Company Quick10K Filing
Quick10K
Adtalem Global Education
Closing Price ($) Shares Out (MM) Market Cap ($MM)
$43.86 57 $2,482
10-K 2019-06-30 Annual: 2019-06-30
10-Q 2019-03-31 Quarter: 2019-03-31
10-Q 2018-12-31 Quarter: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-09-30 Quarter: 2018-09-30
10-K 2018-06-30 Annual: 2018-06-30
10-Q 2018-03-31 Quarter: 2018-03-31
10-Q 2017-12-31 Quarter: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-09-30 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-K 2017-06-30 Annual: 2017-06-30
10-Q 2017-03-31 Quarter: 2017-03-31
10-Q 2016-12-31 Quarter: 2016-12-31
10-Q 2016-09-30 Quarter: 2016-09-30
10-K 2016-06-30 Annual: 2016-06-30
10-Q 2016-03-31 Quarter: 2016-03-31
10-Q 2015-12-31 Quarter: 2015-12-31
10-Q 2015-09-30 Quarter: 2015-09-30
10-K 2015-06-30 Annual: 2015-06-30
10-Q 2015-03-31 Quarter: 2015-03-31
10-Q 2014-12-31 Quarter: 2014-12-31
10-Q 2014-09-30 Quarter: 2014-09-30
10-K 2014-06-30 Annual: 2014-06-30
10-Q 2014-03-31 Quarter: 2014-03-31
10-Q 2013-12-31 Quarter: 2013-12-31
8-K 2019-08-26 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2019-08-22 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-07-15 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2019-06-03 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-05-13 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-05-08 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2019-05-02 Earnings
8-K 2019-04-12 Enter Agreement, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-02-07 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-01-09 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2018-12-11 Enter Agreement, M&A, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-12-11 Exhibits
8-K 2018-12-10 Exhibits
8-K 2018-12-04 M&A
8-K 2018-11-06 Shareholder Vote, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-11-01 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-10-03 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2018-09-12 Other Events
8-K 2018-08-16 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-02 Enter Agreement, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-07-17 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-06-28 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-06-19 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-05-09 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-05-08 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2018-04-13 Enter Agreement, Leave Agreement, Off-BS Arrangement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-03-26 Other Events
8-K 2018-02-02 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-02-01 Other Events, Exhibits
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CECO Career Education 1,456
COE China Online Education Group 1,380
LRN K12 1,074
REDU Rise Education Cayman 874
CSV Carriage Services 392
ASPS Altisource Portfolio Solutions 327
MANT ManTech International 0
ATGE 2019-06-30
Part I
Item 1 – Business
Item 1A — Risk Factors
Item 1B – Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 2 – Properties
Item 3 – Legal Proceedings
Item 4 – Mine Safety Disclosures
Part II
Item 5 – Market for Registrant’S Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6 – Selected Financial Data
Item 7 – Management’S Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 7A – Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 8 – Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Note 1: Nature of Operations
Note 3: Regulatory Settlements
Note 4: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Note 5: Stock-Based Compensation
Note 6: Fair Value Measurements
Note 7: Financing Receivables
Note 8: Dividends and Share Repurchase Programs
Note 9: Business Combinations
Note 10: Intangible Assets
Note 11: Restructuring Charges
Note 12: Income Taxes
Note 13: Debt
Note 14: Employee Benefit Plans
Note 15: Commitments and Contingencies
Note 16: Segment Information
Note 17: Quarterly Financial Data (Unaudited)
Note 18: Subsequent Event
Item 9 – Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A – Controls and Procedures
Item 9B – Other Information
Part III
Item 10 – Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11 – Executive Compensation
Item 12 - Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Item 13 – Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
Item 14 – Principal Accountant Fees and Services
Part IV
Item 15 - Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
Item 16 - Form 10-K Summary
EX-4.(B) atge-20190630ex4b05cf3a2.htm
EX-10.(KK) atge-20190630ex10kk9d3d8.htm
EX-10.(LL) atge-20190630ex10llaba62.htm
EX-21 atge-20190630ex21c2217f8.htm
EX-23 atge-20190630xex23.htm
EX-31 atge-20190630xex31.htm
EX-32 atge-20190630xex32.htm

Adtalem Global Education Earnings 2019-06-30

ATGE 10K Annual Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

10-K 1 atge-20190630x10k.htm 10-K atge_Current_Folio_10K

 

 

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

Form 10-K

(Mark One)

 

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)

OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

 

 

 

For the fiscal year ended: June 30, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

OR

 

 

 

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)

OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

 

 

 

For the transition period from _____to _____

 

 

Commission file number: 1-13988

 

 

Adtalem Global Education Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

DELAWARE

36-3150143

(State or other jurisdiction of

(I.R.S. Employer

incorporation or organization)

Identification No.)

 

 

500 WEST MONROE STREET

60661

CHICAGO,  ILLINOIS

(Zip Code)

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

 

Registrant’s telephone number; including area code:

(866) 374-2678

Securities registered pursuant to section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of Each Class

Trading Symbol

Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered

Common Stock $0.01 Par Value

ATGE

NYSE, CSE

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ☑     No ◻

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ◻     No ☑

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☑     No ◻

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes ☑     No ◻

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a  smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b‑2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer    ☑

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer     ◻   

Smaller reporting company

 

Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by checkmark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  ◻

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b‑2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ◻     No ☑

State the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by nonaffiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was last sold, or the average bid and asked price of such common equity, as of the last business day of the Registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter. Shares of common stock held directly or controlled by each director and executive officer have been excluded.

December 31, 2018 - $2,745,785,089

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date. August 20, 2019 – 54,923,000 shares of Common Stock, $0.01 par value

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Certain portions of the Registrant’s definitive Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held on November 6, 2019 are incorporated into Part III of this Form 10‑K to the extent stated herein.

 

 

 

ADTALEM GLOBAL EDUCATION INC.

ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K

FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2019

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

Page #

 

 

 

 

PART I

 

Item 1 

— Business

4

Item 1A 

— Risk Factors

27

Item 1B 

— Unresolved Staff Comments

42

Item 2 

— Properties

42

Item 3 

— Legal Proceedings

43

 

— Supplementary Item-Executive Officers of the Registrant

44

Item 4 

— Mine Safety Disclosures

47

 

 

 

 

PART II

 

Item 5 

— Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

48

Item 6 

— Selected Financial Data

51

Item 7 

— Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

52

Item 7A 

— Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

76

Item 8 

— Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

77

Item 9 

— Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

130

Item 9A 

— Controls and Procedures

130

Item 9B 

— Other Information

131

 

 

 

 

PART III

 

Item 10 

— Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

131

Item 11 

— Executive Compensation

131

Item 12 

— Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

131

Item 13 

— Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

131

Item 14 

— Principal Accountant Fees and Services

131

 

 

 

 

PART IV

 

Item 15 

— Exhibits,  Financial Statement Schedules

132

Item 16 

— Form 10-K Summary

132

 

 

Signatures 

139

 

 

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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

Certain statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including those statements concerning Adtalem Global Education Inc.’s (“Adtalem”) expectations or plans, may constitute forward-looking statements subject to the Safe Harbor Provision of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. All statements other than statements of historical fact are, or may be deemed to be, forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements generally can be identified by phrases such as Adtalem or its management “believes,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “foresees,” “forecasts,” “estimates,” plans,” “intends,” “continues,” “may,” “will,” “should,” “could,” or other words or phrases of similar import which predict or indicate future events or trends or that are not statements of historical matters. However, the absence of these words does not mean that the statements are not forward-looking. These forward looking statements are based on certain assumptions and analyses made by us in light of our experience and our perception of historical trends, current conditions and expected future developments, as well as other factors we believe are appropriate in the circumstances.

These forward-looking statements are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and assumptions that may cause actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Factors that might cause or contribute to a material difference are described throughout this report, including those in “Note 15: Commitments and Contingencies” to the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Item 1A – Risk Factors,” in the subsections of “Item 1 – Business” titled “Market Trends and Competition,” “Student Admissions,” “Accreditation,” “Financial Aid and Financing Student Education,” “Legislative and Regulatory Requirements,” “Seasonality” and “Employees,” and in the subsection of “Item 7 – Management Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” titled “Liquidity and Capital Resources.” Because of these risks, uncertainties and assumptions, you should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements set forth in this Annual Report on Form 10-K are qualified by these cautionary statements, and should be considered in the context of the risk factors referred to above and discussed elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. There can be no assurance that the actual results or developments anticipated by us will be realized or, even if substantially realized, that they will have the expected consequences to or effects on us or our business or operations. Forward-looking statements set forth in this Annual Report on Form 10-K speak only as of the date hereof, and we do not undertake any obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect subsequent events or circumstances, changes in expectations or the occurrence of unanticipated events, except to the extent required by law or the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”).

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PART I

ITEM 1 – BUSINESS

OVERVIEW OF ADTALEM GLOBAL EDUCATION INC.

Adtalem was incorporated under the laws of the State of Delaware in August 1987. Adtalem’s executive offices are located at 500 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois, 60661, and the telephone number is (866) 374-2678.  For purposes of this report, “Adtalem,” “we,” “our,” “us,” or similar references refers to Adtalem Global Education Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries, unless the context requires otherwise.

Adtalem is a leading global provider of workforce solutions and educational services. The purpose of Adtalem is to empower students to achieve their goals, find success and make inspiring contributions to our global community. Adtalem’s institutions and companies offer a wide array of programs across medical and healthcare, financial services and business and law.

 Adtalem’s vision is to create a dynamic global community of life-long learners who improve the world. Adtalem aims to create value for society and its stakeholders by offering responsive educational programs that are supported by exceptional services to its students, and delivered with integrity and accountability. Towards this vision, Adtalem is proud to play a vital role in expanding access to higher education along with other institutions in the public, independent and private sectors.

Adtalem will continue to strive to achieve superior student outcomes by providing quality education and student services; growing and diversifying into new program areas and geographies; and building quality brands and the infrastructure necessary to compete in an increasingly competitive global market.

During the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2019, Adtalem renamed two of its segments to better reflect our focus on our growth strategies: Professional Education was renamed Financial Services, and Technology and Business was renamed Business and Law. Adtalem operates three reporting segments: “Medical and Healthcare,” which includes the operations of Chamberlain University (“Chamberlain”) and the medical and veterinary schools (including American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine (“AUC”), Ross University School of Medicine (“RUSM”) and Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (“RUSVM”)); “Financial Services,” which includes the operations of the Association of Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists (“ACAMS”), Becker Professional Education (“Becker”), OnCourse Learning (“OCL”) and EduPristine; and “Business and Law,” which includes the operations of Adtalem Education of Brazil (“Adtalem Brazil”). “Home Office and Other” includes activity not allocated to a reporting segment. Financial and descriptive information about Adtalem’s reporting segments is presented in “Note 16: Segment Information” to the Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. These segments are highlighted below. Unless indicated, or the context requires otherwise, references to years refer to Adtalem’s fiscal years.

Medical and Healthcare

Chamberlain was founded in 1889 as Deaconess College of Nursing and acquired by Adtalem in 2005. In May 2017, Chamberlain College of Nursing broadened its reach in healthcare education through the establishment of Chamberlain University and now offers its programs through its College of Nursing and College of Health Professions. Nursing degree offerings include a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (“BSN”) degree (including both the onsite three-year BSN and the online Registered Nurse (“RN”) to BSN Degree Completion Option (“RN-to-BSN”)), an online Master of Science in Nursing (“MSN”) degree, including Family Nurse Practitioner (“FNP”), and the Doctor of Nursing Practice (“DNP”) degree, which is also offered online.

Chamberlain offers an online Master of Public Health (“MPH”) degree program through its College of Health Professions. MPH classes started in July 2017. In fiscal year 2019, Chamberlain received approval to launch an online Master of Social Work (“MSW”) degree program through its College of Health Professions. MSW classes will begin in September 2019.

4

Chamberlain provides an educational experience distinguished by a high level of care for students, academic excellence and integrity delivered through its 21 campuses and online. Chamberlain is committed to graduating health professionals who are empowered to transform healthcare worldwide. Chamberlain had 28,691 students enrolled in the July 2019 term, an increase of 2.3% over the prior year.

Chamberlain College of Nursing’s degree programs span the professional nursing spectrum, from the baccalaureate entry into nursing practice to the terminal practice doctorate. The baccalaureate program integrates theoretical knowledge of general education and nursing content, psychomotor skills development, and development of clinical judgment/reasoning to help students develop the education and skills necessary for a lifetime of personal and professional growth. Pre-licensure students apply theoretical knowledge through robust, hands-on instruction using sophisticated simulators and simulation scenarios along with clinical training at hospitals or other healthcare facilities. Post-licensure students develop advanced nursing practice knowledge and skills through classroom, simulation, project development and practicum experiences in a variety of healthcare settings. Chamberlain has developed numerous partnerships with hospitals and other healthcare facilities to ensure that educational objectives can be met for its programs.

Chamberlain’s pre-licensure BSN degree is an onsite baccalaureate program. The BSN program enables students to complete their BSN degree in three years of full-time study as opposed to the typical four-year BSN program with summer breaks. During calendar year 2018, Chamberlain pre-licensure BSN students who completed the National Council Licensure Examination (“NCLEX”) had an overall pass rate of 88% vs. 84% in 2017. The national NCLEX pass rate for 2018 was 92% and 90% for 2017.

Students who already have passed their NCLEX exam and achieved RN designation through a diploma or associate degree can complete their BSN degree online through Chamberlain’s RN-to-BSN completion option in three semesters of full-time study, although most students enroll part-time while they continue working as nurses.

The online MSN degree program offers four non-direct-care specialty tracks: Educator, Executive, Informatics and Healthcare Policy. These programs require 36 credit hours and are designed to be completed in approximately two years of part-time study. Chamberlain also offers a direct-care FNP track. This program requires 45 credit hours along with 650 lab and clinical hours and is designed to be completed in two and a half years of part-time study. In July 2019, Chamberlain began offering an accelerated MSN option that students can complete in 30 credit hours and receive a generalist degree.

The online DNP degree program is based on the eight essentials of doctoral education outlined by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (“AACN”). The DNP program is designed for nurses seeking a terminal degree in nursing and offers an alternative to research-focused Ph.D. programs. The Chamberlain DNP program offers a Healthcare Systems Leadership track. The program requires 32 to 40 credit hours along with 512 to 1,024 clinical practicum hours. The program can be completed in five to six semesters of study.

Chamberlain’s College of Health Professions MPH degree program focuses on preparing students to become public health practitioners to work with communities and populations globally to promote healthy communities, and to prevent community health problems such as disease, poverty, health access disparities and violence through interdisciplinary coursework. The MSW program aims to develop and empower students to be agents of social change in their communities and throughout the world. The MSW degree program prepares students for generalist or specialized practice and offers six specializations, including Substance Abuse and Addictions, Gerontology, Crisis and Response Interventions, Trauma, Medical Social Work and Military Social Work.

Medical and Veterinary Schools includes three institutions:

·

AUC confers the Doctor of Medicine (“M.D.”) degree;

·

RUSM confers the M.D. degree; and

·

RUSVM confers the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (“D.V.M.”) degree. Through its Postgraduate Studies Program, RUSVM also offers Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees.

5

Together, the three schools, along with the Medical Education Readiness Program (“MERP”) and the Veterinary Preparation Program, had 5,220 students enrolled in the May 2019 semester, a 6.0% decrease compared to the same term last year.

AUC, founded in 1978 and acquired by Adtalem in August 2011, provides medical education. AUC is located in St. Maarten and has graduated more than 7,000 physicians since inception. The mission of AUC is to train tomorrow’s physicians, whose service to their communities and their patients is enhanced by international learning experiences, a diverse learning community, and an emphasis on social accountability and engagement. This is accomplished in an atmosphere of academic integrity and scholarship, which fosters the highest standards in professional ethics and competence. 

RUSM, founded in 1978 and acquired by Adtalem in May 2003, provides medical education. RUSM has graduated more than 14,000 physicians since inception. The mission of RUSM is to prepare highly dedicated students to become effective, successful physicians. RUSM seeks to accomplish this by focusing on imparting the knowledge, skills and values required for its students to establish a successful and satisfying career as a physician. In January 2019, RUSM moved its basic science instruction from Dominica to a new location in Barbados, while its Internal Medicine Foundation program continues to reside in Miramar, Florida.

AUC’s and RUSM’s respective medical education programs are comparable to the educational programs offered at U.S. medical schools as evidenced by student performance on the U.S. Medical Licensing Examination (“USMLE”) tests and residency placement. AUC’s and RUSM’s programs consist of three academic semesters per year, which begin in January, May and September, allowing students to complete their basic science instruction in less time than they would at a U.S. medical school. The programs provide a generalist medical education and the foundation for post graduate specialty training, which is primarily completed in residencies in the U.S.

Initially, AUC and RUSM students complete a program of concentrated study of medical sciences in modern classrooms and laboratories, with AUC’s campus located in St. Maarten and RUSM’s campus located in Barbados. After medical school students sit for Step 1 of the USMLE, which assesses whether students understand and can apply scientific concepts that are basic to the practice of medicine, they complete the remainder of their program by participating in clinical rotations under AUC and RUSM direction, and conducted at over 40 affiliated teaching hospitals or medical centers affiliated with accredited medical education programs in the U.S., Canada and the United Kingdom.

Upon successful completion of their medical degree requirements, students apply for a residency position in their area of specialty through the National Residency Matching Program (“NRMP”). This process is also known as “The Match”® and utilizes an algorithm to “match” applicants to programs using the certified rank order lists of the applicants and program directors.

RUSM students achieved a 96% first-time pass rate on the USMLE Step 1 exam in 2018. In 2019, 92% of first-time eligible 2018-2019 RUSM graduates attained residency positions.

AUC students achieved a 95% first-time pass rate on the USMLE Step 1 exam in 2018. In 2019, 91% of first-time eligible 2018-2019 AUC graduates attained residency positions.

In February 2019, AUC announced a new program starting in September 2019, in partnership with University of Central Lancashire (“UCLan”) in the United Kingdom to enable students from the United Kingdom, and across the world to study towards the M.D. degree, the postgraduate degree of physicians in the U.S. The program offers students a postgraduate diploma in International Medical Sciences (“PGIMS”) from UCLan, followed by a M.D. degree with AUC. Students will then be eligible to complete clinical rotations at AUC’s clinical sites, which include hospitals in the U.S., the United Kingdom and Canada.

MERP is a 15-week medical school preparatory program focused on preparing prospective AUC and RUSM students in building the academic foundation they need to be successful in medical school and to achieve their goals of becoming physicians. Upon successful completion of the program, students are able to enroll in AUC or RUSM.

6

Data has shown that students who complete the MERP program successfully perform just as well or better than students who were admitted directly into medical school.

RUSVM, founded in 1982 and acquired by Adtalem in May 2003, provides veterinary education and offers three graduate degrees. RUSVM is one of 50 American Veterinary Medical Association (“AVMA”) accredited veterinary education institutions in the world. RUSVM is located on St. Kitts and has graduated more than 5,000 veterinarians, since inception. The mission of RUSVM is to provide the best learning environment to prepare students to become members and leaders of the worldwide public and professional healthcare system, advancing human and animal health through research and knowledge exchange.

The RUSVM program is structured to provide a veterinary education that is comparable to educational programs at U.S. veterinary schools. RUSVM students complete a seven-semester, pre-clinical curriculum at the campus on St. Kitts. After completing their pre-clinical curriculum, RUSVM students enter a clinical clerkship lasting approximately 45 weeks under RUSVM direction at one of more than 20 affiliated U.S. Colleges of Veterinary Medicine as well as international affiliates in Canada, Australia, Ireland, New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

RUSVM offers a one-semester Veterinary Preparatory program designed to enhance the pre-clinical science knowledge and study skills that are critical to success in veterinary school. It is structured to prepare students for success at RUSVM.

Financial Services

ACAMS, founded in 2001 and acquired by Adtalem in July 2016, is the largest international membership organization dedicated to enhancing the knowledge, skills and expertise of anti-money laundering (“AML”) and financial crime detection and prevention professionals. As of June 30, 2019, ACAMS has more than 75,000 members in 175 countries. Members include representatives from a wide range of financial institutions, regulatory bodies, law enforcement agencies and industry sectors. ACAMS further strengthens Adtalem’s financial services offerings by providing AML and financial crimes prevention training, conferences and certification.

ACAMS’ main products include membership service, Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialist (“CAMS”) certification, conferences, risk assessment, training and publications. The CAMS credential and ACAMS advanced certifications like CAMS-Audit and CAMS-FCI (Financial Crimes Investigation) are recognized as industry-leading in AML certifications worldwide.

Becker, founded in 1957 as Becker CPA Review and acquired by Adtalem in 1996, is a global leader in professional education serving the accounting and finance professions. Becker prepares candidates for the Certified Public Accountant (“CPA”) and Certified Management Accountant (“CMA”) certification examinations and offers continuing professional education programs and seminars. Classes are taught online and live across the U.S. and in approximately 35 foreign countries; classes are taught directly by Becker and through licensed affiliates. Nearly one million candidates have prepared for the Uniform CPA Examination (“CPA exam”) using Becker’s CPA Exam Review Course. Becker also offers continuing professional education and training programs in the fields of accounting and finance to help individuals and organizations achieve superior performance through professional development.

The CPA exam is prepared and administered by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (“AICPA”). The CPA exam is only offered in a computer-based, on-demand, four-part format for eight months of the year. In addition to successfully passing the four-part exam, CPA candidates must also meet educational, work experience and other requirements specific to the state or jurisdiction in which they intend to be licensed to practice.

Becker is the industry leader in providing CPA exam review services and has been preparing candidates to pass the CPA exam for over 60 years. Since 2005, when the AICPA began to share national results, 90% or more of Elijah Watt Sells Award winners, individuals who achieved the highest cumulative scores on the CPA exam, prepared with Becker.

To meet the demands and learning preferences of today’s busy professionals, Becker’s classes are offered in two formats: live and self-study. The self-study product is interactive and offers the same instructor-led lectures and

7

materials available in the live classroom courses. Becker provides access to a wide variety of services to support students including one-on-one tutoring, success coaching and academic support. Becker also provides administrative support services for its university, firm and corporate partners.

OCL, founded in 2007 and acquired by Adtalem in May 2019, is a leading provider of compliance training, licensure preparation, continuing education and professional development in the banking and mortgage industries across the U.S. OCL is based in Brookfield, Wisconsin. Its online programs focus on banking and credit union compliance and regulatory training, and Mortgage Lending Officer certification exam preparation and continuing education.

EduPristine, founded in 2008, is based in Mumbai, India. Adtalem completed its acquisition of a 69% ownership interest in EduPristine in March 2018. EduPristine is a professional education provider in India offering online and classroom programs in the areas of finance, accounting, analytics, marketing and healthcare.

Business and Law

Adtalem Brazil was established in 2001 and is based in São Paulo. Adtalem completed its acquisition of a majority stake in Adtalem Brazil in April 2009 and had a 97.9% ownership interest in Adtalem Brazil as of June 30, 2019.  On July 1, 2019, the Adtalem Brazil management noncontrolling interest members exercised their put options and sold their remaining ownership interests in Adtalem Brazil to Adtalem. As of the first quarter of fiscal year 2020, Adtalem owns 100% of Adtalem Brazil. The vision of Adtalem Brazil is to be one of the leading Brazilian educational groups, recognized for high quality and innovation, offering international academic standards and focused on the professional success of its students. Adtalem Brazil is currently comprised of 13 institutions. These institutions operate under three brand names, Wyden Educational (“Wyden”), Ibmec and Damasio:

Wyden Institutions:

·

Centro Universitário Unifanor (“UniFanor”)

·

Centro Universitário UniFavip (“UniFavip”)

·

Centro Universitário UniFBV (“UniFBV”)

·

Centro Universitário UniMetrocamp (“UniMetrocamp”)

·

Centro Universitário UniRuy (“UniRuy”)

·

Faculdade ÁREA1 (“AREA1”)

·

Faculdade Ideal (“Faci”)

·

Faculdade Diferencial Integral (“Facid”)

·

Faculdade de Imperatriz (“Facimp”)

·

Faculdade Martha Falcão (“FMF”)

Ibmec Institution:

·

Grupo Ibmec Educacional S.A. (“Ibmec”)

Damasio Institutions:

·

Damásio Educacional S/A (“Damasio”)

·

São Judas Tadeu (“SJT”)

Adtalem Brazil’s institutions offer undergraduate and graduate programs primarily focused in business, engineering, healthcare, law, management, medical and technology. In addition, Damasio offers legal bar exam review courses, review courses for tests required for diplomatic careers in Brazil and medical exam review courses. These institutions operate 17 locations located in 11 states in Northeast, North and Southeast Brazil. Adtalem Brazil also operates more than 180 distance learning centers throughout Brazil under Damasio’s franchise agreements. As of June 30, 2019, Adtalem Brazil serves approximately 80,000 students in undergraduate and graduate programs and serves approximately 40,000 test preparation students.

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Discontinued Operations

On December 4, 2018, Adtalem completed the sale of Carrington College (“Carrington”) to San Joaquin Valley College, Inc. (“SJVC”) pursuant to the Membership Interest Purchase Agreement (the “MIPA”) dated June 28, 2018. To support Carrington’s future success, Adtalem made a capital contribution of $7.5 million to Carrington, based on an agreed working capital balance of $11.5 million at the closing date.

On December 11, 2018, Adtalem completed the sale of DeVry University to Cogswell Education, LLC (“Cogswell”) pursuant to the purchase agreement dated December 4, 2017. To support DeVry University’s future success, Adtalem transferred DeVry University with a working capital balance of $8.75 million at the closing date. In addition, Adtalem has agreed to indemnify Cogswell for certain losses including those related to certain pre-closing defense to repayment claims. The purchase agreement also includes an earn-out entitling Adtalem to payments of up to $20 million over a ten-year period payable based on DeVry University’s free cash flow. 

In accordance with U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (“GAAP”), the DeVry University and Carrington entities are classified as “Discontinued Operations.” As a result, all financial results, disclosures and discussions of continuing operations in this Annual Report on Form 10-K exclude DeVry University and Carrington operations, unless otherwise noted.

DEGREE ENROLLMENTS

The following table provides the percentage of enrollment by degree for Adtalem’s postsecondary educational institutions, excluding Adtalem Brazil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Percent of Enrollment

 

 

 

by Degree

 

 

    

Fall

    

Fall

    

Fall

 

 

 

2018

 

2017

 

2016

 

Bachelor's

 

55

%  

57

%  

59

%

Master's

 

29

%  

27

%  

23

%

Doctoral

 

16

%  

16

%  

18

%

 

MARKET TRENDS AND COMPETITION

Medical and Healthcare

Chamberlain

Chamberlain competes in the U.S. nursing education market, which has more than 1,800 programs leading to RN licensure. These include four-year educational institutions, two-year community colleges, and diploma schools of nursing. The market consists of two distinct segments: pre-licensure nursing programs that prepare students to take the NCLEX-RN licensure exam and post-licensure nursing programs that allow existing RNs to advance their education. Nursing constitutes the largest occupation in healthcare in the U.S., with 2.9 million RNs in 2016, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that employment of RNs is expected to grow 15% from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average employment growth rate for all occupations.

In the pre-licensure nursing market, enrollment caps and limited new student enrollment periods are common among traditional four-year educational institutions and community colleges. Despite the long-term need for nurses, institutions are not increasing educational capacity to keep up with demand. According to AACN, U.S. nursing schools turned away more than 75,000 qualified applicants from baccalaureate nursing programs in 2018 due to budget constraints and an insufficient number of faculty, clinical sites, classroom space and clinical preceptors. In addition, demand for BSN degrees is impacted by the Institute of Medicine’s recommendation and the American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet designation criteria that require hospitals to employ or have a plan to employ at least 80% BSN nurses.

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In post-licensure nursing education, there are more than 600 institutions offering RN-to-BSN programs and more than 500 institutions offering MSN programs. Chamberlain’s RN-to-BSN degree completion option has received two Quality Matters Certifications for Online Learning Support and Online Teaching Support. Chamberlain’s RN-to-BSN degree completion option is approved in 50 states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Similarly, the MSN degree program is approved in 50 states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands, while the FNP Specialty Track is approved in 45 states and the District of Columbia. Chamberlain offers its DNP program in 48 states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands, while the MPH program is offered in 49 states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The MSW program is approved in 36 states and classes will start in September 2019.

Medical and Veterinary Schools

AUC and RUSM compete with approximately 150 U.S. schools of medicine, 48 U.S. colleges of osteopathic medicine and more than 40 Caribbean medical schools as well as with international medical schools recruiting U.S. students who may be eligible to receive funding from U.S. Department of Education (“ED”) Title IV programs. RUSVM competes with American Veterinary Medical Association (“AVMA”) accredited schools, of which 30 are U.S.-based, 5 are Canadian and 15 are other international veterinary schools.

The medical and veterinary schools’ educational institutions attract potential students for several reasons. Some applied to U.S.-based medical or veterinary schools but were not admitted or were wait-listed. Some students elected not to apply to U.S. schools because of self-perceived chances of gaining acceptance. For some students, the medical and veterinary schools’ education institutions are their first or only choice of schools because of their commitment to and focus on quality and on practitioner-oriented teaching.

According to the Association of American Medical Colleges Center for Workforce Studies in an April 2019 analysis, physician demand will continue to grow faster than supply, leading to a projected total physician shortfall of between 46,900 and 121,900 physicians by 2032. The shortfall ranges from 39,700 to 84,500 physicians in 2025.

There has been some recent expansion in the U.S. medical education and veterinary education enrollment capacities because of the growing supply/demand imbalance for medical doctors. Despite this expansion, management believes the imbalance will continue to spur demand for medical and veterinary education.

Financial Services

ACAMS

Money laundering and the financing of terrorism are financial crimes with significant economic effects. The United Nations Office on Drug and Crime estimates that in one year 2-5% of global Gross Domestic Product, or $1.6 to $4 trillion, is laundered globally. Money laundering can occur in various forms including corruption, drug trafficking, tax evasion and cybercrime. AML is the set of procedures, laws and regulations designed to combat the practice of generating income through illegal actions. Professionals who need effective AML procedures include financial institutions, insurers, asset managers, lawyers, broker-dealers, private equity firms, consultants, law enforcement and credit institutions. This training protects companies against various costs, such as financial penalties from regulatory bodies, personal liability, financial action from shareholders or employees and reputational damage.

There are approximately 1.6 million AML industry individuals in the various market segments, with individuals outside the U.S. representing approximately 1.1 million, or 70% of the addressable market. Organizations’ training methods are met by third-parties or internally developed informal training. Regulators are encouraging companies to maintain higher control standards. Due to frequent regulatory changes, internal training is being supplemented with third-party developed training programs to meet the higher regulatory standards. ACAMS is the largest AML certifier and is recognized as an industry leader in AML credentialing.

According to a survey completed by Dow Jones in 2015, the top three memberships with which professionals associate are ACAMS, American Bankers Association and Association of Certified Fraud Examiners. As of June 30,

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2019, more than 42,000 professionals have received the CAMS designation, which is completed by passing the ACAMS CAMS certification examination as a qualified applicant. Two of the top-read industry publications are ACAMS Today and ACAMS moneylaundering.com. ACAMS is also a leader in the industry in conference attendance. Conferences and seminars are held in 32 countries annually serving approximately 11,000 attendees.

Becker

In 2018, the AICPA reported that there were approximately 76,000 accounting graduates combined across bachelor’s and master’s degree candidates and in 2018, approximately 37,000 new candidates began the CPA exam. The number of accounting graduates has increased at a compound annual growth rate of 1.4% over the last ten years. Over that same time period, the number of first-time CPA exam test takers has declined at a compound annual rate of 1.8%; although the number of test-takers may fluctuate in specific years based on the timing of student demand and exam changes. In 2018, the number of first-time CPA exam test takers fell 14% below the ten-year average (2008-2017). Further, 2018 employment of accounting graduates at U.S. public accounting firms, a key driver of CPA demand, declined 13% from the ten-year average as firms seek alternative skill sets to expand services.

Becker competes with other purveyors of exam preparation, including courses offered by colleges, universities and other public and private training companies.

Becker management believes that in addition to its 60-plus year history and track record of successful student achievement on the CPA exam, it has advantages over competitors that include:

·

Experienced, highly qualified instructors for each of the areas of specialty included in the exam including industry renowned accounting experts;

·

Courses available in live and self-study to meet candidate learning preferences and needs for flexibility and control;

·

Extensive, continuously updated and fully integrated review and practice test materials;

·

Practice simulations and software functionality, similar to those used in the actual exam; and

·

Relationships with universities and all of the top 100 largest public accounting firms.

OCL

There are approximately 1.7 million financial services and mortgage industry professionals in the various market segments that comprise OCL’s addressable market. These professionals require mandatory compliance training to meet regulatory requirements and internal compliance requirements; those in the mortgage industry have licensure and continuing education requirements. The regulatory environment for the financial services and mortgage industries continues to change at a rapid pace, which requires companies to maintain higher control standards. The growing importance of specialized skills and up-skilling the workforce are also addressed by OCL’s offerings. Organizations’ training methods are met by third-parties and internally developed informal training. Due to frequent regulatory changes, internal training is being supplemented with third-party developed training programs to meet higher regulatory standards. OCL is one of the largest national providers of training in both the bank and credit union and mortgage industries.

Business and Law

Adtalem Brazil

From 2010 to 2017, the Brazilian private higher education market grew 31% to 6.24 million enrollments, with business, law and healthcare being the largest areas of study by number of students. The private school market comprises 75% of the total market. The main driver of enrollment growth was from online programs that grew 112% to 1.6 million from 2010 to 2017. Onsite programs grew 15% to 4.6 million students. In 2017, 18% of the population was enrolled in higher education, and the objective of the National Plan of Education is to increase this to 33% by 2024, adding potentially 7 million of new higher education enrollments, including public and private schools.

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Brazil has the largest private higher education market in Latin America, which until recently was highly fragmented. Over the last decade, private equity firms and international educational groups have been investing in Brazilian higher education, resulting in consolidation of the market. Private higher education institutions fall into three different segments:

·

Mass market: fastest growing segment, with the highest regulatory risk

·

Superior quality market: growth driven by gaining market share from competitors. Facilitating access to student financing is an important factor to accelerate growth in this segment

·

Niche market: highly specialized, has limited growth potential

Most Adtalem Brazil institutions compete in the superior quality market. Adtalem Brazil faces local competition at each location in which it operates. Nationwide there are also competitors such as: Laureate, Kroton Educacional, Anima, SER Educacional and Estacio.

STUDENT ADMISSIONS

Medical and Healthcare

Chamberlain

Marketing and Outreach

Chamberlain advertises through a variety of marketing channels to inform prospective students interested in entering or advancing their nursing careers about the university and the programs it offers. A mix of local and national tactics are utilized, including online display, paid search, email, paid social, online video and local radio advertising.

To inform prospective students about the pre-licensure program offered at its 21 campus locations, Chamberlain representatives visit high schools, cultivate referrals and participate in career fairs. Chamberlain campuses hold open house events for prospective students and Experience Nursing Days for high school students to inform them about the requirements for nursing school.

Post-licensure programs rely primarily on digital marketing, referrals from current students and alumni, and strategic healthcare partnerships to reach prospective students. A variety of highly targeted internet advertising tactics are used to reach RNs who are considering advancing their careers. A team of healthcare development specialists establishes partnerships with healthcare institutions, other large employers of nurses and community colleges.

Student Admissions and Admissions Standards

Pre-Licensure BSN Program

The Chamberlain undergraduate pre-licensure admission process is made up of two phases: Academic Eligibility and Clinical Clearance. Applicants must meet both sets of requirements to be eligible for admission. Academic Eligibility requires proof of graduation with a minimum grade point average of 2.75 from a recognized high school or other college, along with a minimum custom score on the A2 Admission Assessment test. The admissions committee reviews each application and selects the most qualified candidates. Applicants who are deemed Academically Eligible must receive Clinical Clearance, which includes a background check, fingerprint screen and drug screen for acceptance to be granted. Chamberlain enrolls students in its pre-licensure program three times per year.

RN-to-BSN Option

Admission to the RN-to-BSN option requires a nursing diploma or Associate Degree in Nursing from an accredited institution, a minimum grade point average of 2.0 and a current, active, unrestricted RN license in the U.S. or other

12

jurisdiction that is an associate member of the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (“NCSBN”). Chamberlain enrolls students in its RN-to-BSN program six times per year.

Graduate Programs

To enroll in the MSN program, a prospective student must possess a degree in nursing at the bachelor’s level or higher from an accredited institution, a minimum grade point average of 3.0 and a current, active, unrestricted RN license in the U.S. or other jurisdiction that is an associate member of the NCSBN. Provisional admission may be granted to students who have a grade point average of at least 2.75 but less than 3.0.

Enrollment in the MPH program requires a bachelor’s level degree or higher from an accredited institution and a minimum grade point average of 3.0.

Students seeking to enroll in the MSW program must have a bachelor’s degree or higher from an accredited institution with a minimum grade point average of 2.5. Students must also pass a background and fingerprint check.

The DNP program requires a degree at the master’s level or higher from an accredited institution, a minimum grade point average of 3.0 and a current, active, unrestricted RN license in the U.S. or other jurisdiction that is an associate member of the NCSBN.

Chamberlain enrolls students in its graduate programs six times per year.

Medical and Veterinary Schools

Marketing and Outreach

AUC, RUSM and RUSVM focus their marketing efforts on attracting primarily U.S. and Canadian qualified applicants, with the motivation and requisite academic ability to complete their educational programs and pass the USMLE and the North American Veterinary Licensure Examination, respectively. Each institution’s marketing effort includes visits to undergraduate campuses to meet students and their pre-med/pre-vet advisors, direct e-mail marketing, webinars, targeted direct mail campaigns, information seminars in major markets throughout the U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico, alumni referrals, a national undergraduate poster campaign, radio advertisements in select markets, digital and social media and print ads in major magazines and newspapers.

Student Admissions and Admissions Standards

AUC, RUSM and RUSVM each employ regional admissions representatives in locations throughout the U.S. and in Canada, who seek out students interested in their respective programs. A successful applicant must have received a bachelor’s degree and, for AUC and RUSM, taken the Medical College Admission Test. Candidates for admission must interview with an admissions representative and all admission decisions are made by the admissions committees of the medical and veterinary schools.

Financial Services

ACAMS

Marketing and Outreach

ACAMS markets its training programs to AML and financial crime professionals from a wide range of industries, including large financial institutions, brokerage and consulting firms. Direct mail, print advertising, e-mail, digital and social media advertising are used to enhance program awareness, distribute relevant content and to attract new members and program participants. The ACAMS website is another source of information for prospective members and event attendees.

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Becker

Marketing and Outreach

Becker markets its courses directly to potential customers and to selected employers, including the large global, national and regional public accounting firms. The Becker website along with alumni referrals, print advertising, e-mail, digital and social media advertising and a network of student representatives at colleges and universities across the country also generate new students for Becker’s review courses.

Becker is the preferred provider of CPA review for most of the country’s largest public accounting firms and has long-standing relationships with all of the top 100 largest public accounting firms, including each of the “Global 7” public accounting firms. In total, Becker has relationships with more than 1,500 public accounting firms, professional societies and universities. Becker also delivers its CPA exam review courses on college campuses and recruits students attending those institutions.

OCL

Marketing and Outreach

OCL markets its library of proprietary, evidence-based and industry-aligned accredited courses and training programs to banks and credit unions and mortgage brokerage companies and individuals. Direct mail, print advertising, e-mail, digital and social media advertising enhance program awareness, distribute relevant content and attract new customers. The OCL website is another source of information for prospective customers.

Business and Law

Adtalem Brazil

Marketing and Outreach

Adtalem Brazil advertises on various internet sites, at special events, on television and radio, and utilizes a variety of methods to reach prospective students. Each Adtalem Brazil institution and campus has a specific media plan based on the local market. Damasio is marketed through the more than 180 franchises that offer test preparation, undergraduate and graduate programs.

Adtalem Brazil’s high school program representatives visit high schools throughout the Northeast, North and Southeast regions of Brazil, providing workshops on career choices, the importance of a college education and the international benefits offered by Adtalem Brazil.

Adtalem Brazil’s Corporate Training Services organization is designed to meet the educational needs of corporate clients and their employees with tailor-made program offerings. A national network of corporate account supervisors directs the student recruiting efforts primarily at the country’s more prominent companies, leveraging relationships with these clients and offering undergraduate, graduate and customized educational programs.

Student Admissions and Admission Standards

Adtalem Brazil provides admissions services, and employs salaried, full-time admissions advisors at each Adtalem Brazil institution to support those candidates interested in enrolling in any of Adtalem Brazil’s institutions. Applicants to undergraduate programs can use one of the four methods for entrance to Wyden’s and Ibmec’s programs: (1) entrance examination or “Vestibular,” (2) ENEM grade (standardized government exam for public universities and government financing), (3) a former higher education degree, or (4) transfer from another institution. There are two sessions per year for undergraduate admissions, January and July, for both onsite and distance learning modalities. Graduate admissions criteria include verification of an undergraduate degree and personal interviews. The admissions services at each institution are supported by a central admissions center for the Wyden and Ibmec brands.

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Adtalem Brazil offers the “CASA” program (Student Support), which aims to help students achieve better academic results through educational and psychological support and monitoring. CASA program advisors provide professional guidance to current students and alumni. The main objective of this support is to facilitate access to labor markets and to help students in planning their professional careers.

ACCREDITATION

Educational institutions and their individual programs are awarded accreditation by achieving a level of quality that entitles them to the confidence of the educational community and the public they serve. Accredited institutions are subject to periodic review by accrediting bodies to ensure continued high performance and institutional and program improvement and integrity, and to confirm that accreditation requirements continue to be satisfied. College and university administrators depend on the accredited status of an institution when evaluating transfer credit and applicants to their schools; employers rely on the accredited status of an institution when evaluating a candidate’s credentials; and parents and high school counselors look to accreditation for assurance that an institution meets quality educational standards. Moreover, in the U.S., accreditation is necessary for students to qualify for federal financial assistance and most scholarship commissions restrict their awards to students attending accredited institutions.

Medical and Healthcare

Chamberlain

Chamberlain is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (“HLC”). BSN, MSN and DNP programs at Chamberlain are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. Chamberlain’s MPH program has commenced the accreditation process with the Council on Education for Public Health, which accepted Chamberlain’s application in October 2017. Chamberlain’s MSW program has commenced the accreditation process with the Council on Social Work Education, which accepted Chamberlain’s application in May 2019.

Medical and Veterinary Schools

The Government of St. Maarten authorizes AUC to confer the M.D. degree. AUC is accredited by the Accreditation Commission on Colleges of Medicine (“ACCM”). The ACCM is an international medical school accrediting organization for countries that do not have a national medical school accreditation body. The U.S. Department of Education National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation (“NCFMEA”) has affirmed that the ACCM has established and enforces standards of educational accreditation that are comparable to those promulgated by the U.S. Liaison Committee on Medical Education (“LCME”). In addition, AUC is approved to place students in clinical rotations in the majority of states, including California, Florida and New York, where robust processes are in place to evaluate and approve an international medical school’s programs. AUC students can join residency training programs in all 50 states.

RUSM’s primary accreditor is Caribbean Accreditation Authority for Education in Medicine and other Health Professions (“CAAM-HP”). CAAM-HP is authorized to accredit medical programs by the government of Barbados. On July 26, 2018, Barbados authorized RUSM to confer the M.D. degree. The NCFMEA has affirmed that CAAM-HP has established and enforces standards of educational accreditation that are comparable to those promulgated by the LCME. In addition, RUSM is approved to place students in clinical rotations in the majority of states, including California, Florida, New Jersey and New York, where robust processes are in place to evaluate and accredit an international medical school’s programs. RUSM students can join residency training programs in all 50 states.

RUSVM has been recognized and accredited by the government of the Federation of St. Christopher and Nevis (“St. Kitts”) and is chartered to confer the D.V.M. degree. RUSVM confers a D.V.M. degree that is accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education (“AVMA COE”). RUSVM has affiliations with more than 20 AVMA-accredited U.S. and international colleges of veterinary medicine so that RUSVM students can complete their final three semesters of study in the U.S. or abroad. RUSVM has received accreditation for its Postgraduate Studies program from the St. Christopher & Nevis Accreditation Board. The Postgraduate Studies program

15

offers Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees in all research areas supported by RUSVM. Areas of emphasis are guided by RUSVM's themed Research Centers.

Financial Services

Becker

Becker’s accreditation from the Accrediting Council for Continuing Education & Training (“ACCET”) allows it to extend its accredited programs to international students that desire to attend a live course in the U.S., and issue the required Form I-20 “Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant Student Status” to international students participating in the program.

Business and Law

Adtalem Brazil

The Brazilian Ministry of Education (“MEC”) controls and regulates postsecondary education in the country.  MEC also controls the issuance of licenses and permits.

The licensing process occurs on two levels: institutional and programmatic. Every three to five years, the licenses must be renewed. MEC uses an institutional index called Indice Geral de Cursos (“IGC”), or “General Programs Index.” IGCs range from 1 to 5, with a 3 or above being satisfactory. All Adtalem Brazil institutions have at least a satisfactory IGC or higher.

IGC is calculated using the weighted average of all “Conceito Preliminar de Curso” (“CPC”) or “Preliminary Program Grades.” The CPC is an academic quality metric composed of the following figures:

·

55% Results of ENADE, a national end-of-program standardized exam organized by MEC;

·

30% Faculty credentials and part or full-time faculty status; and

·

15% Student satisfaction.

MEC also licenses programs at each institution. The regulations are different for undergraduate and graduate programs. For undergraduate programs, MEC must grant “authorization” status before classes may commence. After a program is 50% to 75% complete, MEC auditors visit the institution to grant the definitive license, which can be automatically renewed every three years, unless the program presents an unsatisfactory CPC below 3 within a range of 1 to 5 (with 5 being the best). As of June 30, 2019, Adtalem Brazil has approximately 490 authorized undergraduate programs; 223 of which are licensed.

Master’s or Doctorate degree granting programs are regulated by MEC in Brazil; they are licensed every three or four years. Other types of graduate programs are regulated and do not have licenses issued by MEC. Adtalem Brazil has one Master of Sciences program at UniFBV, one program at Facid and two at Ibmec.

FINANCIAL AID AND FINANCING STUDENT EDUCATION

Students attending Chamberlain, AUC, RUSM, RUSVM and Adtalem Brazil pay for their education through a variety of sources. These sources include government-sponsored financial aid, private and university-provided scholarships, employer-provided tuition assistance, veteran’s benefits, private loans and cash payments. Students attending Becker, ACAMS and OCL review courses and programs are not eligible for federal or state financial aid, but may receive partial or full tuition or fee reimbursement from their employers. In addition, Becker’s CPA Exam Review Course can be financed through Becker under an 18-month term loan program.

16

The following table summarizes Adtalem’s revenue by fund source as a percentage of total revenue for fiscal years 2018 and 2017. Final data for fiscal year 2019 is not yet available.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiscal Year

 

Funding Source:

    

2018

    

2017

 

Federal Assistance (Title IV) Program Funding (Grants and Loans)

 

46

%  

47

%

Brazil FIES Public Loan Program

 

 6

%  

 7

%

Private Loans

 

 1

%  

 1

%

Student accounts, cash payments, private scholarships, employer and military provided tuition assistance and other

 

47

%  

45

%

Total

 

100

%  

100

%

 

The increase in the “Student accounts, cash payments, private scholarships, employer and military provided tuition assistance and other” funding source is the result of management’s efforts to reduce Adtalem’s funding provided by U.S. federal and Brazilian FIES sources.

All financial aid and assistance programs are subject to political and governmental budgetary considerations. In the U.S., the Higher Education Act (as reauthorized, the “HEA”) guides the federal government’s support of postsecondary education. The HEA was last reauthorized by the U.S. Congress in July 2008 and was signed into law in August 2008. During the 115th Congress in December 2017, committee leadership of the U.S. House of Representatives released partisan, comprehensive HEA proposals; the Senate did not put forth a comprehensive HEA reauthorization proposal. During the 116th Congress in 2019, neither chamber has yet introduced a comprehensive reauthorization proposal. However, there have been individual bills introduced on various HEA provisions, and committee leadership in both the House and Senate could release comprehensive HEA proposals during this Congress. When HEA is reauthorized, existing programs and participation requirements are subject to change. Additionally, funding for student financial assistance programs may be impacted during appropriations and budget actions.

Information about Particular U.S. and Canadian Government Financial Aid Programs

Chamberlain, AUC, RUSM, and RUSVM students participate in many U.S. and Canadian financial aid programs. Each of these programs is briefly described below.

U.S. Federal Financial Aid Programs

Students in the U.S. rely on three types of ED student financial aid programs under Title IV of the HEA.

1. Grants. Chamberlain undergraduate students may participate in the Federal Pell Grant and Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant programs.

·

Federal Pell Grants: These funds do not have to be repaid and are available to eligible undergraduate students who demonstrate financial need and who have not already received a baccalaureate degree. For the 2019-2020 school year, eligible students could receive Federal Pell Grants ranging from $312 to $9,292.

 

·

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (“FSEOG”): This is a supplement to the Federal Pell Grant, and is only available to the neediest undergraduate students. Federal rules restrict the amount of FSEOG funds that may go to a single institution. The maximum individual FSEOG award is established by the institution but cannot exceed $4,000 per academic year. Educational institutions are required to supplement federal funds with a 25% matching contribution. Institutional matching contributions may be satisfied, in whole or in part, by state grants, scholarship funds (discussed below) or by externally provided scholarship grants.

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2. Loans. Chamberlain, AUC, RUSM and RUSVM students may participate in the Direct Unsubsidized and PLUS programs within the Federal Direct Student Loan Program. Chamberlain undergraduate students may also be eligible for Subsidized Loans within the Federal Direct Student Loan Program.

·

Direct Subsidized Loan: Awarded on the basis of student financial need, it is a low-interest loan (a portion of the interest is subsidized by the Federal government) available to undergraduate students with interest charges and principal repayment deferred until six months after a student no longer attends school on at least a half-time basis (the student is responsible for paying the interest charges during the six months after no longer attending school on at least a half-time basis for those loans with a first disbursement between July 1, 2012 and July 1, 2014). First time borrowers after July 1, 2013 are eligible for Direct Subsidized Loans only for 150% of the published length of their academic program. Loan limits per academic year range from $3,500 for students in their first academic year to $5,500 for students in their third or higher undergraduate academic year.

 

·

Direct Unsubsidized Loan: Awarded to students who do not meet the needs test or as an additional supplement to the Direct Subsidized Loan. These loans incur interest from the time funds are disbursed, but actual principal and interest payments may be deferred until six months after a student no longer attends school on at least a half-time basis. Unsubsidized Loan limits per academic year range from $2,000 for students in their first and second academic year to $7,000 in later undergraduate years and increasing to $20,500 per academic year for graduate and professional program students. Additionally, a student without financial need may borrow an additional amount of Unsubsidized Loans up to the limit of the Direct Subsidized Loan at their respective academic grade level. The total Direct Subsidized and/or Unsubsidized Loan aggregate borrowing limit for undergraduate students is $57,500 and $138,500 for graduate students, which is inclusive of Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loan amounts borrowed as an undergraduate.

 

·

Direct Parent PLUS and Direct Grad PLUS Loans: Enables a graduate student or parents of a dependent undergraduate student to borrow additional funds to meet the cost of the student’s education. These loans are not based on financial need, nor are they subsidized. Interest begins to accrue, and repayment obligations begin, immediately after the loan is fully disbursed, but may be deferred until a student no longer attends school on at least a half-time basis. Graduate students and parents may borrow funds up to the cost of attendance, which includes allowances for tuition, fees and living expenses. Both Parent PLUS and Grad PLUS are subject to credit approval, which generally requires the borrower to be free of any current adverse credit conditions. A co-borrower may be used to meet the credit requirements.

3. Federal Work-study. This program offers work opportunities, both on or off campus, on a part-time basis to students who demonstrate financial need. Federal Work-study wages are paid partly from federal funds and partly from qualified employer funds.

State Financial Aid Programs

Certain states, including Arizona, California, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana,  Ohio and Vermont, offer state grant or loan assistance to eligible undergraduate students attending Adtalem institutions.

Canadian Government Financial Aid Programs

Canadian citizens or permanent residents of Canada (other than students from the Northwest Territories, Nunavet or Quebec) are eligible for loans under the Canada Student Loans Program, which is financed by the Canadian government. Eligibility and amount of funding vary by province. Students attending Chamberlain online while in the U.S., or attending AUC, RUSM or RUSVM, may be eligible for the Canada Student Loan Program. The loans are interest-free while the student is in school, and repayment begins six months after the student leaves school. Qualified students also may benefit from Canada Study Grants (designed for students whose financial needs and special circumstances cannot otherwise be met), tax-free withdrawals from retirement savings plans, tax-free education savings plans, loan repayment extensions and interest relief on loans.

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Information about Other Financial Aid Programs

Private Loan Programs

Some Chamberlain, AUC, RUSM and RUSVM students rely on private (non-federal) loan programs for financial assistance. These programs are used to finance the gap between a student’s educational and living costs and their financial aid awards. The amount of the typical loan varies significantly according to the student’s enrollment and financial aid awards.

Most private loans are approved using the student’s or a co-borrower’s credit history. The cost of these loans varies, but in almost all cases will be more expensive than the federal programs. The application process is separate from the traditional financial aid process. Student finance personnel at Adtalem’s degree-granting institutions coordinate these processes so that students generally receive assistance from the federal and state programs before utilizing private loans.

Adtalem does not maintain a preferred lender list, but does list all of the lenders that made private loans to Adtalem students in the previous year and still offer loans to Adtalem students.

Tax-favored Programs

The U.S. has a number of tax-favored programs aimed at promoting savings for future college expenses. These include state-sponsored “529” college savings plans, state-sponsored prepaid tuition plans, education savings accounts (formerly known as education IRAs), custodial accounts for minors, Hope and Lifetime Learning credits and tax deductions for interest on student loans.

Brazilian Government Financial Aid Programs

Adtalem Brazil students are eligible for loans under Brazil’s FIES public loan program (“Fundo de Financiamento Estudantil” or “Students Financing Fund”), which is financed by the Brazilian government. Adtalem Brazil also participates in PROUNI (“Programa Universidade para Todos” or “University for All Program”), a Brazilian governmental program, which provides federal tax incentives to educational institutions in exchange for providing scholarships to lower income undergraduate students.

FIES targets students from low socio-economic backgrounds enrolled at private postsecondary institutions. Eligible students receive loans with below market interest rates. For contracts signed prior to calendar year 2018, the students are required to begin repaying after an 18-month grace period upon graduation. For contracts signed beginning in calendar year 2018, there is no grace period and the students start repaying small installments during the first month after borrowing. FIES pays participating educational institutions tax credits, which can be used to pay certain federal taxes and social contributions. FIES repurchases excess credits for cash. For contracts signed before 2017, FIES deducts from periodic payments to Adtalem Brazil an average amount of 5.81% to cover administrative expenses (5.63%) and student defaults (0.18%). For contracts signed beginning in calendar year 2018, FIES deducts from periodic payments to Adtalem Brazil an average amount of 15% to cover administrative expenses (2%) and student defaults (13%). Under current FIES rules, there is no additional cost to Adtalem Brazil if students fail to pay their loans under the applicable rules. There have been preliminary discussions by the Brazilian government of charging the institutions for a portion of the FIES student loan defaults. Should these discussions result in FIES rule changes, this could result in an increase in bad debt expense for Adtalem Brazil operations. As of June 30, 2019, approximately 16% of Adtalem Brazil’s degree-seeking students have obtained financing under the FIES program. This represents approximately 15% of Adtalem Brazil’s revenue.

PROUNI promotes the offering of tuition discounts in private postsecondary education schools by granting federal tax incentives for the participating institutions. Discounts reduce tuition by either 50% or 100%. The percentage is driven by rules defined by the Brazilian government based on family monthly earnings. Neither Adtalem Brazil nor its students receive direct funding from the federal government for the tuition discounts granted. Instead, Adtalem Brazil reduces its income tax expense and its income tax liability for the amount of the discounts issued. As of June 30, 2019,  

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approximately 37% of Adtalem Brazil’s undergraduate students have obtained scholarships under the PROUNI program.

The FIES and PROUNI programs are required to be managed in accordance with government standards. Any regulatory violation can be the basis for disciplinary action, including suspension, limitation or termination of rights under the financial assistance program.

In addition to the requirements that educational institutions must meet, student recipients of FIES and PROUNI must maintain satisfactory academic progress towards completion of their programs of study and an appropriate grade point average every semester.

The Brazilian government has stated that it is supportive of the FIES program, which is important in helping achieve the national goal of increasing the number of college graduates; however, changes enacted in recent years to the FIES regulations added restrictions limiting student eligibility for FIES funding and extending the government’s time to disburse funding to participating institutions. These changes include reducing the number of new FIES contracts and adding minimum required entrance test scores in order to qualify for a FIES loan. In addition, the annual interest rate borrowers are charged increased from 3.4% to 6.5%.

Adtalem-Provided Financial Assistance

Chamberlain students are eligible for numerous institutional scholarships with awards up to $2,500 per session.

Students at AUC may be eligible for an institutional scholarship, ranging from $5,000 to $55,000 to cover expenses incurred from tuition and fees. Students at RUSM may be eligible for an institutional scholarship, ranging from $2,500 to $40,000 to cover expenses incurred from tuition and fees. Students at RUSVM may be eligible for an institutional scholarship, ranging from $600 to $24,000 to cover expenses incurred from tuition and fees.

Adtalem’s institutional loan programs are available to students at its Chamberlain, AUC, RUSM and RUSVM institutions. These loan programs are designed to assist students who are unable to completely cover educational costs consisting of tuition, books and fees and are available only after all other student financial assistance has been applied toward those purposes. In addition, AUC, RUSM and RUSVM loans may be used for students’ living expenses. Repayment plans for institutional loan program balances are developed to address the financial circumstances of the particular student. Interest charges accrue each month on the unpaid balance. Students begin repaying loans while they are still in school with a minimum payment level designed to demonstrate their capability to repay and reduce the possibility of over borrowing and to minimize interest being accrued on the loan balance. Payments may increase upon completing or departing the program. After a student leaves school, the student typically will have a monthly installment repayment plan.

The institutional loans do not impose any origination fees, in general have a fixed rate of interest, and most carry annual and aggregate maximums that ensure that they are only a supplemental source of funding and not relied on as the main source. Borrowers must be current in their payments in order to be eligible for subsequent disbursements. Borrowers are advised about the terms of the loans and counseled to utilize all federal funding options.

Adtalem institutional loans are carried on our balance sheet, net of related reserves, and there are no relationships with external parties that shift the risk away from Adtalem.

Employer-Provided Tuition Assistance

Chamberlain students who receive employer tuition assistance may choose from several deferred tuition payment plans. Students eligible for tuition reimbursement plans may have their tuition billed directly to their employers or payment may be deferred until after the end of the session. Educational expenses paid by an employer on behalf of an employee generally are excludable from the employee’s income if provided under a qualified educational assistance plan. At present, the maximum annual exclusion is $5,250.

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Becker

Students taking the Becker review courses are not eligible for federal or state financial aid, but many receive partial or full tuition reimbursement from their employers. Private loans are also available to students to help meet the program costs. In addition, Becker’s CPA Exam Review Course can be financed through Becker under an 18-month term loan program.

LEGISLATIVE AND REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS

Government-funded financial assistance programs are governed by extensive and complex regulations in the U.S., Canada and Brazil. Like other educational institutions, Adtalem’s administration of these programs is periodically reviewed by various regulatory agencies and is subject to audit or investigation by other governmental authorities. Any violation could be the basis for penalties or other disciplinary action, including initiation of a suspension, limitation or termination proceeding.

U.S. Federal Regulations

Our domestic postsecondary institutions are subject to extensive federal and state regulations. The HEA and the related ED regulations govern all higher education institutions participating in Title IV programs, and provide for a regulatory triad by mandating specific regulatory responsibilities for each of the following:

·

The federal government through ED;

·

The accrediting agencies recognized by ED; and

·

State higher education regulatory bodies.

To be eligible to participate in Title IV programs, a postsecondary institution must be accredited by an accrediting body recognized by ED, must comply with the HEA and all applicable regulations thereunder, and must be authorized to operate by the appropriate postsecondary regulatory authority in each state in which the institution operates, as applicable.

In addition to governance by the regulatory triad, there has been focus in recent years by members of the U.S. Congress and federal agencies, including ED, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”) and the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”), on the role that proprietary educational institutions play in higher education. We expect that this challenging regulatory environment will continue for the foreseeable future.

Changes in or new interpretations of applicable laws, rules, or regulations could have a material adverse effect on our eligibility to participate in Title IV programs, accreditation, authorization to operate in various states, permissible activities, and operating costs. The failure to maintain or renew any required regulatory approvals, accreditation, or state authorizations could have a material adverse effect on us. ED regulations regarding financial responsibility provide that, if any one of our Title IV-eligible institutions is unable to pay its obligations under its program participation agreement as a result of operational issues and/or an enforcement action, our other Title IV institutions, regardless of their compliance with applicable laws and regulations, would not be able to maintain their Title IV eligibility without assisting in the repayment of the first institution’s Title IV obligations. As a result, even though Adtalem’s Title IV participating institutions (“Title IV Institutions”) are operated through independent entities, an enforcement action against one of our institutions could also have a material adverse effect on the businesses, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of Adtalem’s other institutions and Adtalem as a whole and could result in the imposition of significant restrictions on the ability of Adtalem’s other institutions and Adtalem as a whole to operate. For further information, see “A bankruptcy filing by us or by any of our Title IV Institutions, or a closure of one of our Title IV Institutions, would lead to an immediate loss of eligibility to participate in Title IV programs” under subsection “Risks Related to Adtalem’s Highly Regulated Industry” in “Item 1A – Risk Factors” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

We have summarized the most significant regulatory requirements applicable to our domestic postsecondary operations. Adtalem has been impacted by these regulations and enforcement efforts and is currently facing multiple related lawsuits arising from the enhanced scrutiny facing the proprietary education sector. For information regarding such pending investigations and litigation, and the potential impact such matters could have on our institutions or on Adtalem, see in

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this Annual Report on Form 10-K: (1) “Note 15: Commitments and Contingencies” to the Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8, (2) the subsection of “Item 1A – Risk Factors” titled “Risks Related to Adtalem’s Highly Regulated Industry,” and (3) the subsection of “Item 7 – Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” titled “Liquidity and Capital Resources.”

Eligibility and Certification Procedures

The HEA specifies the manner in which ED reviews institutions for eligibility and certification to participate in Title IV programs. Every educational institution participating in the Title IV programs must be certified to participate and is required to periodically renew this certification. Institutions that violate certain ED Title IV regulations, including its financial responsibility and administrative capability regulations, may lose their eligibility to participate in Title IV programs or may only continue participation under provisional certification. Schools that do not meet financial responsibility requirements are required to submit a letter of credit equal to at least 10% of their prior fiscal year Title IV disbursements and submit to ED’s heightened cash monitoring process. Provisional certification status also carries fewer due process protections than full certification. As a result, ED may withdraw an institution’s provisional certification more easily than if it is fully certified. Provisional certification does not otherwise limit access to Title IV program funds by students attending the institution.

Defense to Repayment Regulations

Under the HEA, ED is authorized to specify in regulations, which acts or omissions of an institution of higher education a borrower may assert as a defense to repayment of a loan (“Direct Loan”) made under the Federal Direct Loan Program (“Direct Loan Program”). ED’s current defense to repayment regulations (“Defense to Repayment Regulations”) permit a borrower to assert a borrower defense to repayment of a Direct Loan if the institution’s acts or omissions give rise to a cause of action against the institution under state law. On October 28, 2016, ED published final regulations (the “2016 DtR Regulations”) expanding defenses and addressing other related matters, including certain circumstances under which ED may impose a fine, or limit, suspend, or terminate an institution’s participation in Title IV programs. The 2016 DtR Regulations create a new federal standard for borrower defenses to repayment of Direct Loans, new limitation periods for such claims, and new processes for resolution of such claims. On June 14, 2017, ED announced that, due to pending litigation, it is indefinitely postponing implementing the majority of 2016 DtR Regulations, which were due to take effect on July 1, 2017. In September 2018, a federal judge ruled that ED’s delay of these rules was illegal, requiring ED to move forward in their implementation. Implementation guidance was issued by ED in March 2019. ED had previously announced its intention to reassess and revise these rules, and ED published new draft Defense to Repayment Regulations on July 25, 2018. ED’s proposal includes a higher threshold for establishing misrepresentation, provides for a statute of limitation for claims submission, narrows the current triggers allowed for letter of credit requirements and eliminates provisions for group discharges. ED has provided a comment period of 30 days, and is expected to publish final rules in the late fall of 2019; if implemented, the proposed rules would become effective with claims on loans disbursed on or after July 1, 2020. Management is unable to predict what any revised regulations may contain, the result of any other current or future rulemakings, or the impact of such rulemakings on our business.

“90/10 Rule”

An ED regulation known as the “90/10 Rule” affects only proprietary postsecondary institutions, such as Chamberlain, AUC, RUSM and RUSVM. Under this regulation, an institution that derives more than 90% of its revenue on a cash basis from Title IV student financial assistance programs in two consecutive fiscal years loses eligibility to participate in these programs for at least two fiscal years. The following table details the percentage of revenue on a cash basis from federal financial assistance programs (excluding the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and military tuition assistance benefits) for each of Adtalem’s Title IV-eligible institutions for fiscal years 2018 and 2017. Final data for fiscal year 2019 is not yet available.

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Fiscal Year

 

 

    

2018

    

2017

 

Chamberlain University

 

62

%  

63

%  

American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine

 

74

%  

80

%  

Ross University School of Medicine

 

81

%  

82

%  

Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine

 

82

%  

83

%  

 

In September 2016, Adtalem committed to voluntarily limit to 85% the amount of revenue that each of its four Title IV-eligible institutions derive from federal funding, including the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and military tuition assistance benefits. As disclosed in the third party review report that has been made publicly available, Adtalem’s institutions have met this lower threshold for fiscal year 2018. Final data for fiscal year 2019 is not yet available. Adtalem is committed to implementing measures to promote responsible recruitment and enrollment, successful student outcomes, and informed student choice. Management believes students deserve greater transparency to make informed choices about their education. This commitment builds upon a solid foundation and brings Adtalem to a new self-imposed level of public accountability and transparency.

Incentive Compensation

An educational institution participating in Title IV programs may not pay any commission, bonus or other incentive payments to any person involved in student recruitment or admissions or awarding of Title IV program funds, if such payments are based directly or indirectly in any part on success in enrolling students or obtaining student financial aid. The law and regulations governing this requirement have not established clear criteria for compliance in all circumstances, but, prior to 2011, there were 12 safe harbors that defined specific types of compensation that were deemed to constitute permissible incentive compensation. New rules effective in 2011 eliminated the 12 safe harbors. These changes increased the uncertainty about what constitutes incentive compensation and which employees are covered by the regulation. This makes the development of effective and compliant performance metrics more difficult to establish. As such, these changes have limited and are expected to continue to limit Adtalem’s ability to compensate our employees based on their performance of their job responsibilities, which could make it more difficult to attract and retain highly-qualified employees. Management believes that Adtalem has not been, nor is currently, involved in any activities that violate the restrictions on commissions, bonuses or other incentive payments to any person involved in student recruitment, admissions or awarding of Title IV program funds.

Standards of Financial Responsibility

A financial responsibility test is required for continued participation by an institution’s students in U.S. federal financial assistance programs. For Adtalem’s participating institutions, this test is calculated at the consolidated Adtalem level. The test is based upon a composite score of three ratios: an equity ratio that measures the institution’s capital resources; a primary reserve ratio that measures an institution’s ability to fund its operations from current resources; and a net income ratio that measures an institution’s ability to operate profitably. A minimum score of 1.5 is necessary to meet ED’s financial standards. Institutions with scores of less than 1.5 but greater than or equal to 1.0 are considered financially responsible, but require additional oversight. These schools are subject to heightened cash monitoring and other participation requirements. An institution with a score of less than 1.0 is considered not financially responsible. However, a school with a score of less than 1.0 may continue to participate in the Title IV programs under provisional certification. In addition, this lower score typically requires that the school be subject to heightened cash monitoring requirements and post a letter of credit (equal to a minimum of 10% of the Title IV aid it received in the institution's most recent fiscal year).

For the past several years, Adtalem’s composite score has exceeded the required minimum of 1.5. If Adtalem becomes unable to meet requisite financial responsibility standards or otherwise demonstrate, within the regulations, its ability to continue to provide educational services, then Adtalem could be subject to heightened cash monitoring or be required to post a letter of credit to enable its students to continue to participate in federal financial assistance programs.

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Administrative Capability

The HEA directs ED to assess the administrative capability of each institution to participate in Title IV programs. The failure of an institution to satisfy any of the criteria used to assess administrative capability may cause ED to determine that the institution lacks administrative capability and, therefore, subject the institution to additional scrutiny or deny its eligibility for Title IV programs.

State Authorization

Institutions that participate in Title IV programs must be authorized to operate by the appropriate postsecondary regulatory authority in each state where the institution has a physical presence. Chamberlain is specifically authorized to operate in all of the domestic jurisdictions that require such authorizations. Some states assert authority to regulate all degree-granting institutions if their educational programs are available to their residents, whether or not the institutions maintain a physical presence within those states. Chamberlain has obtained licensure in states which require such licensure and where their students are enrolled.

On December 19, 2016, ED published new rules concerning requirements for institutional eligibility to participate in Title IV programs. The regulations, which would have become effective beginning July 1, 2018, but which have been delayed until July 1, 2020, require an institution offering distance education or correspondence courses to be authorized by each state from which the institution enrolls students, if such authorization is required by the state. If an institution offers postsecondary education through distance education or correspondence courses in a state that participates in a state authorization reciprocity agreement, and the institution offering the program is located in a state where it is also covered by such an agreement, the institution would be considered legally authorized to offer postsecondary distance or correspondence education in the state where courses are offered via distance education, subject to any limitations in that agreement. The regulations also require an institution to document the state processes for resolving complaints from students enrolled in programs offered through distance education or correspondence courses. With regard to additional locations or branch campuses located in international countries, the regulations require that such campuses be authorized by an appropriate government agency of the country where the additional location or branch campus is located and, if at least half of an educational program can be completed at the location or branch campus, be approved by the institution's accrediting agency and be reported to the state where the institution's main campus is located. Lastly, the regulations require that an institution provide certain disclosures to enrolled and prospective students regarding its programs offered solely through distance education or correspondence courses. ED renegotiated these rules as part of the 2018-2019 Accreditation and Innovation rule-making sessions. The draft rule published by ED largely comports with the prior requirements as previously described.

Cohort Default Rates

ED has instituted strict regulations that penalize institutions whose students have high default rates on federal student loans. Depending on the type of loan, a loan is considered in default after the borrower becomes at least 270 or 360 days past due. For a variety of reasons, higher default rates are often found in private-sector institutions and community colleges — many of which tend to have a higher percentage of low-income students enrolled than do four-year publicly supported and independent colleges and universities.

Educational institutions are penalized to varying degrees under the Federal Direct Student Loan Program, depending on the default rate for the “cohort” defined in the statute. An institution with a cohort default rate that exceeds 20% for the year is required to develop a plan to reduce defaults, but the institution’s operations and its students’ ability to utilize student loans are not restricted. An institution with a cohort default rate of 30% or more for three consecutive years is ineligible to participate in these loan programs and cannot offer student loans administered by ED for the fiscal year in which the ineligibility determination is made and for the next two fiscal years. Students attending an institution whose cohort default rate has exceeded 30% for three consecutive years also are ineligible for Pell Grants. Any institution with a cohort default rate of 40% or more in any year is subject to immediate limitation, suspension or termination proceedings from all federal aid programs.

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According to ED, the three-year cohort default rate for all colleges and universities eligible for federal financial aid decreased to 10.8% in fiscal year 2015 (the latest period for which data are available) from 11.5% in fiscal year 2014.

Default rates for Chamberlain, AUC, RUSM and RUSVM students follow. The latest period for which final three-year data is available is fiscal year 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cohort Default Rate

 

 

    

2015

    

2014

 

Chamberlain University

 

3.8

%  

3.4

%

American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine

 

1.0

%  

1.2

%

Ross University School of Medicine

 

0.9

%  

0.7

%

Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine

 

0.7

%  

0.2

%

 

Satisfactory Academic Progress

In addition to the requirements that educational institutions must meet, student recipients of financial aid must maintain satisfactory academic progress toward completion of their program of study and an appropriate grade point average.

Change of Ownership or Control

Any material change of ownership or change of control of Adtalem, depending on the type of change, may have significant regulatory consequences for each of Adtalem’s Title IV-eligible institutions. Such a change of ownership or control could require recertification by ED, the re-evaluation of accreditation by our institutions’ accreditors and/or reauthorization by state licensing agencies. If we experience a material change of ownership or change of control, then Chamberlain, AUC, RUSM and RUSVM may cease to be eligible to participate in Title IV programs until recertified by ED. There is no assurance that such recertification would be obtained on a timely basis. After a material change in ownership or change of control, most institutions will participate in Title IV programs on a provisional basis for a period of one to three years.

In addition, most institutions would be required to report any material change in stock ownership to their principal institutional accrediting body, including in the case of Chamberlain, the HLC, and would be required to obtain approval prior to undergoing any transaction that affects, or may affect, its corporate control or governance. In the event of any such change, the applicable accreditor may undertake an evaluation of the effect of the change on the continuing operations of the affected institution for purposes of determining if continued accreditation is appropriate, which evaluation may include a comprehensive review.

In addition, some states in which our institutions are licensed require approval (in some cases, advance approval) of material changes in ownership or changes of control in order to remain authorized to operate in those states, and participation in grant programs in some states may be interrupted or otherwise affected by such a change in ownership or control.

Refer to “If regulators do not approve, or delay their approval, of transactions involving a material change of ownership or change of control of our company, the eligibility of our institutions to participate in Title IV programs, our institutions’ accreditation and our institutions’ state licenses may be impaired in a manner that materially and adversely affects our business” under subsection “Risks Related to Adtalem’s Highly Regulated Industry” in “Item 1A – Risk Factors” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Brazil Regulations

Governmental regulations in foreign countries significantly affect our international operations. New or revised interpretations of regulatory requirements could have a material adverse effect on us. Changes in existing or new interpretations of applicable laws, rules, or regulations in the foreign jurisdictions in which we operate could have a material adverse effect on our accreditation, authorization to operate, permissible activities, and costs of doing business

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outside of the U.S. The failure to maintain or renew any required regulatory approvals could have a material adverse effect on our international operations.

State Approvals and Licensing

Adtalem institutions require authorizations from many state higher education authorities or Canadian ministries to recruit students, operate schools, conduct exam preparation courses and grant degrees. Generally, the addition of any new program of study or new operating location also requires approval by the appropriate licensing and regulatory agencies. In the U.S., each Chamberlain location is approved to grant certificates, diplomas, associate, bachelor’s, master’s and/or doctorate degrees by the respective state in which it is located. Additionally, many states require approval for out-of-state institutions to recruit within their state or offer instruction through online modalities to residents of their states. Adtalem believes it is in compliance with all state requirements as an out-of-state institution. AUC and RUSM clinical programs are accredited as part of their programs of medical education by their respective accrediting bodies, approved by the appropriate boards in those states that have a formal process to do so, and are reported to ED as required.

Many states and Canadian provinces require private-sector postsecondary education institutions to post surety bonds for licensure. In the U.S., Adtalem has posted approximately $9.0 million of surety bonds with regulatory authorities on behalf of Chamberlain, AUC, RUSM, RUSVM and Becker.

Certain states have set standards of financial responsibility that differ from those prescribed by federal regulation. Adtalem believes it is in material compliance with state and Canadian provincial regulations. If Adtalem were unable to meet the tests of financial responsibility for a specific jurisdiction, and could not otherwise demonstrate financial responsibility, Adtalem could be required to cease operations in that state. To date, Adtalem has successfully demonstrated its financial responsibility where required.

SEASONALITY

Adtalem’s quarterly revenue and net income fluctuate primarily as a result of the pattern of student enrollments. Generally, the schools’ highest enrollment and revenue typically occur in the fall, which corresponds to the second and third quarters of Adtalem’s fiscal year. Enrollment is slightly lower in the spring, except in Brazil, and the lowest enrollment generally occurs during the summer months. Adtalem’s operating costs do not fluctuate as significantly on a quarterly basis.

Results of operations reflect both this seasonal enrollment pattern and the pattern of student recruiting activity costs that precede the start of every term. Revenue, operating income and net income by quarter for each of the past two fiscal years are included in “Note 17: Quarterly Financial Data” to the Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

EMPLOYEES

As of June 30, 2019, Adtalem had the following number of employees:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

    

 

    

Temporary

    

 

 

 

Faculty and Staff

 

and Student

 

 

 

 

Full-time

 

Part-time

 

Employees

 

Total

Chamberlain University

 

1,576

 

16

 

284

 

1,876

Medical and Veterinary Schools

 

939

 

20

 

46

 

1,005

Financial Services

 

643

 

 8

 

44

 

695

Adtalem Brazil

 

2,194

 

2,392

 

97

 

4,683

Home Office

 

761

 

 8

 

28

 

797

Total

 

6,113

 

2,444

 

499

 

9,056

 

Adtalem also utilizes approximately 2,300 independent contractors who teach as adjunct faculty and instructors. These independent contractors are not included in the above table. Approximately 60 administrative and support employees of

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RUSM’s medical school campus in Barbados and approximately 5,000 employees at Adtalem Brazil are covered by respective collective bargaining agreements with local unions. Our management believes that we have good relations with our employees. During fiscal year 2019, Adtalem implemented workforce reductions that reduced its workforce by 374 positions at RUSM and Adtalem’s home office.

TRADEMARKS AND SERVICE MARKS

Adtalem owns and uses numerous trademarks and service marks, such as “Adtalem,” “American University of the Caribbean,” “Association of Anti-Money Laundering Specialists,” “ACAMS,” “Becker Professional Education,” “Becker CPA Review,” “Chamberlain College of Nursing,” “Chamberlain University,” “Ross University” and others. All trademarks, service marks, certification marks, patents and copyrights associated with its businesses are owned in the name of Adtalem Global Education Inc. or a subsidiary of Adtalem Global Education Inc. Adtalem vigorously defends against infringements of its trademarks, service marks, certification marks, patents and copyrights.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Adtalem’s website address is http://www.adtalem.com.

Through its website, Adtalem offers its Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and all amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78m(a) or 78o(d)) (the “Exchange Act”) as soon as reasonably practicable after it electronically files such material with, or furnishes such material to, the SEC. The website also includes copies of the following:

Academic Quality Committee Charter

Audit and Finance Committee Charter

Code of Conduct and Ethics

Compensation Committee Charter

Director Nominating Process

External Relations Committee Charter

Governance Principles

Nominating and Governance Committee Charter

Policy for Communicating Allegations Related to Accounting Complaints

Policy for Shareholder Communication with Directors

Information contained on the website is not incorporated by reference into this report.

Copies of the Adtalem’s filings with the SEC and the above-listed policies and charters also may be obtained without charge by written request to Investor Relations at Adtalem’s executive offices. In addition, the SEC maintains a website that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers, including Adtalem, that file electronically with the SEC; the website address is http://www.sec.gov.

ITEM 1A — RISK FACTORS

Adtalem’s business operations are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties, some of which are not entirely within our control. Investors should carefully consider the risk factors described below and all other information contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K before making an investment decision with respect to Adtalem’s common stock. If any of the following risks are realized, Adtalem’s business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows could be materially and adversely affected, and as a result, the price of Adtalem’s common stock could be materially and adversely affected. Management cannot predict all the possible risks and uncertainties that may arise. Risks and uncertainties that may affect Adtalem’s business include the following:

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Risks Related to Adtalem’s Highly Regulated Industry

We are subject to regulatory audits, investigations, lawsuits or other proceedings relating to compliance by the institutions in the Adtalem portfolio with the numerous laws and regulations in the U.S. and foreign jurisdictions applicable to the postsecondary education industry

Due to the highly regulated nature of proprietary postsecondary institutions, we are subject to audits, compliance reviews, inquiries, complaints, investigations, claims of non-compliance and lawsuits by federal and state governmental agencies, regulatory agencies, accrediting agencies, present and former students and employees, shareholders and other third parties, any of whom may allege violations of any of the legal and regulatory requirements applicable to us. If the results of any such claims or actions are unfavorable to us or one or more of our institutions, we may be required to pay monetary judgments, fines or penalties, be required to repay funds received under Title IV programs or state financial aid programs, have restrictions placed on or terminate our schools’ or programs’ eligibility to participate in Title IV programs or state financial aid programs, have limitations placed on or terminate our schools’ operations or ability to grant degrees and certificates, have our schools’ accreditations restricted or revoked or be subject to civil or criminal penalties. ED regulations regarding financial responsibility provide that, if any one of our Title IV Institutions is unable to pay its obligations under its Program Participation Agreement (“PPA”) as a result of operational issues and/or an enforcement action, our other Title IV Institutions, regardless of their compliance with applicable laws and regulations, would not be able to maintain their Title IV eligibility without assisting in the repayment of the non-compliant institution’s Title IV obligations. As a result, even though Adtalem’s Title IV Institutions are operated through independent entities, an enforcement action against one of our institutions could also have a material adverse effect on the businesses, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of Adtalem’s other Title IV Institutions and Adtalem as a whole and could result in the imposition of significant restrictions on the ability for Adtalem’s other Title IV Institutions and for Adtalem as a whole to operate.

The ongoing regulatory effort aimed at proprietary postsecondary institutions of higher education could be a catalyst for additional legislative or regulatory restrictions, investigations, enforcement actions and claims.

The proprietary postsecondary education sector has at times experienced scrutiny from federal legislators, agencies, and state legislators and attorneys general. An adverse disposition of these existing inquiries, administrative actions or claims or the initiation of other inquiries, administrative actions or claims, could, directly or indirectly, have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, result of operations and cash flows and result in significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate.

Adverse publicity arising from investigations, claims or actions brought against us or other proprietary higher education institutions may negatively affect our reputation, business or stock price, or attract additional investigations, lawsuits or regulatory action.

Adverse publicity regarding any past, pending or future investigations, claims, settlements and/or actions against us or other proprietary postsecondary education institutions could negatively affect our reputation, student enrollment levels, revenue, profit and/or the market price of our common stock. Unresolved investigations, claims and actions, or adverse resolutions or settlements thereof, could also result in additional inquiries, administrative actions or lawsuits, increased scrutiny, the withholding of authorizations and/or the imposition of other sanctions by state education and professional licensing authorities, taxing authorities, our accreditors and other regulatory agencies governing us, which, individually or in the aggregate, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate.

Government and regulatory agencies and third parties have initiated, and could initiate additional investigations, claims or actions against us, which could require us to pay monetary damages, halt certain business practices or receive other sanctions. The defense and resolution of these matters could require us to expend significant resources.

As described in “Note 15: Commitments and Contingencies,” to the Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, Adtalem, and former subsidiaries DeVry University, Inc., and DeVry/New York Inc. are the subject of consumer lawsuits alleging facts similar to those alleged by the FTC and ED in previously resolved

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actions. Additionally, Adtalem, Chamberlain and DeVry University are the subject of Civil Investigative Demands (“CID”) from the U.S. Department of Justice (“DOJ”).

Due to the regulatory and enforcement efforts at times directed at proprietary postsecondary higher education institutions and adverse publicity arising from such efforts, we may face additional government and regulatory investigations and actions, lawsuits from private plaintiffs and shareholder class actions and derivative claims. We may incur significant costs and other expenses in connection with our response to, and defense, resolution or settlement of, investigations, claims or actions, or group of related investigations, claims or actions, which, individually or in the aggregate, could be outside the scope of, or in excess of, our existing insurance coverage and could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. As part of our resolution of any such matter, or group of related matters, we may be required to comply with certain forms of injunctive relief, including altering certain business practices, or pay substantial damages, settlement costs, fines and/or penalties. In addition, findings or claims or settlements thereof could serve as a basis for additional lawsuits or governmental inquiries or enforcement actions, including actions under ED’s defense to repayment regulations (“Defense to Repayment Regulations”). Such actions, individually or combined with other proceedings, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate. Additionally, an adverse allegation, finding or outcome in any of these matters could also materially and adversely affect our ability to maintain, obtain or renew licenses, approvals or accreditation and maintain eligibility to participate in Title IV, Department of Defense and Veterans Affairs programs or serve as a basis for ED to discharge certain Title IV student loans and seek recovery for some or all of its resulting losses from us under future Defense to Repayment Regulations, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate.

ED has issued regulations setting forth new standards and procedures related to borrower defenses to repayment of Title IV loan obligations, and ED’s right of recoveries against institutions following a successful borrower defense and institutional financial responsibility. It is possible that a finding or allegation arising from current or future legal proceedings or governmental administrative actions may create significant liability under the proposed regulations.

On October 28, 2016, ED published final rules concerning the acts or omissions of an institution of higher education that a student borrower may assert as a defense to repayment of a loan made under the 2016 DtR Regulations. The 2016 DtR Regulations created a new federal standard for borrower defenses, new limitation periods for borrower defense claims and new processes for resolution of such claims. On June 14, 2017, ED announced that it would indefinitely postpone the implementation of the majority of the 2016 DtR Regulations, which were due to take effect on July 1, 2017. In September 2018, a federal judge ruled that ED’s delay of these rules was illegal, requiring ED to move forward in their implementation. Implementation guidance was issued by ED in March 2019. ED had previously announced its intention to reassess and revise these rules, and ED published new draft Defense to Repayment Regulations on July 25, 2018. ED allowed for a 30-day comment period and intends to publish final, revised Defense to Repayment Regulations in the late fall of 2019. Management is unable to predict the result of any current or future rulemakings or the impact of such rulemakings on our business. The outcome of any legal proceeding instituted by a private party or governmental authority, facts asserted in pending or future lawsuits and/or the outcome of any future governmental inquiry, lawsuit or enforcement action (including matters described in “Note 15: Commitments and Contingencies” to the Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Form 10-K and in the subsection of Item 7 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K titled “Liquidity and Capital Resources”) could serve as the basis for claims by students or ED under the Defense to Repayment Regulations, the posting of substantial letters of credit or the termination of eligibility of our institutions to participate in the Title IV program based on ED’s institutional capability assessment, any of which could, individually or in the aggregate, have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate.

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Regardless of the merits of our actions, while we intend to defend ourselves vigorously in all pending and future legal proceedings, we may settle certain matters for strategic reasons, as a part of a resolution of other matters or in order to avoid potentially worse consequences arising from inherently uncertain judicial or administrative processes. Moreover, regardless of the merits of our defenses, if we are unable to resolve certain legal proceedings or regulatory actions, indirect consequences arising from unproven allegations or appealable regulatory findings may have adverse consequences to us.

While the future of the Defense to Repayment Regulations remains uncertain, certain constituencies are advocating to maintain and/or create standards and processes that would afford holders of federal student loans the broadest relief possible, which could potentially arise as a consequence of certain findings in pending or future governmental inquiries, lawsuits or enforcement actions against us. Despite the merits of our actions and defense, we may settle certain matters for strategic reasons, as a part of a resolution of other matters or in order to avoid potentially worse consequences in inherently uncertain judicial or administrative processes. The terms of any such settlement could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operations and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate. Additionally, although inconsistent with its usual practices, ED has broad discretion to impose significant limitations on us and our business operations arising from acts it determines are in violation of their regulations, including the Defense to Repayment Regulations to the extent they are revised and re-issued. As a result, foreseeable and unforeseeable consequences of prior and prospective adjudicated or settled legal proceedings and regulatory matters could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate.

If the Defense to Repayment Regulations are not significantly modified through upcoming rulemaking, pending or future lawsuits, investigations, program reviews and other events could each trigger, automatically or in some cases at ED’s discretion, the posting of letters of credit or other security.

The Defense to Repayment Regulations, if they are not significantly modified in connection with ED’s announced new rulemaking and recent July 25, 2018 draft rules, ED could require Adtalem to post multiple and substantial letters of credit or other security in connection with, among other things, certain pending and future claims, investigations and program reviews, regardless of the merits of our actions or available defenses, or, potentially, the severity of any findings or facts stipulated. The aggregate amount of these letters of credit or other required security could materially and adversely limit our borrowing capacity under our credit agreement and our ability to make capital expenditures and other investments aimed at growing and diversifying our operations, sustain and fund our operations and make dividend payments to shareholders. Adtalem’s credit agreement allows Adtalem to post up to $100 million in letters of credit. In the event Adtalem is required to post letters of credit in excess of the $100 million limit, Adtalem would be required to seek an amendment to its credit agreement or seek an alternative means of providing security required by ED. Adtalem may not be able to obtain the excess letters of credit or security or may only be able to obtain such excess letters of credit or security at significant cost.

We are subject to risks relating to regulatory matters. If we fail to comply with the extensive regulatory requirements for our operations, we could face fines and penalties, including loss of access to federal and state student financial aid for our students as well as significant civil liability.

As a provider of higher education, we are subject to extensive regulation. These regulatory requirements cover virtually all phases and aspects of our U.S. postsecondary operations, including educational program offerings, facilities, civil rights, safety, privacy, instructional and administrative staff, administrative procedures, marketing and recruiting, financial operations, payment of refunds to students who withdraw, acquisitions or openings of new schools or programs, addition of new educational programs and changes in our corporate structure and ownership.

In particular, in the U.S., the HEA subjects schools that participate in the various federal student financial aid programs under Title IV of the HEA (“Title IV”), which includes Chamberlain, AUC, RUSM, and RUSVM, to significant regulatory scrutiny. Adtalem’s Title IV Institutions collectively receive 70% of their revenue from students under Title IV programs. As a result, the suspension, limitation or termination of the eligibility of any of our institutions to participate in Title IV programs could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate.

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To participate in Title IV programs, an institution must receive and maintain authorization by the appropriate state education agencies, be accredited by an accrediting commission recognized by ED and be certified by ED as an eligible institution, which ultimately is accomplished through the execution of a PPA.

Our institutions that participate in Title IV programs each do so pursuant to a PPA that, among other things, includes commitments to abide by all applicable laws and regulations, such as the Incentive Compensation and Substantial Misrepresentation. Alleged violations of such laws or regulations may form the basis of civil actions for violation of state and/or federal false claims statutes predicated on violations of a PPA, including pursuant to lawsuits brought by private plaintiffs on behalf of governments (qui tam actions), that have the potential to generate very significant damages linked to our receipt of Title IV funding from the government over a period of several years.

Government budgetary pressures and changes to laws governing financial aid programs could reduce our student enrollment or delay our receipt of tuition payments.

Our Title IV Institutions collectively receive 70% of their revenue from students under Title IV programs. As a result, any reductions in funds available to our students or any delays in payments to us under Title IV programs could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate.

Action by the U.S. Congress to revise the laws governing the federal student financial aid programs or reduce funding for those programs could reduce Adtalem’s student enrollment and/or increase its costs of operation. Political and budgetary concerns significantly affect Title IV programs. The U.S. Congress enacted the HEA to be reauthorized on a periodic basis, which most recently occurred in August 2008. The 2008 reauthorization of the HEA made significant changes to the requirements governing Title IV programs, including changes that, among other things:

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Regulated non-federal, private education loans;

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Regulated the relationship between institutions and lenders that make education loans;

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Revised the calculation of the student default rate attributed to an institution and the threshold rate at which sanctions will be imposed against an institution (as discussed above);

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Adjusted the types of revenue that an institution is deemed to have derived from Title IV programs and the sanctions imposed on an institution that derives too much revenue from Title IV programs;

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Increased the types and amount of information that an institution must disclose to current and prospective students and the public; and

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Increased the types of policies and practices that an institution must adopt and follow.

In the 115th Congress, committee leadership of the U.S. House of Representatives released partisan, comprehensive HEA proposals; the Senate did not put forth a comprehensive HEA reauthorization proposal. In the 116th Congress, neither chamber has yet introduced a comprehensive reauthorization proposal. However, there have been individual bills introduced on various HEA provisions, and committee leadership in both the House and Senate could release comprehensive HEA proposals during this Congress. When HEA is reauthorized, existing programs and participation requirements are subject to change. Additionally, funding for student financial assistance programs may be impacted during appropriations and budget actions.

The U.S. Congress can change the laws affecting Title IV programs in annual federal appropriations bills and other laws it enacts between the HEA reauthorizations. At this time, Adtalem cannot predict any or all of the changes that the U.S. Congress may ultimately make. Since a significant percentage of Adtalem’s revenue is tied to Title IV programs, any action by the U.S. Congress that significantly reduces Title IV program funding or the ability of Adtalem’s degree-granting institutions or students to participate in Title IV programs could have a material adverse effect on Adtalem’s business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate. Certain provisions in proposed legislation, if enacted, could have a material adverse

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effect on our business, including but not limited to legislation that limits the enrollment of U.S. citizens in foreign medical schools and legislation that could require institutions to share in the risk of defaulted federal student loans.

Additionally, a shutdown of government agencies, such as ED, responsible for administering student financial aid programs under Title IV could lead to delays in student eligibility determinations and delays in origination and disbursement of government-funded student loans to our students. Funding for the federal government lapsed on each of January 20, 2018 and February 9, 2018, resulting in partial shutdowns that lasted for a few days and several hours, respectively. Funding for some portions of the federal government lapsed on December 22, 2018, resulting in a partial government shutdown that lasted for 35 days.

Our ability to comply with some ED regulations is affected by economic forces affecting our students and graduates that are not entirely within our control.

Our ability to comply with several ED regulations is not entirely within our control. In particular, our ability to participate in federal Title IV programs is dependent on the ability of our past students to avoid default on student loans, obtain employment and pay for a portion of their education with private funds. These factors are heavily influenced by broader economic drivers, including the personal or family wealth of our students, the overall employment outlook for their area of study and the availability of private financing sources. An economic downturn, or a worsening economic outlook, could impact these factors, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operation and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate.

ED rules prohibiting “substantial misrepresentation” are very broad. As a result, we face increased exposure to litigation arising from student and prospective student complaints and enforcement actions by ED that could restrict or eliminate our eligibility to participate in Title IV programs.

ED regulations prohibit any “substantial misrepresentation” by our Title IV Institutions, employees and agents regarding the nature of the institution’s educational programs, its financial charges or the employability of its graduates. These regulations may, among other things, subject us to sanctions for statements containing errors made to non-students, including any member of the public, impose liability on us for the conduct of others and expose us to liability even when no actual harm occurs. A “substantial misrepresentation” is any misrepresentation on which the person to whom it was made could reasonably be expected to rely, or has reasonably relied, to that person’s detriment. It is possible that despite our efforts to prevent misrepresentations, our employees or service providers may make statements that could be construed as substantial misrepresentations. As a result, we may face complaints from students and prospective students over statements made by us and our agents in advertising and marketing, during the enrollment, admissions and financial aid process and throughout attendance at any of our Title IV Institutions, which would expose us to increased risk of enforcement action and applicable sanctions or other penalties, including potential Defense to Repayment liabilities, and increased risk of private qui tam actions under the Federal False Claims Act. If ED determines that an institution has engaged in substantial misrepresentation, ED may (1) fine the institution; (2) discharge students’ debt and hold the institution liable for the discharged debt under the HEA and the Defense to Repayment Regulations; and/or (3) suspend or terminate an institution’s participation in Title IV programs. Alternatively, ED may impose certain other limitations on the institution’s participation in Title IV programs, which could include the denial of applications for approval of new programs or locations, a requirement to post a substantial letter of credit or the imposition of one of ED’s heightened cash monitoring processes. Any of the forgoing actions could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate.

Regulations governing the eligibility of our U.S. degree-granting institutions to participate in Title IV programs preclude us from compensating any employee or third-party involved in student recruitment, admissions or the awarding of financial aid based on their success in those areas. These regulations could limit our ability to attract and retain highly-qualified employees, to sustain and grow our business or to develop or acquire businesses that would not otherwise be subject to such regulations.

An educational institution participating in Title IV programs may not pay any commission, bonus or other incentive payments to any person involved in student recruitment or admissions or the awarding of Title IV program funds, if

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such payments are based directly or indirectly in any part on success in enrolling students or obtaining student financial aid. We endeavor to ensure our compliance with these regulations and have numerous controls and procedures in place to do so, but cannot be sure that our regulators will not determine that the compensation that we have paid our employees do not violate these regulations. Our limited ability to compensate our employees based on their performance of their job responsibilities could make it more difficult for us to attract and retain highly-qualified employees. These regulations may also impair our ability to sustain and grow our business, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

A failure to demonstrate financial responsibility or administrative capability may result in the loss of eligibility to participate in Title IV programs.

All of our Title IV Institutions are subject to meeting financial and administrative standards. These standards are assessed through annual compliance audits, periodic renewal of institutional PPAs, periodic program reviews and ad hoc events which may lead ED to evaluate an institution’s financial responsibility or administrative capability. The administrative capability criteria require, among other things, that our institutions (1) have an adequate number of qualified personnel to administer Title IV programs, (2) have adequate procedures for disbursing and safeguarding Title IV funds and for maintaining records, (3) submit all required reports and consolidated financial statements in a timely manner, and (4) not have significant problems that affect the institution’s ability to administer Title IV programs. If ED determines, in its judgment, that one of our Title IV Institutions has failed to demonstrate either financial responsibility or administrative capability, we could be subject to sanctions, including, among other things, a requirement to post a letter of credit, fines, suspension or termination of our eligibility to participate in Title IV programs or repayment of funds received under Title IV programs, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operation and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate. ED has considerable discretion under the regulations to impose the foregoing sanctions and, in some cases, such sanctions could be imposed without advance notice or any prior right of review or appeal.

If ED does not recertify any one of our institutions to continue participating in Title IV programs, students at that institution would lose their access to Title IV program funds. Alternatively, ED could recertify our institutions but require our institutions to accept significant limitations as a condition of their continued participation in Title IV programs.

ED certification to participate in Title IV programs lasts a maximum of six years, and institutions are thus required to seek recertification from ED on a regular basis in order to continue their participation in Title IV programs. An institution must also apply for recertification by ED if it undergoes a change in control, as defined by ED regulations.

Each of our Title IV Institutions operates under a PPA. There can be no assurance that ED will recertify an institution after its PPA expires or that ED will not limit the period of recertification to participate in Title IV programs to less than six years, place the institution on provisional certification or impose conditions or other restrictions on the institution as a condition of granting our application for recertification. If ED does not renew or withdraws the certification to participate in Title IV programs for one or more of our institutions at any time, students at such institution would no longer be able to receive Title IV program funds. Alternatively, ED could (1) renew the certifications for an institution, but restrict or delay receipt of Title IV funds, limit the number of students to whom an institution could disburse such funds or place other restrictions on that institution, or (2) delay recertification after an institution’s PPA expires, in which case the institution’s certification would continue on a month-to-month basis, any of which could have a material adverse effect on the businesses, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the institution or Adtalem as a whole and could result in the imposition of significant restrictions on the ability of the institution or Adtalem as a whole to operate.

If we fail to maintain our institutional accreditation or if our institutional accrediting body loses recognition by ED, we would lose our ability to participate in Title IV programs.

The loss of institutional accreditation by any of our Title IV Institutions would leave the affected institution ineligible to participate in Title IV programs and would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operation and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate. In

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addition, an adverse action by any of our institutional accreditors other than loss of accreditation, such as issuance of a warning, could have a material adverse effect on our business. Increased scrutiny of accreditors by the Secretary of Education in connection with ED’s recognition process may result in increased scrutiny of institutions by accreditors or have other consequences.

If regulators do not approve, or delay their approval of, transactions involving a material change of ownership or change of control of our company, the eligibility of our institutions to participate in Title IV programs, our institutions’ accreditations and our institutions’ state licenses may be impaired in a manner that materially and adversely affects our business.

A material change of ownership or change of control of Adtalem, depending on the type of change, may have significant regulatory consequences for Chamberlain, AUC, RUSM and RUSVM. Such a change of ownership or control could require recertification by ED, the reevaluation of accreditation by each institution’s accreditors and/or reauthorization by each institutions’ state licensing agencies. If Adtalem experiences a material change of ownership or change of control, then Chamberlain, AUC, RUSM and RUSVM may cease to be eligible to participate in Title IV programs until recertified by ED. The continuing participation of each of Chamberlain, AUC, RUSM and RUSVM in Title IV programs is critical to our business. Any disruption in an institution’s eligibility to participate in Title IV programs would materially and adversely impact our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flow.

In addition, each Title IV Institution is required to report any material change in stock ownership to its principal institutional accrediting body and would generally be required to obtain approval prior to undergoing any transaction that affects, or may affect, its corporate control or governance. In the event of any such change, each of our institution’s accreditors may undertake an evaluation of the effect of the change on the continuing operations of our institution for purposes of determining if continued accreditation is appropriate, which evaluation may include a comprehensive review. If our accreditors determine that the change is such that prior approval was required, but was not obtained, many of our accreditors’ policies require the accreditor to consider withdrawal of accreditation. If accreditation is suspended or withdrawn with respect to any of our Title IV Institutions, they would not be eligible to participate in Title IV programs until the accreditation is reinstated or is obtained from another appropriate accrediting body. There is no assurance that reinstatement of accreditation could be obtained on a timely basis, if at all, and accreditation from a different qualified accrediting authority, if available, would require a significant amount of time. Any material disruption in accreditation would materially and adversely impact our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flow.

In addition, some states in which Chamberlain, AUC, RUSM and RUSVM are licensed require approval (in some cases, advance approval) of changes in ownership or control in order to remain authorized to operate in those states, and participation in grant programs in some states may be interrupted or otherwise affected by a change in ownership or control.

As of June 30, 2019, a substantial portion of our outstanding capital stock is owned by a small group of institutional shareholders. We cannot prevent a material change of ownership or change of control that could arise from a transfer of voting stock by any combination of those shareholders.

A bankruptcy filing by us or by any of our Title IV Institutions, or a closure of one of our Title IV Institutions, would lead to an immediate loss of eligibility to participate in Title IV programs.

In the event of a bankruptcy filing by Adtalem, all of our Title IV Institutions would lose their eligibility to participate in Title IV programs, pursuant to statutory provisions of the HEA, notwithstanding the automatic stay provisions of federal bankruptcy law, which would make any reorganization difficult to implement. Similarly, in the event of a bankruptcy filing by any of Adtalem’s subsidiaries that own a Title IV Institution, such institution would lose its eligibility to participate in Title IV programs. In the event of any bankruptcy affecting one or more of our Title IV Institutions, ED could hold our other Title IV Institutions jointly liable for any Title IV program liabilities, whether asserted or unasserted at the time of such bankruptcy, of the institution whose Title IV program eligibility was terminated.

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Further, in the event that an institution closes and fails to pay liabilities or other amounts owed to ED, ED can attribute the liabilities of that institution to other institutions under common ownership. If any one of our Title IV Institutions were to close or have unpaid ED liabilities, ED could seek to have those liabilities repaid by one of our other Title IV Institutions.

Student loan defaults could result in the loss of eligibility to participate in Title IV programs.

Our Title IV Institutions may lose their eligibility to participate in Title IV programs if their student loan default rates are greater than standards set by ED. An educational institution may lose its eligibility to participate in some or all Title IV programs, if, for three consecutive federal fiscal years, 30% or more of its students who were required to begin repaying their student loans in the relevant federal fiscal year default on their payment by the end of the next two federal fiscal years. In addition, an institution may lose its eligibility to participate in some or all Title IV programs if its default rate for a federal fiscal year was greater than 40%. If any of our Title IV Institutions lose eligibility to participate in Title IV programs because of high student loan default rates, it would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operation and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate. The latest period for which final three-year default rates data is available is fiscal year 2015. Default rates for Chamberlain, AUC, RUSM and RUSVM students for fiscal year 2015 is 3.8%, 1.0%, 0.9% and 0.7%, respectively.

Our Title IV Institutions could lose their eligibility to participate in federal student financial aid programs if the percentage of their revenue derived from those programs were too high.

Our Title IV Institutions may lose eligibility to participate in Title IV programs if, on a cash basis, the percentage of the institution’s revenue derived from Title IV programs for two consecutive fiscal years is greater than 90% (the “90/10 Rule”). Further, if an institution exceeds the 90% threshold for any single fiscal year, ED could place that institution on provisional certification status for the institution’s following two fiscal years. If any of our Title IV Institutions lose eligibility to participate in Title IV programs because they are unable to comply with ED’s 90/10 Rule, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operation and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate.

Our failure to comply with ED’s credit hour rule could result in sanctions and other liability.

In 2009 and 2010, ED’s Office of Inspector General criticized three accreditors, including the Higher Learning Commission (“HLC”), which is the accreditor for Chamberlain, for deficiency in their oversight of institutions’ credit hour allocations. In June 2010, the House Education and Labor Committee held a hearing concerning accrediting agencies’ standards for assessing institutions’ credit hour policies. The 2010 Program Integrity Regulations defined the term “credit hour” for the first time and required accrediting agencies to review the reliability and accuracy of an institution’s credit hour assignments. If an accreditor does not comply with this requirement, its recognition by ED could be jeopardized. If an accreditor identifies systematic or significant noncompliance in one or more of an institution’s programs, the accreditor must notify the Secretary of Education. If ED determines that an institution is out of compliance with the credit hour definition, ED could impose liabilities or other sanctions, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial conditions, results of operation and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate.

If we fail to maintain any of our state authorizations, we would lose our ability to operate in that state and to participate in Title IV programs in the state.

Our Title IV Institutions must be authorized to operate by the appropriate postsecondary regulatory authority in each state in which the institution is located. Campuses of our Title IV Institutions are authorized to operate and grant degrees, diplomas or certificates by the applicable education agency of the state in which each such campus is located. Many states are currently reevaluating and revising their authorization regulations, especially as applied to distance education. The loss of state authorization would, among other things, render the affected institution ineligible to participate in Title IV programs, at least at those state campus locations, and otherwise limit that school’s ability to operate in that state. Loss of authorization in one or more states could increase the likelihood of additional scrutiny and potential loss

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of operating and/or degree-granting authority in other states in which we operate, which would further impact our business. If these pressures and uncertainty continue in the future, or if one or more of our institutions are unable to offer programs in one or more states, it could have a material adverse impact on our enrollment, revenue, results of operations and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate.

Our ability to place our medical schools’ students in hospitals in the U.S. may be limited by efforts of certain state government regulatory bodies, which may limit the growth potential of our medical schools, put our medical schools at a competitive disadvantage to other medical schools or force our medical schools to substantially reduce their class sizes.

Each of AUC and RUSM enter into affiliation agreements with hospitals across the U.S. to place their third and fourth year students in clinical programs at such hospitals. Certain states with regulatory programs that require state approval of clinical education programs have in recent years precluded, limited or imposed onerous requirements on Adtalem’s entry into affiliation agreements with hospitals in their states. If these or other states continue to limit access to affiliation arrangements, our medical schools may be at a competitive disadvantage to other medical schools, and our medical schools may be required to substantially restrict their enrollment due to limited clinical opportunities for enrolled students. The impact on enrollment, and the potential for enrollment growth, of such restrictions on our medical schools’ clinical placements could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial conditions, results of operation and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate.

Budget constraints in states that provide state financial aid to our students could reduce the amount of such financial aid that is available to our students, which could reduce our enrollment and adversely affect our 90/10 Rule percentage.

Some states are experiencing budget deficits and constraints. Some of these states have reduced or eliminated various student financial assistance programs or established minimum performance measures as a condition of participation, and additional states may do so in the future. If our students who receive this type of assistance cannot secure alternate sources of funding, they may be forced to withdraw, reduce the rate at which they seek to complete their education or replace the source with more expensive forms of funding, such as private loans. Other students who would otherwise have been eligible for state financial assistance may not be able to enroll without such aid. This reduced funding could decrease our enrollment and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

In addition, the reduction or elimination of these non-Title IV sources of student funding may adversely affect our 90/10 Rule measurement.

We could be subject to sanctions if we fail to calculate accurately and make timely payment of refunds of Title IV program funds for students who withdraw before completing their educational program.

The HEA and ED regulations require us to calculate refunds of unearned Title IV program funds disbursed to students who withdraw from their educational program. If refunds are not properly calculated or timely paid, we may be required to post a letter of credit with ED or be subject to sanctions or other adverse actions by ED, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operation and cash flows.

A failure of our vendors to comply with applicable regulations in the servicing of our students and institutions could subject us to fines or restrictions on or loss of our ability to participate in Title IV programs.

We contract with unaffiliated entities for student software systems and services related to the administration of portions of our Title IV and institutional loan programs. Because each of our institutions may be jointly and severally liable for the actions of third-party servicers and vendors, failure of such servicers to comply with applicable regulations could have a material adverse effect on our institutions, including fines and the loss of eligibility to participate in Title IV programs, which could have a material adverse effect on our enrollment, revenue and results of operations and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate. If any of our third party servicers discontinues providing such services to us, we may not be able to replace such third party servicer in a timely, cost-efficient or effective manner, or at all, and we could lose our ability to comply with collection, lending and Title

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IV requirements, which could have a material adverse effect our enrollment, revenue and results of operations and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate.

We provide financing programs to assist some of our students in affording our educational offerings. These programs are subject to various federal and state rules and regulations. Failure to comply with these regulations could subject us to fines, penalties, obligations to discharge loans and other injunctive requirements.

If we, or one of the companies that service our loans, do not comply with laws applicable to the financing programs that assist our students in affording our educational offerings, including Truth in Lending and Fair Debt Collections Practices laws and the Unfair, Deceptive or Abusive Acts or Practices provisions of Title X of the Dodd-Frank Act, we could be subject to fines, penalties, obligations to discharge loans and other injunctive requirements, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operation and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate. Additionally, an adverse allegation, finding or outcome in any of these matters could also materially and adversely affect our ability to maintain, obtain or renew licenses, approvals or accreditation and maintain eligibility to participate in Title IV programs or serve as a basis for ED to discharge certain Title IV student loans and seek recovery for some or all of its resulting losses from us, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate.

Release of confidential information could subject us to civil penalties or cause us to lose our eligibility to participate in Title IV programs.

As an educational institution participating in federal and state student assistance programs and collecting financial receipts from enrollees or their sponsors, we collect and retain certain confidential information. Such information is subject to federal and state privacy and security rules, including the Family Education Right to Privacy Act, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act. Release or failure to secure confidential information or other noncompliance with these rules could subject us to fines, loss of our capacity to conduct electronic commerce and loss of eligibility to participate in Title IV programs, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We could be subject to sanctions if we fail to accurately and timely report sponsored students’ tuition, fees and enrollment to the sponsoring agency.

A significant portion of our enrollment is sponsored through various federal and state supported agencies and programs, including the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Department of Labor and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. We are required to periodically report tuition, fees and enrollment to the sponsoring agencies. As a recipient of funds, we are subject to periodic reviews and audits. Inaccurate or untimely reporting could result in suspension or termination of our eligibility to participate in these federal and state programs and have a material adverse impact on enrollment and revenue, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Our enrollment may be adversely affected by presentations of data that are not representative of actual educational costs for our prospective students.

ED and other public policy organizations are concerned with the affordability of higher education and have developed various tools and resources to help students find low-cost educational alternatives. These resources primarily rely on and present data for first-time, full-time residential students, which is not representative of most of our prospective students. These presentations may influence some prospective students to exclude our institutions from their consideration, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

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Restrictions or limitations on the government-supported student loan and scholarship programs in Brazil could have a material and adverse impact on Adtalem Brazil’s ability to attract and retain students and execute its plans for growth.

Adtalem Brazil students are eligible for loans under Brazil’s public loan program “Fundo de Financiamento Estudantil” or “Students Financing Fund” (“FIES”), which is financed by the Brazilian government. Adtalem Brazil also participates in “Programa Universidade para Todos” or “University for All Program” (“PROUNI”), a Brazilian governmental program, which provides scholarships to a portion of its undergraduate students under certain conditions. As of June 30, 2019, approximately 16% of Adtalem Brazil’s degree-seeking students have obtained financing under the FIES program while approximately 37% have obtained scholarships under the PROUNI program. Without prior notice, during fiscal year 2015, the Brazilian government enacted changes to the FIES regulations limiting student eligibility for FIES funding and extending the government’s time to pay participating institutions. Restrictions or limitations on the FIES public loan program or student scholarships under the PROUNI program could have a material and adverse impact on Adtalem Brazil’s ability to attract and retain students and execute its plans for growth, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Risks Related to Adtalem’s Business

Student enrollment at our schools is affected by legislative, regulatory and economic factors that may change in ways we cannot predict. These factors outside our control limit our ability to assess our future enrollment effectively.

Our future revenue and growth depend on a number of factors, including many of the regulatory risks discussed above and business risks discussed below. Despite ongoing efforts to provide more scholarships to prospective students, and to increase quality and build our reputation, negative perceptions of the value of a college degree, increased reluctance to take on debt and the resulting lower student consumer confidence may continue to impact enrollment in the future. In addition, technological innovations in the delivery of low-cost education alternatives and increased competition could negatively affect enrollment.

We are subject to risks relating to enrollment of students. If we are not able to continue to successfully recruit and retain our students, our revenue may decline.

Our undergraduate and graduate educational programs are concentrated in selected areas of medical, healthcare, law and business. If applicant career interests or employer needs shift away from these fields, and we do not anticipate or adequately respond to that trend, future enrollment and revenue may decline and the rates at which our graduates obtain jobs involving their fields of study could fall.

If our graduates are unable to find appropriate employment opportunities or obtain professional licensure or certification, we may not be able to recruit new students.

If employment opportunities for our graduates in fields related to their educational programs decline or they are unable to obtain professional licenses or certifications in their chosen fields, future enrollment and revenue may decline as potential applicants choose to enroll at other educational institutions or providers.

We face heightened competition in the postsecondary education market from both public and private educational institutions.

Postsecondary education in our existing and new market areas is highly competitive and is becoming increasingly so. We compete with traditional public and private two-year and four-year colleges, other proprietary schools and alternatives to higher education. Some of our competitors, both public and private, have greater financial and nonfinancial resources than us. Some of our competitors, both public and private, are able to offer programs similar to ours at a lower tuition level for a variety of reasons, including the availability of direct and indirect government subsidies, government and foundation grants, large endowments, tax-deductible contributions and other financial resources not available to proprietary institutions, or by providing fewer student services or larger class sizes. An increasing number of traditional colleges and community colleges are offering distance learning and other online

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education programs, including programs that are geared towards the needs of working adults. This trend has been accelerated by private companies that provide and/or manage online learning platforms for traditional colleges and community colleges. As the proportion of traditional colleges providing alternative learning modalities increases, we will face increasing competition for students from traditional colleges, including colleges with well-established reputations for excellence. As the online and distance learning segment of the postsecondary education market matures, we believe that the intensity of the competition we face will continue to increase. This intense competition could make it more challenging for us to enroll students who are likely to succeed in our educational programs, which could adversely affect our new student enrollment levels and student persistence and put downward pressure on our tuition rates, any of which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

The personal information that we collect may be vulnerable to breach, theft or loss that could adversely affect our reputation and operations.

Possession and use of personal information in our operations subjects us to risks and costs that could harm our business. We collect, use and retain large amounts of personal information regarding our students and their families, including social security numbers, tax return information, personal and family financial data and credit card numbers. We also collect and maintain personal information of our employees and contractors in the ordinary course of our business. Some of this personal information is held and managed by certain of our vendors. Confidential information also may become available to third parties inadvertently when we integrate or convert computer networks into our network following an acquisition or in connection with system upgrades from time to time.

Due to the sensitive nature of the information contained on our networks, such as students’ financial information and grades, our networks may be targeted by hackers. Anyone who circumvents security measures could misappropriate proprietary or confidential information or cause interruptions or malfunctions in our operations. Although we use security and business controls to limit access and use of personal information, a third party may be able to circumvent those security and business controls, which could result in a breach of privacy. In addition, errors in the storage, use or transmission of personal information could result in a breach of privacy. Possession and use of personal information in our operations also subjects us to legislative and regulatory burdens that could require notification of data breaches and restrict our use of personal information. We cannot assure that a breach, loss or theft of personal information will not occur. A breach, theft or loss of personal information regarding our students and their families, customers, employees, or contractors that is held by us or our vendors could have a material adverse effect on our reputation and results of operations and result in liability under state and federal privacy statutes and legal actions by federal or state authorities and private litigants, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business and result in the imposition of significant restrictions on us and our ability to operate.

System disruptions and vulnerability from security risks to our computer network or information systems could severely impact our ability to serve our existing students and attract new students.

The performance and reliability of our computer networks and system applications, especially online educational platforms and student operational and financial aid packaging applications, are critical to our reputation and ability to attract and retain students. System errors, disruptions or failures, including those arising from unauthorized access, computer hackers, computer viruses, denial of service attacks and other security threats, could adversely impact our delivery of educational content to our students or result in delays and/or errors in processing student financial aid and related disbursements. Such events could have a material adverse effect on the reputation of our institutions, our financial conditions, results of operation and cash flows. We may be required to expend significant resources to protect against system errors, failures or disruptions, or the threat of security breaches, or to repair or otherwise mitigate problems caused by any actual errors, disruptions, failures or breaches. We cannot ensure that these efforts will protect our computer networks, or fully mitigate the resulting impact of interruptions or malfunctions in our operations, despite our regular monitoring of our technology infrastructure security and business continuity plans.

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Government regulations relating to the internet could increase our cost of doing business and affect our ability to grow.

The use of the internet and other online services has led to and may lead to the adoption of new laws and regulations in the U.S. or foreign countries and to new interpretations of existing laws and regulations. These new laws, regulations and interpretations may relate to issues such as online privacy, copyrights, trademarks and service marks, sales taxes, value-added taxes, withholding taxes, cost of internet access and services, allocation and apportionment of income amongst various state, local and foreign jurisdictions, fair business practices and the requirement that online education institutions qualify to do business as foreign corporations or be licensed in one or more jurisdictions where they have no physical location or other presence. New laws, regulations or interpretations related to doing business over the internet could increase our costs and materially and adversely affect our enrollment, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Natural disasters or other extraordinary events or political disruptions may cause us to close some of our schools.

We may experience business interruptions resulting from natural disasters, inclement weather, transit disruptions, political disruptions or other events in one or more of the geographic areas in which it operates, particularly in the West Coast and Gulf States of the U.S., the Caribbean and Brazil. These events could cause us to close schools — temporarily or permanently — and could affect student recruiting opportunities in those locations, causing enrollment and revenue to decline, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Our ability to open new campuses, offer new programs and add capacity is dependent on regulatory approvals and requires financial and human resources.

As part of our strategy, we intend to open new campuses, offer new educational programs and add capacity to certain existing locations. Such actions require us to obtain appropriate federal, state and accrediting agency approvals. In addition, adding new locations, programs and capacity may require significant financial investments and human resource capabilities. The failure to obtain appropriate approvals or to properly allocate financial and human resources could adversely impact our future growth.

We may not be able to attract, retain and develop key employees necessary for our operations and the successful execution of our strategic plans.

We may be unable to attract, retain and develop key employees with appropriate educational qualifications and experience. Regulatory and other legal actions and the claims contained in these actions may have diminished our reputation, and these actions and the resulting negative publicity may have decreased interest by potential employees. In addition, we may be unable to effectively plan and prepare for changes in key employees. Such matters may cause us to incur higher wage expense and/or provide less student support and customer service, which could adversely affect enrollment, revenue and expense. A significant amount of our compensation for key employees is tied to our financial performance. We may require new employees in order to execute some of our strategic plans. Uncertainty regarding our future financial performance may limit our ability to attract new employees with competitive compensation or increase our cost of recruiting and retaining such new employees.

We may not be able to successfully identify, pursue or integrate acquisitions.

As part of our strategy, we are actively considering acquisition opportunities primarily in the U.S. We have acquired and expect to acquire additional education institutions or education related businesses that complement our strategic direction, some of which could be material to our operations. Any acquisition involves significant risks and uncertainties, including, but not limited to:

Inability to successfully integrate the acquired operations and personnel into our business and maintain uniform standards, controls, policies and procedures;

Failure to secure applicable regulatory approvals;

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Assumption of known and unknown liabilities;

Diversion of significant attention of our senior management from day-to-day operations;

Issues not discovered in our due diligence process, including compliance issues, commitments and/or contingencies; and

Financial commitments, investments in foreign countries and compliance with debt covenants and ED financial responsibility scores.

Proposed changes in, or lapses of, U.S. tax laws regarding earnings from international operations could adversely affect our financial results.

Our effective tax rate could be subject to volatility or be adversely impacted by changes to federal tax laws governing the taxation of foreign earnings of U.S. based companies. For example, recent changes to U.S. tax laws will significantly impact how U.S. multinational corporations are taxed on foreign earnings. Numerous countries are evaluating their existing tax laws, due in part to recommendations made by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (“OECD’s”) Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (“BEPS”) project. In addition, the recent U.S. tax law changes are subject to further interpretations from U.S. federal and state governments and regulatory organizations, such as the Treasury Department and/or Internal Revenue Service, and this could change the provisional tax liability or the accounting treatment of the provisional tax liability based on updated guidance and interpretations. A significant portion of the additional provisions for income taxes we have made due to the enactment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (the “Tax Act”) is payable by us over a period of up to eight years. As a result, our cash flows from operating activities will be adversely impacted until the additional tax provisions are paid in full. In addition, Adtalem has benefitted from the ability to enter into international intercompany arrangements without incurring U.S. taxation due to a law, which expires in fiscal year 2020, deferring U.S. taxation of “foreign personal holding company income” such as foreign income from dividends, interest, rents and royalties. If this law is not extended, or a similar law adopted, our consolidated tax provision would be impacted beginning in our fiscal year 2021, and we may not be able to allocate international capital optimally without realizing U.S. income taxes, which would increase our effective income tax rate and adversely impact our earnings and cash flows.

Changes in effective tax rates or adverse outcomes resulting from examination of our income or other tax returns could adversely affect our results.

Our future effective tax rates could be subject to volatility or adversely affected by: earnings being lower than anticipated in countries where we have lower statutory rates and higher than anticipated earnings in countries where we have higher statutory rates; changes in the valuation of our deferred tax assets and liabilities; expiration of or lapses in various tax law provisions; tax treatment of stock-based compensation; costs related to intercompany or other restructurings; or other changes in tax rates, laws, regulations, accounting principles or interpretations thereof. In addition, we are subject to examination of our income tax returns by the Internal Revenue Service and other tax authorities. We regularly assess the likelihood of adverse outcomes resulting from these examinations to determine the adequacy of our provision for income taxes. Although we have accrued tax and related interest for potential adjustments to tax liabilities for prior years, there can be no assurance that the outcomes from these continuous examinations will not have a material effect, either positive or negative, on our business, financial condition and results of operation.

We may experience movements in foreign currency exchange rates that could adversely affect our operating results.

As we expand internationally, we will conduct more transactions in currencies other than the U.S. dollar. The volume of transactions in the various foreign currencies could continue to increase, thus increasing our exposure to foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations. The financial position and results of operations at Adtalem Brazil are measured using the Brazilian Real as the functional currency. Brazilian-based assets constitute a material portion of Adtalem’s overall assets, and Brazilian-based liabilities constitute a material portion of our overall liabilities. Significant devaluations in the Brazilian Real will result in a significant devaluation in relation to the U.S. dollar. Fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

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Expansion into new international markets will subject us to risks inherent in international operations.

As part of our strategy, we have acquired and intend to acquire or establish additional educational operations outside of the U.S. To the extent that we expand internationally, we will face risks that are inherent in international operations including, but not limited to:

Compliance with foreign laws and regulations;

Management of internal operations;

Foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations;

Ability to protect intellectual property;

Monetary policy risks, such as inflation, hyperinflation and deflation;

Price controls or restrictions on exchange of foreign currencies;

Political and economic instability in the countries in which we operate;

Potential unionization of employees under local labor laws;

Multiple and possibly overlapping and conflicting tax laws;

Inability to cost effectively repatriate cash balances; and

Compliance with U.S. laws and regulations such as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

Our goodwill and intangible assets potentially could be impaired if our business results and financial condition were materially and adversely impacted by risks and uncertainties.

Adtalem’s market capitalization can be affected by, among other things, changes in industry or market conditions, changes in results of operations and changes in forecasts or market expectations related to future results. If our market capitalization were to remain below its carrying value for a sustained period of time or if such a decline becomes indicative that the fair values of our reporting units have declined below their carrying values, an impairment test may result in a non-cash impairment charge. As of June 30, 2019, intangible assets from business combinations totaled $418.1 million and goodwill totaled $874.5 million. Together, these assets equaled 58% of total assets as of such date. If our business results and financial condition were materially and adversely impacted, then such intangible assets and goodwill could be impaired, requiring a possible write-off of up to $418.1 million of intangible assets and up to $874.5 million of goodwill.

ITEM 1B – UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

There are no unresolved SEC staff comments.

ITEM 2 – PROPERTIES

Medical and Healthcare

Chamberlain

Chamberlain’s home office is located in Downers Grove, Illinois. Chamberlain currently operates 21 campuses in various U.S. locations, of which 4 are in Adtalem owned locations and 17 in leased facilities. One of the campuses is co-located with RUSM. Chamberlain’s total portfolio of academic and administrative operations comprise approximately 0.9 million square feet.

AUC

AUC’s nine-acre campus is located in St. Maarten. The campus is owned and includes approximately 218,500 square feet of academic, student-life and student residence facilities. In addition to classrooms and auditoriums, educational facilities include a gross anatomy lab, a multi-purpose learning lab, library and learning resource centers, offices, cafeteria and recreational space facilities. The AUC campus is also supported by administrative staff located in Pembroke Pines, Florida.

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RUSM

RUSM’s campus is comprised of leased facilities of approximately 107,000 square feet are located in Barbados. Educational facilities include 102,000 square feet of classrooms, labs for anatomy and radiology imaging, simulation, physiology and pathology, exam rooms, private and group study, and faculty and administrative space. A residential village includes 5,000 square feet of administrative student services space surrounded by shopping and recreational facilities and over 400 multi-bedroom student units. The RUSM campus is also supported by administrative staff located in Miramar, Florida.

RUSVM

RUSVM’s pre-clinical instructional facilities of approximately 224,000 square feet are located on a 50-acre site in St. Kitts which is owned. Educational facilities include an anatomy/clinical building, pathology building, research building with state-of-the-art necropsy lab, classroom buildings, administration building, bookstore, cafeteria and a library/learning resource center. Animal care facilities include kennels, an aviary and livestock barns. Student-life and student residence facilities are also located on the campus. The RUSVM campus is also supported by administrative staff located in Miramar, Florida.

Financial Services

Financial Services leases approximately 50,000 square feet for its administrative operations in various U.S. and international locations. Becker classes are conducted in leased facilities, fewer than 10 of which are leased on a full-time basis. The remaining classes are conducted in facilities that are leased on an as-needed basis, allowing classes to be added, expanded, relocated or closed as current enrollments require.

Business and Law

Adtalem Brazil

 Adtalem Brazil operates 17 locations in Brazil. Adtalem Brazil’s administrative operations are located within campuses located in Fortaleza and São Paulo as well as in two additional non-campus locations in Salvador and Rio de Janeiro. All of these locations comprise approximately 2.5 million square feet of space, of which approximately 1.9 million square feet are under lease agreements and approximately 0.6 million square feet are owned real estate.

Home Office

Adtalem’s home office staff is located in two leased facilities in Chicago and Downers Grove, Illinois utilizing approximately 191,000 square feet of office space.

Adtalem’s leased facilities are occupied under leases whose remaining terms range from 1 to 11 years. A majority of these leases contain provisions giving Adtalem the right to terminate early or renew its lease for additional periods at various rental rates, although generally at rates higher than are currently being paid. Adtalem’s owned facilities total approximately 1.73 million square feet worldwide. No facility that is owned by Adtalem is subject to a mortgage or other indebtedness.

Adtalem is leasing space to DeVry University at five facilities owned by Adtalem and subleasing space, in full or in part, at an additional 24 facilities, of which 17 are subleased to DeVry University and/or Carrington. Adtalem remains the primary lessee on the 24 underlying leases. These lease and sublease agreements were entered into at comparable market rates and the terms range from one to seven years.

ITEM 3 – LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

For a discussion of legal proceedings, see “Note 15: Commitments and Contingencies” to the Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

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SUPPLEMENTARY ITEM-INFORMATION ABOUT OUR EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

The name, age and current position of each executive officer of Adtalem as of the date of this filing are:

 

 

 

 

 

Name and Current Position

    

Age

    

Business Experience

 

 

 

 

 

Lisa W. Wardell

 

Chairman of the Board, President and Chief Executive Officer,  Adtalem Global Education

 

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Ms. Wardell joined Adtalem in May 2016 as President and Chief Executive Officer and was appointed Chairman of the Board in July 2019. Previously, Ms. Wardell served on the Adtalem Board of Directors since 2008 and also chaired the audit and finance committee. Prior to joining Adtalem, Ms. Wardell was Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of The RLJ Companies from 2004 through 2016.

 

 

 

 

 

Kathy Boden Holland

 

Group President, Medical and Healthcare Education, Adtalem Global Education

 

 

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Ms. Boden Holland joined Adtalem in May 2018 as Group President, Medical and Healthcare Education. Previously, Ms. Boden Holland served on the Adtalem Board of Directors from January 2017 through May 2018. Prior to joining Adtalem, Ms. Boden Holland was Executive Vice President, Bank Products and in other executive leadership roles at Elevate Credit from 2014 through 2018. Previously, Ms. Boden Holland was Executive Vice President, Corporate Development at Think Finance Incorporated from 2012 to 2014 and President of RLJ Financial LLC from 2010 to 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

Mehul Patel

 

Group President, Financial Services, Adtalem Global Education

 

 

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Mr. Patel joined Adtalem in September 2017 as Group President, Financial Services. Prior to joining Adtalem, Mr. Patel was President of Apollo Global (a subsidiary of Apollo Education Group) where he also held other executive leadership roles from 2009 through 2017. Previously, Mr. Patel held a variety of leadership roles at Kaplan Professional (a division of Kaplan Inc.) from 2005 through 2009.

 

 

 

 

 

Thiago Aguiar Sayão

 

Group President, Business and Law, Adtalem Global Education

 

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Mr. Sayão joined Adtalem in 2015, as Vice President of Adtalem Brazil, upon the acquisition of Damásio Educacional. In June 2019, Mr. Sayão was appointed Group President, Business and Law.  Prior to joining Adtalem, Mr. Sayão has held a number of executive positions and has nearly 20 years in education experience.

 

 

 

 

 

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Name and Current Position

    

Age

    

Business Experience

Dr. Karen Cox

 

President, Chamberlain University

 

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Dr. Cox joined Adtalem in August 2018 as President of Chamberlain University. Prior to joining Adtalem, Dr. Cox served as Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Children’s Mercy – Kansas City an independent, academic medical center in Missouri, from 2006 through August 2018. Prior to that role, Dr. Cox was Senior Vice President for Patient Care Services and Chief Nursing Officer from 2004 through 2006.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Randolfi

 

Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer, Adtalem Global Education

 

 

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Mr. Randolfi joined Adtalem in August 2019 as Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer. Mr. Randolfi succeeds Mr. Unzicker who had served as Adtalem’s Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer until August 25, 2019. In connection with this transition, Mr. Unzicker continues to serve as Adtalem’s principal financial officer and principal accounting officer through August 30, 2019, at which time Mr. Randolfi will assume those duties. Prior to joining Adtalem, Mr. Randolfi served as the Chief Financial Officer of Groupon, Inc. since April 2016. Prior to his CFO role at Groupon, Mr. Randolfi served as Chief Financial Officer of Orbitz Worldwide, Inc. from March 2013 until November 2015 (when he departed following its acquisition by Expedia, Inc.). Prior to Orbitz, Mr. Randolfi, spent fourteen years with Delta Airlines in a variety of executive financial roles culminating in Senior Vice President and Controller.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Name and Current Position

    

Age

    

Business Experience

Patrick J. Unzicker

 

Principal Financial Officer and Principal Accounting Officer, Adtalem Global Education

 

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Mr. Unzicker joined Adtalem in March 2006 as its Controller. In March 2012, Mr. Unzicker was appointed Vice President, Finance and Chief Accounting Officer and in March 2015, Mr. Unzicker assumed the Treasurer role. In June 2016, Mr. Unzicker was appointed Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer and maintained the Treasurer role. On August 26, 2019, Adtalem announced that it had appointed Mr. Randolfi as Adtalem’s Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer. Mr. Randolfi succeeds Mr. Unzicker. In connection with this transition, Mr. Unzicker continues to serve as Adtalem’s principal financial officer and principal accounting officer through August 30, 2019, at which time Mr. Randolfi will assume those duties. Prior to joining Adtalem, Mr. Unzicker was Vice President — Controller at Whitehall Jewelers, Inc., a mall-based retail jeweler, from July 2003 to March 2006. 

 

 

 

 

 

Stephen W. Beard

 

Chief Operating Officer and General Counsel, Adtalem Global Education

 

 

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Mr. Beard joined Adtalem in February 2018 as Senior Vice President, Secretary and General Counsel. In January 2019, Mr. Beard was appointed Chief Operating Officer and General Counsel. Prior to joining Adtalem, Mr. Beard held a variety of leadership roles at Heidrick & Struggles, International from 2003 through 2018 and was most recently Executive Vice President, Chief Administrative Officer and General Counsel.

 

 

 

 

 

Donna N. Jennings

 

Senior Vice President, Human Resources, Adtalem Global Education

 

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Ms. Jennings joined Adtalem in October 2006 as Senior Vice President of Human Resources. Prior to joining Adtalem, Ms. Jennings was Vice President, Human Resources and Communications, of Velsicol Chemical Corporation, a global chemical products manufacturer, from 1994 to 2006.

 

 

 

 

 

Fernando Lau

 

Senior Vice President, Chief Marketing Officer, Adtalem Global Education

 

 

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Mr. Lau joined Adtalem in January 2010 as Vice President of Marketing and Admissions at Adtalem Brazil. In October 2016, Mr. Lau was appointed Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer. Prior to joining Adtalem, Mr. Lau led the Trade Marketing departments of Motorola and Nokia in Brazil from 2007 to 2009.

 

 

 

 

 

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Name and Current Position

    

Age

    

Business Experience

Christopher C. Nash

 

Senior Vice President, Chief Information Officer, Adtalem Global Education

 

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Mr. Nash joined Adtalem in 2010 as Chief Technology Officer and was promoted to Senior Vice President, Chief Information Officer in 2013. Prior to joining Adtalem, Mr. Nash was Chief Technology Officer at Millward Brown Group, a global market research organization and division of Kantar Group. Previously, Mr. Nash held technical leadership roles at Kraft Foods, Inc., Greenbrier & Russel, and Rand McNally.

 

 

 

 

 

Lisa M. Sodeika

 

Senior Vice President, Corporate Relations, Adtalem Global Education

 

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Ms. Sodeika joined Adtalem in March 2015 as Senior Vice President, Corporate Relations. Prior to joining Adtalem, Ms. Sodeika served as Executive Vice President of Corporate Affairs at HSBC North America Holdings, Inc. from 2003 to 2014.

 

 

 

 

 

Kathleen Carroll

 

Vice President, Controller, Adtalem Global Education

 

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Ms. Carroll joined Adtalem in 2014 as Controller and was promoted to Vice President, Controller in July 2016. Prior to joining Adtalem, Ms. Carroll served in a number of finance leadership roles for PepsiCo Beverages and Foods (formerly The Quaker Oats Company), most recently as Vice President, Finance for PepsiCo’s U.S. Foods division.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 4 – MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.

 

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PART II

ITEM 5 – MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Market Information

Adtalem’s common stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and the Chicago Stock Exchange under the symbol “ATGE.” The stock transfer agent and registrar for Adtalem’s common stock is Computershare Investor Services, L.L.C.

Security Holders

There were 396 current holders of record of Adtalem’s common stock as of August 1, 2019. The number of holders of record does not include beneficial owners of its securities whose shares are held by various brokerage firms, other financial institutions, Adtalem’s 401(k) and profit sharing plan and its Colleague Stock Purchase Plan.

Dividends

Adtalem did not pay any dividends in fiscal year 2018 or 2019. Adtalem does not expect to pay any cash dividends in the foreseeable future. Any future payment of dividends will be at the discretion of the Adtalem Board of Directors (the “Board”) and will be dependent on projections of future earnings, cash flow, financial requirements of Adtalem and other factors as the Board deems relevant.

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

At the 2005 Annual Meeting of Stockholders held on November 9, 2005, Adtalem’s stockholders approved the DeVry Inc. Employee Stock Purchase Plan (“ESPP”) that authorized 200,000 shares of common stock for issuance under the ESPP, effective January 1, 2006. The ESPP provided for monthly purchase dates on the last business day of each month beginning January 2006 and purchases at a 5% discount to fair market value on such date. The ESPP was an amendment and restatement of a prior DeVry Inc. employee stock purchase plan that was effective August 1, 1993. On December 22, 2005, Adtalem registered 200,000 shares common stock that were authorized under the ESPP on a Registration Statement on Form S-8 (Reg. No. 333-130604).

 

From January 1, 2006 to February 28, 2019, eligible ESPP participants purchased 450,095 shares of common stock under the ESPP at purchase prices ranging from $16.41 to $61.94 per share. Of the total shares of common stock purchased under the ESPP from January 1, 2006 to February 28, 2019, Adtalem inadvertently issued 250,095 shares of common stock that were not registered under federal securities laws and not authorized under the ESPP. Under the applicable provisions of federal securities laws, plan participants who purchased unregistered shares of common stock may seek to rescind the transaction within one year following the date of purchase, which is the applicable federal statute of limitation. The last potential rescission rights related to the shares of common stock held by the original purchasers expires by the statute of limitations on February 28, 2020. As of June 30, 2019, approximately 10,182 shares were subject to rescission rights.

 

Adtalem believes its potential liability, if any, with respect to shares of common stock subject to rescission rights and still held by the original purchasers is not material to Adtalem.

 

Although the 250,095 shares of common stock purchased by ESPP participants through the ESPP were not registered prior to such purchase, ESPP participants may resell all such shares pursuant to Rule 144.

 

Adtalem terminated the ability to purchase shares of common stock under the ESPP and the last purchase made through the ESPP was on February 28, 2019. Adtalem is in the process of implementing a new employee stock purchase plan and submitting the new plan for stockholder approval at Adtalem’s next annual meeting of stockholders to be held on November 6, 2019.

 

48

Additionally, effective March 31, 2019, Adtalem reduced the number of shares of common stock available under the Adtalem Global Education Inc. Fourth Amended and Restated Incentive Plan of 2013 by 250,095 shares of common stock to reduce any potential dilution to stockholders.

Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

See “Item 12 – Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters” in Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

The following information describes Adtalem’s stock repurchases during the fourth quarter of the fiscal year ended June 30, 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

    

 

 

    

Total Number of Shares

    

Approximate Dollar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchased as Part of

 

Value of Shares that May

 

 

Total Number of

 

Average Price Paid

 

Publicly Announced

 

Yet Be Purchased Under

Period

 

  Shares Purchased  

 

per Share

 

Plans or Programs (1)

 

the Plans or Programs (1)

April 2019

 

434,628

 

$

48.31

 

434,628

 

$

237,073,448

May 2019

 

949,813

 

$

44.18

 

949,813

 

$

195,108,782

June 2019

 

290,151

 

$

44.77

 

290,151

 

$

182,119,886

Total

 

1,674,592

 

$

45.35

 

1,674,592

 

$

182,119,886

 

(1)

On November 8, 2018, Adtalem announced that the Board of Directors of Adtalem authorized a share repurchase program to buy back up to $300 million of Adtalem common stock through December 31, 2021.  The eleventh share repurchase program commenced during January 2019. The timing and amount of any repurchase will be determined based on an evaluation of the market and other factors. The total remaining authorization under this share repurchase program was $182,119,886 as of June 30, 2019.

Other Purchases of Equity Securities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

    

 

 

    

Total Number of Shares

    

Approximate Dollar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchased as Part of 

 

Value of Shares that May

 

 

Total Number of

 

Average Price Paid

 

Publicly Announced

 

Yet Be Purchased Under

Period

 

Shares Purchased (1)

 

per Share

 

Plans or Programs

 

the Plans or Programs

April 2019

 

 —

 

$

 —

 

NA

 

NA

May 2019

 

5,103

 

$

43.79

 

NA

 

NA

June 2019

 

1,158

 

$

44.20

 

NA

 

NA

Total

 

6,261

 

$

43.86

 

NA

 

NA

 

(1)

Represents shares delivered back to Adtalem for payment of withholding taxes from employees for vesting restricted stock units and shares swapped for payment on exercise of incentive stock options pursuant to the terms of Adtalem's stock incentive plans.

Performance Graph

The following graph and chart compare the total cumulative return (assuming dividend reinvestment) on Adtalem’s common stock during the period from June 30, 2014 through June 30, 2019, with the cumulative return on the NYSE Composite Index (U.S. Companies), the New Peer Group and the Old Peer Group (as defined below).

49

COMPARISON OF CUMULATIVE TOTAL RETURN SINCE JUNE 30, 2014

AMONG ADTALEM GLOBAL EDUCATION INC., NYSE COMPOSITE INDEX AND A PEER GROUP

Picture 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 30,

 

    

2014

    

2015

    

2016

    

2017

    

2018

    

2019

Adtalem Global Education Inc.

 

100.0

 

71.5

 

43.3

 

92.6

 

117.4

 

110.0

NYSE Composite Index (U.S. Companies)

 

100.0

 

100.9

 

100.7

 

115.9

 

126.5

 

135.7

New Peer Group (1)

 

100.0

 

83.9

 

84.0

 

147.7

 

209.9

 

235.3

Old Peer Group (1)

 

100.0

 

86.0

 

83.1

 

155.7

 

203.7

 

231.4

 

Data for this graph were provided by Zacks Investment Research.

Assumes $100 was invested on June 30, 2014 in Adtalem Global Education Inc. common stock, the NYSE Composite Index (U.S. Companies), the New Peer Group and the Old Peer Group, and that all dividends were reinvested.

(1)  The “New Peer Group” consists of the following companies selected on the basis of similarity in nature of their businesses: American Public Education, Inc., Career Education Corporation, Grand Canyon Education, Inc., Lincoln Educational Services Corporation, Strategic Education, Inc. (formerly known as Strayer Education, Inc.), and Universal Technical Institute, Inc. Adtalem believes that, including itself, these companies represent the majority of the market value of publicly traded companies whose primary business is education. The “Old Peer Group” consists of the following companies: Capella Education Company, Career Education Corporation, Grand Canyon Education, Inc., Lincoln Educational Services Corporation, Strayer Education, Inc., Universal Technical Institute, Inc., and Zovio Inc. (formerly known as Bridgepoint Education, Inc.). We changed our peer group from fiscal year 2018 as follows: Zovio Inc (formerly known as Bridgepoint Education, Inc.) was removed due to the shift in focus to an education technology services company and Capella Education Company was removed due to its merger with Strayer Education, Inc, while American Public Education, Inc. was added.

50

ITEM 6 – SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

Selected financial data for Adtalem for the last five years are included in the exhibit, “Five-Year Summary — Operating, Financial and Other Data,” on page 133 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

51

ITEM 7 – MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion of Adtalem Global Education Inc.’s (“Adtalem”) results of operations and financial condition should be read in conjunction with Adtalem’s Consolidated Financial Statements and the related Notes thereto in Item 8 in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

The seasonal pattern of Adtalem’s enrollments and its educational programs’ starting dates affect the results of operations and the timing of cash flows. Therefore, management believes that comparisons of its results of operations should primarily be made to the corresponding period in the preceding year. Comparisons of financial position should be made to both the end of the previous fiscal year and to the end of the corresponding quarterly period in the preceding year.

Unless indicated, or the context requires otherwise, references to “net income” refers to “net income attributable to Adtalem Global Education.”

During the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2019, Adtalem renamed two of its segments to better reflect our focus on our growth strategies: Professional Education was renamed Financial Services, and Technology and Business was renamed Business and Law. Adtalem operates three reporting segments: “Medical and Healthcare,” which includes the operations of Chamberlain University (“Chamberlain”) and the medical and veterinary schools (which include American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine (“AUC”), Ross University School of Medicine (“RUSM”) and Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (“RUSVM”)); “Financial Services,” which includes the operations of the Association of Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists (“ACAMS”), Becker Professional Education (“Becker”), OnCourse Learning (“OCL”) and EduPristine; and “Business and Law,” which includes the operations of Adtalem Education of Brazil (“Adtalem Brazil”). “Home Office and Other” includes activity not allocated to a reporting segment. Financial and descriptive information about Adtalem’s reporting segments is presented in “Note 16: Segment Information” to the Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

OVERVIEW

Adtalem’s financial results for fiscal year 2019 reflect revenue growth of $8.5 million, or 0.7%, compared to the prior year, driven by increased revenue in the Medical and Healthcare and Financial Services segments. These increases were partially offset by a decrease in revenue in the Business and Law segment. On a constant currency basis, revenue in fiscal year 2019 increased 3.7% compared to the prior year. Net income in fiscal year 2019 of $95.2 million increased $61.4 million, or 181.8%, compared to the prior year. Net income from continuing operations excluding special items decreased 3.3% in fiscal year 2019 compared to the prior year, driven by an increase in interest expense and operating income decreases in the Medical and Healthcare and Business and Law segments. These decreases were partially offset by an increase in operating income in the Financial Services segment and expense reductions at home office. (See “Use of Non-GAAP Financial Information and Supplemental Reconciliation Schedule” below). Operational and financial highlights for fiscal year 2019 include:

·

Chamberlain revenue grew by 3.1% in fiscal year 2019 compared to the prior year. For the May 2019 session, total enrollment at Chamberlain increased 1.8% to 30,867 students compared to the same term last year. Chamberlain continues to invest in its programs, student services and campus locations.

 

·

For the March 2019 session, Adtalem Brazil new student enrollment increased 17.7% and total student enrollment increased 5.6%, compared to the same session last year. Online and Ibmec enrollment were the main drivers of the increases.

 

·

In the Financial Services segment, ACAMS reached over 75,000 members worldwide, a 13.0% increase over the prior fiscal year, and Becker returned to revenue growth of 3.8% in fiscal year 2019 compared to the prior fiscal year.

 

52

·

In January 2019, RUSM commenced operations at its new campus in Barbados. Academic facilities are located in Bridgetown. Student housing is located close to academic facilities in the parish of Christ Church and includes amenities, student services and convenient transportation to campus.

 

·

On May 31, 2019, Adtalem completed the acquisition of 100% of the equity interests of OCL for $118.4 million, net of cash of $1.2 million. The payment for this purchase was made in the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2019, and was funded with available domestic cash balances and $100 million in borrowings under Adtalem’s revolving credit facility. OCL is a leading provider of compliance training, licensure preparation, continuing education and professional development in the banking and mortgage industries across the U.S. The acquisition furthers Adtalem’s growth strategy into financial services.

 

·

On December 4, 2018, Adtalem completed the sale of its ownership of all the outstanding equity interests in the holding company of Carrington College (“Carrington”), to San Joaquin Valley College, Inc. (“SJVC”), pursuant to the terms and conditions of the Membership Interest Purchase Agreement (“MIPA”), dated June 28, 2018. The equity interests were sold for de minimis consideration, subject to customary adjustments for working capital, resulting in a pre-tax loss of $11.3 million recorded in discontinued operations in fiscal year 2019.

 

·

On December 11, 2018, Adtalem completed the sale of all of its right, title, and interest in and to the issued and outstanding shares of capital stock (the “Equity Interests”) of DeVry University, Inc. and DeVry/New York Inc. (collectively “DeVry University”) to Cogswell Education, LLC (“Cogswell”) under the terms of the Stock Purchase Agreement (“Purchase Agreement”) dated December 4, 2017. The Equity Interests were sold for de minimis consideration, subject to customary adjustments for working capital, resulting in a pre-tax loss of $22.3 million recorded in discontinued operations in fiscal year 2019.

 

·

In December 2018, AUC and RUSM received the final insurance settlement proceeds related to the property damage and disruption of operations caused by Hurricanes Irma and Maria in fiscal year 2018. These proceeds produced a gain of $15.6 million, which was recorded in the second quarter of fiscal year 2019. AUC and RUSM have completed all planned repairs and replacement of damaged facilities and equipment.

 

·

During fiscal year 2019, Adtalem recorded restructuring charges of $55.9 million primarily related to the write-off of assets and other charges associated with RUSM’s exit from Dominica, and real estate consolidations and workforce reductions at Adtalem Brazil and Adtalem’s home office.

 

·

Adtalem completed its tenth share repurchase program and commenced its eleventh share repurchase program by repurchasing a total of 5,306,203 shares of Adtalem’s common stock at an average cost of $47.65 per share during fiscal year 2019. On November 7, 2018, the Adtalem Board of Directors approved the eleventh share repurchase program, which allows Adtalem to repurchase up to $300 million of its common stock through December 31, 2021.

 

·

Adtalem’s financial position remained strong, generating $204.9 million of operating cash flow during fiscal year 2019. As of June 30, 2019, cash and cash equivalents totaled $299.4 million and outstanding borrowings totaled $407.0 million.

 

DIVESTITURE OF DEVRY UNIVERSITY

On December 11, 2018, Adtalem completed the sale of DeVry University to Cogswell pursuant to the purchase agreement dated December 4, 2017. To support DeVry University’s future success, Adtalem transferred DeVry University with a working capital balance of $8.75 million at the closing date. In addition, Adtalem has agreed to indemnify Cogswell for certain losses including those related to certain pre-closing defense to repayment claims. The purchase agreement also includes an earn-out entitling Adtalem to payments of up to $20 million over a ten-year period payable based on DeVry University’s free cash flow.

DeVry University was an operating segment and was previously included in our former U.S. Traditional Postsecondary reporting segment. Subject to the terms and conditions of the purchase agreement, DeVry University was sold in its

53

entirety. Divesting DeVry University is a strategic shift in the operations of Adtalem. DeVry University offered principally bachelor’s and master’s degrees in technology and business in the U.S., and Adtalem exited this market with this disposition. Adtalem’s only other operating segment that grants primarily bachelor’s and master’s degrees is Chamberlain, and this institution’s degrees are in nursing and related healthcare fields. Selling the DeVry University operating segment reduces the organization’s dependence on government Title IV funds for its revenue, which was one of Adtalem’s strategic goals. DeVry University was the legacy business of Adtalem and at one time accounted for the majority of its consolidated revenue and operating income. Disposal of this operating segment will have a significant effect on the operations and financial results of Adtalem (See “Note 2: Discontinued Operations”) to the Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

In accordance with U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (“GAAP”), we have classified the DeVry University entity as “Held for Sale” and “Discontinued Operations.” As a result, all financial results, disclosures and discussions of continuing operations in this Annual Report on Form 10-K exclude DeVry University operations, unless otherwise noted.

DIVESTITURE OF CARRINGTON COLLEGE

On December 4, 2018, Adtalem completed the sale of Carrington to SJVC pursuant to the MIPA dated June 28, 2018. To support Carrington’s future success, Adtalem made a capital contribution of $7.5 million to Carrington, based on an agreed working capital balance of $11.5 million at the closing date.

Carrington was an operating segment and was previously included in our former U.S. Traditional Postsecondary reporting segment. Subject to the terms and conditions of the MIPA, Carrington was sold in its entirety. Divesting Carrington is a strategic shift in the operations of Adtalem. Carrington offered principally career specific certificate or associate degree programs in the U.S., and Adtalem exited this market with this disposition. Selling the Carrington operating segment reduces the organization’s dependence on government Title IV funds for its revenue, which was one of Adtalem’s important strategic goals. Disposal of this operating segment will have a significant effect on the operations and financial results of Adtalem (See “Note 2: Discontinued Operations”) to the Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

In accordance with GAAP, we have classified the Carrington entity as “Held for Sale” and “Discontinued Operations.” As a result, all financial results, disclosures and discussions of continuing operations in this Annual Report on Form 10-K exclude Carrington operations, unless otherwise noted.

USE OF NON-GAAP FINANCIAL INFORMATION AND SUPPLEMENTAL RECONCILIATION SCHEDULE

During fiscal year 2019, Adtalem recorded special items related to the following:

·

Restructuring charges, including asset write-offs, primarily related to the closing of the RUSM campus in Dominica, and real estate consolidations and workforce reductions at Adtalem Brazil and Adtalem’s home office.

·

Insurance settlement gain related to the final proceeds received for damages from Hurricanes Irma and Maria at AUC and RUSM.

·

Gain related to a lawsuit settlement against the Adtalem Board of Directors.

·

Adjustments to the preliminary income tax charges related to the implementation of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 and tax charges related to the divestiture of DeVry University.

 

During fiscal year 2018, Adtalem recorded special items related to the following:

 

·

Restructuring charges related to workforce reductions and real estate consolidations at the medical and veterinary schools, Becker and Adtalem’s home office, and asset impairment charges at Adtalem Brazil related to the planned fiscal year 2019 dispositions of the Sao Luis and Joao Pessoa institutions, which were completed in fiscal year 2019.

·

Income tax charges related to implementation of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.

54

·

A net tax benefit for the loss on Adtalem’s investment in Carrington.

During fiscal year 2017, Adtalem recorded special items related to the following:

·

Restructuring charges related to workforce reductions and real estate consolidations at the administrative support operations of the medical and veterinary schools and Adtalem’s home office.

·

Charges arising from the settlement agreements with the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) and the Office of the Attorney General of the State of New York (“NYAG”).

The following table illustrates the effects of discontinued operations and special items on Adtalem’s net income. Management believes that the non-GAAP disclosure of net income from continuing operations excluding special items and adjusted earnings per share excluding discontinued operations and special items provides investors with useful supplemental information regarding the underlying business trends and performance of Adtalem’s ongoing operations and is useful for period-over-period comparisons of such operations given the nature of discontinued operations, restructuring charges, settlement gains, regulatory settlements and certain income tax charges and deductions. Adtalem uses these supplemental financial measures internally in its management and budgeting process. However, these non-GAAP financial measures should be viewed in addition to, and not as a substitute for, Adtalem’s reported results prepared in accordance with GAAP. The following table reconciles these non-GAAP measures to the most directly comparable GAAP information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiscal Year

 

 

2019

    

2018

    

2017

 

 

(in thousands, except per share amounts)

Net Income

 

$

95,168

 

$

33,769

 

$

122,283

Earnings per Share (diluted)

 

$

1.60

 

$

0.54

 

$

1.91

Continuing Operations:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Restructuring Expense

 

$

55,925

 

$

5,067

 

$

12,973

Effect on Earnings per Share (diluted)

 

$

0.94

 

$

0.08

 

$

0.20

Settlement Gains

 

$

(26,178)

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

Effect on Earnings per Share (diluted)

 

$

(0.44)

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 and Tax Charges Related to the Divestiture of DeVry University

 

$

3,584

 

$

103,878

 

$

 —

Effect on Earnings per Share (diluted)

 

$

0.06

 

$

1.67

 

$

 —

Net Tax Benefit on Carrington Loss

 

$

 —

 

$

(48,903)

 

$

 —

Effect on Earnings per Share (diluted)

 

$

 —

 

$

(0.79)

 

$

 —

Regulatory Settlements

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

$

52,150

Effect on Earnings per Share (diluted)

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

$

0.81

Income Tax Impact on Non-GAAP Adjustments (1)

 

$

(1,732)

 

$

(1,083)

 

$

(24,666)

Effect on Earnings per Share (diluted)

 

$

(0.03)

 

$

(0.02)

 

$

(0.39)

Discontinued Operations, net of tax

 

$

40,443

 

$

80,146

 

$

(2,309)

Effect on Earnings per Share (diluted)

 

$

0.68

 

$

1.29

 

$

(0.04)

Net Income from Continuing Operations Excluding Special Items, net of tax

 

$

167,210

 

$

172,874

 

$

160,431

Earnings per Share from Continuing Operations Excluding Special Items, net of tax (diluted)

 

$

2.82

 

$

2.78

 

$

2.51

Diluted Shares used in EPS calculation

 

 

59,330

 

 

62,280

 

 

64,019


(1)

Represents the income tax impact of non-GAAP continuing operations adjustments that is recognized in our GAAP financial statements.

55

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following table presents information with respect to the relative size to revenue of each item in the Consolidated Statements of Income for fiscal years 2019, 2018 and 2017. Percentages may not add because of rounding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiscal Year

 

 

 

 

2019

    

2018

    

2017

 

Revenue

 

 

100.0

%

100.0

%

100.0

%

Cost of Educational Services

 

 

50.3

%

52.4

%

52.8

%

Student Services and Administrative Expense

 

 

32.3

%

30.3

%

30.6

%

Restructuring Expense

 

 

4.5

%

0.4

%

1.1

%

Settlement Gains

 

 

(2.1)

%

0.0

%

0.0

%

Regulatory Settlements

 

 

0.0

%

0.0

%

4.3

%

Total Operating Cost and Expense

 

 

85.0

%

83.1

%

88.8

%

Operating Income from Continuing Operations

 

 

15.0

%

16.9

%

11.2

%

Net Other Expense

 

 

(1.3)

%

(0.7)

%

(0.4)

%

Income from Continuing Operations Before Income Taxes

 

 

13.7

%

16.1

%

10.9

%

Income Tax Provision

 

 

(2.8)

%

(6.8)

%

(0.8)

%

Equity Method Investment Loss

 

 

0.0

%

(0.0)

%

(0.1)

%

Income from Continuing Operations

 

 

11.0

%

9.3

%

10.0

%

(Loss) Income from Discontinued Operations, Net of Tax

 

 

(3.3)

%

(6.5)