Company Quick10K Filing
Quick10K
Astronics
10-K 2018-12-31 Annual: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-09-29 Quarter: 2018-09-29
10-Q 2018-06-30 Quarter: 2018-06-30
10-Q 2018-03-31 Quarter: 2018-03-31
10-K 2017-12-31 Annual: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-09-30 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-Q 2017-07-01 Quarter: 2017-07-01
10-Q 2017-04-01 Quarter: 2017-04-01
10-K 2016-12-31 Annual: 2016-12-31
10-Q 2016-10-01 Quarter: 2016-10-01
10-Q 2016-07-02 Quarter: 2016-07-02
10-Q 2016-04-02 Quarter: 2016-04-02
10-K 2015-12-31 Annual: 2015-12-31
10-Q 2015-10-03 Quarter: 2015-10-03
10-Q 2015-07-04 Quarter: 2015-07-04
10-Q 2015-04-04 Quarter: 2015-04-04
10-K 2014-12-31 Annual: 2014-12-31
10-Q 2014-09-27 Quarter: 2014-09-27
10-Q 2014-06-28 Quarter: 2014-06-28
10-Q 2014-03-29 Quarter: 2014-03-29
10-K 2013-12-31 Annual: 2013-12-31
8-K 2019-02-21 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-02-13 Enter Agreement, M&A, Exhibits
8-K 2018-12-14 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2018-11-13 Enter Agreement, Earnings
8-K 2018-11-05 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-09-21 Amend Bylaw, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-03 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-06-13 Other Events
8-K 2018-05-31 Shareholder Vote
8-K 2018-05-09 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-02-26 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-02-16 Enter Agreement, Off-BS Arrangement
CYBF Cyberfort Software 0
VRCA Verrica Pharmaceuticals 0
FOE Ferro 0
FIBK First Interstate Bancsystem 0
NOV National Oilwell Varco 0
ABMD Abiomed 0
HAIN Hain Celestial Group 0
NYLD NRG Yield 0
ING ING Group 0
FLS Flowserve 0
ATRO 2018-12-31
Part I
Item 1. Business
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 2. Properties
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Part II
Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6. Selected Financial Data
Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Note 1 - Summary of Significant Accounting Principles and Practices
Note 2 - Revenue
Note 3 - Accounts Receivable
Note 4 - Inventories
Note 5 - Property, Plant and Equipment
Note 6 - Intangible Assets
Note 7 - Goodwill
Note 8 - Long-Term Debt and Notes Payable
Note 9 - Warranty
Note 10 - Income Taxes
Note 11 - Profit Sharing/401(K) Plan
Note 12 - Retirement Plans and Related Post Retirement Benefits
Note 13 - Shareholders' Equity
Note 14 - Earnings per Share
Note 15 - Equity Compensation
Note 16 - Fair Value
Note 17 - Selected Quarterly Financial Information
Note 18 - Commitments and Contingencies
Note 19 - Segments
Note 20 - Acquisitions
Note 21 - Divestiture Activities
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures
Item 9B. Other Information
Part III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11. Executive Compensation
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence
Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services
Part IV
Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
Item 16. Form 10-K Summary
EX-21 atro-20181231xex21.htm
EX-23 atro-20181231xex23.htm
EX-31.1 atro-20181231xex311.htm
EX-31.2 atro-20181231xex312.htm
EX-32 atro-20181231xex32.htm

Astronics Earnings 2018-12-31

ATRO 10K Annual Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

Document
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 UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 ___________________________________________________________
Form 10-K
___________________________________________________________
xANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2018 
Commission File Number 0-7087
___________________________________________________________ 
Astronics Corporation
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)
 ___________________________________________________________
New York 16-0959303
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
130 Commerce Way, East Aurora, N.Y. 14052
(Address of principal executive office)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (716) 805-1599
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: None
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
$.01 par value Common Stock; $.01 par value Class B Stock
(Title of Class)
___________________________________________________________ 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  x
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See definition of “large accelerated filer”, an “accelerated filer”, a “non-accelerated filer” and a “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
Large accelerated filerxAccelerated filer¨
Non-accelerated filer¨Smaller Reporting Company¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).    Yes  ¨    No  x
As of February 14, 2019, 32,596,233 shares were outstanding, consisting of 24,430,801 shares of Common Stock $.01 par value and 8,165,432 shares of Class B Stock $.01 par value. The aggregate market value, as of the last business day of the
Company’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter, of the shares of Common Stock and Class B Stock of Astronics Corporation held by non-affiliates was approximately $847,000,000 (assuming conversion of all of the outstanding Class B Stock into Common Stock and assuming the affiliates of the Registrant to be its directors, executive officers and persons known to the Registrant to beneficially own more than 10% of the outstanding capital stock of the Corporation).
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the Company’s Proxy Statement for the 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held May 30, 2019 are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Report.
1


Table of Contents
ASTRONICS CORPORATION
Index to Annual Report
on Form 10-K
Year Ended December 31, 2018 
 
  Page
Item 1.
Item 1A.
Item 1B.
Item 2.
Item 3.
Item 4.
Item 5.
Item 6.
Item 7.
Item 7A.
Item 8.
Item 9.
Item 9A.
Item 9B.
Item 10.
Item 11.
Item 12.
Item 13.
Item 14.
Item 15.
Item 16.

3


FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS
Information included or incorporated by reference in this report that does not consist of historical facts, including statements accompanied by or containing words such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “believes,” “expects,” “expected,” “intends,” “plans,” “projects,” “approximate,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “potential,” “outlook,” “forecast,” “anticipates,” “presume” and “assume,” are forward-looking statements. Such forward-looking statements are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to several factors, risks and uncertainties, the impact or occurrence of which could cause actual results to differ materially from the expected results described in the forward-looking statements. Certain of these factors, risks and uncertainties are discussed in the sections of this report entitled “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” New factors, risks and uncertainties may emerge from time to time that may affect the forward-looking statements made herein. Given these factors, risks and uncertainties, investors should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements as predictive of future results. We disclaim any obligation to update the forward-looking statements made in this report.
4


PART I
ITEM 1. BUSINESS
Astronics Corporation (“Astronics” or the “Company”) is a leading provider of advanced technologies to the global aerospace, defense and electronics industries. Our products and services include advanced, high-performance electrical power generation, distribution and motion systems, lighting and safety systems, avionics products, systems and certification, aircraft structures and automated test systems.
We have operations in the United States (“U.S.”), Canada and France. We design and build our products through our wholly owned subsidiaries Astronics Advanced Electronic Systems Corp. (“AES”); Astronics AeroSat Corporation (“AeroSat”); Armstrong Aerospace, Inc. (“Armstrong”); Astronics Test Systems, Inc. (“ATS”); Ballard Technology, Inc. (“Ballard”); Astronics Connectivity Systems and Certification Corp. (“CSC”); Astronics Custom Control Concepts Inc. (“CCC”); Astronics DME LLC (“DME”); Luminescent Systems, Inc. (“LSI”); Luminescent Systems Canada, Inc. (“LSI Canada”); Max-Viz, Inc. (“Max-Viz”); Peco, Inc. (“Peco”); and PGA Electronic s.a. (“PGA”).
Acquisitions
On April 3, 2017, Astronics Custom Control Concepts Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company acquired substantially all the assets and certain liabilities of Custom Control Concepts LLC, located in Kent, Washington. CCC is a provider of cabin management and in-flight entertainment systems for a range of aircraft. The total consideration for the transaction was $10.2 million, net of $0.5 million in cash acquired. CCC is included in our Aerospace segment.
On December 1, 2017, Astronics acquired substantially all of the assets of Telefonix Inc. and a related company, Product Development Technologies, LLC and its subsidiaries, to become CSC, primarily located in Waukegan and Lake Zurich, Illinois. CSC designs and manufactures advanced in-flight entertainment and connectivity equipment, and provides industry leading design consultancy services for the global aerospace industry. The Company's products include wireless access points, file servers, content loaders and passenger control units. The total consideration for the transaction was $103.8 million, net of $0.2 million in cash acquired. CSC is included in our Aerospace segment.
Divestiture
On February 13, 2019, the Company completed a divestiture of its semiconductor test business within the Test Systems segment. The total cash proceeds of the divestiture amounted to approximately $103.5 million, consisting of $100 million cash at closing, plus approximately $3.5 million related to the sale of certain related inventory. The Company expects to record a pre-tax gain on the sale of approximately $80 million in the first quarter of 2019. The income tax expense relating to the gain is estimated to be $22 million.
The transaction also includes two elements of contingent earnouts. The “First Earnout” is calculated based on a multiple of all future sales of existing and certain future derivative products to existing and future customers in each annual period from 2019 through 2022. The First Earnout may not exceed $35 million in total. The “Second Earnout” is calculated based on a multiple of future sales related to an existing product and program with an existing customer exceeding an annual threshold for each annual period from 2019 through 2022. The Second Earnout is not capped. For the Second Earnout, if the applicable sales in an annual period do not exceed the annual threshold, no amounts will be paid relative to such annual period; the sales in such annual period do not carry over to the next annual period. Due to the degree of uncertainty associated with estimating the future sales levels of the divested business and its underlying programs, and the lack of reliable predictive market information, the Company will recognize such earnout proceeds, if received, as additional gain on sale when such proceeds are realized or realizable.
Products and Customers
Our Aerospace segment designs and manufactures products for the global aerospace industry. Product lines include lighting and safety systems, electrical power generation, distribution and motions systems, aircraft structures, avionics products, systems certification, and other products. Our Aerospace customers are the airframe manufacturers (“OEM”) that build aircraft for the commercial, military and general aviation markets, suppliers to those OEM’s, aircraft operators such as airlines and branches of the U.S. Department of Defense as well as the Federal Aviation Administration and airport operators. During 2018, this segment’s sales were divided 80% to the commercial transport market, 10% to the military aircraft market, 6% to the business jet market and 4% to other markets. Most of this segment’s sales are a result of contracts or purchase orders received from customers, placed on a day-to-day basis or for single year procurements rather than long-term multi-year contract commitments. On occasion, the Company does receive contractual commitments or blanket purchase orders from our customers covering multiple-year deliveries of hardware to our customers.
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Our Test Systems segment designs, develops, manufactures and maintains automated test systems that support the aerospace, communications and weapons test systems as well as training and simulation devices for both commercial and military applications. In the Test Systems segment, Astronics’ products are sold to a global customer base including OEMs and prime government contractors for both electronics and military products. During 2018, this segment’s sales were divided 66% to the semiconductor market and 34% to the aerospace & defense market.
Sales by segment, geographic region, major customer and foreign operations are provided in Note 19 of Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data in this report.
We have a significant concentration of business with two major customers; Panasonic Avionics Corporation (“Panasonic”) and The Boeing Company (“Boeing”). Sales to Panasonic accounted for 14.4% of sales in 2018, 19.1% of sales in 2017, and 21.6% of sales in 2016. Sales to Boeing accounted for 14.3% of sales in 2018, 16.8% of sales in 2017, and 15.2% of sales in 2016.
Strategy
Our strategy is to increase our value by developing technologies and capabilities either internally or through acquisition, and use those capabilities to provide innovative solutions to the aerospace & defense and other markets where our technology can be beneficial.
Practices as to Maintaining Working Capital
Liquidity is discussed in Part II, Item 7, Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, in the Liquidity and Capital Resources section of this report.
Competitive Conditions
We experience considerable competition in the market sectors we serve, principally with respect to product performance and price, from various competitors, many of which are substantially larger and have greater resources. Success in the markets we serve depends upon product innovation, customer support, responsiveness and cost management. We continue to invest in developing the technologies and engineering support critical to competing in our markets.
Government Contracts
All U.S. government contracts, including subcontracts where the U.S. government is the ultimate customer, may be subject to termination at the election of the government. Our revenue stream relies on military spending. Approximately 14% of our consolidated sales were made to the military aircraft and military test systems markets combined.
Raw Materials
Materials, supplies and components are purchased from numerous sources. We believe that the loss of any one source, although potentially disruptive in the short-term, would not materially affect our operations in the long-term.
Seasonality
Our business is typically not seasonal.
Backlog
At December 31, 2018, our consolidated backlog was $416 million. Excluding backlog related to the divested semiconductor business, our backlog was $403 million at December 31, 2018. At December 31, 2017, our backlog was $394 million. Backlog in the Aerospace segment was $326 million at December 31, 2018, of which $306 million is expected to be realized in 2019. Backlog in the Test Systems segment, exclusive of the backlog associated with the divested semiconductor business, was $77 million at December 31, 2018, of which $46 million is expected to be realized in 2019.
Patents
We have a number of patents. While the aggregate protection of these patents is of value, our only material business that is dependent upon the protection afforded by these patents is our cabin power distribution products. Our patents and patent applications relate to electroluminescence, instrument panels, cord reels and handsets, and a broad patent covering the cabin power distribution technology. We regard our expertise and techniques as proprietary and rely upon trade secret laws and contractual arrangements to protect our rights. We have trademark protection in our major markets.
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Research, Development and Engineering Activities
We are engaged in a variety of engineering and design activities as well as basic research and development activities directed to the substantial improvement or new application of our existing technologies. These costs are expensed when incurred and included in cost of sales. Research, development and engineering costs amounted to approximately $114.3 million in 2018, $95.0 million in 2017 and $88.9 million in 2016.
Employees
We employed approximately 2,700 employees at December 31, 2018. We consider our relations with our employees to be good. We have approximately 200 hourly production employees at Peco who are subject to collective bargaining agreements.
Available information
We file our financial information and other materials as electronically required with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). These materials can be accessed electronically via the Internet at www.sec.gov. Such materials and other information about the Company are also available through our website at www.astronics.com.
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS
The loss of Panasonic or Boeing as major customers or a significant reduction in business with either of those customers would reduce our sales and earnings. In 2018, we had a concentration of sales to Panasonic and Boeing representing approximately 14.4% and 14.3% of our sales, respectively. The loss of either of these customers or a significant reduction in business with them would significantly reduce our sales and earnings.
A write-off of all or part of our goodwill or other intangible assets could adversely affect our operating results and net worth. At December 31, 2018, goodwill and net intangible assets were approximately 16.1% and 17.2% of our total assets, respectively. Our goodwill and other intangible assets may increase in the future since our strategy includes growing through acquisitions. We may have to write-off all or part of our goodwill or purchased intangible assets if their value becomes impaired. Although this write-off would be a non-cash charge, it could reduce our earnings and net worth significantly.
The markets we serve are cyclical and sensitive to domestic and foreign economic conditions and events, which may cause our operating results to fluctuate. Demand for our products is, to a large extent, dependent on the demand and success of our customers' products where we are a supplier to an OEM. In our Aerospace segment, demand by the business jet markets for our products is dependent upon several factors, including capital investment, product innovations, economic growth and wealth creation and technology upgrades. In addition, the commercial airline industry is highly cyclical and sensitive to fuel price increases, labor disputes, global economic conditions, availability of capital to fund new aircraft purchases and upgrades of existing aircraft and passenger demand. A change in any of these factors could result in a reduction in the amount of air travel and the ability of airlines to invest in new aircraft or to upgrade existing aircraft. These factors would reduce orders for new aircraft and would likely reduce airlines’ spending for cabin upgrades for which we supply products, thus reducing our sales and profits. A reduction in air travel may also result in our commercial airline customers being unable to pay our invoices on a timely basis or not at all.
We are a supplier on various new aircraft programs just entering or expected to begin production in the future. As with any new program, there is risk as to whether the aircraft or program will be successful and accepted by the market. As is customary for our business, we purchase inventory and invest in specific capital equipment to support our production requirements generally based on delivery schedules provided by our customer. If a program or aircraft is not successful, we may have to write-off all or a part of the inventory, accounts receivable and capital equipment related to the program. A write-off of these assets could result in a significant reduction of earnings and cause covenant violations relating to our debt agreements. This could result in our being unable to borrow additional funds under our bank credit facility or being obliged to refinance or renegotiate the terms of our bank indebtedness.
In our Test Systems segment, the market for our products is concentrated with a limited number of significant customers accounting for a substantial portion of the purchases of test equipment. In any one reporting period, a single customer or several customers may contribute an even larger percentage of our consolidated sales. In addition, our ability to increase sales will depend, in part, on our ability to obtain orders from current or new significant customers. The opportunities to obtain orders from these customers may be limited, which may impair our ability to grow sales. We expect that sales of our Test Systems products will continue to be concentrated with a limited number of significant customers for the foreseeable future. Additionally, demand for some of our test products is dependent upon government funding levels for our products, our ability to compete successfully for those contracts and our ability to develop products to satisfy the demands of our customers.
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Our products are sold in highly competitive markets. Some of our competitors are larger, more diversified corporations and have greater financial, marketing, production and research and development resources. As a result, they may be better able to withstand the effects of periodic economic downturns. Our operations and financial performance will be negatively impacted if our competitors:
develop products that are superior to our products;
develop products that are more competitively priced than our products;
develop methods of more efficiently and effectively providing products and services; or
adapt more quickly than we do to new technologies or evolving customer requirements.
We believe that the principal points of competition in our markets are product quality, price, design and engineering capabilities, product development, conformity to customer specifications, quality of support after the sale, timeliness of delivery and effectiveness of the distribution organization. Maintaining and improving our competitive position will require continued investment in manufacturing, engineering, quality standards, marketing, customer service and support and our distribution networks. If we do not maintain sufficient resources to make these investments, or are not successful in maintaining our competitive position, our operations and financial performance will suffer.
Our future success depends to a significant degree upon the continued contributions of our management team and technical personnel. The loss of members of our management team could have a material and adverse effect on our business. In addition, competition for qualified technical personnel in our industry is intense, and we believe that our future growth and success will depend on our ability to attract, train and retain such personnel.
We may incur losses and liabilities as a result of our acquisition strategy. Growth by acquisition involves risks that could adversely affect our financial condition and operating results, including:
diversion of management time and attention from our core business;
the potential exposure to unanticipated liabilities;
the potential that expected benefits or synergies are not realized and that operating costs increase;
the risks associated with incurring additional acquisition indebtedness, including that additional indebtedness could limit our cash flow availability for operations and our flexibility;
difficulties in integrating the operations and personnel of acquired companies; and
the potential loss of key employees, suppliers or customers of acquired businesses.
In addition, any acquisition, once successfully integrated, could negatively impact our financial performance if it does not perform as planned, does not increase earnings, or does not prove otherwise to be beneficial to us.
We currently are involved or may become involved in the future, in legal proceedings that, if adversely adjudicated or settled, could materially impact our financial condition. As an aerospace company, we may become a party to litigation in the ordinary course of our business, including, among others, matters alleging product liability, warranty claims, breach of commercial or government contract or other legal actions. In general, litigation claims can be expensive and time consuming to bring or defend against and could result in settlements or damages that could significantly impact results of operations and financial condition.
We are a defendant in actions filed in the Regional State Court of Mannheim, Germany (Lufthansa Technik AG v. Astronics Advanced Electronics Systems Corp.) relating to an allegation of patent infringement. On December 29, 2010, Lufthansa Technik AG (“Lufthansa”) filed a Statement of Claim in the Regional State Court of Mannheim, Germany. Lufthansa’s claim asserts that our subsidiary, AES, sold, marketed, and brought into use in Germany a power supply system that infringes upon a German patent held by Lufthansa. Lufthansa sought an order requiring AES to stop selling and marketing the allegedly infringing power supply system, a recall of allegedly infringing products sold to commercial customers in Germany since November 26, 2003, and compensation for damages related to direct sales of the allegedly infringing power supply system in Germany (referred to as “direct sales”). The claim does not specify an estimate of damages and a related damages claim is being pursued by Lufthansa in separate court proceedings in an action filed in July 2017, as further discussed below.
In February 2015, the Regional State Court of Mannheim, Germany rendered its decision that the patent was infringed. The judgment does not require AES to recall products that are already installed in aircraft or have been sold to other end users. On
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July 15, 2015, Lufthansa advised AES of their intention to enforce the accounting provisions of the decision, which required AES to provide certain financial information regarding direct sales of the infringing product in Germany to enable Lufthansa to make an estimate of requested damages. Additionally, if Lufthansa provides the required bank guarantee specified in the decision, the Company may be required to offer a recall of products that are in the distribution channels in Germany. No such bank guarantee has been issued to date. As of December 31, 2018 there are no products subject to the order in the distribution channels in Germany.
The Company appealed to the Higher Regional Court of Karlsruhe. On November 15, 2016, the Court issued its ruling and upheld the lower court’s decision. The Company submitted a petition to grant AES leave for appeal to the German Federal Supreme Court. On April 18, 2018, the German Federal Supreme Court granted Astronics’ petition in part, namely with respect to the part concerning the amount of damages. On January 8, 2019, Federal Supreme Court held the hearing on the appeal. A decision on the Company's appeal is expected in late March 2019.
In July 2017, Lufthansa filed an action in the Regional State Court of Mannheim for payment of damages caused by the alleged patent infringement of AES, related to direct sales of the allegedly infringing product in Germany (associated with the original December 2010 action discussed above). In this action, which was served on AES on April 11, 2018, Lufthansa claims payment of approximately $6.2 million plus interest. According to AES's assessment, this claim is significantly higher than justified. We estimate AES’s potential exposure to be approximately $1 million to $3 million, and have recorded a reserve of $1 million associated with this matter. Such amount is recorded within Other Accrued Expenses and Selling, General and Administrative Expenses in the accompanying financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2018. An oral hearing in this matter has been scheduled for March 15, 2019. A first instance decision in this matter is expected in mid-2019.
On December 29, 2017, Lufthansa filed another infringement action against AES in the Regional State Court of Mannheim claiming that sales by AES to its international customers have infringed Lufthansa's patent if AES's customers later shipped the products to Germany (referred to as “indirect sales”). This action, therefore, addresses sales other than those covered by the action filed on December 29, 2010, discussed above. In this action, served on April 11, 2018, Lufthansa seeks an injunction, an order obliging AES to provide information and accounting and a finding that AES owes damages for the attacked indirect sales. AES will vigorously defend against the action. No amount of claimed damages has been specified by Lufthansa and such amount is not quantifiable at this time. An oral hearing in this matter has been scheduled for March 15, 2019. A first instance decision is in this matter is expected in mid-2019. As loss exposure is neither probable nor estimable at this time, the Company has not recorded any liability with respect to this litigation as of December 31, 2018.
In December 2017, Lufthansa filed patent infringement cases in the United Kingdom and France against AES. The Lufthansa patent expired in May 2018. In those cases, Lufthansa accuses AES of having manufactured, used, sold and offered for sale a power supply system, and offered and supplied parts for a power supply system, that infringed upon a Lufthansa patent in those respective countries. As loss exposure is neither probable nor estimable at this time, the Company has not recorded any liability with respect to these matters as of December 31, 2018. 
On November 26, 2014, Lufthansa filed a complaint in the United States District for the Western District of Washington. Lufthansa’s complaint in that action alleges that AES manufactures, uses, sells and offers for sale a power supply system that infringes upon a U.S. patent held by Lufthansa. The patent at issue in the U.S. action is based on technology similar to that involved in the German action. On April 25, 2016, the Court issued its ruling on claim construction, holding that the sole independent claim in the patent is indefinite, rendering all claims in the patent indefinite. Based on this ruling, AES filed a motion for summary judgment on the grounds that the Court’s ruling that the patent is indefinite renders the patent invalid and unenforceable. On July 20, 2016, the U.S. District Court granted the motion for summary judgment and issued an order dismissing all claims against AES with prejudice.
Lufthansa appealed the District Court's decision to the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. On October 19, 2017, the Federal Circuit affirmed the district court’s decision, holding that the sole independent claim of the patent is indefinite, rending all claims on the patent indefinite. Lufthansa did not file a petition for en banc rehearing or petition the U.S. Supreme Court for a writ of certiorari. Therefore, there is no longer a risk of exposure from that lawsuit.
Other than these proceedings, we are not party to any significant pending legal proceedings that management believes will result in a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations.
The amount of debt we have outstanding, as well as any debt we may incur in the future, could have an adverse effect on our operational and financial flexibility. As of December 31, 2018, we had approximately $234.0 million of debt outstanding,
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of which $232.1 million is long-term debt. Changes to our level of debt subsequent to December 31, 2018 could have significant consequences to our business, including the following:
Depending on interest rates and debt maturities, a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations could be dedicated to paying principal and interest on our debt, thereby reducing funds available for our acquisition strategy, capital expenditures or other purposes;
A significant amount of additional debt could make us more vulnerable to changes in economic conditions or increases in prevailing interest rates;
Our ability to obtain additional financing for acquisitions, capital expenditures or for other purposes could be impaired;
The increase in the amount of debt we have outstanding increases the risk of non-compliance with some of the covenants in our debt agreements which require us to maintain specified financial ratios; and
We may be more leveraged than some of our competitors, which may result in a competitive disadvantage.
We are subject to debt covenant restrictions. Our credit facility contains certain financial and other restrictive covenants. A significant decline in our operating income could cause us to violate our covenants. A covenant violation would require a waiver by the lenders or an alternative financing arrangement be achieved. This could result in our being unable to borrow under our bank credit facility or being obliged to refinance and renegotiate the terms of our bank indebtedness. Historically both choices have been available to us, however, it is difficult to predict the availability of these options in the future.
We are subject to financing and interest rate exposure risks that could adversely affect our business, liquidity and operating results. Changes in the availability, terms and cost of capital, and increases in interest rates could cause our cost of doing business to increase and place us at a competitive disadvantage. At December 31, 2018, approximately 3% of our debt was at fixed interest rates with the remainder subject to variable interest rates.
Our future operating results could be impacted by estimates used to calculate impairment losses on long lived assets. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make significant and subjective estimates and assumptions that may affect the reported amounts of long lived assets in the financial statements. These estimates are integral in the determination of whether a potential non-cash impairment loss exists as well as the calculation of that loss. Actual future results could differ from those estimates.
Future terror attacks, war, or other civil disturbances could negatively impact our business. Continued terror attacks, war or other disturbances could lead to economic instability and decreases in demand for our products, which could negatively impact our business, financial condition and results of operations. Terrorist attacks world-wide have caused instability from time to time in global financial markets and the aviation industry. The long-term effects of terrorist attacks on us are unknown. These attacks and the U.S. government’s continued efforts against terrorist organizations may lead to additional armed hostilities or to further acts of terrorism and civil disturbance in the U.S. or elsewhere, which may further contribute to economic instability.
Our business and operations could be adversely impacted in the event of a failure of our information technology infrastructure or adversely impacted by a successful cyber-attack. We are dependent on various information technologies throughout our company to administer, store and support multiple business activities. We routinely experience various cybersecurity threats, threats to our information technology infrastructure, unauthorized attempts to gain access to our company sensitive information, and denial-of-service attacks as do our customers, suppliers and subcontractors. We conduct regular periodic training of our employees as to the protection of sensitive information which includes security awareness training intended to prevent the success of “phishing” attacks.
The threats we face vary from attacks common to most industries to more advanced and persistent, highly organized adversaries, including nation states, which target us and other defense contractors because we protect sensitive information. If we are unable to protect sensitive information, our customers or governmental authorities could question the adequacy of our threat mitigation and detection processes and procedures, and depending on the severity of the incident, our customers’ data, our employees’ data, our intellectual property, and other third party data (such as subcontractors, suppliers and vendors) could be compromised. As a consequence of their persistence, sophistication and volume, we may not be successful in defending against all such attacks. Due to the evolving nature of these security threats, the impact of any future incident cannot be predicted.
Although we work cooperatively with our customers, suppliers, and subcontractors to seek to minimize the impact of cyber threats, other security threats or business disruptions, we must rely on the safeguards put in place by these entities, which may affect the security of our information. These entities have varying levels of cyber security expertise and safeguards and their
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relationships with U.S. government contractors, such as Astronics, may increase the likelihood that they are targeted by the same cyber threats we face.
Our inability to adequately enforce and protect our intellectual property or defend against assertions of infringement could prevent or restrict our ability to compete. We rely on patents, trademarks and proprietary knowledge and technology, both internally developed and acquired, in order to maintain a competitive advantage. Our inability to defend against the unauthorized use of these rights and assets could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. Litigation may be necessary to protect our intellectual property rights or defend against claims of infringement. This litigation could result in significant costs and divert our management’s focus away from operations.
If we are unable to adapt to technological change, demand for our products may be reduced. The technologies related to our products have undergone, and in the future may undergo, significant changes. To succeed in the future, we will need to continue to design, develop, manufacture, assemble, test, market and support new products and enhancements on a timely and cost effective basis. Our competitors may develop technologies and products that are more effective than those we develop or that render our technology and products obsolete or uncompetitive. Furthermore, our products could become unmarketable if new industry standards emerge. We may have to modify our products significantly in the future to remain competitive, and new products we introduce may not be accepted by our customers.
Our new product development efforts may not be successful, which would result in a reduction in our sales and earnings. We may experience difficulties that could delay or prevent the successful development of new products or product enhancements, and new products or product enhancements may not be accepted by our customers. In addition, the development expenses we incur may exceed our cost estimates, and new products we develop may not generate sales sufficient to offset our costs. If any of these events occur, our sales and profits could be adversely affected.
We depend on government contracts and subcontracts with defense prime contractors and sub-contractors that may not be fully funded, may be terminated, or may be awarded to our competitors. The failure to be awarded these contracts, the failure to receive funding or the termination of one or more of these contracts could reduce our sales. Sales to the U.S. government and its prime contractors and subcontractors represent a significant portion of our business. The funding of these programs is generally subject to annual congressional appropriations, and congressional priorities are subject to change. In addition, government expenditures for defense programs may decline or these defense programs may be terminated. A decline in governmental expenditures or the termination of existing contracts may result in a reduction in the volume of contracts awarded to us. We have resources applied to specific government contracts and if any of those contracts were terminated, we may incur substantial costs redeploying those resources.
If our subcontractors or suppliers fail to perform their contractual obligations, our prime contract performance and our ability to obtain future business could be materially and adversely impacted. Many of our contracts involve subcontracts with other companies upon which we rely to perform a portion of the services we must provide to our customers. There is a risk that we may have disputes with our subcontractors, including disputes regarding the quality and timeliness of work performed by the subcontractor or customer concerns about the subcontractor. Failure by our subcontractors to satisfactorily provide, on a timely basis, the agreed-upon supplies or perform the agreed-upon services may materially and adversely impact our ability to perform our obligations with our customer. Subcontractor performance deficiencies could result in a customer terminating our contract for default. A default termination could expose us to liability and substantially impair our ability to compete for future contracts and orders. In addition, a delay in our ability to obtain components and equipment parts from our suppliers may affect our ability to meet our customers’ needs and may have an adverse effect upon our profitability.
Our results of operations are affected by our fixed-price contracts, which could subject us to losses in the event that we have cost overruns. For the year ended December 31, 2018, fixed-price contracts represented almost all of the Company’s sales. On fixed-price contracts, we agree to perform the scope of work specified in the contract for a predetermined price. Depending on the fixed price negotiated, these contacts may provide us with an opportunity to achieve higher profits based on the relationship between our costs and the contract’s fixed price. However, we bear the risk that increased or unexpected costs may reduce our profit.
Some of our contracts contain late delivery penalties. Failure to deliver in a timely manner due to supplier problems, development schedule slides, manufacturing difficulties, or similar schedule related events could have a material adverse effect on our business.
The failure of our products may damage our reputation, necessitate a product recall or result in claims against us that exceed our insurance coverage, thereby requiring us to pay significant damages. Defects in the design and manufacture of our products may necessitate a product recall. We include complex system design and components in our products that could contain errors or defects, particularly when we incorporate new technology into our products. If any of our products are defective, we could be required to redesign or recall those products or pay substantial damages or warranty claims. Such an
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event could result in significant expenses, disrupt sales and affect our reputation and that of our products. We are also exposed to product liability claims. We carry aircraft and non-aircraft product liability insurance consistent with industry norms. However, this insurance coverage may not be sufficient to fully cover the payment of any potential claim. A product recall or a product liability claim not covered by insurance could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Changes in discount rates and other estimates could affect our future earnings and equity. Our goodwill asset impairment evaluations are determined using valuations that involve several assumptions, including discount rates, cash flow estimates, growth rates and terminal values. Certain of these assumptions, particularly the discount rate, are based on market conditions and are outside of our control. Changes in these assumptions could affect our future earnings and equity.
Additionally, pension obligations and the related costs are determined using actual results and actuarial valuations that involve several assumptions. The most critical assumption is the discount rate. Other assumptions include mortality, salary increases and retirement age. The discount rate assumptions are based on current market conditions and are outside of our control. Changes in these assumptions could affect our future earnings and equity.
Contracting in the defense industry is subject to significant regulation, including rules related to bidding, billing and accounting kickbacks and false claims, and any non-compliance could subject us to fines and penalties or possible debarment. Like all government contractors, we are subject to risks associated with this contracting. These risks include the potential for substantial civil and criminal fines and penalties. These fines and penalties could be imposed for failing to follow procurement integrity and bidding rules, employing improper billing practices or otherwise failing to follow cost accounting standards, receiving or paying kickbacks or filing false claims. We have been, and expect to continue to be, subjected to audits and investigations by government agencies. The failure to comply with the terms of our government contracts could harm our business reputation. It could also result in suspension or debarment from future government contracts.
If we fail to meet expectations of securities analysts or investors due to fluctuations in our sales or operating results, our stock price could decline significantly. Our sales and earnings may fluctuate from quarter to quarter due to a number of factors, including delays or cancellations of programs. It is likely that in some future quarters our operating results may fall below the expectations of securities analysts or investors. In this event, the trading price of our stock could decline significantly.
Our operations in foreign countries expose us to political and currency risks and adverse changes in local legal and regulatory environments. In 2018, approximately 8.8% of our sales were made by our subsidiaries in France and Canada. Net assets held by these subsidiaries total $45.0 million at December 31, 2018. Our financial results may be adversely affected by fluctuations in foreign currencies and by the translation of the financial statements of our foreign subsidiaries from local currencies into U.S. dollars. We expect international operations and export sales to continue to contribute to our earnings for the foreseeable future. Both the sales from international operations and export sales are subject in varying degrees to risks inherent in doing business outside of the U.S. Such risks include the possibility of unfavorable circumstances arising from host country laws or regulations, changes in tariff and trade barriers and import or export licensing requirements, and political or economic reprioritization, insurrection, civil disturbance or war.
Government regulations could limit our ability to sell our products outside the U.S. and could otherwise adversely affect our business. Certain of our sales are subject to compliance with U.S. export regulations. Our failure to obtain, or fully adhere to the limitations contained in, the requisite licenses, meet registration standards or comply with other government export regulations would hinder our ability to generate sales of our products outside the U.S. Compliance with these government regulations may also subject us to additional fees and operating costs. The absence of comparable restrictions on competitors in other countries may adversely affect our competitive position. In order to sell our products in European Union countries, we must satisfy certain technical requirements. If we are unable to comply with those requirements with respect to a significant quantity of our products, our sales in Europe would be restricted. Doing business internationally also subjects us to numerous U.S. and foreign laws and regulations, including regulations relating to import-export control, technology transfer restrictions, foreign corrupt practices and anti-boycott provisions. Our failure, or failure by an authorized agent or representative that is attributable to us, to comply with these laws and regulations could result in administrative, civil or criminal liabilities and could, in the extreme case, result in monetary penalties, suspension or debarment from government contracts or suspension of our export privileges, which would have a material adverse effect on us.
Our stock price is volatile. For the year ended December 31, 2018, our stock price ranged from a low of $28.46 to a high of $41.18. The price of our common stock has been and likely will continue to be subject to wide fluctuations in response to a number of events and factors, such as:
quarterly variations in operating results;
variances of our quarterly results of operations from securities analyst estimates;
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changes in financial estimates;
announcements of technological innovations and new products;
news reports relating to trends in our markets; and
the cancellation of major contracts or programs with our customers.
In addition, the stock market in general, and the market prices for companies in the aerospace & defense industry in particular, have experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that often have been unrelated to the operating performance of the companies affected by these fluctuations. These broad market fluctuations may adversely affect the market price of our common stock, regardless of our operating performance.
ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
None
ITEM 2PROPERTIES
On December 31, 2018, we own or lease 1.2 million square feet of space, distributed by segment as follows:
OwnedLeasedTotal
Aerospace779,000 308,000 1,087,000 
Test Systems— 149,000 149,000 
Total Square Feet779,000 457,000 1,236,000 
We have principal manufacturing facilities in the United States, Canada, and France.
Upon the expiration of our current leases, we believe that we will be able to either secure renewal terms or enter into leases for or purchases of alternative locations at market terms. We believe that our properties have been adequately maintained and are generally in good condition.
ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
On December 29, 2010, Lufthansa Technik AG (“Lufthansa”) filed a Statement of Claim in the Regional State Court of Mannheim, Germany. Lufthansa’s claim asserts that our subsidiary, AES, sold, marketed, and brought into use in Germany a power supply system that infringes upon a German patent held by Lufthansa. Lufthansa sought an order requiring AES to stop selling and marketing the allegedly infringing power supply system, a recall of allegedly infringing products sold to commercial customers in Germany since November 26, 2003, and compensation for damages related to direct sales of the allegedly infringing power supply system in Germany (referred to as “direct sales”). The claim does not specify an estimate of damages and a related damages claim is being pursued by Lufthansa in separate court proceedings in an action filed in July 2017, as further discussed below. 
In February 2015, the Regional State Court of Mannheim, Germany rendered its decision that the patent was infringed. The judgment does not require AES to recall products that are already installed in aircraft or have been sold to other end users. On July 15, 2015, Lufthansa advised AES of their intention to enforce the accounting provisions of the decision, which required AES to provide certain financial information regarding direct sales of the infringing product in Germany to enable Lufthansa to make an estimate of requested damages. Additionally, if Lufthansa provides the required bank guarantee specified in the decision, the Company may be required to offer a recall of products that are in the distribution channels in Germany. No such bank guarantee has been issued to date. As of December 31, 2018 there are no products subject to the order in the distribution channels in Germany.
The Company appealed to the Higher Regional Court of Karlsruhe. On November 15, 2016, the Court issued its ruling and upheld the lower court’s decision. The Company submitted a petition to grant AES leave for appeal to the German Federal Supreme Court. On April 18, 2018, the German Federal Supreme Court granted Astronics’ petition in part, namely with respect to the part concerning the amount of damages. On January 8, 2019, Federal Supreme Court held the hearing on the appeal. A decision on the Company's appeal is expected in late March 2019.
In July 2017, Lufthansa filed an action in the Regional State Court of Mannheim for payment of damages caused by the alleged patent infringement of AES, related to direct sales of the allegedly infringing product in Germany (associated with the original December 2010 action discussed above). In this action, which was served on AES on April 11, 2018, Lufthansa claims payment of approximately $6.2 million plus interest. According to AES's assessment, this claim is significantly higher than justified. We
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estimate AES’s potential exposure to be approximately $1 million to $3 million, and have recorded a reserve of $1 million associated with this matter. Such amount is recorded within Other Accrued Expenses and Selling, General and Administrative Expenses in the accompanying financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2018. An oral hearing in this matter has been scheduled for March 15, 2019. A first instance decision in this matter is expected in mid-2019.
On December 29, 2017, Lufthansa filed another infringement action against AES in the Regional State Court of Mannheim claiming that sales by AES to its international customers have infringed Lufthansa's patent if AES's customers later shipped the products to Germany (referred to as “indirect sales”). This action, therefore, addresses sales other than those covered by the action filed on December 29, 2010, discussed above. In this action, served on April 11, 2018, Lufthansa seeks an injunction, an order obliging AES to provide information and accounting and a finding that AES owes damages for the attacked indirect sales. AES will vigorously defend against the action. No amount of claimed damages has been specified by Lufthansa and such amount is not quantifiable at this time. An oral hearing in this matter has been scheduled for March 15, 2019. A first instance decision is in this matter is expected in mid-2019. As loss exposure is neither probable nor estimable at this time, the Company has not recorded any liability with respect to this litigation as of December 31, 2018.
In December 2017, Lufthansa filed patent infringement cases in the United Kingdom and France against AES. The Lufthansa patent expired in May 2018. In those cases, Lufthansa accuses AES of having manufactured, used, sold and offered for sale a power supply system, and offered and supplied parts for a power supply system, that infringed upon a Lufthansa patent in those respective countries. As loss exposure is neither probable nor estimable at this time, the Company has not recorded any liability with respect to these matters as of December 31, 2018. 
On November 26, 2014, Lufthansa filed a complaint in the United States District for the Western District of Washington. Lufthansa’s complaint in that action alleges that AES manufactures, uses, sells and offers for sale a power supply system that infringes upon a U.S. patent held by Lufthansa. The patent at issue in the U.S. action is based on technology similar to that involved in the German action. On April 25, 2016, the Court issued its ruling on claim construction, holding that the sole independent claim in the patent is indefinite, rendering all claims in the patent indefinite. Based on this ruling, AES filed a motion for summary judgment on the grounds that the Court’s ruling that the patent is indefinite renders the patent invalid and unenforceable. On July 20, 2016, the U.S. District Court granted the motion for summary judgment and issued an order dismissing all claims against AES with prejudice.
Lufthansa appealed the District Court's decision to the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. On October 19, 2017, the Federal Circuit affirmed the district court’s decision, holding that the sole independent claim of the patent is indefinite, rending all claims on the patent indefinite. Lufthansa did not file a petition for en banc rehearing or petition the U.S. Supreme Court for a writ of certiorari. Therefore, there is no longer a risk of exposure from that lawsuit.
Other than these proceedings, we are not party to any significant pending legal proceedings that management believes will result in a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations.
ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
Not Applicable
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PART II
 
ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
The table below sets forth the range of prices for the Company’s Common Stock, traded on the NASDAQ National Market System, for each quarterly period during the last two years. The approximate number of shareholders of record as of February 14, 2019, was 766 for Common Stock and 2,205 for Class B Stock.
2018HighLow
First$41.18 $30.94 
Second$34.23 $29.40 
Third$40.10 $31.60 
Fourth$37.80 $28.46 

2017HighLow
First$30.23 $25.03 
Second$28.95 $25.85 
Third$27.34 $21.85 
Fourth$38.15 $26.22 
The Company has not paid any cash dividends in the three-year period ended December 31, 2018. The Company has no plans to pay cash dividends as it plans to retain all cash from operations as a source of capital to finance working capital and growth in the business.
On September 29, 2018, the Company announced a three-for-twenty distribution of Class B Stock to holders of both Common and Class B Stock. Stockholders received three shares of Class B Stock for every twenty shares of Common and Class B Stock held on the record date of October 12, 2018. Fractional shares were paid in cash. All share quantities, share prices and per share data reported throughout this report have been adjusted to reflect the impact of this distribution.
On February 24, 2016, the Company’s Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $50 million of common stock (the “Buyback Program”). The Buyback Program allowed the Company to purchase shares of its common stock in accordance with applicable securities laws on the open market or through privately negotiated transactions. The Company has repurchased approximately 1,675,000 shares and has completed that program. On December 12, 2017, the Company’s Board of Directors authorized an additional repurchase of up to $50 million of common stock. No amounts have been repurchased under the new program as of December 31, 2018.











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The following graph and table shows the performance of the Company’s common stock compared with the S&P 500 Index — Total Return and the NASDAQ US and Foreign Companies for a $100 investment made December 31, 2013:
atro-20181231_g1.jpg
201320142015201620172018
Astronics Corp.Return %— 30.51 (15.99)(1.75)22.55 (13.30)
Cum $100.00 130.51 109.64 107.72 132.01 114.45 
S&P 500 Index - Total ReturnsReturn %— 13.69 1.38 11.96 21.83 (4.38)
Cum $100.00 113.69 115.26 129.05 157.22 150.33 
NASDAQ Stock Market (US and Foreign Companies)Return %— 14.43 6.99 8.80 8.43 (2.95)
Cum $100.00 114.43 122.43 133.21 144.44 140.17 

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ITEM 6.  SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
Five-Year Performance Highlights 
20182017 (5)20162015 (4)2014 (3)
(Amounts in thousands, except for employees and per share data)     
RESULTS OF OPERATIONS:
Sales$803,256 $624,464 $633,123 $692,279 $661,039 
Net Income$46,803 $19,679 $48,424 $66,974 $56,170 
Impairment Loss (6)$— $16,237 $— $— $— 
Net Margin5.8 %3.2 %7.6 %9.7 %8.5 %
Diluted Earnings Per Share (1)$1.41 $0.58 $1.40 $1.93 $1.63 
Weighted Average Shares Outstanding – Diluted (1)33,136 33,718 34,537 34,706 34,466 
Return on Average Equity13.1 %5.9 %15.2 %25.3 %28.1 %
YEAR-END FINANCIAL POSITION:
Working Capital (2)$246,079 $212,438 $168,513 $145,735 $136,602 
Total Assets$774,640 $735,956 $604,344 $609,243 $562,910 
Indebtedness$233,982 $271,767 $148,120 $169,789 $183,008 
Shareholders’ Equity$386,625 $329,927 $337,449 $300,225 $228,177 
Book Value Per Share (1)$11.86 $10.22 $10.13 $8.93 $6.84 
OTHER YEAR-END DATA:
Depreciation and Amortization$35,032 $27,063 $25,790 $25,309 $27,254 
Capital Expenditures$16,317 $13,478 $13,037 $18,641 $40,882 
Shares Outstanding (1)32,593 32,269 33,328 33,635 33,353 
Number of Employees2,690 2,516 2,304 2,304 2,041 
1.Diluted Earnings Per Share, Weighted Average Shares Outstanding - Diluted, Book Value Per Share and Shares Outstanding have been adjusted for the impact of the October 12, 2018 fifteen percent Class B stock distribution, October 11, 2016 fifteen percent Class B stock distribution, October 8, 2015 fifteen percent Class B stock distribution and the September 5, 2014 twenty percent Class B stock distribution. 
2.Working capital is calculated as the difference between Current Assets and Current Liabilities.
3.Information includes the results of ATS, acquired on February 28, 2014, from the acquisition date forward.
4.Information includes the results of Armstrong, acquired on January 14, 2015, from the acquisition date forward.
5.Information includes the results of CCC acquired on April 3, 2017 and CSC acquired December 1, 2017, each from the acquisition date forward.
6.The Company recorded a $16.2 million goodwill impairment charge during the fourth quarter of 2017.
ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
OVERVIEW
Astronics, through its subsidiaries, designs and manufactures advanced, high-performance electrical power generation, distribution and motion systems, lighting and safety systems, avionics products, systems and certification, aircraft structures and automated test systems.
Our strategy is to increase our value by developing technologies and capabilities either internally or through acquisition, and use those capabilities to provide innovative solutions to the aerospace & defense and other markets where our technology can be beneficial.
We have two reportable segments, Aerospace and Test Systems. Our Aerospace segment has thirteen principal operating facilities with one located in New York State, Florida, Oregon, Quebec, Canada and Montierchaume, France; two located in
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New Hampshire; and three located in each of Illinois and Washington State. Our Test Systems segment has facilities located in Florida and California.
Our Aerospace segment serves three primary markets. They are the military, commercial transport and business jet markets. Our Test Systems segment serves the aerospace & defense markets.
Important factors affecting our growth and profitability are the rate at which new aircraft are produced, government funding of military programs, our ability to have our products designed into new aircraft and the rates at which aircraft owners, including commercial airlines, refurbish or install upgrades to their aircraft. New aircraft build rates and aircraft owners spending on upgrades and refurbishments is cyclical and dependent on the strength of the global economy. Once designed into a new aircraft, the spare parts business is frequently retained by the Company. Future growth and profitability of the test business is dependent on developing and procuring new and follow-on business in the semiconductor market as well as with the military. The nature of our Test Systems business is such that it pursues large multi-year projects. There can be significant periods of time between orders in this business which may result in large fluctuations of sales and profit levels and backlog from period to period.
Each of the markets that we serve presents opportunities that we expect will provide growth for the Company over the long-term. We continue to look for opportunities in all of our markets to capitalize on our core competencies to expand our existing business and to grow through strategic acquisitions.
Challenges which continue to face us include improving shareholder value through increasing profitability. Increasing profitability is dependent on many things, primarily sales growth and the Company’s ability to control operating expenses and to identify means of creating improved productivity. Sales are driven by increased build rates for existing aircraft, market acceptance and economic success of new aircraft and our products, continued government funding of defense programs, the Company’s ability to obtain production contracts for parts we currently supply or have been selected to design and develop for new aircraft platforms and continually identifying and winning new business for our Test Systems segment. Our semiconductor test products are highly dependent on winning new and follow-on programs with our current customers as well as developing new customers. This product line was divested on February 13, 2019, as further discussed below. Reduced aircraft build rates driven by a weak economy, tight credit markets, reduced air passenger travel and an increasing supply of used aircraft on the market would likely result in reduced demand for our products, which will result in lower profits. Reduction of defense spending may result in fewer opportunities for us to compete, which could result in lower profits in the future. Many of our newer development programs are based on new and unproven technology and at the same time we are challenged to develop the technology on a schedule that is consistent with specific programs. We will continue to address these challenges by working to improve operating efficiencies and focusing on executing on the growth opportunities currently in front of us.
ACQUISITIONS
On December 1, 2017, Astronics acquired substantially all of the assets of Telefonix Inc. and a related company Product Development Technologies, LLC and its subsidiaries, to become CSC, located primarily in Waukegan and Lake Zurich, Illinois. CSC designs and manufactures advanced in-flight entertainment and connectivity equipment, and provides industry leading design consultancy services for the global aerospace industry. Under the terms of the Agreement, the total consideration for the transaction was $103.8 million, net of $0.2 million in cash acquired. CSC is included in our Aerospace segment.
On April 3, 2017, Astronics Custom Control Concepts Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company acquired substantially all the assets and certain liabilities of CCC, located in Kent, Washington. CCC is a provider of cabin management and in-flight entertainment systems for a range of aircraft. The total consideration for the transaction was $10.2 million, net of $0.5 million in cash acquired. CCC is included in our Aerospace segment.
DIVESTITURE
On February 13, 2019, the Company completed a divestiture of its semiconductor test business within the Test Systems segment. The total cash proceeds of the divestiture amounted to approximately $103.5 million, consisting of $100 million cash at closing, plus approximately $3.5 million related to the sale of certain related inventory. The Company expects to record a pre-tax gain on the sale of approximately $80 million in the first quarter of 2019. The income tax expense relating to the gain is estimated to be $22 million. 
The transaction also includes two elements of contingent earnouts. The “First Earnout” is calculated based on a multiple of all future sales of existing and certain future derivative products to existing and future customers in each annual period from 2019 through 2022. The First Earnout may not exceed $35 million in total. The “Second Earnout” is calculated based on a multiple of future sales related to an existing product and program with an existing customer exceeding an annual threshold for each annual period from 2019 through 2022. The Second Earnout is not capped. For the Second Earnout, if the applicable sales in an annual
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period do not exceed the annual threshold, no amounts will be paid relative to such annual period; the sales in such annual period do not carry over to the next annual period. Due to the degree of uncertainty associated with estimating the future sales levels of the divested business and its underlying programs, and the lack of reliable predictive market information, the Company will recognize such earnout proceeds, if received, as additional gain on sale when such proceeds are realized or realizable.
MARKETS
Commercial Transport Market
Sales to the commercial transport market include sales of electrical power generation, distribution and motion products, lighting & safety products, avionics products, systems certification and structures products. Sales to this market totaled approximately $536.3 million or 66.7% of our consolidated sales in 2018.
Maintaining and growing sales to the commercial transport market will depend on airlines’ capital spending budgets for cabin upgrades as well as the purchase of new aircraft by global airlines. This spending by the airlines is impacted by their profits, cash flow and available financing as well as competitive pressures between the airlines to improve the travel experience for their passengers. We expect that new aircraft will be equipped with more passenger and aircraft connectivity and in-seat power than previous generation aircraft. This market has experienced strong growth from airlines installing in-seat passenger power systems on their existing and newly delivered aircraft. Our ability to maintain and grow sales to this market depends on our ability to maintain our technological advantages over our competitors and maintain our relationships with major in-flight entertainment suppliers and global airlines.
Military Aerospace Market
Sales to the military aerospace market include sales of lighting & safety products, avionics products, electrical power & motion products and other products. Sales to this market totaled approximately 8.5% of our consolidated sales and amounted to $68.1 million in 2018.
The military market is dependent on governmental funding which can change from year to year. Risks are that overall spending may be reduced in the future, specific programs may be eliminated or that we fail to win new business through the competitive bid process. Astronics does not have significant reliance on any one program such that cancellation of a particular program will cause material financial loss. We believe that we will continue to have opportunities similar to past years regarding this market.
Business Jet Market
Sales to the business jet aerospace market include sales of lighting & safety products, avionics products, and electrical power & motion products. Sales to this market totaled approximately 5.4% of our consolidated sales in 2018 and amounted to $43.1 million. 
Sales to the business jet market are driven by our ship set content on new aircraft and build rates of new aircraft. Business jet OEM build rates continue to be significantly impacted by slow global wealth creation and corporate profitability which have been negatively affected during the past several years by global economic uncertainty among prospective buyers. We continue to see opportunities on new aircraft currently in the design phase to employ our lighting & safety, electrical power and avionics technologies in the business jet market. There is risk involved in the development of any new aircraft including the risk that the aircraft will not ultimately be produced or that it will be produced in lower quantities than originally expected and thus impacting our return on our engineering and development efforts.
Other Aerospace
Sales of our other aerospace products include sales of airfield lighting products and other Peco products. Sales to this market totaled approximately 3.5% of our total sales or $28.1 million in 2018.
Tests Systems Products
Our Test Systems segment accounted for approximately 15.9% of our consolidated sales in 2018 and amounted to $127.6 million. Sales to the semiconductor market were approximately $84.3 million. Sales to the aerospace & defense market were approximately $43.4 million in 2018.
CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES
Our financial statements and accompanying notes are prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. The preparation of the Company’s financial statements requires management to make estimates, assumptions and
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judgments that affect the amounts reported. These estimates, assumptions and judgments are affected by management’s application of accounting policies, which are discussed in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, Note 1 of Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data of this report. The critical accounting policies have been reviewed with the Audit Committee of our Board of Directors.
Revenue Recognition
Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (“ASU 2014-09”) was adopted on January 1, 2018 using the modified retrospective method, which required the recognition of the cumulative effect of the transition as an adjustment to retained earnings.
Revenue is recognized when, or as, the Company transfers control of promised products or services to a customer in an amount that reflects the consideration the Company expects to be entitled in exchange for transferring those products or services.
Payment terms and conditions vary by contract, although terms generally include a requirement of payment within a range from 30 to 60 days, or in certain cases, up-front deposits. In circumstances where the timing of revenue recognition differs from the timing of invoicing, the Company has determined that the Company's contracts generally do not include a significant financing component. Taxes collected from customers, which are subsequently remitted to governmental authorities, are excluded from sales.
The Company recognizes an asset for the incremental, material costs of obtaining a contract with a customer if the Company expects the benefit of those costs to be longer than one year and the costs are expected to be recovered. As of December 31, 2018, the Company does not have such incremental, material costs on any open contracts with an original expected duration of greater than one year, and therefore such costs are expensed as incurred. These incremental costs include, but are not limited to, sales commissions incurred to obtain a contract with a customer.
The Company recognizes an asset for certain costs to fulfill a contract if it is determined that the costs relate directly to a contract or anticipated contracts that can be specifically identified, generate or enhance resources that will be used in satisfying performance obligations in the future, and are expected to be recovered. Such costs are amortized on a systematic basis that is consistent with the transfer to the customer of the goods to which the asset relates. Start-up costs are expensed as incurred. Capitalized fulfillment costs are included in Inventories in the accompanying Consolidated Balance Sheets. Should future orders not materialize or it is determined the costs are no longer probable of recovery, the capitalized costs are written off. Capitalized fulfillment costs were $9.6 million as of December 31, 2018. These costs were associated with a contract that is included in the divestiture of the semiconductor business and as such, the balance is included in Assets Held for Sale in the accompanying consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2018. Amortization of fulfillment costs recognized within Cost of Products Sold was approximately $1.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2018.
A performance obligation is a promise in a contract to transfer a distinct good or service to the customer, and is the unit of account. A contract’s transaction price is allocated to each distinct performance obligation and recognized as revenue when, or as, the performance obligation is satisfied. The majority of our contracts have a single performance obligation as the promise to transfer the individual goods or services is not separately identifiable from other promises in the contracts which are, therefore, not distinct. Promised goods or services that are immaterial in the context of the contract are not separately assessed as performance obligations.
Some of our contracts have multiple performance obligations, most commonly due to the contract covering multiple phases of the product lifecycle (development, production, maintenance and support). For contracts with multiple performance obligations, the contract’s transaction price is allocated to each performance obligation using our best estimate of the standalone selling price of each distinct good or service in the contract. The primary method used to estimate standalone selling price is the expected cost plus margin approach, under which expected costs are forecast to satisfy a performance obligation and then an appropriate margin is added for that distinct good or service. Shipping and handling activities that occur after the customer has obtained control of the good are considered fulfillment activities, not performance obligations.
Some of our contracts offer price discounts or free units after a specified volume has been purchased. The Company evaluates these options to determine whether they provide a material right to the customer, representing a separate performance obligation. If the option provides a material right to the customer, revenue is allocated to these rights and recognized when those future goods or services are transferred, or when the option expires.
Contract modifications are routine in the performance of our contracts. Contracts are often modified to account for changes in contract specifications or requirements. Contract modifications are for goods or services that are distinct, and, therefore, are accounted for as new contracts. The aggregate effect of all modifications as of the period beginning January 1, 2018 has been
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reflected when identifying the satisfied and unsatisfied performance obligations, determining the transaction price and allocating the transaction price. Contracts modified prior to January 1, 2018 have not been retrospectively restated.
The vast majority of the Company’s revenue from contracts with customers is recognized at a point in time, when the customer obtains control of the promised product, which is generally upon delivery and acceptance by the customer. These contracts may provide credits or incentives, which may be accounted for as variable consideration. Variable consideration is estimated at the most likely amount to predict the consideration to which the Company will be entitled, and only to the extent it is probable that a subsequent change in estimate will not result in a significant revenue reversal when estimating the amount of revenue to recognize. Variable consideration is treated as a change to the sales transaction price and based on an assessment of all information (i.e., historical, current and forecasted) that is reasonably available to the Company, and estimated at contract inception and updated at the end of each reporting period as additional information becomes available. Most of our contracts do not contain rights to return product; where this right does exist, it is evaluated as possible variable consideration.
For contracts with customers in which the Company satisfies a promise to the customer to provide a product that has no alternative use to the Company and the Company has enforceable rights to payment for progress completed to date inclusive of profit, the Company satisfies the performance obligation and recognizes revenue over time, using costs incurred to date relative to total estimated costs at completion to measure progress toward satisfying our performance obligations. Incurred cost represents work performed, which corresponds with, and thereby best depicts, the transfer of control to the customer. Contract costs include labor, material and overhead.
The Company also recognizes revenue from service contracts (including service-type warranties) over time. The Company recognizes revenue over time during the term of the agreement as the customer is simultaneously receiving and consuming the benefits provided throughout the Company’s performance. Therefore, due to control transferring over time, the Company typically recognizes revenue on a straight-line basis throughout the contract period.
Reviews for Impairment of Long-Lived Assets
Goodwill Impairment Testing
Our goodwill is the result of the excess of purchase price over net assets acquired from acquisitions. As of December 31, 2018, we had approximately $125.0 million of goodwill. As of December 31, 2017, we had approximately $125.6 million of goodwill.
We identify our reporting units by assessing whether the components of our operating segments constitute businesses for which discrete financial information is available and segment management regularly reviews the operating results of those components. The Test Systems operating segment is its own reporting unit while the other reporting units are one level below our Aerospace operating segment.
Companies may perform a qualitative assessment as the initial step in the annual goodwill impairment testing process for all or selected reporting units under certain circumstances. Companies are also allowed to bypass the qualitative analysis and perform a quantitative analysis if desired. Economic uncertainties and the length of time from the calculation of a baseline fair value are factors that we would consider in determining whether to perform a quantitative test.
When we evaluate the potential for goodwill impairment using a qualitative assessment, we consider factors including, but not limited to, macroeconomic conditions, industry conditions, the competitive environment, changes in the market for our products and services, regulatory and political developments, entity specific factors such as strategy and changes in key personnel and overall financial performance. If, after completing this assessment, it is determined that it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying value, we proceed to a quantitative impairment test.
Quantitative testing first requires a comparison of the fair value of each reporting unit to the carrying value. We use the discounted cash flow method to estimate the fair value of each of our reporting units. The discounted cash flow method incorporates various assumptions, the most significant being projected sales growth rates, operating profit margins and cash flows, the terminal growth rate and the discount rate. Management projects sales growth rates, operating margins and cash flows based on each reporting unit’s current business, expected developments and operational strategies. If the carrying value of the reporting unit exceeds its fair value, goodwill is considered impaired and any loss must be measured. Goodwill impairment is measured as the amount by which a reporting unit's carrying value exceeds its fair value, not to exceed the carrying value of goodwill.
We performed quantitative assessments for the nine reporting units which had goodwill as of the first day of the fourth quarter and concluded that it is more likely than not that their fair values exceed their carrying values. Based on our quantitative assessments of our reporting units, we concluded that goodwill was not impaired in 2018.
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Amortized Intangible Asset Impairment Testing
Amortizable intangible assets with a carrying value of $133.4 million at December 31, 2018 and $153.5 million at December 31, 2017 are amortized over their assigned useful lives. We test these long-lived assets for impairment when events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of those assets may not be recoverable. The recoverability test consists of comparing the projected undiscounted cash flows associated with the asset to its carrying amount. An impairment loss would then be recognized for the carrying amount in excess of its fair value. There were no impairment charges in 2018, 2017 or 2016.
Depreciable Asset Impairment Testing
Property, plant and equipment with a carrying value of $120.9 million at December 31, 2018 and $125.8 million at December 31, 2017 are depreciated over their assigned useful lives. We test these long-lived assets for impairment when events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of those assets may not be recoverable. The recoverability test consists of comparing the projected undiscounted cash flows, with its carrying amount. An impairment loss would then be recognized for the carrying amount in excess of its fair value. There were no impairment charges in 2018, 2017 or 2016.
Inventory Valuation
We record valuation reserves to provide for excess, slow moving or obsolete inventory or to reduce inventory to the lower of cost or net realizable value. In determining the appropriate reserve, management considers the age of inventory on hand, the overall inventory levels in relation to forecasted demands as well as reserving for specifically identified inventory that we believe is no longer salable. At December 31, 2018, our reserve for inventory valuation was $20.8 million, or 12.0% of gross inventory, inclusive of inventory and its associated reserves held for sale. At December 31, 2017, our reserve for inventory valuation was $18.0 million, or 10.7% of gross inventory.
Acquisitions
The Company accounts for its acquisitions under ASC Topic 805, Business Combinations and Reorganizations (“ASC Topic 805”). ASC Topic 805 provides guidance on how the acquirer recognizes and measures the consideration transferred, identifiable assets acquired, liabilities assumed, non-controlling interests, and goodwill acquired in a business combination. ASC Topic 805 also expands required disclosures surrounding the nature and financial effects of business combinations. Acquisition costs are expensed as incurred. Acquisition related expenses were insignificant in 2018, $0.3 million in 2017, and insignificant in 2016.
When the Company acquires a business, we allocate the purchase price to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed in the transaction at their respective estimated fair values. We record any premium over the fair value of net assets acquired as goodwill. The allocation of the purchase price involves judgments and estimates both in characterizing the assets and in determining their fair value. The way we characterize the assets has important implications, as long-lived assets with definitive lives, for example, are depreciated or amortized, whereas goodwill is tested annually for impairment, as explained previously. With respect to determining the fair value of assets, the most subjective estimates involve valuations of long-lived assets, such as property, plant, and equipment as well as identified intangible assets. We use all available information to make these fair value determinations and engage independent valuation specialists to assist in the fair value determination of the acquired long-lived assets. The fair values of long-lived assets are determined using valuation techniques that use discounted cash flow methods, independent market appraisals and other acceptable valuation techniques.
With respect to determining the fair value of the purchase price, the most subjective estimates involve valuations of contingent consideration. Significant judgment is necessary to determine the fair value of the purchase price when the transaction includes an earn-out provision. We engage valuation specialists to assist in the determination of the fair value of contingent consideration. Key assumptions used to value the contingent consideration include future projections and discount rates.
See Note 20 in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data, regarding the acquisitions in 2017.
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CONSOLIDATED RESULTS OF OPERATIONS AND OUTLOOK
(In thousands, except percentages)
20182017 (1)2016
Sales$803,256 $624,464 $633,123 
Gross Margin22.5 %22.0 %25.2 %
Impairment Loss$— $16,237 $— 
SG&A Expenses as a Percentage of Sales14.6 %14.2 %13.4 %
Interest Expense$9,710 $5,369 $4,354 
Effective Tax Rate10.5 %21.3 %29.6 %
Net Income$46,803 $19,679 $48,424 
(1) Our results of operations for 2017 include the operations of CCC, beginning April 3, 2017, and the operations of CSC,  beginning December 1, 2017 (collectively, the “Acquired Businesses”). 
A discussion by segment can be found at “Segment Results of Operations and Outlook” in this MD&A.
CONSOLIDATED OVERVIEW OF OPERATIONS
2018 Compared With 2017 
Consolidated sales were $803.3 million, up 28.6%, or $178.8 million, from the same period last year. Organic sales increased $94.0 million, or 15.0%. Acquired sales for 2018 were $84.8 million and all related to the Aerospace segment. Aerospace segment sales of $675.6 million were up 26.4%, or $141.0 million, and Test Systems segment sales were up 42.0% to $127.6 million.
Consolidated cost of products sold increased $135.2 million to $622.6 million in 2018 from $487.4 million in the prior year. The increase was due primarily to the cost associated with the higher organic sales volume, coupled with the cost of products sold related to the Acquired Businesses.
Selling, general and administrative (“SG&A”) expenses were $117.0 million, or 14.6% or sales, compared with $88.8 million, or 14.2% of sales, for the prior year period. The $28.3 million increase was due primarily to the incremental SG&A costs of the Acquired Businesses, which added $20.9 million. This included $7.4 million of incremental intangible asset amortization expense in 2018. Corporate overhead expenses increased $2.6 million due primarily to increased staffing and infrastructure development.
Interest expense increased in 2018 compared to 2017 due primarily to increased average debt levels.
2017 Compared With 2016 
Consolidated sales for 2017 decreased by $8.7 million, or 1.4%, to $624.5 million. Aerospace segment sales of $534.6 million were consistent with 2016 sales of $534.0 million, while Test Systems segment sales were down 9.3% to $89.9 million. Sales from the Acquired Businesses contributed $15.5 million in 2017.
Consolidated cost of products sold increased $13.7 million to $487.4 million in 2017 from $473.7 million in the prior year. The increase was due primarily to the incremental cost of products sold associated with the Acquired Businesses of $19.8 million, and increased E&D costs offset by lower organic sales volume. E&D costs increased 6.8% to $95.0 million in 2017 primarily due to the Acquired Businesses, compared with $88.9 million in 2016. The incremental E&D costs of the Acquired Businesses totaled $5.7 million. As a percent of sales, E&D was 15.2% and 14.0% in 2017 and 2016, respectively.
SG&A expenses increased $4.2 million in 2017 compared with 2016. As a percent of sales, SG&A expenses were 14.2% and 13.4% for 2017 and 2016, respectively. The increase was due primarily to the incremental SG&A costs of the Acquired Businesses of $4.6 million, which included $1.8 million of intangible asset amortization expense.
Interest expense decreased in 2017 compared to 2016 due to decreased debt levels.
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Income Taxes
Our effective tax rates for 2018, 2017 and 2016 were 10.5%, 21.3% and 29.6%, respectively. Our tax rate is affected by recurring items, such as tax rates in foreign jurisdictions and the relative amount of income we earn in those jurisdictions, which we expect to be fairly consistent in the near term. It is also affected by discrete items that may occur in any given year, but are not consistent from year to year. In addition to state income taxes, the following items had the most significant impact on the difference between our statutory U.S. federal income tax rate (21% in 2018 and 35% in 2017 and 2016) and our effective tax rate:
2018:
1.Recognition of approximately $3.2 million of 2018 U.S. R&D tax credits.
2017:
1.Recognition of approximately $2.9 million of 2017 U.S. R&D tax credits.
2.Permanent differences, primarily the impact of the Domestic Production Activities Deduction.
3.Provisional amounts related to the Federal tax expense on deemed repatriation of foreign earnings ($1.3 million), partially offset by revaluation of the deferred tax balances ($0.9 million) as a result of a reduction in the Federal tax rate from tax law changes enacted in 2017.
2016:
1.Recognition of approximately $2.6 million of 2016 U.S. R&D tax credits.
2.Permanent differences, primarily the impact of the Domestic Production Activities Deduction.
2019 Outlook
Consolidated sales in 2019 are expected to be in the range of $760 million to $805 million. Excluding sales of the disposed semiconductor business from 2018 sales, the mid-point of the range represents consolidated organic growth of 8%. Approximately $710 million to $745 million is expected from the Aerospace segment, an increase at the mid-point of about 8% over 2018. Test Systems segment sales for 2019 are expected to be in the range of $50 million to $60 million, the mid-point representing an increase of 14% over Test Systems sales in 2018 after backing out the disposed semiconductor business.
On February 13, 2019, Astronics completed the sale of its semiconductor test business. The Company expects to record a pre-tax gain on the sale of approximately $80 million in the first quarter of 2019. The income tax expense relating to the gain is estimated to be $22 million.
At December 31, 2018, our consolidated backlog was $416 million. Excluding backlog related to the divested semiconductor business, our backlog was $403 million at December 31, 2018. At December 31, 2017, our backlog was $394 million. Backlog in the Aerospace segment was $326 million at December 31, 2018, of which $306 million is expected to be realized in 2019. Backlog in the Test Systems segment, exclusive of the backlog associated with the divested semiconductor business, was $77 million at December 31, 2018, of which $46 million is expected to be realized in 2019.
The effective tax rate for 2019, excluding the impact of the gain on the sale of the semiconductor business, is expected to be approximately 18% to 22%.
Capital equipment spending in 2019 is expected to be in the range of $22.0 million to $28.0 million.
SEGMENT RESULTS OF OPERATIONS AND OUTLOOK
Operating profit, as presented below, is sales less cost of products sold and other operating expenses excluding interest expense, corporate expenses and other non-operating sales and expenses. Cost of products sold and operating expenses are directly attributable to the respective segment. Operating profit is reconciled to earnings before income taxes in Note 19 of Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data, of this report.
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AEROSPACE SEGMENT 
(In thousands, except percentages)201820172016
Sales$675,625 $534,603 $534,041 
Operating Profit$69,761 $38,888 $77,966 
Operating Margin10.3 %7.3 %14.6 %

20182017 
Total Assets$647,870 $621,047 
Backlog$326,047 $298,604 

Sales by Market 201820172016
Commercial Transport$536,269 $414,523 $435,552 
Military68,138 61,270 54,556 
Business Jet43,090 41,298 25,407 
Other28,128 17,512 18,526 
Total$675,625 $534,603 $534,041 

Sales by Product Line201820172016
Electrical Power & Motion$303,180 $264,286 $288,465 
Lighting & Safety174,383 158,663 156,871 
Avionics131,849 53,960 32,761 
Systems Certification13,951 14,333 16,531 
Structures24,134 25,849 20,887 
Other28,128 17,512 18,526 
Total$675,625 $534,603 $534,041 
2018 Compared With 2017 
Aerospace segment sales increased by $141.0 million, or 26.4%, to $675.6 million, when compared with the prior-year period of $534.6 million. Organic sales increased $56.2 million, or 10.5%, to $590.8 million, while acquired sales were $84.8 million.
Avionics sales increased by $77.9 million, driven primarily by the acquisitions, which contributed incremental sales of $72.5 million.  Electrical Power & Motion sales increased $38.9 million, or 14.7%, due to higher sales of in-seat power and seat motion products. Lighting & Safety sales increased $15.7 million due to a general increase in volume. Sales of Other products were up $10.6 million, due to the CSC business. The increases were slightly offset by a decrease in Structures sales of $1.7 million.
Aerospace operating profit for 2018 was $69.8 million, or 10.3% of sales, compared with $38.9 million, or 7.3% of sales, in the same period of 2017. Aerospace operating profit benefited from higher organic sales and profits of CSC, offset partially by increased operating losses of CCC, AeroSat and Armstrong which improved by $3.8 million to $34.7 million compared with the prior year, excluding Armstrong’s 2017 goodwill impairment charge. For the year, intangible asset amortization expense was $9.2 million related to the Acquired Businesses. Operating profit in the prior year was negatively impacted by the $16.2 million impairment at Armstrong.
2017 Compared With 2016 
Aerospace segment sales increased by $0.6 million, or 0.1%, to $534.6 million, when compared with the prior year, primarily due to the addition of the Acquired Businesses which added $15.5 million.
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Electrical Power & Motion sales decreased $24.2 million, or 8.4%, due to lower sales of cabin power products due to a combination of lower volume and pricing. Systems Certifications sales decreased $2.2 million and Other products decreased $1.0 million from lower project activity. These declines were offset by increased Avionics sales, up $21.2 million of which $15.0 million was from the Acquired Businesses and $5.3 million was from increased sales of databus and in-flight entertainment systems. Structures sales increased by $5.0 million.
Aerospace operating profit for 2017 was $38.9 million, or 7.3% of sales, compared with $78.0 million, or 14.6% of sales, in the same period last year. Aerospace operating profit was negatively impacted by lower sales volume and market pricing pressures primarily related to cabin power products, coupled with the $16.2 million goodwill impairment at Armstrong and an operating loss of $8.4 million from CCC. E&D costs for Aerospace were $85.3 million (inclusive of $5.6 million related to the Acquired Businesses) and $78.5 million in 2017 and 2016, respectively.
2019 Outlook for Aerospace – We expect 2019 Aerospace segment sales to be in the range of $710 million to $745 million. The Aerospace segment’s backlog at December 31, 2018 was $326 million, compared to $299 million at December 31, 2017. Approximately $306 million of the backlog at December 31, 2018 is expected to be shipped over the next 12 months.
TEST SYSTEMS SEGMENT 
(In thousands, except percentages)201820172016
Sales$127,631 $89,861 $99,082 
Operating Profit$10,718 $7,359 $8,507 
Operating Margin8.4 %8.2 %8.6 %

 2018 (1)2017 
Total Assets$97,056 $90,859 
Backlog$89,470 $95,086 
(1) $89.5 million backlog includes $12.2 million related to the divested semiconductor business.
Sales by Market201820172016
Semiconductor$84,254 $31,999 $37,939 
Aerospace & Defense43,377 57,862 61,143 
Total$127,631 $89,861 $99,082 
2018 Compared With 2017 
Sales in 2018 increased 42.0% to $127.6 million compared with sales of $89.9 million for 2017. The growth was driven by a $52.3 million increase in sales to the Semiconductor market, offset by a decrease in Aerospace & Defense sales of $14.5 million.
Operating profit was $10.7 million, or 8.4% of sales, compared with $7.4 million, or 8.2% of sales, in 2017. This was primarily due to increased sales volume partially offset by approximately $2.0 million in increased engineering costs and elevated initial costs associated with new products.
2017 Compared With 2016 
Sales in 2017 decreased 9.3% to $89.9 million compared with sales of $99.1 million for 2016, due to lower shipments to both the Semiconductor and Aerospace & Defense markets. Sales to the Semiconductor market decreased $5.9 million and sales to the Aerospace & Defense market decreased $3.3 million compared with 2016. 
Operating profit was $7.4 million, or 8.2% of sales, compared with $8.5 million, or 8.6% of sales, in 2016. This is primarily due to decreased sales volume. E&D costs were $9.7 million in 2017, compared with $10.4 million in 2016.

2019 Outlook for Test Systems – We expect 2019 Test System segment sales to be in the range of $50 million to $60 million. The Test System segment’s backlog at December 31, 2018, excluding backlog related to the divested semiconductor business, was $77 million, compared with $95 million at December 31, 2017. Approximately $46 million in backlog is expected to ship in 2019.
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OFF BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS
We do not have material off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a material future effect on our results of operations or financial condition.
CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS
The following table represents contractual obligations as of December 31, 2018:
 Payments Due by Period
(In thousands)Total20192020-20212022-2023After 2023
Long-term Debt$233,982 $1,870 $4,200 $227,912 $— 
Purchase Obligations155,022 141,747 13,275 — — 
Interest on Long-term Debt36,326 8,980 17,663 9,683 — 
Supplemental Retirement Plan and Post Retirement Obligations23,106 418 827 798 21,063 
Operating Leases23,225 4,717 7,584 5,650 5,274 
Other Long-term Liabilities115 10 25 32 48 
Total Contractual Obligations$471,776 $157,742 $43,574 $244,075 $26,385 
Notes to Contractual Obligations Table
Long-term Debt — See Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data, Note 8, Long-Term Debt and Note Payable in this report. The timing of the payments above consider the amendment to the revolving credit facility as discussed in Note 8.
Interest on Long-term Debt — Future interest payments have been calculated using the applicable interest rate of each debt facility based on actual borrowings as of December 31, 2018. Actual future borrowings and rates may differ from these estimates.
Purchase Obligations — Purchase obligations are comprised of the Company’s commitments for goods and services in the normal course of business.
Operating Leases — Operating lease obligations are primarily related to facility leases for AES, AeroSat, Armstrong, ATS, Ballard, CCC, CSC, and LSI Canada.
LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES
(In thousands)201820172016
Net cash provided (used) by:
Operating Activities$54,881 $37,783 $48,854 
Investing Activities$(19,667)$(129,561)$(14,622)
Financing Activities$(36,134)$91,425 $(34,806)
Our cash flow from operations and available borrowing capacity provide us with the financial resources needed to run our operations and reinvest in our business.
Operating Activities
Cash provided by operating activities was $54.9 million in 2018 compared with $37.8 million in 2017. The increase of $17.1 million in 2018 was primarily a result of increased net income in 2018 when compared with 2017, offset with a change in net operating assets.
Cash provided by operating activities was $37.8 million in 2017 compared with $48.9 million in 2016. The decrease of $11.1 million in 2017 was primarily a result of decreased net income and net operating assets in 2017 when compared with 2016.
Cash provided by operating activities was $48.9 million in 2016 compared with $78.5 million in 2015. The decrease of $29.6 million in 2016 was primarily a result of decreased net income and net operating assets in 2016 when compared with 2015, partially offset by an increased deferred income tax benefit in 2016.
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Our cash flows from operations are primarily dependent on our net income adjusted for non-cash expenses and the timing of collections of receivables, level of inventory and payments to suppliers and employees. Sales and operating results of our Aerospace segment are influenced by the build rates of new aircraft, which are subject to general economic conditions, airline passenger travel and spending for government and military programs. Our Test Systems segment sales depends in part on capital expenditures of the aerospace & defense industry which, in turn, depend on current and future demand for those products. A reduction in demand for our customers’ products would adversely affect our operating results and cash flows.
Investing Activities
Cash used for investing activities in 2018 was $19.7 million, primarily related to purchases of property, plant, and equipment (“PP&E”) of $16.3 million.
Cash used for investing activities in 2017 was $129.6 million, primarily related to the acquisitions of CCC and CSC of $114.0 million and purchases of PP&E of $13.5 million.
Cash used for investing activities in 2016 was $14.6 million, primarily related to purchases of PP&E of $13.0 million.
Our expectation for 2019 is that we will invest between $22.0 million and $28.0 million for PP&E. Future requirements for PP&E depend on numerous factors, including expansion of existing product lines and introduction of new products. Management believes that our cash flow from operations and current borrowing arrangements will provide for these capital expenditures. We expect to continue to evaluate acquisition opportunities in the future.
Financing Activities
Our ability to maintain sufficient liquidity is highly dependent upon achieving expected operating results. Failure to achieve expected operating results could have a material adverse effect on our liquidity, our ability to obtain financing, and our operations in the future.
On February 24, 2016, the Company’s Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $50 million of common stock (the “Buyback Program”). The Buyback Program allowed the Company to purchase shares of its common stock in accordance with applicable securities laws on the open market or through privately negotiated transactions. The Company has repurchased approximately 1,675,000 shares and has completed that program. On December 12, 2017, the Company’s Board of Directors authorized an additional repurchase of up to $50 million of common stock. No amounts have been repurchased under the new program as of December 31, 2018.
The Company's Fourth Amended and Restated Credit Agreement (the “Original Facility”) provided for a $350 million revolving credit line with the option to increase the line by up to $150 million. The maturity date of the Original Facility was January 13, 2021. On February 16, 2018, the Company modified and extended the Original Facility by entering into the Fifth Amended and Restated Credit Agreement (the “Agreement”), which provides for a $500 million revolving credit line with the option to increase the line by up to $150 million. A new lender was added to the facility as well. The outstanding balance of the Original Facility were rolled into the Agreement on the date of closing. The maturity date of the loans under the Agreement is February 16, 2023. At December 31, 2018, there was $227.0 million outstanding on the revolving credit facility and there remains $271.9 million available, net of outstanding letters of credit. The credit facility allocates up to $20 million of the $500 million revolving credit line for the issuance of letters of credit, including certain existing letters of credit. At December 31, 2018, outstanding letters of credit totaled $1.1 million. 
The maximum permitted leverage ratio of funded debt to Adjusted EBITDA (as defined in the Agreement) was 3.75 to 1, increasing to 4.50 to 1 for up to four fiscal quarters following the closing of an acquisition permitted under the Agreement, subject to limitations. The Company's leverage ratio was 2.04 to 1 at December 31, 2018. The Company will pay interest on the unpaid principal amount of the facility at a rate equal to one-, three- or six-month LIBOR plus between 1.00% and 1.50% based upon the Company’s leverage ratio. The Company will also pay a commitment fee to the Lenders in an amount equal to between 0.10% and 0.20% on the undrawn portion of the credit facility, based upon the Company’s leverage ratio.
The Company’s obligations under the Credit Agreement as amended are jointly and severally guaranteed by each domestic subsidiary of the Company other than a non-material subsidiary. The obligations are secured by a first priority lien on substantially all of the Company’s and the guarantors’ assets.
In the event of voluntary or involuntary bankruptcy of the Company or any subsidiary, all unpaid principal and other amounts owing under the Credit Agreement automatically become due and payable. Other events of default, such as failure to make payments as they become due and breach of financial and other covenants, change of control, judgments over a certain amount, and cross default under other agreements give the Agent the option to declare all such amounts immediately due and payable.
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The primary financing activities in 2018 related to net repayments on our senior facility of $35.0 million. The primary financing activities in 2017 related to net borrowings on our senior facility of $126.0 million and $32.4 million in share repurchases under our original Buyback Program, using cash generated from operations. The primary financing activities in 2016 related to net payments on our senior facility of $19.0 million and $17.6 million in share repurchases under our original Buyback Program, using cash generated from operations.
The Company’s cash needs for working capital, debt service, capital equipment, and acquisition opportunities during 2019 is expected to be met by cash flows from operations and cash balances and, if necessary, utilization of the revolving credit facility.
DIVIDENDS
Management believes that it should retain the capital generated from operating activities for investment in advancing technologies, acquisitions and debt retirement. Accordingly, there are no plans to institute a cash dividend program.
BACKLOG
At December 31, 2018, our consolidated backlog was $416 million. Excluding backlog related to the divested semiconductor business, our backlog was $403 million at December 31, 2018. At December 31, 2017, our backlog was $394 million. Backlog in the Aerospace segment was $326 million at December 31, 2018, of which $306 million is expected to be realized in 2019. Backlog in the Test Systems segment, exclusive of the backlog associated with the divested semiconductor business, was $77 million at December 31, 2018, of which $46 million is expected to be realized in 2019.
RELATED-PARTY TRANSACTIONS
Information regarding certain relationships and related transactions is incorporated herein by reference to the information included in the Company’s 2019 Proxy Statement which will be filed with the Commission within 120 days after the end of the Company’s 2018 fiscal year.
RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS
See Note 1 of the Consolidated Financial Statements at Item 8 of this report.
ITEM 7A.  QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
The Company has limited exposure to fluctuation in Canadian and Euro currency exchange rates to the U.S. dollar. Over 90% of the Company’s consolidated sales are transacted in U.S. dollars. Net assets held in or measured in Canadian dollars amounted to $9.8 million at December 31, 2018. Annual disbursements transacted in Canadian dollars were approximately $14.7 million in 2018. A 10% change in the value of the U.S. dollar versus the Canadian dollar would have had a $0.4 million impact to 2018 net income; however it could be significant in the future. Net assets held in or measured in Euros amounted to $35.2 million at December 31, 2018. Disbursements transacted in Euros in 2018 were approximately $45.1 million. A 10% change in the value of the U.S. dollar versus the Euros would have had a $0.1 million impact to 2018 net income; however it could be significant in the future. Risk due to fluctuation in interest rates is a function of the Company’s floating rate debt obligations, which total approximately $227.0 million at December 31, 2018. A change of 1% in interest rates of all variable rate debt would impact annual net income by approximately $2.3 million, before income taxes.
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ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
To the Shareholders and Board of Directors of Astronics Corporation
Opinion on the Financial Statements
We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Astronics Corporation (the Company) as of December 31, 2018 and 2017, the related consolidated statements of operations, comprehensive income, cash flows, and shareholders’ equity for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2018, and the related notes and financial statement schedule listed in the Index at Item 15(a)(2) (collectively referred to as the “consolidated financial statements”). In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company at December 31, 2018 and 2017, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2018, in conformity with US generally accepted accounting principles.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB), the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2018, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (2013 framework) and our report dated February 28, 2019 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.
Adoption of ASU No. 2014-09
As discussed in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company changed its method for recognizing revenue as a result of the adoption of Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), and the amendments in ASUs 2015-14, 2016-08, 2016-10 and 2016-12, effective January 1, 2018.
Basis for Opinion
These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the PCAOB and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
/s/ Ernst & Young LLP
We have served as the Company's auditor since 1992.
Buffalo, New York
February 28, 2019 
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MANAGEMENT’S REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING
Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Rule 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) of the Exchange Act. Under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, we conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2018 based upon the framework in Internal Control – Integrated Framework originally issued in 2013 by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). Based on that evaluation, our management concluded that our internal control over financial reporting is effective as of December 31, 2018.
Ernst & Young LLP, independent registered public accounting firm, has audited our consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and, as part of their audit, has issued their report, included herein, on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting.
By:/s/ Peter J. GundermannFebruary 28, 2019
Peter J. Gundermann
President & Chief Executive Officer
(Principal Executive Officer)
/s/ David C. BurneyFebruary 28, 2019
David C. Burney
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
(Principal Financial Officer)

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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
To the Shareholders and Board of Directors of Astronics Corporation
Opinion on Internal Control over Financial Reporting
We have audited Astronics Corporation’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2018, based on criteria established in Internal Control–Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (2013 framework) (the COSO criteria).  In our opinion, Astronics Corporation (the Company) maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2018, based on the COSO criteria.

We have also audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB), the consolidated balance sheets of the Company as of December 31, 2018 and 2017, the related consolidated statements of operations, comprehensive income, cash flows, and shareholders’ equity for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2018, and the related notes and financial statement schedule listed in the Index at Item 15(a)(2) and our report dated February 28, 2019 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.
Basis for Opinion
The Company’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting included in the accompanying Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting.  Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit. We are a public accounting firm registered with the PCAOB and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.
We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects.
Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
Definition and Limitations of Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
/s/ Ernst & Young LLP
Buffalo, New York
February 28, 2019 
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ASTRONICS CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
 Year Ended December 31,
(In thousands, except per share data)201820172016
Sales$803,256 $624,464 $633,123 
Cost of Products Sold622,560 487,351 473,656 
Gross Profit180,696 137,113 159,467 
Impairment Loss 16,237  
Selling, General and Administrative Expenses117,033 88,775 84,585 
Income from Operations63,663 32,101 74,882 
Other Expense, Net of Other Income1,671 1,741 1,743 
Interest Expense, Net of Interest Income9,710 5,369 4,354 
Income Before Income Taxes52,282 24,991 68,785 
Provision for Income Taxes5,479 5,312 20,361 
Net Income$46,803 $19,679 $48,424 
Basic Earnings Per Share$1.45 $0.60 $1.44 
Diluted Earnings Per Share$1.41 $0.58 $1.40 
See notes to consolidated financial statements.
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ASTRONICS CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
 Year Ended December 31,
(In thousands)201820172016
Net Income$46,803 $19,679 $48,424 
Other Comprehensive Income (Loss):
Foreign Currency Translation Adjustments(2,691)4,132 (626)
Retirement Liability Adjustment – Net of Tax4,087 (1,990)196 
Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)1,396 2,142 (430)
Comprehensive Income$48,199 $21,821 $47,994 
See notes to consolidated financial statements.
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ASTRONICS CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
 December 31,
(In thousands, except share and per share data)20182017
ASSETS
Current Assets:
Cash and Cash Equivalents$16,622 $17,914 
Accounts Receivable, Net of Allowance for Doubtful Accounts182,308 132,633 
Inventories138,685 150,196 
Prepaid Expenses and Other Current Assets17,198 14,586 
Assets Held for Sale19,358  
Total Current Assets374,171 315,329 
Property, Plant and Equipment, Net of Accumulated Depreciation
120,862 125,830 
Other Assets21,272 15,659 
Intangible Assets, Net of Accumulated Amortization133,383 153,493 
Goodwill124,952 125,645 
Total Assets$774,640 $735,956 
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Current Liabilities:
Current Maturities of Long-term Debt$1,870 $2,689 
Accounts Payable50,664 41,846 
Accrued Payroll and Employee Benefits31,732 24,890 
Accrued Income Taxes312 261 
Other Accrued Expenses15,728 13,598 
Customer Advanced Payments and Deferred Revenue26,880 19,607 
Liabilities Held for Sale906  
Total Current Liabilities128,092 102,891 
Long-term Debt232,112 269,078 
Supplemental Retirement Plan and Other Liabilities for Pension Benefits22,689 26,030 
Other Liabilities1,923 2,909 
Deferred Income Taxes3,199 5,121 
Total Liabilities388,015 406,029 
Shareholders’ Equity:
Common Stock, $.01 par value, Authorized 40,000,000 Shares
25,978,037 Shares Issued and 24,303,323 Outstanding at December 31, 2018
22,860,742 Shares Issued and 21,186,028 Outstanding at December 31, 2017
260 229 
Convertible Class B Stock, $.01 par value, Authorized 15,000,000 Shares
8,289,794 Shares Issued and Outstanding at December 31, 2018
11,083,060 Shares Issued and Outstanding at December 31, 2017
83 111 
Additional Paid-in Capital73,044 67,748 
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss(13,329)(13,352)
Retained Earnings376,567 325,191 
Treasury Stock; 1,674,714 Shares at December 31, 2018, 1,674,714 Shares at December 31, 2017 (50,000)(50,000)
Total Shareholders’ Equity386,625 329,927 
Total Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity$774,640 $735,956 
See notes to consolidated financial statements.
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ASTRONICS CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
 Year Ended December 31,
(In thousands)201820172016
Cash Flows from Operating Activities
Net Income$46,803 $19,679 $48,424 
Adjustments to Reconcile Net Income to Cash Provided By Operating Activities, Excluding the Effects of Acquisitions:
Depreciation and Amortization35,032 27,063 25,790 
Provision for Non-Cash Losses on Inventory and Receivables3,271 2,973 2,404 
Equity-based Compensation Expense3,098 2,598 2,281 
Deferred Tax Benefit(2,680)(5,494)(4,756)
Impairment Loss 16,237  
Other(668)(937)165 
Cash Flows from Changes in Operating Assets and Liabilities, net of the Effects from Acquisitions of Businesses:
Accounts Receivable(47,291)(9,844)(14,622)
Inventories(14,695)(18,116)(2,671)
Prepaid Expenses and Other Current Assets464 (2,132)108 
Accounts Payable9,171 10,439 (2,000)
Accrued Expenses9,177 (702)(174)
Income Taxes Payable(4,460)(376)7,926 
Customer Advanced Payments and Deferred Revenue15,735 (4,918)(15,539)
Supplemental Retirement Plan and Other Liabilities1,924 1,313 1,518 
Cash Provided By Operating Activities54,881 37,783 48,854 
Cash Flows from Investing Activities
Acquisitions of Business, Net of Cash Acquired (114,039) 
Capital Expenditures(16,317)(13,478)(13,037)
Other(3,350)(2,044)(1,585)
Cash Used For Investing Activities(19,667)(129,561)(14,622)
Cash Flows from Financing Activities
Proceeds From Long-term Debt35,015 147,086 20,000 
Principal Payments on Long-term Debt