended May 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

 

Cash Flow from Financing Activities

 

During the nine months ended May 31, 2020 and 2019, the Company received $380,678 and $1,675,637 from issuance of common stock and $7,116 and $12,222 from advance from related parties and repaid $113,866 and $0 for stock issuance costs and $3,040 and $8,087 to related parties, respectively. During the nine months ended May 31, 2020, the Company refunded fractional stock of $117.

 

Going Concern

 

Our financial statements are prepared using GAAP applicable to a going concern which contemplates the realization of assets and liquidation of liabilities in the normal course of business. The Company has not established an ongoing source of revenues sufficient to cover its operating cost and requires additional capital to commence its operating plan. The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern is dependent on the Company obtaining adequate capital to fund operating losses until it becomes profitable. If the Company is unable to obtain adequate capital, it could be forced to cease operations. These factors raise substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern.

 

In order to continue as a going concern, the Company will need, among other things, additional capital resources. Management’s plan to obtain such resources for the Company include: sales of equity instruments; traditional financing, such as loans; and obtaining capital from management and significant stockholders sufficient to meet its minimal operating expenses. However, management cannot provide any assurance that the Company will be successful in accomplishing any of its plans. Management’s current expectation is that our capital resources will not be sufficient to fund our operations for our operations for at least the next 12 months.

 

 
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Off Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We do not have any relationships with unconsolidated entities or financial partnerships, such as entities often referred to as structured finance or special purpose entities, which would have been established for the purpose of facilitating off-balance sheet arrangements or other contractually narrow or limited purposes. In addition, we do not have any undisclosed borrowings or debt, and we have not entered into any synthetic leases. We are, therefore, not materially exposed to any financing, liquidity, market, or credit risk that could arise if we had engaged in such relationships.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

We prepare our financial statements in conformity with GAAP, which requires management to make certain estimates and apply judgments. We base our estimates and judgments on historical experience, current trends and other factors that management believes to be important at the time the financial statements are prepared. On a regular basis, we review our accounting policies and how they are applied and disclosed in our financial statements.

 

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

As a “smaller reporting company”, we are not required to provide the information required by this Item.

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures

 

Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

Our management, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer (our principal executive officer, principal financial officer and principal accounting officer), has evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a- 15(e) and 15d- 15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (Exchange Act)), as of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. Based on such evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer has concluded that as of such date, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective such that the information relating to us required to be disclosed in our Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) reports (i) is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in SEC rules and forms, and (ii) is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

During the period covered by this report there were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

 
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PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings

 

From time to time, we may become involved in litigation relating to claims arising out of its operations in the normal course of business. We are not involved in any pending legal proceeding or litigation and, to the best of our knowledge, no governmental authority is contemplating any proceeding to which we area party or to which any of our properties is subject, which would reasonably be likely to have a material adverse effect on us.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors

 

Investing in our securities stock involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the risks described below, as well as other information included in our 2019 Annual Report on Form 10-K, including our financial statements and the related notes, and the section titled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” any of which may be relevant to decisions regarding an investment in or ownership of our securities. The occurrence of any of these risks could have a significant adverse effect on our reputation, business, financial condition, results of operations, growth and ability to accomplish our strategic objectives. We have organized the description of these risks into groupings in an effort to enhance readability, but many of the risks interrelate or could be grouped or ordered in other ways, so no special significance should be attributed to the groupings or order below.

 

RISKS RELATED TO OUR BUSINESS AND PRODUCT CANDIDATES

 

Our ability to continue our operations requires that we raise additional capital and our operations could be curtailed if we are unable to obtain the additional funding as or when needed.

 

Upon the completion of our financial statements for the period ended May 31, 2020, and management’s assessment of our ability to continue as a going concern, we concluded there was substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern for the twelve months after the date of this report. Our independent registered public accounting firm included an explanatory paragraph in its report on our financial statements as of and for the year-ended August 31, 2019, noting the existence of substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. As of the date of this report, there have been no changes to management’s conclusion that there remains substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

 

To continue to fund operations, we will need to secure additional funding. We may obtain additional financing in the future through the issuance of our common stock, through other equity or debt financings or through collaborations or partnerships with other companies. We may not be able to raise additional capital on terms acceptable to us, or at all. Further, any failure to raise capital as and when needed could compromise our ability to execute on our business plan, and we may be forced to liquidate our assets. In such a scenario, the values we receive for our assets in liquidation or dissolution could be significantly lower than the values reflected in our financial statements.

 

We will need to raise additional financing to support our business objectives. We cannot be sure we will be able to obtain additional financing on terms favorable to us when needed, or at all. If we are unable to obtain additional financing to meet our needs, our operations may be adversely affected or terminated.

 

Since our inception, we have used substantial amounts of cash to fund our operations and expect our expenses to increase substantially in the foreseeable future. Developing our product candidates and conducting clinical trials in the future will require substantial amounts of capital. We will also require a significant additional amount of capital to commercialize any products that are approved in the future.

 

 
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We will need to raise significant additional capital in the future to pursue our business objectives. Our current financial resources are limited. We will need to raise additional funds in the near future in order to satisfy our working capital and capital expenditure requirements. We may raise additional funds through public or private equity offerings, debt financings, strategic partnerships or alliances, receivables or royalty financings or corporate collaboration and licensing arrangements. We cannot be certain that additional funding will be available on acceptable terms, or at all. To the extent that we raise additional capital by issuing equity securities or convertible debt, your ownership will be diluted and the terms of such financings may include liquidation or other preferences that adversely affect the rights of existing stockholders. Any future debt financing into which we enter may impose upon us covenants that restrict our operations, including limitations on our ability to incur liens or additional debt, pay dividends, redeem our stock, make certain investments and engage in certain merger, consolidation or asset sale transactions. These restrictions could adversely impact our ability to conduct our business and may result in liens being placed on our assets and intellectual property. Debt financings may also be coupled with an equity component, such as warrants to purchase shares, which could also result in dilution of our existing stockholders’ ownership. The incurrence of indebtedness would result in increased fixed payment obligations and could also result in certain restrictive covenants, such as limitations on our ability to incur additional debt, limitations on our ability to acquire or license intellectual property rights and other operating restrictions that could adversely impact our ability to conduct our business and may result in liens being placed on our assets and intellectual property. If we were to default on such indebtedness, we could lose such assets and intellectual property. If we raise additional funds through strategic partnerships and alliances and licensing arrangements with third parties, we may have to relinquish valuable rights to our product candidates. In addition, if we raise additional funds through corporate collaboration and licensing arrangements, it may be necessary to relinquish potentially valuable rights to products or product candidates, or grant licenses on terms that are not favorable to us. Our future capital requirements may depend on a wide range of factors, including, but not limited to:

 

 

·

the costs related to initiation, progress, timing, costs and results of preclinical studies and clinical trials for our product candidates;

 

 

 

 

·

any change in the clinical development plans for these product candidates;

 

 

 

 

·

the number and characteristics of product candidates that we develop or acquire;

 

 

 

 

·

our ability to establish and maintain strategic collaborations, licensing or other commercialization arrangements and the terms and timing of such arrangements;

 

 

 

 

·

the emergence, approval, availability, perceived advantages, relative cost, relative safety and relative efficacy of other products or treatments;

 

 

 

 

·

the events related to the outcome, timing and cost of meeting regulatory requirements established by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (the “DEA”), the FDA or other comparable foreign regulatory authorities;

 

 

 

 

·

the potential costs of filing, prosecuting, defending and enforcing our patent claims and other intellectual property;

 

 

 

 

·

the expenses needed to attract and retain skilled personnel;

 

 

 

 

·

the costs associated with being a public company;

 

 

 

 

·

the cost of defending intellectual property disputes; and

 

 

 

 

·

the cost of marketing and generating revenues for any of our product candidates.

  

If we are unable to raise additional capital when required or on acceptable terms, we may be required to significantly delay, scale back or discontinue one or more of our product development programs or commercialization efforts, or other aspects of our business plan. We also may be required to relinquish, license or otherwise dispose of rights to products or product candidates that we would otherwise seek to commercialize or develop ourselves on terms that are less favorable than might otherwise be available. In addition, our ability to achieve profitability or to respond to competitive pressures would be significantly limited.

 

If we fail to comply with our obligations under our patent licenses with third parties, we could lose license rights that are vital to our business.

 

We are a party to license agreements with NEOMED Institute, a Canadian not-for-profit corporation, renamed adMare in June 2019 (“NEOMED”) and the Research Foundation at Stony Brook University, pursuant to which we in-license key patents and patent applications for our product candidates. These existing licenses impose various diligence, milestone payment, royalty and other obligations on us. If we fail to comply with these obligations, our licensors may have the right to terminate the licenses, in which event we would not be able to develop or market the products covered by such licensed intellectual property. In particular, on April 24, 2019, we exercised our option (the “Option Exercise”) pursuant to the Material and Data Transfer, Option and License Agreement with NEOMED dated as of December 20, 2017, as amended on January 4, 2019 (the “NEOMED Agreement”). If we are found in the future not to be in compliance with the NEOMED Agreement, our license agreement with the Research Foundation at Stony Brook University (the “Stony Brook Agreement”), or any other license agreements it could materially adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects. If we fail to comply with these any of our license obligations, our licensors may have the right to terminate these agreements, in which event we might not be able to develop and market any product candidate that is covered by these agreements. Termination of these licenses or reduction or elimination of our licensed rights may result in our having to negotiate new or reinstated licenses with less favorable terms. We may enter into additional licenses in the future and if we fail to comply with obligations under those agreements, we could suffer similar consequences.

 

 
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Changes in regulatory requirements or other unforeseen circumstances may impact the timing of the initiation or completion of our clinical trials.

 

Changes in regulatory requirements and guidance may occur, and we may need to amend clinical trial protocols or our development plan to reflect these changes. Amendments may require resubmitting clinical trial protocols to the FDA or other similar authorities in other jurisdictions and institutional review boards for reexamination, which may impact the costs, timing or successful completion of our clinical trials. If we experience delays in completion of, or if we terminate any planned clinical trials, the commercial prospects for product candidates may be harmed, and the ability to generate product revenues will be delayed. In addition, many of the factors that cause, or lead to, a delay in the commencement or completion of clinical trials may also ultimately lead to the denial of regulatory approval of product candidates.

 

The full impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Artelo’s clinical trial plans, product development, and how the a regulatory body reviews study data has been significantly impacted by the pandemic, is difficult to predict, but may have a material adverse impact on Artelo’s business operations, clinical trial plans, and product development, including delays in clinical trial and study participant recruitment, delay in regulatory approval of our product candidates, and additional costs and resources. The pandemic’s impact on the economy and drug product manufacturing and supply chain may also adversely affect Artelo’s clinical trial plans and drug development. Additionally, depending on the duration of shelter-in-place, social distancing, and similar measures, as well as business closures and stresses on our healthcare systems and clinical trial sites, Artelo’s ability to recruit participants for its clinical trials may be significantly impacted. Artelo may not be able to commence or complete its clinical trials as currently planned. Artelo may be required to significantly modify its study protocol, policies and procedures in order to address or accommodate patients and study site needs during the pandemic or some time after the immediate concerns have been reduced. Such changes can include modification to protocol inclusion and exclusion criteria, extending the time for patient follow up visits, using telemedicine, phone interviews and other technology to monitor patient safety, all of which will need to be approved.

 

We face many of the risks and difficulties frequently encountered by relatively new companies with respect to our operations.

 

Our business objective is to pursue the licensing, development and commercialization of therapeutic treatments that are associated with modulation of the endocannabinoid system. We have limited operating history as a medical research company engaged in biopharmaceutical research upon which an evaluation of our Company and our prospects could be based. There can be no assurance that our management will be successful in being able to commercially exploit the results, if any, from our product development research projects or that we will be able to develop products and treatments that will enable us to generate sufficient revenues to meet our expenses or to achieve and/or maintain profitability.

 

If we are unable to raise sufficient capital as needed, we may be required to reduce the scope of our planned research and development activities, which could harm our business plans, financial condition and operating results, or cease our operations entirely, in which case, you will lose all your investment.

 

Even if one or more of our product candidates is approved for commercial sale, we anticipate incurring significant costs associated with commercializing any approved product candidate and we may not generate significant revenue from sales of such products, resulting in limited or no profitability in the future. Our prior losses and expected future losses have had and will continue to have an adverse effect on our stockholders’ equity and working capital for the foreseeable future. Any failure to become and remain profitable may adversely affect the market price of our securities, our ability to raise capital and our future viability.

 

We have no mature product candidates and may not be successful in licensing any.

 

One of the key elements of our business strategy is to license technologies or compounds from companies and/or research institutions. We may not be able to identify technologies or compounds that are commercially viable, or that are available for licensure under acceptable terms. If we are able to identify suitable technologies or compounds, we may be unable to successfully negotiate a license, or maintain the licensing and collaboration arrangements necessary to develop and commercialize any product candidates. We may be unable to compete with companies that are more established than us and have greater financial resources than us for licenses to available technologies and compounds. Even if we are successful in licensing programs, we may not be able to satisfy development requirements should we be unable to raise additional funding.

 

Any failure to establish or maintain licensing or collaboration arrangements on favorable terms could adversely affect our ability to develop and commercialize product candidates, which can adversely affect our business prospects and financial condition.

 

Even if we are successful in licensing lead product candidates, resource limitations may limit our ability to successfully develop them.

 

Pharmaceutical development requires substantial capital, skilled personnel and infrastructure to successfully develop products for the market. The success of our business is highly dependent on our ability to successfully develop, obtain regulatory approval for and commercialize products. We do not currently have the financial resources to fund the development of any lead product candidate and there is no assurance that we can raise enough capital to fund product development. If we are unable to raise additional capital, we will not be able to pursue the development of any products and may have to relinquish rights to any products we may have licensed.

  

 
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We do not have any therapeutic products that are approved for commercial sale. Our ability to generate revenue from product sales and become profitable depends significantly on our success in a number of factors.

 

We currently do not have any therapeutic products that are approved for commercial sale. We have not received, and do not expect to receive for at least the next several years, if at all, any revenues from the commercialization of our product candidates if approved. To obtain revenues from sales of our product candidates that are significant or large enough to achieve profitability, we must succeed, either alone or with third parties, in developing, obtaining regulatory approval for, manufacturing and marketing therapies with commercial potential. Our ability to generate revenue and achieve profitability depends significantly on our success in many areas, including:

 

 

·

our research and development efforts, including preclinical studies and clinical trials of our product candidates;

 

 

 

 

·

developing sustainable, scalable, reliable and cost-effective manufacturing and distribution processes for our product candidates, including establishing and maintaining commercially viable supply relationships with third parties and establishing our own current good manufacturing processes (cGMPs), manufacturing facilities and processes;

 

 

 

 

·

addressing any competing technological and industry developments;

 

 

 

 

·

identifying, assessing, acquiring and/or developing new technology platforms and product candidates across numerous therapeutic areas;

 

 

 

 

·

obtaining regulatory approvals and marketing authorizations for product candidates;

 

 

 

 

·

launching and commercializing any approved products, either directly or with a collaborator or distributor;

 

 

 

 

·

obtaining market acceptance of and acceptable reimbursement for any approved products;

 

 

 

 

·

completing collaborations, licenses and other strategic transactions on favorable terms, if at all;

 

 

 

 

·

maintaining, protecting and expanding our portfolio of intellectual property rights, including patents, trade secrets and know-how; and

 

 

 

 

·

attracting, hiring and retaining qualified personnel.

 

We have very limited operating history and capabilities.

 

Although our business was formed in 2011, we have had very limited operations in our current field of interest. We do not currently have the ability to perform the functions necessary to develop any product candidates. The successful development of any product candidates will require us to perform a variety of functions including, but not limited to:

 

·

Identifying, licensing and obtaining development programs and lead candidates;

 

·

Conducting initial research required to identify a lead candidate as the result of intellectual property we have licensed;

 

·

Initiating preclinical, clinical or other required studies for future product candidates;

 

·

Adding manufacturers and suppliers required to advance our programs;

 

·

Obtaining regulatory and marketing approvals for our product candidates that successfully complete clinical studies;

 

·

Making milestone or other payments under any license agreements;

 

·

Expanding, maintaining and protecting our intellectual property portfolio;

 

·

Attracting and retaining skilled personnel; and

 

·

Creating and maintaining an infrastructure required to support our operations as a public company.

 

 
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Our operations continue to be focused on acquiring, developing and securing our proprietary technology and undertaking preclinical and clinical trials of our products.

 

We expect our financial condition and operating results to continue to fluctuate from quarter to quarter and year to year due to a variety of factors, many of which are beyond our control. We will need to transition from a company with a research and development focus to a company capable of undertaking commercial activities. We may encounter unforeseen expenses, difficulties, complications and delays and may not be successful in such a transition.

 

Artelo’s operations and financial results could be adversely impacted by the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak in China and the rest of the world.

 

In December 2019, a novel strain of coronavirus (“COVID-19”) was reported to have surfaced in Wuhan, China, resulting in significant disruptions to manufacturing, supply chain, markets, and travel world-wide, especially businesses involving activities or operations in China. On January 30, 2020, the International Health Regulations Emergency Committee of the World Health Organization (the “WHO”) declared the COVID-19 outbreak a public health emergency of international concern and on March 12, 2020 the WHO announced the outbreak was a pandemic. While the extent of the impact of the current COVID-19 pandemic on our business and financial results is uncertain, a continued and prolonged public health crisis such as the COVID-19 outbreak could have a negative impact on our business, financial condition and operating results. Due to the global pandemic, our clinical trial recruiting and participants could also be slowed or delayed, or in a more severe scenario, our business, financial condition and operating results could be more severely affected. Given the dynamic nature of these circumstances, the duration of any business disruption or potential impact to our business resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic is difficult to predict, but it may increase our costs or expenses.

 

We may not be able to file Investigational New Drug applications to commence additional clinical trials on the timelines we expect, and even if we are able to, the FDA may not permit us to proceed in a timely manner, or at all.

 

Prior to commencing clinical trials in the United States for any of our product candidates, we may be required to have an Investigational New Drug application (“IND”) for each product candidate. Submission of an IND may not result in the FDA allowing clinical trials to begin and, once begun, issues may arise that will require us to suspend or terminate such clinical trials. Additionally, even if relevant regulatory authorities agree with the design and implementation of the clinical trials set forth in an IND or clinical trial application, these regulatory authorities may change their requirements in the future. The fact that we are pursuing novel technologies may also exacerbate these risks with respect to our product candidates, and as a result we may not meet our anticipated clinical development timelines.

 

Use of our product candidates could be associated with side effects or adverse events.

 

As with most biopharmaceutical products, use of our product candidates could be associated with side effects or adverse events which can vary in severity and frequency. Side effects or adverse events associated with the use of our product candidates may be observed at any time, including in clinical trials or once a product is commercialized, and any such side effects or adverse events may negatively affect our ability to obtain regulatory approval or market our product candidates. Side effects such as toxicity or other safety issues associated with the use of our product candidates could require us to perform additional studies or halt development or sale of these product candidates or expose us to product liability lawsuits which will harm our business. We may be required by regulatory agencies to conduct additional preclinical or clinical trials regarding the safety and efficacy of our product candidates which we have not planned or anticipated. We cannot assure you that we will resolve any issues related to any product-related adverse events to the satisfaction of the FDA or any regulatory agency in a timely manner or ever, which could harm our business, prospects and financial condition. We may also inadvertently fail to report adverse events we become aware of within the prescribed timeframe. We may also fail to appreciate that we have become aware of a reportable adverse event, especially if it is not reported to us as an adverse event or if it is an adverse event that is unexpected or removed in time from the use of our products. If we fail to comply with our reporting obligations, the FDA or other foreign regulatory agencies could take action including criminal prosecution, the imposition of civil monetary penalties, seizure of our products, or delay in approval or clearance of future products.

 

Clinical drug development involves a lengthy and expensive process with an uncertain outcome, results of earlier studies and clinical trials may not be predictive of future clinical trial results, and our clinical trials may fail to adequately demonstrate substantial evidence of safety and efficacy of our product candidates.

 

Clinical testing is expensive and can take many years to complete, and its outcome is inherently uncertain. A failure of one or more of our clinical trials can occur at any time during the clinical trial process. The results of preclinical studies and early clinical trials of our product candidates may not be predictive of the results of later-stage clinical trials. There is a high failure rate for drugs proceeding through clinical trials, and product candidates in later stages of clinical trials may fail to show the required safety and efficacy despite having progressed through preclinical studies and initial clinical trials. A number of companies in the pharmaceutical industry have suffered significant setbacks in advanced clinical trials due to lack of efficacy or adverse safety profiles, notwithstanding promising results in earlier clinical trials, and we cannot be certain that we will not face similar setbacks. Even if our clinical trials are completed, the results may not be sufficient to support obtaining regulatory approval for our product candidates.

 

 
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We do not know whether future clinical trials, if any, will begin on time, need to be redesigned, enroll an adequate number of patients on time or be completed on schedule, if at all. Clinical trials can be delayed, suspended or terminated by us, regulatory authorities, clinical trial investigators, and ethics committees for a variety of reasons, including failure to:

 

·

generate sufficient preclinical, toxicology, or other in vivo or in vitro data to support the initiation or continuation of clinical trials;

 

·

obtain regulatory approval, or feedback on clinical trial design, to commence a clinical trial;

 

·

identify, recruit and train suitable clinical investigators;

 

·

reach agreement on acceptable terms with prospective clinical research organizations (“CROs”) and clinical trial sites;

 

·

obtain and maintain institutional review board (“IRB”), approval at each clinical trial site;

 

·

identify, recruit and enroll suitable patients to participate in a clinical trial;

 

·

have a sufficient number of patients complete a clinical trial or return for post-treatment follow-up;

 

·

ensure clinical investigators observe clinical trial protocol or continue to participate in a clinical trial;

 

·

address any patient safety concerns that arise during the course of a clinical trial;

 

·

address any conflicts with new or existing laws or regulations;

 

·

add a sufficient number of clinical trial sites;

 

·

timely manufacture sufficient quantities of a product candidate for use in clinical trials; or

 

·

raise sufficient capital to fund a clinical trial.

 

Patient enrollment is a significant factor in the timing of clinical trials and is affected by many factors, including the size and nature of the patient population, the proximity of patients to clinical sites, the eligibility criteria for the clinical trial, the design of the clinical trial, competing clinical trials and clinicians’ and patients’ or caregivers’ perceptions as to the potential advantages of the drug candidate being studied in relation to other available therapies, including any new drugs or treatments that may be approved for the indications we are investigating.

 

We could also encounter delays if a clinical trial is suspended or terminated by us, by the data safety monitoring board for such clinical trial or by the FDA or any other regulatory authority, or if the IRBs of the institutions in which such clinical trials are being conducted suspend or terminate the participation of their clinical investigators and sites subject to their review. Such authorities may suspend or terminate a clinical trial due to a number of factors, including failure to conduct the clinical trial in accordance with regulatory requirements, including good clinical practices (“GCPs”), or our clinical protocols, inspection of the clinical trial operations or clinical trial site by the FDA or other regulatory authorities resulting in the imposition of a clinical hold, unforeseen safety issues or adverse side effects, failure to demonstrate a benefit from using a product candidate, changes in governmental regulations or administrative actions or lack of adequate funding to continue the clinical trial.

 

If we experience delays in the completion of, or termination of, any clinical trial of our product candidates for any reason, the commercial prospects of our product candidates may be harmed, and our ability to generate product revenues from any of these product candidates will be delayed. In addition, any delays in completing our clinical trials will increase our costs, slow down our product candidate development and approval process and jeopardize our ability to commence product sales and generate revenues. Any of these occurrences may significantly harm our business, financial condition and prospects. In addition, many of the factors that cause, or lead to, a delay in the commencement or completion of clinical trials may also ultimately lead to the denial of regulatory approval of our product candidates.

 

 
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Due to our limited resources, we may be forced to focus on a limited number of development candidates which may force us to pass on opportunities that could have a greater chance of clinical success.

 

Due to our limited resources and capabilities, we will have to decide to focus on developing a limited number of product candidates. As a result, we may forego or delay pursuit of opportunities with other product candidates or for other indications that later prove to have greater commercial potential. Our resource allocation decisions may cause us to fail to capitalize on viable commercial product candidates or profitable market opportunities. Our spending on research and development programs and product candidates for specific indications may not yield any commercially viable products. If we do not accurately evaluate the commercial potential or target market for a particular product candidate, we may relinquish valuable rights to that product candidate through collaboration, licensing or other royalty arrangements in cases in which it would have been more advantageous for us to retain sole development and commercialization rights to such product candidate.

 

We will need to rely on third parties to conduct our preclinical research and clinical trials and those third parties may not perform satisfactorily, including failing to meet deadlines for the completion of such research or trials.

 

We plan to rely on third-party CROs, to conduct the majority of our preclinical research studies and our clinical trials. In addition, we plan to rely on other third parties, such as clinical data management organizations, medical institutions and clinical investigators, to conduct those clinical trials. There is no assurance we can obtain the services we need at commercially reasonable prices or within the timeframes we desire. Even though we will enter into agreements governing their activities, we will have limited influence over their actual performance and we will control only certain aspects of their activities. Further, agreements with such third parties might terminate for a variety of reasons, including a failure to perform by the CROs. If there is any dispute or disruption in our relationship with our contractors or if we need to enter into alternative arrangements, that would delay our product development activities.

 

Our reliance on third parties for research and development activities will reduce our control over these activities, and will not relieve us of our responsibilities. For example, we will remain responsible for ensuring that each of our clinical trials is conducted in accordance with the general investigational plan and protocols for the trial. If any of our CROs’ processes, methodologies or results were determined to be invalid or inadequate, our own clinical data and results and related regulatory approvals could be adversely affected. Moreover, the FDA requires us to comply with GCPs for conducting, recording and reporting the results of clinical trials to assure that data and reported results are credible and accurate and that the rights, integrity and confidentiality of trial participants are protected. The FDA enforces these GCPs through periodic inspections of trial sponsors, principal investigators and clinical trial sites. If we or our CRO fail to comply with applicable GCPs, the clinical data generated in our clinical trials may be deemed unreliable and the FDA may require us to perform additional clinical trials before approving any marketing applications. Upon inspection, the FDA may determine that our clinical trials did not comply with GCPs. In addition, our clinical trials will require a sufficiently large number of test subjects to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a product candidate. Accordingly, if our CROs fail to comply with these regulations or fail to recruit a sufficient number of patients, our clinical trials may be delayed or we may be required to repeat such clinical trials, which would delay the regulatory approval process.

 

Furthermore, these third parties may also have relationships with other entities, some of which may be our competitors. If these third parties do not successfully carry out their contractual duties, meet expected deadlines, or if the quality of the clinical data they obtain is compromised due to the failure to conduct our clinical trials in accordance with regulatory requirements or our stated protocols, we will not be able to obtain, or may be delayed in obtaining, marketing approvals for our product candidates and will not be able to, or may be delayed in our efforts to, successfully commercialize our product candidates.

   

We currently have no marketing and sales organization and have no experience in marketing products. If we are unable to establish marketing and sales capabilities or enter into agreements with third parties to market and sell our product candidates, we may not be able to generate product revenue.

 

We currently have no sales, marketing or distribution capabilities and have no experience as a company in marketing products. If we develop internal sales, marketing and distribution organization, this would require significant capital expenditures, management resources and time, and we would have to compete with other pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to recruit, hire, train and retain marketing and sales personnel.

 

 
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If we are unable or decide not to establish internal sales, marketing and distribution capabilities, we expect to pursue collaborative arrangements regarding the sales, marketing and distribution of our products. However, we may not be able to establish or maintain such collaborative arrangements, or if we are able to do so, their sales forces may not be successful in marketing our products. Any revenue we receive would depend upon the efforts of such third parties, which may not be successful. We may have little or no control over the sales, marketing and distribution efforts of such third parties and our revenue from product sales may be lower than if we had commercialized our product candidates ourselves. We also face competition in our search for third parties to assist us with the sales, marketing and distribution efforts of our product candidates. There can be no assurance that we will be able to develop internal sales, marketing distribution capabilities or establish or maintain relationships with third-party collaborators to commercialize any product in the United States or overseas.

 

If any of our offices become damaged or inoperable, or we are required to vacate our facilities, our ability to pursue our research and development efforts may be jeopardized.

 

We currently do not have any manufacturing facilities. We also do not own any properties, laboratories, or manufacturing facilities. However, we have offices in La Jolla, California, and Dublin, Ireland. Our facilities could be harmed or rendered inoperable by natural or man-made disasters, including earthquakes, fires, power shortages, telecommunications failures, water shortages, famines, pestilence, floods, hurricanes, typhoons, tornadoes, extreme weather conditions, medical epidemics, pandemics, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, cyber warfare, international conflict, climate change, and other natural or man-made disasters or other business interruptions, for which we are predominantly self-insured. Any of these may render it difficult or impossible for us to continue company operations. If any of our facilities is inoperable for even a short period of time, the interruption in research and development may result in harm to our reputation and increased costs, which would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations. Furthermore, it could be costly and time-consuming to repair or replace our facilities and the equipment we use to perform our research and development work.

 

Even if we are successful in licensing or developing research programs and/or product candidates, we or our licensors must maintain the intellectual property.

 

Our commercial success is significantly dependent on intellectual property related to any product candidates and technologies we may either acquire, license or develop internally. We are currently the licensee of multiple issued patents and pending patent applications and we intend to license additional technologies from pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, and research institutions. In addition, we have one U.S. patent, one U.S. patent application, and two foreign patent applications directed to a solid-state CBD composition.

      

Our success depends in large part on our and our licensor’s ability to obtain and maintain patent protection in the United States and other countries with respect to our proprietary technology and product candidates. In some circumstances, we may not have the right to control the preparation, filing and prosecution of patent applications, or to maintain the patents, covering technology or products that we license from third parties. Therefore, we cannot be certain that these patents and applications will be prosecuted and enforced in a manner consistent with the best interests of our business. In addition, if third parties who license patents to us fail to maintain such patents, or lose rights to those patents, the rights we have licensed may be reduced or eliminated.

 

The patent position of biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies generally is highly uncertain, involves complex legal and factual questions and has in recent years been the subject of much litigation. As a result, the issuance, scope, validity, enforceability and commercial value of our and our licensor’s patent rights are highly uncertain. Our and our licensor’s pending and future patent applications may not result in patents being issued which protect our technology or products or which effectively prevent others from commercializing competitive technologies and products. Changes in either the patent laws or interpretation of the patent laws in the United States and other countries may diminish the value of our patents or narrow the scope of our patent protection. The laws of foreign countries may not protect our rights to the same extent as the laws of the United States. Publications of discoveries in the scientific literature often lag behind the actual discoveries, and patent applications in the United States and other jurisdictions are typically not published until 18 months after filing, or in some cases not at all. Therefore, we cannot be certain that we or our licensor were the first to make the inventions claimed in our owned and licensed patents or pending patent applications, or that we or our licensor were the first to file for patent protection of such inventions. Assuming the other requirements for patentability are met, the first to file a patent application is entitled to the patent. We may become involved in opposition or interference proceedings challenging our patent rights or the patent rights of others. An adverse determination in any such proceeding could reduce the scope of, or invalidate our patent rights, allow third parties to commercialize our technology or product candidates and compete directly with us, without payment to us, or result in our inability to manufacture or commercialize our product candidates without infringing third-party patent rights.

 

 
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Even if any owned and/or licensed patent applications issue as patents, they may not issue in a form that will provide us with any meaningful protection, prevent competitors from competing with us or otherwise provide us with any competitive advantage. Our competitors may be able to circumvent our owned or licensed patents by developing similar or alternative technologies or products in a non-infringing manner. The issuance of a patent is not conclusive as to its scope, validity or enforceability, and our owned and licensed patents may be challenged in the courts or patent offices in the United States and abroad. Such challenges may result in patent claims being narrowed, invalidated or held unenforceable, which could limit our ability to stop or prevent us from stopping others from using or commercializing similar or identical technology and products, or limit the duration of the patent protection of our technology and product candidates. Given the amount of time required for the development, testing and regulatory review of new product candidates, patents protecting such candidates might expire before or shortly after such candidates are commercialized. As a result, our owned and licensed patent portfolio may not provide us with sufficient rights to exclude others from commercializing products similar or identical to ours.

   

The costs and other requirements associated with filing new patent applications, and the ongoing cost of prosecuting pending patent applications and maintenance of issued patents are material to us. Bearing these costs and complying with these requirements are essential to procurement and maintenance of patents integral to our product candidates.

 

Legal, filing costs, periodic maintenance fees, renewal fees, annuity fees and various other governmental fees on patents and/or patent applications will come due for payment periodically throughout the lifecycle of patent applications and issued patents. In order to help ensure that we comply with any required fee payment, documentary and/or procedural requirements as they might relate to any patents for which we are an assignee or co-assignee, we employ legal help and related professionals as needed to comply with those requirements. Failure to meet a required fee payment, document production or procedural requirement can result in the abandonment of a pending patent application or the lapse of an issued patent. In some instances, the defect can be cured through late compliance, but there are situations where the failure to meet the required deadline cannot be cured. Such an occurrence could compromise the intellectual property protection around a preclinical or clinical product candidate and possibly weaken or eliminate our ability to protect our eventual market share for that product candidate.

 

Our ability to research, develop and commercialize any product candidates is dependent on our ability to acquire, maintain or utilize third party contract research facilities that possess licenses relating to the cultivation, possession and supply of controlled substances.

 

In the United States, the DEA regulates the cultivation, possession and supply of cannabis for medical research and/or commercial development, including the requirement of annual registrations to manufacture or distribute cannabinoid-based pharmaceuticals. We do not currently conduct manufacturing or repackaging/relabeling of any product candidates in the United States, however we intend to conduct research on cannabinoids, including naturally-occurring cannabinoids, which are currently considered a Schedule 1 controlled substance. We plan to obtain the required licenses regulating the possession and supply of cannabinoids and to utilize third party contractors to conduct research who have the required registrations, however there is no assurance that we will be successful in obtaining the required licenses or that we will be successful identifying or engaging third party contractors who have the required registrations.

 

 
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We plan to conduct a significant portion of our research in the United Kingdom, where licenses to cultivate, possess and supply cannabinoids for medical research are granted by the Home Office on an annual basis. We do not currently possess the required licenses, so until we do so, our research must be conducted within research institutions that possess the required licenses. If we are unable to conduct research at institutions that possess the required licenses, or if those licenses are not renewed in the future, we may not be in a position to engage in or carry on research and development programs in the United Kingdom. In order to carry out research in countries other than the United States and the United Kingdom, similar licenses to those outlined above are required to be issued by the relevant authority in each country. In addition, we will be required to obtain licenses to export from the U.S. and to import into the recipient country. We may also conduct a portion of our research in Canada, where we currently collaborating on certain research, and Ireland, where we currently have an office.

 

To date, we have not obtained import, export, or supply licenses in any countries. We do not have an established track record of obtaining such required licenses and there is no assurance we will be able to obtain or maintain such licenses in the future, which could restrict our ability to conduct the research required for development and commercialization of lead products.

  

Any product candidates we develop will be subject to U.S. controlled substance laws and regulations and failure to comply with these laws and regulations, or the cost of compliance with these laws and regulations, may adversely affect the results of our business operations, both during clinical development and post approval, and our financial condition.

 

Some of our product candidates may contain controlled substances as defined in the federal Controlled Substances Act of 1970 (the “CSA”). Controlled substances that are pharmaceutical products are subject to a high degree of regulation under the CSA, which establishes, among other things, certain registration, manufacturing quotas, security, recordkeeping, reporting, import, export and other requirements administered by the DEA. The DEA classifies controlled substances into five schedules: Schedule I, II, III, IV or V substances. Schedule I substances by definition have a high potential for abuse, no currently “accepted medical use” in the United States, lack accepted safety for use under medical supervision, and may not be prescribed, marketed or sold in the U.S. Pharmaceutical products approved for use in the United States which contain a controlled substance are listed as Schedule II, III, IV or V, with Schedule II substances considered to present the highest potential for abuse or dependence and Schedule V substances the lowest relative risk of abuse among such substances. Schedule I and II drugs are subject to the strictest controls under the CSA, including manufacturing and procurement quotas, security requirements and criteria for importation. In addition, dispensing of Schedule II drugs is further restricted. For example, they may not be refilled without a new prescription.

 

While cannabis is a Schedule I controlled substance, products approved for medical use in the United States that contain cannabis or cannabis extracts may be placed in Schedules II-V, since approval by the FDA satisfies the “accepted medical use” requirement. If and when any of our product candidates receive FDA approval, the DEA will make a scheduling determination and place the product in a schedule other than Schedule I in order for it to be prescribed to patients in the U.S. Consequently, the manufacture, importation, exportation, domestic distribution, storage, sale and legitimate use will be subject to specific and potentially significant levels of regulation by the DEA. On November 25, 2015 the President of the United States signed a new law that (i) amends the CSA to require the DEA to issue an interim final scheduling rule within ninety days following FDA approval and the Secretary of Health and Human Services recommending that the Attorney General control the drug in Schedule II, III, IV or V, and (ii) amends the FDCA to ensure that companies do not lose exclusivity on newly approved drugs because of the DEA drug scheduling process. Furthermore, if the FDA, DEA, or any foreign regulatory authority determines that any approved cannabinoid-based products may have potential for abuse, it may require us to generate more clinical or other data than we customary to establish whether or to what extent the substance has an abuse potential, which could increase the cost and/or delay the launch of that product.

 

 
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DEA registration and inspection of facilities. Facilities conducting research, manufacturing, distributing, importing or exporting, or dispensing controlled substances must be registered (licensed) to perform these activities and have the security, control, recordkeeping, reporting and inventory mechanisms required by the DEA to prevent drug loss and diversion. All these facilities must renew their registrations annually, except dispensing facilities, which must renew every three years. The DEA conducts periodic inspections of certain registered establishments that handle controlled substances. Obtaining the necessary registrations may result in delay of the importation, manufacturing or distribution of any cannabinoid derived products we may develop. Furthermore, failure to maintain compliance with the CSA, particularly non-compliance resulting in loss or diversion, can result in regulatory action that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. The DEA may seek civil penalties, refuse to renew necessary registrations, or initiate proceedings to restrict, suspend or revoke those registrations. In certain circumstances, violations could lead to criminal proceedings.

  

State-controlled substances laws. Individual states have also established controlled substance laws and regulations. Though state-controlled substances laws often mirror federal law, because the states are separate jurisdictions, they may separately schedule our product candidates as well. While some states automatically schedule a drug based on federal action, other states schedule drugs through rulemaking or a legislative action. State scheduling may delay commercial sale of any product for which we obtain federal regulatory approval and adverse scheduling could have a material adverse effect on the commercial attractiveness of such product. We or our partners must also obtain separate state registrations, permits or licenses in order to be able to obtain, handle, and distribute controlled substances for clinical trials or commercial sale, and failure to meet applicable regulatory requirements could lead to enforcement and sanctions by the states in addition to those from the DEA or otherwise arising under federal law.

 

Clinical trials. It is possible some compounds we develop may contain cannabinoids, which may be designated as Schedule I substances, therefore to conduct clinical trials in the United States prior to approval, each of our research sites must submit a research protocol to the DEA and obtain and maintain a DEA researcher registration that will allow those sites to handle and dispense our lead products, as applicable, and to obtain the product from our importer. If the DEA delays or denies the grant of a research registration to one or more research sites, the clinical trial could be significantly delayed, and we could lose clinical trial sites. The importer for the clinical trials must also obtain a Schedule I importer registration and an import permit for each import. We do not currently conduct any clinical trials, manufacturing or repackaging/relabeling in the U.S.

 

Importation. If one of our product candidates is approved and classified as a Schedule II or III substance, an importer can import for commercial purposes if it obtains an importer registration and files an application for an import permit for each import. The DEA provides annual assessments/estimates to the International Narcotics Control Board which guides the DEA in the amounts of controlled substances that the DEA authorizes to be imported. The failure to identify an importer or obtain the necessary import authority, including specific quantities, could affect product availability and have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. In addition, an application for a Schedule II importer registration must be published in the Federal Register, and there is a waiting period for third party comments to be submitted. It is always possible a competitor could take this opportunity to make adverse comments that delay the grant of an importer registration.

 

If one of our product candidates is approved and classified as a Schedule II controlled substance, federal law may prohibit the import of the substance for commercial purposes. If a product is listed as a Schedule II substance, we will not be allowed to import that drug for commercial purposes unless the DEA determines that domestic supplies are inadequate or there is inadequate domestic competition among domestic manufacturers for the substance as defined by the DEA. It is always possible the DEA could find that the active substance in a product, even if it is a plant derived substance, could be manufactured in the US. Moreover, Schedule I controlled substances, have never been registered with the DEA for importation commercial purposes, only for scientific and research needs. Therefore, if any of our future products could not be imported, that product would have to be wholly manufactured in the United States, and we would need to secure a manufacturer that would be required to obtain and maintain a separate DEA registration for that activity.

 

 
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Manufacture in the United States. If, because of a Schedule II classification or voluntarily, we were to conduct manufacturing or repackaging/relabeling in the United States, our contract manufacturers would be subject to the DEA’s annual manufacturing and procurement quota requirements. Additionally, regardless of the scheduling of any future product candidates, if the active ingredient in the final dosage form is a cannabinoid and is currently a Schedule I controlled substance it would be subject to such quotas as these substances could remain listed on Schedule I. The annual quota allocated to us or our contract manufacturers for the active ingredients in our products may not be sufficient to complete clinical trials or meet commercial demand. Consequently, any delay or refusal by the DEA in establishing our, or our contract manufacturers’, procurement and/or production quota for controlled substances could delay or stop our clinical trials or product launches, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position and operations.

  

Distribution in the United States. If any of our product candidates is scheduled as Schedule II or III, we would also need to identify wholesale distributors with the appropriate DEA and state registrations and authority to distribute the product to pharmacies and other health care providers. We would need to identify distributors to distribute the product to pharmacies; these distributors would need to obtain Schedule II or III distribution registrations. The failure to obtain, or delay in obtaining, or the loss any of those registrations could result in increased costs to us. If any of our product candidates is a Schedule II drug, pharmacies would have to maintain enhanced security with alarms and monitoring systems, and they must adhere to recordkeeping and inventory requirements. This may discourage some pharmacies from carrying either or both of these products. Furthermore, state and federal enforcement actions, regulatory requirements, and legislation intended to reduce prescription drug abuse, such as the requirement that physicians consult a state prescription drug monitoring program may make physicians less willing to prescribe, and pharmacies to dispense, Schedule II products.

 

Our product development projects, if approved, may be unable to achieve the expected market acceptance and, consequently, limit our ability to generate revenue.

 

Even when and if product development is successful and regulatory approval has been obtained, our ability to generate significant revenue depends on the acceptance of our product candidates by physicians and patients. We cannot assure you that any of our product candidates will achieve the expected market acceptance and revenue, if and when we obtain the regulatory approvals. The market acceptance of any of our potential products depends on a number of factors, including the indication statement and warnings approved by regulatory authorities in the drug label, continued demonstration of efficacy and safety in commercial use, physicians’ willingness to prescribe the product, reimbursement from third-party payers such as government health care systems and insurance companies, the price of the product, the nature of any post-approval risk management plans mandated by regulatory authorities, competition, and marketing and distribution support. Any factors preventing or limiting the market acceptance of our products could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Results of preclinical studies and earlier clinical trials are not necessarily predictive indicators of future results.

 

Any positive results from future preclinical testing of our product candidates and potential clinical trials may not necessarily be predictive of the results from Phase 1, Phase 2 or Phase 3 clinical trials. In addition, our interpretation of results derived from clinical data or our conclusions based on our preclinical data may prove inaccurate. Frequently, pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have suffered significant setbacks in clinical trials after achieving positive results in preclinical testing and early clinical trials, and we cannot be certain that we will not face similar setbacks. These setbacks may be caused by the fact that preclinical and clinical data can be susceptible to varying interpretations and analyses. Furthermore, certain product candidates performed satisfactorily in preclinical studies and clinical trials, but nonetheless failed to obtain FDA approval or a marketing authorization granted by the European Commission. If we fail to produce positive results in our clinical trials for our product candidates, the development timeline and regulatory approval and commercialization prospects for them and as a result our business and financial prospects, would be materially adversely affected.

 

 
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Clinical trials of cannabinoid-based product candidates are novel with very limited or non-existing history; we face a significant risk that the trials will not result in commercially viable products and treatments.

 

At present, there is only a very limited documented clinical trial history from which we can derive any scientific conclusions, or prove that our present assumptions for the current and planned research are scientifically compelling. While we are encouraged by the limited results of clinical trials by others, there can be no assurance that any clinical trial will result in commercially viable products or treatments.

  

Clinical trials are expensive, time consuming and difficult to design and implement. We, as well as the regulatory authorities may suspend, delay or terminate our clinical trials at any time, may require us, for various reasons, to conduct additional clinical trials, or may require a particular clinical trial to continue for a longer duration than originally planned, including, among others:

 

lack of effectiveness of any formulation or delivery system during clinical trials;

 

discovery of serious or unexpected toxicities or side effects experienced by trial participants or other safety issues;

 

slower than expected rates of subject recruitment and enrollment rates in clinical trials;

 

delays or inability in manufacturing or obtaining sufficient quantities of materials for use in clinical trials due to regulatory and manufacturing constraints;

 

delays in obtaining regulatory authorization to commence a trial, including IRB approvals, licenses required for obtaining and using cannabinoids for research, either before or after a trial is commenced;

 

unfavorable results from ongoing pre-clinical studies and clinical trials;

 

patients or investigators failing to comply with study protocols;

 

patients failing to return for post-treatment follow-up at the expected rate;

 

sites participating in an ongoing clinical study withdraw, requiring us to engage new sites;

 

third-party clinical investigators decline to participate in our clinical studies, do not perform the clinical studies on the anticipated schedule, or act in ways inconsistent with the established investigator agreement, clinical study protocol, good clinical practices, and other IRB requirements;

 

third-party entities do not perform data collection and analysis in a timely or accurate manner or at all; or

 

regulatory inspections of our clinical studies require us to undertake corrective action or suspend or terminate our clinical studies.

 

Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

 
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Changes in consumer preferences and acceptance of cannabinoid-derived products and any negative trends will adversely affect our business.

 

We are substantially dependent on initial and continued market acceptance and proliferation of cannabinoid-derived therapeutic treatments. We believe that as cannabinoid-derived products become more widely accepted by the medical and scientific communities and the public at large, the stigma associated with cannabinoid-derived products and treatments will moderate and, as a result, consumer demand will likely continue to grow. However, we cannot predict the future growth rate and size of the market, assuming that the regulatory framework is favorable of which there can be no assurance. Any negative outlook on cannabinoid-derived products and treatments could adversely affect our business prospects.

 

In addition, while some may believe that large, well-funded pharmaceutical and other related businesses and industries may have material economic reasons to be in strong opposition to cannabinoid-based products, we do not believe that it is accurate. Despite the fact that several large pharmaceutical companies are already marketing FDA approved cannabinoid-based or ECS targeting therapies, it remains relatively uncommon among the global pharmaceutical giants. The pharmaceutical industry is also well-funded with a strong and experienced lobby presence at both the federal and state levels as well as internationally, that surpasses financial resources of the current group of research and development companies working on product candidates that modulate the endocannabinoid system. Any effort the pharmaceutical lobby could or might undertake to halt or delay the development of cannabinoid-based products could have a detrimental impact on our business.

 

These pressures could also limit or restrict the introduction and marketing of any such cannabinoid-derived product. Adverse publicity regarding cannabis misuse or adverse side effects from cannabis or other cannabinoid-derived products may adversely affect the commercial success or marketability. The nature of our business attracts and may be expected to continue to attract a high level of public and media interest and, in the event of any related adverse publicity, we may not succeed in monetizing our products and treatments.

 

Our product candidates may contain controlled substances, the use of which may generate public controversy.

 

Since our product candidates may contain controlled substances, their regulatory approval may generate public controversy. Political and social pressures and adverse publicity could lead to delays in approval of, and increased expenses for, our product candidates. These pressures could also limit or restrict the introduction and marketing of our product candidates. Adverse publicity from cannabis misuse or adverse side effects from cannabis or other cannabinoid-derived products may adversely affect the commercial success or market penetration achievable by our product candidates. The nature of our business will likely attract a high-level of public and media interest, and in the event of any resultant adverse publicity, our reputation may be harmed.

 

The FDA has only approved one plant-derived cannabinoid drug as a safe and effective treatment for indications related to epilepsy in children.

 

To date, the FDA has approved one plant-derived cannabinoid product as safe and effective for indications related to epilepsy in children. The FDA is aware that there is considerable interest in the use of cannabinoids to attempt to treat a number of medical conditions. Before conducting testing in humans in the U.S. of a drug that has not been approved by the FDA, we will need to submit an IND application to the FDA. Failure to comply with applicable U.S. requirements may subject a company to a variety of administrative or judicial sanctions, such as FDA refusal to approve pending new drug applications (“NDAs”), warning letters, product recalls, product seizures, total or partial suspension of production or distribution, injunctions, fines, civil penalties and criminal prosecution.

 

 
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Laws and regulations affecting therapeutic uses of cannabinoids are constantly evolving.

 

The constant evolution of laws and regulations affecting the research and development of cannabinoid-based pharmaceutical products and treatments could detrimentally affect our business. Laws and regulations related to the therapeutic uses of cannabinoids are subject to changing interpretations. These changes may require us to incur substantial costs associated with legal and compliance fees and ultimately require us to alter our business plan. Furthermore, violations or alleged violation of these laws could disrupt our business and result in a material adverse effect on our operations. In addition, we cannot predict the nature of any future laws, regulations, interpretations or applications of laws and regulations and it is possible that new laws and regulations may be enacted in the future that will be directly applicable to our business.

 

Cannabinoid-based research activities in the pharmaceutical industry may make it difficult to obtain insurance coverage.

 

In the event that we decide to commence research based on plant-derived cannabinoids in the U.S., obtaining and maintaining necessary insurance coverage, for such things as workers compensation, general liability, product liability and directors and officers insurance, may be more difficult and expensive for us to find because of our research directions utilizing synthetic and plant-derived cannabinoids. There can be no assurance that we will be able to find such insurance, if needed, or that the cost of coverage will be affordable or cost-effective. If, either because of unavailability or cost prohibitive reasons, we are compelled to operate without insurance coverage, we may be prevented from entering certain business sectors, experience inhibited growth potential and/or expose us to additional risks and financial liabilities.

 

We face a potentially highly competitive market.

 

Demand for medical cannabinoid-derived products is dependent on a number of social, political and economic factors that are beyond our control. While we believe that demand for such products will continue to grow, there is no assurance that such increase in demand will happen, that we will benefit from any demand increase or that our business, in fact, will ever become profitable.

 

The emerging markets for cannabinoid-derived products and medical research and development are and will likely remain competitive. The development and commercialization of products is highly competitive. We compete with a variety of multinational pharmaceutical companies and specialized biotechnology companies, as well as products and processes being developed by universities and other research institutions. Many of our competitors have developed, are developing, or will develop products and processes competitive with our product candidates. Competitive therapeutic treatments include those that have already been approved and accepted by the medical community and any new treatments that may enter the market. For some of our product development directions, other treatment options are currently available, under development, and may become commercially available in the future. If any of our product candidates is approved for the diseases and conditions we are currently pursuing, they may compete with a range of therapeutic treatments that are either in development or currently marketed.

 

 
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Changes in legislation or regulation in the health care systems in the United States and foreign jurisdictions may affect us.

 

Our ability to successfully commercialize our products may depend on how the U.S. and other governments and/or health administrations provide coverage and/or reimbursements for our products. The ongoing efforts of governments, insurance companies, and other participants in the health care services industry to trim health care costs may adversely affect our ability to achieve profitability.

 

In certain foreign markets, including countries in the European Union, pricing of prescription pharmaceuticals is subject to governmental control. Price negotiations with governmental authorities may range from 6 to 12 months or longer after the receipt of regulatory marketing approval for a product. Our business could be detrimentally impacted if reimbursements of our products are unavailable or limited if pricing is set at unacceptable levels.

 

We are highly dependent on our key personnel, and if we are not successful in attracting and retaining highly qualified personnel, we may not be able to successfully implement our business strategy.

 

Our ability to compete in our highly competitive industry depends upon our ability to attract and retain highly qualified managerial, scientific and medical personnel. We are highly dependent on our Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, President, Treasurer and Secretary, Gregory D. Gorgas. The loss of the services of Mr. Gorgas, and our inability to find a suitable replacement could result in delays in research and development and product development and harm our business. Additionally, although we have entered into an employment agreement with Mr. Gorgas, this employment agreement provides for at-will employment, which means that Mr. Gorgas could leave our employment at any time, with or without notice. We do not maintain “key man” insurance policies on the life of Mr. Gorgas.

 

Competition for skilled personnel in our market is intense and may limit our ability to hire and retain highly qualified personnel on acceptable terms or at all. To induce valuable service providers to remain at our Company, in addition to salary and cash incentives, we have issued stock options and restricted stock awards that vest over time. The value to service providers of stock options and restricted stock awards that vest over time may be significantly affected by movements in our stock price that are beyond our control, and may at any time be insufficient to counteract more lucrative offers from other companies. Despite our efforts to retain valuable employees, members of our management, scientific and development teams may terminate their employment with us on short notice. Our success depends on our ability to continue to attract, retain and motivate highly skilled junior, mid-level and senior managers as well as junior, mid-level and senior scientific and medical personnel. If we are not successful in attracting and retaining highly qualified personnel, it would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

We will need to grow the size and capabilities of our organization, and we may experience difficulties in managing this growth.

 

To effect our business plan, we will need to rapidly add other management, accounting, regulatory, and scientific staff. We currently have only three employees. We will need to attract, retain and motivate a significant number of new additional managerial, operational, sales, marketing, financial, and other personnel, as well as highly skilled scientific and medical personnel, and to expand our capabilities to successfully pursue our research, development, manufacturing and commercialization efforts and secure collaborations to market and distribute our products. This growth may strain our existing managerial, operational, financial and other resources. We also intend to add personnel in our research and development and regulatory departments as we expand our clinical trial and research capabilities. Moreover, we will need to hire additional accounting and other personnel and augment our infrastructure as we continue to grow the Company. Any inability to attract and retain qualified employees to enable our planned growth and establish additional capabilities or our failure to manage our growth effectively could delay or curtail our product development and commercialization efforts and harm our business.

 

 
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We are currently reliant on consultants to oversee critical activities and perform services on behalf of the Company.

 

Due to our limited financial resources, we have engaged consultants to work on a part-time basis to oversee critical activities and perform services on behalf of the Company. Even if we are successful in raising additional capital and require those activities and services be performed by full-time employees, there is no guarantee that we will be able to hire our current consultants or consultants with similar background and experience to oversee those functions or perform services on behalf of the Company. We are also at risk that the consultants we use may not be able to perform services on a timely basis for us as opposed to other companies who may offer greater compensation or more opportunity than we do, and that those consultants may eventually decide to accept full-time employment with other companies, some of which could be a direct competitor to us.

 

We have incurred losses since inception and cannot assure that we will ever achieve or sustain profitability.

 

We have incurred losses since inception. We expect to continue to incur significant expenses and increasing operating and net losses for the foreseeable future. To date, we have financed our operations primarily through the sale of equity securities. To date our primary activities have been limited to, and our limited resources have been dedicated to, raising capital, non-clinical research on our programs, recruiting service providers, negotiating with business partners and licensors of intellectual property, filing patent applications, and complying with public reporting requirements.

 

We have never been profitable and do not expect to be profitable in the foreseeable future. We expect our expenses to increase significantly as we pursue our objectives. The extent of our future operating losses and the timing of profitability are highly uncertain, and we expect to continue to incur significant expenses and operating losses over the next several years. Our prior and continuing losses have had and will continue to have an adverse effect on our stockholders’ equity and working capital. We cannot assure that we will ever be able to achieve profitability. Even if we achieve profitability, we may not be able to sustain or increase profitability on a quarterly or annual basis. Our failure to become and remain profitable would depress the value of our company and could impair our ability to raise capital, expand our business, license additional programs, establish or maintain development efforts, obtain regulatory approvals or continue operations.

 

Our employees or consultants may engage in misconduct or other improper activities, including non-compliance with regulatory standards and requirements.

 

We are exposed to the risk of employee fraud or other misconduct. Misconduct by our employees or consultants could include intentional failures to comply with FDA regulations, to provide accurate information to the FDA, to comply with manufacturing standards we have established, to comply with federal and state healthcare fraud and abuse laws and regulations, to report financial information or data accurately or to disclose unauthorized activities to us. In particular, sales, marketing and business arrangements in the healthcare industry are subject to extensive laws and regulations intended to prevent fraud, kickbacks, self-dealing and other abusive practices. These laws and regulations may restrict or prohibit a wide range of pricing, discounting, marketing and promotion, sales commission, customer incentive programs and other business arrangements. Employee misconduct could also involve the improper use of individually identifiable information, including, without limitation, information obtained in the course of clinical trials, which could result in regulatory sanctions and serious harm to our reputation. We have adopted a code of business conduct and ethics, but it is not always possible to identify and deter employee misconduct, and the precautions we take to detect and prevent improper activities may not be effective in controlling unknown or unmanaged risks or losses or in protecting us from governmental investigations or other actions or lawsuits stemming from a failure to be in compliance with such laws or regulations. If any such actions are instituted against us, and we are not successful in defending ourselves or asserting our rights, those actions could have a significant impact on our business, including the imposition of significant fines or other sanctions, including civil, criminal or administrative.

 

 
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We may not successfully manage our growth.

 

Our success will depend upon the effective management of our growth, which will place a significant strain on our management and on administrative, operational and financial resources. To manage this growth, we will be required to expand our facilities, augment our operational, financial and management systems and hire and train additional qualified personnel. Our inability to manage this growth could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

RISKS RELATED TO OUR INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

 

If we are unable to obtain and maintain patent protection for our products, our competitors could develop and commercialize products and technology similar or identical to our product candidates, and our ability to successfully commercialize any product candidates we may develop, and our science may be adversely affected.

 

As with our competitors, our ability to maintain and solidify a proprietary position for our product candidates will depend upon our success in obtaining effective patent claims that cover such product candidates, their manufacturing processes and their intended methods of use, and enforcing those claims once granted. Furthermore, in some cases, we may not be able to obtain issued claims covering our product candidates which are sufficient to prevent third parties, such as our competitors, from either utilizing our technology or designing around any patent claims to avoid infringing them. Any failure to obtain or maintain patent protection with respect to our product candidates could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

Changes in either the patent laws or their interpretation in the U.S. and other countries may diminish our ability to protect our inventions, obtain, maintain, and enforce our intellectual property rights and, more generally, could affect the value of our intellectual property or narrow the scope of our issued patents. Additionally, we cannot predict whether the patent applications we or our licensors are currently pursuing will issue as patents in any particular jurisdiction or whether the claims of any issued patents will provide sufficient protection from competitors or other third parties.

 

The patent prosecution process is expensive, time-consuming, and complex, and we may not be able to file, prosecute, maintain, enforce, or license all necessary or desirable patent applications at a reasonable cost or in a timely manner. It is also possible that we will fail to identify patentable aspects of our research and development output in time to file for or obtain patent protection. Although we enter into non-disclosure and confidentiality agreements with parties who have access to confidential or patentable aspects of our research and development output, such as our employees, corporate collaborators, outside scientific collaborators, suppliers, consultants, advisors and other third parties, any of these parties may breach the agreements and disclose such output before a patent application is filed, thereby jeopardizing our ability to seek patent protection. If any licensors are not fully cooperative or disagree with us as to the prosecution, maintenance or enforcement of any patent rights, such patent rights could be compromised or even lost entirely. If there are material defects in the form, preparation or prosecution of our patents or patent applications, such patents or applications may be subject to challenges based on invalidity and/or unenforceability. Any of these outcomes could impair our ability to prevent competition from third parties, which may have an adverse impact on our business.

 

Patents also have a limited lifespan. In the United States, subject to certain extensions that may be obtained in some cases, the natural expiration of a utility patent is generally 20 years from its earliest effective filing date, and the natural expiration of a design patent is generally 14 years after its issue date, unless the filing date occurred on or after May 13, 2015, in which case the natural expiration of a design patent is generally 15 years after its issue date. Various extensions may be available; however the life of a patent, and the protection it affords, is limited. Without patent protection for our products and services, we may be open to competition. Further, if we encounter delays in our development efforts, the period of time during which we could market our products and services under patent protection would be reduced.

 

 
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Obtaining and maintaining our patent protection depends on compliance with various procedural measures, document submissions, fee payments and other requirements imposed by government patent agencies, and our patent protection could be reduced or eliminated for non-compliance with these requirements.

 

Periodic maintenance fees, renewal fees, annuity fees and various other government fees on patents and applications will be due to be paid to the United States Patent and Trademark Office (the “USPTO”) and various government patent agencies outside of the U.S. over the lifetime of our and our licensors’ patents and applications. The USPTO and various non-U.S. government agencies require compliance with several procedural, documentary, fee payment and other similar provisions during the patent application process and after patent issuance. In some cases, an inadvertent lapse can be cured by payment of a late fee or by other means in accordance with the applicable rules. There are situations, however, in which non-compliance can result in abandonment or lapse of the patent or patent application, resulting in a partial or complete loss of patent rights in the relevant jurisdiction. In such an event, potential competitors might be able to enter the market in that jurisdiction with similar or identical products or technology, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

We may be subject to claims challenging the inventorship of our patents and other intellectual property.

 

We may be subject to claims that former employees, collaborators or other third parties have an interest in our patents or other intellectual property as an inventor or co-inventor. For example, we may have inventorship disputes arise from conflicting obligations of employees, consultants or others who are involved in developing our product candidates. Litigation may be necessary to defend against these and other claims challenging inventorship of inventions covered by our or our licensors’ patents, trade secrets or other intellectual property. If we or our licensors fail in defending any such claims, in addition to paying monetary damages, we may lose valuable intellectual property rights, such as exclusive ownership of, or rights or licenses to use, intellectual property that is important to our products. Even if we and our licensors are successful in defending against such claims, litigation could result in substantial costs and be a distraction to management and other employees. Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

Intellectual property rights do not necessarily address all potential threats.

 

The degree of future protection afforded by our intellectual property rights is uncertain because intellectual property rights have limitations, can be expensive or difficult to enforce, and may not adequately protect our business or permit us to maintain our competitive advantage. For example:

 

others may be able to make products that are similar to our product candidates or utilize similar science or technology but that are not covered by the claims of the patents that we may own or license from our licensors or that incorporate certain research in our product candidates that is in the public domain;

 

we, or our licensors or collaborators, might not have been the first to make the inventions covered by the issued patent or pending patent application that we or our licensors own now or in the future;

 

we, or our licensors or collaborators, might not have been the first to file patent applications covering certain of our or their inventions;

 

others may independently develop similar or alternative technologies or duplicate any of our technologies without infringing our intellectual property rights;

 

 
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it is possible that our or our licensors’ current or future pending patent applications will not lead to issued patents;

 

issued patents that we or our licensors hold rights to may be held invalid or unenforceable, including as a result of legal challenges by our competitors or other third parties;

 

our competitors or other third parties might conduct research and development activities in countries where we or our licensors do not have patent rights and then use the information learned from such activities to develop competitive products for sale in our major commercial markets;

 

we may not develop additional proprietary product candidates that are patentable;

 

the patents of others may harm our business if, for example, we or our licensors are found to have infringed those patents or if those patents serve as prior art to our or our licensors’ patents which could potentially invalidate our or our licensors’ patents; and

 

we may choose not to file a patent in order to maintain certain trade secrets or know-how, and a third party may subsequently file a patent covering such intellectual property, which could ultimately result in public disclosure of the intellectual property if the third party’s patent application is published or issues to a patent.

 

Should any of these events occur, they could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

  

Intellectual property litigation could cause us to spend substantial resources and distract our personnel from their normal responsibilities.

 

There is a great deal of litigation concerning intellectual property in our industry, and we or our licensors could become involved in litigation. Even if resolved in our or our licensors’ favor, litigation or other legal proceedings relating to intellectual property claims may cause us or our licensors to incur significant expenses, and could distract our technical and management personnel from their normal responsibilities. In addition, there could be public announcements of the results of hearings, motions or other interim proceedings or developments, and if securities analysts or investors perceive these results to be negative, it could have a substantial adverse effect on the price of our securities. Such litigation or proceedings could substantially increase our operating losses and reduce our resources available for development activities. We may not have sufficient financial or other resources to adequately conduct or defend against such litigation or proceedings. Some of our competitors may be able to sustain the costs of such litigation or proceedings more effectively than we can because of their substantially greater financial resources. Uncertainties resulting from the initiation and continuation of patent litigation or other proceedings could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and ability to compete in the marketplace.

 

We may be subject to claims that our employees have wrongfully used or disclosed alleged trade secrets of their former employers.

 

Some of our employees and consultants were previously employed at universities or other biotechnology or pharmaceutical companies, including our competitors or potential competitors. Although we try to ensure that our employees do not use the proprietary information or know-how of others in their work for us, we may be subject to claims that we or our employees have used or disclosed intellectual property, including trade secrets or other proprietary information, of any such employee’s former employer. Litigation may be necessary to defend against these claims. If we fail in defending any such claims, in addition to paying monetary damages, we may lose valuable intellectual property rights or personnel. Even if we are successful in defending against such claims, litigation could result in substantial costs and be a distraction to management.

 

 
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RISKS RELATED TO OUR SECURITIES

 

The price of our securities may be volatile, and you could lose all or part of your investment. Further, we do not know whether an active, liquid and orderly trading market will develop for our securities or what the market price of our securities will be and as a result it may be difficult for you to sell your shares of our securities.

 

Although our securities are listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market, an active trading market for our shares may never develop or be sustained. You may not be able to sell your shares quickly or at the market price if trading in shares of our securities is not active. Further, an inactive market may also impair our ability to raise capital by selling shares of our securities and may impair our ability to enter into strategic partnerships or acquire companies or products by using shares of our securities as consideration, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations. In addition, the trading price of our securities is likely to be highly volatile and could be subject to wide fluctuations in response to various factors, some of which are beyond our control, including limited trading volume.

 

Our executive officers, directors and certain stockholders possess the majority of our voting power, and through this ownership, control the Company and our corporate actions.

 

As of July 10, 2020, our current executive officers, directors and certain large stockholders of the Company hold approximately 7.93% of the voting power of our outstanding shares. These officers and investors have a controlling influence in determining the outcome of any corporate transaction or other matters submitted to our stockholders for approval, including mergers, consolidations and the sale of all or substantially all of our assets, election of directors, and other significant corporate actions. As such, our executive officers and these investors have the power to prevent or cause a change in control; therefore, without their consent we could be prevented from entering into transactions that could be beneficial to us. The interests of our executive officers may give rise to a conflict of interest with the Company and the Company’s stockholders.

  

Shares of our common stock that have not been registered under federal securities laws are subject to resale restrictions imposed by Rule 144, including those set forth in Rule 144(i) which apply to a former “shell company.”

 

Our common stock was previously listed for trading on the OTC Market’s OTCQB service under the symbol “ARTL.” Our stock has limited trading volume. Many of our securities will be subject to restrictions on transfer under the Securities Act and may not be transferred in the absence of registration or the availability of a resale exemption. In particular, in the absence of registration, such securities cannot be resold to the public until certain requirements under Rule 144 promulgated under the Securities Act have been satisfied, including certain holding period requirements and other requirements applicable to companies that have previously been a shell company. An investor may be unable to sell such securities at the time or at the price or upon such other terms and conditions as the investor desires, and the terms of such sale may be less favorable than might be obtainable because of a limited market, which may never develop.

 

Until December 2017, we were deemed a “shell company” under applicable SEC rules and regulations because we had no or nominal operations and either no or nominal assets, assets consisting solely of cash and cash equivalents, or assets consisting of any amount of cash and cash equivalents and nominal other assets. Pursuant to Rule 144 promulgated under the Securities Act, sales of the securities of a former shell company, such as us, under that rule are not permitted (i) until at least 12 months have elapsed from the date on which our Current Report on Form 8–K reflecting our status as a non-shell company, was filed with the SEC; and (ii) unless at the time of a proposed sale, we are subject to the reporting requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act and have filed all reports and other materials required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act, as applicable, during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that we were required to file such reports and materials), other than Form 8–K reports. We are currently subject to the reporting rules under the Exchange Act expect to remain subject to the reporting requirements under the Exchange Act. However, even then, many of our stockholders may be forced to hold their shares of our common stock for at least that 12-month period before they are eligible to sell those shares, and even after that 12-month period, sales may not be made under Rule 144 unless we are in compliance with other requirements of Rule 144. Further, it will be more difficult for us to raise funding to support our operations through the sale of debt or equity securities unless we agree to register such securities under the Securities Act, which could cause us to expend significant time and cash resources. Additionally, our previous status as a shell company could also limit our use of our securities to pay for any acquisitions we may seek to pursue in the future (although none are currently planned). The lack of liquidity of our securities as a result of the inability to sell under Rule 144 for a longer period of time than a non-former shell company could cause the market price of our securities to decline or make it difficult to establish a trading market in our shares.

 

 
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Our public warrants are speculative in nature.

 

Our public warrants do not confer any rights of common stock ownership on their holders, such as voting rights or the right to receive dividends, but rather merely represent the right to purchase shares of our common stock for a limited period of time. Specifically, commencing on the date of issuance, holders of public warrants may exercise their rights to acquire shares of our common stock until the fifth (5th) anniversary of the issuance date after which dates any unexercised warrants will expire and have no further value. There can be no assurance that the fair market value of our common stock will ever equal or exceed the exercise price of the warrants, and consequently, whether it will ever be profitable for holders of the warrants to exercise the warrants.

 

Certain of the possible adjustments to the warrants may result in a deemed distribution from us to a beneficial owner of a warrant that will be taxable, even though the beneficial owner does not receive a corresponding distribution of cash.

 

The exercise terms of the warrants may be adjusted in certain circumstances. An adjustment to the number of shares of common stock that will be issued on the exercise of the warrants or an adjustment to the exercise price of the warrants (or, in certain circumstances, a failure to make adjustments) may be treated as a taxable deemed distribution to a holder of the warrants, even if such holder does not receive any cash or other property in connection with the adjustment. Holders of the warrants should consult their tax advisors regarding the proper treatment of any adjustments to the warrants.

  

Holders of our public warrants will have no rights as common stockholders until such holders exercise the public warrants and acquire our common stock.

 

Until holders of public warrants acquire shares of our common stock upon exercise of the warrants, holders of the public warrants will have no rights with respect to the shares of our common stock. Upon exercise of the public warrants, the holders thereof will be entitled to exercise the rights of a common stockholder only as to matters for which the record date occurs after the exercise date.

 

Sales of our currently issued and outstanding stock may become freely tradable pursuant to Rule 144 and sales of such shares may have a depressive effect on the share price of our common stock.

 

Many of the outstanding shares of common stock are “restricted securities” within the meaning of Rule 144. As restricted shares, these shares may be resold only pursuant to an effective registration statement or under the requirements of Rule 144 or other applicable exemptions from registration under the Securities Act and as required under applicable state securities laws. Rule 144 provides in essence that a non-affiliate who has held restricted securities for a period of at least six months may sell their shares of common stock. Under Rule 144, affiliates who have held restricted securities for a period of at least six months may, under certain conditions, sell every three months, in brokerage transactions, a number of shares that does not exceed the greater of 1% of a company’s outstanding shares of common stock or the average weekly trading volume during the four calendar weeks prior to the sale. A sale under Rule 144 or under any other exemption from the Securities Act, if available, or pursuant to subsequent registrations of our shares of common stock, may have a depressive effect upon the price of our shares of common stock in any active market that may develop.

 

 
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We do not plan to declare or pay any dividends to our stockholders in the near future.

 

We have not declared any dividends in the past, and we do not intend to distribute dividends in the near future. The declaration, payment and amount of any future dividends will be made at the discretion of our Board and will depend upon, among other things, the results of operations, cash flows and financial condition, operating and capital requirements, and other factors as our Board considers relevant. There is no assurance that future dividends will be paid, and if dividends are paid, there is no assurance with respect to the amount of any such dividend.

 

We incur significant costs as a result of operating as a public company, and our management will be required to devote substantial time to new compliance initiatives.

 

As a public company, we will continue to incur significant legal, accounting, and other expenses. We are subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, (“the Exchange Act”), which will require, among other things, that we file with the SEC, annual, quarterly and current reports with respect to our business and financial condition. In addition, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, as well as rules subsequently adopted by the SEC and the Nasdaq to implement provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, impose significant requirements on public companies, including requiring establishment and maintenance of effective disclosure and financial controls and changes in corporate governance practices. Further, in July 2010, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, or the Dodd-Frank Act, was enacted. There are significant corporate governance and executive compensation related provisions in the Dodd-Frank Act that require the SEC to adopt additional rules and regulations in these areas such as “say on pay” and proxy access. Emerging growth companies are permitted to implement many of these requirements over a longer period and we will have until our fiscal year ending August 2020 to do so. We intend to continue to take advantage of this legislation but cannot guarantee that we will not be required to implement these requirements sooner than anticipated or planned and thereby incur unexpected expenses. Stockholder activism, the current political environment and the current high level of government intervention and regulatory reform may lead to substantial new regulations and disclosure obligations, which may lead to additional compliance costs and impact the manner in which we operate our business in ways we cannot currently anticipate.

  

Additionally, as we are now listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market, we expect the rules and regulations applicable to Nasdaq-listed companies to substantially increase our legal and financial compliance costs and to make some activities more time-consuming and costly. If these requirements divert the attention of our management and personnel from other business concerns, they could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations. The increased costs will decrease our net income or increase our net loss, and may require us to reduce costs in other areas of our business or increase the prices of our products or services. For example, we expect these rules and regulations to make it more difficult and more expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance and we may be required to incur substantial costs to maintain the same or similar coverage. We cannot predict or estimate the amount or timing of additional costs we may incur to respond to these requirements. The impact of these requirements could also make it more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified persons to serve on our Board, our board committees or as executive officers.

 

 
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Future changes in financial accounting standards or practices may cause adverse unexpected financial reporting fluctuations and affect reported results of operations.

 

A change in accounting standards or practices can have a significant effect on our reported results and may even affect our reporting of transactions completed before the change is effective. New accounting pronouncements and varying interpretations of accounting pronouncements have occurred and may occur in the future. Changes to existing rules or the questioning of current practices may adversely affect our reported financial results or the way we conduct business.

 

Our disclosure controls and procedures may not be effective to ensure that we make all required disclosures.

 

As a public reporting company, we are subject to the periodic reporting requirements of the Exchange Act. Our disclosure controls and procedures are designed to reasonably assure that information required to be disclosed by us in reports we file or submit under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to management, recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the rules and forms of the SEC. We believe that any disclosure controls and procedures or internal controls and procedures, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met.

 

These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people or by an unauthorized override of the controls. Accordingly, because of the inherent limitations in our control system, misstatements or insufficient disclosures due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.

  

Anti-takeover provisions in our amended and restated articles of incorporation and bylaws, as well as provisions in Nevada law, might discourage, delay or prevent a change of control of our company or changes in our management and, therefore, depress the trading price of our securities.

 

Our amended and restated articles of incorporation, bylaws and Nevada law contain provisions that could have the effect of rendering more difficult or discouraging an acquisition deemed undesirable by our Board. Our corporate governance documents include provisions:

 

providing for a single class of directors where each member of the board shall serve for a one year term and may be elected to successive terms;

 

authorizing blank check preferred stock, which could be issued with voting, liquidation, dividend and other rights superior to our common stock;

 

limiting the liability of, and providing indemnification to, our directors, including provisions that require the company to advance payment for defending pending or threatened claims;

 

limiting the ability of our stockholders to call and bring business before special meetings and to take action by written consent in lieu of a meeting;

 

requiring advance notice of stockholder proposals for business to be conducted at meetings of our stockholders and for nominations of candidates for election to our Board;

 

controlling the procedures for the conduct and scheduling of board and stockholder meetings;

 

limiting the determination of the number of directors on our board and the filling of vacancies or newly created seats on the board to our Board then in office; and

 

providing that directors may be removed by stockholders at any time.

 

 
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These provisions, alone or together, could delay hostile takeovers and changes in control or changes in our management.

 

As a Nevada corporation, we are also subject to provisions of Nevada corporate law, including Section 78.411, et seq. of the Nevada Revised Statutes, which prohibits a publicly-held Nevada corporation from engaging in a business combination with an interested stockholder, generally a person which together with its affiliates owns, or within the last two years has owned, 10% of our voting stock, for a period of three years after the date of the transaction in which the person became an interested stockholder, unless the business combination is approved in a prescribed manner.

 

The existence of the foregoing provisions and anti-takeover measures could limit the price that investors might be willing to pay in the future for shares of our common stock. They could also deter potential acquirers of our company, thereby reducing the likelihood that our stockholders could receive a premium for their common stock in an acquisition.

  

Our business is subject to changing regulations related to corporate governance and public disclosure that have increased both our costs and the risk of noncompliance.

 

Because our common stock and our public warrants are publicly traded, we are subject to certain rules and regulations of federal, state and financial market exchange entities charged with the protection of investors and the oversight of companies whose securities are publicly traded. These entities, including the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, the SEC and Nasdaq, have issued requirements and regulations and continue to develop additional regulations and requirements in response to corporate scandals and laws enacted by Congress, most notably the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Our efforts to comply with these regulations have resulted in, and are likely to continue resulting in, increased general and administrative expenses and diversion of management time and attention from revenue-generating activities to compliance activities. Because new and modified laws, regulations and standards are subject to varying interpretations in many cases due to their lack of specificity, their application in practice may evolve over time as new guidance is provided by regulatory and governing bodies. This evolution may result in continuing uncertainty regarding compliance matters and additional costs necessitated by ongoing revisions to our disclosure and governance practices.

 

We are an emerging growth company as well as a smaller reporting company, and we cannot be certain if the reduced reporting requirements applicable to emerging growth companies and/or smaller reporting companies will make our securities less attractive to investors.

 

We are an emerging growth company, as defined in the JOBS Act. For as long as we continue to be an emerging growth company, we may take advantage of exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies, including not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation and our periodic reports and proxy statements and exemptions from the requirements of holding nonbinding advisory votes on executive compensation and stockholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. We could be an emerging growth company until our fiscal year ending August 2020, although circumstances could cause us to lose that status earlier. We will remain an emerging growth company until the earlier of (i) the last day of the fiscal year (a) August 2020, (b) in which we have total annual gross revenue of at least $1.07 billion or (c) in which we are deemed to be a large accelerated filer, which requires the market value of our common stock that is held by non-affiliates to exceed $700.0 million as of the prior June 30th, and (ii) the date on which we have issued more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt during the prior three-year period.

 

 
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Even after we no longer qualify as an emerging growth company, we may still qualify as a “smaller reporting company” which would allow us to take advantage of many of the same exemptions from disclosure requirements including not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation and our periodic reports and proxy statements. We cannot predict if investors will find our securities less attractive because we may rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our securities less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our securities, and our stock price may be more volatile.

 

Under the JOBS Act, emerging growth companies can also delay adopting new or revised accounting standards until such time as those standards apply to private companies. We have elected to avail ourselves of this exemption and, therefore, we are not subject to the same new or revised accounting standards as other public companies that are not emerging growth companies. As a result, changes in rules of U.S. generally accepted accounting principles or their interpretation, the adoption of new guidance or the application of existing guidance to changes in our business could significantly affect our financial position and results of operations.

  

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our share price and trading volume could decline.

 

The trading market for our securities will depend on the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us or our business. We do not have any control over these analysts. There can be no assurance that analysts will cover us or provide favorable coverage. If one or more of the analysts who cover us downgrade our stock or change their opinion of our stock, our share price would likely decline. If one or more of these analysts cease coverage of our company or fail to regularly publish reports on us, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which could cause our share price or trading volume to decline.

 

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

 

On May 4, 2020, the Company issued 45,834 shares of common stock to two Directors, for proceeds of $55,000.

 

Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities

 

None.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

 

Not Applicable.

 

Item 5. Other Information

 

None.

 

 
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Item 6. Exhibits

 

Exhibit

Number

Description

 

Form

File No.

 

Filing

Date

 

Filed

Herewith

3.1

 

Articles of Incorporation and Amendments

S-1

 

333-199213

10/8/2014

 

3.2

 

Certificate of Amendment filed with the Nevada Secretary of State on February 2, 2017 with an effective date of February 10, 2017.

8-K

 

333-199213

2/9/2017

 

3.3

 

Certificate of Change.

8-K

 

333-199213

4/17/2017

 

3.4

 

Bylaws

S-1

 

333-199213

10/8/2014

 

3.5

 

Certificate of Amendment to Articles of Incorporation filed with the Nevada Secretary of State on June 19, 2019.

S-1/A

 

333-230658

6/20/2019

 

4.1

 

Form of Public Warrant

S-1/A

333-230658

6/20/2019

 

 

4.2

 

Form of Underwriter’s Warrant

S-1/A

333-230658

6/20/2019

 

 

4.3

 

Form of Private Placement Warrant

8-K/A

 

333-199213

10/3/2017

 

 

10.1

 

Senior Promissory Note dated November 18, 2016

8-K

 

333-199213

11/18/2016

 

10.2

 

Consultancy Agreement by and between the Company and Dr. Saoirse O’Sullivan, PhD dated March 22, 2017.

8-K

 

333-199213

4/7/2017

 

10.3#

 

Amended and Restated Employment Agreement by and between the Company and Gregory D. Gorgas dated August 30, 2019.

10-K

 

001-38951

11/25/2019

 

10.4

 

Securities Purchase Agreement by and between the Company and Gregory D. Gorgas dated April 3, 2017.

8-K

 

333-199213

4/7/2017

 

10.5#

 

Form of Indemnification Agreement

8-K

 

333-199213

5/8/2017

 

10.6

 

Note Repayment Agreement by and between Artelo Biosciences, Inc. and Malibu Investments Limited

8-K

 

333-199213

5/8/2017

 

10.7

 

Stock Purchase Agreement dated May 4, 2017

8-K

 

333-199213

5/8/2017

 

10.8

 

Form of Private Placement Subscription Agreement

8-K

 

333-199213

8/4/2017

 

10.9

 

Form of Registration Rights Agreement

8-K

 

333-199213

8/4/2017

 

10.10#

 

Indemnification Agreement dated as of July 31, 2017

8-K

 

333-199213

8/4/2017

 

10.11

 

Stock Purchase Agreement dated as of August 1, 2017

8-K

 

333-199213

8/4/2017

 

10.12#

 

Form of Indemnification Agreement, by and between the Company and its directors.

8-K

 

333-199213

9/25/2017

 

10.13

 

Material and Data Transfer, Option and License Agreement dated as of December 20, 2017 by and between the Company and NEOMED Institute+

10-Q

 

333-199213

1/16/2018

 

10.14+

 

First Amendment to Material and Data Transfer, Option and License Agreement by and between the Company and NEOMED Institute, dated as of January 4, 2019

10-Q

 

333-199213

 

4/15/2019

 

10.15#

 

Amended and Restated 2018 Equity Incentive Plan

 S-8

 

333-239434

 

6/25/2020 

 

10.16#

 

Form of Stock Option Agreement—2018 Equity Incentive Plan

S-1

 

333-227571

9/27/2018

 

10.17

 

Form of Warrant Agency Agreement

S-1/A

333-230658

6/20/2019

 

10.18+

 

License Agreement with Stony Brook University, by and between the Company and Stony Brook University, dated January 18, 2018

S-1/A

 

333-222756

4/17/2018

 

31.1

 

Section 302 Certification

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*

32.1**

 

Section 906 Certification

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*

101.INS

 

XBRL Instance Document

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

101.SCH

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

101.CAL

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

101.DEF

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

101.LAB

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

101.PRE

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

____________

#

Management contracts or compensatory plans, contracts or arrangements.

+

Certain portions of this exhibit have been omitted.

**

 

The certification attached as Exhibit 32.1 that accompany this Quarterly Report, is deemed furnished and not filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission and are not to be incorporated by reference into any filing of Artelo Biosciences, Inc. under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, whether made before or after the date of this Quarterly Report, irrespective of any general incorporation language contained in such filing.

 

 
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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

 

Artelo Biosciences, Inc.

 

(Registrant)

 

 

 

Dated: July 13, 2020

 

/s/ Gregory D. Gorgas

 

Gregory D. Gorgas

 

President, Chief Executive Officer,

Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer and Director

 

(Principal Executive Officer,

Principal Financial Officer and

Principal Accounting Officer)

 

 

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