Company Quick10K Filing
Quick10K
AXA Equitable Life Insurance
10-K 2018-12-31 Annual: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-09-30 Quarter: 2018-09-30
10-Q 2018-06-30 Quarter: 2018-06-30
10-Q 2018-03-31 Quarter: 2018-03-31
10-K 2017-12-31 Annual: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-09-30 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-Q 2017-06-30 Quarter: 2017-06-30
10-Q 2017-03-31 Quarter: 2017-03-31
10-K 2016-12-31 Annual: 2016-12-31
10-Q 2016-09-30 Quarter: 2016-09-30
10-Q 2016-06-30 Quarter: 2016-06-30
10-Q 2016-03-31 Quarter: 2016-03-31
10-K 2015-12-31 Annual: 2015-12-31
10-Q 2015-09-30 Quarter: 2015-09-30
10-Q 2015-06-30 Quarter: 2015-06-30
10-Q 2015-03-31 Quarter: 2015-03-31
10-K 2014-12-31 Annual: 2014-12-31
10-Q 2014-09-30 Quarter: 2014-09-30
10-Q 2014-06-30 Quarter: 2014-06-30
10-Q 2014-03-31 Quarter: 2014-03-31
10-K 2013-12-31 Annual: 2013-12-31
8-K 2018-12-31 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
NS NuStar Energy 2,990
GTY Getty Realty 1,300
NP Neenah 1,120
ATNI ATN 935
OOMA Ooma 278
VRME Verifyme 0
SGLDF Shoal Games 0
FVTI Fortune Valley Treasures 0
LAZEX Lazex 0
FSAC Federal Street Acquisition 0
AXAEQ 2018-12-31
Part I, Item 1.
Part I, Item 1A.
Part I, Item 1B.
Part I, Item 2.
Part I, Item 3.
Part I, Item 4.
Part Ii, Item 5.
Part Ii, Item 6.
Part Ii, Item 7.
Part Ii, Item 8.
Part Ii, Item 9.
Part Ii, Item 9A
Part Ii, Item 9B.
Part Iii, Item 10.
Part Iii, Item 11.
Part Iii, Item 12.
Part Iii, Item 13.
Part Iii, Item 14.
Part Iv, Item 15.
Part Iv, Item 16.
EX-23.1 axaeq-123118x10kxexhibit231.htm
EX-31.1 axaeq-123118xexhibit311.htm
EX-31.2 axaeq-123118xexhibit312.htm
EX-32.1 axaeq-123118xexhibit321.htm
EX-32.2 axaeq-123118xexhibit322.htm

AXA Equitable Life Insurance Earnings 2018-12-31

AXAEQ 10K Annual Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

10-K 1 ael201810-k.htm 10-K Document

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549  
 
FORM 10-K
 
(Mark One)
x
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018 
OR
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from              to             

Commission File No. 000-20501
 
AXA EQUITABLE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

New York
 
13-5570651
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
1290 Avenue of the Americas, New York, New York
 
10104
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
(212) 554-1234
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: None
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  Yes ¨    No  x
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ¨    No  x
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an “emerging growth company”. See definition of “accelerated filer,” “large accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer
¨

Accelerated filer
¨
Non-accelerated filer
x
Smaller reporting company
¨
Emerging growth company
¨
 
 
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13 (a) of the Exchange Act.
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ¨ No x
As of March 28, 2019, 2,000,000 shares of the registrant’s $1.25 par value Common Stock were outstanding, all of which were owned indirectly by AXA Equitable Holdings, Inc.
REDUCED DISCLOSURE FORMAT
AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company meets the conditions set forth in General Instruction (I)(1)(a) and (b) of Form 10-K and is therefore filing this Form with the reduced disclosure format.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
None.



TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
Page
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
Certain of the statements included or incorporated by reference in this Annual Report on Form 10-K constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Words such as “expects,” “believes,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “seeks,” “aims,” “plans,” “assumes,” “estimates,” “projects,” “should,” “would,” “could,” “may,” “will,” “shall” or variations of such words are generally part of forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are made based on management’s current expectations and beliefs concerning future developments and their potential effects upon AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company (“AXA Equitable”) and its consolidated subsidiaries. “We,” “us” and “our” refer to AXA Equitable and its consolidated subsidiaries, unless the context refers only to AXA Equitable as a corporate entity. There can be no assurance that future developments affecting AXA Equitable will be those anticipated by management. Forward-looking statements include, without limitation, all matters that are not historical facts.
These forward-looking statements are not a guarantee of future performance and involve risks and uncertainties, and there are certain important factors that could cause actual results to differ, possibly materially, from expectations or estimates reflected in such forward-looking statements, including, among others: (i) conditions in the financial markets and economy, including equity market declines and volatility, interest rate fluctuations and changes in liquidity and access to and cost of capital; (ii) operational factors, remediation of our material weaknesses, indebtedness, elements of our business strategy not being effective in accomplishing our objectives, protection of confidential customer information or proprietary business information, information systems failing or being compromised and strong industry competition; (iii) credit, counterparties and investments, including counterparty default on derivative contracts, failure of financial institutions, defaults, errors or omissions by third parties and affiliates and gross unrealized losses on fixed maturity and equity securities; (iv) our reinsurance and hedging programs; (v) our products, structure and product distribution, including variable annuity guaranteed benefits features within certain of our products, complex regulation and administration of our products, variations in statutory capital requirements, financial strength and claims-paying ratings and key product distribution relationships; (vi) estimates, assumptions and valuations, including risk management policies and procedures, potential inadequacy of reserves, actual mortality, longevity and morbidity experience differing from pricing expectations or reserves, amortization of deferred acquisition costs and financial models; (vii) legal and regulatory risks, including federal and state legislation affecting financial institutions, insurance regulation and tax reform; and (viii) risks related to our separation and rebranding.
You should read this Annual Report on Form 10-K completely and with the understanding that actual future results may be materially different from expectations. All forward-looking statements made in this Annual Report on Form 10-K are qualified by these cautionary statements. Further, any forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date on which it is made, and we undertake no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after the date on which the statement is made or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events, except as otherwise may be required by law.
Other risks, uncertainties and factors, including those discussed under “Risk Factors,” could cause our actual results to differ materially from those projected in any forward-looking statements we make. Readers should read carefully the factors described in “Risk Factors” to better understand the risks and uncertainties inherent in our business and underlying any forward-looking statements.
CERTAIN IMPORTANT TERMS
As used in this Form 10-K, the term “AXA Equitable” refers to AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company, a New York stock life insurance corporation established in 1859. “We,” “our,” “us” and the “Company” refer to AXA Equitable and its consolidated subsidiaries, unless the context refers only to AXA Equitable. The term “Holdings” refers to AXA Equitable Holdings, Inc., a Delaware corporation. The term “AXA Distributors” refers to our subsidiary, AXA Distributors, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, “AXA Advisors” refers to our affiliate, AXA Advisors, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, “AXA Network” refers to our affiliate, AXA Network, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company and its subsidiary, “AXA Equitable FMG” refers to our subsidiary, AXA Equitable Funds Management Group, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, “AXA RE Arizona” refers to our affiliate, AXA RE Arizona Company, an Arizona corporation, and “EQ AZ Life Re” refers to our affiliate, EQ AZ Life Re Company, an Arizona corporation. The term “MONY America” refers to our affiliate, MONY Life Insurance Company of America, an Arizona life insurance corporation and wholly owned subsidiary of Holdings. The term “AXA” refers to AXA S.A., a société anonyme organized under the laws of France. The term “General Account” refers to the assets held in the general account of AXA Equitable and all of the investment assets held in certain of AXA Equitable’s separate accounts on which AXA Equitable bears the investment risk. The term “Separate Accounts” refers to the separate account investment assets of AXA Equitable excluding the assets held in those separate accounts on which AXA Equitable bears the investment risk.

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Part I, Item 1.
BUSINESS
GENERAL
We are one of America’s leading financial services companies, providing advice and solutions for helping Americans set and meet their retirement goals and protect and transfer their wealth across generations.
We are an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of Holdings. On May 14, 2018, Holdings completed the initial public offering (“Holdings IPO”) in which AXA sold shares of Holdings common stock to the public. On March 25, 2019, AXA completed a follow-on secondary offering of 46 million shares of common stock of Holdings and the sale to Holdings of 30 million shares common stock. Following the completion of this secondary offering and the share buyback by Holdings, AXA owns 48.3% of the shares of common stock of Holdings. As a result, Holdings is no longer a “controlled company” within the meaning of the corporate governance standards of the NYSE and is no longer a majority owned subsidiary of AXA.
RECENT DEVELOPMENTS
AllianceBernstein Transfer
In December 2018, we entered into a series of transactions whereby we transferred our ownership interests in AllianceBernstein L.P. (“ABLP”), AllianceBernstein Holding L.P. (“AB Holding” and together with ABLP, “AB”) and AllianceBernstein Corporation to a wholly-owned subsidiary of Holdings. For additional information, see Note 19 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
As a result of these transactions, we now operate as a single segment entity based on the manner in which we use financial information to evaluate business performance and to determine the allocation of resources.
GMxB Unwind
In April 2018, we completed an unwind of the reinsurance provided to the Company by AXA RE Arizona for certain variable annuities with GMxB features (the “GMxB Unwind”). Accordingly, all business previously reinsured to AXA RE Arizona, with the exception of variable annuities with GMxB riders issued on or after January 1, 2006 and in-force on September 30, 2008 (the “GMxB business”), was novated to EQ AZ Life Re, a newly formed captive insurance company organized under the laws of Arizona, which is an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of Holdings. Following the novation of this business to EQ AZ Life Re, AXA RE Arizona was merged with and into AXA Equitable. Following AXA RE Arizona’s merger with and into AXA Equitable, the GMxB business is not subject to any new internal or third-party reinsurance arrangements, though in the future AXA Equitable may reinsure the GMxB Business with third parties. See “Products — Individual Variable Annuities — Risk Management — Reinsurance — Captive Reinsurance” and Note 12 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further details of the GMxB Unwind.
PRODUCTS
We offer a variety of variable annuity products, term, variable and universal life insurance products, employee benefit products, and investment products including mutual funds, principally to individuals, small and medium-sized businesses and professional and trade associations. Our product approach is to ensure that design characteristics are attractive to both our customers and our company’s capital approach. We currently focus on products across our business that expose us to less market and customer behavior risk, are more easily hedged and, overall, are less capital intensive than many traditional products.
Individual Variable Annuities
We are a leading provider of individual variable annuity products, which are primarily sold to affluent and high net worth individuals saving for retirement or seeking guaranteed retirement income. We have a long history of innovation, as one of the

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first companies, in 1968, to enter the variable annuity market, as the first company, in 1996, to provide variable annuities with living benefits, and as the first company, in 2010, to bring to market an index-linked variable annuity product. We continue to innovate our offering, periodically updating our product benefits and introducing new variable annuity products to meet the evolving needs of our clients while managing the risk and return of these variable annuity products to our company. We sell our variable annuity products through AXA Advisors and a wide network of over 600 third-party firms, including banks, broker-dealers and insurance partners, reaching more than 100,000 advisors.
Variable Annuities Policy Feature Overview
Variable annuities allow the policyholder to make deposits into accounts offering variable investment options. For deposits allocated to Separate Accounts, the risks associated with the investment options are borne entirely by the policyholder, except where the policyholder elects guaranteed minimum death benefits (“GMDB”) and/or guaranteed minimum living benefits (“GMLB,” and together with GMDB, “GMxB features”) in certain variable annuities, for which additional fees are charged. Additionally, certain variable annuity products permit policyholders to allocate a portion of their account to investment options backed by the General Account and are credited with interest rates that we determine, subject to certain limitations.
Certain variable annuity products offer one or more GMxB features in addition to the standard return of premium death benefit guarantee. GMxB features (other than the return of premium death benefit guarantee) provide the policyholder a minimum return based on their initial deposit adjusted for withdrawals (i.e., the benefit base), thus guarding against a downturn in the markets. The rate of this return may increase the specified benefit base at a guaranteed minimum rate (i.e., a fixed roll-up rate) or may increase the benefit base at a rate tied to interest rates (i.e., a floating roll-up rate). GMxB riders must be chosen by the policyholder no later than at the issuance of the contract.
GMLBs principally include guaranteed minimum income benefits (“GMIB”) and guaranteed income benefits (“GIB”). Variable annuities may also offer a guaranteed minimum accumulation benefit (“GMAB”) or a guaranteed withdrawal benefit for life (“GWBL”) rider. A GMIB is an optional benefit where an annuitant is entitled to annuitize the policy and receive a minimum payment stream based on the benefit base, which could be greater than the underlying account value (“AV”). A GMDB is an optional benefit that guarantees an annuitant’s beneficiaries are entitled to a minimum payment based on the benefit base, which could be greater than the underlying AV, upon the death of the annuitant. A GIB is an optional benefit which provides the policyholder with a guaranteed lifetime annuity based on predetermined annuity purchase rates applied to a GIB benefit base, with annuitization automatically triggered if and when the contract AV falls to zero. A GWBL is an optional benefit where an annuitant is entitled to withdraw a maximum amount of their benefit base each year, for the duration of the policyholder’s life, regardless of account performance. “GMxB” is a general reference to all forms of variable annuity guaranteed benefits.
    Current Variable Annuities Offered
We primarily sell three variable annuity products, each providing policyholders with distinct features and return profiles. Our current primary product offering includes:
Structured Capital Strategies (“SCS”). Our index-linked variable annuity product allows the policyholder to invest in various investment options, whose performance is tied to one or more securities indices, commodities indices or exchange traded funds (“ETFs”), subject to a performance cap, over a set period of time. The risks associated with such investment options are borne entirely by the policyholder, except the portion of any negative performance that we absorb (a buffer) upon investment maturity. This variable annuity does not offer GMxB features, other than an optional return of premium death benefit that we have introduced on some versions.
Retirement Cornerstone. Our Retirement Cornerstone product offers two platforms: (i) RC Performance, which offers access to over 100 funds with annuitization benefits based solely on non-guaranteed account investment performance and (ii) RC Protection, which offers access to a focused selection of funds and an optional floating-rate GMxB feature providing guaranteed income for life, with a choice between two floating roll-up rate options.
Investment Edge. Our investment-only variable annuity is a wealth accumulation variable annuity that defers current taxes during accumulation and provides tax-efficient distributions on non-qualified assets through scheduled payments over a set period of time with a portion of each payment being a return of cost basis, thus excludable from taxes. Investment Edge does not offer any GMxB feature other than an optional return of premium death benefit.

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Other products. We offer other products which offer optional GMxB benefits. These other products do not contribute significantly to our sales.
We work with AXA Equitable FMG to identify and include appropriate underlying investment options in its products, as well as to control the costs of these options and increase profitability of the products. For a discussion of AXA Equitable FMG, see below “ —AXA Equitable FMG.”
Underwriting and Pricing
We generally do not underwrite our variable annuity products on an individual-by-individual basis. Instead, we price our products based upon our expected investment returns and assumptions regarding mortality, longevity and persistency for our policyholders collectively, while taking into account historical experience. We price annuities by analyzing longevity and persistency risk, volatility of expected earnings on our AV and the expected time to retirement. Our product pricing models also take into account capital requirements, hedging costs and operating expenses. Investment-oriented products are priced based on various factors, which may include investment return, expenses, persistency and optionality.
Our variable annuity products generally include penalties for early withdrawals. From time to time, we reevaluate the type and level of GMxB and other features we offer. We have previously changed the nature and pricing of the features we offer and will likely do so from time to time in the future as the needs of our clients, the economic environment and our risk appetite evolve.
Risk Management
To actively manage and protect against the economic risks associated with our in-force variable annuity products, our management team has taken a multi-pronged approach. Our in-force variable annuity risk management programs include:
Hedging
We use a dynamic hedging strategy supplemented by static hedges to offset changes in our economic liability from changes in equity markets and interest rates. In addition to our dynamic hedging strategy, in the fourth quarter of 2017 and first quarter of 2018, we implemented static hedge positions to maintain a target asset level for all variable annuities at a CTE98 level under most economic scenarios, and to maintain a CTE95 level even in extreme scenarios. The term “CTE” refers to “conditional tail expectation,” which is calculated as the average amount of total assets required to satisfy obligations over the life of the contract or policy in the worst x% of scenarios and is represented as CTE (100 less x). E.g., CTE95 represents the worst five percent of scenarios. We expect to adjust from time to time our static equity hedge positions to maintain our target level of CTE protection over time. A wide range of derivatives contracts are used in these hedging programs, such as futures and total return swaps (both equity and fixed income), options and variance swaps, as well as, to a lesser extent, bond investments and repurchase agreements. For GMxB features, we retain certain risks including basis, credit spread and some volatility risk and risk associated with actual versus expected assumptions for mortality, lapse and surrender, withdrawal and contract-holder election rates, among other things.
Reinsurance
We have used reinsurance to mitigate a portion of the risks that we face in certain of our variable annuity products with regard to a portion of the GMxB features. Under our reinsurance arrangements, other insurers assume a portion of the obligation to pay claims and related expenses to which we are subject. However, we remain liable as the direct insurer on all risks we reinsure and, therefore, are subject to the risk that our reinsurer is unable or unwilling to pay or reimburse claims at the time demand is made. We evaluate the financial condition of our reinsurers in an effort to minimize our exposure to significant losses from reinsurer insolvencies.
Non-affiliate Reinsurance. We have reinsured to non-affiliated reinsurers a portion of our exposure on variable annuity products that offer a GMxB feature issued through February 2005. At December 31, 2018, we had reinsured to non-affiliated reinsurers, subject to certain maximum amounts or caps in any one period, approximately 15.5% of our net amount at risk resulting from the GMIB feature and approximately 2.9% of our net amount at risk (“NAR”) to the GMDB obligation on variable annuity contracts in force as of December 31, 2018.
Captive Reinsurance. In addition to non-affiliated reinsurance, we ceded to AXA RE Arizona, a captive reinsurance company, a 100% quota share of all liabilities for variable annuities with GMxB riders other than return of premium death

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benefit issued on or after January 1, 2006 and in-force on September 30, 2008 and a 100% quota share of all liabilities for variable annuities with GMIB riders issued on or after May 1, 1999 through August 31, 2005 in excess of the liability assumed by two unaffiliated reinsurers, which are subject to certain maximum amounts or limitations on aggregate claims (the “Excess Risks”). Upon completion of the GMxB Unwind, we have assumed all of the liabilities of the GMxB business that were previously ceded to AXA RE Arizona and the Excess Risks were novated to EQ AZ Life Re. For more detail on the GMxB Unwind and its associated risks, see “Risk Factors—Risks Relating to Our Business—Risks Relating to Our Reinsurance and Hedging Programs—Our reinsurance arrangements with affiliated captives may be adversely impacted by changes to policyholder behavior assumptions under the reinsured contracts, the performance of their hedging program, their liquidity needs, their overall financial results and changes in regulatory requirements regarding the use of captives.”
Other Programs
We have introduced several other programs that reduced gross reserves and reduced the risk in our in-force block and, in many cases, offered a benefit to our clients by offering liquidity or flexibility:
Investment Option Changes. We made several changes to our investment options within our variable annuity products over the years to manage risk, employ more passive strategies and offer our clients attractive risk-adjusted investment returns. To reduce the differential between hedging instruments performance and fund performance, we added many passive investment strategies and reduced the credit risk of some of the bond portfolios, which is designed to provide a better risk adjusted return to clients. We also introduced managed volatility funds in 2009. Our volatility management strategy seeks to reduce the portfolio’s equity exposure during periods when certain market indicators indicate that market volatility is above specific thresholds set for the portfolio. Historically when market volatility is high, equity markets generally are trending down, and therefore this strategy is intended to reduce the overall risk of investing in the portfolio for clients.
Optional Buyouts. Since 2012, we have implemented several successful buyout programs that benefited clients whose needs had changed since buying the initial contract and reduced our exposure to certain types of GMxB features. We have executed buyout programs since 2012, offering buyouts to contracts issued between 2002 and 2009.
Premium Suspension Programs. We have suspended the acceptance of subsequent premiums to certain GMxB contracts.
Lump Sum Option. Since 2015, we have provided certain policyholders with the optional benefit to receive a one-time lump sum payment rather than systematic lifetime payments if their AV falls to zero. This option provides the same advantages as a buyout. However, because the availability of this option is contingent on future events, their actual effectiveness will only be known over a long-term horizon.
Employer-Sponsored Products and Services
We also offer tax-deferred investment and retirement services or products to plans sponsored by educational entities, municipalities and not-for-profit entities, as well as small and medium-sized businesses. We primarily operate in the 403(b), 401(k) and 457(b) markets where we sell variable annuity and mutual fund-based products. As of December 31, 2018, we had relationships with approximately 26,000 employers and served more than one million participants, of which approximately 758,000 were educators. A specialized division of AXA Advisors, the Retirement Benefits Group (“RBG”), is the primary distributor of our products and related solutions to the education market with more than 1,000 advisors dedicated to helping educators prepare for retirement as of December 31, 2018.
Our products offer teachers, municipal employees and corporate employees a savings opportunity that provides tax-deferred wealth accumulation coupled with industry award-winning customer service. Our innovative product offerings address all retirement phases with diverse investment options.

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Variable Annuities. Our variable annuities offer defined contribution plan record-keeping, as well as administrative and participant services combined with a variety of proprietary and non-proprietary investment options. Our variable annuity investment lineup mostly consists of proprietary variable investment options that are managed by AXA Equitable FMG. AXA Equitable FMG provides discretionary investment management services for these investment options that include developing and executing asset allocation strategies and providing rigorous oversight of sub-advisors for the investment options. This helps to ensure that we retain high quality managers and that we leverage our scale across our products. In addition, our variable annuity products offer the following features:
Guaranteed Interest Option (“GIO”)—Provides a fixed interest rate and guaranteed AV.
Structured Investment Option (“SIO”)—Provides upside market participation that tracks either the S&P 500, Russell 2000 or the MSCI EAFE index subject to a performance cap, with a downside buffer that limits losses in the investment over a one, three or five year investment horizon. This option leverages our innovative SCS individual annuity offering, and we believe that we are the only provider that offers this type of guarantee in the defined contribution markets today.
Personal Income Benefit—An optional GMxB feature that enables participants to obtain a guaranteed withdrawal benefit for life for an additional fee.
Open Architecture Mutual Fund Platform. We recently launched a mutual fund-based product to complement our variable annuity products. This platform provides a similar service offering to our variable annuities from the same award-winning service team. The program allows plan sponsors to select from approximately 15,000 mutual funds. The platform also offers a group fixed annuity that operates very similarly to the GIO as an available investment option on this platform.
Services. Both our variable annuity and open architecture mutual fund products offer a suite of tools and services to enable plan participants to obtain education and guidance on their contributions and investment decisions and plan fiduciary services. Education and guidance is available on-line or in person from a team of plan relationship and enrollment specialists and/or the advisor that sold the product. Our clients’ retirement contributions come through payroll deductions, which contribute significantly to stable and recurring sources of renewals.
Underwriting and Pricing
We generally do not underwrite our annuity products on an individual-by-individual basis. Instead, we price our products based upon our expected investment returns and assumptions regarding mortality, longevity and persistency for our policyholders collectively, while taking into account historical experience. We price variable annuities by analyzing longevity and persistency risk, volatility of expected earnings on our AV and the expected time to retirement. Our product pricing models also take into account capital requirements, hedging costs and operating expenses. Investment-oriented products are priced based on various factors, which may include investment return, expenses, persistency and optionality.
Our variable annuity products generally include penalties for early withdrawals. From time to time, we reevaluate the type and level of guarantees and other features we offer. We have previously changed the nature and pricing of the features we offer and will likely do so from time to time in the future as the needs of our clients, the economic environment and our risk appetite evolve.
Risk Management
We design our employer-sponsored products with the goal of providing attractive features to clients that also minimize risks to us. To mitigate risks to our General Account from fluctuations in interest rates, we apply a variety of techniques that align well with a given product type. We designed our GIO to comply with the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (the “NAIC”) minimum rate (1.75% for new issues), and our 403(b) products that we currently sell include a contractual provision that enables us to limit transfers into the GIO. As most defined contribution plans allow participants to borrow against their accounts, we have made changes to our loan repayment processes to minimize participant loan defaults and to facilitate loan repayments to the participant’s current investment allocation as opposed to requiring repayments only to the GIO. In the 401(k) and 457(b) markets, we may charge a market value adjustment on the assets of the GIO when a plan sponsor terminates its agreement with us. We also prohibit direct transfers to fixed income products that compete with the GIO, which protects the principal in the General Account in a rising interest rate environment.

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In the Tax-Exempt market, the benefits include a minimum guaranteed interest rate on our GIO, return of premium death benefits and limited optional GMxB features. The utilization of GMxB features is low. In the Corporate market, the products that we sell today we do not offer death benefits in excess of the AV.
We use a committee of subject matter experts and business leaders that meet periodically to set crediting rates for our guaranteed interest options. The committee evaluates macroeconomic and business factors to determine prudent interest rates in excess of the contract minimum when appropriate.
We also monitor the behavior of our clients who have the ability to transfer assets between the GIO and various Separate Account investment options. We have not historically observed a material shift of assets moving into guarantees during times of higher market volatility.
Hedging
We hedge crediting rates to mitigate certain risks associated with the SIO. In order to support the returns associated with the SIO, we enter into derivatives contracts whose payouts, in combination with fixed income investments, emulate those of the S&P 500, Russell 2000 or MSCI EAFE index, subject to caps and buffers.
Life Insurance Products
We have a long history of providing life insurance products to affluent and high net worth individuals and small and medium-sized business markets. We are currently focused on the relatively less capital intensive asset accumulation segments of the market, with leading offerings in the VUL and IUL markets.
We offer a targeted range of life insurance products aimed at serving the financial needs of our clients throughout their lives. Specifically, our products are designed to help affluent and high net worth individuals as well as small and medium-sized business owners protect and transfer their wealth. Our product offerings include VUL, IUL and term life products. Our products are distributed through AXA Advisors and select third-party firms. We benefit from a long-term, stable distribution relationship with AXA Advisors.
Our life insurance products are primarily designed to help individuals and small and medium-sized businesses with protection, wealth accumulation and transfer, as well as corporate planning solutions. We target select segments of the life insurance market: permanent life insurance, including IUL and VUL products and term insurance. As part of a strategic shift over the past several years, we evolved our product design to be less capital-intensive and more accumulation-focused.
Permanent Life Insurance. Our permanent life insurance offerings are built on the premise that all clients expect to receive a benefit from the policy. The benefit may take the form of a life insurance death benefit paid at time of death no matter the age or duration of the policy or the form of access to cash that has accumulated in the policy on a tax-favored basis. In each case, the value to the client comes from access to a broad spectrum of investments that accumulate the policy value at attractive rates of return.
We have three permanent life insurance offerings built upon a universal life (“UL”) insurance framework: IUL, VUL and corporate-owned life insurance targeting the small and medium-sized business market, which is a subset of VUL products. Universal life policies offer flexible premiums, and generally offer the policyholder the ability to choose one of two death benefit options: a level benefit equal to the policy’s original face amount or a variable benefit equal to the original face amount plus any existing policy AV. Our universal life insurance products include single-life products and second-to-die (i.e., survivorship) products, which pay death benefits following the death of both insureds.
IUL. IUL uses an equity-linked approach for generating policy investment returns. The equity linked options provide upside return based on an external equity based index (e.g., S&P 500) subject to a cap. In exchange for this cap on investment returns, the policy provides downside protection in that annual investment returns are guaranteed to never be less than zero, even if the relevant index is down. In addition, there is an option to receive a higher cap on certain investment returns in exchange for a fee. As noted above, the performance of any universal life insurance policy also depends on the level of policy charges. For further discussion, see “—Pricing and Fees.”
VUL. VUL uses a series of investment options to generate the investment return allocated to the cash value. The sub-accounts are similar to retail mutual funds: a policyholder can invest premiums in one or more underlying investment options

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offering varying levels of risk and growth potential. These provide long-term growth opportunities, tax-deferred earnings and the ability to make tax-free transfers among the various sub-accounts. In addition, the policyholder can invest premiums in a guaranteed interest option, as well as an investment option we call the Market Stabilizer Option (“MSO”), which provides downside protection from losses in the index up to a specified percentage. We also offer corporate-owned life insurance, which is a VUL insurance product tailored specifically to support executive benefits in the small business market.
We work with AXA Equitable FMG to identify and include appropriate underlying investment options in our variable life products, as well as to control the costs of these options.
Term Life. Term life provides basic life insurance protection for a specified period of time, and is typically a client’s first life insurance purchase due to its relatively low cost. Life insurance benefits are paid if death occurs during the term period, as long as required premiums have been paid. The required premiums are guaranteed not to increase during the term period, otherwise known as a level pay or fixed premium. Our term products include competitive conversion features that allow the policyholder to convert their term life insurance policy to permanent life insurance within policy limits and the ability to add certain riders. Our term life portfolio includes 1, 10, 15 and 20-year term products.
Other Benefits. We offer a portfolio of riders to provide clients with additional flexibility to protect the value of their investments and overcome challenges. Our Long-Term Care Services Rider provides an acceleration of the policy death benefit in the event of a chronic illness. The MSO, referred to above and offered via a policy rider on our variable life products, provides policyholders with the opportunity to manage volatility. The return of premium rider provides a guarantee that the death benefit payable will be no less than the amount invested in the policy.
As part of Holdings’ ongoing efforts to efficiently manage capital amongst its subsidiaries, improve the quality of the product line-up of its insurance subsidiaries and enhance the overall profitability of Holdings, most sales of IUL insurance products to policyholders located outside of New York are being issued through MONY America, another life insurance subsidiary of Holdings, instead of AXA Equitable. We expect that Holdings will continue to issue newly developed life insurance products to policyholders located outside of New York through MONY America instead of AXA Equitable. Since future decisions regarding product development and availability depend on factors and considerations not yet known, management is unable to predict the extent to which additional products will be offered through MONY America or another subsidiary of Holdings instead of or in addition to AXA Equitable, or what the impact to AXA Equitable will be.
Underwriting
Our underwriting process, built around extensive underwriting guidelines, is designed to assign prospective insureds to risk classes in a manner that is consistent with our business and financial objectives, including our risk appetite and pricing expectations.
As part of making an underwriting decision, our underwriters evaluate information disclosed as part of the application process as well as information obtained from other sources after the application. This information includes, but is not limited to, the insured’s age and sex, results from medical exams and financial information.
We continue to research and develop guideline changes to increase the efficiency of our underwriting process (e.g., through the use of predictive models), both from an internal cost perspective and our customer experience perspective. We manage changes to our underwriting guidelines though a robust governance process that ensures that our underwriting decisions continue to align with our business and financial objectives, including risk appetite and pricing expectations. We continuously monitor our underwriting decisions through internal audits and other quality control processes, to ensure accurate and consistent application of our underwriting guidelines.
We use reinsurance to manage our mortality risk and volatility. Our reinsurer partners regularly review our underwriting practices and mortality and lapse experience through audits and experience studies, the outcome of which have consistently validated the high-quality underwriting process and decisions.
Pricing and Fees
Life insurance products are priced based upon assumptions including, but not limited to, expected future premium payments, surrender rates, mortality and morbidity rates, investment returns, hedging costs, equity returns, expenses and inflation and capital requirements. The primary source of revenue from our life insurance business is premiums, investment

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income, asset-based fees (including investment management and 12b-1 fees) and policy charges (expense loads, surrender charges, mortality charges and other policy charges).
Risk Management
Reinsurance
We use reinsurance to mitigate a portion of our risk and optimize the capital efficiency and operating returns of our life insurance portfolio. As part of our risk management function, we continuously monitor the financial condition of our reinsurers in an effort to minimize our exposure to significant losses from reinsurer insolvencies.
Non-affiliate Reinsurance. We generally obtain reinsurance for the portion of a life insurance policy that exceeds $10 million. We have set up reinsurance pools with highly rated unaffiliated reinsurers that obligate the pool participants to pay death claim amounts in excess of our retention limits for an agreed-upon premium.
Captive Reinsurance. EQ AZ Life Re Company reinsures a 90% quota share of level premium term insurance issued by AXA Equitable on or after March 1, 2003 through December 31, 2008 and 90% of the risk of the lapse protection riders under UL insurance policies issued by AXA Equitable on or after June 1, 2003 through June 30, 2007 (collectively, the “Life Business”).
Hedging
We hedge the exposure contained in our IUL products and the MSO rider we offer on our VUL products. These products and riders allow the policyholder to participate in the performance of an index price movement up to certain caps and/or protect the policyholder in a movement down to a certain buffer for a set period of time. In order to support our obligations under these investment options, we enter into derivatives contracts whose payouts, in combination with returns from the underlying fixed income investments, seek to replicate those of the index price, subject to prescribed caps and buffers.
Employee Benefits Products
Our employee benefits business focuses on serving small and medium-sized businesses located in New York, offering these businesses a differentiated technology platform and competitive suite of group insurance products. Though we only entered the market in 2015, we now offer coverage nationally. We believe our employee benefits business will further augment our solution for small and medium-sized businesses which we believe is differentiated by a high-quality technology platform. Leveraging our innovative technology platform, we have formed strategic partnerships with large insurance and health carriers as their primary group benefits provider. As a new entrant in the employee benefits market we were able to build a platform from the ground up, without reliance on legacy systems.
Our products are designed to provide valuable protection for employees as well as help employers attract employees and control costs. We currently offer a suite of life, short and long-term disability, dental and vision insurance products to small and medium-sized businesses located in New York. Sales of employee benefit products to businesses located outside of New York are being issued through MONY America.
Underwriting
We manage the underwriting process to facilitate quality sales and serve the needs of our customers, while supporting our financial strength and business objectives. The application of our underwriting guidelines is continuously monitored through internal underwriting audits to achieve high standards of underwriting and consistency.
Pricing and Fees
Employee benefits pricing reflects the claims experience and the risk characteristics of each group. We set appropriate plans for the group based on demographic information and, for larger groups, also evaluate the experience of the group. The claims experience is reviewed at the time of policy issuance and during the renewal timeframes, resulting in periodic pricing adjustments at the group level.

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Reinsurance
Group Reinsurance Plus provides reinsurance on our short and long-term disability products. Our current arrangement provides quota share reinsurance at 50% for disability products.
MARKETS
Variable Annuity Products. We target sales of our variable annuity products to affluent and high net worth individuals and families saving for retirement or seeking retirement income. Within our target customer base, customers prioritize certain features based on their life-stage and investment needs. In addition, our products offer features designed to serve different market conditions. SCS targets clients with investable assets who want exposure to equity markets, but also want to guard against a market correction. Retirement Cornerstone targets clients who want growth potential and guaranteed income with increases in a rising interest rate environment. Investment Edge targets clients concerned about rising taxes.
Employer-Sponsored Products and Services. We primarily operate in the tax-exempt 403(b)/457(b), corporate 401(k) and other markets. In the tax-exempt 403(b)/457(b) market, we primarily serve employees of public school systems. To a lesser extent, we also market to government entities that sponsor 457(b) plans. In the corporate 401(k) market, we target small and medium-sized businesses with 401(k) plans that generally have under $20 million in assets. Our product offerings accommodate start up plans and plans with accumulated assets.
Life Insurance Products. We are focused on targeted segments of the life insurance market, particularly affluent and high net worth individuals, as well as small and medium-sized businesses located in New York. We focus on creating value for our customers through the differentiated features and benefits we offer on our products. We distribute these products through retail advisors and third-party firms who demonstrate the value of life insurance in helping clients to accumulate wealth and protect their assets.
Employee Benefit Products. Our employee benefit product suite is targeted to small and medium-sized businesses located in New York seeking simple, technology-driven employee benefits management. We built the employee benefits business from the ground up based on feedback from brokers and employers, ensuring the business’ relevance to the market we address. We are committed to continuously evolving our product suite and technology platform to meet market demand.
DISTRIBUTION
We primarily distribute our products through AXA Advisors and through third party distribution channels.
Affiliated Distribution. We offer our products on a retail basis through our affiliated retail sales force of financial professionals, AXA Advisors. These financial professionals have access to and offer a broad array of variable annuity, life insurance, employee benefits and investment products and services from affiliated and unaffiliated insurers and other financial service providers. AXA Advisors, through RBG, is the primary distribution channel for our employer-sponsored products and services. RBG has a group of more than 1,000 advisors that specialize in the 403(b) and 457(b) markets.
Third-Party Distribution. For our annuity products, we have shifted the focus of our third-party distribution significantly over the last decade, growing our distribution in the bank, broker-dealer and insurance partner channels and providing us access to more than 100,000 financial professionals. We also distribute life insurance products through third-party firms provides efficient access to independent producers on a largely variable cost basis. Brokerage general agencies, producer groups, banks, warehouses, independent broker-dealers and registered investment advisers are all important partners who distribute our products today. We distribute our employee benefits products through a growing network of third-party firms, including private exchanges, health plans and professional employer organizations.
COMPETITION
There is strong competition among insurers, banks, brokerage firms and other financial institutions and providers seeking clients for the types of products and services we provide. Competition is intense among a broad range of financial institutions and other financial service providers for retirement and other savings dollars.
The principal competitive factors affecting our business are our financial strength as evidenced, in part, by our financial and claims-paying ratings; access to capital; access to diversified sources of distribution; size and scale; product quality, range, features/functionality and price; our ability to bring customized products to the market quickly; technological capabilities; our

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ability to explain complicated products and features to our distribution channels and customers; crediting rates on fixed products; visibility, recognition and understanding of our brand in the marketplace; reputation and quality of service; the tax-favored status certain of our products receive under the current federal and state laws and (with respect to variable insurance and annuity products, mutual funds and other investment products) investment options, flexibility and investment management performance.
We and our affiliated distributors must attract and retain productive sales representatives to sell our products. Strong competition continues among financial institutions for sales representatives with demonstrated ability. We and our affiliated distribution companies compete with other financial institutions for sales representatives primarily on the basis of financial position, product breadth and features, support services and compensation policies.
Legislative and other changes affecting the regulatory environment can affect our competitive position within the life insurance industry and within the broader financial services industry.
AXA EQUITABLE FMG
AXA Equitable FMG oversees our variable funds and supports our business. AXA Equitable FMG helps add value and marketing appeal to our products by bringing investment management expertise and specialized strategies to the underlying investment lineup of each product. In addition, by advising an attractive array of proprietary investment portfolios (each, a “Portfolio,” and together, the “Portfolios”), AXA Equitable FMG brings investment acumen, financial controls and economies of scale to the construction of high-quality, economical underlying investment options for our products. Finally, AXA Equitable FMG is able to negotiate favorable terms for investment services, operations, trading and administrative functions for the Portfolios.
AXA Equitable FMG provides investment management and administrative services to proprietary investment vehicles sponsored by the Company, including investment companies that are underlying investment options for our variable insurance and annuity products. AXA Equitable FMG is registered as an investment adviser under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, as amended (the “Investment Advisers Act”). AXA Equitable FMG serves as the investment adviser to three investment companies that are registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended—EQ Advisors Trust (“EQAT”), AXA Premier VIP Trust (“VIP Trust”) and 1290 Funds (each, a “Trust” and collectively, the “Trusts”)—and to two private investment trusts established in the Cayman Islands. Each of the investment companies and private investment trusts is a “series” type of trust with multiple Portfolios. AXA Equitable FMG provides discretionary investment management services to the Portfolios, including, among other things, (1) portfolio management services for the Portfolios; (2) selecting investment sub-advisers and (3) developing and executing asset allocation strategies for multi-advised Portfolios and Portfolios structured as funds-of-funds. AXA Equitable FMG also provides administrative services to the Portfolios. AXA Equitable FMG is further charged with ensuring that the other parts of the Company that interact with the Trusts, such as product management, the distribution system and the financial organization, have a specific point of contact.
AXA Equitable FMG has a variety of responsibilities for the general management and administration of its investment company clients. One of AXA Equitable FMG’s primary responsibilities is to provide clients with portfolio management and investment advisory evaluation services, principally by reviewing whether to appoint, dismiss or replace sub-advisers to each Portfolio, and thereafter monitoring and reviewing each sub-adviser’s performance through qualitative and quantitative analysis, as well as periodic in-person, telephonic and written consultations with the sub-advisers. Currently, AXA Equitable FMG has entered into sub-advisory agreements with more than 40 different sub-advisers, including AB and other AXA affiliates. Another primary responsibility of AXA Equitable FMG is to develop and monitor the investment program of each Portfolio, including Portfolio investment objectives, policies and asset allocations for the Portfolios, select investments for Portfolios (or portions thereof) for which it provides direct investment selection services, and ensure that investments and asset allocations are consistent with the guidelines that have been approved by clients. The administrative services that AXA Equitable FMG provides to the Portfolios include, among others, coordination of each Portfolio’s audit, financial statements and tax returns; expense management and budgeting; legal administrative services and compliance monitoring; portfolio accounting services, including daily net asset value accounting; risk management; and oversight of proxy voting procedures and anti-money laundering program.

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REGULATION
Insurance Regulation
We are licensed to transact insurance business, and are subject to extensive regulation and supervision by insurance regulators, in all 50 states of the United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and nine of Canada’s thirteen provinces and territories. We are domiciled in New York and are primarily regulated by the New York State Department of Financial Services (the “NYDFS”). The extent of regulation by jurisdiction varies, but most jurisdictions have laws and regulations governing the financial aspects and business conduct of insurers. State laws in the U.S. grant insurance regulatory authorities broad administrative powers with respect to, among other things, licensing companies to transact business, sales practices, establishing statutory capital and reserve requirements and solvency standards, reinsurance and hedging, protecting privacy, regulating advertising, restricting the payment of dividends and other transactions between affiliates, permitted types and concentrations of investments and business conduct to be maintained by insurance companies as well as agent licensing, approval of policy forms and, for certain lines of insurance, approval or filing of rates. Insurance regulators have the discretionary authority to limit or prohibit new issuances of business to policyholders within their jurisdictions when, in their judgment, such regulators determine that the issuing company is not maintaining adequate statutory surplus or capital. Additionally, New York Insurance Law limits sales commissions and certain other marketing expenses that we may incur. For additional information on Insurance Supervision, see “Risk Factors.”
Supervisory agencies in each of the jurisdictions in which we do business may conduct regular or targeted examinations of our operations and accounts, and make requests for particular information from us. Periodic financial examinations of the books, records, accounts and business practices of insurers domiciled in their states are generally conducted by such supervisory agencies every three to five years. From time to time, regulators raise issues during examinations or audits of us that could, if determined adversely, have a material adverse effect on us. In addition, the interpretations of regulations by regulators may change and statutes may be enacted with retroactive impact, particularly in areas such as accounting or statutory reserve requirements. In addition to oversight by state insurance regulators in recent years, the insurance industry has seen an increase in inquiries from state attorneys general and other state officials regarding compliance with certain state insurance, securities and other applicable laws. We have received and responded to such inquiries from time to time. For additional information on legal and regulatory risk, see “Risk Factors—Legal and Regulatory Risks.”
We are required to file detailed annual financial statements, prepared on a statutory accounting basis or in accordance with other accounting practices permitted by the applicable regulator, with supervisory agencies in each of the jurisdictions in which we do business. The NAIC has approved a series of uniform statutory accounting principles (“SAP”) that have been adopted, in some cases with minor modifications, by all state insurance regulators. As a basis of accounting, SAP was developed to monitor and regulate the solvency of insurance companies. In developing SAP, the insurance regulators were primarily concerned with assuring an insurer’s ability to pay all its current and future obligations to policyholders. As a result, statutory accounting focuses on conservatively valuing the assets and liabilities of insurers, generally in accordance with standards specified by the insurer’s domiciliary state. The values for assets, liabilities and equity reflected in financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP are usually different from those reflected in financial statements prepared under SAP.
Holding Company and Shareholder Dividend Regulation
Most states, including New York, regulate transactions between an insurer and its affiliates under insurance holding company acts. The insurance holding company laws and regulations vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, but generally require that all transactions affecting insurers within a holding company system be fair and reasonable and, if material, typically require prior notice and approval or non-disapproval by the state’s insurance regulator.
The insurance holding company laws and regulations generally also require a controlled insurance company (insurers that are subsidiaries of insurance holding companies) to register with state regulatory authorities and to file with those authorities certain reports, including information concerning its capital structure, ownership, financial condition, certain intercompany transactions and general business operations. States generally require the ultimate controlling person of a U.S. insurer to file an annual enterprise risk report with the lead state of the insurance holding company system identifying risks likely to have a material adverse effect upon the financial condition or liquidity of the insurer or its insurance holding company system as a whole.
State insurance statutes also typically place restrictions and limitations on the amount of dividends or other distributions payable by insurance company subsidiaries to their parent companies, as well as on transactions between an insurer and its

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affiliates. Under New York insurance law, a domestic stock life insurer may not, without prior approval of the NYDFS, pay a dividend to its stockholders exceeding an amount calculated under one of two standards. The first standard allows payment of an ordinary dividend out of the insurer’s earned surplus (as reported on the insurer’s most recent annual statement) up to a limit calculated pursuant to a statutory formula, provided that the NYDFS is given notice and opportunity to disapprove the dividend if certain qualitative tests are not met (the “Earned Surplus Standard”). The second standard allows payment of an ordinary dividend up to a limit calculated pursuant to a different statutory formula without regard to the insurer’s earned surplus (the “Alternative Standard”). Dividends exceeding these prescribed limits require the insurer to file a notice of its intent to declare the dividends with the NYDFS and prior approval or non-disapproval from the NYDFS.
State insurance holding company regulations also regulate changes in control. State laws generally provide that no person, corporation or other entity may acquire control of an insurance company, or a controlling interest in any parent company of an insurance company, without the prior approval of such insurance company’s domiciliary state insurance regulator. Generally, any person acquiring, directly or indirectly, 10% or more of the voting securities of an insurance company is presumed to have acquired “control” of the company. This statutory presumption may be rebutted by a showing that control does not exist in fact. State insurance regulators, however, may find that “control” exists in circumstances in which a person owns or controls less than 10% of voting securities.
The laws and regulations regarding acquisition of control transactions may discourage potential acquisition proposals and may delay or prevent a change of control involving us, including through unsolicited transactions that some of our shareholders might consider desirable.
NAIC
The mandate of the NAIC is to benefit state insurance regulatory authorities and consumers by promulgating model insurance laws and regulations for adoption by the states. The NAIC provides standardized insurance industry accounting and reporting guidance through its Accounting Practices and Procedures Manual (the “Manual”). However, statutory accounting principles have been, or may be, modified by individual state laws, regulations and permitted practices. Changes to the Manual or modifications by the various state insurance departments may impact our statutory capital and surplus.
In September 2012, the NAIC adopted the Risk Management and Own Risk and Solvency Assessment Model Act (“ORSA”), which has been enacted by New York. ORSA requires that insurers maintain a risk management framework and conduct an internal risk and solvency assessment of the insurer’s material risks in normal and stressed environments. The assessment is documented in a confidential annual summary report, a copy of which must be made available to regulators as required or upon request. We have been filing an ORSA summary report with the NYDFS since 2015.
In December 2012, the NAIC approved a new valuation manual containing a principles-based approach to life insurance company reserves. Principles-based reserving is designed to better address reserving for products, including the current generation of products for which the current formulaic basis for reserve determination does not work effectively. The principles-based reserving approach became effective for new business on January 1, 2017 in the states where it has been adopted with a three-year phase-in period. The New York Legislature enacted legislation adopting principles-based reserving in June 2018 which was signed into law by the Governor in December 2018. Also, in December 2018, the NYDFS promulgated an emergency regulation to begin implementation of principle-based reserving, to become effective on January 1, 2020.
Captive Reinsurer Regulation
As described above, we use captive reinsurers as part of our capital management strategy. During the last few years, the NAIC and certain state regulators, including the NYDFS, have been scrutinizing insurance companies’ use of affiliated captive reinsurers or offshore entities.
In 2014, the NAIC considered a proposal to require states to apply NAIC accreditation standards, applicable to traditional insurers, to captive reinsurers. In 2015, the NAIC adopted such a proposal, in the form of a revised preamble to the NAIC accreditation standards (the “Standard”), with an effective date of January 1, 2016 for application of the Standard to captives that assume level premium term life insurance (“XXX”) business and universal life with secondary guarantees (“AXXX”) business. During 2014, the NAIC approved a new regulatory framework, the XXX/AXXX Reinsurance Framework, applicable to XXX/AXXX transactions. The framework requires more disclosure of an insurer’s use of captives in its statutory financial statements, and narrows the types of assets permitted to back statutory reserves that are required to support the insurer’s future obligations. The NAIC implemented the framework through an actuarial guideline (“AG 48”), which requires the actuary of the

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ceding insurer that opines on the insurer’s reserves to issue a qualified opinion if the framework is not followed. AG 48 applies prospectively, so that XXX/AXXX captives will not be subject to AG 48 if reinsured policies were issued prior to January 1, 2015 and ceded so that they were part of a reinsurance arrangement as of December 31, 2014, as is the case for the XXX business and AXXX business reinsured by our Arizona captive. Regulation of XXX/AXXX captives is deemed to satisfy the Standard if the applicable reinsurance transaction satisfies the XXX/AXXX Reinsurance Framework requirements adopted by the NAIC. The NAIC also adopted a revised Credit for Reinsurance Model Law in January 2016 and the Term and Universal Life Insurance Reserving Financing Model Regulation in December 2016 to replace AG 48. The model regulation will generally replace AG 48 in a state upon the state’s adoption of the model regulation. The NAIC left for future action the application of the Standard to captives that assume variable annuity business.
During 2015, the NAIC Financial Condition Committee (the “NAIC E Committee”) established the Variable Annuities Issues E Working Group (“VAIWG”) to oversee the NAIC’s efforts to study and address, as appropriate, regulatory issues resulting in variable annuity captive reinsurance transactions. In November 2015, upon the recommendation of the VAIWG, the NAIC E Committee adopted the Framework for Change which recommends charges for NAIC working groups to adjust the variable annuity statutory framework applicable to all insurers that have written or are writing variable annuity business. The Framework for Change contemplates a holistic set of reforms that would improve the current reserve and capital framework and address root cause issues that result in the use of captive arrangements but would not necessarily mandate recapture by insurers of VA cessions to captives. In November 2015, VAIWG engaged Oliver Wyman (“OW”) to conduct a quantitative impact study (the “QIS”) involving industry participants including the Company, of various reforms outlined in the Framework for Change. OW completed the QIS in July of 2016 and reported its initial findings to the VAIWG in late August 2016. The OW report proposed certain revisions to the current VA reserve and capital framework, which focused on (i) mitigating the asset-liability accounting mismatch between hedge instruments and statutory instruments and statutory liabilities, (ii) removing the non-economic volatility in statutory capital charges and the resulting solvency ratios and (iii) facilitating greater harmonization across insurers and products for greater compatibility, and recommended a second quantitative impact study to be conducted so that testing can inform the proper calibration for certain conceptual and/or preliminary parameters set out in the OW proposal. Following a fourth quarter 2016 public comment period and several meetings on the OW proposal, the VAIWG determined that a second quantitative impact study (the “QIS2”) involving industry participants, including us, will be conducted by OW. The QIS2 began in February 2017 and OW issued its recommendations in December 2017. In 2018, the VAIWG held multiple public conference calls to discuss and refine the proposed recommendations. By the end of July 2018, both the VAIWG and the NAIC E Committee adopted the proposed recommendations with modifications reflecting input from all stakeholders. After adopting the Framework for Change, other NAIC working groups and task forces will consider specific revisions to the capital requirements for variable annuities to implement the recommendations in the framework. The changes to the variable annuity reserve and capital framework are expected to become effective January 1, 2020 with a suggested three-year phase-in period, but exact timing for implementation of changes remains subject to change.
We cannot predict what revisions, if any, will be made to the model laws and regulations relating to XXX/AXXX transactions, or to the Standard, if adopted for variable annuity captives, as states consider their adoption or undertake their implementation, or how the Framework for Change proposal may be implemented as a result of ongoing NAIC work. It is also unclear whether the Standard or other proposals will be adopted by the NAIC or how the NYDFS will implement the Framework for Change, or what additional actions and regulatory changes will result from the continued captives scrutiny and reform efforts by the NAIC and other regulatory bodies. Any regulatory action that limits our ability to achieve desired benefits from the use of or materially increases our cost of using captive reinsurance and applies retroactively, including, if the Standard is adopted as proposed, without grandfathering provisions for existing captive variable annuity reinsurance entities, could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations. For additional information on our use of a captive reinsurance company, see “Risk Factors.”
Surplus and Capital; Risk Based Capital
Insurers are required to maintain their capital and surplus at or above minimum levels. Regulators have discretionary authority, in connection with the continued licensing of insurance companies, to limit or prohibit an insurer’s sales to policyholders if, in their judgment, the regulators determine that such insurer has not maintained the minimum surplus or capital or that the further transaction of business will be hazardous to policyholders. We report our RBC based on a formula calculated by applying factors to various asset, premium and statutory reserve items, as well as taking into account the risk characteristics of the insurer. The major categories of risk involved are asset risk, insurance risk, interest rate risk, market risk and business risk. The formula is used as a regulatory tool to identify possible inadequately capitalized insurers for purposes of initiating regulatory action, and not as a means to rank insurers generally. State insurance laws provide insurance regulators the authority to require various actions by, or take various actions against, insurers whose RBC ratio does not meet or exceed

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certain RBC levels. As of the date of the most recent annual statutory financial statements filed with insurance regulators, our RBC was in excess of each of those RBC levels. For additional information on RBC, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources.”
Guaranty Associations and Similar Arrangements
Each of the states in which we are admitted to transact business require life insurers doing business within the jurisdiction to participate in guaranty associations, which are organized to pay certain contractual insurance benefits owed pursuant to insurance policies issued by impaired, insolvent or failed insurers. The laws are designed to protect policyholders from losses under insurance policies issued by insurance companies that become impaired or insolvent. These associations levy assessments, up to prescribed limits, on all member insurers in a particular state on the basis of the proportionate share of the premiums written by member insurers in the lines of business in which the impaired, insolvent or failed insurer is engaged. Some states permit member insurers to recover assessments paid through full or partial premium tax offsets.
During each of the past five years, the assessments levied against us have not been material.
New York Insurance Regulation 210
State regulators are currently considering whether to apply regulatory standards to the determination and/or readjustment of non-guaranteed elements (“NGEs”) within life insurance policies and annuity contracts that may be adjusted at the insurer’s discretion, such as the cost of insurance for universal life insurance policies and interest crediting rates for life insurance policies and annuity contracts. For example, in March 2018, Insurance Regulation 210 went into effect in New York. That regulation establishes standards for the determination and any readjustment of NGEs, including a prohibition on increasing profit margins on existing business or recouping past losses on such business, and requires advance notice of any adverse change in a NGE to both the NYDFS as well as to affected policyholders. We are continuing to assess the impact of Regulation 210 on our business. Beyond the New York regulation and a similar rule recently enacted in California that takes effect on July 1, 2019, the likelihood of enactment of any such state-based regulation is uncertain at this time, but if implemented, these regulations could have adverse effects on our business and consolidated results of operations.
Broker-Dealer and Securities Regulation
We and certain policies and contracts offered by us are subject to regulation under the Federal securities laws administered by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”), self-regulatory organizations and under certain state securities laws. These regulators may conduct examinations of our operations, and from time to time make requests for particular information from us.
Certain of our subsidiaries and affiliates, including AXA Advisors, AXA Distributors, AllianceBernstein Investments, Inc. and Sanford C. Bernstein & Co., LLC (“SCB LLC”), are registered as broker-dealers (collectively, the “Broker-Dealers”) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). The Broker-Dealers are subject to extensive regulation by the SEC and are members of, and subject to regulation by, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (“FINRA”), a self-regulatory organization subject to SEC oversight. The Broker-Dealers are subject to the capital requirements of the SEC and/or FINRA, which specify minimum levels of capital (“net capital”) that the Broker-Dealers are required to maintain and also limit the amount of leverage that the Broker-Dealers are able to employ in their businesses. The SEC and FINRA also regulate the sales practices of the Broker-Dealers. In recent years, the SEC and FINRA have intensified their scrutiny of sales practices relating to variable annuities, variable life insurance and alternative investments, among other products. In addition, the Broker-Dealers are also subject to regulation by state securities administrators in those states in which they conduct business, who may also conduct examinations and direct inquiries to the Broker-Dealers.
Certain of our Separate Accounts are registered as investment companies under the Investment Company Act. Separate Account interests under certain annuity contracts and insurance policies issued by us are also registered under the Securities Act. EQAT, AXA Premier VIP Trust and 1290 Funds are registered as investment companies under the Investment Company Act and shares offered by these investment companies are also registered under the Securities Act.
Certain subsidiaries and affiliates including AXA Equitable FMG and AXA Advisors are registered as investment advisers under the Investment Advisers Act. The investment advisory activities of such registered investment advisers are subject to various federal and state laws and regulations and to the laws in those foreign countries in which they conduct business. These

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laws and regulations generally grant supervisory agencies broad administrative powers, including the power to limit or restrict the carrying on of business for failure to comply with such laws and regulations.
AXA Equitable FMG is registered with the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) as a commodity pool operator with respect to certain portfolios and is also a member of the National Futures Association (“NFA”). The CFTC is a federal independent agency that is responsible for, among other things, the regulation of commodity interests and enforcement of the Commodity Exchange Act (“CEA”). The NFA is a self-regulatory organization to which the CFTC has delegated, among other things, the administration and enforcement of commodity regulatory registration requirements and the regulation of its members. As such, AXA Equitable FMG is subject to regulation by the NFA and CFTC and is subject to certain legal requirements and restrictions in the CEA and in the rules and regulations of the CFTC and the rules and by-laws of the NFA on behalf of itself and any commodity pools that it operates, including investor protection requirements and anti-fraud prohibitions, and is subject to periodic inspections and audits by the CFTC and NFA. AXA Equitable FMG is also subject to certain CFTC-mandated disclosure, reporting and record-keeping obligations.
Regulators, including the SEC, FINRA, the CFTC, NFA and state attorneys general, continue to focus attention on various practices in or affecting the investment management and/or mutual fund industries, including portfolio management, valuation and the use of fund assets for distribution.
We and certain of our subsidiaries and affiliates have provided, and in certain cases continue to provide, information and documents to the SEC, FINRA, the CFTC, NFA, state attorneys general, the NYDFS and other state insurance regulators, and other regulators regarding our compliance with insurance, securities and other laws and regulations regarding the conduct of our business. For example, we have responded to inquiries from the SEC requesting information with regard to contract language and accompanying disclosure for certain variable annuity contracts. For additional information on regulatory matters, see Note 17 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
The SEC, FINRA, the CFTC and other governmental regulatory authorities may institute administrative or judicial proceedings that may result in censure, fines, the issuance of cease-and-desist orders, trading prohibitions, the suspension or expulsion of a broker-dealer or member, its officers, registered representatives or employees or other similar sanctions.
Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act
Currently, the U.S. federal government does not directly regulate the business of insurance. While the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) does not remove primary responsibility for the supervision and regulation of insurance from the states, Title V of the Dodd-Frank Act establishes the Federal Insurance Office (“FIO”) within the U.S. Treasury Department and reforms the regulation of the non-admitted property and casualty insurance market and the reinsurance market. The Dodd-Frank Act also established the Financial Stability Oversight Council (“FSOC”), which is authorized to subject non-bank financial companies, including insurers, to supervision by the Federal Reserve and enhanced prudential standards if the FSOC determines that a non-bank financial institution could pose a threat to U.S. financial stability.
The FIO has authority that extends to all lines of insurance except health insurance, crop insurance and (unless included with life or annuity components) long-term care insurance. Under the Dodd-Frank Act, the FIO is charged with monitoring all aspects of the insurance industry (including identifying gaps in regulation that could contribute to a systemic crisis), recommending to the FSOC the designation of any insurer and its affiliates (potentially including AXA and its affiliates) as a non-bank financial company subject to oversight by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (including the administration of stress testing on capital), assisting the Treasury Secretary in negotiating “covered agreements” with non-U.S. governments or regulatory authorities, and, with respect to state insurance laws and regulation, determining whether state insurance measures are pre-empted by such covered agreements.
In addition, the FIO is empowered to request and collect data (including financial data) on and from the insurance industry and insurers (including reinsurers) and their affiliates. In such capacity, the FIO may require an insurer or an affiliate of an insurer to submit such data or information as the FIO may reasonably require. In addition, the FIO’s approval will be required to subject a financial company whose largest U.S. subsidiary is an insurer to the special orderly liquidation process outside the federal bankruptcy code, administered by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the “FDIC”) pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act. U.S. insurance subsidiaries of any such financial company, however, would be subject to rehabilitation and liquidation proceedings under state insurance law. The Dodd-Frank Act also reforms the regulation of the non-admitted property/casualty insurance market (commonly referred to as excess and surplus lines) and the reinsurance markets, including prohibiting the

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ability of non-domiciliary state insurance regulators to deny credit for reinsurance when recognized by the ceding insurer’s domiciliary state regulator.
Other aspects of our operations could also be affected by the Dodd-Frank Act. These include:
Heightened Standards and Safeguards
The FSOC may recommend that state insurance regulators or other regulators apply new or heightened standards and safeguards for activities or practices we and other insurers or other financial services companies engage in if the FSOC determines that those activities or practices could create or increase the risk that significant liquidity, credit or other problems spread among financial companies. We cannot predict whether any such recommendations will be made or their effect on our business, consolidated results of operations or financial condition.
Over-The-Counter Derivatives Regulation
The Dodd-Frank Act includes a framework of regulation of the over-the-counter (“OTC”) derivatives markets. Regulations approved to date require clearing of previously uncleared transactions and will require clearing of additional OTC transactions in the future. In addition, regulations approved pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act impose margin requirements on OTC transactions not required to be cleared. As a result of these regulations, our costs of risk mitigation have and may continue to increase under the Dodd-Frank Act. For example, margin requirements, including the requirement to pledge initial margin for OTC cleared transactions entered into after June 10, 2013 and for OTC uncleared transactions entered into after the phase-in period, which would be applicable to us in 2020, have increased. In addition, restrictions on securities that will qualify as eligible collateral, will require increased holdings of cash and highly liquid securities with lower yields causing a reduction in income. Centralized clearing of certain OTC derivatives exposes us to the risk of a default by a clearing member or clearinghouse with respect to our cleared derivatives transactions. We use derivatives to mitigate a wide range of risks in connection with our business, including the impact of increased benefit exposures from certain variable annuity products that offer GMxB features. We have always been subject to the risk that our hedging and other management procedures might prove ineffective in reducing the risks to which insurance policies expose us or that unanticipated policyholder behavior or mortality, combined with adverse market events, could produce economic losses beyond the scope of the risk management techniques employed. Any such losses could be increased by higher costs of writing derivatives (including customized derivatives) and the reduced availability of customized derivatives that might result from the enactment and implementation of the Dodd-Frank Act.
Broker-Dealer Regulation
The Dodd-Frank Act provides that the SEC may promulgate rules to provide that the standard of conduct for all broker-dealers, when providing personalized investment advice about securities to retail customers (and any other customers as the SEC may by rule provide) will be the same as the standard of conduct applicable to an investment adviser under the Investment Advisers Act. On April 18, 2018, the SEC released a set of proposed rules that would, among other things, enhance the existing standard of conduct for broker-dealers to require them to act in the best interest of their clients; clarify the nature of the fiduciary obligations owed by registered investment advisers to their clients; impose new disclosure requirements aimed at ensuring investors understand the nature of their relationship with their investment professionals; and restrict certain broker-dealers and their financial professionals from using the terms “adviser” or “advisor.” Public comments were due by August 7, 2018. Although the full impact of the proposed rules can only be measured when the implementing regulations are adopted, the intent of this provision is to authorize the SEC to impose on broker-dealers fiduciary duties to their customers, similar to what applies to investment advisers under existing law. We are currently assessing these proposed rules to determine the impact they may have on our business. In addition, FINRA is also currently focusing on how broker-dealers identify and manage conflicts of interest.
Although many of the regulations implementing portions of the Dodd-Frank Act have been promulgated, we are still unable to predict how this legislation may be interpreted and enforced or the full extent to which implementing regulations and policies may affect us. Also, the Trump administration and Congress have indicated that the Dodd-Frank Act will be under further scrutiny and some of the provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act may be revised, repealed or amended. For example, President Trump has issued an executive order that calls for a comprehensive review of the Dodd-Frank Act and requires the Secretary of the Treasury to consult with the heads of the member agencies of FSOC to identify any laws, regulations or requirements that inhibit federal regulation of the financial system in a manner consistent with the core principles identified in the executive order. In addition, on June 8, 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Financial CHOICE Act of 2017, which proposes to amend or repeal various sections of the Dodd-Frank Act. There is considerable uncertainty with respect to the impact the Trump administration and Congress may have, if any, on the Dodd-Frank Act and any changes likely will take

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time to unfold. We cannot predict the ultimate content, timing or effect of any reform legislation or the impact of potential legislation on us.
ERISA Considerations
We provide certain products and services to employee benefit plans that are subject to the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (“ERISA”) and certain provisions of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”). As such, our activities are subject to the restrictions imposed by ERISA and the Code, including the requirement that fiduciaries must perform their duties solely in the interests of plan participants and beneficiaries, and fiduciaries may not cause or permit a covered plan to engage in certain prohibited transactions with persons (parties-in-interest) who have certain relationships with respect to such plans. The applicable provisions of ERISA and the Code are subject to enforcement by the U.S. Department of Labor (the “DOL”), the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) and the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation.
In April 2016, the DOL issued a rule (the “DOL Rule”) which significantly expanded the range of activities considered to be fiduciary investment advice under ERISA when our advisors and our employees provide investment-related information and support to retirement plan sponsors, participants and IRA holders. In the wake of the March 2018 federal appeals court decision to vacate the DOL Rule, the SEC and NAIC as well as state regulators are currently considering whether to apply an impartial conduct standard similar to the DOL Rule to recommendations made in connection with certain annuities and, in one case, to life insurance policies. For example, the NAIC is actively working on a proposal to raise the advice standard for annuity sales and in July 2018, the NYDFS issued a final version of Regulation 187 that adopts a “best interest” standard for recommendations regarding the sale of life insurance and annuity products in New York. Regulation 187 takes effect on August 1, 2019 with respect to annuity sales and February 1, 2020 for life insurance sales and is applicable to sales of life insurance and annuity products in New York. We are currently assessing Regulation 187 to determine the impact it may have on our business. In November 2018, the three primary agent groups in New York launched a legal challenge against the NYDFS over the adoption of Regulation 187. It is not possible to predict whether this challenge will be successful. Beyond the New York regulation, the likelihood of enactment of any such federal or state-based regulation is uncertain at this time, but if implemented, these regulations could have adverse effects on our business and consolidated results of operations.
International Regulation
Regulators and lawmakers in non-U.S. jurisdictions are engaged in addressing the causes of the financial crisis and means of avoiding such crises in the future. On July 18, 2013, the International Association of Insurance Supervisors (“IAIS”) published an initial assessment methodology for designating global systemically important insurers (“GSIIs”), as part of the global initiative launched by the G20 with the assistance of the Financial Stability Board (the “FSB”) to identify those insurers whose distress or disorderly failure, because of their size, complexity and interconnectedness, would cause significant disruption to the global financial system and economic activity.
On July 18, 2013, the FSB published its initial list of nine GSIIs, which included AXA. The GSII list was originally intended to be updated annually following consultation with the IAIS and respective national supervisory authorities. AXA remained on the list as updated in November 2014, 2015 and 2016. However, the FSB announced in November 2017 that it, in consultation with the IAIS and national authorities, has decided not to publish a new list of GSIIs for 2017. On November 14, 2018, the FSB announced that, in light of IAIS progress in developing a proposed holistic framework for the assessment and mitigation of potential systemic risk in the insurance sector, the FSB has decided not to engage in an identification of G-SIIs in 2018. In its public consultation on the holistic framework, issued on November 14, 2018, the IAIS recommended that the implementation of its proposed holistic framework should obviate the need for the FSB’s annual G-SII identification process. The FSB subsequently stated that it will assess the IAIS’s recommendation to suspend G-SII identification from 2020, once the holistic framework is finalized in November 2019, and, in November 2022, based on the initial implementation of the holistic framework, review the need to either discontinue or reestablish an annual identification of G-SIIs.
The policy measures for GSIIs, published by the IAIS in July 2013, include (i) the introduction of new capital requirements; a “basic” capital requirement (“BCR”) applicable to all GSII activities which is intended to serve as a basis for an additional level of capital, called “Higher Loss Absorbency” (“HLA”) required from GSIIs in relation to their systemic activities, (ii) greater regulatory oversight over holding companies, (iii) various measures to promote the structural and financial “self-sufficiency” of group companies and reduce group interdependencies including restrictions on intra-group financing and other arrangements, and (iv) in general, a greater level of regulatory scrutiny for GSIIs (including a requirement to establish a Systemic Risk Management Plan (“SRMP”), a Liquidity Risk Management Plan (“LRMP”) and a Recovery and Resolution Plan (“RRP”) which have entailed significant new processes, reporting and compliance burdens and costs for AXA. The

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contemplated policy measures include the constitution of a Crisis Management Group by the group-wide supervisor, the preparation of the above-mentioned documents (SRMP, LRMP and RRP) and the development and implementation of the BCR in 2014, while other measures are to be phased in more gradually, such as the HLA (the first version of which was endorsed by the FSB in October 2015 but which is expected to be revised before its implementation in at least 2019).
On June 16, 2016, the IAIS published an updated assessment methodology, applicable to the 2016 designation process, which is yet to be endorsed by the FSB. To support some adjustments proposed by the revised assessment methodology, the IAIS also published a paper on June 16, 2016, describing the “Systemic Features Framework” that the IAIS intends to employ in assessing whether certain contractual features and other factors are likely to expose an insurer to a greater degree of systemic risk, focusing specifically on two sets of risks: macroeconomic exposure and substantial liquidity risk. Also, the IAIS stated that the 2016 assessment methodology, along with the Systemic Features Framework, will lead to a change in HLA design and calibration. In addition, the IAIS is in the process of developing an activities-based approach to systemic risk in the insurance sector and published a consultation paper on this approach in December 2017. The development of this activities-based approach may have significant implications for the identification of GSIIs and the policy measures to which they are expected to be subject.
As part of its efforts to create a common framework for the supervision of internationally active insurance groups (“IAIGs”), the IAIS has also been developing a comprehensive, group-wide international insurance capital standard (the “ICS”) to be applied to both GSIIs and IAIGs, although it is not expected to be finalized until 2019 at the earliest, and is not expected to be fully implemented, if at all, until at least five years thereafter. AXA currently meets the parameters set forth to define an IAIG. Although the BCR and HLA are more developed than the ICS at present, the IAIS has stated that it intends to revisit both standards following development and refinement of the ICS, and that the BCR will eventually be replaced by the ICS. The NAIC plans to develop an “aggregation method” for group capital. Although the aggregation method will not be part of ICS, the IAIS aims to make a determination whether the aggregated approach provides substantially the same outcome as the ICS, in which case it could be incorporated into the ICS as an outcome-equivalent approach.
Although the standards issued by the FSB and/or the IAIS are not binding on the United States or other jurisdictions around the world unless and until the appropriate local governmental bodies or regulators adopt appropriate laws and regulations, these measures could have far reaching regulatory and competitive implications for AXA in the event they are implemented by its group supervisors, which in turn, to the extent we are deemed to be controlled by or an affiliate of AXA at the time the measures are implemented, or we independently meet the criteria for being an IAIG and the measures are adopted by U.S. group supervisors, could materially affect our competitive position, consolidated results of operations, financial condition, liquidity and how we operate our business.
Federal Tax Legislation, Regulation, and Administration
Although we cannot predict what legislative, regulatory, or administrative changes may or may not occur with respect to the federal tax law, we nevertheless endeavor to consider the possible ramifications of such changes on the profitability of our business and the attractiveness of our products to consumers. In this regard, we analyze multiple streams of information, including those described below.
Enacted Legislation
At present, the federal tax laws generally permit certain holders of life insurance and annuity products to defer taxation on the build-up of value within such products (commonly referred to as “inside build-up”) until payments are made to the policyholders or other beneficiaries. From time to time, Congress considers legislation that could enhance or reduce (or eliminate) the benefit of tax deferral on some life insurance and annuity products. As an example, the American Taxpayer’s Relief Act increased individual tax rates for higher-income taxpayers. Higher tax rates increase the benefits of tax deferral on inside build-up and, correspondingly, tend to enhance the attractiveness of life insurance and annuity products to consumers that are subject to those higher tax rates. The Tax Reform Act reduced individual tax rates, which could reduce demand for our products. The modification or elimination of this tax-favored status could also reduce demand for our products. In addition, if the treatment of earnings accrued inside an annuity contract was changed prospectively, and the tax-favored status of existing contracts was grandfathered, holders of existing contracts would be less likely to surrender or rollover their contracts. These changes could reduce our earnings and negatively impact our business.

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The Tax Reform Act
The Tax Reform Act overhauled the U.S. Internal Revenue Code and changed long-standing provisions governing the taxation of U.S. corporations, including life insurance companies. While the Tax Reform Act had a net positive economic impact on us, it contained measures which could have adverse or uncertain impacts on some aspects of our business, results of operations or financial condition. We continue to monitor regulations and interpretations of the Tax Reform Act that could impact our business, results of operations and financial condition. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Macroeconomic and Industry Trends—Impact of the Tax Reform Act.”
Future Changes in U.S. Tax Laws
We anticipate that, following the Tax Reform Act, we will continue deriving tax benefits from certain items, including but not limited to the dividend received deduction (“DRD”), tax credits, insurance reserve deductions and interest expense deductions. However, there is a risk that interpretations of the Tax Reform Act, regulations promulgated thereunder, or future changes to federal, state or other tax laws could reduce or eliminate the tax benefits from these or other items and result in our incurring materially higher taxes.
Regulatory and Other Administrative Guidance from the Treasury Department and the IRS
Regulatory and other administrative guidance from the Treasury Department and the IRS also could impact the amount of federal tax that we pay. For example, the adoption of “principles based” approaches for calculating statutory reserves may lead the Treasury Department and the IRS to issue guidance that changes the way that deductible insurance reserves are determined, potentially reducing future tax deductions for us.
Privacy and Security of Customer Information and Cybersecurity Regulation
We are subject to federal and state laws and regulations that require financial institutions to protect the security and confidentiality of customer information, and to notify customers about their policies and practices relating to their collection and disclosure of customer information and their practices relating to protecting the security and confidentiality of that information. We have adopted a privacy policy outlining procedures and practices to be followed by members of Holdings and its subsidiaries relating to the collection, disclosure and protection of customer information. As required by law, a copy of the privacy policy is mailed to customers on an annual basis. Federal and state laws generally require that we provide notice to affected individuals, law enforcement, regulators and/or potentially others if there is a situation in which customer information is intentionally or accidentally disclosed to and/or acquired by unauthorized third parties. Federal regulations require financial institutions to implement programs to detect, prevent, and mitigate identity theft. Federal and state laws and regulations regulate the ability of financial institutions to make telemarketing calls and to send unsolicited e-mail or fax messages to both consumers and customers, and also regulate the permissible uses of certain categories of customer information. Violation of these laws and regulations may result in significant fines and remediation costs. It may be expected that legislation considered by either the U.S. Congress and/or state legislatures could create additional and/or more detailed obligations relating to the use and protection of customer information.
On February 16, 2017, the NYDFS announced the adoption of a new cybersecurity regulation for financial services institutions, including banking and insurance entities, under its jurisdiction. The new regulation became effective on March 1, 2017 and is being implemented in stages that commenced on August 28, 2017 and will be fully implemented by March 1, 2019. This new regulation requires these entities to, among other things, establish and maintain a cybersecurity policy designed to protect consumers’ private data. We have adopted a cybersecurity policy outlining our policies and procedures for the protection of our information systems and information stored on those systems that comports with the regulation. In addition to New York’s cybersecurity regulation, the NAIC adopted the Insurance Data Security Model Law in October 2017. Under the model law, companies that are compliant with the NYDFS cybersecurity regulation are deemed also to be in compliance with the model law. The purpose of the model law is to establish standards for data security and for the investigation and notification of insurance commissioners of cybersecurity events involving unauthorized access to, or the misuse of, certain nonpublic information. Certain states have adopted the model law, and we expect that additional states will also adopt the model law, although it cannot be predicted whether or not, or in what form or when, they will do so.
Environmental Considerations
Federal, state and local environmental laws and regulations apply to our ownership and operation of real property. Inherent in owning and operating real property are the risk of environmental liabilities and the costs of any required clean-up. Under the

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laws of certain states, contamination of a property may give rise to a lien on the property to secure recovery of the costs of clean-up, which could adversely affect our mortgage lending business. In some states, this lien may have priority over the lien of an existing mortgage against such property. In addition, in some states and under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, or CERCLA, we may be liable, in certain circumstances, as an “owner” or “operator,” for costs of cleaning-up releases or threatened releases of hazardous substances at a property mortgaged to us. We also risk environmental liability when we foreclose on a property mortgaged to us. However, federal legislation provides for a safe harbor from CERCLA liability for secured lenders, provided that certain requirements are met. Application of various other federal and state environmental laws could also result in the imposition of liability on us for costs associated with environmental hazards.
We routinely conduct environmental assessments prior to making a mortgage loan or taking title to real estate, whether through acquisition for investment or through foreclosure on real estate collateralizing mortgages. We cannot provide assurance that unexpected environmental liabilities will not arise. However, based on information currently available to us, we believe that any costs associated with compliance with environmental laws and regulations or any clean-up of properties would not have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations.
Intellectual Property
We rely on a combination of copyright, trademark, patent and trade secret laws to establish and protect our intellectual property rights. Holdings has entered into a licensing arrangement (the “Trademark License Agreement”) with AXA concerning the use by Holdings of the “AXA” name. We also have an extensive portfolio of trademarks and service marks that we consider important in the marketing of our products and services. We regard our intellectual property as valuable assets and protect them against infringement.
Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act
Holdings, AXA Equitable and their global subsidiaries had no transactions or activities requiring disclosure under the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act (“Iran Act”), nor were they involved in the AXA Group matters described immediately below.
The non-U.S. based subsidiaries of AXA operate in compliance with applicable laws and regulations of the various jurisdictions in which they operate, including applicable international (United Nations and European Union) laws and regulations. While AXA Group companies based and operating outside the United States generally are not subject to U.S. law, as an international group, AXA has in place policies and standards (including the AXA Group International Sanctions Policy) that apply to all AXA Group companies worldwide and often impose requirements that go well beyond local law.
AXA has informed us that AXA Konzern AG, an AXA insurance subsidiary organized under the laws of Germany, provides car, accident and health insurance to diplomats based at the Iranian Embassy in Berlin, Germany. The total annual premium of these policies is approximately $139,700 and the annual net profit arising from these policies, which is difficult to calculate with precision, is estimated to be $24,272.
AXA also has informed us that AXA Belgium, an AXA insurance subsidiary organized under the laws of Belgium, has two policies providing for car insurance for Global Trading NV, which was designated on May 17, 2018 under (E.O.) 13224, and subsequently changed its name to Energy Engineers & Construction on August 20, 2018. The total annual premium of these policies is approximately $6,559 before tax and the annual net profit arising from these policies, which is difficult to calculate with precision, is estimated to be $983.
In addition, AXA has informed us that AXA Insurance Ireland, an AXA insurance subsidiary, provides statutorily required car insurance under four separate policies to the Iranian Embassy in Dublin, Ireland. AXA has informed us that compliance with the Declined Cases Agreement of the Irish Government prohibits the cancellation of these policies unless another insurer is willing to assume the coverage. The total annual premium for these policies is approximately $7,115 and the annual net profit arising from these policies, which is difficult to calculate with precision, is estimated to be $853.
Also, AXA has informed us that AXA Sigorta, a subsidiary of AXA organized under the laws of the Republic of Turkey, provides car insurance coverage for vehicle pools of the Iranian General Consulate and the Iranian Embassy in Istanbul, Turkey. Motor liability insurance coverage is compulsory in Turkey and cannot be canceled unilaterally. The total annual premium in

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respect of these policies is approximately $3,150 and the annual net profit, which is difficult to calculate with precision, is estimated to be $473.
Additionally, AXA has informed us that AXA Winterthur, an AXA insurance subsidiary organized under the laws of Switzerland, provides Naftiran Intertrade, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Iranian state-owned National Iranian Oil Company, with life, disability and accident coverage for its employees. In addition, AXA Winterthur also provides car and property insurance coverage for the Iranian Embassy in Bern. The provision of these forms of coverage is mandatory in Switzerland. The total annual premium of these policies is approximately $396,597 and the annual net profit arising from these policies, which is difficult to calculate with precision, is estimated to be $59,489.
Also, AXA has informed us that AXA Egypt, an AXA insurance subsidiary organized under the laws of Egypt, provides the Iranian state-owned Iran Development Bank, two life insurance contracts, covering individuals who have loans with the bank. The total annual premium of these policies is approximately $19,839 and annual net profit arising from these policies, which is difficult to calculate with precision, is estimated to be $2,000.
Furthermore, AXA has informed us that AXA XL, which AXA acquired during the third quarter of 2018, through various non-U.S. subsidiaries, provides insurance to marine policyholders located outside of the U.S. or reinsurance coverage to non-U.S. insurers of marine risks as well as mutual associations of ship owners that provide their members with protection and liability coverage. The provision of these coverages may involve entities or activities related to Iran, including transporting crude oil, petrochemicals and refined petroleum products. AXA XL’s non-U.S. subsidiaries insure or reinsure multiple voyages and fleets containing multiple ships, so they are unable to attribute gross revenues and net profits from such marine policies to activities with Iran. As the activities of these insureds and re-insureds are permitted under applicable laws and regulations, AXA XL intends for its non-U.S. subsidiaries to continue providing such coverage to its insureds and re-insureds to the extent permitted by applicable law.
Lastly, a non-U.S. subsidiary of AXA XL provided accident & health insurance coverage to the diplomatic personnel of the Embassy of Iran in Brussels, Belgium during the third quarter of 2018. AXA XL’s non-U.S. subsidiary received aggregate payments for this insurance from inception through December 31, 2018 of approximately $73,451. Benefits of approximately $2,994 were paid to beneficiaries during 2018. These activities are permitted pursuant to applicable law. The policy has been canceled and is no longer in force.
The aggregate annual premium for the above-referenced insurance policies is approximately $646,411, representing approximately 0.0006% of AXA’s 2018 consolidated revenues, which exceed $100 billion. The related net profit, which is difficult to calculate with precision, is estimated to be $88,070, representing approximately 0.001% of AXA’s 2018 aggregate net profit.
EMPLOYEES
As of December 31, 2018, the Company had approximately 4,200 full time employees.

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Part I, Item 1A.
RISK FACTORS
You should consider and read carefully all of the risks and uncertainties described below, as well as other information set forth in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The risks described below are not the only ones facing us. The occurrence of any of the following risks or additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or that we currently believe to be immaterial could materially and adversely affect our business, financial position, results of operations or cash flows. This Annual Report on Form 10-K also contains forward-looking statements and estimates that involve risks and uncertainties. Our actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in the forward-looking statements as a result of specific factors, including the risks and uncertainties described below.
Risks Relating to Our Business
Risks Relating to Conditions in the Financial Markets and Economy
Conditions in the global capital markets and the economy could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Our business, results of operations or financial condition are materially affected by conditions in the global capital markets and the economy generally. A wide variety of factors continue to impact economic conditions and consumer confidence. These factors include, among others, concerns over the pace of economic growth in the United States, equity market performance, continued low interest rates, uncertainty regarding the U.S. Federal Reserve’s plans to further raise short-term interest rates, the strength of the U.S. dollar, uncertainty created by actions the Trump administration and Congress may pursue, global trade wars, global economic factors including quantitative easing or similar programs by major central banks or the unwinding of quantitative easing or similar programs, the United Kingdom’s vote to exit (“Brexit”) from the European Union (the “EU”), and other geopolitical issues. Given our interest rate and equity market exposure in our investment and derivatives portfolios and many of our products, these factors could have a material adverse effect on us. Our revenues may decline, our profit margins could erode and we could incur significant losses. The value of our investments and derivatives portfolios may also be impacted by reductions in price transparency, changes in the assumptions or methodology we use to estimate fair value and changes in investor confidence or preferences, which could potentially result in higher realized or unrealized losses and have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition. Market volatility may also make it difficult to transact in or to value certain of our securities if trading becomes less frequent.
Factors such as consumer spending, business investment, government debt and spending, the volatility and strength of the equity markets, interest rates, deflation and inflation all affect the business and economic environment and, ultimately, the amount and profitability of our business. In an economic downturn characterized by higher unemployment, lower family income, lower corporate earnings, lower business investment and lower consumer spending, the demand for our retirement, protection or investment products and our investment returns could be materially and adversely affected. The profitability of many of our retirement, protection and investment products depends in part on the value of the General Account and Separate Accounts supporting them, which may fluctuate substantially depending on any of the foregoing conditions. In addition, a change in market conditions could cause a change in consumer sentiment and adversely affect sales and could cause the actual persistency of these products to vary from their anticipated persistency (the probability that a product will remain in force from one period to the next) and adversely affect profitability. Changing economic conditions or adverse public perception of financial institutions can influence customer behavior, which can result in, among other things, an increase or decrease in the levels of claims, lapses, deposits, surrenders and withdrawals in certain products, any of which could adversely affect profitability. Our policyholders may choose to defer paying insurance premiums or stop paying insurance premiums altogether. In addition, market conditions may affect the availability and cost of reinsurance protections and the availability and performance of hedging instruments in ways that could materially and adversely affect our profitability.
Accordingly, both market and economic factors may affect our business results by adversely affecting our business volumes, profitability, cash flow, capitalization and overall financial condition. Disruptions in one market or asset class can also spread to other markets or asset classes. Upheavals and stagnation in the financial markets could also materially affect our financial condition (including our liquidity and capital levels) as a result of the impact of such events on our assets and liabilities.

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Equity market declines and volatility may materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Declines or volatility in the equity markets, such as that which we experienced during the fourth quarter of 2018, can negatively impact our investment returns as well as our business, results of operations or financial condition. For example, equity market declines or volatility could, among other things, decrease the AV of our annuity and variable life contracts which, in turn, would reduce the amount of revenue we derive from fees charged on those account and asset values. Our variable annuity business in particular is highly sensitive to equity markets, and a sustained weakness or stagnation in equity markets could decrease our revenues and earnings with respect to those products. At the same time, for variable annuity contracts that include GMxB features, equity market declines increase the amount of our potential obligations related to such GMxB features and could increase the cost of executing GMxB-related hedges beyond what was anticipated in the pricing of the products being hedged. This could result in an increase in claims and reserves related to those contracts, net of any reinsurance reimbursements or proceeds from our hedging programs. We may not be able to effectively mitigate, including through our hedging strategies, and we may sometimes choose based on economic considerations and other factors not to fully mitigate the equity market volatility of our portfolio. Equity market declines and volatility may also influence policyholder behavior, which may adversely impact the levels of surrenders, withdrawals and amounts of withdrawals of our annuity and variable life contracts or cause policyholders to reallocate a portion of their account balances to more conservative investment options (which may have lower fees), which could negatively impact our future profitability or increase our benefit obligations particularly if they were to remain in such options during an equity market increase. Market volatility can negatively impact the value of equity securities we hold for investment which could in turn reduce our statutory capital. In addition, equity market volatility could reduce demand for variable products relative to fixed products, lead to changes in estimates underlying our calculations of DAC that, in turn, could accelerate our DAC amortization and reduce our current earnings and result in changes to the fair value of our GMIB reinsurance contracts and GMxB liabilities, which could increase the volatility of our earnings. Lastly, periods of high market volatility or adverse conditions could decrease the availability or increase the cost of derivatives.
Interest rate fluctuations or prolonged periods of low interest rates may materially and adversely impact our business, consolidated results of operations or financial condition.
We are affected by the monetary policies of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (“Federal Reserve Board”) and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York (collectively, with the Federal Reserve Board, the “Federal Reserve”) and other major central banks, including the unwinding of quantitative easing programs, as such policies may adversely impact the level of interest rates and, as discussed below, the income we earn on our investments or the level of product sales.
Some of our retirement and protection products and certain of our investment products, and our investment returns, are sensitive to interest rate fluctuations, and changes in interest rates may adversely affect our investment returns and results of operations, including in the following respects:
changes in interest rates may reduce the spread on some of our products between the amounts that we are required to pay under the contracts and the rate of return we are able to earn on our General Account investments supporting the contracts. When interest rates decline, we have to reinvest the cash income from our investments in lower yielding instruments, potentially reducing net investment income. Since many of our policies and contracts have guaranteed minimum interest or crediting rates or limit the resetting of interest rates, the spreads could decrease and potentially become negative. When interest rates rise, we may not be able to quickly replace the assets in our General Account with higher yielding assets needed to fund the higher crediting rates necessary to keep these products and contracts competitive, which may result in higher lapse rates;
when interest rates rise rapidly, policy loans and surrenders and withdrawals of annuity contracts and life insurance policies may increase as policyholders seek to buy products with perceived higher returns, requiring us to sell investment assets potentially resulting in realized investment losses, or requiring us to accelerate the amortization of DAC, which could reduce our net income;
a decline in interest rates accompanied by unexpected prepayments of certain investments may result in reduced investment income and a decline in our profitability. An increase in interest rates accompanied by unexpected extensions of certain lower yielding investments may result in a decline in our profitability;
changes in the relationship between long-term and short-term interest rates may adversely affect the profitability of some of our products;
changes in interest rates could result in changes to the fair value of our GMIB reinsurance contracts asset, which could increase the volatility of our earnings. Higher interest rates reduce the value of the GMIB reinsurance contract asset

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which reduces our earnings, while lower interest rates increase the value of the GMIB reinsurance contract asset which increases our earnings;
changes in interest rates could result in changes to the fair value liability of our variable annuity GMxB business. Higher interest rates decrease the fair value liability of our GMxB variable annuity business, which increases our earnings; while lower interest rates increase the fair value liability of our GMxB variable annuity business, which decreases our earnings;
changes in interest rates may adversely impact our liquidity and increase our costs of financing and the cost of some of our hedges;
our mitigation efforts with respect to interest rate risk are primarily focused on maintaining an investment portfolio with diversified maturities that has a weighted average duration that is within an acceptable range of the duration of our estimated liability cash flow profile given our risk appetite. However, our estimate of the liability cash flow profile may turn out to be inaccurate. In addition, there are practical and capital market limitations on our ability to accomplish this objective. Due to these and other factors we may need to liquidate investments prior to maturity at a loss in order to satisfy liabilities or be forced to reinvest funds in a lower rate environment;
we may not be able to effectively mitigate, including through our hedging strategies, and we may sometimes choose based on economic considerations and other factors not to fully mitigate or to increase, the interest rate risk of our assets relative to our liabilities; and
for certain of our products, a delay between the time we make changes in interest rate and other assumptions used for product pricing and the time we are able to reflect these assumptions in products available for sale may negatively impact the long-term profitability of products sold during the intervening period.
Recent periods have been characterized by low interest rates relative to historical levels. A prolonged period during which interest rates remain low may result in greater costs associated with our variable annuity products with GMxB features; higher costs for some derivative instruments used to hedge certain of our product risks; or shortfalls in investment income on assets supporting policy obligations as our portfolio earnings decline over time, each of which may require us to record charges to increase reserves. In addition, an extended period of declining interest rates or a prolonged period of low interest rates may also cause us to change our long-term view of the interest rates that we can earn on our investments. Such a change in our view would cause us to change the long-term interest rate that we assume in our calculation of insurance assets and liabilities under U.S. GAAP. Any future revision would result in increased reserves, accelerated amortization of DAC and other unfavorable consequences. In addition, certain statutory capital and reserve requirements are based on formulas or models that consider interest rates, and an extended period of low interest rates may increase the statutory capital we are required to hold and the amount of assets we must maintain to support statutory reserves. In addition to compressing spreads and reducing net investment income, such an environment may cause certain policies to remain in force for longer periods than we anticipated in our pricing, potentially resulting in greater claims costs than we expected and resulting in lower overall returns on business in force.
We manage interest rate risk as part of our asset and liability management strategies, which include (i) maintaining an investment portfolio with diversified maturities that has a weighted average duration that is within an acceptable range of the duration of our estimated liability cash flow profile given our risk appetite and (ii) our hedging programs. For certain of our liability portfolios, it is not possible to invest assets to the full liability duration, thereby creating some asset/liability mismatch. Where a liability cash flow may exceed the maturity of available assets, as is the case with certain retirement products, we may support such liabilities with equity investments, derivatives or interest rate mismatch strategies. We take measures to manage the economic risks of investing in a changing interest rate environment, but we may not be able to mitigate the interest rate risk of our fixed income investments relative to our interest sensitive liabilities. Widening credit spreads, if not offset by equal or greater declines in the risk-free interest rate, would also cause the total interest rate payable on newly issued securities to increase, and thus would have the same effect as an increase in underlying interest rates.
Adverse capital and credit market conditions may significantly affect our ability to meet liquidity needs, our access to capital and our cost of capital.
The capital and credit markets may experience, and have experienced, varying degrees of volatility and disruption. In some cases, the markets have exerted downward pressure on availability of liquidity and credit capacity for certain issuers. We need liquidity to pay our operating expenses (including potential hedging losses), interest expenses and any dividends. Without sufficient liquidity, we could be required to curtail our operations and our business would suffer.

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While we expect that our future liquidity needs will be satisfied primarily through cash generated by our operations, borrowings from third parties and dividends and distributions from our subsidiaries, it is possible that the level of cash and securities we maintain when combined with expected cash inflows from investments and operations will not be adequate to meet our anticipated short-term and long-term benefit and expense payment obligations. If current resources are insufficient to satisfy our needs, we may access financing sources such as bank debt or the capital markets. The availability of additional financing would depend on a variety of factors, such as market conditions, the general availability of credit, the volume of trading activities, the overall availability of credit to the financial services industry, interest rates, credit spreads, our credit ratings and credit capacity, as well as the possibility that our customers or lenders could develop a negative perception of our long- or short-term financial prospects if we incur large investment losses or if the level of our business activity decreases due to a market downturn. Similarly, our access to funds may be rendered more costly or impaired if rating agencies downgrade our ratings or if regulatory authorities take certain actions against us. If we are unable to access capital markets to issue new debt or refinance existing debt as needed, or if we are unable to obtain such financing on acceptable terms, our business could be adversely impacted.
Volatility in the capital markets may also consume liquidity as we pay hedge losses and meet collateral requirements related to market movements. We maintain hedging programs to reduce our net economic exposure under long-term liabilities to risks such as interest rates and equity market levels. We expect these hedging programs to incur losses in certain market scenarios, creating a need to pay cash settlements or post collateral to counterparties. Although our liabilities will also be reduced in these scenarios, this reduction is not immediate, and so in the short-term hedging losses will reduce available liquidity. Liquidity may also be consumed by increased required contributions to captive reinsurance trusts. For more details, see “—Risks Relating to Our Business—Risks Relating to Our Reinsurance and Hedging Programs—Our reinsurance arrangements with affiliated captives may be adversely impacted by changes to policyholder behavior assumptions under the reinsured contracts, the performance of their hedging program, their liquidity needs, their overall financial results and changes in regulatory requirements regarding the use of captives.”
Disruptions, uncertainty or volatility in the capital and credit markets may also limit our access to capital. Such market conditions may in the future limit our ability to raise additional capital to support business growth, or to counter-balance the consequences of losses or increased regulatory reserves and rating agency capital requirements. Our business, results of operations, financial condition, liquidity, statutory capital or rating agency capital position could be materially and adversely affected by disruptions in the financial markets.
Future changes in our credit ratings are possible, and any downgrade to our ratings is likely to increase our borrowing costs and limit our access to the capital markets and could be detrimental to our business relationships with distribution partners. If this occurs, we may be forced to incur unanticipated costs or revise our strategic plans, which could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Risks Relating to Our Operations
During the course of preparing our U.S. GAAP financial statements, our management identified two material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting. If our remediation of these material weaknesses is not effective, we may not be able to report our financial condition or results of operations accurately or on a timely basis.
During the course of preparing our U.S. GAAP financial statements, our management identified two material weaknesses in the design and operation of our internal control over financial reporting. A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of a company’s annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.
Our management consequently concluded that we do not: (1) maintain effective controls to timely validate that actuarial models are properly configured to capture all relevant product features and to provide reasonable assurance that timely reviews of assumptions and data have occurred, and, as a result, errors were identified in future policyholders’ benefits and deferred policy acquisition costs balances; and (2) maintain sufficient experienced personnel to prepare the Company’s consolidated financial statements and to verify that consolidating and adjusting journal entries were completely and accurately recorded to the appropriate accounts and, as a result, errors were identified in the Company’s consolidated financial statements, including in the presentation and disclosure between sections of the statement of cash flows.
These material weaknesses resulted in misstatements in the Company’s previously issued annual and interim financial statements and resulted in the restatement of the annual financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2016, the revision

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to each of the quarterly interim periods for 2017 and 2016, and the revision of the annual financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2015.
In addition, during the preparation of our quarterly report on Form 10-Q for the six months ended June 30, 2018, management identified a misclassification error between interest credited and net derivative gains/losses, which resulted in misstatements in the consolidated statements of income (loss) and statements of cash flows that were not considered material. Accordingly, we: (i) revised the annual financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2017; (ii) revised the annual financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2016; and (iii) revised the interim financial statements for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 and for the six months ended June 30, 2017.
Further, in connection with preparing our quarterly report on Form 10-Q for the nine months ended September 30, 2018, management identified errors primarily related to the calculation of policyholders’ benefit reserves for our life and annuity products and the calculation of net derivative gains (losses) and DAC amortization for certain variable and interest sensitive life products. Accordingly, we: (i) revised the interim financial statements for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 and the six months ended June 30, 2017 from the previously reported interim financial statements; (ii) revised the interim financial statements for the six months ended June 30, 2018 and the three months ended March 31, 2018 and 2017 from the previously reported interim financial statements; (iii) revised the annual financial statements for the years ended December 31, 2017 from the Company’s Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q for the quarterly periods ended March 31, 2018 and June 30, 2018; (iv) and revised the annual financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2016 from the Company’s Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q for the quarterly periods ended March 31, 2018 and June 30, 2018.
Lastly, in connection with preparing our annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018, management identified certain cash flows that were incorrectly classified in the Company’s historical consolidated statements of cash flows. The impact of these misclassifications was not considered material. Accordingly, the Company revised the interim financial statements for the three, six, and nine months ended March 31, June 30 and September 30, 2018 and 2017 and the annual financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2017.
The changes necessary to correct the identified misstatements in our previously reported historical results have been appropriately reflected in our consolidated annual financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Until remedied, these material weaknesses could result in a misstatement of our consolidated financial statements or disclosures that would result in a material misstatement to our annual or interim financial statements that would not be prevented or detected.
Since identifying the two material weaknesses, we have been, and are currently in the process of, remediating each material weakness. Although we plan to complete the remediation process as quickly as possible for each material weakness, we cannot at this time estimate when the remediation will be completed. For additional information, see “Controls and Procedures-Remediation Status of Material Weaknesses.”
If we fail to remediate effectively these material weaknesses or if we identify additional material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, we may be unable to report our financial condition or financial results accurately or to report them within the timeframes required by the SEC. If this were the case, we could become subject to sanctions or investigations by the SEC or other regulatory authorities. Furthermore, failure to report our financial condition or financial results accurately or report them within the timeframes required by the SEC could cause us to curtail or cease sales of certain variable insurance products. In addition, if we are unable to determine that our internal control over financial reporting or our disclosure controls and procedures are effective, users of our financial statements may lose confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports, we may face reduced ability to obtain financing and restricted access to the capital markets, and we may be required to curtail or cease sales of our products. See “Controls and Procedures” in Part II, Item 9A.
Failure to protect the confidentiality of customer information or proprietary business information could adversely affect our reputation and have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Our business and relationships with customers are dependent upon our ability to maintain the confidentiality of our customers’ proprietary business and confidential information (including customer transactional data and personal data about our employees, our customers and the employees and customers of our customers). Pursuant to federal laws, various federal regulatory and law enforcement agencies have established rules protecting the privacy and security of personal information. In addition, most states, including New York, have enacted laws, which vary significantly from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, to safeguard the privacy and security of personal information.

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We and certain of our vendors retain confidential information in our information systems and in cloud-based systems (including customer transactional data and personal information about our customers, the employees and customers of our customers, and our own employees). We rely on commercial technologies and third parties to maintain the security of those systems. Anyone who is able to circumvent our security measures and penetrate our information systems, those of our vendors, or the cloud-based systems we use, could access, view, misappropriate, alter or delete any information in the systems, including personally identifiable customer information and proprietary business information. It is possible that an employee, contractor or representative could, intentionally or unintentionally, disclose or misappropriate personal information or other confidential information. Our employees, distribution partners and other vendors may use portable computers or mobile devices which may contain similar information to that in our information systems, and these devices have been and can be lost, stolen or damaged. In addition, an increasing number of states require that customers be notified if a security breach results in the inappropriate disclosure of personally identifiable customer information. Any compromise of the security of our information systems, or those of our vendors, or the cloud-based systems we use, through cyber-attacks or for any other reason that results in inappropriate disclosure of personally identifiable customer information could damage our reputation in the marketplace, deter people from purchasing our products, subject us to significant civil and criminal liability and require us to incur significant technical, legal and other expenses any of which could have a material adverse effect on our reputation, business, results of operations or financial condition.
For example, in November 2018, we were notified by one of our third-party vendors of an incident involving unauthorized access to confidential information of certain of our customers, as well as customer information of a number of other institutions. In accordance with applicable law and regulations, we have notified the appropriate regulators and our affected customers. We have also conducted a thorough investigation of this security breach and believe it has been resolved. However, we cannot provide assurances that all potential causes of the incident have been identified and remediated or that a similar incident will not occur again.
Our own operational failures or those of service providers on which we rely, including failures arising out of human error, could disrupt our business, damage our reputation and have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Weaknesses or failures in our internal processes or systems could lead to disruption of our operations, liability to clients, exposure to disciplinary action or harm to our reputation. Our business is highly dependent on our ability to process, on a daily basis, large numbers of transactions, many of which are highly complex, across numerous and diverse markets. These transactions generally must comply with client investment guidelines, as well as stringent legal and regulatory standards.
Weaknesses or failures within a vendor’s internal processes or systems, or inadequate business continuity plans, can materially disrupt our business operations. In addition, vendors may lack the necessary infrastructure or resources to effectively safeguard our confidential data. If we are unable to effectively manage the risks associated with such third-party relationships, we may suffer fines, disciplinary action and reputational damage.
Our obligations to clients require us to exercise skill, care and prudence in performing our services. The large number of transactions we process makes it highly likely that errors will occasionally occur. If we make a mistake in performing our services that causes financial harm to a client, we have a duty to act promptly to put the client in the position the client would have been in had we not made the error. The occurrence of mistakes, particularly significant ones, can have a material adverse effect on our reputation, business, results of operations or financial condition.
Our information systems may fail or their security may be compromised, which could materially and adversely impact our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Our business is highly dependent upon the effective operation of our information systems. We also have arrangements in place with outside vendors and other service providers through which we share and receive information. We rely on these systems throughout our business for a variety of functions, including processing claims and applications, providing information to customers and third-party distribution firms, performing actuarial analyses and modeling, hedging, performing operational tasks (e.g., processing transactions and calculating net asset value) and maintaining financial records. Our information systems and those of our outside vendors and service providers may be vulnerable to physical or cyber-attacks, computer viruses or other computer related attacks, programming errors and similar disruptive problems. In some cases, such physical and electronic break-ins, cyber-attacks or other security breaches may not be immediately detected. In addition, we could experience a failure of one or these systems, our employees or agents could fail to monitor and implement enhancements or other modifications to a system in a timely and effective manner, or our employees or agents could fail to complete all

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necessary data reconciliation or other conversion controls when implementing a new software system or implementing modifications to an existing system. The failure of these systems for any reason could cause significant interruptions to our operations, which could result in a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition. In addition, a failure of these systems could lead to the possibility of litigation or regulatory investigations or actions, including regulatory actions by state and federal governmental authorities. While we take preventative measures to avoid cyber-attacks and other security breaches, we cannot guarantee that such measures will successfully prevent an attack or breach.
Many of the software applications that we use in our business are licensed from, and supported, upgraded and maintained by, vendors. A suspension or termination of certain of these licenses or the related support, upgrades and maintenance could cause temporary system delays or interruptions. Additionally, technology rapidly evolves and we cannot guarantee that our competitors may not implement more advanced technology platforms for their products and services, which may place us at a competitive disadvantage and materially and adversely affect our results of operations and business prospects.
Our service providers, including service providers to whom we outsource certain of our functions, are also subject to the risks outlined above, any one of which could result in our incurring substantial costs and other negative consequences, including a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
On February 16, 2017, the NYDFS issued final Cybersecurity Requirements for Financial Services Companies that require banks, insurance companies and other financial services institutions regulated by the NYDFS, including us, to, among other things, establish and maintain a cybersecurity policy “designed to protect consumers and ensure the safety and soundness of New York State’s financial services industry.” The regulation went into effect on March 1, 2017 and has transition periods ranging from 180 days to two years. We have a cybersecurity policy in place outlining our policies and procedures for the protection of our information systems and information stored on those systems that comports with the regulation. In accordance with the regulation, our Chief Information Security Officer reports to the Board. In addition to New York’s cybersecurity regulation, the NAIC adopted the Insurance Data Security Model Law in October 2017. Under the model law, companies that are compliant with the NYDFS cybersecurity regulation are deemed also to be in compliance with the model law. The purpose of the model law is to establish standards for data security and for the investigation and notification of insurance commissioners of cybersecurity events involving unauthorized access to, or the misuse of, certain nonpublic information. Certain states have adopted the model law, and we expect that additional states will begin adopting the model law, although it cannot be predicted whether or not, or in what form or when, they will do so. We are currently evaluating these regulations and their potential impact on our operations, and, with respect to the NYDFS regulations, have begun implementing compliance procedures for those portions of the regulation that are in effect. Depending on our assessment of these and other potential implementation requirements, we and other financial services companies may be required to incur significant expense in order to comply with these regulatory mandates.
Central banks in Europe and Japan have in recent years begun to pursue negative interest rate policies, and the Federal Open Market Committee has not ruled out the possibility that the Federal Reserve would adopt a negative interest rate policy for the United States, at some point in the future, if circumstances so warranted. Because negative interest rates are largely unprecedented, there is uncertainty as to whether the technology used by financial institutions, including us, could operate correctly in such a scenario. Should negative interest rates emerge, our hardware or software, or the hardware or software used by our contractual counterparties and financial services providers, may not function as expected or at all. In such a case, our business, results of operations or financial condition could be materially and adversely affected.
We face competition from other insurance companies, banks, asset managers and other financial institutions, which may adversely impact our market share and consolidated results of operations.
There is strong competition among insurers, banks, asset managers, brokerage firms and other financial institutions and financial services providers seeking clients for the types of products and services we provide. Competition is intense among a broad range of financial institutions and other financial service providers for retirement and other savings dollars. As a result, this competition makes it especially difficult to provide unique products because, once such products are made available to the public, they often are reproduced and offered by our competitors. As with any highly competitive market, competitive pricing structures are important. If competitors charge lower fees for similar products or strategies, we may decide to reduce the fees on our own products or strategies (either directly on a gross basis or on a net basis through fee waivers) in order to retain or attract customers. Such fee reductions, or other effects of competition, could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.

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Competition may adversely impact our market share and profitability. Many of our competitors are large and well-established and some have greater market share or breadth of distribution, offer a broader range of products, services or features, assume a greater level of risk, have greater financial resources, have higher claims-paying or credit ratings, have better brand recognition or have more established relationships with clients than we do. We may also face competition from new market entrants or non-traditional or online competitors, which may have a material adverse effect on our business.
Our ability to compete is dependent on numerous factors including, among others, the successful implementation of our strategy; our financial strength as evidenced, in part, by our financial and claims-paying ratings; new regulations or different interpretations of existing regulations; our access to diversified sources of distribution; our size and scale; our product quality, range, features/functionality and price; our ability to bring customized products to the market quickly; our technological capabilities; our ability to explain complicated products and features to our distribution channels and customers; crediting rates on our fixed products; the visibility, recognition and understanding of our brands in the marketplace; our reputation and quality of service; the tax-favored status certain of our products receive under current federal and state laws; and, with respect to variable annuity and insurance products, mutual funds and other investment products, investment options, flexibility and investment management performance.
Many of our competitors also have been able to increase their distribution systems through mergers, acquisitions, partnerships or other contractual arrangements. Furthermore, larger competitors may have lower operating costs and have an ability to absorb greater risk, while maintaining financial strength ratings, allowing them to price products more competitively. These competitive pressures could result in increased pressure on the pricing of certain of our products and services, and could harm our ability to maintain or increase profitability. In addition, if our financial strength and credit ratings are lower than our competitors, we may experience increased surrenders or a significant decline in sales. The competitive landscape in which we operate may be further affected by government sponsored programs or regulatory changes in the United States and similar governmental actions outside of the United States. Competitors that receive governmental financing, guarantees or other assistance, or that are not subject to the same regulatory constraints, may have or obtain pricing or other competitive advantages. Due to the competitive nature of the financial services industry, there can be no assurance that we will continue to effectively compete within the industry or that competition will not materially and adversely impact our business, results of operations or financial condition.
We may also face competition from new entrants into our markets, many of whom are leveraging digital technology that may challenge the position of traditional financial service companies, including us, by providing new services or creating new distribution channels.
The inability of AXA Advisors and AXA Network to recruit, motivate and retain experienced and productive financial professionals and our inability to recruit, motivate and retain key employees may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Financial professionals associated with AXA Advisors and AXA Network and our key employees are key factors driving our sales. Intense competition exists among insurers and other financial services companies for financial professionals and key employees. Companies compete for financial professionals principally with respect to compensation policies, products and sales support. Competition is particularly intense in the hiring and retention of experienced financial professionals. Our ability to incentivize our employees and financial professionals may be adversely affected by tax reform. We cannot provide assurances that we, AXA Advisors or AXA Network will be successful in our respective efforts to recruit, motivate and retain key employees and top financial professionals, and the loss of such employees and professionals could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
We also rely upon the knowledge and experience of employees involved in functions that require technical expertise in order to provide for sound operational controls for our overall enterprise, including the accurate and timely preparation of required regulatory filings and U.S. GAAP and statutory financial statements and operation of internal controls. A loss of such employees, including as a result of shifting our real estate footprint away from the New York metropolitan area, could adversely impact our ability to execute key operational functions and could adversely affect our operational controls, including internal control over financial reporting.

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Misconduct by our employees or financial professionals associated with us could expose us to significant legal liability and reputational harm.
Past or future misconduct by our employees, financial professionals associated with us, agents, intermediaries, representatives of our broker-dealer subsidiaries or employees of our vendors could result in violations of law by us or our subsidiaries, regulatory sanctions or serious reputational or financial harm and the precautions we take to prevent and detect this activity may not be effective in all cases. We employ controls and procedures designed to monitor employees’ and financial professionals’ business decisions and to prevent us from taking excessive or inappropriate risks, including with respect to information security, but employees may take such risks regardless of such controls and procedures. Our compensation policies and practices are reviewed by us as part of our overall risk management program, but it is possible that such compensation policies and practices could inadvertently incentivize excessive or inappropriate risk taking. If our employees or financial professionals take excessive or inappropriate risks, those risks could harm our reputation, subject us to significant civil or criminal liability and require us to incur significant technical, legal and other expenses.
We may engage in strategic transactions that could pose risks and present financial, managerial and operational challenges.
We may, from time to time, consider potential strategic transactions, including acquisitions, dispositions, mergers, consolidations, joint ventures and similar transactions, some of which may be material. These transactions may not be effective and could result in decreased earnings and harm to our competitive position. In addition, these transactions, if undertaken, may involve a number of risks and present financial, managerial and operational challenges, including:
adverse effects on our earnings;
additional demand on our existing employees;
unanticipated difficulties integrating operating facilities technologies and new technologies;
higher than anticipated costs related to integration;
existence of unknown liabilities or contingencies that arise after closing; and
potential disputes with counterparties.
Acquisitions also pose the risk that any business we acquire may lose customers or employees or could underperform relative to expectations. Additionally, the loss of investment personnel poses the risk that we may lose the AUM we expected to manage, which could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition. Furthermore, strategic transactions may require us to increase our leverage or, if we issue shares to fund an acquisition, would dilute the holdings of the existing stockholders. Any of the above could cause us to fail to realize the benefits anticipated from any such transaction.
Our business could be materially and adversely affected by the occurrence of a catastrophe, including natural or man-made disasters.
Any catastrophic event, such as pandemic diseases, terrorist attacks, floods, severe storms or hurricanes or computer cyber-terrorism, could have a material and adverse effect on our business in several respects:
we could experience long-term interruptions in our service and the services provided by our significant vendors due to the effects of catastrophic events. Some of our operational systems are not fully redundant, and our disaster recovery and business continuity planning cannot account for all eventualities. Additionally, unanticipated problems with our disaster recovery systems could further impede our ability to conduct business, particularly if those problems affect our computer-based data processing, transmission, storage and retrieval systems and destroy valuable data;
 the occurrence of a pandemic disease could have a material adverse effect on our liquidity and the operating results of our insurance business due to increased mortality and, in certain cases, morbidity rates;
the occurrence of any pandemic disease, natural disaster, terrorist attack or any other catastrophic event that results in our workforce being unable to be physically located at one of our facilities could result in lengthy interruptions in our service;
a localized catastrophic event that affects the location of one or more of our corporate-owned or employer-sponsored life insurance customers could cause a significant loss due to the corresponding mortality claims; and

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a terrorist attack in the United States could have long-term economic impacts that may have severe negative effects on our investment portfolio, including loss of AUM and losses due to significant volatility, and disrupt our business operations. Any continuous and heightened threat of terrorist attacks could also result in increased costs of reinsurance.
In the event of a disaster, such as a natural catastrophe, epidemic, industrial accident, blackout, computer virus, terrorist attack, cyber-attack or war, unanticipated problems with our disaster recovery systems could have a material adverse impact on our ability to conduct business and on our results of operations and financial position, particularly if those problems affect our computer-based data processing, transmission, storage and retrieval systems and destroy valuable data. Our ability to conduct business may be adversely affected by a disruption in the infrastructure that supports our operations and the communities in which they are located. This may include a disruption involving electrical, communications, transportation or other services we may use or third parties with which we conduct business. If a disruption occurs in one location and our employees in that location are unable to occupy our offices or communicate with or travel to other locations, our ability to conduct business with and on behalf of our clients may suffer, and we may not be able to successfully implement contingency plans that depend on communication or travel. Furthermore, unauthorized access to our systems as a result of a security breach, the failure of our systems, or the loss of data could give rise to legal proceedings or regulatory penalties under laws protecting the privacy of personal information, disrupt operations and damage our reputation.
Our operations require experienced, professional staff. Loss of a substantial number of such persons or an inability to provide properly equipped places for them to work may, by disrupting our operations, adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition. In addition, our property and business interruption insurance may not be adequate to compensate us for all losses, failures or breaches that may occur.
We may not be able to protect our intellectual property and may be subject to infringement claims by a third party.
We rely on a combination of contractual rights, copyright, trademark and trade secret laws to establish and protect our intellectual property. Third parties may infringe or misappropriate our intellectual property. The loss of intellectual property protection or the inability to secure or enforce the protection of our intellectual property assets could have a material adverse effect on our business and our ability to compete. Third parties may have, or may eventually be issued, patents or other protections that could be infringed by our products, methods, processes or services or could limit our ability to offer certain product features. In recent years, there has been increasing intellectual property litigation in the financial services industry challenging, among other things, product designs and business processes. If we were found to have infringed or misappropriated a third-party patent or other intellectual property right, we could in some circumstances be enjoined from providing certain products or services to our customers or from using and benefiting from certain patents, copyrights, trademarks, trade secrets or licenses. Alternatively, we could be required to enter into costly licensing arrangements with third parties or implement a costly alternative. Any of these scenarios could harm our reputation and have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
The insurance that we maintain may not fully cover all potential exposures.
We maintain property, business interruption, cyber, casualty and other types of insurance, but such insurance may not cover all risks associated with the operation of our business. Our coverage is subject to exclusions and limitations, including higher self-insured retentions or deductibles and maximum limits and liabilities covered. In addition, from time to time, various types of insurance may not be available on commercially acceptable terms or, in some cases, at all. We are potentially at additional risk if one or more of our insurance carriers fail. Additionally, severe disruptions in the domestic and global financial markets could adversely impact the ratings and survival of some insurers. Future downgrades in the ratings of enough insurers could adversely impact both the availability of appropriate insurance coverage and its cost. In the future, we may not be able to obtain coverage at current levels, if at all, and our premiums may increase significantly on coverage that we maintain. We can make no assurance that a claim or claims will be covered by our insurance policies or, if covered, will not exceed the limits of available insurance coverage, or that our insurers will remain solvent and meet their obligations.
Changes in accounting standards could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Our consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP, the principles of which are revised from time to time. Accordingly, from time to time we are required to adopt new or revised accounting standards issued by recognized authoritative bodies, including the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”). In the future, new accounting

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pronouncements, as well as new interpretations of existing accounting pronouncements, may have material adverse effects on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
FASB has issued several accounting standards updates which have resulted in significant changes in U.S. GAAP, including how we account for our insurance contracts and financial instruments and how our financial statements are presented. The changes to U.S. GAAP could affect the way we account for and report significant areas of our business, could impose special demands on us in the areas of governance, employee training, internal controls and disclosure and will likely affect how we manage our business. In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-12, Financial Services-Insurance (Topic 944), which applies to all insurance entities that issue long-duration contracts and revises elements of the measurement models for traditional nonparticipating long-duration and limited payment insurance liabilities and recognition and amortization model for DAC for most long-duration contracts. The new accounting standard also requires product features that have other-than-nominal credit risk, or market risk benefits (“MRBs”), to be measured at fair value. ASU 2018-12 is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2020. Early adoption is permitted. We are currently evaluating the impact that the adoption of this guidance will have on our consolidated financial statements.
In addition, AXA, prepares consolidated financial statements in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”). From time to time, AXA may be required to adopt new or revised accounting standards issued by recognized authoritative bodies, including the International Accounting Standards Board. In the future, new accounting pronouncements, as well as new interpretations of existing accounting pronouncements, may have material adverse effects on AXA’s business, results of operations or financial condition which could impact the way we conduct our business (including, for example, which products we offer), our competitive position, our hedging program and the way we manage capital.
Certain of our administrative operations and offices are located internationally, subjecting us to various international risks and increased compliance and regulatory risks and costs.
We have various offices in other countries and certain of our administrative operations are located in India. In the future, we may seek to expand operations in India or other countries. As a result of these operations, we may be exposed to economic, operating, regulatory and political risks in those countries, such as foreign investment restrictions, substantial fluctuations in economic growth, high levels of inflation, volatile currency exchange rates and instability, including civil unrest, terrorist acts or acts of war, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. The political or regulatory climate in the United States could also change such that it would no longer be lawful or practical for us to use international operations in the manner in which they are currently conducted. If we had to curtail or cease operations in India and transfer some or all of these operations to another geographic area, we would incur significant transition costs as well as higher future overhead costs that could adversely affect us.
In many foreign countries, particularly in those with developing economies, it may be common to engage in business practices that are prohibited by laws and regulations applicable to us, such as the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977, as amended (the “FCPA”) and similar anti-bribery laws. Any violations of the FCPA or other anti-bribery laws by us, our employees, subsidiaries or local agents, could have a material adverse effect on our business and reputation and result in substantial financial penalties or other sanctions.
Our investment advisory agreements with clients, and our selling and distribution agreements with various financial intermediaries, are subject to termination or non-renewal on short notice.
As part of our variable annuity products, AXA Equitable FMG enters into written investment management agreements (or other arrangements) with mutual funds. Generally, these investment management agreements are terminable without penalty at any time or upon relatively short notice by either party. For example, an investment management contract with an SEC-registered investment company (a “RIC”) may be terminated at any time, without payment of any penalty, by the RIC’s board of directors or by vote of a majority of the outstanding voting securities of the RIC on not more than 60 days’ notice. The investment management agreements pursuant to which AXA Equitable FMG manage RICs must be renewed and approved by the RIC’s boards of directors (including a majority of the independent directors) annually. A significant majority of the directors are independent. Consequently, there can be no assurance that the board of directors of each RIC will approve the investment management agreement each year or will not condition its approval on revised terms that may be adverse to us.
Also, as required by the Investment Company Act, each investment advisory agreement with a RIC automatically terminates upon its assignment, although new investment advisory agreements may be approved by the RIC’s board of directors or trustees and stockholders. An “assignment” includes a sale of a control block of the voting stock of the investment adviser or

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its parent company. If future sales of Holdings’ common stock were deemed to be an actual or constructive assignment, these termination provisions could be triggered, which may adversely affect AXA Equitable FMG’s ability to realize the value of its investment advisory agreements.
The Investment Advisers Act may also require approval or consent of advisory contracts by clients in the event of an “assignment” of the contract (including a sale of a control block of the voting stock of the investment adviser or its parent company) or a change in control of the investment adviser. Were future sales of Holdings’ common stock or another transaction to result in an assignment or change in control, the inability to obtain consent or approval from clients or stockholders of RICs or other clients could result in a significant reduction in advisory fees.
Similarly, we enter into selling and distribution agreements with securities firms, brokers, banks and other financial intermediaries that are terminable by either party upon notice (generally 60 days) and do not obligate the financial intermediary to sell any specific amount of our products. These intermediaries generally offer their clients investment products that compete with our products.
We may fail to replicate or replace functions, systems and infrastructure provided by AXA or certain of its affiliates (including through shared service contracts) or lose benefits from AXA’s global contracts, and AXA and its affiliates may fail to perform the services provided for in a transitional services agreement with Holdings.
Historically, we have received services from AXA and have provided services to AXA, including information technology services, services that support financial transactions and budgeting, risk management and compliance services, human resources services, insurance, operations and other support services, primarily through shared services contracts with various third-party service providers. AXA and its affiliates continue to provide or procure certain services to us pursuant to a transitional services agreement with Holdings (the “Transitional Services Agreement”). Under the Transitional Services Agreement, AXA will continue to provide certain services, either directly or on a pass-through basis, and we will continue to provide AXA with certain services, either directly or on a pass-through basis. The Transitional Services Agreement will not continue indefinitely.
We are working to replicate or replace the services that we will continue to need in the operation of our business that are provided currently by AXA or its affiliates through shared service contracts they have with various third-party providers and that will continue to be provided under the Transitional Services Agreement for applicable transitional periods. We cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain the services at the same or better levels or at the same or lower costs directly from third-party providers. As a result, when AXA or its affiliates cease providing these services to us, either as a result of the termination of the Transitional Services Agreement or individual services thereunder or a failure by AXA or its affiliates to perform their respective obligations under the Transitional Services Agreement, our costs of procuring these services or comparable replacement services may increase, and the cessation of such services may result in service interruptions and divert management attention from other aspects of our operations.
There is a risk that an increase in the costs associated with replicating and replacing the services provided to us under the Transitional Services Agreement and the diversion of management’s attention to these matters could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition. We may fail to replicate the services we currently receive from AXA on a timely basis or at all. Additionally, we may not be able to operate effectively if the quality of replacement services is inferior to the services we are currently receiving. Furthermore, once we are no longer an affiliate of AXA, we will no longer receive certain group discounts and reduced fees that we are eligible to receive as an affiliate of AXA. The loss of these discounts and reduced fees could increase our expenses and have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Costs associated with any rebranding could be significant.
Prior to the Holdings IPO, as an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of AXA, we marketed our products and services using the “AXA” brand name and logo together with the “Equitable” brand. Following the settlement of AXA’s sell-down in March 2019, we expect to rebrand and cease use, pursuant to the Trademark License Agreement, of the “AXA” brand name and logo within 18 months, subject to such extensions as permitted under the Trademark License Agreement. We have benefited, and will continue to benefit for a limited time as set forth in the Trademark License Agreement, from trademarks licensed in connection with the AXA brand. We believe the association with AXA provides us with preferred status among our customers, vendors and other persons due to AXA’s globally recognized brand, reputation for high quality products and services and strong capital base and financial strength. Any rebranding we undertake could adversely affect our ability to attract and retain customers, which could result in reduced sales of our products. We cannot accurately predict the effect that any rebranding we

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undertake will have on our business, customers or employees. We expect to incur significant costs, including marketing expenses, in connection with any rebranding of our business. Any adverse effect on our ability to attract and retain customers and any costs could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Changes in the method for determining the London Inter-Bank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) and the potential replacement of LIBOR may affect our cost of capital and net investment income.
As a result of concerns about the accuracy of the calculation of LIBOR, a number of British Bankers’ Association (BBA) member banks entered into settlements with certain regulators and law enforcement agencies with respect to the alleged manipulation of LIBOR.  As a consequence of such events, it is anticipated that LIBOR will be discontinued by the end of 2021 and an alternative rate will be used for derivatives contracts, debt investments, intercompany and third party loans and other types of commercial contracts. We anticipate a valuation risk around the potential discontinuation event. It is not possible to predict what rate or rates may become accepted alternatives to LIBOR or the effect of any such alternatives on the value of LIBOR-linked securities. Any changes to LIBOR or any alternative rate, or any further uncertainty in relation to the timing and manner of implementation of such changes, could have an adverse effect on the value of investments in our investment portfolio, derivatives we use for hedging, or other indebtedness, securities or commercial contracts.
Risks Relating to Credit, Counterparties and Investments
Our counterparties’ requirements to pledge collateral or make payments related to declines in estimated fair value of derivative contracts exposes us to counterparty credit risk and may adversely affect our liquidity.
We use derivatives and other instruments to help us mitigate various business risks. Our transactions with financial and other institutions generally specify the circumstances under which the parties are required to pledge collateral related to any decline in the market value of the derivatives contracts. If our counterparties fail or refuse to honor their obligations under these contracts, we could face significant losses to the extent collateral agreements do not fully offset our exposures and our hedges of the related risk will be ineffective. Such failure could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition. Additionally, the implementation of the Dodd-Frank Act and other regulations may increase the need for liquidity and for the amount of collateral assets in excess of current levels.
We may be materially and adversely affected by changes in the actual or perceived soundness or condition of other financial institutions and market participants.
A default by any financial institution or by a sovereign could lead to additional defaults by other market participants. The failure of any financial institution could disrupt securities markets or clearance and settlement systems and lead to a chain of defaults, because the commercial and financial soundness of many financial institutions may be closely related as a result of credit, trading, clearing or other relationships. Even the perceived lack of creditworthiness of a financial institution may lead to market-wide liquidity problems and losses or defaults by us or by other institutions. This risk is sometimes referred to as “systemic risk” and may adversely affect financial intermediaries, such as clearing agencies, clearing houses, banks, securities firms and exchanges with which we interact on a daily basis. Systemic risk could have a material adverse effect on our ability to raise new funding and on our business, results of operations or financial condition. In addition, such a failure could impact future product sales as a potential result of reduced confidence in the financial services industry. Regulatory changes implemented to address systemic risk could also cause market participants to curtail their participation in certain market activities, which could decrease market liquidity and increase trading and other costs.
Losses due to defaults, errors or omissions by third parties and affiliates, including outsourcing relationships, could materially and adversely impact our business, results of operations or financial condition.
We depend on third parties and affiliates that owe us money, securities or other assets to pay or perform under their obligations. These parties include the issuers whose securities we hold in our investment portfolios, borrowers under the mortgage loans we make, customers, trading counterparties, counterparties under swap and other derivatives contracts, reinsurers, clearing agents, exchanges, clearing houses and other financial intermediaries. Defaults by one or more of these parties on their obligations to us due to bankruptcy, lack of liquidity, downturns in the economy or real estate values, operational failure or other factors, or even rumors about potential defaults by one or more of these parties, could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.

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We also depend on third parties and affiliates in other contexts, including as distribution partners. For example, in establishing the amount of the liabilities and reserves associated with the risks assumed in connection with reinsurance pools and arrangements, we rely on the accuracy and timely delivery of data and other information from ceding companies. In addition, as investment manager and administrator of several mutual funds, we rely on various affiliated and unaffiliated sub-advisers to provide day-to-day portfolio management services for each investment portfolio.
 We rely on various counterparties and other vendors to augment our existing investment, operational, financial and technological capabilities, but the use of a vendor does not diminish our responsibility to ensure that client and regulatory obligations are met. Default rates, credit downgrades and disputes with counterparties as to the valuation of collateral increase significantly in times of market stress. Disruptions in the financial markets and other economic challenges may cause our counterparties and other vendors to experience significant cash flow problems or even render them insolvent, which may expose us to significant costs and impair our ability to conduct business.
Losses associated with defaults or other failures by these third parties and outsourcing partners upon whom we rely could materially adversely impact our business, results of operations or financial condition.
We are also subject to the risk that our rights against third parties may not be enforceable in all circumstances. The deterioration or perceived deterioration in the credit quality of third parties whose securities or obligations we hold could result in losses or adversely affect our ability to use those securities or obligations for liquidity purposes. While in many cases we are permitted to require additional collateral from counterparties that experience financial difficulty, disputes may arise as to the amount of collateral we are entitled to receive and the value of pledged assets. Our credit risk may also be exacerbated when the collateral we hold cannot be realized or is liquidated at prices not sufficient to recover the full amount of the loan or derivatives exposure that is due to us, which is most likely to occur during periods of illiquidity and depressed asset valuations, such as those experienced during the financial crisis. The termination of contracts and the foreclosure on collateral may subject us to claims for the improper exercise of rights under the contracts. Bankruptcies, downgrades and disputes with counterparties as to the valuation of collateral tend to increase in times of market stress and illiquidity.
Gross unrealized losses on fixed maturity and equity securities may be realized or result in future impairments, resulting in a reduction in our net earnings.
Fixed maturity securities classified as available-for-sale are reported at fair value. Unrealized gains or losses on available-for-sale securities are recognized as a component of other comprehensive income (loss) and are, therefore, excluded from net earnings. The accumulated change in estimated fair value of these available-for-sale securities is recognized in net earnings when the gain or loss is realized upon the sale of the security or in the event that the decline in estimated fair value is determined to be other-than-temporary and an impairment charge to earnings is taken. Realized losses or impairments may have a material adverse effect on our net earnings in a particular quarterly or annual period.
The occurrence of a major economic downturn, acts of corporate malfeasance, widening credit risk spreads, or other events that adversely affect the issuers or guarantors of securities we own or the underlying collateral of structured securities we own could cause the estimated fair value of our fixed maturity securities portfolio and corresponding earnings to decline and cause the default rate of the fixed maturity securities in our investment portfolio to increase. A ratings downgrade affecting issuers or guarantors of particular securities we hold, or similar trends that could worsen the credit quality of issuers, such as the corporate issuers of securities in our investment portfolio, could also have a similar effect. With economic uncertainty, credit quality of issuers or guarantors could be adversely affected. Similarly, a ratings downgrade affecting a security we hold could indicate the credit quality of that security has deteriorated and could increase the capital we must hold to support that security to maintain our RBC level. Levels of write-downs or impairments are impacted by intent to sell, or our assessment of the likelihood that we will be required to sell, fixed maturity securities, as well as our intent and ability to hold equity securities which have declined in value until recovery. Realized losses or impairments on these securities may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, liquidity or financial condition in, or at the end of, any quarterly or annual period.
Some of our investments are relatively illiquid and may be difficult to sell, or to sell in significant amounts at acceptable prices, to generate cash to meet our needs.
We hold certain investments that may lack liquidity, such as privately placed fixed maturity securities, mortgage loans, commercial mortgage backed securities and alternative investments. In the past, even some of our very high-quality investments experienced reduced liquidity during periods of market volatility or disruption. Although we seek to adjust our cash and short-term investment positions to minimize the likelihood that we would need to sell illiquid investments, if we were

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required to liquidate these investments on short notice or were required to post or return collateral, we may have difficulty doing so and be forced to sell them for less than we otherwise would have been able to realize.
The reported values of our relatively illiquid types of investments do not necessarily reflect the current market price for the asset. If we were forced to sell certain of our assets in the current market, there can be no assurance that we would be able to sell them for the prices at which we have recorded them and we might be forced to sell them at significantly lower prices, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, liquidity or financial condition.
Defaults on our mortgage loans and volatility in performance may adversely affect our profitability.
A portion of our investment portfolio consists of mortgage loans on commercial and agricultural real estate. Our exposure to this risk stems from various factors, including the supply and demand of leasable commercial space, creditworthiness of tenants and partners, capital markets volatility, interest rate fluctuations, agricultural prices and farm incomes, which have recently been declining. Although we manage credit risk and market valuation risk for our commercial and agricultural real estate assets through geographic, property type and product type diversification and asset allocation, general economic conditions in the commercial and agricultural real estate sectors will continue to influence the performance of these investments. These factors, which are beyond our control, could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, liquidity or financial condition.
Our mortgage loans face default risk and are principally collateralized by commercial and agricultural properties. We establish valuation allowances for estimated impairments, which are based on loan risk characteristics, historical default rates and loss severities, real estate market fundamentals, such as property prices and unemployment, and economic outlooks, as well as other relevant factors (for example, local economic conditions). In addition, substantially all of our commercial and agricultural mortgage loans held-for-investment have balloon payment maturities. An increase in the default rate of our mortgage loan investments or fluctuations in their performance could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, liquidity or financial condition.
Further, any geographic or property type concentration of our mortgage loans may have adverse effects on our investment portfolio and consequently on our business, results of operations, liquidity or financial condition. While we seek to mitigate this risk by having a broadly diversified portfolio, events or developments that have a negative effect on any particular geographic region or sector may have a greater adverse effect on our investment portfolio to the extent that the portfolio is concentrated. Moreover, our ability to sell assets relating to a group of related assets may be limited if other market participants are seeking to sell at the same time.
Risks Relating to Our Reinsurance and Hedging Programs
Our reinsurance and hedging programs may be inadequate to protect us against the full extent of the exposure or losses we seek to mitigate.
Certain of our products contain GMxB features or minimum crediting rates. Downturns in equity markets or reduced interest rates could result in an increase in the valuation of liabilities associated with such products, resulting in increases in reserves and reductions in net income. In the normal course of business, we seek to mitigate some of these risks to which our business is subject through our hedging and reinsurance programs. However, these programs cannot eliminate all of the risks, and no assurance can be given as to the extent to which such programs will be completely effective in reducing such risks. For example, in the event that reinsurers, derivatives or other counterparties or central clearinghouses do not pay balances due or do not post the required amount of collateral as required under our agreements, we still remain liable for the guaranteed benefits.
 Reinsurance. We use reinsurance to mitigate a portion of the risks that we face, principally in certain of our in-force annuity and life insurance products with regard to mortality, and in certain of our annuity products with regard to a portion of the GMxB features. Under our reinsurance arrangements, other insurers assume a portion of the obligation to pay claims and related expenses to which we are subject. However, we remain liable as the direct insurer on all risks we reinsure and, therefore, are subject to the risk that our reinsurer is unable or unwilling to pay or reimburse claims at the time demand is made. The inability or unwillingness of a reinsurer to meet its obligations to us, or the inability to collect under our reinsurance treaties for any other reason, could have a material adverse impact on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
We are continuing to use reinsurance to mitigate a portion of our risk on certain new life insurance sales. Prolonged or severe adverse mortality or morbidity experience could result in increased reinsurance costs, and ultimately may reduce the

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availability of reinsurance for future life insurance sales. If, for new sales, we are unable to maintain our current level of reinsurance or purchase new reinsurance protection in amounts that we consider sufficient, we would either have to be willing to accept an increase in our net exposures, revise our pricing to reflect higher reinsurance premiums or limit the amount of new business written on any individual life. If this were to occur, we may be exposed to reduced profitability and cash flow strain or we may not be able to price new business at competitive rates.
The premium rates and other fees that we charge are based, in part, on the assumption that reinsurance will be available at a certain cost. Some of our reinsurance contracts contain provisions that limit the reinsurer’s ability to increase rates on in-force business; however, some do not. If a reinsurer raises the rates that it charges on a block of in-force business, in some instances, we will not be able to pass the increased costs onto our customers and our profitability will be negatively impacted. Additionally, such a rate increase could result in our recapturing of the business, which may result in a need to maintain additional reserves, reduce reinsurance receivables and expose us to greater risks. While in recent years, we have faced a number of rate increase actions on in-force business, to date they have not had a material effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition. However, there can be no assurance that the outcome of future rate increase actions would have no material effect. In addition, market conditions beyond our control determine the availability and cost of reinsurance for new business. If reinsurers raise the rates that they charge on new business, we may be forced to raise our premiums, which could have a negative impact on our competitive position.
Hedging Programs. We use a hedging program to mitigate a portion of the unreinsured risks we face in, among other areas, the GMxB features of our variable annuity products and minimum crediting rates on our variable annuity and life products from unfavorable changes in benefit exposures due to movements in the capital markets. In certain cases, however, we may not be able to apply these techniques to effectively hedge these risks because the derivatives markets in question may not be of sufficient size or liquidity or there could be an operational error in the application of our hedging strategy or for other reasons. The operation of our hedging programs is based on models involving numerous estimates and assumptions, including, among others, mortality, lapse, surrender and withdrawal rates and amounts of withdrawals, election rates, fund performance, equity market returns and volatility, interest rate levels and correlation among various market movements. There can be no assurance that ultimate actual experience will not differ materially from our assumptions, particularly, but not only, during periods of high market volatility, which could adversely impact our business, results of operations or financial condition. For example, in the past, due to, among other things, levels of volatility in the equity and interest rate markets above our assumptions as well as deviations between actual and assumed surrender and withdrawal rates, gains from our hedging programs did not fully offset the economic effect of the increase in the potential net benefits payable under the GMxB features offered in certain of our products. If these circumstances were to re-occur in the future or if, for other reasons, results from our hedging programs in the future do not correlate with the economic effect of changes in benefit exposures to customers, we could experience economic losses which could have a material adverse impact on our business, results of operations or financial condition. Additionally, our strategies may result in under or over-hedging our liability exposure, which could result in an increase in our hedging losses and greater volatility in our earnings and have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
For further discussion, see below “—Risks Relating to Estimates, Assumptions and Valuations—Our risk management policies and procedures may not be adequate to identify, monitor and manage risks, which may leave us exposed to unidentified or unanticipated risks, which could negatively affect our business, results of operations or financial condition.”
Risks Relating to the Products We Offer, Our Structure and Product Distribution
GMxB features within certain of our products may decrease our earnings, decrease our capitalization, increase the volatility of our results, result in higher risk management costs and expose us to increased counterparty risk.
Certain of the variable annuity products we offer and certain in-force variable annuity products we offered historically, and certain variable annuity risks we assumed historically through reinsurance, include GMxB features. We also offer index-linked variable annuities with guarantees against a defined floor on losses. GMxB features are designed to offer protection to policyholders against changes in equity markets and interest rates. Any such periods of significant and sustained negative or low Separate Account returns, increased equity volatility or reduced interest rates will result in an increase in the valuation of our liabilities associated with those products. In addition, if the Separate Account assets consisting of fixed income securities, which support the guaranteed index-linked return feature, are insufficient to reflect a period of sustained growth in the equity-index on which the product is based, we may be required to support such Separate Accounts with assets from our General Account and increase our liabilities. An increase in these liabilities would result in a decrease in our net income and depending

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on the magnitude of any such increase, could materially and adversely affect our financial condition, including our capitalization, as well as the financial strength ratings which are necessary to support our product sales.
Additionally, we make assumptions regarding policyholder behavior at the time of pricing and in selecting and using the GMxB features inherent within our products (e.g., use of option to annuitize within a GMIB product). An increase in the valuation of the liability could result to the extent emerging and actual experience deviates from these policyholder option use assumptions. We review our actuarial assumptions at least annually, including those assumptions relating to policyholder behavior, and update assumptions when appropriate. If we update our assumptions based on our actuarial assumption review in future years, we could be required to increase the liabilities we record for future policy benefits and claims to a level that may materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition which, in certain circumstances, could impair our solvency. In addition, we have in the past updated our assumptions on policyholder behavior, which has negatively impacted our net income, and there can be no assurance that similar updates will not be required in the future.
In addition, capital markets hedging instruments may not effectively offset the costs of GMxB features or may otherwise be insufficient in relation to our obligations. Furthermore, we are subject to the risk that changes in policyholder behavior or mortality, combined with adverse market events, could produce economic losses not addressed by the risk management techniques employed. These factors, individually or collectively, may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, capitalization, financial condition or liquidity including our ability to pay dividends.
Our products contain numerous features and are subject to extensive regulation and failure to administer or meet any of the complex product requirements may adversely impact our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Our products are subject to a complex and extensive array of state and federal tax, securities, insurance and employee benefit plan laws and regulations, which are administered and enforced by a number of different governmental and self-regulatory authorities, including, among others, state insurance regulators, state securities administrators, state banking authorities, the SEC, FINRA, the DOL and the IRS.
For example, U.S. federal income tax law imposes requirements relating to annuity and insurance product design, administration and investments that are conditions for beneficial tax treatment of such products under the Code. Additionally, state and federal securities and insurance laws impose requirements relating to annuity and insurance product design, offering and distribution, and administration. Failure to administer product features in accordance with contract provisions or applicable law, or to meet any of these complex tax, securities or insurance requirements could subject us to administrative penalties imposed by a particular governmental or self-regulatory authority, unanticipated costs associated with remedying such failure or other claims, litigation, harm to our reputation or interruption of our operations. If this were to occur, it could adversely impact our business, results of operations or financial condition.
We are required to file periodic and other reports within certain time periods imposed by U.S. federal securities laws, rules and regulations. Failure to file such reports within the designated time period failure to accurately report our financial condition or results of operations, or restatements of historical financial statements could require us to curtail or cease sales of certain of our variable annuity products and other variable insurance products or delay the launch of new products or new features, which could cause a significant disruption in our business. If our affiliated and third party distribution platforms are required to curtail or cease sales of our products, we may lose shelf space for our products indefinitely, even once we are able to resume sales. For example, we failed to timely file our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2017 and required an extension of the due date under Rule 12b-25 for this Form 10-K. If we fail to file any future periodic or other report with the SEC on a timely basis, we would be required to cease sales of SEC-registered variable annuity products until such time that new registration statements could be filed with the SEC and declared effective. Any curtailment or cessation of sales of our variable insurance products could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Many of our products and services are complex and are frequently sold through intermediaries. In particular, we rely on intermediaries to describe and explain our products to potential customers. The intentional or unintentional misrepresentation of our products and services in advertising materials or other external communications, or inappropriate activities by our personnel or an intermediary, could adversely affect our reputation and business, as well as lead to potential regulatory actions or litigation.

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The amount of statutory capital that we have and the amount of statutory capital we must hold to meet our statutory capital requirements and our financial strength and credit ratings can vary significantly from time to time.
Statutory accounting standards and capital and reserve requirements for AXA Equitable are prescribed by the applicable state insurance regulators and the NAIC. State insurance regulators have established regulations that govern reserving requirements and provide minimum capitalization requirements based on RBC ratios for life insurance companies. This RBC formula establishes capital requirements relating to insurance, business, asset and interest rate risks, including equity, interest rate and expense recovery risks associated with variable annuities and group annuities that contain death benefits or certain living benefits.
In any particular year, statutory surplus amounts and RBC ratios may increase or decrease depending on a variety of factors, including but not limited to the amount of statutory income or losses we generate (which itself is sensitive to equity market and credit market conditions), changes in interest rates, changes to existing RBC formulas, changes in reserves, the amount of additional capital we must hold to support business growth, changes in equity market levels and the value and credit rating of certain fixed income and equity securities in our investment portfolio, which could in turn reduce our statutory capital. Additionally, state insurance regulators have significant leeway in how to interpret existing regulations, which could further impact the amount of statutory capital or reserves that we must maintain. We are primarily regulated by the NYDFS, which from time to time has taken more stringent positions than other state insurance regulators on matters affecting, among other things, statutory capital or reserves. In certain circumstances, particularly those involving significant market declines, the effect of these more stringent positions may be that our financial condition appears to be worse than competitors who are not subject to the same stringent standards, which could have a material adverse impact on our business, results of operations or financial condition. Moreover, rating agencies may implement changes to their internal models that have the effect of increasing or decreasing the amount of capital we must hold in order to maintain their current ratings. To the extent that our statutory capital resources are deemed to be insufficient to maintain a particular rating by one or more rating agencies, our financial strength and credit ratings might be downgraded by one or more rating agencies. There can be no assurance that we will be able to maintain our current RBC ratio in the future or that our RBC ratio will not fall to a level that could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Our failure to meet our RBC requirements or minimum capital and surplus requirements could subject us to further examination or corrective action imposed by insurance regulators, including limitations on our ability to write additional business, supervision by regulators, rehabilitation, or seizure or liquidation. Any corrective action imposed could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition. A decline in our RBC ratio, whether or not it results in a failure to meet applicable RBC requirements could result in a loss of customers or new business, and could be a factor in causing ratings agencies to downgrade our financial strength ratings, each of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Changes in statutory reserve or other requirements or the impact of adverse market conditions could result in changes to our product offerings that could materially and adversely impact our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Changes in statutory reserve or other requirements, increased costs of hedging, other risk mitigation techniques and financing and other adverse market conditions could result in certain products becoming less profitable or unprofitable. These circumstances may cause us to modify or eliminate certain features of various products or cause the suspension or cessation of sales of certain products in the future. Any modifications to products that we may make could result in certain of our products being less attractive or competitive. This could adversely impact sales, which could negatively impact AXA Advisors’ ability to retain its sales personnel and our ability to maintain our distribution relationships. This, in turn, may materially and adversely impact our business, results of operations or financial condition.
A downgrade in our financial strength and claims-paying ratings could adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Claims-paying and financial strength ratings are important factors in establishing the competitive position of insurance companies. They indicate the rating agencies’ opinions regarding an insurance company’s ability to meet policyholder obligations and are important to maintaining public confidence in our products and our competitive position. A downgrade of our ratings or those of Holdings could adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition by, among other things, reducing new sales of our products, increasing surrenders and withdrawals from our existing contracts, possibly requiring us to reduce prices or take other actions for many of our products and services to remain competitive, or adversely

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affecting our ability to obtain reinsurance or obtain reasonable pricing on reinsurance. A downgrade in our ratings may also adversely affect our cost of raising capital or limit our access to sources of capital. Upon announcement of AXA’s plan to pursue the Holdings IPO, Holdings’ and AXA Equitable’s ratings were downgraded by AM Best, S&P and Moody’s. We may face additional downgrades as a result of future sales of Holdings’ common stock by AXA.
As rating agencies continue to evaluate the financial services industry, it is possible that rating agencies will heighten the level of scrutiny that they apply to financial institutions, increase the frequency and scope of their credit reviews, request additional information from the companies that they rate and potentially adjust upward the capital and other requirements employed in the rating agency models for maintenance of certain ratings levels. It is possible that the outcome of any such review of us would have additional adverse ratings consequences, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition. We may need to take actions in response to changing standards or capital requirements set by any of the rating agencies which could cause our business and operations to suffer. We cannot predict what additional actions rating agencies may take, or what actions we may take in response to the actions of rating agencies.
Holdings could sell insurance, annuity or investment products through another one of its subsidiaries which would result in reduced sales of our products and total revenues.
We are a direct, wholly owned subsidiary of Holdings, a diversified financial services organization offering a broad spectrum of financial advisory, insurance and investment management products and services. As part of Holdings’ ongoing efforts to efficiently manage capital amongst its subsidiaries, improve the quality of the product line-up of its insurance subsidiaries and enhance the overall profitability of its group of companies, Holdings could sell insurance, annuity, investment and/or employee benefit products through another one of its subsidiaries. For example, most sales of indexed universal life insurance to policyholders located outside of New York and sales of employee benefit products to businesses located outside of New York are issued through MONY America, another life insurance subsidiary of Holdings, instead of AXA Equitable. It is expected that Holdings will continue to issue newly-developed life insurance products to policyholders located outside of New York through MONY America instead of AXA Equitable. This has impacted sales and may continue to reduce sales of our insurance products outside of New York, which will continue to reduce our total revenues. Since future decisions regarding product development and availability depend on factors and considerations not yet known, management is unable to predict the extent to which additional products will be offered through MONY America or another subsidiary instead of or in addition to AXA Equitable, or the impact to AXA Equitable.
The ability of financial professionals associated with AXA Advisors and AXA Network to sell our competitors’ products could result in reduced sales of our products and revenues.
Most of the financial professionals associated with AXA Advisors and AXA Network are permitted to sell products from competing unaffiliated insurance companies. If our competitors offer products that are more attractive than ours, or pay higher commission rates to the sales representatives than we do, these representatives may concentrate their efforts in selling our competitor’s products instead of ours. To the extent the financial professionals sell our competitors’ products rather than our products, we may experience reduced sales and revenues.
A loss of, or significant change in, key product distribution relationships could materially and adversely affect sales.
We distribute certain products under agreements with third-party distributors and other members of the financial services industry that are not affiliated with us. We compete with other financial institutions to attract and retain commercial relationships in each of these channels, and our success in competing for sales through these distribution intermediaries depends upon factors such as the amount of sales commissions and fees we pay, the breadth of our product offerings, the strength of our brand, our perceived stability and financial strength ratings, and the marketing and services we provide to, and the strength of the relationships we maintain with, individual third-party distributors. An interruption or significant change in certain key relationships could materially and adversely affect our ability to market our products and could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operation or financial condition. Distributors may elect to alter, reduce or terminate their distribution relationships with us, including for such reasons as changes in our distribution strategy, adverse developments in our business, adverse rating agency actions or concerns about market-related risks. Alternatively, we may terminate one or more distribution agreements due to, for example, a loss of confidence in, or a change in control of, one of the third-party distributors, which could reduce sales.
 Furthermore, an interruption in certain key relationships could materially and adversely affect our ability to market our products and could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition. The future sale of

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Holdings shares by AXA could prompt some third parties to re-price, modify or terminate their distribution or vendor relationships with us due to a perceived uncertainty related to such offering or our business. An interruption or significant change in certain key relationships could materially and adversely affect our ability to market our products and could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition. Distributors may elect to suspend, alter, reduce or terminate their distribution relationships with us for various reasons, including uncertainty related to offerings of Holdings’ common stock, changes in our distribution strategy, adverse developments in our business, adverse rating agency actions or concerns about market-related risks.
We are also at risk that key distribution partners may merge or change their business models in ways that affect how our products are sold, either in response to changing business priorities or as a result of shifts in regulatory supervision or potential changes in state and federal laws and regulations regarding standards of conduct applicable to third-party distributors when providing investment advice to retail and other customers.
Because our products are distributed through unaffiliated firms, we may not be able to monitor or control the manner of their distribution despite our training and compliance programs. If our products are distributed by such firms in an inappropriate manner, or to customers for whom they are unsuitable, we may suffer reputational and other harm to our business.
Consolidation of third-party distributors of insurance products may adversely affect the insurance industry and the profitability of our business.
The insurance industry distributes many of its products through other financial institutions such as banks and broker-dealers. An increase in the consolidation activity of bank and other financial services companies may create firms with even stronger competitive positions, negatively impact the industry’s sales, increase competition for access to third-party distributors, result in greater distribution expenses and impair our ability to market products to our current customer base or expand our customer base. We may also face competition from new market entrants or non-traditional or online competitors, which may have a material adverse effect on our business. Consolidation of third-party distributors or other industry changes may also increase the likelihood that third-party distributors will try to renegotiate the terms of any existing selling agreements to terms less favorable to us.
Risks Relating to Estimates, Assumptions and Valuations
Our risk management policies and procedures may not be adequate to identify, monitor and manage risks, which may leave us exposed to unidentified or unanticipated risks, which could negatively affect our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Our policies and procedures, including hedging programs, to identify, monitor and manage risks may not be adequate or fully effective. Many of our methods of managing risk and exposures are based upon our use of historical market behavior or statistics based on historical models. As a result, these methods will not predict future exposures, which could be significantly greater than the historical measures indicate, such as the risk of terrorism or pandemics causing a large number of deaths. Other risk management methods depend upon the evaluation of information regarding markets, clients, catastrophe occurrence or other matters that is publicly available or otherwise accessible to us, which may not always be accurate, complete, up-to-date or properly evaluated. Management of operational, legal and regulatory risks requires, among other things, policies and procedures to record and verify large numbers of transactions and events. These policies and procedures may not be fully effective.
We employ various strategies, including hedging and reinsurance, with the objective of mitigating risks inherent in our business and operations. These risks include current or future changes in the fair value of our assets and liabilities, current or future changes in cash flows, the effect of interest rates, equity markets and credit spread changes, the occurrence of credit defaults and changes in mortality and longevity. We seek to control these risks by, among other things, entering into reinsurance contracts and through our various hedging programs. Developing an effective strategy for dealing with these risks is complex, and no strategy can completely insulate us from such risks. Our hedging strategies also rely on assumptions and projections regarding our assets, liabilities, general market factors and the creditworthiness of our counterparties that may prove to be incorrect or prove to be inadequate. Accordingly, our hedging activities may not have the desired beneficial impact on our business, results of operations or financial condition. As U.S. GAAP accounting differs from the methods used to determine regulatory reserves and rating agency capital requirements, our hedging program tends to create earnings volatility in our U.S. GAAP financial statements. Further, the nature, timing, design or execution of our hedging transactions could actually increase our risks and losses. Our hedging strategies and the derivatives that we use, or may use in the future, may not adequately mitigate or offset the hedged risk and our hedging transactions may result in losses.

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Our reserves could be inadequate due to differences between our actual experience and management’s estimates and assumptions.
We establish and carry reserves to pay future policyholder benefits and claims. Our reserve requirements for our direct and reinsurance assumed business are calculated based on a number of estimates and assumptions, including estimates and assumptions related to future mortality, morbidity, longevity, interest rates, future equity performance, reinvestment rates, persistency, claims experience and policyholder elections (i.e., the exercise or non-exercise of rights by policyholders under the contracts). Examples of policyholder elections include, but are not limited to, lapses and surrenders, withdrawals and amounts of withdrawals, and contributions and the allocation thereof. The assumptions and estimates used in connection with the reserve estimation process are inherently uncertain and involve the exercise of significant judgment. We review the appropriateness of reserves and the underlying assumptions and update assumptions during the third quarter of each year and, if necessary, update our assumptions as additional information becomes available. For example, in 2018 we updated certain assumptions, resulting in increases and decreases in the carrying values of these product liabilities and assets. We cannot, however, determine with precision the amounts that we will pay for, or the timing of payment of, actual benefits and claims or whether the assets supporting the policy liabilities will grow to the level assumed prior to payment of benefits or claims. Our claim costs could increase significantly and our reserves could be inadequate if actual results differ significantly from our estimates and assumptions. If so, we will be required to increase reserves or reduce DAC, which could materially and adversely impact our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Future reserve increases in connection with experience updates could be material and adverse to our results of operations or financial condition.
Our profitability may decline if mortality, longevity or persistency or other experience differ significantly from our pricing expectations or reserve assumptions.
We set prices for many of our retirement and protection products based upon expected claims and payment patterns, using assumptions for mortality rates of our policyholders. In addition to the potential effect of natural or man-made disasters, significant changes in mortality, longevity and morbidity could emerge gradually over time due to changes in the natural environment, the health habits of the insured population, technologies and treatments for disease or disability, the economic environment or other factors. The long-term profitability of our retirement and protection products depends upon how our actual mortality rates, and to a lesser extent actual morbidity rates, compare to our pricing assumptions. In addition, prolonged or severe adverse mortality or morbidity experience could result in increased reinsurance costs, and ultimately, reinsurers might not offer coverage at all. If we are unable to maintain our current level of reinsurance or purchase new reinsurance protection in amounts that we consider sufficient, we would have to accept an increase in our net risk exposures, revise our pricing to reflect higher reinsurance premiums, or otherwise modify our product offering.
Pricing of our retirement and protection products is also based in part upon expected persistency of these products, which is the probability that a policy or contract will remain in force from one period to the next. Persistency within our variable annuity products may be significantly and adversely impacted by the value of GMxB features contained in many of our variable annuity products being higher than current AV in light of poor equity market performance or extended periods of low interest rates as well as other factors. Results may also vary based on differences between actual and expected premium deposits and withdrawals for these products. Persistency within our life insurance products may be significantly impacted by, among other things, conditions in the capital markets, the changing needs of our policyholders, the manner in which a product is marketed or illustrated and competition, including the availability of new products and policyholder perception of us, which may be negatively impacted by adverse publicity.
Significant deviations in actual experience from our pricing assumptions could have an adverse effect on the profitability of our products. For example, if policyholder elections differ from the assumptions we use in our pricing, our profitability may decline. Actual persistency that is lower than our persistency assumptions could have an adverse effect on profitability, especially in the early years of a policy, primarily because we would be required to accelerate the amortization of expenses we defer in connection with the acquisition of the policy. Actual persistency that is higher than our persistency assumptions could have an adverse effect on profitability in the later years of a block of business because the anticipated claims experience is higher in these later years. If actual persistency is significantly different from that assumed in our current reserving assumptions, our reserves for future policy benefits may prove to be inadequate. Although some of our variable annuity and life insurance products permit us to increase premiums or adjust other charges and credits during the life of the policy or contract, the adjustments permitted under the terms of the policies or contracts may not be sufficient to maintain profitability. Many of our variable annuity and life insurance products do not permit us to increase premiums or adjust other charges and credits or

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limit those adjustments during the life of the policy or contract. Even if we are permitted under the contract to increase premiums or adjust other charges and credits, we may not be able to do so due to litigation, point of sale disclosures, regulatory reputation and market risk or due to actions by our competitors. In addition, the development of a secondary market for life insurance, including life settlements or “viaticals” and investor owned life insurance, and to a lesser extent third-party investor strategies in the variable annuity market, could adversely affect the profitability of existing business and our pricing assumptions for new business.
We may be required to accelerate the amortization of DAC, which could adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition.
DAC represents policy acquisition costs that have been capitalized. Capitalized costs associated with DAC are amortized in proportion to actual and estimated gross profits, gross premiums or gross revenues depending on the type of contract. On an ongoing basis, we test the DAC recorded on our balance sheets to determine if the amount is recoverable under current assumptions. In addition, we regularly review the estimates and assumptions underlying DAC. The projection of estimated gross profits, gross premiums or gross revenues requires the use of certain assumptions, principally related to Separate Account fund returns in excess of amounts credited to policyholders, policyholder behavior such as surrender, lapse and annuitization rates, interest margin, expense margin, mortality, future impairments and hedging costs. Estimating future gross profits, gross premiums or gross revenues is a complex process requiring considerable judgment and the forecasting of events well into the future. If these assumptions prove to be inaccurate, if an estimation technique used to estimate future gross profits, gross premiums or gross revenues is changed, or if significant or sustained equity market declines occur or persist, we could be required to accelerate the amortization of DAC, which would result in a charge to earnings. Such adjustments could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
We use financial models that rely on a number of estimates, assumptions and projections that are inherently uncertain and which may contain errors.
We use models in our hedging programs and many other aspects of our operations, including but not limited to, product development and pricing, capital management, the estimation of actuarial reserves, the amortization of DAC, the fair value of the GMIB reinsurance contracts and the valuation of certain other assets and liabilities. These models rely on estimates, assumptions and projections that are inherently uncertain and involve the exercise of significant judgment. Due to the complexity of such models, it is possible that errors in the models could exist and our controls could fail to detect such errors. Failure to detect such errors could materially and adversely impact our business, results of operations or financial condition.
The determination of the amount of allowances and impairments taken on our investments is subjective and could materially impact our business, results of operations or financial condition.
The determination of the amount of allowances and impairments vary by investment type and is based upon our evaluation and assessment of known and inherent risks associated with the respective asset class. Management updates its evaluations regularly and reflects changes in allowances and impairments in operations as such evaluations are revised. There can be no assurance that management’s judgments, as reflected in our financial statements, will ultimately prove to be an accurate estimate of the actual and eventual diminution in realized value. Historical trends may not be indicative of future impairments or allowances. Furthermore, additional impairments may need to be taken or allowances provided for in the future that could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
We define fair value generally as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability. When available, the estimated fair value of securities is based on quoted prices in active markets that are readily and regularly obtainable; these generally are the most liquid holdings and their valuation does not involve management judgment. When quoted prices in active markets are not available, we estimate fair value based on market standard valuation methodologies, including discounted cash flow methodologies, matrix pricing, or other similar techniques. For securities with reasonable price transparency, the significant inputs to these valuation methodologies either are observable in the market or can be derived principally from or corroborated by observable market data. When the volume or level of activity results in little or no price transparency, significant inputs no longer can be supported by reference to market observable data but instead must be based on management’s estimation and judgment. Valuations may result in estimated fair values which vary significantly from the amount at which the investments may ultimately be sold. Further, rapidly changing and unprecedented credit and equity market conditions could materially impact the valuation of securities as reported within our financial statements and the period-to-period changes in estimated fair value could vary significantly. Decreases in the estimated fair value of securities we hold may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.

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Legal and Regulatory Risks
We may be materially and adversely impacted by U.S. federal and state legislative and regulatory action affecting financial institutions.
Regulatory changes, and other reforms globally, could lead to business disruptions, could adversely impact the value of assets we have invested on behalf of clients and policyholders and could make it more difficult for us to conduct certain business activities or distinguish ourselves from competitors. Any of these factors could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Dodd-Frank Act—The Dodd-Frank Act established the FSOC, which has the authority to designate non-bank systemically important financial institutions (“SIFIs”), thereby subjecting them to enhanced prudential standards and supervision by the Federal Reserve Board, including enhanced risk-based capital requirements, leverage limits, liquidity requirements, single counterparty exposure limits, governance requirements for risk management, capital planning and stress test requirements, special debt-to-equity limits for certain companies, early remediation procedures and recovery and resolution planning. If the FSOC were to determine that Holdings is a non-bank SIFI, we, as a subsidiary of Holdings, would become subject to certain of these enhanced prudential standards. Other regulators, such as state insurance regulators, may also determine to adopt new or heightened regulatory safeguards as a result of actions taken by the Federal Reserve Board in connection with its supervision of non-bank SIFIs. There can be no assurance that Holdings will not be designated as a non-bank SIFI, that such new or enhanced regulation will not apply to Holdings in the future, or, to the extent such regulation is adopted, that it would not have a material impact on our operations.
In addition, if Holdings were designated a SIFI, it could potentially be subject to capital charges or other restrictions with respect to activities it engages in that are limited by Section 619 of the Dodd-Frank Act, commonly referred to as the “Volcker Rule,” which places limitations on the ability of banks and their affiliates to engage in proprietary trading and limits the sponsorship of, and investment in, covered funds by banking entities and their affiliates.
Title II of the Dodd-Frank Act provides that certain financial companies, including Holdings, may be subject to a special resolution regime outside the federal bankruptcy code, which is administered by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation as receiver, and is applied to a covered financial company upon a determination that the company presents a risk to U.S. financial stability. U.S. insurance subsidiaries of any such covered financial company, however, would be subject to rehabilitation and liquidation proceedings under state insurance law. We cannot predict how rating agencies, or our creditors, will evaluate this potential or whether it will impact our financing or hedging costs.
The Dodd-Frank Act also established the FIO within the U.S. Department of the Treasury, which has the authority, on behalf of the United States, to participate in the negotiation of “covered agreements” with foreign governments or regulators, as well as to collect information and monitor about the insurance industry. While not having a general supervisory or regulatory authority over the business of insurance, the director of the FIO will perform various functions with respect to insurance, including serving as a non-voting member of the FSOC and making recommendations to the FSOC regarding insurers to be designated for more stringent regulation.
While the Trump administration has indicated its intent to modify various aspects of the Dodd-Frank Act, it is unclear whether or how such modifications will be implemented or the impact any such modifications would have on our business.
Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Act creates a new framework for regulation of the OTC derivatives markets. As a result of the adoption of final rules by federal banking regulators and the CFTC in 2015 establishing margin requirements for non-centrally cleared derivatives, the amount of collateral we may be required to pledge in support of such transactions may increase under certain circumstances and will increase as a result of the requirement to pledge initial margin on non-centrally cleared derivatives commencing in 2020. Notwithstanding the broad categories of non-cash collateral permitted under the rules, higher capital charges on non-cash collateral applicable to our bank counterparties may significantly increase pricing of derivatives and restrict or eliminate certain types of eligible collateral that we have available to pledge, which could significantly increase our hedging costs, adversely affect the liquidity and yield of our investments, affect the profitability of our products or their attractiveness to our customers, or cause us to alter our hedging strategy or change the composition of the risks we do not hedge.
 Regulation of Broker-Dealers—The Dodd-Frank Act provides that the SEC may promulgate rules to provide that the standard of conduct for all broker-dealers, when providing personalized investment advice about securities to retail customers

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(and any other customers as the SEC may by rule provide), will be the same as the standard of conduct applicable to an investment adviser under the Investment Advisers Act. For a discussion of the SEC’s recent set of proposed rules, see “Business—Regulation—Broker-Dealer and Securities Regulation—Broker-Dealer Regulation.”
General—From time to time, regulators raise issues during examinations or audits of us and regulated subsidiaries that could, if determined adversely, have a material impact on us. In addition, the interpretations of regulations by regulators may change and statutes may be enacted with retroactive impact, particularly in areas such as accounting or statutory reserve requirements. We are also subject to other regulations and may in the future become subject to additional regulations. Compliance with applicable laws and regulations is time consuming and personnel-intensive, and changes in these laws and regulations may materially increase our direct and indirect compliance and other expenses of doing business, thus having a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Our business is heavily regulated, and changes in regulation and in supervisory and enforcement policies may limit our growth and have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
We are subject to a wide variety of insurance and other laws and regulations. State insurance laws regulate most aspects of our business, and we are regulated by the NYDFS and the states in which we are licensed. We are domiciled in New York and are primarily regulated by the NYDFS. The primary purpose of state regulation is to protect policyholders, and not necessarily to protect creditors and investors.
 State insurance guaranty associations have the right to assess insurance companies doing business in their state in order to help pay the obligations of insolvent insurance companies to policyholders and claimants. Because the amount and timing of an assessment is beyond our control, liabilities we have currently established for these potential assessments may not be adequate.
State insurance regulators, the NAIC and other regulatory bodies regularly reexamine existing laws and regulations applicable to insurance companies and their products. In the wake of the March 2018 federal appeals court decision to vacate the DOL Rule, the SEC and NAIC as well as state regulators are currently considering whether to apply an impartial conduct standard similar to the DOL Rule to recommendations made in connection with certain annuities and, in one case, to life insurance policies.  For example, the NAIC is actively working on a proposal to raise the advice standard for annuity sales and in July 2018, the NYDFS issued a final version of Regulation 187 that adopts a “best interest” standard for recommendations regarding the sale of life insurance and annuity products in New York. Regulation 187 takes effect on August 1, 2019 with respect to annuity sales and February 1, 2020 for life insurance sales and is applicable to sales of life insurance and annuity products in New York. In November 2018, the three primary agent groups in New York launched a legal challenge against the NYDFS over the adoption of Regulation 187. It is not possible to predict whether this challenge will be successful. We are currently assessing Regulation 187 to determine the impact it may have on our business. Beyond the New York regulation, the likelihood of any such state-based regulation is uncertain at this time, but if implemented, these regulations could have adverse effects on our business and consolidated results of operations. Generally, changes in laws and regulations, or in interpretations thereof, including potentially rescinding prior product approvals, are often made for the benefit of the consumer at the expense of the insurer and could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition.
We currently use captive reinsurance subsidiaries primarily to reinsure (i) term life insurance and universal life insurance with secondary guarantees, (ii) excess claims relating to variable annuities with GMIB riders which are subject to reinsurance treaties with unaffiliated third parties and (iii) to retrocede reinsurance of variable annuity guaranteed minimum benefits assumed from unaffiliated third parties. Uncertainties associated with continued use of captive reinsurance are primarily related to potential regulatory changes. See “—Risks Relating to Our Business—Risks Relating to Our Reinsurance and Hedging Programs.”
Insurance regulators have implemented, or begun to implement significant changes in the way in which insurers must determine statutory reserves and capital, particularly for products with contractual guarantees, such as variable annuities and universal life policies, and are considering further potentially significant changes in these requirements. The NAIC’s principle-based reserves (“PBR”) approach for life insurance policies became effective on January 1, 2017, and has a three-year phase-in period. Additionally, the New York legislature enacted legislation adopting principles based reserving in June 2018, which was signed into law by the Governor in December 2018. Also, in December 2018, the NYDFS promulgated emergency regulation to begin implementation of principles based reserving, to become effective on January 1, 2020. We are currently assessing the impact of, and appropriate implementation plan for, the PBR approach for life policies. The timing and extent of further changes to statutory reserves and reporting requirements are uncertain.

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During 2015, the NAIC E Committee established the VAIWG to oversee the NAIC’s efforts to study and address, as appropriate, regulatory issues resulting in variable annuity captive reinsurance transactions. In November 2015, upon the recommendation of the VAIWG, the NAIC E Committee adopted the Framework for Change which recommends charges for NAIC working groups to adjust the variable annuity statutory framework applicable to all insurers that have written or are writing variable annuity business and therefore has broader implications beyond captive reinsurance transactions. The Framework for Change contemplates a holistic set of reforms that would improve the current reserve and capital framework for insurers that write variable annuity business. In November 2015, VAIWG engaged Oliver Wyman (“OW”) to conduct a QIS involving industry participants, including the Company, of various reforms outlined in the Framework for Change. OW completed the QIS in July of 2016 and reported its initial findings to the VAIWG in late August. The OW report proposed certain revisions to the current variable annuity reserve and capital framework and recommended a second quantitative impact study be conducted so that testing can inform the proper calibration for certain conceptual and/or preliminary parameters set out in the OW proposal. Following a fourth quarter 2016 public comment period and several meetings on the OW proposal, the VAIWG determined that a QIS2 involving industry participants including us, will be conducted by OW. The QIS2 was initiated in February 2017 and OW issued its recommendation in December 2017. In 2018, the VAIWG held multiple public conference calls to discuss and refine the proposed recommendations. By the end of July 2018, both the VAIWG and the NAIC E Committee adopted the proposed recommendations with modifications reflecting input from all stakeholders. After adopting the Framework for Change, other NAIC working groups and task forces will consider specific revisions to the capital requirements for variable annuities to implement the recommendations in the framework. The changes to the variable annuity reserve and capital framework are expected to become effective January 1, 2020 with a suggested three-year phase-in period, but exact timing for implementation of changes remains subject to change.
We are currently assessing the impact on the Company of the implementation of the NAIC proposed changes to the reserve and capital framework requirements currently applicable to our variable annuity business and we cannot predict how the Framework for Change proposal may be implemented as a result of ongoing NAIC deliberations. Additionally, we cannot predict how the NYDFS will implement the final Framework for Change. As a result, the timing and extent of any necessary changes to reserves and capital requirements for our variable annuity business resulting from the work of the NAIC VAIWG are uncertain.
In addition, state regulators are currently considering whether to apply regulatory standards to the determination and/or readjustment of non-guaranteed elements (“NGEs”) within life insurance policies and annuity contracts that may be adjusted at the insurer’s discretion, such as the cost of insurance for universal life insurance policies and interest crediting rates for life insurance policies and annuity contracts. For example, in March 2018, Insurance Regulation 210 went into effect in New York. That regulation establishes standards for the determination and any readjustment of NGEs, including a prohibition on increasing profit margins on existing business or recouping past losses on such business, and requires advance notice of any adverse change in a NGE to both the NYDFS as well as to affected policyholders. We are continuing to assess the impact of Regulation 210 on our business. Beyond the New York regulation and a similar rule recently enacted in California that takes effect on July 1, 2019, the likelihood of enactment of any such state-based regulation is uncertain at this time, but if implemented, these regulations could have adverse effects on our business and consolidated results of operations.
Future changes in U.S. tax laws and regulations or interpretations of the Tax Reform Act could reduce our earnings and negatively impact our business, results of operations or financial condition, including by making our products less attractive to consumers.
On December 22, 2017, President Trump signed into law the Tax Reform Act, a broad overhaul of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code that changed long-standing provisions governing the taxation of U.S. corporations, including life insurance companies. While the Tax Reform Act had a net positive economic impact on us, it contained measures which could have adverse or uncertain impacts on some aspects of our business, results of operations or financial condition.
In August 2018, the NAIC adopted changes to the RBC calculation, including the C-3 Phase II Total Asset Requirement for variable annuities, to reflect the 21% corporate income tax rate in RBC reported at year-end 2018, which resulted in a reduction to our Combined RBC Ratio. These revisions could also have a negative impact on the CTE calculations of our insurance company subsidiaries, which could cause us to revise our target RBC and CTE levels, as appropriate.
Future changes in U.S. tax laws could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition. We anticipate that, following the Tax Reform Act, we will continue deriving tax benefits from certain items, including but not limited to the DRD, tax credits, insurance reserve deductions and interest expense deductions. However, there is a risk that interpretations of the Tax Reform Act, regulations promulgated thereunder, or future changes to federal, state or

46




other tax laws could reduce or eliminate the tax benefits from these or other items and result in our incurring materially higher taxes.
Many of the products that we sell benefit from one or more forms of tax-favored status under current federal and state income tax regimes. For example, life insurance and annuity contracts currently allow policyholders to defer the recognition of taxable income earned within the contract. While the Tax Reform Act does not change these rules, a future change in law that modifies or eliminates this tax-favored status could reduce demand for our products. Also, if the treatment of earnings accrued inside an annuity contract was changed prospectively, and the tax-favored status of existing contracts was grandfathered, holders of existing contracts would be less likely to surrender or rollover their contracts. Each of these changes could reduce our earnings and negatively impact our business.
Legal and regulatory actions could have a material adverse effect on our reputation, business, results of operations or financial condition.
A number of lawsuits, claims, assessments and regulatory inquiries have been filed or commenced against us and other life and health insurers and asset managers in the jurisdictions in which we do business. These actions and proceedings involve, among other things, insurers’ sales practices, alleged agent misconduct, alleged failure to properly supervise agents, contract administration, product design, features and accompanying disclosure, cost of insurance increases, the use of captive reinsurers, payment of death benefits and the reporting and escheatment of unclaimed property, alleged breach of fiduciary duties, discrimination, alleged mismanagement of client funds and other general business-related matters. Some of these matters have resulted in the award of substantial fines and judgments, including material amounts of punitive damages, or in substantial settlements. In some states, juries have substantial discretion in awarding punitive damages.
We face a significant risk of, and from time to time we are involved in, such actions and proceedings, including class action lawsuits. Our consolidated results of operations or financial position could be materially and adversely affected by defense and settlement costs and any unexpected material adverse outcomes in such matters, as well as in other material actions and proceedings pending against us. The frequency of large damage awards, including large punitive damage awards and regulatory fines that bear little or no relation to actual economic damages incurred, continues to create the potential for an unpredictable judgment in any given matter. For instance, we are a defendant in a number of lawsuits related to cost of insurance increases, including class actions in federal and state court alleging breach of contract and other claims under UL policies. For information regarding these and others legal proceedings pending against us, see Note 17 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
In addition, investigations or examinations by federal and state regulators and other governmental and self-regulatory agencies including, among others, the SEC, FINRA, the CFTC, the National Futures Association (the “NFA”), state attorneys general, the NYDFS and other state insurance regulators, and other regulators could result in legal proceedings (including securities class actions and stockholder derivative litigation), adverse publicity, sanctions, fines and other costs. We have provided and, in certain cases, continue to provide information and documents to the SEC, FINRA, the CFTC, the NFA, state attorneys general, the NYDFS and other state insurance regulators, and other regulators on a wide range of issues. On March 30, 2018, we received a copy of an anonymous letter containing general allegations relating to the preparation of our financial statements. Our audit committee, with the assistance of independent outside counsel, has reviewed these matters and concluded that the allegations were not substantiated and accordingly did not present any issue material to our financial statements. At this time, management cannot predict what actions the SEC, FINRA, the CFTC, the NFA, state attorneys general, the NYDFS and other state insurance regulators, or other regulators may take or what the impact of such actions might be.
A substantial legal liability or a significant federal, state or other regulatory action against us, as well as regulatory inquiries or investigations, may divert management’s time and attention, could create adverse publicity and harm our reputation, result in material fines or penalties, result in significant expense, including legal costs, and otherwise have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.

47




Part I, Item 1B.
UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
None.
Part I, Item 2.
PROPERTIES
AXA Equitable’s principal executive offices at 1290 Avenue of the Americas, New York, New York are occupied pursuant to a lease that extends to 2023. AXA Equitable also has the following significant office space leases in: Syracuse, NY, under a lease that expires in 2023; Jersey City, NJ, under a lease that expires in 2023, Charlotte, NC, under a lease that expires in 2028; and Secaucus, NJ, under a lease that expires in 2020.
Part I, Item 3.
LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
For information regarding certain legal proceedings pending against us, see Note 17 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements. See “Risk Factors—Legal and Regulatory Risks—Legal and regulatory actions could have a material adverse effect on our reputation, business, results of operations or financial condition.”
Part I, Item 4.
MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
Not Applicable.

Part II, Item 5.
MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
General
At December 31, 2018, all of AXA Equitable’s common equity was owned by AXA Equitable Financial Services, LLC. Consequently, there is no established public market for AXA Equitable’s common equity.
Dividends
In 2018, 2017 and 2016, AXA Equitable paid $1.1 billion, $0 and $1.1 billion, respectively, in shareholder dividends. For information on AXA Equitable’s present and future ability to pay dividends, see Note 18 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
Part II, Item 6.
SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
Omitted pursuant to General Instruction I(2)(a) of Form 10-K.

48




Part II, Item 7.
MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
Management’s narrative analysis of the results of operations is presented pursuant to General Instruction I(2)(a) of Form 10-K.
The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with our annual financial statements included elsewhere herein. In addition to historical data, this discussion contains forward-looking statements about our business, operations and financial performance based on current expectations that involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions. Actual results may differ materially from those discussed in the forward-looking statements as a result of various factors. Factors that could or do contribute to these differences include those factors discussed below and elsewhere in this Form 10-K, particularly under the captions “Risk Factors” and “Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements and Information.”
Executive Summary
Overview
We are one of America’s leading financial services companies, providing advice and solutions for helping Americans set and meet their retirement goals and protect and transfer their wealth across generations.
We benefit from our complementary mix of businesses. This business mix provides diversity in our earnings sources, which helps offset fluctuations in market conditions and variability in business results, while offering growth opportunities.
GMxB Unwind
On April 12, 2018, we completed an unwind of the reinsurance provided to us by AXA RE Arizona for certain variable annuities with GMxB features (the “GMxB Unwind”). Accordingly, all business previously reinsured to AXA RE Arizona, with the exception of the GMxB business, was novated to EQ AZ Life Re Company (“EQ AZ Life Re”), a newly formed captive insurance company organized under the laws of Arizona, which is an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of Holdings. As of December 31, 2018, our GMIB reinsurance contract asset with EQ AZ Life Re had carrying value of $259 million and is reported in GMIB reinsurance contract asset at fair value in the consolidated balance sheets. Following the novation of this business to EQ AZ Life Re, AXA RE Arizona was merged with and into AXA Equitable. Following AXA RE Arizona’s merger with and into AXA Equitable, the GMxB business is not subject to any new internal or third-party reinsurance arrangements, though in the future AXA Equitable may reinsure the GMxB Business with third parties. See “Products — Individual Variable Annuities — Risk Management — Reinsurance — Captive Reinsurance” and Note 12 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further details of the GMxB Unwind.
Transfer of AB Units
In the fourth quarter of 2018, we transferred our interest in AB (including units of the limited partnership interest in AllianceBernstein L.P., units representing assignments of beneficial ownership of limited partnership interests in AllianceBernstein Holding L.P. and shares of AllianceBernstein Corporation) to a wholly-owned subsidiary of Holdings (the “AB Business Transfer”). As a result of this transaction, the previously consolidated results of AB have been reclassified to Discontinued operations in the consolidated financial statements. See Note 19 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further details of the transfer of the AB Units.
As a result of the AB Business Transfer, we now operate as a single segment entity based on the manner in which we use financial information to evaluate business performance and to determine the allocation of resources.
Revenues
Our revenues come from three principal sources:
fee income and premiums from our traditional life insurance and annuity products; and

49




investment income from our General Account investment portfolio.
Our fee income varies directly in relation to the amount of the underlying account value or benefit base of our retirement and protection products are influenced by changes in economic conditions, primarily equity market returns, as well as net flows. Our premium income is driven by the growth in new policies written and the persistency of our in-force policies, both of which are influenced by a combination of factors, including our efforts to attract and retain customers and market conditions that influence demand for our products. Our investment income is driven by the yield on our General Account investment portfolio and is impacted by the prevailing level of interest rates as we reinvest cash associated with maturing investments and net flows to the portfolio.
Benefits and Other Deductions
Our primary expenses are:
policyholders’ benefits and interest credited to policyholders’ account balances;
sales commissions and compensation paid to intermediaries and advisors that distribute our products and services; and
compensation and benefits provided to our employees and other operating expenses.
Policyholders’ benefits are driven primarily by mortality, customer withdrawals and benefits which change in response to changes in capital market conditions. In addition, some of our policyholders’ benefits are directly tied to the AV and benefit base of our variable annuity products. Interest credited to policyholders varies in relation to the amount of the underlying AV or benefit base. Sales commissions and compensation paid to intermediaries and advisors vary in relation to premium and fee income generated from these sources, whereas compensation and benefits to our employees are more constant and impacted by market wages, and decline with increases in efficiency. Our ability to manage these expenses across various economic cycles and products is critical to the profitability of our company.
Net Income Volatility
We have offered and continue to offer variable annuity products with variable annuity guaranteed benefits (“GMxB”) features. The future claims exposure on these features is sensitive to movements in the equity markets and interest rates. Accordingly, we have implemented hedging and reinsurance programs designed to mitigate the economic exposure to us from these features due to equity market and interest rate movements. Changes in the values of the derivatives associated with these programs due to equity market and interest rate movements are recognized in the periods in which they occur while corresponding changes in offsetting liabilities are recognized over time. This results in net income volatility as further described below. See “—Significant Factors Impacting Our Results—Impact of Hedging and GMIB Reinsurance on Results.”
In addition to our dynamic hedging strategy, we have recently implemented static hedge positions designed to mitigate the adverse impact of changing market conditions on our statutory capital. We believe this program will continue to preserve the economic value of our variable annuity contracts and better protect our target variable annuity asset level. However, these new static hedge positions increase the size of our derivative positions and may result in higher net income volatility on a period-over-period basis.
Significant Factors Impacting Our Results
The following significant factors have impacted, and may in the future impact, our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
Impact of Hedging and GMIB Reinsurance on Results
We have offered and continue to offer variable annuity products with GMxB features. The future claims exposure on these features is sensitive to movements in the equity markets and interest rates. Accordingly, we have implemented hedging and reinsurance programs designed to mitigate the economic exposure to us from these features due to equity market and interest rate movements. These programs include:
Variable annuity hedging programs. We use a dynamic hedging program (within this program, generally, we reevaluate our economic exposure at least daily and rebalance our hedge positions accordingly) to mitigate certain

50




risks associated with the GMxB features that are embedded in our liabilities for our variable annuity products. This program utilizes various derivative instruments that are managed in an effort to reduce the economic impact of unfavorable changes in GMxB features’ exposures attributable to movements in the equity markets and interest rates. Although this program is designed to provide a measure of economic protection against the impact of adverse market conditions, it does not qualify for hedge accounting treatment. Accordingly, changes in value of the derivatives will be recognized in the period in which they occur with offsetting changes in reserves partially recognized in the current period, resulting in net income volatility. In addition to our dynamic hedging program, in the fourth quarter of 2017 and the first quarter of 2018, we implemented a new hedging program using static hedge positions (derivative positions intended to be held to maturity with less frequent re-balancing) to protect our statutory capital against stress scenarios. The implementation of this new program in addition to our dynamic hedge program is expected to increase the size of our derivative positions, resulting in an increase in net income volatility.
GMIB reinsurance contracts. Historically, GMIB reinsurance contracts were used to cede to affiliated and non-affiliated reinsurers a portion of our exposure to variable annuity products that offer a GMIB feature. We account for the GMIB reinsurance contracts as derivatives and report them at fair value. Gross reserves for GMIB reserves are calculated on the basis of assumptions related to projected benefits and related contract charges over the lives of the contracts. Accordingly, our gross reserves will not immediately reflect the offsetting impact on future claims exposure resulting from the same capital market or interest rate fluctuations that cause gains or losses on the fair value of the GMIB reinsurance contracts. Because changes in the fair value of the GMIB reinsurance contracts are recorded in the period in which they occur and a majority of the changes in gross reserves for GMIB are recognized over time, net income will be more volatile.
Effect of Assumption Updates on Operating Results
Most of the variable annuity products, variable universal life insurance and universal life insurance products we offer maintain policyholder deposits that are reported as liabilities and classified within either Separate Account liabilities or policyholder account balances. Our products and riders also impact liabilities for future policyholder benefits and unearned revenues and assets for DAC and deferred sales inducements (“DSI”). The valuation of these assets and liabilities (other than deposits) are based on differing accounting methods depending on the product, each of which requires numerous assumptions and considerable judgment. The accounting guidance applied in the valuation of these assets and liabilities includes, but is not limited to, the following: (i) traditional life insurance products for which assumptions are locked in at inception; (ii) universal life insurance and variable life insurance secondary guarantees for which benefit liabilities are determined by estimating the expected value of death benefits payable when the account balance is projected to be zero and recognizing those benefits ratably over the accumulation period based on total expected assessments; (iii) certain product guarantees for which benefit liabilities are accrued over the life of the contract in proportion to actual and future expected policy assessments; and (iv) certain product guarantees reported as embedded derivatives at fair value.
Our actuaries oversee the valuation of these product liabilities and assets and review underlying inputs and assumptions. We comprehensively review the actuarial assumptions underlying these valuations and update assumptions during the third quarter of each year. Assumptions are based on a combination of company experience, industry experience, management actions and expert judgment and reflect our best estimate as of the date of each financial statement. Changes in assumptions can result in a significant change to the carrying value of product liabilities and assets and, consequently, the impact could be material to earnings in the period of the change. For further details of our accounting policies and related judgments pertaining to assumption updates, see Note 2 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements and “—Summary of Critical Accounting Estimates—Liability for Future Policy Benefits.”
Assumption Updates and Model Changes
In 2018, we began conducting our annual review of our assumptions and models during the third quarter, consistent with industry practice.
Our annual review encompasses assumptions underlying the valuation of unearned revenue liabilities, embedded derivatives for our insurance business, liabilities for future policyholder benefits, DAC and DSI assets. As a result of this review, some assumptions were updated, resulting in increases and decreases in the carrying values of these product liabilities and assets.
The table below presents the impact of our actuarial assumption updates during 2018 and 2017 to our Income (loss) from continuing operations, before income taxes and Net income (loss):

51




 
Years Ended December 31,
 
2018
 
2017
 
(in millions)
Impact of assumption updates on Net income (loss):
 
 
 
Variable annuity product features related assumption updates
$
(331
)
 
$
1,324

All other assumption updates
103

 
342

Impact of assumption updates on Income (loss) from continuing operations, before income tax

(228
)
 
1,666

Income tax (expense) benefit on assumption updates

41

 
(583
)
Net income (loss) impact of assumption updates

$
(187
)
 
$
1,083

2018 Assumption Updates
The impact of assumption updates in 2018 on Income (loss) from continuing operations, before income taxes was a decrease of $228 million and a decrease to Net income (loss) of $187 million. This includes a $331 million unfavorable impact on the reserves for our Variable annuity product features as a result of unfavorable updates to policyholder behavior, primarily due to annuitization assumptions, partially offset by favorable updates to economic assumptions.
The assumption changes during 2018 consisted of a decrease in Policy charges and fee income of $12 million, a decrease in Policyholders’ benefits of $684 million, an increase in Net derivative losses of $1,065 million, and a decrease in the Amortization of DAC of $165 million.
2017 Assumption Updates
The impact of the assumption updates in 2017 on Income (loss) from continuing operations, before income taxes was an increase of $1,666 million and an increase to Net income (loss) of approximately $1,083 million. This includes a $1,324 million favorable impact on the reserves for our Variable annuity product features as a result of favorable updates to policyholder behavior assumptions.
The assumption changes during 2017 consisted of a decrease in Policy charges and fee income of $88 million, a decrease in Policyholders’ benefits of $23 million, an increase in Amortization of DAC of $247 million, and a decrease in Net derivative losses by $1,978 million.
Macroeconomic and Industry Trends
Our business and consolidated results of operations are significantly affected by economic conditions and consumer confidence, conditions in the global capital markets and the interest rate environment.
Financial and Economic Environment
A wide variety of factors continue to impact global financial and economic conditions. These factors include, among others, concerns over economic growth in the United States, continued low interest rates, falling unemployment rates, the U.S. Federal Reserve’s potential plans to further raise short-term interest rates, fluctuations in the strength of the U.S. dollar, the uncertainty created by what actions the current administration may pursue, concerns over global trade wars, changes in tax policy, global economic factors including programs by the European Central Bank and the United Kingdom’s vote to exit from the European Union and other geopolitical issues. Additionally, many of the products and solutions we sell are tax-advantaged or tax-deferred. If U.S. tax laws were to change, such that our products and solutions are no longer tax-advantaged or tax-deferred, demand for our products could materially decrease. See “Risk Factors—Legal and Regulatory Risks—Future changes in the U.S. tax laws and regulations or interpretations of the Tax Reform Act could reduce our earnings and negatively impact our business, results of operations or financial condition, including by making our products less attractive to consumers.
Stressed conditions, volatility and disruptions in the capital markets, particular markets, or financial asset classes can have an adverse effect on us, in part because we have a large investment portfolio and our insurance liabilities and derivatives are sensitive to changing market factors. An increase in market volatility could affect our business, including through effects on the yields we earn on invested assets, changes in required reserves and capital and fluctuations in the value of our Account Values.

52




These effects could be exacerbated by uncertainty about future fiscal policy, changes in tax policy, the scope of potential deregulation and levels of global trade.
In the short- to medium-term, the potential for increased volatility, coupled with prevailing interest rates remaining below historical averages, could pressure sales and reduce demand for our products as consumers consider purchasing alternative products to meet their objectives. In addition, this environment could make it difficult to consistently develop products that are attractive to customers. Financial performance can be adversely affected by market volatility and equity market declines as fees driven by Account Values fluctuate, hedging costs increase and revenues decline due to reduced sales and increased outflows.
We monitor the behavior of our customers and other factors, including mortality rates, morbidity rates, annuitization rates and lapse and surrender rates, which change in response to changes in capital market conditions, to ensure that our products and solutions remain attractive and profitable. For additional information on our sensitivity to interest rates and capital market prices, See “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.”
Interest Rate Environment
We believe the interest rate environment will continue to impact our business and financial performance in the future for several reasons, including the following:
Certain of our variable annuity and life insurance products pay guaranteed minimum interest crediting rates. We are required to pay these guaranteed minimum rates even if earnings on our investment portfolio decline, with the resulting investment margin compression negatively impacting earnings. In addition, we expect more policyholders to hold policies with comparatively high guaranteed rates longer (lower lapse rates) in a low interest rate environment. Conversely, a rise in average yield on our investment portfolio should positively impact earnings. Similarly, we expect policyholders would be less likely to hold policies with existing guaranteed rates (higher lapse rates) as interest rates rise.
A prolonged low interest rate environment also may subject us to increased hedging costs or an increase in the amount of statutory reserves that our insurance subsidiaries are required to hold for GMxB features, lowering their statutory surplus, which would adversely affect their ability to pay dividends to us. In addition, it may also increase the perceived value of GMxB features to our policyholders, which in turn may lead to a higher rate of annuitization and higher persistency of those products over time. Finally, low interest rates may continue to cause an acceleration of DAC amortization or reserve increase due to loss recognition for interest sensitive products.
Regulatory Developments
We are regulated primarily by the NYDFS, with some policies and products also subject to federal regulation. On an ongoing basis, regulators refine capital requirements and introduce new reserving standards. Regulations recently adopted or currently under review can potentially impact our statutory reserve and capital requirements.
National Association of Insurance Commissioners (“NAIC”). In 2015, the NAIC Financial Condition (E) Committee established a working group to study and address, as appropriate, regulatory issues resulting from variable annuity captive reinsurance transactions, including reforms that would improve the current statutory reserve and RBC framework for insurance companies that sell variable annuity products. In August 2018, the NAIC adopted the new framework developed and proposed by this working group, expected to take effect January 2020, and which has now been referred to various other NAIC committees to develop the expected full implementation details. Among other changes, the new framework includes new prescriptions for reflecting hedge effectiveness, investment returns, interest rates, mortality and policyholder behavior in calculating statutory reserves and RBC. Once effective, it could materially change the level of variable annuity reserves and RBC requirements as well as their sensitivity to capital markets including interest rate, equity markets, volatility and credit spreads. Overall, we believe the NAIC reform is moving variable annuity capital standards towards an economic framework and is consistent with how we manage our business.
Fiduciary Rules/ “Best Interest” Standards of Conduct. In the wake of the March 2018 federal appeals court decision to vacate the DOL Rule, the SEC and NAIC as well as state regulators are currently considering whether to apply an impartial conduct standard similar to the DOL Rule to recommendations made in connection with certain annuities and, in one case, to life insurance policies. For example, the NAIC is actively working on a proposal to raise the advice standard for annuity sales and in July 2018, the NYDFS issued a final version of Regulation 187 that adopts a “best interest” standard for recommendations regarding the sale of life insurance and annuity products in New York.

53




Regulation 187 takes effect on August 1, 2019 with respect to annuity sales and February 1, 2020 for life insurance sales and is applicable to sales of life insurance and annuity products in New York. In November 2018, the primary agent groups in New York launched a legal challenge against the NYDFS over the adoption of Regulation 187. It is not possible to predict whether this challenge will be successful. We are currently assessing Regulation 187 to determine the impact it may have on our business. Beyond the New York regulation, the likelihood of enactment of any such state-based regulation is uncertain at this time, but if implemented, these regulations could have adverse effects on our business and consolidated results of operations.
In April 2018, the SEC released a set of proposed rules that would, among other things, enhance the existing standard of conduct for broker-dealers to require them to act in the best interest of their clients; clarify the nature of the fiduciary obligations owed by registered investment advisers to their clients; impose new disclosure requirements aimed at ensuring investors understand the nature of their relationship with their investment professionals; and restrict certain broker-dealers and their financial professionals from using the terms “adviser” or “advisor”. Public comments were due by August 7, 2018. Although the full impact of the proposed rules can only be measured when the implementing regulations are adopted, the intent of this provision is to authorize the SEC to impose on broker-dealers’ fiduciary duties to their customers similar to those that apply to investment advisers under existing law. We are currently assessing these proposed rules to determine the impact they may have on our business.
Impact of the Tax Reform Act
On December 22, 2017, President Trump signed into law the Tax Reform Act, a broad overhaul of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code that changed long-standing provisions governing the taxation of U.S. corporations, including life insurance companies.
The Tax Reform Act reduced the federal corporate income tax rate to 21% and repealed the corporate Alternative Minimum Tax (“AMT”) while keeping existing AMT credits. It also contained measures affecting our insurance companies, including changes to the DRD, insurance reserves and tax DAC. As a result of the Tax Reform Act, our Net Income has improved.
In August 2018, the NAIC adopted changes to the RBC calculation, including the C-3 Phase II Total Asset Requirement for variable annuities, to reflect the 21% corporate income tax rate in RBC, which resulted in a reduction to our Combined RBC Ratio.
Overall, the Tax Reform Act had a net positive economic impact on us and we continue to monitor regulations related to this reform.
Consolidated Results of Operations
Our consolidated results of operations are significantly affected by conditions in the capital markets and the economy because we offer market sensitive products. These products have been a significant driver of our results of operations. Because the future claims exposure on these products is sensitive to movements in the equity markets and interest rates, we have in place various hedging and reinsurance programs that are designed to mitigate the economic risks of movements in the equity markets and interest rates. The volatility in Net income attributable to AXA Equitable for the periods presented below results from the mismatch between (i) the change in carrying value of the reserves for GMDB and certain GMIB features that do not fully and immediately reflect the impact of equity and interest market fluctuations and (ii) the change in fair value of products with the GMIB feature that has a no-lapse guarantee, and our hedging and reinsurance programs.
Reclassification of DAC Capitalization
During the fourth quarter of 2018, the Company revised the presentation of the capitalization of deferred policy acquisition costs (“DAC”) in the consolidated statements of income for all prior periods presented herein by netting the capitalized amounts within the applicable expense line items, such as Compensation and benefits, Commissions and distribution plan payments and Other operating costs and expenses. Previously, the Company had netted the capitalized amounts within the Amortization of deferred acquisition costs. There was no impact on Net income (loss) or Comprehensive income of this reclassification.
The reclassification adjustments for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016 are presented in the table below. Capitalization of DAC reclassified to Compensation and benefits, Commissions and distribution plan payments, and Other operating costs and expenses reduced the amounts previously reported in those expense line items, while the capitalization of

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DAC reclassified from the Amortization of deferred policy acquisition costs line item increases that expense line item.
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2017
 
2016
 
(in millions)
Reductions to expense line items:
 
 
 
Compensation and benefits
$
128

 
$
128

Commissions and distribution plan payments
443

 
460

Other operating costs and expenses
7

 
6

Total reductions
$
578

 
$
594

 
 
 
 
Increase to expense line item:
 
 
 
Amortization of deferred policy acquisition costs
$
578

 
$
594

The following table summarizes our consolidated statements of income (loss) for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017:
Consolidated Statement of Income (Loss)
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2018
 
2017
 
(in millions)
REVENUES
 
 
 
Policy charges and fee income
$
3,523

 
$
3,294

Premiums
862

 
904

Net derivative gains (losses)
(1,010
)
 
894

Net investment income (loss)
2,478

 
2,441

Investment gains (losses), net:
 
 
 
Total other-than-temporary impairment losses
(37
)
 
(13
)
Other investment gains (losses), net
41

 
(112
)
Total investment gains (losses), net
4

 
(125
)
Investment management and service fees
1,029

 
1,007

Other income
65

 
41

Total revenues
6,951

 
8,456

BENEFITS AND OTHER DEDUCTIONS
 
 
 
Policyholders’ benefits
3,005

 
3,473

Interest credited to policyholders’ account balances
1,002

 
921

Compensation and benefits
422

 
327

Commissions and distribution related payments
620

 
628

Interest expense
34

 
23

Amortization of deferred policy acquisition costs
431

 
900

Other operating costs and expenses
2,918

 
635

Total benefits and other deductions
8,432

 
6,907

Income (loss) from continuing operations, before income taxes
(1,481
)
 
1,549

Income tax (expense) benefit from continuing operations
446

 
1,210

Net income (loss) from continuing operations
(1,035
)
 
2,759

Net income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of taxes and noncontrolling interest
114

 
85

Less: net (income) loss attributable to the noncontrolling interest
3

 
(1
)
Net income (loss) attributable to AXA Equitable
$
(918
)
 
$
2,843


The following discussion compares the results for the year ended December 31, 2018 to the year ended December 31, 2017.

55




Year Ended December 31, 2018 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2017
Net Income (Loss) Attributable to AXA Equitable
The $3,761 million decrease in net income attributable to AXA Equitable, to a loss of $918 million for the year ended 2018 from net income of $2,843 million for the year ended 2017, was primarily driven by the following notable items:
Other operating costs and expenses increased by $2,283 million mainly due to $1,882 million of amortization of the deferred cost of reinsurance asset in 2018 including the write-off of $1,840 million of this asset, and the settlement of outstanding payments of $248 million, both related to the GMxB Unwind.
Net derivative gains (losses) decreased by $1,904 million mainly due to the unfavorable impact of assumption updates in 2018 compared to the favorable impact of assumption updates in 2017.
Compensation and benefits increased by $95 million primarily due to the loss resulting from the annuity purchase transaction and partial settlement of the employee pension plan in 2018.
Interest credited to policyholders’ account balances increased by $81 million primarily driven by higher SCS AV due to new business growth.
Interest expense increased by $11 million due to higher repurchase agreement costs.
Income tax benefit decreased by $764 million primarily driven by a one-time tax benefit in 2017 related to the Tax Reform Act.
Partially offsetting this decrease were the following notable items:
Amortization of deferred policy acquisition costs decreased by $469 million mainly due to the favorable impact of assumption updates in 2018.
Policyholders’ benefits decreased by $468 million mainly due to the favorable impact of assumption updates in 2018 compared to the unfavorable impact of assumption updates in 2017, combined with the favorable impact of rising interest rates, partially offset by the impact of equity market declines affecting our GMxB liabilities.
Policy charges, fee income and premiums increased by $187 million primarily due to higher cost of insurance charges.
Total investment gains (losses), net increased by $129 million primarily due to the sale of fixed maturities.
Investment management, service fees and other income increased by $46 million primarily due to higher equity markets.
Increase in Net investment income of $37 million primarily due to higher assets from the GMxB Unwind and General Account optimization.

56




Contractual Obligations
The table below summarizes the future estimated cash payments related to certain contractual obligations as of December 31, 2018. The estimated payments reflected in this table are based on management’s estimates and assumptions about these obligations. Because these estimates and assumptions are necessarily subjective, the actual cash outflows in future periods will vary, possibly materially, from those reflected in the table. In addition, we do not believe that our cash flow requirements can be adequately assessed based solely upon an analysis of these obligations, as the table below does not contemplate all aspects of our cash inflows, such as the level of cash flow generated by certain of our investments, nor all aspects of our cash outflows.
 
Estimated Payments Due by Period
 
Total
 
2019
 
2020-2022
 
2023-2024
 
2025 and thereafter
 
(in millions)
Contractual obligations:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Policyholders’ liabilities (1)
$
100,158

 
$
1,745

 
$
5,025

 
$
6,722

 
$
86,666

FHLBNY Funding Agreements
3,990

 
1,640

 
1,094


475

 
781

Interest on FHLBNY Funding Agreements
267

 
65

 
109


50

 
43

Operating leases
419

 
81

 
143

 
129

 
66

Loan from affiliates
572

 
572

 

 

 

Employee benefits
3,941

 
214

 
431

 
410

 
2,886

Total Contractual Obligations
$
109,347

 
$
4,317

 
$
6,802

 
$
7,786

 
$
90,442

_______________
(1)
Policyholders’ liabilities represent estimated cash flows out of the General Account related to the payment of death and disability claims, policy surrenders and withdrawals, annuity payments, minimum guarantees on Separate Account funded contracts, matured endowments, benefits under accident and health contracts, policyholder dividends and future renewal premium-based and fund-based commissions offset by contractual future premiums and deposits on in-force contracts. These estimated cash flows are based on mortality, morbidity and lapse assumptions comparable with the Company’s experience and assume market growth and interest crediting consistent with actuarial assumptions used in amortizing DAC. These amounts are undiscounted and, therefore, exceed the policyholders’ account balances and future policy benefits and other policyholder liabilities included in the consolidated balance sheet. They do not reflect projected recoveries from reinsurance agreements. Due to the use of assumptions, actual cash flows will differ from these estimates, see “—Summary of Critical Accounting Policies—Liability for Future Policy Benefits.” Separate Account liabilities have been excluded as they are legally insulated from General Account obligations and will be funded by cash flows from Separate Account assets.

Unrecognized tax benefits of $273 million, were not included in the above table because it is not possible to make reasonably reliable estimates of the occurrence or timing of cash settlements with the respective taxing authorities.
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
At December 31, 2018, the Company was not a party to any off-balance sheet transactions other than those guarantees and commitments described in Notes 10 and 17 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
Summary of Critical Accounting Estimates
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to adopt accounting policies and make estimates and assumptions that affect amounts reported in our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere herein. For a discussion of our significant accounting policies, see Note 2 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements. The most critical estimates include those used in determining:
liabilities for future policy benefits;
accounting for reinsurance;
capitalization and amortization of DAC and policyholder bonus interest credits;
estimated fair values of investments in the absence of quoted market values and investment impairments;

57




estimated fair values of freestanding derivatives and the recognition and estimated fair value of embedded derivatives requiring bifurcation;
measurement of income taxes and the valuation of deferred tax assets; and
liabilities for litigation and regulatory matters.
In applying our accounting policies, we make subjective and complex judgments that frequently require estimates about matters that are inherently uncertain. Many of these policies, estimates and related judgments are common in the insurance and financial services industries while others are specific to our business and operations. Actual results could differ from these estimates.
Liability for Future Policy Benefits
We establish reserves for future policy benefits to, or on behalf of, policyholders in the same period in which the policy is issued or acquired, using methodologies prescribed by U.S. GAAP. The assumptions used in establishing reserves are generally based on our experience, industry experience or other factors, as applicable. At least annually we review our actuarial assumptions, such as mortality, morbidity, retirement and policyholder behavior assumptions, and update assumptions when appropriate. Generally, we do not expect trends to change significantly in the short-term and, to the extent these trends may change, we expect such changes to be gradual over the long-term.
The reserving methodologies used include the following:
Universal life (“UL”) and investment-type contract policyholder account balances are equal to the policy AV. The policy AV represent an accumulation of gross premium payments plus credited interest less expense and mortality charges and withdrawals.
Participating traditional life insurance future policy benefit liabilities are calculated using a net level premium method on the basis of actuarial assumptions equal to guaranteed mortality and dividend fund interest rates.
Non-participating traditional life insurance future policy benefit liabilities are estimated using a net level premium method on the basis of actuarial assumptions as to mortality, persistency and interest.
For most long-duration contracts, we utilize best estimate assumptions as of the date the policy is issued or acquired with provisions for the risk of adverse deviation, as appropriate. After the liabilities are initially established, we perform premium deficiency tests using best estimate assumptions as of the testing date without provisions for adverse deviation. If the liabilities determined based on these best estimate assumptions are greater than the net reserves (i.e., U.S. GAAP reserves net of any DAC or DSI), the existing net reserves are adjusted by first reducing the DAC or DSI by the amount of the deficiency or to zero through a charge to current period earnings. If the deficiency is more than these asset balances for insurance contracts, we then increase the net reserves by the excess, again through a charge to current period earnings. If a premium deficiency is recognized, the assumptions as of the premium deficiency test date are locked in and used in subsequent valuations and the net reserves continue to be subject to premium deficiency testing.
For certain reserves, such as those related to GMDB and GMIB features, we use current best estimate assumptions in establishing reserves. The reserves are subject to adjustments based on periodic reviews of assumptions and quarterly adjustments for experience, including market performance, and the reserves may be adjusted through a benefit or charge to current period earnings.
For certain GMxB features, the benefits are accounted for as embedded derivatives, with fair values calculated as the present value of expected future benefit payments to contractholders less the present value of assessed rider fees attributable to the embedded derivative feature. Under U.S. GAAP, the fair values of these benefit features are based on assumptions a market participant would use in valuing these embedded derivatives. Changes in the fair value of the embedded derivatives are recorded quarterly through a benefit or charge to current period earnings.
The assumptions used in establishing reserves are generally based on our experience, industry experience and/or other factors, as applicable. We typically update our actuarial assumptions, such as mortality, morbidity, retirement and policyholder behavior assumptions, annually, unless a material change is observed in an interim period that we feel is indicative of a long-term trend. Generally, we do not expect trends to change significantly in the short-term and, to the extent these trends may change, we expect such changes to be gradual over the long-term. In a sustained low interest rate environment, there is an increased likelihood that the reserves determined based on best estimate assumptions may be greater than the net liabilities.

58




See Note 8 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information on our accounting policy relating to GMxB features and liability for future policy benefits and Note 2 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for future policyholder benefit liabilities.
Sensitivity of Future Rate of Return Assumptions on GMDB/GMIB Reserves
The Separate Account future rate of return assumptions that are used in establishing reserves for GMxB features are set using a long-term-view of expected average market returns by applying a reversion to the mean approach, consistent with that used for DAC amortization. For additional information regarding the future expected rate of return assumptions and the reversion to the mean approach, see, “—DAC and Policyholder Bonus Interest Credits”.
The GMDB/GMIB reserve balance before reinsurance ceded was $8.4 billion at December 31, 2018. The following table provides the sensitivity of the reserves GMxB features related to variable annuity contracts relative to the future rate of return assumptions by quantifying the adjustments to these reserves that would be required assuming both a 1% increase and decrease in the future rate of return. This sensitivity considers only the direct effect of changes in the future rate of return on operating results due to the change in the reserve balance before reinsurance ceded and not changes in any other assumptions such as persistency, mortality, or expenses included in the evaluation of the reserves, or any changes on DAC or other balances including hedging derivatives and the GMIB reinsurance asset.
GMDB/GMIB Reserves
Sensitivity - Rate of Return
December 31, 2018
 
Increase/(Decrease) in GMDB/GMIB Reserves
 
(in millions)
1% decrease in future rate of return
$
1,259.3

1% increase in future rate of return
$
(1,333.2
)
Traditional Annuities
The reserves for future policy benefits for annuities include group pension and payout annuities, and, during the accumulation period, are equal to accumulated policyholders’ fund balances and, after annuitization, are equal to the present value of expected future payments based on assumptions as to mortality, retirement, maintenance expense, and interest rates. Interest rates used in establishing such liabilities range from 1.6% to 5.5% (weighted average of 4.8%). If reserves determined based on these assumptions are greater than the existing reserves, the existing reserves are adjusted to the greater amount.
Health
Individual health benefit liabilities for active lives are estimated using the net level premium method and assumptions as to future morbidity, withdrawals and interest. Benefit liabilities for disabled lives are estimated using the present value of benefits method and experience assumptions as to claim terminations, expenses and interest.
Reinsurance
Accounting for reinsurance requires extensive use of assumptions and estimates, particularly related to the future performance of the underlying business and the potential impact of counterparty credit risk with respect to reinsurance receivables. We periodically review actual and anticipated experience compared to the aforementioned assumptions used to establish assets and liabilities relating to ceded and assumed reinsurance and evaluate the financial strength of counterparties to our reinsurance agreements using criteria similar to those evaluated in our security impairment process. See “—Estimated Fair Value of Investments.” Additionally, for each of our reinsurance agreements, we determine whether the agreement provides indemnification against loss or liability relating to insurance risk, in accordance with applicable accounting standards. We review all contractual features, including those that may limit the amount of insurance risk to which the reinsurer is subject or features that delay the timely reimbursement of claims. If we determine that a reinsurance agreement does not expose the reinsurer to a reasonable possibility of a significant loss from insurance risk, we record the agreement using the deposit method of accounting.

59




For reinsurance contracts other than those covering GMIB exposure, reinsurance recoverable balances are calculated using methodologies and assumptions that are consistent with those used to calculate the direct liabilities. GMIB reinsurance contracts are used to cede affiliated and non-affiliated reinsurers a portion of the exposure on variable annuity products that offer the GMIB feature. The GMIB reinsurance contracts are accounted for as derivatives and are reported at fair value. Gross reserves for GMIB, on the other hand, are calculated on the basis of assumptions related to projected benefits and related contract charges over the lives of the contracts, therefore, will not immediately reflect the offsetting impact on future claims exposure resulting from the same capital market and/or interest rate fluctuations that cause gains or losses on the fair value of the GMIB reinsurance contracts.
See Note 10 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information on our reinsurance agreements.
DAC and Policyholder Bonus Interest Credits
We incur significant costs in connection with acquiring new and renewal insurance business. Costs that relate directly to the successful acquisition or renewal of insurance contracts are deferred as DAC. In addition to commissions, certain direct-response advertising expenses and other direct costs, other deferrable costs include the portion of an employee’s total compensation and benefits related to time spent selling, underwriting or processing the issuance of new and renewal insurance business only with respect to actual policies acquired or renewed. We utilize various techniques to estimate the portion of an employee’s time spent on qualifying acquisition activities that result in actual sales, including surveys, interviews, representative time studies and other methods. These estimates include assumptions that are reviewed and updated on a periodic basis or more frequently to reflect significant changes in processes or distribution methods.
Amortization Methodologies
Participating Traditional Life Policies
For participating traditional life policies (substantially all of which are in the Closed Block), DAC is amortized over the expected total life of the contract group as a constant percentage based on the present value of the estimated gross margin amounts expected to be realized over the life of the contracts using the expected investment yield.
At December 31, 2018, the average investment yields assumed (excluding policy loans) were 4.7% grading to 4.3% in 2024. Estimated gross margins include anticipated premiums and investment results less claims and administrative expenses, changes in the net level premium reserve and expected annual policyholder dividends. The effect on the accumulated amortization of DAC of revisions to estimated gross margins is reflected in earnings in the period such estimated gross margins are revised. The effect on the DAC assets that would result from realization of unrealized gains (losses) is recognized with an offset to AOCI in consolidated equity as of the balance sheet date. Many of the factors that affect gross margins are included in the determination of the Company’s dividends to these policyholders. DAC adjustments related to participating traditional life policies do not create significant volatility in results of operations as the Closed Block recognizes a cumulative policyholder dividend obligation expense in “Policyholders’ dividends,” for the excess of actual cumulative earnings over expected cumulative earnings as determined at the time of demutualization.
Non-participating Traditional Life Insurance Policies
DAC associated with non-participating traditional life policies are amortized in proportion to anticipated premiums. Assumptions as to anticipated premiums are estimated at the date of policy issue and are consistently applied during the life of the contracts. Deviations from estimated experience are reflected in earnings (loss) in the period such deviations occur. For these contracts, the amortization periods generally are for the total life of the policy.
Universal Life and Investment-type Contracts
DAC associated with certain variable annuity products is amortized based on estimated assessments, with the remainder of variable annuity products, UL and investment-type products amortized over the expected total life of the contract group as a constant percentage of estimated gross profits arising principally from investment results, Separate Account fees, mortality and expense margins and surrender charges based on historical and anticipated future experience, updated at the end of each accounting period. When estimated gross profits are expected to be negative for multiple years of a contract life, DAC is amortized using the present value of estimated assessments. The effect on the amortization of DAC of revisions to estimated

60




gross profits or assessments is reflected in net income (loss) in the period such estimated gross profits or assessments are revised. A decrease in expected gross profits or assessments would accelerate DAC amortization. Conversely, an increase in expected gross profits or assessments would slow DAC amortization. The effect on the DAC assets that would result from realization of unrealized gains (losses) is recognized with an offset to AOCI in consolidated equity as of the balance sheet date.
Quarterly adjustments to the DAC balance are made for current period experience and market performance related adjustments, and the impact of reviews of estimated total gross profits. The quarterly adjustments for current period experience reflect the impact of differences between actual and previously estimated expected gross profits for a given period. Total estimated gross profits include both actual experience and estimates of gross profits for future periods. To the extent each period’s actual experience differs from the previous estimate for that period, the assumed level of total gross profits may change. In these cases, cumulative adjustment to all previous periods’ costs is recognized.
During each accounting period, the DAC balances are evaluated and adjusted with a corresponding charge or credit to current period earnings for the effects of the Company’s actual gross profits and changes in the assumptions regarding estimated future gross profits. A decrease in expected gross profits or assessments would accelerate DAC amortization. Conversely, an increase in expected gross profits or assessments would slow DAC amortization. The effect on the DAC assets that would result from realization of unrealized gains (losses) is recognized with an offset to AOCI in consolidated equity as of the balance sheet date.
For the variable and UL policies a significant portion of the gross profits is derived from mortality margins and therefore, are significantly influenced by the mortality assumptions used. Mortality assumptions represent our expected claims experience over the life of these policies and are based on a long-term average of actual company experience. This assumption is updated periodically to reflect recent experience as it emerges. Improvement of life mortality in future periods from that currently projected would result in future deceleration of DAC amortization. Conversely, deterioration of life mortality in future periods from that currently projected would result in future acceleration of DAC amortization.
Loss Recognition Testing
After the initial establishment of reserves, loss recognition tests are performed using best estimate assumptions as of the testing date without provisions for adverse deviation. When the liabilities for future policy benefits plus the present value of expected future gross premiums for the aggregate product group are insufficient to provide for expected future policy benefits and expenses for that line of business (i.e., reserves net of any DAC asset), DAC is first written off, and thereafter a premium deficiency reserve is established by a charge to earnings.
In 2018 and 2017, we determined that we had a loss recognition in certain of our variable interest-sensitive life insurance products due to the release of life reserves and low interest rates. As of December 31, 2018 and 2017, we wrote off $162 million and $656 million, respectively, of the DAC balance through accelerated amortization.
Additionally, in certain policyholder liability balances for a particular line of business may not be deficient in the aggregate to trigger loss recognition; however, the pattern of earnings may be such that profits are expected to be recognized in earlier years and then followed by losses in later years. This pattern of profits followed by losses is exhibited in our VISL business and is generated by the cost structure of the product or secondary guarantees in the contract. The secondary guarantee ensures that, subject to specified conditions, the policy will not terminate and will continue to provide a death benefit even if there is insufficient policy value to cover the monthly deductions and charges. We accrue for these Profits Followed by Losses (“PFBL”) using a dynamic approach that changes over time as the projection of future losses change.
In addition, we are required to analyze the impacts from net unrealized investment gains and losses on our available-for-sale investment securities backing insurance liabilities, as if those unrealized investment gains and losses were realized. This may result in the recognition of unrealized gains and losses on related insurance assets and liabilities in a manner consistent with the recognition of the unrealized gains and losses on available-for-sale investment securities within the statements of comprehensive income and changes in equity. Changes to net unrealized investment (gains) losses may increase or decrease the ending DAC balance. Similar to a loss recognition event, when the DAC balance is reduced to zero, additional insurance liabilities are established if necessary. Unlike a loss recognition event, which is based on changes in net unrealized investment (gains) losses, these adjustments may reverse from period to period. In 2017, due primarily to the release of life reserves, we recorded an unrealized loss in Other comprehensive income (loss). There was no impact to Net income (loss).

61




Sensitivity of DAC to Changes in Future Mortality Assumptions
The following table demonstrates the sensitivity of the DAC balance relative to future mortality assumptions by quantifying the adjustments that would be required, assuming an increase and decrease in the future mortality rate by 1.0%. This information considers only the direct effect of changes in the mortality assumptions on the DAC balance and not changes in any other assumptions used in the measurement of the DAC balance and does not assume changes in reserves.
DAC Sensitivity - Mortality
December 31, 2018
 
Increase/(Decrease) in DAC
 
(in millions)
Decrease in future mortality by 1%
$
20

Increase in future mortality by 1%
$
(20
)
Sensitivity of DAC to Changes in Future Rate of Return Assumptions
A significant assumption in the amortization of DAC on variable annuity products and, to a lesser extent, on variable and interest-sensitive life insurance relates to projected future Separate Accounts performance. Management sets estimated future gross profit or assessment assumptions related to Separate Account performance using a long-term view of expected average market returns by applying a Reversion to the Mean (“RTM”) approach, a commonly used industry practice. This future return approach influences the projection of fees earned, as well as other sources of estimated gross profits. Returns that are higher than expectations for a given period produce higher than expected account balances, increase the fees earned resulting in higher expected future gross profits and lower DAC amortization for the period. The opposite occurs when returns are lower than expected.
In applying this approach to develop estimates of future returns, it is assumed that the market will return to an average gross long-term return estimate, developed with reference to historical long-term equity market performance. In second quarter 2015, based upon management’s then-current expectations of interest rates and future fund growth, we updated our reversion to the mean assumption from 9.0% to 7.0%. The average gross long-term return measurement start date was also updated to December 31, 2014. Management has set limitations as to maximum and minimum future rate of return assumptions, as well as a limitation on the duration of use of these maximum or minimum rates of return. At December 31, 2018, the average gross short-term and long-term annual return estimate on variable and interest-sensitive life insurance and variable annuity products was 7.0% (4.7% net of product weighted average Separate Accounts fees), and 0.0% (2.3)% net of product weighted average Separate Account fees), respectively. The maximum duration over which these rate limitations may be applied is five years. This approach will continue to be applied in future periods. These assumptions of long-term growth are subject to assessment of the reasonableness of resulting estimates of future return assumptions.
If actual market returns continue at levels that would result in assuming future market returns of 15.0% for more than five years in order to reach the average gross long-term return estimate, the application of the five-year maximum duration limitation would result in an acceleration of DAC amortization. Conversely, actual market returns resulting in assumed future market returns of 0.0% for more than five years would result in a required deceleration of DAC amortization. At December 31, 2018, current projections of future average gross market returns assume a 1.6% annualized return for the next two quarters, followed by 7.0% thereafter. Other significant assumptions underlying gross profit estimates for UL and investment type products relate to contract persistency and General Account investment spread.
The following table provides an example of the sensitivity of the DAC balance of variable annuity products and variable and interest-sensitive life insurance relative to future return assumptions by quantifying the adjustments to the DAC balance that would be required assuming both an increase and decrease in the future rate of return by 1.0%. This information considers only the effect of changes in the future Separate Accounts rate of return and not changes in any other assumptions used in the measurement of the DAC balance.

62




DAC Sensitivity - Rate of Return
December 31, 2018
 
Increase/(Decrease) in DAC
 
(in millions)
Decrease in future rate of return by 1%
$
(97
)
Increase in future rate of return by 1%
$
121

Estimated Fair Value of Investments
The Company’s investment portfolio principally consists of public and private fixed maturities, mortgage loans, equity securities and derivative financial instruments, including exchange traded equity, currency and interest rate futures contracts, total return and/or other equity swaps, interest rate swap and floor contracts, swaptions, variance swaps as well as equity options used to manage various risks relating to its business operations.
Fair Value Measurements
Investments reported at fair value in the consolidated balance sheets of the Company include fixed maturity securities classified as available-for-sale, equity and trading securities and certain other invested assets, such as freestanding derivatives. In addition, reinsurance contracts covering GMIB exposure and the liabilities in the SCS variable annuity products, SIO in the EQUI-VEST variable annuity product series, MSO in the variable life insurance products, IUL insurance products and the GMAB, GIB, GMWB and GWBL feature in certain variable annuity products issued by the Company are considered embedded derivatives and reported at fair value.
When available, the estimated fair value of securities is based on quoted prices in active markets that are readily and regularly obtainable; these generally are the most liquid holdings and their valuation does not involve management judgment. When quoted prices in active markets are not available, we estimate fair value based on market standard valuation methodologies. These alternative approaches include matrix or model pricing and use of independent pricing services, each supported by reference to principal market trades or other observable market assumptions for similar securities. More specifically, the matrix pricing approach to fair value is a discounted cash flow methodology that incorporates market interest rates commensurate with the credit quality and duration of the investment. For securities with reasonable price transparency, the significant inputs to these valuation methodologies either are observable in the market or can be derived principally from or corroborated by observable market data. When the volume or level of activity results in little or no price transparency, significant inputs no longer can be supported by reference to market observable data but instead must be based on management’s estimation and judgment. Substantially the same approach is used by us to measure the fair values of freestanding and embedded derivatives with exception for consideration of the effects of master netting agreements and collateral arrangements as well as incremental value or risk ascribed to changes in own or counterparty credit risk.
As required by the accounting guidance, we categorize our assets and liabilities measured at fair value into a three-level hierarchy, based on the priority of the inputs to the respective valuation technique, giving the highest priority to quoted prices in active markets for identical assets and liabilities (Level 1) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3). For additional information regarding the key estimates and assumptions surrounding the determinations of fair value measurements, see Note 7 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
Impairments and Valuation Allowances
The assessment of whether OTTIs have occurred is performed quarterly by our Investments Under Surveillance (“IUS”) Committee, with the assistance of its investment advisors, on a security-by-security basis for each available-for-sale fixed maturity that has experienced a decline in fair value for purpose of evaluating the underlying reasons. The analysis begins with a review of gross unrealized losses by the following categories of securities: (i) all investment grade and below investment grade fixed maturities for which fair value has declined and remained below amortized cost by 20% or more and (ii) below-investment-grade fixed maturities for which fair value has declined and remained below amortized cost for a period greater than 12 months. Integral to the analysis is an assessment of various indicators of credit deterioration to determine whether the investment security is expected to recover, including, but not limited to, consideration of the duration and severity of the unrealized loss, failure, if any, of the issuer of the security to make scheduled payments, actions taken by rating agencies, adverse conditions specifically related to the security or sector, the financial strength, liquidity, and continued viability of the

63




issuer and, for equity securities only, the intent and ability to hold the investment until recovery, resulting in identification of specific securities for which OTTI is recognized.
If there is no intent to sell or likely requirement to dispose of the fixed maturity security before its recovery, only the credit loss component of any resulting OTTI is recognized in earnings and the remainder of the fair value loss is recognized in OCI. The amount of credit loss is the shortfall of the present value of the cash flows expected to be collected as compared to the amortized cost basis of the security. The present value is calculated by discounting management’s best estimate of projected future cash flows at the effective interest rate implicit in the debt security at the date of acquisition. Projections of future cash flows are based on assumptions regarding probability of default and estimates regarding the amount and timing of recoveries. These assumptions and estimates require use of management judgment and consider internal credit analyses as well as market observable data relevant to the collectability of the security. For mortgage- and asset-backed securities, projected future cash flows also include assumptions regarding prepayments and underlying collateral value.
Mortgage loans are stated at unpaid principal balances, net of unamortized discounts and valuation allowances. Valuation allowances are based on the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s original effective interest rate or on its collateral value if the loan is collateral dependent. However, if foreclosure is or becomes probable, the collateral value measurement method is used.
For commercial and agricultural mortgage loans, an allowance for credit loss is typically recommended when management believes it is probable that principal and interest will not be collected according to the contractual terms. Factors that influence management’s judgment in determining allowance for credit losses include the following:
Loan-to-value ratio— Derived from current loan balance divided by the fair market value of the property. An allowance for credit loss is typically recommended when the loan-to-value ratio is in excess of 100%. In the case where the loan-to-value is in excess of 100%, the allowance for credit loss is derived by taking the difference between the fair market value (less cost of sale) and the current loan balance.
Debt service coverage ratio—Derived from actual operating earnings divided by annual debt service. If the ratio is below 1.0x, then the income from the property does not support the debt.
Occupancy—Criteria vary by property type but low or below market occupancy is an indicator of sub-par property performance.
Lease expirations—The percentage of leases expiring in the upcoming 12 to 36 months are monitored as a decline in rent and/or occupancy may negatively impact the debt service coverage ratio. In the case of single-tenant properties or properties with large tenant exposure, the lease expiration is a material risk factor.
Maturity—Mortgage loans that are not fully amortizing and have upcoming maturities within the next 12 to 24 months are monitored in conjunction with the capital markets to determine the borrower’s ability to refinance the debt and/or pay off the balloon balance.
Borrower/tenant related issues—Financial concerns, potential bankruptcy, or words or actions that indicate imminent default or abandonment of property.
Payment status - current vs. delinquent—A history of delinquent payments may be a cause for concern.
Property condition—Significant deferred maintenance observed during the lenders annual site inspections.
Other—Any other factors such as current economic conditions may call into question the performance of the loan.
Mortgage loans also are individually evaluated quarterly by the IUS Committee for impairment on a loan-by-loan basis, including an assessment of related collateral value. Commercial mortgages 60 days or more past due and agricultural mortgages 90 days or more past due, as well as all mortgages in the process of foreclosure, are identified as problem mortgages. Based on its monthly monitoring of mortgages, a class of potential problem mortgages also is identified, consisting of mortgage loans not currently classified as problems but for which management has doubts as to the ability of the borrower to comply with the present loan payment terms and which may result in the loan becoming a problem or being restructured. The decision whether to classify a performing mortgage loan as a potential problem involves significant subjective judgments by management as to likely future industry conditions and developments with respect to the borrower or the individual mortgaged property.
For problem mortgage loans a valuation allowance is established to provide for the risk of credit losses inherent in the lending process. The allowance includes loan specific reserves for loans determined to be non-performing as a result of the loan review process. A non-performing loan is defined as a loan for which it is probable that amounts due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement will not be collected. The loan specific portion of the loss allowance is based on our

64




assessment as to ultimate collectability of loan principal and interest. Valuation allowances for a non-performing loan are recorded based on the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate or based on the fair value of the collateral if the loan is collateral dependent. The valuation allowance for mortgage loans can increase or decrease from period to period based on such factors.
Impaired mortgage loans without provision for losses are mortgage loans where the fair value of the collateral or the net present value of the expected future cash flows related to the loan equals or exceeds the recorded investment. Interest income earned on mortgage loans where the collateral value is used to measure impairment is recorded on a cash basis. Interest income on mortgage loans where the present value method is used to measure impairment is accrued on the net carrying value amount of the loan at the interest rate used to discount the cash flows. Changes in the present value attributable to changes in the amount or timing of expected cash flows are reported as investment gains or losses.
Mortgage loans are placed on nonaccrual status once management believes the collection of accrued interest is doubtful. Once mortgage loans are classified as nonaccrual mortgage loans, interest income is recognized under the cash basis of accounting and the resumption of the interest accrual would commence only after all past due interest has been collected or the mortgage loan on real estate has been restructured to where the collection of interest is considered likely.
See Notes 2 and 3 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information relating to our determination of the amount of allowances and impairments.
Derivatives
We use freestanding derivative instruments to hedge various capital market risks in our products, including: (i) certain guarantees, some of which are reported as embedded derivatives; (ii) current or future changes in the fair value of our assets and liabilities; and (iii) current or future changes in cash flows. All derivatives, whether freestanding or embedded, are required to be carried on the balance sheet at fair value with changes reflected in either net income (loss) or in other comprehensive income, depending on the type of hedge. Below is a summary of critical accounting estimates by type of derivative.
Freestanding Derivatives
The determination of the estimated fair value of freestanding derivatives, when quoted market values are not available, is based on market standard valuation methodologies and inputs that management believes are consistent with what other market participants would use when pricing such instruments. Derivative valuations can be affected by changes in interest rates, foreign currency exchange rates, financial indices, credit spreads, default risk, nonperformance risk, volatility, liquidity and changes in estimates and assumptions used in the pricing models. See Note 7 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional details on significant inputs into the OTC derivative pricing models and credit risk adjustment.
Embedded Derivatives
We issue variable annuity products with guaranteed minimum benefits, some of which are embedded derivatives measured at estimated fair value separately from the host variable annuity product, with changes in estimated fair value reported in net derivative gains (losses). We also have assumed from an affiliate the risk associated with certain guaranteed minimum benefits, which are accounted for as embedded derivatives measured at estimated fair value. The estimated fair values of these embedded derivatives are determined based on the present value of projected future benefits minus the present value of projected future fees attributable to the guarantee. The projections of future benefits and future fees require capital markets and actuarial assumptions, including expectations concerning policyholder behavior. A risk-neutral valuation methodology is used under which the cash flows from the guarantees are projected under multiple capital market scenarios using observable risk-free rates.
Market conditions, including, but not limited to, changes in interest rates, equity indices, market volatility and variations in actuarial assumptions, including policyholder behavior, mortality and risk margins related to non-capital market inputs, as well as changes in our nonperformance risk adjustment may result in significant fluctuations in the estimated fair value of the guarantees that could materially affect net income. Changes to actuarial assumptions, principally related to contract holder behavior such as annuitization utilization and withdrawals associated with GMIB riders, can result in a change of expected future cash outflows of a guarantee between the accrual-based model for insurance liabilities and the fair-value based model for embedded derivatives. See Note 2 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information relating to the determination of the accounting model. Risk margins are established to capture the non-capital market risks of the instrument which represent the additional compensation a market participant would require to assume the risks related to the

65




uncertainties in certain actuarial assumptions. The establishment of risk margins requires the use of significant management judgment, including assumptions of the amount and cost of capital needed to cover the guarantees.
With respect to assumptions regarding policyholder behavior, we have recorded charges, and in some cases benefits, in prior years as a result of the availability of sufficient and credible data at the conclusion of each review.
We ceded the risk associated with certain of the variable annuity products with GMxB features described in the preceding paragraphs. The value of the embedded derivatives on the ceded risk is determined using a methodology consistent with that described previously for the guarantees directly written by us with the exception of the input for nonperformance risk that reflects the credit of the reinsurer. However, because certain of the reinsured guarantees do not meet the definition of an embedded derivative and, thus are not accounted for at fair value, significant fluctuations in net income may occur when the change in the fair value of the reinsurance recoverable is recorded in net income without a corresponding and offsetting change in fair value of the directly written guaranteed liability.
Nonperformance Risk Adjustment
The valuation of our embedded derivatives includes an adjustment for the risk that we fail to satisfy our obligations, which we refer to as our nonperformance risk. The nonperformance risk adjustment, which is captured as a spread over the risk-free rate in determining the discount rate to discount the cash flows of the liability, is determined by taking into consideration publicly available information relating to spreads on corporate bonds in the secondary market comparable to AXA Equitable Life’s financial strength rating.
The table below illustrates the impact that a range of reasonably likely variances in credit spreads would have on our consolidated balance sheet, excluding the effect of income tax, related to the embedded derivative valuation on certain variable annuity products measured at estimated fair value. Even when credit spreads do not change, the impact of the nonperformance risk adjustment on fair value will change when the cash flows within the fair value measurement change. The table only reflects the impact of changes in credit spreads on our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere herein and not these other potential changes. In determining the ranges, we have considered current market conditions, as well as the market level of spreads that can reasonably be anticipated over the near term. The ranges do not reflect extreme market conditions such as those experienced during the 2008–2009 Financial Crisis as we do not consider those to be reasonably likely events in the near future.
 
Future policyholders’ benefits and other policyholders’ liabilities

 
(in billions)
100% increase in AXA Equitable Life’s credit spread
$
3.6

As reported
$
5.3

50% decrease in AXA Equitable Life’s credit spread
$
6.4

See Note 3 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information on our derivatives and hedging programs.
Litigation Contingencies
We are a party to a number of legal actions and are involved in a number of regulatory investigations. Given the inherent unpredictability of these matters, it is difficult to estimate the impact on our financial position.
Liabilities are established when it is probable that a loss has been incurred and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. On a quarterly and annual basis, we review relevant information with respect to liabilities for litigation, regulatory investigations and litigation-related contingencies to be reflected in our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere herein. See Note 17 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for information regarding our assessment of litigation contingencies.
Income Taxes
Income taxes represent the net amount of income taxes that we expect to pay to or receive from various taxing jurisdictions in connection with its operations. We provide for Federal and state income taxes currently payable, as well as those deferred

66




due to temporary differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured at the balance sheet date using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years the temporary differences are expected to reverse. The realization of deferred tax assets depends upon the existence of sufficient taxable income within the carryforward periods under the tax law in the applicable jurisdiction. Valuation allowances are established when management determines, based on available information, that it is more likely than not that deferred tax assets will not be realized. Management considers all available evidence including past operating results, the existence of cumulative losses in the most recent years, forecasted earnings, future taxable income and prudent and feasible tax planning strategies. Our accounting for income taxes represents management’s best estimate of the tax consequences of various events and transactions.
Significant management judgment is required in determining the provision for income taxes and deferred tax assets and liabilities, and in evaluating our tax positions including evaluating uncertainties under the guidance for Accounting for Uncertainty in Income taxes. Under the guidance, we determine whether it is more likely than not that a tax position will be sustained upon examination by the appropriate taxing authorities before any part of the benefit can be recorded in the financial statements. Tax positions are then measured at the largest amount of benefit that is greater than 50 percent likely of being realized upon settlement.
Our tax positions are reviewed quarterly and the balances are adjusted as new information becomes available.
Adoption of New Accounting Pronouncements
See Note 2 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for a complete discussion of newly issued accounting pronouncements.

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Part II, Item 8.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SCHEDULES
AXA EQUITABLE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
 
 
Consolidated Financial Statements:
 
 

Audited Consolidated Financial Statement Schedules
 

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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

To the Board of Directors and Shareholder of AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company:
Opinion on the Financial Statements
We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company and its subsidiaries (the Company) as of December 31, 2018 and 2017, and the related consolidated statements of income (loss), comprehensive income (loss), equity and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2018, including the related notes and financial statement schedules listed in the accompanying index (collectively referred to as the consolidated financial statements). In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2018 and 2017, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2018 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.
Change in Accounting Principle
As discussed in Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company changed in 2018 the manner in which it accounts for certain income tax effects originally recognized in accumulated other comprehensive income.
Basis for Opinion
These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s consolidated financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.
We conducted our audits of these consolidated financial statements in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company's internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.
Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

/s/PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
New York, NY
March 28, 2019

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 1993.

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AXA EQUITABLE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
DECEMBER 31, 2018 AND 2017
 
2018
 
2017
 
(in millions, except share amounts)
ASSETS
 
Investments:
 
 
 
Fixed maturities available for sale, at fair value (amortized cost of $42,492 and $34,831)
$
41,915

 
$
36,358

Mortgage loans on real estate (net of valuation allowance of $7 and $8)
11,818

 
10,935

Real estate held for production of income
52

 
390

Policy loans
3,267

 
3,315

Other equity investments
1,144

 
1,264

Trading securities, at fair value
15,166

 
12,277

Other invested assets
1,554

 
1,830

Total investments
74,916

 
66,369

Cash and cash equivalents
2,622

 
2,400

Cash and securities segregated, at fair value

 
9

Deferred policy acquisition costs
5,011

 
4,492

Amounts due from reinsurers
3,124

 
5,079

Loans to affiliates
600

 
703

GMIB reinsurance contract asset, at fair value
1,991

 
10,488

Current and deferred income taxes
438

 

Other assets
2,763

 
4,018

Assets of disposed subsidiary

 
9,835

Separate Accounts assets
108,487

 
122,537

Total Assets
$
199,952

 
$
225,930

LIABILITIES
 
 
 
Policyholders' account balances
$
46,403

 
$
43,805

Future policy benefits and other policyholders' liabilities
29,808

 
29,070

Broker-dealer related payables
69

 
430

Securities sold under agreements to repurchase
573

 
1,887

Amounts due to reinsurers
113

 
134

Long-term debt

 
203

Loans from affiliates
572

 

Current and deferred income taxes

 
1,550

Other liabilities
1,460

 
1,242

Liabilities of disposed subsidiary

 
4,954

Separate Accounts liabilities
108,487

 
122,537

Total Liabilities
$
187,485

 
$
205,812

Redeemable noncontrolling interest:
 
 
 
Continuing operations
$
39

 
$
24

Disposed subsidiary

 
602

Redeemable noncontrolling interest
$
39

 
$
626

Commitments and contingent liabilities (Note 17)

 

EQUITY
 
 
 
Equity attributable to AXA Equitable:
 
 


Common stock, $1.25 par value; 2,000,000 shares authorized, issued and outstanding
$
2

 
$
2

Capital in excess of par value
7,807

 
6,859

Retained earnings
5,098

 
8,938

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)
(491
)
 
598

Total equity attributable to AXA Equitable
12,416

 
16,397

Noncontrolling interest
12

 
3,095

Total Equity
12,428

 
19,492

Total Liabilities, Redeemable Noncontrolling Interest and Equity
$
199,952

 
$
225,930


See Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

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AXA EQUITABLE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME (LOSS)
YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2018, 2017 AND 2016
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
(in millions)
REVENUES
 
 
 
 
 
Policy charges and fee income
$
3,523

 
$
3,294

 
$
3,311

Premiums
862

 
904

 
880

Net derivative gains (losses)
(1,010
)
 
894

 
(1,321
)
Net investment income (loss)
2,478

 
2,441

 
2,168

Investment gains (losses), net:
 
 
 
 
 
Total other-than-temporary impairment losses
(37
)
 
(13
)
 
(65
)
Other investment gains (losses), net
41

 
(112
)
 
83

Total investment gains (losses), net
4

 
(125
)
 
18

Investment management and service fees
1,029

 
1,007

 
951

Other income
65

 
41

 
36

Total revenues
6,951

 
$
8,456

 
$
6,043

 
 
 
 
 
 
BENEFITS AND OTHER DEDUCTIONS
 
 
 
 
 
Policyholders’ benefits
3,005

 
3,473

 
2,771

Interest credited to policyholders’ account balances
1,002

 
921

 
905

Compensation and benefits
422

 
327

 
364

Commissions and distribution related payments
620

 
628

 
635

Interest expense
34

 
23

 
13

Amortization of deferred policy acquisition costs
431

 
900

 
642

Other operating costs and expenses
2,918

 
635

 
753

Total benefits and other deductions
8,432

 
6,907

 
6,083

Income (loss) from continuing operations, before income taxes
(1,481
)
 
1,549

 
(40
)
Income tax (expense) benefit from continuing operations
446

 
1,210

 
164

Net income (loss) from continuing operations
(1,035
)
 
2,759

 
124

Net income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of taxes and noncontrolling interest
114

 
85

 
66

Net income (loss)
(921
)
 
2,844

 
190

Less: net (income) loss attributable to the noncontrolling interest
3

 
(1
)
 

Net income (loss) attributable to AXA Equitable
$
(918
)
 
$
2,843

 
$
190


See Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
    

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AXA EQUITABLE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)
YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2018, 2017 AND 2016
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
(in millions)
COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)
 
 
 
 
 
Net income (loss)
$
(921
)
 
$
2,844

 
$
190

Other Comprehensive income (loss) net of income taxes:
 
 
 
 
 
Change in unrealized gains (losses), net of reclassification adjustment
(1,230
)
 
625

 
(233
)
Changes in defined benefit plan related items not yet recognized in periodic benefit cost, net of reclassification adjustment
(4
)
 
(5
)
 
(3
)
Other comprehensive income (loss) from discontinued operations

 
(18
)
 
17

Total other comprehensive income (loss), net of income taxes
(1,234
)
 
602

 
(219
)
Comprehensive income (loss) attributable to AXA Equitable
$
(2,155
)
 
$
3,446

 
$
(29
)

See Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

72




AXA EQUITABLE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF EQUITY
YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2018, 2017 AND 2016
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
(in millions)
Equity attributable to AXA Equitable: