Company Quick10K Filing
Quick10K
Banc of California
Closing Price ($) Shares Out (MM) Market Cap ($MM)
$14.97 51 $758
10-K 2018-12-31 Annual: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-09-30 Quarter: 2018-09-30
10-Q 2018-06-30 Quarter: 2018-06-30
10-Q 2018-03-31 Quarter: 2018-03-31
10-K 2017-12-31 Annual: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-09-30 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-Q 2017-06-30 Quarter: 2017-06-30
10-Q 2017-03-31 Quarter: 2017-03-31
10-K 2016-12-31 Annual: 2016-12-31
10-K 2016-09-30 Annual: 2016-09-30
10-Q 2016-06-30 Quarter: 2016-06-30
10-Q 2016-03-31 Quarter: 2016-03-31
10-K 2015-12-31 Annual: 2015-12-31
10-Q 2015-09-30 Quarter: 2015-09-30
10-Q 2015-06-30 Quarter: 2015-06-30
10-Q 2015-03-31 Quarter: 2015-03-31
10-K 2014-12-31 Annual: 2014-12-31
10-Q 2014-09-30 Quarter: 2014-09-30
10-Q 2014-03-31 Quarter: 2014-03-31
10-K 2013-12-31 Annual: 2013-12-31
10-Q 2013-12-31 Quarter: 2013-12-31
8-K 2019-03-03 Exhibits
8-K 2019-03-01 Exhibits
8-K 2019-02-15 Exhibits
8-K 2019-01-24 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-01-24 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-11-28 Other Events
8-K 2018-11-15 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-11-01 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-10-25 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-10-18 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-31 Officers, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-23 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-15 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-07-26 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-06-26 Exit Costs, Officers
8-K 2018-05-31 Officers, Amend Bylaw, Shareholder Vote, Exhibits
8-K 2018-05-15 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-05-09 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-04-27 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-04-13 Officers
8-K 2018-03-14 Other Events
8-K 2018-03-08 Officers
8-K 2018-02-15 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2018-02-08 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-01-25 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-01-19 Officers, Other Events
8-K 2017-12-28 Leave Agreement
BLFS Biolife Solutions 317
NVCN Neovasc 26
CLGN Collplant Holdings 20
CREG China Recycling Energy 7
SURG Surge Holdings 0
RGBP Regen Biopharma 0
PKPL Park Place Energy 0
P Pandora 0
ECMT Eco-Mat 0
RGPT Rodin Global Property Trust 0
BANC 2018-12-31
Part III of Form 10-K-Portions of The Proxy Statement for The Annual Meeting of Stockholders To Be Held in 2019.
Part I
Item 1. Business
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 2. Properties
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Part II
Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6. Selected Financial Data
Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Item 1 - Financial Statements
Note 1 - Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Note 2 - Sales of Branch, Subsidiary and Business Units
Note 3 - Fair Values of Financial Instruments
Note 4 - Investment Securities
Note 5 - Loans and Leases and Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses
Note 6 - Premises, Equipment, and Capital Leases, Net
Note 7 - Servicing Rights
Note 8 - Other Real Estate Owned
Note 9 - Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets, Net
Note 10 - Deposits
Note 11 - Federal Home Loan Bank Advances and Other Borrowings
Note 12 - Long-Term Debt
Note 13 - Income Taxes
Note 14 - Reserve for Loss on Repurchased Loans
Note 15 - Derivative Instruments
Note 16 - Employee Stock Compensation
Note 17 - Employee Benefit Plans
Note 18 - Stockholders' Equity
Note 19 - Regulatory Capital Matters
Note 20 - Variable Interest Entities
Note 21 - Earnings per Common Share
Note 22 - Loan Commitments and Other Related Activities
Note 23 - Restructuring
Note 24 - Revenue Recognition
Note 25 - Parent Company Financial Statements
Note 26 - Related-Party Transactions
Note 27 - Litigation
Note 28 - Quarterly Results of Operations (Unaudited)
Note 29 - Subsequent Events
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures
Item 9B. Other Information
Part III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11. Executive Compensation
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services
Part IV
Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
EX-21.0 a12312018-ex210.htm
EX-23.0 a12312018-ex230.htm
EX-31.1 a12312018-ex311.htm
EX-31.2 a12312018-ex312.htm
EX-32.0 a12312018-ex320.htm

Banc of California Earnings 2018-12-31

BANC 10K Annual Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

10-K 1 banc-12312018x10k.htm 10-K Document

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K
(Mark One)
ý ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018
or
¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from                      to
Commission file number 001-35522
BANC OF CALIFORNIA, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Maryland
 
04-3639825
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
 
(IRS Employer Identification No.)
3 MacArthur Place, Santa Ana, California
 
92707
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (855) 361-2262
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share
 
New York Stock Exchange
Depositary Shares each representing a 1/40th Interest in a share of 7.375% Non-Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock, Series D
 
New York Stock Exchange
Depositary Shares each representing a 1/40th Interest in a share of 7.00% Non-Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock, Series E
 
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    YES ý NO ¨
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.     YES ¨ NO ý
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    YES  ý    NO  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    YES  ý    NO  ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.    ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” “smaller reporting company,” and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer
ý
 
Accelerated filer
¨
Non-accelerated filer
¨
 
Smaller reporting company
¨
 
 
 
Emerging growth company
¨
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.    ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).    YES  ¨    NO  ý
The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant, computed by reference to the closing price of such stock on the New York Stock Exchange as of June 30, 2018, was $843.8 million. (The exclusion from such amount of the market value of the shares owned by any person shall not be deemed an admission by the registrant that such person is an affiliate of the registrant). As of February 22, 2019, the registrant had outstanding 50,180,041 shares of voting common stock and 477,321 shares of Class B non-voting common stock.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
PART III of Form 10-K—Portions of the Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held in 2019.



BANC OF CALIFORNIA, INC.
ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K
December 31, 2018
Table of Contents
 
 
Page
Part I
 
 
Item 1.
Item 1.A.
Item 1.B.
Item 2.
Item 3.
Item 4.
Part II
 
 
Item 5.
Item 6.
Item 7.
Item 7.A.
Item 8.
Item 9.
Item 9.A.
Item 9.B.
Part III
 
 
Item 10.
Item 11.
Item 12.
Item 13.
Item 14.
Part IV
 
 
Item 15.


2


Forward-Looking Statements
When used in this report and in public stockholder communications, in other documents of Banc of California, Inc. (the Company, we, us and our) filed with or furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission (the SEC), or in oral statements made with the approval of an authorized executive officer, the words or phrases “believe,” “will,” “should,” “will likely result,” “are expected to,” “will continue,” “is anticipated,” “estimate,” “project,” “plans,” “guidance” or similar expressions are intended to identify “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date made. These statements may relate to our future financial performance, strategic plans or objectives, revenue, expense or earnings projections, or other financial items. By their nature, these statements are subject to numerous uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those anticipated in the statements.
Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the results anticipated or projected include, but are not limited to, the following:
i.
an ongoing investigation by the SEC as well as any related litigation or other litigation may result in adverse findings, reputational damage, the imposition of sanctions, increased costs and other negative consequences;
ii.
the costs and effects of litigation generally, including legal fees and other expenses, settlements and judgments;
iii.
the risk that we will not be successful in our efforts to transition to a core commercial banking platform;
iv.
the risks associated with any acquisitions we make of other banks, bank branches, other assets or other businesses;
v.
the risks that additional capital will not be available when needed and the risk that funds obtained from capital raising activities will not be utilized efficiently or effectively;
vi.
the risk that the savings we actually realize from our reduction in force and planned reduction in use of third party advisors will be less than anticipated and the risk that the costs associated with the reduction in force will be greater than anticipated;
vii.
the credit risks of lending activities, which may be affected by deterioration in real estate markets and the financial condition of borrowers, and the operational risk of lending activities, including but not limited to the effectiveness of our underwriting practices and the risk of fraud, any of which credit and operational risks may lead to increased loan and lease delinquencies, losses and non-performing assets in our loan and lease portfolio, and may result in our allowance for loan and lease losses not being adequate to cover actual losses and require us to materially increase our loan and lease loss reserves;
viii.
the quality and composition of our securities portfolio, which includes a large portfolio of collateralized loan obligations;
ix.
changes in general economic conditions, either nationally or in our market areas, or changes in financial markets;
x.
continuation of or changes in the historically low short-term interest rate environment, changes in the levels of general interest rates, volatility in the interest rate environment, the relative differences between short- and long-term interest rates, deposit interest rates, our net interest margin and funding sources;
xi.
fluctuations in the demand for loans and leases, the number of unsold homes and other properties and fluctuations in commercial and residential real estate values in our market area;
xii.
our ability to develop and maintain a strong core deposit base or other low cost funding sources necessary to fund our activities;
xiii.
results of examinations of us by regulatory authorities and the possibility that any such regulatory authority may, among other things, limit our business activities, require us to change our business mix, increase our allowance for loan and lease losses, write-down asset values, or increase our capital levels, or affect our ability to borrow funds or maintain or increase deposits, any of which could adversely affect our liquidity and earnings;
xiv.
legislative or regulatory changes that adversely affect our business, including, without limitation, changes in tax laws and policies and changes in regulatory capital or other rules, and the availability and resources to address and respond to such changes;
xv.
our ability to control operating costs and expenses;
xvi.
staffing fluctuations in response to product demand or the implementation of corporate strategies that affect our work force and potential associated charges;
xvii.
the risk that our implementation of new lines of business and/or new products and services will be unsuccessful or subject us to increased regulatory scrutiny or other legal risks;
xviii.
errors in estimates of the fair values of certain of our assets and liabilities, which may result in significant changes in valuation;
xix.
the network and computer systems on which we depend could fail or experience a security breach;
xx.
our ability to attract and retain key members of our senior management team;
xxi.
increased competitive pressures among financial services companies;
xxii.
changes in consumer spending, borrowing and saving habits;
xxiii.
the effects of severe weather, natural disasters, acts of war or terrorism and other external events on our business;
xxiv.
the ability of key third-party providers to perform their obligations to us;
xxv.
the dependency of our single family residential mortgage loan origination business on third party mortgage brokers who are not contractually obligated to do business with us;
xxvi.
changes in accounting policies and practices, as may be adopted by the financial institution regulatory agencies or the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) or their application to our business, including additional guidance and interpretation on accounting issues and details of the implementation of new accounting methods;
xxvii.
share price volatility and reputational risks, related to, among other things, speculative trading and certain traders shorting our common shares and attempting to generate negative publicity about us;
xxviii.
the risk that our enterprise risk management framework may not be effective in mitigating risk and reducing the potential for losses; and
xxix.
other economic, competitive, governmental, regulatory, and technological factors affecting our operations, pricing, products and services and the other risks described in this report and from time to time in other documents that we file with or furnish to the SEC, including, without limitation, the risks described under “Part I. Item 1A. Risk Factors” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
The Company undertakes no obligation to update any such statement to reflect circumstances or events that occur after the date, on which the forward-looking statement is made, except as required by law.

3


PART I
Item 1. Business
General
Banc of California, Inc. is a financial holding company regulated by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the Federal Reserve Board or FRB) and the parent company of Banc of California, National Association (the Bank), a California-based bank regulated by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (the OCC).
Banc of California, Inc. was incorporated under Maryland law in March 2002, and was formerly known as "First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc.", and changed its name to “Banc of California, Inc.” in July 2013. Unless the context indicates otherwise, all references to “Banc of California, Inc.” refer to Banc of California, Inc. excluding its consolidated subsidiaries and all references to the “Company,” “we,” “us” or “our” refer to Banc of California, Inc. including its consolidated subsidiaries.
The principal executive office of the Company is located at 3 MacArthur Place, Santa Ana, California, and its telephone number is (855) 361-2262.
The reports, proxy statements and other information that Banc of California, Inc. files with the SEC, as well as news releases, are available free of charge through the Company’s Internet site at http://www.bancofcal.com. This information can be found on the “News and Events” or “Investor relations” pages of our Internet site. Annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports filed and furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act are available as soon as reasonably practicable after they have been filed or furnished to the SEC. Reference to the Company’s Internet address is not intended to incorporate any of the information contained on our Internet site into this document.
Business Overview
The Company is focused on California and core banking products and services designed to cater to the unique needs of California's diverse private businesses, entrepreneurs and communities through its 32 full service branches in San Diego, Orange, Santa Barbara, and Los Angeles Counties. Through the Bank and its predecessors, the Company has served California markets since 1941. The Company offers a variety of financial products and services designed around its target client in order to serve all of their banking and financial needs. Deposit and banking product and service offerings include checking, savings, money market, certificates of deposit, and retirement accounts. Additional product and service offerings include automated bill payment, cash and treasury management, master demand accounts, foreign exchange, interest rate swaps, card payment services, remote and mobile deposit capture, automated clearing house origination, wire transfer, direct deposit, and safe deposit boxes. Lending activities are focused on providing financing to California’s diverse private businesses, entrepreneurs, and communities, and loans are often secured by California commercial and residential real estate.
Significant Transactions
Banc Home Loans Sale
On March 30, 2017, the Company completed the sale of specific assets and activities related to its Banc Home Loans division to Caliber Home Loans, Inc. (Caliber). The Banc Home Loans division largely represented the Company's Mortgage Banking segment, the activities of which related to originating, servicing, underwriting, funding and selling residential mortgage loans. Assets sold to Caliber included mortgage servicing rights (MSRs) on certain conventional agency residential mortgage loans. The Banc Home Loans division, along with certain other mortgage banking related assets and liabilities that were to be sold or settled separately within one year, is classified as discontinued operations in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition and Consolidated Statements of Operations. Certain components of the Company’s Mortgage Banking segment, including MSRs on certain conventional government single family residential (SFR) mortgage loans that were not sold as part of the Banc Home Loans sale and the repurchase reserves related to previously sold loans, have been classified as continuing operations in the financial statements as they remain part of the Company’s ongoing operations.
The Company received a $25.0 million cash premium payment, in addition to the net book value of certain assets acquired by Caliber, totaling $2.5 million, upon the closing of the transaction. Caliber also purchased the MSRs of $37.8 million on approximately $3.86 billion in unpaid balances of conventional agency mortgage loans, subject to adjustment under certain circumstances. The entire transaction resulted in a net gain on disposal of $15.2 million in total for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017.
Additionally, the Company could receive an earn-out, payable quarterly, based on future performance over the 38 months following completion of the transaction. During the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, the Company recognized earn-out payments of $2.8 million and $1.1 million, respectively. Since the completion of the transaction, the Company has recognized a total earn-out of $4.0 million in Income from Discontinued Operations on the Consolidated Statements of Operations. Caliber retains an option to buy out the future earn-out payable to the Company for cash consideration of $35.0

4


million, less the aggregate amount of all earn-out payments made prior to the date on which Caliber pays the buyout amount. For additional information, see Note 2 to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Commercial Equipment Finance Business Sale
On October 27, 2016, the Company sold its Commercial Equipment Finance business unit from its Commercial Banking segment to Hanmi Bank, a wholly owned subsidiary of Hanmi Financial Corporation (Hanmi). As part of the transaction, Hanmi acquired $217.2 million of equipment leases diversified across the U.S. with concentrations in California, Georgia and Texas. An additional $25.4 million of equipment leases were transferred during December 2016. Hanmi retained most of the Company’s former Commercial Equipment Finance employees. The Company recorded a gain on sale of business unit of $2.6 million on its Consolidated Statements of Operations during the year ended December 31, 2016. For additional information, see Note 2 to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
The Palisades Group Sale
On May 5, 2016, the Company completed the sale of all of its membership interests in The Palisades Group, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company, to an entity wholly owned by Stephen Kirch and Jack Macdowell, who serve as the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Investment Officer of The Palisades Group. As part of the sale, The Palisades Group issued to the Company a 10 percent, $5.0 million note due May 5, 2018 (the Note). The Company recognized a gain on sale of subsidiary of $3.7 million on its Consolidated Statements of Operations during the year ended December 31, 2016. On September 28, 2016, the Note was paid in full in cash prior to maturity and the Company recognized an additional gain of $2.8 million, which is included in Other Income on the Consolidated Statements of Operations for the year ended December 31, 2016. For additional information, see Note 2 to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Lending Activities
General
The Company offers a number of commercial and consumer loan products including commercial and industrial loans; commercial real estate loans; multifamily loans; construction and renovation loans; SFR mortgage loans; warehouse loans; asset, insurance or security-backed loans; home equity lines of credit (HELOCs); consumer and business lines of credit; and other consumer loans.
Legal lending limits are calculated in conformance with OCC regulations, which prohibit a national bank from lending to any one individual or entity or its related interests on any amount that exceeds 15 percent of a bank’s capital and surplus, plus an additional 10 percent of a bank’s capital and surplus, if the amount that exceeds a bank’s 15 percent general limit is fully secured by readily marketable collateral. At December 31, 2018, the Bank’s authorized legal lending limits for loans to one borrower were $168.0 million for unsecured loans and an additional $112.0 million for specific secured loans.
At December 31, 2018, the Company's total loans and leases held-for-investment and loans held-for-sale were $7.70 billion or 72.4 percent of total assets and $8.1 million or 0.1 percent of total assets, respectively, compared to $6.66 billion or 64.5 percent of total assets and $67.1 million or 0.6 percent of total assets at December 31, 2017, respectively. For additional information concerning changes in loans and leases, see "Loans and Leases Receivable, Net" and "Loans Held-for-Sale" included in Item 7 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

5


Risk Governance
The Company conducts its business activities under a system of risk governance controls. Key elements of the Company's risk governance structure include the risk appetite framework and risk appetite statement. The risk appetite framework adopted by the Company has been developed in conjunction with the Company’s strategic and capital plans. The strategic and capital plans articulate the Board of Director's (Board's) approved statement of financial condition, loan concentration targets and the appropriate level of capital to manage our risks properly.
The risk appetite framework includes policies, procedures, controls, and systems through which the risk appetite is established, communicated, and monitored. The risk appetite framework utilizes a risk assessment process to identify inherent risks across the Company, gauges the effectiveness of the Company's internal controls, and establishes tolerances for residual risk in each of the following risk categories: strategic, reputational, earnings, capital, liquidity, asset quality (credit), market, operational, people, and diversification/concentration. Each risk category is assigned a qualitative statement as well as specific, measurable, risk metrics. The risk metrics have variance thresholds established which indicate whether the metric is within tolerance or at variance to plan. Variances are reported regularly to both executive management and to the Board and require remediation measures or risk acceptance, as appropriate.
The risk appetite framework includes a risk appetite statement, risk limits, and an outline of roles and responsibilities of those overseeing the implementation and monitoring of the framework. The risk appetite statement is an expression of the maximum level of residual risk that the Company is prepared to accept in order to achieve the Company's business objectives. Defining, communicating, and monitoring risk appetite are fundamental to a safe and sound control environment and a risk-focused culture. The Board of Directors establishes the Company’s strategic objectives and approves the Company’s risk appetite statement, which is developed in collaboration with the Company's executive leadership. The executive team translates the Board-approved strategic objectives and the risk appetite statement into targets and constraints for business lines and legal entities to follow.
The risk appetite framework is supported by an enterprise risk management program. Enterprise risk management at the Company and Bank integrates all risk efforts under one common framework. Key elements of enterprise risk management that are intended to support prudent lending activities include:
Policies—The Company's loan policy articulates the credit culture of the Company's lending business and provides clarity around encouraged and discouraged lending activities. Additional policies cover key business segments of the portfolio (for example, the Company's Commercial Real Estate Policy) and other important aspects supporting the Bank's lending activities (for example, policies relating to appraisals, risk ratings, fair lending, etc.).
Credit Approval Authorities—All material credit exposures of the Company are approved by a credit risk management group that is independent of the business units with the exception of SFR mortgage loans that have been provided delegated authority within the approved credit policy. Above this threshold, credit approvals are made by the chief credit officer or an executive management credit committee of the Bank. The joint credit and enterprise risk committees of the Company's Board of Directors and the Bank's Board of Directors review and approve material loan pool purchases, divestitures, and any other transactions as appropriate.
Concentration Risk Management Policy—To mitigate and manage the risk within the Company's loan portfolio, the Board of Directors of the Bank adopted a concentration risk management policy, pursuant to which it expects to review and revise concentration risk to tolerance thresholds at least annually and otherwise from time to time as appropriate. It is anticipated that these concentration risk to tolerance thresholds may change at any time when the Board of Directors is considering material strategic initiatives such as acquisitions, new product launches and terminations of products or other factors as the Board of Directors believes appropriate. The Company has developed procedures relating to the appropriate actions to be taken should management seek to increase the concentration guidelines or exceed the guideline maximum based on various factors. Concentration risk to tolerance thresholds are intended to aid management and the Board to ensure that the loan concentrations are consistent with the Board’s risk appetite.
Stress Testing—The Company has developed a stress test policy and stress testing methodology as a tool to evaluate our loan portfolio, capital levels and strategic plan with the objective of ensuring that our loan portfolio and balance sheet concentrations are consistent with the Board-approved risk appetite and strategic and capital plans.
Loan Portfolio Management—The Company has an internal asset review committee that formally reviews the loan portfolio on a regular basis. Risk rating trends, loan portfolio performance, including delinquency status, and the resolution of problem assets are reviewed and evaluated.
Commercial Real Estate Loan Pricing, Multifamily Loan Pricing and Residential Loan Pricing—Regular discussions occur between the areas of executive management, Treasury, Capital Markets, Credit and Risk Management and the business units with regard to the pricing of the Company's loan products. These groups meet to ensure that the Company is pricing its products appropriately and consistently with the Company's strategic and capital plans.

6


Commercial and Industrial Loans
Commercial and industrial loans are made to finance operations, provide working capital, finance the purchase of fixed assets, equipment or real property, business acquisitions and warehousing lending. A borrower’s cash flow from operations is generally the primary source of repayment. Accordingly, the Company's policies provide specific guidelines regarding debt coverage and other financial ratios. Commercial and industrial loans include lines of credit, commercial term loans and owner occupied commercial real estate loans. Commercial lines of credit are extended to businesses generally to finance operations, working capital needs and finance mortgage loans. Commercial term loans are typically made to finance the acquisition of fixed assets, refinance short-term debt originally used to purchase fixed assets or make business acquisitions. Owner occupied commercial real estate loans are extended to purchase or refinance real property and are usually 50 percent or more occupied by the underlying business and the business's cash flow is the primary source of repayment.
Commercial and industrial loans are extended based on the financial strength and integrity of the borrower and guarantor(s) and are generally collateralized by the borrower's assets such as mortgage loans, accounts receivable, inventory, equipment or real estate and typically have a term of 1-5 years.
Commercial and industrial loans may be unsecured, for well-capitalized and highly profitable borrowers. The interest rates on these loans generally are adjustable and usually are indexed to The Wall Street Journal’s prime rate (Prime Rate) or London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) and will vary based on market conditions and be commensurate to the perceived credit risk. Where it can be negotiated, loans are written with a floor rate of interest. Some of the owner-occupied commercial real estate loans may be fixed for periods of up to 10 years and many have prepayment penalties. Commercial and industrial loans generally are made to businesses that have had profitable operations, and have a conservative debt-to-net worth ratio, good payment histories as evidenced by credit reports, acceptable working capital, and operating cash flow sufficient to demonstrate the ability to pay obligations as they become due.
The Company’s commercial and industrial loan policy includes credit file documentation and analysis of the borrower’s background, capacity to repay the loan, the adequacy of the borrower’s capital and collateral as well as an evaluation of global conditions affecting the borrower and the industry in which they participate. Detailed analysis of the borrower’s past, present and future cash flow is also an important aspect of the credit analysis, as it is the Company's primary source of repayment. In addition, commercial and industrial loans are typically monitored periodically to provide an early warning for deteriorating cash flow. All commercial and industrial loans must have well-defined primary and secondary or, at times, tertiary sources of repayment.
In order to mitigate the risk of borrower default, the Company generally requires collateral to support the credit and, in the case of loans made to businesses, personal guarantees from their owners. The Company attempts to control the risk by generally requiring loan-to-value (LTV) ratios of not more than 80 percent (owner occupied commercial real estate loans are typically 75 percent or less if SBA loans) and by regularly monitoring the amount and value of the collateral in order to maintain that ratio. However, the collateral securing the loans may depreciate over time, may be difficult to appraise and may fluctuate in value based on the success of the business. Because of the potential value reduction, the availability of funds for the repayment of commercial and industrial loans may be substantially dependent on the success of the business itself, which, in turn, is often dependent, in part, upon general economic conditions. See “Asset Quality” under "Loans and Leases Receivable, Net" included in Item 7 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Commercial and industrial loan growth also assists in the growth of the Company's deposits because many commercial and industrial loan borrowers establish deposit accounts and treasury banking services relationships. Those deposit accounts help the Company to reduce the overall cost of funds and those banking service relationships provide a source of noninterest fee income.
Commercial Real Estate and Multifamily Loans
Commercial real estate and multifamily loans are secured primarily by multifamily dwellings, industrial/warehouse buildings, anchored and non-anchored retail centers, office buildings and, on a limited basis, hospitality properties primarily located in the Company’s market area.
The Company’s loans secured by commercial real estate and multifamily properties are originated with either a fixed or an adjustable interest rate. The interest rate on adjustable rate loans is based on a variety of indices, generally determined through negotiation with the borrower. LTV ratios on these loans typically do not exceed 75 percent of the appraised value of the property securing the loan. These loans typically require monthly payments, may contain balloon payments and generally have maturities of 15 years with maximum maturities of 30 years for multifamily loans and 10 years for commercial real estate loans.

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Loans secured by commercial real estate and multifamily properties are underwritten based on the income producing potential of the property and the financial strength of the borrower and/or guarantor. The net operating income, which is the income derived from the operation of the property less all operating expenses, must be sufficient to cover the payments related to the outstanding debt. The Company generally requires an assignment of rents or leases in order to be assured that the cash flow from the project will be used to repay the debt. Appraisals on properties securing commercial real estate and multifamily loans are performed by independent state licensed appraisers approved by management. In order to monitor the adequacy of cash flows on income-producing properties, the borrower is generally required to provide periodic financial information. Because payments on loans secured by commercial real estate and multifamily properties are often dependent on the successful operation or management of the properties, repayment of these loans may be subject to adverse conditions in the real estate market or the economy. If the cash flow from the project is reduced, or if leases are not obtained or renewed, the borrower’s ability to repay the loan may be impaired. See “Asset Quality” under "Loans and Leases Receivable, Net" included in Item 7 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Small Business Administration Loans
The Company provides numerous SBA loan products through the Bank. The Bank’s Preferred Lender Program status generally gives it the authority to make the final credit decision and have most servicing and liquidation authority. The Company provides the following SBA products:
7(a)—These loans provide the Bank with a guarantee from the SBA for up to 85 percent of the loan amount for loans up to $150,000 and 75 percent of the loan amount for loans of more than $150,000, with a maximum loan amount of $5 million. These are term loans that can be used for a variety of purposes including business acquisition, working capital, expansion, renovation, new construction, and equipment purchases. Depending on collateral, these loans can have terms ranging from 7 to 25 years. The guaranteed portion of these loans is often sold into the secondary market.
Cap Lines—In general, these lines are guaranteed up to 75 percent and are typically used for working capital purposes and secured by accounts receivable and/or inventory. These lines are generally allowed in amounts up to $5 million and can be issued with maturities of up to 5 years.
504 Loans—These are real estate loans in which the lender can advance up to 90 percent of the purchase price; retain 50 percent as a first trust deed; and have a Certified Development Company (CDC) retain the second trust deed for 40 percent of the total cost. CDCs are licensed by the SBA. Required equity of the borrower is 10 percent. Terms of the first trust deed are typically similar to market rates for conventional real estate loans, while the CDC establishes rates and terms for the second trust deed loan.
SBA Express—These loans offer a 50 percent guaranty by the SBA and are made in amounts up to a maximum of $350,000. These loans are typically revolving lines and have maturities of up to 7 years.
SBA loans are subject to federal legislation that can affect the availability and funding of the program. This dependence on legislative funding might cause future limitations and uncertainties with regard to the continued funding of such programs, which could potentially have an adverse financial impact on our business. The Company’s portfolio of SBA loans is subject to certain risks, including, but not limited to: (i) the effects of economic downturns on the economy; (ii) interest rate increases; (iii) deterioration of the value of the underlying collateral; and (iv) deterioration of a borrower's or guarantor's financial capabilities. The Company attempts to mitigate these risks through: (i) reviewing each loan request and renewal individually; (ii) adhering to written loan policies; (iii) adhering to SBA policies and regulations; (iv) obtaining independent third party appraisals; and (v) obtaining external independent credit reviews. SBA loans normally require monthly installment payments of principal and interest and therefore are continually monitored for past due conditions. In general, the Company receives and reviews financial statements and other documents of borrowers on an ongoing basis during the term of the relationship and responds to any deterioration identified.
Construction Loans
The Company provides short-term construction loans primarily relating to single family or multifamily residential properties. Construction loans are typically secured by first deeds of trust and guarantees of the borrower. The economic viability of the projects, borrower’s creditworthiness, and borrower’s and contractor’s experience are primary considerations in the loan underwriting decision. The Company utilizes independent state licensed appraisers approved by management and monitors projects during construction through inspections and a disbursement program tied to the percentage of completion of each project. The Company may, in the future, originate or purchase loans or participations in construction, renovation and rehabilitation loans on residential, multifamily and/or commercial real estate properties.
Lease Financing
On October 27, 2016, the Company sold its Commercial Equipment Finance business unit. For financial information, see Note 2 to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

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Single Family Residential Mortgage Loans
The Company originates mortgage loans secured by a first deed of trust on single family residences mainly throughout California. The Company offers non-conforming SFR mortgage loans where the loan amount exceeds Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac limits, or the loans otherwise do not conform to Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac guidelines.
The Company’s residential lending activities include both a direct-to-consumer retail residential lending business and a wholesale and correspondent mortgage business. In the retail business, the Company's loan officers are located either in the Company's call center in Santa Ana or full service branches in San Diego, Orange, Santa Barbara and Los Angeles Counties, and originate mortgage loans directly to consumers. The wholesale mortgage business originates SFR mortgage loans submitted to the Company by outside mortgage brokers for underwriting and funding. The correspondent mortgage business acquires residential mortgage loans originated by third parties. The Company does not originate loans defined as high cost by state or federal regulators.
The Company generally underwrites SFR mortgage loans based on the applicant’s income and credit history and the appraised value of the subject property. Properties securing SFR mortgage loans are appraised by independent fee appraisers approved by management. The Company requires borrowers to obtain title insurance, hazard insurance, and flood insurance, if necessary. A majority of SFR mortgage loans originated by the Company are made to finance the purchase or the refinance of existing loans on owner occupied homes with a smaller percentage used to finance non-owner occupied homes.
The Company originates SFR mortgage loans on either a fixed or an adjustable rate basis, as consumer demand and the Bank’s risk management dictates. The Company’s pricing strategy for SFR mortgage loans includes setting interest rates that are competitive with other local financial institutions and mortgage originators.
Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) loans are offered with flexible initial repricing dates, ranging from 1 to 10 years, and periodic repricing dates through the life of the loan. The Company uses a variety of indices to reprice ARM loans. During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company originated $1.01 billion of held-for-investment SFR ARM loans with terms up to 30 years. Of total SFR mortgage loans at December 31, 2018, $59.3 million, or 2.6 percent, were fixed rate, and $2.25 billion, or 97.4 percent, were adjustable rate. Of total SFR mortgage loans at December 31, 2017, $380 thousand, or 0.1 percent, were fixed rate, and $2.06 billion, or 99.9 percent, were adjustable rate.
The Company also offers interest only loans, which have payment features that allow interest only payments during the first five or seven years during which time the interest rate is fixed before converting to fully amortizing payments. Following the expiration of the fixed interest rate period, the interest rate and payment begins to adjust on an annual basis, with fully amortizing payments that include principal and interest calculated over the remaining term of the loan. The loan can be secured by owner or non-owner occupied properties that include single family units and second homes. For additional information, see “Non-Traditional Mortgage Portfolio” and “Non-Traditional Mortgage Loan Credit Risk Management” under “Loans and Leases Receivable, Net” included in Item 7 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Other Consumer Loans
The Company offers a variety of secured consumer loans, including second deed of trust home equity loans and HELOCs and loans secured by deposits. The Company also offers a limited amount of unsecured loans. The Company originates consumer loans primarily in its market area. Consumer loans generally have shorter terms to maturity or variable interest rates, which reduce the Company's exposure to changes in interest rates, and carry higher rates of interest than do SFR mortgage loans. Management believes that offering consumer loan products helps to expand and create stronger ties to the Company’s existing customer base by increasing the number of customer relationships and providing cross-marketing opportunities.
HELOCs have a seven or ten year draw period and require the payment of 1.0 percent or 1.5 percent of the outstanding loan balance per month (depending on the terms) or interest only payment during the draw period. Following receipt of payments, the available credit includes amounts repaid up to the credit limit. HELOCs with a ten-year draw period have a balloon payment due at the end of the draw period or then fully amortize for the remaining term. For loans with shorter-term draw periods, once the draw period has lapsed, generally, the payment is fixed based on the loan balance and prevailing market interest rates at that time.
The Company proactively monitors changes in the market value of all home loans contained in its portfolio. The most recent valuations were effective as of October 17, 2018. The Company has the right to adjust, and has adjusted, existing lines of credit to address current market conditions subject to the terms of the loan agreement and covenants. At December 31, 2018, unfunded commitments totaled $69.3 million on consumer lines of credit. Consumer loan terms vary according to the type of collateral, length of contract and creditworthiness of the borrower.

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Investment Activities
The general objectives of the Company's investment portfolio are to provide liquidity when loan and lease demand is high, to assist in maintaining earnings when loan and lease demand is low and to provide a relatively stable source of interest income while satisfactorily managing risk, including credit risk, reinvestment risk, liquidity risk and interest rate risk. For additional information, see Item 7A of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Currently, the Company primarily invests in collateralized loan obligations. Historically, in addition to collateralized loan obligations, the Company has invested in SBA loan pool securities, U.S. government agency and U.S. government sponsored enterprise (GSE) residential mortgage-backed securities, non-agency residential mortgage-backed securities, non-agency commercial mortgage-backed securities, and corporate bonds.
As an investor in CLOs, we purchase specific tranches, or slices, of debt instruments that are secured by professionally managed portfolios of senior secured loans to corporations. CLOs are not secured by residential or commercial mortgages. CLO managers are typically large non-bank financial institutions or banks. CLOs are typically $300 million to $1 billion in size, contain 100 or more loans, and have five to six credit tranches ranging from AAA, AA, A, BBB, BB, B and equity tranche. Interest and principal are paid out to the AAA tranche first then move down the capital stack. Losses are borne by the equity tranche first then move up the capital stack. CLOs typically have subordination levels that range from approximately 33 percent to 39 percent for AAA, 20 percent to 28 percent for AA, 15 percent to 18 percent for A and 10 percent to 14 percent for BBB.
The CLOs we currently hold may, from time to time, not be actively traded, and under certain market conditions may be relatively illiquid investments, and volatility in the CLO trading market may cause the value of these investments to decline. The market value of CLOs may be affected by, among other things, perceived changes in the economy, performance by the manager and performance of the underlying loans.
Although we attempt to mitigate the credit and liquidity risks associated with CLOs by purchasing CLOs with credit ratings of A or higher and by maintaining a pre-purchase due diligence and ongoing review process by a dedicated credit administration team, no assurance can be given that these risk mitigation efforts will be successful.
Sources of Funds
General
The Company’s primary sources of funds are deposits, certificates of deposits, sales of loans and investment securities, payments on and maturities of outstanding loans and leases and investment securities, and other short-term investments and funds provided from operations. While scheduled payments from loans and leases and investment securities, and maturing investment securities and short-term investments are relatively predictable sources of funds, deposit flows and loan and lease prepayments are greatly influenced by general interest rates, economic conditions, and competition. In addition, the Company invests excess funds in short-term interest-earning assets, which provide liquidity to meet lending requirements. The Company also generates cash through borrowings. The Company mainly utilizes Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) advances to leverage its capital base, to provide funds for its lending activities, as a source of liquidity, and to enhance its interest rate risk management.
Deposits
The Company offers a variety of deposit products to consumers, businesses, and institutional customers with a wide range of interest rates and terms. The Company's deposits consist of interest-bearing and noninterest-bearing demand accounts, savings accounts, money market deposit accounts, and certificates of deposit. The Company solicits deposits primarily in its market area, excluding brokered deposits. The Company primarily relies on competitive pricing policies, marketing and customer service to attract and retain deposits. The flow of deposits is influenced significantly by general economic conditions, prevailing interest rates and competition. The variety of deposit products the Company offers has allowed the Company to be competitive in obtaining funds and to respond with flexibility to changes in demand from actual and prospective consumer, business and institutional customers.
The Company tries to manage the pricing of deposits in keeping with the Company's asset/liability management, liquidity and profitability objectives, subject to market competitive factors. Based on the Company's experience, the Company believes that the Company's deposits are relatively stable sources of funds. Despite this stability, the Company's ability to attract and maintain these deposits and the rates paid on them have been and will continue to be significantly affected by market conditions.
Core deposits, which we define as interest-bearing and noninterest-bearing demand deposits, savings, money market deposit accounts, and certificates of deposit, excluding brokered and certain legacy high-rate, high-volatility deposits, increased $579.4 million during the year ended December 31, 2018 and totaled $6.21 billion at December 31, 2018, representing 78.4 percent of total deposits on that date. The run-off of the legacy high-rate, high-volatility deposits was completed during the first quarter of 2018. The Company held brokered deposits of $1.71 billion, or 21.6 percent of total deposits, at December 31, 2018.

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Borrowings
Although deposits are the Company's primary source of funds, the Company may utilize borrowings when they are a less costly source of funds and can be invested at a positive interest rate spread, when the Company desires additional capacity to fund loan and lease demand or when they meet the Company's asset/liability management goals to diversify funding sources and enhance interest rate risk management.
The Company utilizes FHLB advances and securities sold under repurchase agreements to leverage its capital base, to provide funds for its lending activities, to provide a source of liquidity, and to enhance its interest rate risk management. The Company also has the ability to borrow from the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco (Federal Reserve Bank), as well as through unsecured federal funds lines with correspondent banks. The Company may obtain advances from the FHLB by collateralizing the advances with certain of the Company’s loans and investment securities. These advances may be made pursuant to several different credit programs, each of which has its own interest rate, range of maturities and call features. At December 31, 2018, the Company had $1.52 billion in FHLB advances outstanding and the ability to borrow an additional $1.35 billion.
Availabilities and terms on securities sold under repurchase agreements are subject to the counterparties' discretion and pledging additional investment securities. At December 31, 2018, the Company had no securities sold under repurchase agreements. During the year ended December 31, 2017, the Company voluntarily terminated a line of credit of $75.0 million that was maintained at Banc of California, Inc. with an unaffiliated financial institution. The Company also had the ability to borrow $60.6 million from the Federal Reserve Bank and $210.0 million from unsecured federal funds lines with correspondent banks as of December 31, 2018. For additional information, see Note 11 to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
In addition, the Company has borrowed through the issuance of its senior notes and junior subordinated amortizing notes. The Company had $173.2 million in outstanding senior notes at December 31, 2018. During the year ended December 31, 2017, the Company made the final installment payments on the junior subordinated amortizing notes. For additional information, see Note 12 to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Competition and Market Area
The Company faces strong competition in originating real estate and other loans and in attracting deposits. Competition in originating real estate loans comes primarily from other commercial banks, savings institutions, credit unions and mortgage bankers. Other commercial banks, savings institutions, credit unions and finance companies provide vigorous competition in consumer and commercial lending. The Company attracts deposits through its community banking branch network, its Treasury function and through the internet. Consequently, the Company has the ability to service client needs with a variety of deposit accounts and products at competitive rates. Competition for deposits is principally from other commercial banks, savings institutions, and credit unions, as well as mutual funds, broker dealers, registered investment advisors, investment banks financial institutions, financial service companies, and other alternative investments.
Based on the most recent branch deposit data as of June 30, 2018 provided by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), the Bank's share of deposits in Los Angeles, Orange, San Diego, and Santa Barbara counties was as follows:
 
June 30, 2018
Los Angeles County
0.63
%
Orange County
3.28
%
San Diego County
0.53
%
Santa Barbara County
0.52
%
Employees
At December 31, 2018, the Company had a total of 730 full-time employees and 11 part-time employees. The Company's employees are not represented by any collective bargaining group. Management considers its employee relations to be satisfactory.
Regulation and Supervision
General
The Company is extensively regulated under federal laws. As a financial holding company, Banc of California, Inc. is subject to the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended (the BHCA), and its primary regulator is the FRB. As a national bank, the Bank is subject to regulation primarily by the OCC. In addition, the Bank is also subject to backup regulation from the FDIC.
Regulation and supervision by the federal banking agencies is intended primarily for the protection of customers and depositors and the Deposit Insurance Fund administered by the FDIC and not for the benefit of stockholders. Set forth below is a brief

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description of material information regarding certain laws and regulations that are applicable to the Company and the Bank. This description, as well as other descriptions of laws and regulations in this Form 10-K, is not complete and is qualified in its entirety by reference to applicable laws and regulations.
Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act
The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the Dodd-Frank Act) enacted on July 1, 2010 is one of the most significant pieces of financial legislation since the 1930s. The Dodd-Frank Act and FRB policy require requires that bank holding companies, such as the Company, act as a source of financial and managerial strength for their insured depository institution subsidiaries, such as the Bank, particularly when such subsidiaries are in financial distress. The FRB has extensive enforcement authority over the Company and the OCC has extensive enforcement authority over the Bank under federal law. Enforcement authority generally includes, among other things, the ability to assess civil money penalties, to issue cease-and-desist or removal orders and to initiate injunctive actions.
In general, these enforcement actions may be initiated for violations of laws and regulations and unsafe or unsound practices. Other actions or inactions may provide the basis for enforcement action, including misleading or untimely filing of reports. Except under certain circumstances, public disclosure of formal enforcement actions by the FRB and the OCC is required by law.
The Dodd-Frank Act made other significant changes to the regulation of bank holding companies and their subsidiary banks, including the regulation of the Company and the Bank, and other significant changes will continue to occur as rules are promulgated under the Dodd-Frank Act. These regulatory changes have had and will continue to have a material effect on the business and results of the Company and the Bank. The Dodd-Frank Act created the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), with the authority to promulgate regulations intended to protect consumers with respect to financial products and services, including those provided by the Bank, and to restrict unfair, deceptive or abusive conduct by providers of consumer financial products and services. The CFPB has issued rules under the Dodd-Frank Act affecting the Bank’s residential mortgage lending business, including ability-to-repay and qualified mortgage standards, mortgage servicing standards, loan originator compensation standards, high-cost mortgage requirements, appraisal and escrow standards and requirements for higher-priced mortgages. The activities of the Bank are also subject to regulation under numerous federal laws and state consumer protection statutes.
In addition to the Dodd-Frank Act, other legislative and regulatory proposals affecting banks have been made both domestically and internationally. Among other things, these proposals include significant additional capital and liquidity requirements and limitations on size or types of activity in which banks may engage.
Legislation is introduced from time to time in the United States Congress that may affect our operations. In addition, the regulations governing us may be amended from time to time. Any legislative or regulatory changes in the future, including those resulting from the Dodd-Frank Act, could adversely affect our operations and financial condition.
2018 Regulatory Reform
In May 2018 the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief and Consumer Protection Act (the “Economic Growth Act”), was enacted to modify or remove certain financial reform rules and regulations, including some of those implemented under the Dodd-Frank Act. The Economic Growth Act, among other matters, directs the federal banking regulators to simplify the regulatory capital rules for financial institutions and their holding companies with total consolidated assets of less than $10 billion and includes regulatory relief regarding stress testing, mortgage disclosures and risk weights for certain high-risk commercial real estate loans, among other items. It is difficult at this time to predict when or how new standards under the Economic Growth Act will ultimately be applied, what specific impact this legislation and the yet-to-be-written implementing rules and regulations will have.
Banc of California, Inc.
As a bank holding company that has elected to become a financial holding company pursuant to the BHCA, Banc of California, Inc. may engage in activities permitted for bank holding companies and may affiliate with securities firms and insurance companies and engage in other activities that are financial in nature or incidental or complementary to activities that are financial in nature. “Financial in nature” activities include securities underwriting, dealing and market making; sponsoring mutual funds and investment companies; insurance underwriting and agency; and merchant banking. See “Volcker Rule” below.
Banc of California, Inc. is required to register and file reports with, and is subject to regulation and examination by the FRB. The FRB’s approval is required for the acquisition of the Company, or the acquisition by the Company, of another financial institution or holding company thereof, and, under certain circumstances, the Company’s acquisition of other subsidiaries.
As a bank holding company, Banc of California, Inc. is subject to the regulations of the FRB imposing capital requirements for a bank holding company, which establish a capital framework as described in “Capital Requirements” below. As of

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December 31, 2018, Banc of California, Inc. was considered well-capitalized, with capital ratios in excess of those required to qualify as such.
Under the FRB’s policy statement on the payment of cash dividends, a bank holding company should pay cash dividends only to the extent that its net income for the past year is sufficient to cover both the cash dividends and a rate of earnings retention that is consistent with the company’s capital needs, asset quality, and overall financial condition. A bank holding company must give the FRB prior notice of any purchase or redemption of its equity securities if the consideration for the purchase or redemption, when combined with the consideration for all such purchases or redemptions in the preceding 12 months, is equal to 10 percent or more of its consolidated net worth. Notice to the FRB would include, but may not be limited to, background information on a redemption, pro-forma financial statements that reflect the planned transaction including impact to the Company and stress testing that incorporates the transaction. The FRB may disapprove such a purchase or redemption if it determines that the proposal would be an unsafe or unsound practice or would violate any law, regulation, FRB order, or condition imposed in writing by the FRB. This notification requirement does not apply to a bank holding company that qualifies as well-capitalized, received a composite rating and a rating for management of “1” or “2” in its last examination and is not subject to any unresolved supervisory issue. Regarding dividends, see "Capital Requirements" below.
The Bank
The Bank is subject to a variety of requirements under federal law. The Bank is required to maintain sufficient liquidity to ensure safe and sound operations. For additional information, see "Liquidity" included in Item 7 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
The OCC has adopted guidelines establishing safety and soundness standards on such matters as loan and lease underwriting and documentation, asset quality, earnings standards, internal controls and audit systems, interest rate risk exposure, and compensation and other employee benefits. Any institution which fails to comply with these standards must submit a compliance plan.
The FRB requires all depository institutions to maintain noninterest bearing reserves at specified levels against their transaction accounts, primarily checking, NOW and Super NOW checking accounts. At December 31, 2018, the Bank was in compliance with these reserve requirements.
FDIC Insurance
The deposits of the Bank are insured up to the applicable limits by the FDIC, and such insurance is backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government. The basic deposit insurance limit is generally $250,000. As insurer, the FDIC imposes deposit insurance premiums and is authorized to conduct examinations of and to require reporting by FDIC-insured institutions. The Bank’s deposit insurance premiums for the year ended December 31, 2018 were $5.8 million. FDIC-insured institutions are required to pay an additional quarterly assessment called the FICO assessment in order to fund the interest on bonds issued to resolve thrift failures in the 1980s. This assessment will continue until the bonds mature in the years 2017 through 2019. For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018, the Bank paid $279 thousand in FICO assessments.
The FDIC assesses deposit insurance premiums quarterly on each FDIC-insured institution based on annualized rates. Each institution with $10 billion or more in assets is assessed under a scorecard method using supervisory ratings, financial ratios and other factors. Such institutions are also subject to a temporary surcharge required by the Dodd-Frank Act which was discontinued for assessment periods commencing after September 30, 2018. As required by the Dodd-Frank Act, deposit insurance premiums are assessed on the amount of an institution’s total assets minus its branch Tier 1 capital. Smaller institutions are assessed by a method using supervisory ratings and financial ratios.
Capital Requirements
The Company and the Bank are subject to capital regulations adopted by the FRB and the OCC. The current regulations, which became effective January 1, 2015 (with some changes being phased in over several years), establish required minimum ratios for common equity Tier 1 (CET1) capital, Tier 1 capital and total capital and a leverage ratio; set risk-weighting for assets and certain other items for purposes of the risk-based capital ratios; require an additional capital conservation buffer over the minimum required capital ratios; and define what qualifies as capital for purposes of meeting the capital requirements. Under these capital regulations, the minimum capital ratios are: (i) a CET1 capital ratio of 4.5 percent of total risk-weighted assets; (ii) a Tier 1 capital ratio of 6.0 percent of total risk-weighted assets; (iii) a total capital ratio of 8.0 percent of total risk-weighted assets; and (iv) a leverage ratio (the ratio of Tier 1 capital to average total consolidated assets) of 4.0 percent.
CET1 capital generally consists of common stock, retained earnings, accumulated other comprehensive income (AOCI) except where an institution elects to exclude AOCI from regulatory capital, and certain minority interests, subject to applicable regulatory adjustments and deductions, including deduction of certain amounts of mortgage servicing assets and certain deferred tax assets that exceed specified thresholds. The Company elected to permanently opt out of including AOCI in regulatory capital. Tier 1 capital generally consists of CET1 capital plus noncumulative perpetual preferred stock and certain additional items less applicable regulatory adjustments and deductions. Tier 2 capital generally consists of subordinated debt;

13


certain other preferred stock, and allowance for loan and lease losses up to 1.25 percent of risk-weighted assets, less applicable regulatory adjustments and deductions. Total capital is the sum of Tier 1 capital and Tier 2 capital.
Assets and certain off-balance sheet items are assigned risk-weights ranging from 0 percent to 1,250 percent, reflecting credit risk and other risk exposure, to determine total risk-weighted assets for the risk-based capital ratios. For some items, risk-weights have changed compared to their risk-weights under rules in effect before January 1, 2015. These include a 150 percent risk-weight (up from 100 percent ) for certain high volatility commercial real estate acquisition, development and construction loans and for non-residential mortgage loans that are 90 days past due or otherwise in non-accrual status, a 20 percent (up from 0 percent) credit conversion factor for the unused portion of a commitment with an original maturity of one year or less that is not unconditionally cancellable, and a 250 percent risk-weight (up from 100 percent) for mortgage servicing and deferred tax assets that are not deducted from capital.
In addition to the minimum CET1, Tier 1, total capital and leverage ratios, the Company and the Bank must maintain a capital conservation buffer consisting of additional CET1 capital greater than 2.5 percent of risk-weighted assets above the required minimum risk-based capital levels in order to avoid limitations on paying dividends, engaging in share repurchases, and paying discretionary bonuses. The phase-in of the capital conservation buffer requirement began on January 1, 2016, when a buffer greater than 0.625 percent of risk-weighted assets was required, which amount increased each year until the buffer requirement became fully implemented on January 1, 2019.
The OCC may establish an individual minimum capital requirement for a particular bank, based on its circumstances, which may vary from what would otherwise be required. The OCC has not imposed such a requirement on the Bank.
To be considered well-capitalized, the Company must maintain on a consolidated basis a total risk-based capital ratio of 10.0 percent or more, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of 8.0 percent or more and not be subject to any written agreement, capital directive or prompt corrective action directive issued by the FRB to meet and maintain a specific capital level for any capital measure. For the well-capitalized standard applicable to the Bank, see “Prompt Corrective Action” below.
Although the Company continues to evaluate the impact that the capital rules will have on the Company and the Bank, management anticipates that the Company and the Bank will remain well-capitalized, and will meet the capital conservation buffer requirement.
Prompt Corrective Action
The Bank is required to maintain specified levels of regulatory capital under the capital and prompt corrective action regulations of the OCC. To be adequately capitalized, an institution must have the minimum capital ratios discussed in “Capital Requirements” above. To be well-capitalized, an institution must have a CET1 risk-based capital ratio of at least 6.5 percent, Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of at least 8.0 percent, a total risk-based capital ratio of at least 10.0 percent and a leverage ratio of at least 5.0 percent, and not be subject to any written agreement, capital directive or prompt corrective action directive issued by its primary Federal banking regulator to meet and maintain a specific capital level for any capital measure. Institutions that are not well-capitalized are subject to certain restrictions on brokered deposits and interest rates on deposits.
The OCC is authorized and, under certain circumstances, required to take certain actions against an institution that is less than adequately capitalized. Such an institution must submit a capital restoration plan, including a specified guarantee by its holding company, and until the plan is approved by the OCC, the institution may not increase its assets, acquire another institution, establish a branch or engage in any new activities, and generally may not make capital distributions.
For institutions that are not at least adequately capitalized, progressively more severe restrictions generally apply as capital ratios decrease or if the OCC reclassifies an institution into a lower capital category due to unsafe or unsound practices or unsafe or unsound condition. Such restrictions may cover all aspects of operations and may include a forced merger or acquisition. An institution that becomes “critically undercapitalized” because it has a tangible equity ratio of 2.0 percent or less is generally subject to the appointment of the FDIC as receiver or conservator for the institution within 90 days after it becomes critically undercapitalized. The imposition by the OCC of any of these measures on the Bank may have a substantial adverse effect on its operations and profitability.
Anti-Money Laundering and Suspicious Activity
Several federal laws, including the Bank Secrecy Act, the Money Laundering Control Act and the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (the Patriot Act) require all financial institutions, including banks, to implement policies and procedures relating to anti-money laundering, compliance, suspicious activities, and currency transaction reporting and due diligence on customers. The Patriot Act also requires federal bank regulators to evaluate the effectiveness of an applicant in combating money laundering when determining whether to approve a proposed bank acquisition.

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Community Reinvestment Act
The Bank is subject to the provisions of the Community Reinvestment Act (CRA). Under the terms of the CRA, the Bank has a continuing and affirmative obligation, consistent with safe and sound operation, to help meet the credit needs of its community, including providing credit to individuals residing in low- and moderate-income neighborhoods. The CRA does not establish specific lending requirements or programs for financial institutions, and does not limit an institution’s discretion to develop the types of products and services that it believes are best suited to its particular community in a manner consistent with the CRA.
The OCC regularly assesses the Bank on its record in meeting the credit needs of the communities it serves, including low-income and moderate-income neighborhoods. In the uniform four-tier- rating system used by federal banking agencies in assessing CRA performance, an "Outstanding" rating is the top tier rating. This CRA rating deals strictly with how well an institution is meeting its responsibilities under the CRA and the OCC takes into account performance under the CRA when considering a bank’s application to establish or relocate a branch or main office or to merge with, acquire assets, or assume liabilities of another insured depository institution. The bank’s record may be the basis for denying the application.
Performance under the CRA also is considered when the FRB reviews applications to acquire, merge or consolidate with another banking institution or its holding company. In the case of a bank holding company applying for approval to acquire a bank, the FRB will assess the records of each subsidiary depository institution of the applicant bank holding company, and that record may be the basis for denying the application.
Financial Privacy Under the Requirements of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act
The Company and its subsidiaries are required periodically to disclose to their retail customers the Company’s policies and practices with respect to the sharing of nonpublic customer information with its affiliates and others, and the confidentiality and security of that information. Under the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (the GLBA), retail customers also must be given the opportunity to “opt out” of information-sharing arrangements with non-affiliates, subject to certain exceptions set forth in the GLBA.
Limitations on Transactions with Affiliates and Loans to Insiders
Transactions between the Bank and any affiliate are governed by Sections 23A and 23B of the Federal Reserve Act. An affiliate of a bank is generally any company or entity which controls, is controlled by or is under common control with the bank but which is not a subsidiary of the bank. The Company and its subsidiaries are affiliates of the Bank. Generally, Section 23A limits the extent to which the Bank or its subsidiaries may engage in “covered transactions” with any one affiliate to an amount equal to 10.0 percent of the Bank’s capital stock and surplus, and limits all such transactions with all affiliates to an amount equal to 20.0 percent of such capital stock and surplus. Section 23B applies to “covered transactions” as well as certain other transactions and requires that all transactions be on terms substantially the same, or at least as favorable to the Bank, as those provided to a non-affiliate. The term “covered transaction” includes a loan by the Bank to an affiliate, the purchase of or investment in securities issued by an affiliate by the Bank, the purchase of assets by the Bank from an affiliate, the acceptance by the Bank of securities issued by an affiliate as collateral security for a loan or extension of credit to any person or company, or the issuance by the Bank of a guarantee, acceptance or letter of credit on behalf of an affiliate. Loans by the Bank to an affiliate must be collateralized.
In addition, Sections 22(g) and (h) of the Federal Reserve Act place restrictions on loans to executive officers, directors and principal stockholders of the Bank and its affiliates. Under Section 22(h), aggregate loans to a director, executive officer or greater than 10.0 percent stockholder of the Bank or any of its affiliates, and certain related interests of such a person may generally not exceed, together with all other outstanding loans to such person and related interests, 15.0 percent of the Bank’s unimpaired capital and surplus, plus an additional 10.0 percent of unimpaired capital and surplus for loans that are fully secured by readily marketable collateral having a value at least equal to the amount of the loan. Section 22(h) also requires that loans to directors, executive officers and principal stockholders be made on terms substantially the same as those offered in comparable transactions to other persons, and not involve more than the normal risk of repayment or present other unfavorable features.
There is an exception for loans that are made pursuant to a benefit or compensation program that (i) is widely available to employees of the Bank or its affiliate and (ii) does not give preference to any director, executive officer or principal stockholder or certain related interests over other employees of the Bank or its affiliate. Section 22(h) also requires prior board approval for certain loans. In addition, the aggregate amount of all loans to all of the executive officers, directors and principal stockholders of the Bank or its affiliates and certain related interests may not exceed 100.0 percent of the institution’s unimpaired capital and surplus. Furthermore, Section 22(g) places additional restrictions on loans to executive officers.
The Company and its affiliates, including the Bank, maintain programs to meet the limitations on transactions with affiliates and restrictions on loans to insiders and the Company believes it and the Bank are currently in compliance with these requirements.

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Identity Theft
Under the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACT Act), the Bank is required to develop and implement a written Identity Theft Prevention Program to detect, prevent and mitigate identity theft “red flags” in connection with the opening of certain accounts or certain existing accounts. Under the FACT Act, the Bank is required to adopt reasonable policies and procedures to (i) identify relevant red flags for covered accounts and incorporate those red flags into the program: (ii) detect red flags that have been incorporated into the program; (iii) respond appropriately to any red flags that are detected to prevent and mitigate identity theft; and (iv) ensure the program is updated periodically, to reflect changes in risks to customers or to the safety and soundness of the financial institution or creditor from identity theft.
The Bank maintains a program to meet the requirements of the FACT Act and the Bank believes it is currently in compliance with these requirements.
Consumer Protection Laws and Regulations; Other Regulations
The Bank and its affiliates are subject to a broad array of federal and state consumer protection laws and regulations that govern almost every aspect of its business relationships with consumers, including but not limited to the Truth-in-Lending Act, the Truth in Savings Act, the Electronic Funds Transfer Act, the Expedited Funds Availability Act, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, the Fair Housing Act, the Secure and Fair Enforcement in Mortgage Licensing Act, the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, the Service Members Civil Relief Act, the Right to Financial Privacy Act, the Home Ownership and Equity Protection Act, the Consumer Leasing Act, the Fair Credit Billing Act, the Homeowners Protection Act, the Check Clearing for the 21st Century Act, laws governing flood insurance, federal and state laws prohibiting unfair and deceptive business practices, foreclosure laws and various regulations that implement the foregoing. Among other things, these laws and regulations mandate certain disclosure requirements and regulate the manner in which financial institutions must deal with customers when taking deposits, making loans, collecting loans and providing other services. If the Bank fails to comply with these laws and regulations, it may be subject to various penalties.
The Dodd-Frank Act established the CFPB as an independent bureau within the Federal Reserve System that is responsible for regulating consumer financial products and services under federal consumer financial laws. The CFPB has broad rulemaking authority with respect to these laws. The Company and the Bank are subject to CFPB’s regulations regarding consumer financial services and products and to supervision and examination by the CFPB with respect to federal consumer protection laws and regulations. The CFPB has issued numerous regulations, and is expected to continue to do so in the next few years. The CFPB’s rulemaking, examination and enforcement authority has significantly affected, and is expected to continue to significantly affect, financial institutions involved in the provision of consumer financial products and services, including the Company and the Bank.
Restrictions on residential mortgages were also promulgated under the Dodd-Frank Act. The provisions include (i) a requirement that lenders make a determination that at the time a residential mortgage loan is consummated the consumer has a reasonable ability to repay the loan and related costs; (ii) a ban on loan originator compensation based on the interest rate or other terms of the loan (other than the amount of the principal); (iii) a ban on prepayment penalties for certain types of loans; (iv) bans on arbitration provisions in mortgage loans; and (v) requirements for enhanced disclosures in connection with the making of a loan. The Dodd-Frank Act also imposes a variety of requirements on entities that service mortgage loans.
The OCC must approve an acquisition of the Bank and the Bank’s acquisition of other financial institutions and certain other acquisitions, and its establishment of branches. Generally, the Bank may branch de novo nationwide, but branching by acquisition may be restricted by applicable state law.
The Bank’s general limit on loans to one borrower is 15 percent of its capital and surplus, plus an additional 10 percent of its capital and surplus if the amount of loans greater than 15 percent of capital and surplus is fully secured by readily marketable collateral. Capital and surplus means Tier 1 and Tier 2 capital plus the amount of allowance for loan and lease losses not included in Tier 2 capital. The Bank has no loans in excess of its loans-to-one borrower limit.
OCC regulations impose various restrictions on the ability of a bank to make capital distributions, which include dividends, stock redemptions or repurchases, and certain other items. Generally, a bank may make capital distributions during any calendar year equal to up to 100 percent of net income for the year-to-date plus retained net income for the two preceding years without prior OCC approval. However, the OCC may restrict dividends by an institution deemed to be in need of more than normal supervision. Dividends can also be restricted if the capital conservation buffer requirement is not met.
The Bank is a member of the FHLB, which makes loans or advances to members. All advances are required to be fully secured by sufficient collateral as determined by the FHLB. To be a FHLB member, financial institutions must demonstrate that they originate and/or purchase long-term home mortgage loans or mortgage-backed securities. The Bank is required to purchase and maintain stock in the FHLB. At December 31, 2018, the Bank had $41.0 million in FHLB stock, which was in compliance with this requirement.

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Volcker Rule
The federal banking agencies have adopted regulations to implement the provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act known as the Volcker Rule. Under the regulations, FDIC-insured depository institutions, their holding companies, subsidiaries and affiliates (collectively, banking entities), are generally prohibited, subject to certain exemptions, from proprietary trading of securities and other financial instruments and from acquiring or retaining an ownership interest in a “covered fund.”
Trading in certain government obligations is not prohibited. These include, among others, obligations of or guaranteed by the United States or an agency or GSE of the United States, obligations of a State of the United States or a political subdivision thereof, and municipal securities. Proprietary trading generally does not include transactions under repurchase and reverse repurchase agreements, securities lending transactions and purchases and sales for the purpose of liquidity management if the liquidity management plan meets specified criteria; nor does it generally include transactions undertaken in a fiduciary capacity.
The term “covered fund” can include, in addition to many private equity and hedge funds and other entities, certain collateralized mortgage obligations, collateralized debt obligations and collateralized loan obligations, and other items, but it does not include wholly owned subsidiaries, certain joint ventures, or loan securitizations generally, if the underlying assets are solely loans. The term “ownership interest” includes not only an equity interest or a partnership interest, but also an interest that has the right to participate in selection or removal of a general partner, managing member, director, trustee or investment manager or advisor; to receive a share of income, gains or profits of the fund; to receive underlying fund assets after all other interests have been redeemed; to receive all or a portion of excess spread; or to receive income on a pass-through basis or income determined by reference to the performance of fund assets. In addition, “ownership interest” includes an interest under which amounts payable can be reduced based on losses arising from underlying fund assets.
Activities eligible for exemptions include, among others, certain brokerage, underwriting and marketing activities, and risk-mitigating hedging activities with respect to specific risks and subject to specified conditions.
Future Legislation or Regulation
In light of recent conditions in the United States economy and the financial services industry, the Trump administration, Congress, the regulators and various states continue to focus attention on the financial services industry. Additional proposals that affect the industry have been, and will likely continue to be, introduced. The Company cannot predict whether any of these proposals will be enacted or adopted or, if they are, the effect they would have on our business, the Company's operations or financial condition.
Item 1A. Risk Factors
An investment in our securities is subject to certain risks. These risk factors should be considered by prospective and current investors in our securities when evaluating the disclosures in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or that we currently deem immaterial also may impair our business operations. If any of the following risks actually occur, our business, results of operations and financial condition could suffer. In that event, the value of our securities could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment.
Risks Relating to Our Business and Operating Environment
The primary focus of our business strategy is transitioning to a core commercial banking platform, which presents a number of challenges and risks.
For most of our operating history, reflecting the Bank’s roots as a thrift institution, the vast majority of our loans were secured by single family residential real estate. The Bank converted from a federal savings bank to a national bank in 2013, and we remain in the process of transitioning to a core commercial banking platform. At December 31, 2018, commercial loans totaled $5.33 billion, or 69.2 percent of total loans and leases held for investment, as compared to $1.04 billion, or 42.7 percent of total loans and leases held for investment, at December 31, 2013. Commercial loans at December 31, 2018 were principally comprised of commercial real estate and multifamily loans and commercial and industrial loans, totaling $3.11 billion and $1.94 billion, respectively, and representing 40.4 percent and 25.2 percent, respectively, of total loans and leases held for investment. As a general matter, commercial real estate and multifamily loans and commercial and industrial loans are higher yielding, but have a greater risk of loss, than single family residential real estate loans. See “--Our income property loans, consisting of commercial real estate and multifamily loans, involve higher principal amounts than other loans and repayment of these loans may be dependent on factors outside our control or the control of our borrowers” and “--Repayment of our commercial and industrial loans is often dependent on the cash flows of the borrower, which may be unpredictable, and the collateral securing these loans may not be sufficient to repay the loan in the event of default.”
As part of our efforts to transition to a core commercial banking platform, we are focused on marketing our products and services to small and medium-sized businesses. These businesses generally have fewer financial resources in terms of capital or borrowing capacity than larger entities. They are generally more vulnerable to economic downturns and may not have the capital needed to compete against their larger, more capitalized competitors. Additionally, their continued success is frequently

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contingent on a small group of owners or senior management, and the death, disability or resignation of one or more such individuals could also have a material effect on the business and its ability to repay its loan obligations.
Building out our core commercial banking platform has required us to make a significant investment in human capital. During the fourth quarter of 2018, we added 13 new hires to our Business Banking team and may add more new hires in the future. No assurance can be given that we will be able to retain the recent hires or attract and retain additional new hires with the requisite qualifications. The expanded Business Banking team has been tasked with growing relationships and market share while delivering a tailored client experience. A key marker of success in this area will be growth in core deposits, which we define as interest-bearing and noninterest-bearing demand deposits, savings, money market deposit accounts, and certificates of deposit of $250,000 or less, excluding brokered deposits, to provide a less costly and more stable source of funding. It may prove difficult to grow our core deposit base. See “--We may not be able to expand our core deposit base or other low cost funding sources.”
If we are not successful in our efforts to transition to a core commercial banking platform, this could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
To the extent we acquire other banks, bank branches, other assets or other businesses, we may be negatively impacted by certain risks inherent with such acquisitions.
Acquiring other banks, bank branches, other assets or other businesses involves various risks, including the risks of incorrectly assessing the credit quality of acquired assets, encountering greater than expected costs of integrating acquired banks, branches or businesses, the risk of loss of customers and/or employees of the acquired bank, branch or business, executing cost savings measures, not achieving revenue enhancements and otherwise not realizing the transaction’s anticipated benefits. Our ability to address these matters successfully cannot be assured. There is also the risk that the requisite regulatory approvals might not be received and other conditions to consummation of a transaction might not be satisfied during the anticipated timeframes, or at all. In addition, pursuing an acquisition may divert resources or management’s attention from ongoing business operations, may require investment in integration and in development and enhancement of additional operational and reporting processes and controls, and may subject us to additional regulatory scrutiny. To finance an acquisition, we may borrow funds, thereby increasing our leverage and diminishing our liquidity, or raise additional capital, which could dilute the interests of our existing stockholders.
An ongoing investigation by the SEC, as well as any related litigation or other litigation, may result in adverse findings, reputational damage, the imposition of sanctions, increased costs, diversion of management time and resources and other negative consequences, which could adversely affect our financial condition and future operating results.
Beginning on October 18, 2016, various anonymous blog posts raised questions about related party transactions, concerns over director independence and other issues, including suggestions that the Company was controlled by an individual who pled guilty to securities fraud in matters unrelated to us. In response to these allegations, the Company's Board of Directors formed a Special Committee consisting solely of independent directors to investigate the allegations. The Special Committee conducted its investigation with the assistance of independent legal counsel and did not find evidence that the individual named in the blog posts had any direct or indirect control or undue influence over the Company.
Furthermore, the inquiry did not find any violations of law or evidence establishing that any loan, related party transaction, or any other circumstance impaired the independence of any director. However, the Special Committee did find that certain public statements made by the Company in October 2016 regarding an earlier inquiry into these matters were not fully accurate.
On January 12, 2017, the Company received a formal order of investigation issued by the SEC and a subpoena seeking documents primarily related to certain of the issues that the Special Committee reviewed. The Company has been fully cooperating with the SEC in this investigation.
The SEC investigation could lead to the institution of civil or administrative proceedings against the Company as well as against individuals currently or previously associated with the Company. Any such proceedings or threatened proceedings might result in the imposition of monetary fines or other sanctions against the named parties. Resulting sanctions could include remedial measures that might prove costly or disruptive to our business. Additionally, as discussed under Item 3 in Part I of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, a consolidated class action lawsuit was filed against the Company on January 23, 2017, and other lawsuits have been filed against the Company by former officers and others. In addition to the risk of fines, sanctions, or monetary judgments, the SEC investigation and lawsuits may cause the Company to incur significant attorneys’ fees, both with regards to counsel representing the Company and with regards to indemnity obligations incurred by the Company.
The pendency of the SEC investigation and any resulting litigation or sanctions, as well as the pending lawsuits (or any other lawsuits) could harm our reputation, leading to a loss of existing and potential customers, and our ability to attract and retain deposits and greater difficulty in securing financing or other developments which could adversely affect our liquidity, financial condition and future operating results.

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In addition, management time and resources have been and will continue to be diverted to address the investigation and any related litigation, as well as the pending lawsuits, and we have incurred and may continue to incur significant legal and other expenses in our defense of the investigation and any related litigation as well as the pending lawsuits.
We are reducing the overall size of our organization, and we may encounter difficulties in managing our business as a result of this reduction or attrition that may follow this reduction. In addition, we may not achieve anticipated savings from the reduction.
On June 26, 2018, we began implementing a reduction in force to reduce our workforce by approximately 9% of total staffing. The reduction in force resulted in the loss of some longer-term employees, the loss of institutional knowledge and expertise and the reallocation and combination of certain roles and responsibilities across the organization, all of which could adversely affect our operations. Given the complexity and nature of our business, we must continue to implement and improve our managerial, operational and financial systems, manage our facilities and continue to recruit and retain qualified personnel. This could be made more challenging by the reduction in force and additional measures we may take to reduce costs, including our planned reduction in use of third party advisors. As a result, our management may need to divert a disproportionate amount of its attention away from our day-to-day strategic and operational activities and devote a substantial amount of time to managing these organizational changes. Further, the restructuring and additional cost containment measures may have unintended consequences, such as attrition beyond our intended reduction in force and reduced employee morale. Employees who were not affected by the reduction in force may seek alternate employment, which could require us to obtain contract support at unplanned additional expense.
We estimated that we will recognize annual savings of approximately $15.0 million from the reduction in force and planned reduction in use of third party advisors. We incurred severance-related costs during the year ended 2018 of $4.4 million, pre-tax, as a result of the reduction in force. It is possible that the actual savings we realize from the reduction in force and our planned reduction in use of third party advisors will be less than anticipated and the costs associated with the reduction in force will be greater than anticipated.
Our financial condition and results of operations are dependent on the economy, particularly in the Bank’s market areas. A worsening in economic conditions in the market areas we serve may impact our earnings adversely and could increase the credit risk of our loan and lease portfolio.
Our primary market area is concentrated in the greater San Diego, Orange, Santa Barbara, and Los Angeles counties. Adverse economic conditions in any of these areas can reduce our rate of growth, affect our customers’ ability to repay loans and leases and adversely impact our financial condition and earnings. General economic conditions, including inflation, unemployment and money supply fluctuations, also may affect our profitability adversely.
A deterioration in economic conditions in the market areas we serve could result in the following consequences, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations:
Demand for our products and services may decline;
Loan and lease delinquencies, problem assets and foreclosures may increase;
Collateral for our loans and leases may further decline in value; and
The amount of our low cost or noninterest-bearing deposits may decrease.
We cannot accurately predict the possibility of weakness in the national or local economy effecting our future operating results.
We cannot accurately predict the possibility of the national or local economy’s return to recessionary conditions or to a period of economic weakness, which would adversely impact the markets we serve. Any deterioration in national or local economic conditions would have an adverse effect, which could be material, on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects, and any economic weakness could present substantial risks for the banking industry and for us.

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The enacted tax reform legislation effective January 1, 2018 is expected to have a significant impact on the Company and our financial condition and results of operations could be negatively affected by the broader implications of the legislation.
The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act was signed into law in December 2017, which included a number of provisions that will have impact on the banking industry, and on the borrowers and the market for residential and commercial real estate. Changes include a lower limit on the deductibility of interest on residential mortgage loans and home equity loans; a limitation on the deductibility of business interest expense; a limitation on the deductibility of property taxes and state and local income taxes, etc. The new law's limitation on the mortgage interest deduction and state and local tax deduction for individual taxpayers is expected to increase the after-tax cost of owning a home for many of our potential and existing customers and potentially lead to reduced demand for new residential mortgage loans that we originate. The value of the properties securing loans in our loan portfolio may be adversely impacted as a result of the changing economics of home ownership, which could require an increase in our provision for loan losses, which would reduce our profitability and could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Further, these changes implemented by the new tax law could make some businesses and industries less inclined to borrow, potentially reducing demand for the Company’s commercial loan products. Finally, we may be negatively impacted more than our competitors because our business strategy focuses on California, which has a higher cost real estate market compared to other states.
We are also subject to potential tax audits in various jurisdictions and in such event, tax authorities may disagree with certain positions we have taken and assess penalties or additional taxes. While we assess regularly the likely outcomes of these potential audits, there can be no assurance that we will accurately predict the outcome of a potential audit, and an audit could have a material adverse impact on our business, results of operations, and financial condition.
Severe weather, natural disasters, acts of war or terrorism and other external events could significantly impact our business.
Severe weather, natural disasters such as earthquakes and wildfires, acts of war or terrorism and other adverse external events could have a significant impact on our ability to conduct business. Such events could affect the stability of our deposit base, impair the ability of our borrowers to repay their outstanding loans, cause significant property damage or otherwise impair the value of collateral securing our loans, and result in loss of revenue and/or cause us to incur additional expenses. Although we have established disaster recovery plans and procedures, and we monitor the effects of any such events on our loans, properties and investments, the occurrence of any such event could have a material adverse effect on us or our earnings or our financial condition.
There are risks associated with our lending activities and our allowance for loan and lease losses may prove to be insufficient to absorb actual incurred losses in our loan and lease portfolio.
Lending money is a substantial part of our business. Every loan and lease carries a certain risk that it will not be repaid in accordance with its terms or that any underlying collateral will not be sufficient to assure repayment. This risk is affected by, among other things:
Cash flow of the borrower and/or the project being financed;
In the case of a collateralized loan or lease, the changes and uncertainties as to the future value of the collateral;
The credit history of a particular borrower;
Changes in economic and industry conditions; and
The duration of the loan or lease.
We maintain an allowance for loan and lease losses which we believe is appropriate to provide for probable incurred losses inherent in our loan and lease portfolio. The amount of this allowance is determined by our management through a periodic review and consideration of several factors, including, but not limited to:
An ongoing review of the quality, size and diversity of the loan and lease portfolio;
Evaluation of non-performing loans and leases;
Historical default and loss experience;
Historical recovery experience;
Existing economic conditions;
Risk characteristics of the various classifications of loans and leases; and
The amount and quality of collateral, including guarantees, securing the loans and leases.

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If actual losses on our loans and leases exceed our estimates used to establish our allowance for loan and lease losses, our business, financial condition and profitability may suffer.
The determination of the appropriate level of the allowance for loan and lease losses inherently involves a high degree of subjectivity and requires us to make various assumptions and judgments about the collectability of our loan and lease portfolio, including the creditworthiness of our borrowers and the value of the real estate and other assets serving as collateral for the repayment of many of our loans and leases. In determining the amount of the allowance for loan and lease losses, we review our loans and leases and the loss and delinquency experience, and evaluate economic conditions and make significant estimates of current credit risks and future trends, all of which may undergo material changes. If our estimates are incorrect, the allowance for loan and lease losses may not be sufficient to cover losses inherent in our loan and lease portfolio, resulting in the need for additions to our allowance through an increase in the provision for loan and lease losses. Deterioration in economic conditions affecting borrowers, new information regarding existing loans and leases, identification of additional problem loans and leases and other factors, both within and outside of our control, may require an increase in the allowance for loan and lease losses. Our allowance for loan and lease losses was 0.81 percent of total loans and leases held-for-investment and 282.0 percent of non-performing loans and leases at December 31, 2018. In addition, bank regulatory agencies periodically review our allowance for loan and lease losses and may require an increase in the provision for loan and lease losses or the recognition of further charge-offs (which will in turn also require an increase in the provision for loan losses if the charge-offs exceed the allowance for loan losses), based on judgments different than that of management. Any increases in the provision for loan and lease losses will result in a decrease in net income and may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.
Our business may be adversely affected by credit risk associated with residential property and declining property values.
At December 31, 2018, $2.35 billion, or 30.5 percent of our total loans and leases held-for-investment, was secured by SFR mortgage loans and HELOCs, as compared with $2.11 billion, or 31.7 percent of our total loans and leases held-for-investment, at December 31, 2017. This type of lending is generally sensitive to regional and local economic conditions that significantly impact the ability of borrowers to meet their loan payment obligations, making loss levels difficult to predict. The decline in residential real estate values as a result of a downturn in the California housing markets may reduce the value of the real estate collateral securing these types of loans and increase the risk that we would incur losses if borrowers default on their loans. Residential loans with high combined loan-to-value ratios generally will be more sensitive to declining property values than those with lower combined loan-to-value ratios and therefore may experience a higher incidence of default and severity of losses. In addition, if the borrowers sell their homes, the borrowers may be unable to repay their loans in full from the sale proceeds. As a result, these loans may experience higher rates of delinquencies, defaults and losses, which will in turn adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.
Our loan portfolio possesses increased risk due to our level of adjustable rate loans.
A substantial majority of our real estate secured loans held are adjustable rate loans. Any rise in prevailing market interest rates may result in increased payments for some borrowers who have adjustable rate mortgage loans, increasing the possibility of defaults.
Our underwriting practices may not protect us against losses in our loan portfolio.
We seek to mitigate the risks inherent in our loan portfolio by adhering to specific underwriting practices, including: analyzing a borrower’s credit history, financial statements, tax returns and cash flow projections; valuing collateral based on reports of independent appraisers; and verifying liquid assets. Although we believe that our underwriting criteria are, and historically have been, appropriate for the various kinds of loans we make, we have incurred losses on loans that have met these criteria, and may continue to experience higher than expected losses depending on economic factors and borrower behavior. In addition, our ability to assess the creditworthiness of our customers may be impaired if the models and approaches we use to select, manage, and underwrite our customers become less predictive of future behaviors, or in the case of borrower fraud. Finally, we may have higher credit risk, or experience higher credit losses, to the extent our loans are concentrated by loan type, industry segment, borrower type, or location of the borrower or collateral. At December 31, 2018, 78.7 percent of our commercial real estate loans, 89.2 percent of our multifamily loans and 66.7 percent of our originated SFR mortgage loans were secured by collateral in southern California. Deterioration in real estate values and underlying economic conditions in southern California could result in significantly higher credit losses to our portfolio.

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Our non-traditional and interest only single family residential loans expose us to increased lending risk.
Many of the residential mortgage loans we have originated for investment consist of non-traditional SFR mortgage loans that do not conform to Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac underwriting guidelines as a result of loan-to-value ratios or debt-to-income ratios, loan terms, loan size (exceeding agency limits) or other exceptions from agency underwriting guidelines. Moreover, many of these loans do not meet the qualified mortgage definition established by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and therefore contain additional regulatory and legal risks. See "Rulemaking changes by the CFPB in particular are expected to result in higher regulatory and compliance costs that may adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.” In addition, the secondary market demand for nonconforming mortgage loans generally is limited, and consequently, we may have a difficult time selling the nonconforming loans in our portfolio should we decide to do so.
In the case of interest only loans, a borrower’s monthly payment is subject to change when the loan converts to fully-amortizing status. Since the borrower’s monthly payment may increase by a substantial amount, even without an increase in prevailing market interest rates, the borrower might not be able to afford the increased monthly payment. In addition, interest only loans have a large, balloon payment at the end of the loan term, which the borrower may be unable to pay. Negative amortization involves a greater risk to us because credit risk exposure increases when the loan incurs negative amortization and the value of the home serving as collateral for the loan does not increase proportionally. Negative amortization is only permitted up to 110 percent of the original loan to value ratio during the first five years the loan is outstanding, with payments adjusting periodically as provided in the loan documents, potentially resulting in higher payments by the borrower. The adjustment of these loans to higher payment requirements can be a substantial factor in higher loan delinquency levels because the borrowers may not be able to make the higher payments. Also, real estate values may decline, and credit standards may tighten in concert with the higher payment requirement, making it difficult for borrowers to sell their homes or refinance their loans to pay off their mortgage obligations. For these reasons, interest only loans and negative amortization loans are considered to have an increased risk of delinquency, default and foreclosure than conforming loans and may result in higher levels of realized losses. Our interest only loans increased during the year ended December 31, 2018, from $717.5 million, or 10.8 percent of our total loans and leases held-for-investment, at December 31, 2017 to $753.1 million, or 9.8 percent of our total loans and leases held-for-investment, at December 31, 2018.
Our income property loans, consisting of commercial real estate and multifamily loans, involve higher principal amounts than other loans and repayment of these loans may be dependent on factors outside our control or the control of our borrowers.
We originate commercial real estate and multifamily loans for individuals and businesses for various purposes, which are secured by commercial properties. These loans typically involve higher principal amounts than other types of loans, and repayment is dependent upon income generated, or expected to be generated, by the property securing the loan in amounts sufficient to cover operating expenses and debt service, which may be adversely affected by changes in the economy or local market conditions. For example, if the cash flow from the borrower’s project is reduced as a result of leases not being obtained or renewed in a timely manner or at all, the borrower’s ability to repay the loan may be impaired.
Commercial real estate and multifamily loans also expose us to credit risk because the collateral securing these loans often cannot be sold easily. In addition, many of our commercial real estate and multifamily loans are not fully amortizing and contain large balloon payments upon maturity. Such balloon payments may require the borrower to either sell or refinance the underlying property in order to make the payment, which may increase the risk of default or non-payment.
If we foreclose on a commercial real estate or multifamily loan, our holding period for the collateral typically is longer than for residential mortgage loans because there are fewer potential purchasers of the collateral. Additionally, commercial real estate and multifamily loans generally have relatively large balances to single borrowers or groups of related borrowers. Accordingly, if we make any errors in judgment in the collectability of our commercial real estate and multifamily loans, any resulting charge-offs may be larger on a per loan basis than those incurred with our residential or consumer loan portfolios. Our commercial real estate and multifamily loans increased during the year ended December 31, 2018, from $2.53 billion, or 38.0 percent of our total loans and leases held-for-investment, at December 31, 2017 to $3.11 billion, or 40.4 percent of our total loans and leases held-for-investment, at December 31, 2018.

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Our portfolio of Green Loans subjects us to greater risks of loss.
We have a portfolio of Green Account home equity loans which generally have a fifteen year draw period with interest only payment requirements, and a balloon payment requirement at the end of the draw period. The Green Loans include an associated “clearing account” that allows all types of deposit and withdrawal transactions to be performed by the borrower during the term. We ceased originating new Green Loans in 2011; however, existing Green Loan borrowers are entitled to continue to draw on their Green Loans. Green Loans in our portfolio decreased during the year ended December 31, 2018, from $85.8 million, or 1.3 percent of our total loans and leases held-for-investment, at December 31, 2017 to $70.1 million, or 0.91 percent of our total loans and leases held-for-investment, at December 31, 2018.
In 2011, we implemented an information reporting system which allowed us to capture more detailed information than was previously possible, including transaction level data concerning our Green Loans. Although such transaction level data would have enabled us to more closely monitor trends in the credit quality of our Green Loans, we do not possess the enhanced transaction level data relating to the Green Loans for periods prior to the implementation of those enhanced systems. Although we do not believe that the absence of such historical data itself represents a material impediment to our current mechanisms for monitoring the credit quality of the Green Loans, until we compile sufficient transaction level data going forward we are limited in our ability to use historical information to monitor trends in the portfolio that might assist us in anticipating credit problems. Green Loans expose us to greater credit risk than other residential mortgage loans because they are non- amortizing and contain large balloon payments upon maturity.
Although the loans require the borrowers to make monthly interest payments, we are also subject to an increased risk of loss in connection with the Green Loans because payments due under the loans can be made by means of additional advances drawn by the borrower, up to the amount of the credit limit, thereby increasing our overall loss exposure due to negative amortization. The balloon payment due on maturity may require the borrower to either sell or refinance the underlying property in order to make the payment, which may increase the risk of default or non-payment. Our ability to take remedial actions in response to these additional risks of loss is limited by the terms and conditions of the Green Loans and our alternatives consist primarily of the ability to curtail additional borrowing when we determine that either the collateral value of the underlying real property or the creditworthiness of the borrower no longer supports the level of credit originally extended. Additionally, many of our Green Loans have larger balances than traditional residential mortgage loans, and accordingly, if the loans go into default either during the draw period or at maturity, any resulting charge-offs may be larger on a per loan basis than those incurred with traditional residential loans.
If our investments in other real estate owned are not properly valued or sufficiently reserved to cover actual losses, or if we are required to increase our valuation reserves, our earnings could be reduced.
We obtain updated valuations in the form of appraisals and broker price opinions when a loan has been foreclosed upon and the property is taken in as other real estate owned (OREO), and at certain other times during the asset’s holding period. Our net book value (NBV) in the loan at the time of foreclosure and thereafter is compared to the updated market value (fair value) of the foreclosed property less estimated selling costs. A charge-off is recorded for any excess in the asset’s NBV over its fair value. If our valuation process is incorrect, the fair value of our investments in OREO may not be sufficient to recover our NBV in such assets, resulting in the need for additional write-downs. Additional write-downs to our investments in OREO could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. Our bank regulators periodically review our OREO and may require us to recognize further write-downs. Any increase in our write-downs, as required by such regulator, may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. As of December 31, 2018, we had OREO of $672 thousand.
Repayment of our commercial and industrial loans is often dependent on the cash flows of the borrower, which may be unpredictable, and the collateral securing these loans may not be sufficient to repay the loan in the event of default.
We make our commercial and industrial loans primarily based on the identified cash flow of the borrower and secondarily on the underlying collateral provided by the borrower. Collateral securing commercial and industrial loans may depreciate over time, be difficult to appraise and fluctuate in value. In the case of loans secured by accounts receivable, the availability of funds for the repayment of these loans may be substantially dependent on the ability of the borrower to collect the amounts due from its customers. As of December 31, 2018, our commercial and industrial loans totaled $1.94 billion, or 25.2 percent of our total loans and leases held-for-investment.

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We are exposed to risk of environmental liabilities with respect to real properties which we may acquire.
In prior years, due to weakness of the U.S. economy and, more specifically, the California economy, including higher levels of unemployment than the nationwide average and declines in real estate values, certain borrowers have been unable to meet their loan repayment obligations and, as a result, we have had to initiate foreclosure proceedings with respect to and take title to a number of real properties that had collateralized their loans. As an owner of such properties, we could become subject to environmental liabilities and incur substantial costs for any property damage, personal injury, investigation and clean-up that may be required due to any environmental contamination that may be found to exist at any of those properties, even though we did not engage in the activities that led to such contamination. In addition, if we are the owner or former owner of a contaminated site, we may be subject to common law claims by third parties seeking damages for environmental contamination emanating from the site. If we were to become subject to significant environmental liabilities or costs, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be adversely affected.
Our single family residential mortgage loan origination business is largely dependent on third party brokers, and a change in that business could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
A majority of our residential mortgage loans are originated through third party mortgage brokers who are not contractually obligated to do business with us. Further, our competitors also have relationships with these brokers and actively compete with us in our efforts to expand our broker networks. Accordingly, we may not be successful in maintaining our existing relationships or expanding our broker networks.
Secondary mortgage market conditions could have a material adverse impact on our business, results of operations, financial condition or liquidity.
In addition to being affected by interest rates, the secondary mortgage markets are subject to investor demand for mortgage loans and mortgage-backed securities and investor yield requirements for those loans and securities. These conditions may fluctuate or even worsen in the future. Our SFR mortgage loan business strategy is to originate nonconforming jumbo conventional residential mortgage loans. We sell a portion of the single family residential loans that we originate in the secondary market. Secondary market demand for nonconforming jumbo residential mortgage loans generally is not as strong as the demand for conventional loans and can be volatile, reducing the demand or pricing for those loans; consequently, we may have a more difficult time selling the nonconforming jumbo residential mortgage loans that we originate or selling them at a price we believe is appropriate.
Originating loans for sale enables us to earn revenue from fees and gains on loan sales, while reducing our credit risk on the loans as well as our liquidity requirements. From time to time, as part of our balance sheet management process, we may also sell single family residential loans and other types of mortgage loans from our portfolio, including multifamily loans. We may use the proceeds of loan sales for generating new loans or for other purposes. If secondary mortgage market conditions were to deteriorate in the future and we cannot sell loans at our desired levels, our balance sheet management objectives might not be met. As a result, our business, results of operations, financial condition or liquidity may be adversely affected.
Any breach of representations and warranties made by us to our residential mortgage loan purchasers or credit default on our loan sales may require us to repurchase residential mortgage loans we have sold.
Prior to the sale of our Banc Home Loans division, we sold a majority of the residential mortgage loans we originated in the secondary market pursuant to agreements that generally require us to repurchase loans in the event of a breach of a representation or warranty made by us to the loan purchaser. Any fraud or misrepresentation during the mortgage loan origination process, whether by us, the borrower, mortgage broker, or other party in the transaction, or, in some cases, upon any early payment default on such mortgage loans, may require us to repurchase such loans.
We believe that, as a result of the increased defaults and foreclosures during the last recession resulting in increased demand for repurchases and indemnification in the secondary market, many purchasers of residential mortgage loans are particularly sensitive to obtaining indemnification or the requirement of originators to repurchase loans, and would benefit from enforcing any repurchase remedies they may have. Our exposure to repurchases under our representations and warranties could include the current unpaid balance of all loans we have sold. During the years ended December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016, we sold residential mortgage loans aggregating $14.5 million, $1.88 billion, and $5.13 billion, respectively. To recognize the potential loan repurchase or indemnification losses, we maintained a total reserve of $2.5 million at December 31, 2018. Increases to this reserve reduce mortgage banking revenue. The determination of the appropriate level of the reserve inherently involves a high degree of subjectivity and requires us to make estimates of repurchase and indemnification risks and expected losses. The estimates used could be inaccurate, resulting in a level of reserve that is less than actual losses.
Deterioration in the economy, an increase in interest rates or a decrease in home values could increase customer defaults on loans that were sold and increase demand for repurchases and indemnification and increase our losses from loan repurchases and indemnification. If we are required to indemnify loan purchasers or repurchase loans and incur losses that exceed our reserve, this could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, any claims asserted

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against us in the future by loan purchasers may result in liabilities or legal expenses that could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.
We may not be able to develop and maintain a strong core deposit base or other low cost funding sources.
We depend on checking, savings and money market deposit account balances and other forms of deposits as the primary source of funding for our lending activities. Our future growth will largely depend on our ability to expand core deposits, to provide a less costly and stable source of funding. The deposit markets are competitive, and therefore it may prove difficult to grow our core deposit base.
In 2018, the Bank focused on remixing the deposit base towards core relationship deposits. The Bank experienced net deposit outflows from large balance accounts (defined as $100 million or more in balances) primarily in the Institutional Banking business unit.
In 2018, the Bank increased its focus and attention toward expanding its core relationship deposit business, including recruiting sales and product personnel and adding subject matter expertise. Concurrently with the rise in short term interest rates, the competitive landscape for deposits intensified in the fourth quarter of 2017 and continued throughout 2018. Outflows were offset by new account and client acquisitions. In a competitive market, depositors have many choices as to where to place their deposit accounts. As the Bank continues to grow its core deposit base and seeks to reduce its exposure to high rate/high volatility accounts, it may continue to experience a net deposit outflow, which could negatively impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Other-than-temporary impairment charges in our investment securities portfolio could result in losses and adversely affect our continuing operations.
As of December 31, 2018, we had $1.99 billion of securities available-for-sale, as compared with $2.58 billion of securities available-for-sale as of December 31, 2017.
As of December 31, 2018, securities available-for-sale that were in an unrealized loss position had a total fair value of $1.84 billion with unrealized losses of $34.3 million. These unrealized losses primarily consisted of U.S. government agency and GSE residential mortgage-backed securities of $437.4 million with unrealized losses of $24.5 million, and collateralized loan obligations of $1.40 billion with unrealized losses of $9.8 million.
As of December 31, 2017, securities available-for-sale that were in an unrealized loss position had a fair value of $579.5 million and aggregate unrealized losses of $15.6 million.
The Company monitors to ensure it has adequate credit support and, as of December 31, 2018, except with respect to the CMBS portfolio (as noted below), the Company believed there was no other-than-temporary-impairment (OTTI) and did not have the intent to sell any of its securities in an unrealized loss position and it is likely that it will not be required to sell such securities before their anticipated recovery. The Company decided to sell its entire CMBS portfolio and, therefore, recorded OTTI loss of $3.3 million as of December 31, 2018. The portfolio was sold in January 2019.
The remaining portfolio is evaluated using either OTTI guidance provided by FASB Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) 320, Investments-Debt and Equity Securities, or ASC 325, Recognition of Interest Income and Impairment on Purchased Beneficial Interests and Beneficial Interests that Continue to be Held by a Transferor in Securitized Financial Assets. Investment securities classified as available-for-sale or held-to-maturity are generally evaluated for OTTI under ASC 320. However, certain purchased beneficial interests, including non-agency mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, and collateralized debt obligations, that had credit ratings at the time of purchase below AA are evaluated using the model outlined in ASC 325. The non-agency residential mortgage-backed securities, commercial mortgage-backed securities and collateralized loan obligations in the Company’s portfolio referenced above were rated AA or above at purchase and are not within the scope of ASC 325. For more information about ASC 320 and ASC 325, see Note 1 to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
We closely monitor our investment securities for changes in credit risk. The valuation of our investment securities also is influenced by external market and other factors, including implementation of SEC and FASB guidance on fair value accounting. Accordingly, if market conditions deteriorate further and we determine our holdings of other investment securities are OTTI, our future earnings, stockholders’ equity, regulatory capital and continuing operations could be materially adversely affected.

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More than 50 percent of our securities portfolio is invested in collateralized loan obligations.
As of December 31, 2018, based on fair value, $1.42 billion, or 71.3 percent of our securities portfolio, was invested in collateralized loan obligations (CLOs). By comparison, as of December 31, 2017, based on fair value, $1.70 billion, or 66.1 percent of our securities portfolio, was invested in CLOs.
As of December 31, 2018, based on amortized cost, $79.0 million of our CLO holdings were AAA rated and $1.35 billion were AA rated. As of December 31, 2018, there were no CLOs rated below AA and none of the CLOs were subject to ratings downgrade in 2018. All of our CLOs are floating rate, with rates set on a quarterly basis at three month LIBOR plus a spread.
As an investor in CLOs, we purchase specific tranches, or slices, of debt instruments that are secured by professionally managed portfolios of senior secured loans to corporations. CLOs are not secured by residential or commercial mortgages. CLO managers are typically large non-bank financial institutions or banks. CLOs are typically $300 million to $1 billion in size, contain 100 or more loans, and have five to six credit tranches ranging from AAA, AA, A, BBB, BB, B and equity tranche. Interest and principal are paid out to the AAA tranche first then move down the capital stack. Losses are borne by the equity tranche first then move up the capital stack. CLOs typically have subordination levels that range from approximately 33 percent to 39 percent for AAA, 20 percent to 28 percent for AA, 15 percent to 18 percent for A and 10 percent to 14 percent for BBB.
The CLOs we currently hold may, from time to time, not be actively traded, and under certain market conditions may be relatively illiquid investments, and volatility in the CLO trading market may cause the value of these investments to decline. The market value of CLOs may be affected by, among other things, perceived changes in the economy, performance by the manager and performance of the underlying loans.
Although we attempt to mitigate the credit and liquidity risks associated with CLOs by purchasing CLOs with credit ratings of AA or higher and by maintaining a pre-purchase due diligence and ongoing review process by a dedicated credit administration team, no assurance can be given that these risk mitigation efforts will be successful.
The Volcker Rule covered fund provisions could adversely affect us.
The so-called “Volcker Rule” provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act and its implementing regulations restrict our ability to sponsor or invest in “covered funds” (as defined in the implementing regulations). When the implementing regulations were adopted, banking entities such as us were required to conform our covered fund investments and activities by July 21, 2015. However, on December 18, 2014, the FRB extended the conformance period to July 21, 2016, for investments in, and relationships with, covered funds (including non-conforming CLOs) that were in place prior to December 31, 2013. The FRB later extended the conformance period until July 21, 2017. The Volcker Rule excludes from the definition of “covered fund” loan securitizations that meet specified investment criteria and do not invest in impermissible assets. Accordingly investments in CLOs that qualify for the loan securitization exclusion are not prohibited by the Volcker Rule. It is our practice to invest only in CLOs that meet the Volcker Rule’s definition of permissible loan securitizations and therefore are Volcker Rule compliant. However, the Volcker Rule and its implementing regulations are relatively new and untested, and it is possible that certain CLOs in which we have invested may be found subsequently to be covered funds. If so, we may be required to divest our interest in nonconforming CLOs, and we could incur losses on such divestitures.
Our business is subject to interest rate risk and variations in interest rates may hurt our profits.
To be profitable, we have to earn more money in interest that we receive on loans and investments than we pay to our depositors and lenders in interest. If interest rates rise, our net interest income and the value of our assets could be reduced if interest paid on interest-bearing liabilities, such as deposits and borrowings, increases more quickly than interest received on interest-earning assets, such as loans, other mortgage-related investments and investment securities. This is most likely to occur if short-term interest rates increase at a faster rate than long-term interest rates, which would cause our net interest income to go down. In addition, rising interest rates may hurt our income, because that may reduce the demand for loans and the value of our securities. In a rapidly changing interest rate environment, we may not be able to manage our interest rate risk effectively, which would adversely impact our financial condition and results of operations.
We face significant operational risks.
We operate many different financial service functions and rely on the ability of our employees, third party vendors and systems to process a significant number of transactions. Operational risk is the risk of loss from operations, including fraud by employees or outside persons, employees’ execution of incorrect or unauthorized transactions, data processing and technology errors or hacking and breaches of internal control systems.

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Our enterprise risk management framework may not be effective in mitigating risk and reducing the potential for losses.
Our enterprise risk management framework seeks to mitigate risk and loss to us. We have established comprehensive policies and procedures and an internal control framework designed to provide a sound operational environment for the types of risk to which we are subject, including credit risk, market risk (interest rate and price risks), liquidity risk, operational risk, compliance risk, strategic risk, and reputational risk. However, as with any risk management framework, there are inherent limitations to our current and future risk management strategies, including risks that we have not appropriately anticipated or identified. In certain instances, we rely on models to measure, monitor and predict risks. However, these models are inherently limited because they involve techniques, including the use of historical data in some circumstances, and judgments that cannot anticipate every economic and financial outcome in the markets in which we operate, nor can they anticipate the specifics and timing of such outcomes. There is no assurance that these models will appropriately capture all relevant risks or accurately predict future events or exposures. Accurate and timely enterprise-wide risk information is necessary to enhance management’s decision-making in times of crisis. If our enterprise risk management framework proves ineffective or if our enterprise-wide management information is incomplete or inaccurate, we could suffer unexpected losses, which could materially adversely affect our results of operations or financial condition. In addition, our businesses and the markets in which we operate are continuously evolving. We may fail to fully understand the implications of changes in our businesses or the financial markets or fail to adequately or timely enhance our enterprise risk framework to address those changes. If our enterprise risk framework is ineffective, either because it fails to keep pace with changes in the financial markets, regulatory requirements, our businesses, our counterparties, clients or service providers or for other reasons, we could incur losses, suffer reputational damage or find ourselves out of compliance with applicable regulatory or contractual mandates.
An important aspect of our enterprise risk management framework is creating a risk culture in which all employees fully understand that there is risk in every aspect of our business and the importance of managing risk as it relates to their job functions. We continue to enhance our enterprise risk management program to support our risk culture, ensuring that it is sustainable and appropriate to our role as a major financial institution. Nonetheless, if we fail to create the appropriate environment that sensitizes all of our employees to managing risk, our business could be adversely impacted. For more information on our risk management framework, see "Governance" under “Lending Activities” included in Item 1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Managing reputational risk is important to attracting and maintaining customers, investors and employees.
Threats to our reputation can come from many sources, including adverse sentiment about financial institutions generally, unethical practices, employee misconduct, failure to deliver minimum standards of service or quality, compliance deficiencies, regulatory investigations, marketplace rumors and questionable or fraudulent activities of our customers. We have policies and procedures in place to promote ethical conduct and protect our reputation. However, these policies and procedures may not be fully effective and cannot adequately protect against all threats to our reputation. Negative publicity regarding our business, employees, or customers, with or without merit, may result in the loss of customers, investors and employees, costly litigation, a decline in revenues and increased governmental oversight.
Liquidity risk could impair our ability to fund operations and jeopardize our financial condition.
Liquidity is essential to our business. An inability to raise funds through deposits, borrowings, the sale of loans and other sources could have a substantial negative effect on our liquidity. Our access to funding sources in amounts adequate to finance our activities or on terms that are acceptable to us could be impaired by factors that affect us specifically or the financial services industry or economy in general.
Factors that could detrimentally impact our access to liquidity sources include a decrease in the level of our business activity as a result of a downturn in the markets in which our loans are concentrated or adverse regulatory action against us. Our ability to borrow could also be impaired by factors that are not specific to us, such as a disruption in the financial markets or negative views and expectations about the prospects for the financial services industry.


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We depend on our directors and key management personnel.
Our success will, to a large extent, depend on the continued service of our directors and continued employment of our key management personnel. The unexpected loss of the services of any of these individuals could have a detrimental effect on our business. Although we have entered into employment agreements with our Chief Executive Officer and our Chief Financial Officer, no assurance can be given that these individuals, or any of our key management personnel, will continue to be employed by us. The loss of any of these individuals could negatively affect our ability to achieve our business plan and could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.
We currently hold a significant amount of bank owned life insurance.
At December 31, 2018, we held $107.0 million of bank owned life insurance (BOLI) on certain key and former employees and executives, with a cash surrender value of $107.0 million, as compared with $104.9 million of BOLI, with a cash surrender value of $104.9 million, at December 31, 2017. The eventual repayment of the cash surrender value is subject to the ability of the various insurance companies to pay death benefits or to return the cash surrender value to us if needed for liquidity purposes. We continually monitor the financial strength of the various companies with whom we carry these policies. Any one of these companies could experience a decline in financial strength, which could impair its ability to pay benefits or return our cash surrender value. If we need to liquidate these policies for liquidity purposes, we would be subject to taxation on the cumulative increase in cash surrender value and penalties for early termination, both of which would adversely impact our earnings.
If our investment in the Federal Home Loan Bank of San Francisco becomes impaired, our earnings and stockholders’ equity could decrease.
At December 31, 2018, we owned $41.0 million in FHLB stock. We are required to own this stock to be a member of and to obtain advances from our FHLB. This stock is not marketable and can only be redeemed by our FHLB. Our FHLB’s financial condition is linked, in part, to the eleven other members of the FHLB System and to accounting rules and asset quality risks that could materially lower their capital, which would cause our FHLB stock to be deemed impaired, resulting in a decrease in our earnings and assets.
We rely on numerous external vendors.
We rely on numerous external vendors to provide us with products and services necessary to maintain our day-to-day operations. Accordingly, our operations are exposed to risk that these vendors will not perform in accordance with the contracted arrangements under service level agreements. The failure of an external vendor to perform in accordance with the contracted arrangements under service level agreements because of changes in the vendor's organizational structure, financial condition, support for existing products and services or strategic focus or for any other reason, could be disruptive to our operations, which in turn could have a material negative impact on our financial condition and results of operations. We also could be adversely affected to the extent such an agreement is not renewed by the third party vendor or is renewed on terms less favorable to us.

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We are subject to certain risks in connection with our use of technology.
Our cyber-security measures may not be sufficient to mitigate the risk of a cyber attack or cyber theft.
Communications and information systems are essential to the conduct of our business, as we use such systems to manage our customer relationships, our general ledger and virtually all other aspects of our business. Our operations rely on the secure processing, storage, and transmission of confidential and other information in our computer systems and networks. Although we take protective measures and endeavor to modify them as circumstances warrant, the security of our computer systems, software, and networks may be vulnerable to breaches, unauthorized access, misuse, computer viruses, or other malicious code and other types of cyber attacks. If one or more of these events occur, this could jeopardize our customers' confidential and other information that we process and store, or otherwise cause interruptions in our operations or the operations of our customers or counterparties. If a cyber attack occurs, we may be required to expend significant additional resources to modify our protective measures or to investigate and remediate vulnerabilities or other exposures, and we may be subject to litigation and financial losses that are either not insured against or not fully covered through our current insurance policies. If a cyber attack succeeds in disrupting our operations or disclosing confidential data, we could also suffer significant reputational damage in addition to possible regulatory fines or customer lawsuits.
We provide internet banking services to our customers which have additional cyber risks related to our customer’s mobile devices. Any compromise of mobile device security could expose our customers to account take-overs (ATO) and the possibility for financial crimes such as fraud or identity theft and deter customers from using our internet banking services. We rely on industry-standard internet security systems to provide the security and authentication necessary to effect secure transmission of data. These precautions may not protect our systems from future compromises or data breaches.
Our security measures may not protect us from systems failures or interruptions.
While we have established policies and technical controls to prevent or limit the impact of systems failures and interruptions, there are no absolute assurances that such events will not occur or that the resulting damages will be adequately mitigated.
We rely on communications, information, operating and financial control systems technology from third party service providers, and we may suffer an interruption in those systems.
We outsource certain aspects of our data processing and operational functions to third party providers. If our third party providers encounter difficulties, or if we have difficulty in communicating with them, our ability to adequately process and account for transactions could be affected, and our business operations could be adversely impacted.
The occurrence of any systems failure or interruption could damage our reputation and result in a loss of customers and business, could subject us to additional regulatory scrutiny, or could expose us to legal liability. Any of these occurrences could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.
We rely heavily on third party service providers for much of our communications, information, operating and financial control systems technology, including our online banking services and data processing systems.
We rely on our third party providers to help ensure the confidentiality of our customer information and acknowledge the additional risks these third parties expose us to. Third party providers may experience unauthorized access to and disclosure of our consumer or customer information or result in the destruction or corruption of company information. Any failure or interruption, or breaches in security, of these systems could result in failures or interruptions in our customer relationship management, general ledger, deposit, loan origination and servicing systems, thereby harming our business reputation, operating results and financial condition. Additionally, interruptions in service and security breaches could lead existing customers to terminate their banking relationships with us and could make it more difficult for us to attract new banking customers in the future.

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We operate in a highly regulated environment and our operations and income may be affected adversely by changes in laws, rules and regulations governing our operations.
We are subject to extensive regulation and supervision by the FRB, the OCC and the CFPB. The FRB regulates the supply of money and credit in the United States. Its fiscal and monetary policies determine in a large part our cost of funds for lending and investing and the return that can be earned on those loans and investments, both of which affect our net interest margin. FRB policies can also materially affect the value of financial instruments that we hold, such as debt securities, certain mortgage loans held-for-sale and MSRs. Its policies also can affect our borrowers, potentially increasing the risk that they may fail to repay their loans or satisfy their obligations to us. Changes in policies of the FRB are beyond our control and the impact of changes in those policies on our activities and results of operations can be difficult to predict.
The Company and the Bank are heavily regulated. This oversight is to protect depositors, the federal deposit insurance fund (DIF) and the banking system as a whole, and not stockholders. These regulatory authorities have extensive discretion in connection with their supervisory and enforcement activities, including the ability to impose increased capital requirements and restrictions on a bank’s operations, to reclassify assets, to determine the adequacy of a bank’s allowance for loan and lease losses and to set the level of deposit insurance premiums assessed.
Congress, state legislatures and federal and state agencies continually review banking, lending and other laws, regulations and policies for possible changes. Any change in such regulation and oversight, whether in the form of regulatory policy, new regulations or legislation, that applies to us or additional deposit insurance premiums could have a material adverse impact on our operations. Because our business is highly regulated, the laws and applicable regulations are subject to frequent change. Any new laws, rules and regulations including the recently enacted California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) could make compliance more difficult, expensive, costly to implement or may otherwise adversely affect our business, financial condition or growth prospects. Such changes could subject us to additional costs, limit the types of financial services and products we may offer and/or increase the ability of non-banks to offer competing financial services and products, among other things.
The Dodd-Frank Act and supporting regulations could have a material adverse effect on us.
The Dodd-Frank Act provides for various capital requirements and new restrictions on financial institutions and their holding companies. These changes may result in additional restrictions on investments and other activities. Regulations under the Dodd-Frank Act significantly impact our operations, and we expect to continue to face increased regulation. These regulations may affect the manner in which we do business and the products and services that we provide, affect or restrict our ability to compete in our current businesses or our ability to enter into or acquire new businesses, reduce or limit our revenue or impose additional fees or assessments on us, intensify the regulatory supervision of us and the financial services industry, and adversely affect our business operations.
The Dodd-Frank Act, among other things, established the CFPB with broad authority to administer and enforce a new federal regulatory framework of consumer financial regulation. Many of the provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act have extended implementation periods and require extensive rulemaking, guidance and interpretation by various regulatory agencies. While some rules have been finalized or issued in proposed form, some have yet to be proposed. It is impossible to predict when all such additional rules will be issued or finalized, and what the content of such rules will be.
We must apply resources to ensure that we are in compliance with all applicable provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act and any implementing rules, which may increase our costs of operations and adversely impact our earnings. We expect that the Dodd-Frank Act, including current and future rules implementing its provisions and the interpretations of those rules, will reduce our revenues, increase our expenses, require us to change certain of our business practices, increase the regulatory supervision of us, increase our capital requirements and impose additional assessments and costs on us, and otherwise adversely affect our business.

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As of March 31, 2017, the Company’s consolidated total assets and the Bank’s total assets, exceeded $10 billion for four consecutive quarters (the $10 billion threshold). As a result, we have become subject to additional regulatory scrutiny and a number of additional requirements that impose additional compliance costs on our business and higher expectations from regulators regarding risk management, strategic planning, governance and other aspects of our operations.
Pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act and regulations adopted by the federal banking regulators, bank holding companies and banks with average total consolidated assets greater than $10 billion were required to conduct an annual “stress test” of capital and consolidated earnings and losses under the baseline, adverse and severely adverse scenarios provided by the federal banking regulators.  On May 24, 2018, the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief and Consumer Protection Act (the “Economic Growth Act”) was signed into law, which amended portions of the Dodd-Frank Act and immediately raised the asset threshold for company-run stress testing from $10 billion to $100 billion for bank holding companies.  As a result, the Company is no longer subject to the Dodd-Frank Act company-run stress testing requirements.  On July 6, 2018, the federal banking regulators issued an interagency statement that banks with less than $100 billion in total consolidated assets, including the Bank, would not be required to comply with company-run stress testing requirements until November 25, 2019, at which time such banks will become exempt from company-run stress testing requirements under the Economic Growth Act.  In addition, the federal banking regulators have each proposed to amend their stress testing regulations consistent with the Economic Growth Act.
Despite the improvements for financial institutions that has resulted from Economic Growth Act, many  provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act and its implementing regulations remain in place and will continue to result in additional operating and compliance costs that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operation. In addition, the Economic Growth Act requires the enactment of a number of implementing regulations, the details of which may have a material effect on the ultimate impact of the law.


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Rulemaking changes implemented by the CFPB in particular have resulted in higher regulatory and compliance costs that adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.
As indicated above, the Dodd-Frank Act created the CFPB, an independent federal agency with broad rulemaking, supervisory and enforcement powers under various federal consumer financial protection laws, including the laws referenced above, fair lending laws and certain other statutes. The CFPB has examination and primary enforcement authority with respect to depository institutions, their affiliates, their service providers and certain non-depository entities such as debt collectors and consumer reporting agencies if the assets of the institution exceed the $10 billion threshold.
The CFPB has authority to prevent unfair, deceptive or abusive practices in connection with the offering of consumer financial products. The Dodd-Frank Act authorizes the CFPB to establish certain minimum standards for the origination of residential mortgages including a determination of the borrower’s ability to repay. In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act allows borrowers to raise certain defenses to foreclosure if they receive any loan other than a “qualified mortgage” as defined by the CFPB. The Dodd-Frank Act permits states to adopt consumer protection laws and standards that are more stringent than those adopted at the federal level and, in certain circumstances, permits state attorneys general to enforce compliance with both the state and federal laws and regulations.
The CFPB has finalized a number of significant rules which impact nearly every aspect of the lifecycle of a residential mortgage loan. Among other things, the rules adopted by the CFPB require banks to: (i) develop and implement procedures to ensure compliance with an “ability to repay” test and identify whether a loan meets a new definition for a “qualified mortgage,” in which case a rebuttable presumption exists that the creditor extending the loan has satisfied the ability to repay test; (ii) implement new or revised disclosures, policies and procedures for originating and servicing mortgages including, but not limited to, pre-loan counseling, early intervention with delinquent borrowers and specific loss mitigation procedures for loans secured by a borrower's principal residence; (iii) comply with additional restrictions on mortgage loan originator hiring and compensation; (iv) comply with new disclosure requirements and standards for appraisals and certain financial products; and (v) maintain escrow accounts for higher-priced mortgage loans for a longer period of time. The new rules include the TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosure (TRID) rules. The TRID rules contain new requirements and new disclosure forms that are required to be provided to borrowers.
In order to comply with the CFPB rules, we have made significant changes to our residential mortgage business, including investments in technology, training of our personnel, changes in the loan products we offer, changes in compensation of our loan originators and mortgage brokers that do business with us, and a reduction in fees that we charge, We are continuing to analyze the impact that such rules may have on our business. In addition to the exercise of its rulemaking authority, the CFPB’s supervisory powers of the CFPB and the primary federal banking regulators entitle them to examine institutions for violations of consumer lending laws even in the absence of consumer complaints or damages. Compliance with the rules and policies adopted by the CFPB has limited the products we may permissibly offer to some or all of our customers, or limited the terms on which those products may be issued, or may adversely affect our ability to conduct our business as previously conducted. We may also be required to add compliance personnel or incur other significant compliance-related expenses. Our business, financial condition, results of operations and/or competitive position may be adversely affected as a result.
The short-term and long-term impact of the changing regulatory capital requirements and new capital rules is uncertain.
In July 2013, the FRB and the other federal bank regulatory agencies issued a final rule to revise their risk-based and leverage capital requirements and their method for calculating risk-weighted assets to make them consistent with Basel III and certain provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act. The final rule applies to all banking organizations. Among other things, the rule establishes a common equity Tier 1 minimum capital requirement of 4.5 percent of risk-weighted assets and a minimum Tier 1 risk-based capital requirement of 6.0 percent of risk-weighted assets and assigns higher risk-weightings than in the past (150 percent) to exposures that are more than 90 days past due or are on non-accrual status and certain commercial facilities that finance the acquisition, development or construction of real property. The final rule also limits a banking organization’s capital distributions and certain discretionary bonus payments if the banking organization does not hold a “capital conservation buffer” in excess of 2.5 percent of common equity tier 1 capital in addition to the minimum risk-based capital ratios. The final rule became effective for the Company and the Bank on January 1, 2015. The capital conservation buffer requirement was phased in over a three-year period that began on January 1, 2016 and ended on January 1, 2019, when the full capital conservation buffer requirement became effective. An institution is subject to limitations on paying dividends, engaging in share repurchases, and paying discretionary bonuses if its capital level falls below the buffer amount.
While our current capital levels exceed the capital requirements, our capital levels could decrease in the future as a result of factors such as acquisitions, faster than anticipated growth, reduced earnings levels, operating losses and other factors. The application of more stringent capital requirements for us could, among other things, result in lower returns on equity, require the raising of additional capital, and result in our inability to pay dividends or repurchase shares if we were to be unable to comply with such requirements.

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We are subject to federal and state fair lending laws, and failure to comply with these laws could lead to material penalties.
Federal and state fair lending laws and regulations, such as the Equal Credit Opportunity Act and the Fair Housing Act, impose nondiscriminatory lending requirements on financial institutions. The Department of Justice, CFPB and other federal and state agencies are responsible for enforcing these laws and regulations. Private parties may also have the ability to challenge an institution’s performance under fair lending laws in private class action litigation. A successful challenge to our performance under the fair lending laws and regulations could adversely impact our rating under the CRA and result in a wide variety of sanctions, including the required payment of damages and civil money penalties, injunctive relief, imposition of restrictions on merger and acquisition activity and restrictions on expansion activity, which could negatively impact our reputation, business, financial condition and results of operations.
Non-compliance with the Patriot Act, Bank Secrecy Act, or other laws and regulations could result in fines or sanctions or operating restrictions.
We are subject to government legislation and regulation, including but not limited to the USA PATRIOT and Bank Secrecy Acts, which require financial institutions to develop programs to detect money laundering, terrorist financing, and other financial crimes. If detected, financial institutions are obligated to report such activity to the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, a bureau of the United States Department of the Treasury. These regulations require financial institutions to establish procedures for identifying and verifying the identity of customers seeking to establish and maintain a relationship with a financial institution. Failure to comply with these regulations could result in fines, sanctions or restrictions that could have a material adverse effect on our strategic initiatives and operating results, and could require us to make changes to our operations and the customers that we serve. Several banking institutions have received large fines, or suffered limitations on their operations, for non-compliance with these laws and regulations. Although we have developed policies and procedures designed to assist in compliance with these laws and regulations, no assurance can be given that these policies and procedures will be effective in detecting violations of these laws and regulations.
Our federal regulators have extensive discretion in connection with their supervisory and enforcement activities over our operations and compliance with the USA PATRIOT and Bank Secrecy Acts. Current laws and applicable regulations are subject to frequent change. Any new laws and regulations could make compliance more difficult or expensive or otherwise adversely affect our business. One aspect of our business that we believe presents risks in this particular area is the conflict between federal and state law, including but not limited to cannabis and cannabis related businesses, which are legal in the State of California and prohibited by federal law. If our risk management and compliance programs prove to be ineffective, incomplete or inaccurate, we could suffer unexpected losses, which could materially adversely affect our results of operations or financial condition. As part of our federal regulators' enforcement authority, significant civil or criminal monetary penalties, consent orders, or other regulatory actions can be assessed against the Bank. Such actions could require us to make changes to our operations, including the customers that we serve, and may have an adverse impact on our operating results.
Increases in deposit insurance premiums and special FDIC assessments would negatively impact our earnings.
We may pay higher FDIC premiums in the future. The Dodd-Frank Act increased the minimum FDIC deposit insurance reserve ratio from 1.15 percent to 1.35 percent. The FDIC has adopted a plan under which it will meet this ratio by the statutory deadline of December 31, 2020.
The Dodd-Frank Act requires the FDIC to offset the effect of the increase in the minimum reserve ratio on institutions with assets less than $10 billion. To implement the offset requirement, the FDIC has imposed a temporary surcharge on institutions with assets greater than $10 billion, which was discontinued for assessment periods commencing after September 30, 2018. In addition to the minimum reserve ratio, the FDIC must set a designated reserve ratio. The FDIC has set a designated reserve ratio of 2.0, which exceeds the minimum reserve ratio.
Our holding company relies on dividends from the Bank for substantially all of its income and the net proceeds of capital raising transactions are currently the primary source of funds for cash dividends to our preferred and common stockholders.
Our primary source of revenue at the holding company level is dividends from the Bank and we also have previously relied on the net proceeds of capital raising transactions as the primary source of funds for cash dividends to our preferred and common stockholders. To the extent we are limited in our ability to raise capital in the future, our ability to pay cash dividends to our stockholders could likewise be limited, especially if we are unable to increase the amount of dividends the Bank pays to us. The OCC regulates and, in some cases, must approve the amounts the Bank pays as dividends to us. The Bank’s ability to pay dividends can be restricted or eliminated if the Bank does not meet the capital conservation buffer requirement or for other supervisory reasons. If the Bank is unable to pay dividends to us, then we may not be able to service our debt, including our senior notes, pay our other obligations or pay cash dividends on our preferred and common stock. Our inability to service our debt, pay our other obligations or pay dividends to our stockholders could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition and the value of your investment in our securities.

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We may elect or be compelled to seek additional capital in the future, but that capital may not be available when it is needed or on acceptable terms.
We are required by federal regulatory authorities to maintain adequate levels of capital to support our operations. At some point, we may need to raise additional capital to support continued growth.
Our ability to raise additional capital, if needed, will depend on conditions in the capital markets, economic conditions, our financial performance and a number of other factors, many of which are outside our control. Accordingly, we cannot assure you of our ability to raise additional capital if needed or on terms acceptable to us. If we cannot raise additional capital when needed, our ability to further expand our operations could be materially impaired and our financial condition and liquidity could be materially and adversely affected.
The Company has a deferred tax asset that may or may not be fully realized.
The Company has a deferred tax asset (DTA) and cannot assure that it will be fully realized. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are the expected future tax amounts for the temporary differences between the carrying amounts and the tax basis of assets and liabilities computed using enacted tax rates. If we determine that we will not achieve sufficient future taxable income to realize our net deferred tax asset, we are required under generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) to establish a full or partial valuation allowance. If we determine that a valuation allowance is necessary, we are required to incur a charge to operations. We regularly assess available positive and negative evidence to determine whether it is more likely than not that our net deferred tax asset will be realized. Realization of a deferred tax asset requires us to apply significant judgment and is inherently speculative because it requires estimates that cannot be made with certainty. At December 31, 2018, the Company had a net DTA of $49.4 million. For additional information, see Note 13 to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
We may experience future goodwill impairment.
If our estimates of the fair value of our reporting units change as a result of changes in our business or other factors, we may determine that a goodwill impairment charge is necessary. Estimates of fair value are based on a complex model using, among other things, estimated cash flows and industry pricing multiples. The Company tests its goodwill for impairment annually as of August 31 (the Measurement Date). At each Measurement Date, the Company, in accordance with ASC 350-20-35-3, evaluates, based on the weight of evidence, the significance of all qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of each of the reporting units is less than its carrying amount.
The assessment of qualitative factors at the most recent Measurement Date (August 31, 2018) indicated that it was not more likely than not that impairment existed; as a result, no further testing was performed. At December 31, 2018, the Company had goodwill of $37.1 million. For additional information, see Note 9 to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. No assurance can be given that the Company will not record an impairment loss on goodwill in the future and any such impairment loss could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.
Changes in accounting standards may affect our performance.
Our accounting policies and methods are fundamental to how we record and report our financial condition and results of operations. From time to time there are changes in the financial accounting and reporting standards and interpretations that govern the preparation of our financial statements. These changes can be difficult to predict and can materially impact how we report and record our financial condition and results of operations. In some cases, we could be required to apply a new or revised standard retroactively, resulting in a retrospective adjustment to prior financial statements.
New lines of business, new products and services, or strategic project initiatives may subject us to additional risks.
From time to time, we may seek to implement new lines of business or offer new products and services within existing lines of business. There are substantial risks and uncertainties associated with these efforts, particularly in instances where the markets are not fully developed. In developing and marketing new lines of business and/or new products and services, we may invest significant time and resources. Initial timetables for the introduction and development of new lines of business and/or new products or services may not be achieved, and price and profitability targets may not prove feasible, which could in turn have a material negative effect on our operating results. New lines of business and/or new products or services also could subject us to additional regulatory requirements, increased scrutiny by our regulators and other legal risks.
Additionally from time to time we undertake strategic project initiatives. Significant effort and resources are necessary to manage and oversee the successful completion of these initiatives. These initiatives often place significant demands on a limited number of employees with subject matter expertise and management and may involve significant costs to implement as well as increase operational risk as employees learn to process transactions under new systems. The failure to properly execute on these strategic initiatives could adversely impact our business and results of operations.

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Strong competition within our market areas may limit our growth and profitability.
Competition in the banking and financial services industry is intense. In our market areas, we compete with commercial banks, savings institutions, mortgage brokerage firms, credit unions, finance companies, mutual funds, insurance companies, and brokerage and investment banking firms operating locally and elsewhere. Many of these competitors have substantially greater name recognition, resources and lending limits than we do and may offer certain services or prices for services that we do not or cannot provide. Our profitability depends upon our continued ability to successfully compete in our markets.
In addition, our future success will depend, in part, upon our ability to address the needs of our clients by using technology to provide products and services that will satisfy client demands for convenience, as well as to create additional efficiencies in our operations. Many of our competitors have substantially greater resources to invest in technological improvements. We may not be able to effectively implement new technology-driven products and services or be successful in marketing these products and services to our clients.
Our business could be negatively affected as a result of actions by activist stockholders.
Campaigns by stockholders to effect changes at publicly traded companies are sometimes led by investors seeking to increase stockholder value through various corporate actions. Certain activist stockholders have contacted us and made various proposals regarding changes in our corporate governance and the composition of our board of directors. We believe we have had a constructive dialogue with such stockholders. We have added to our board of directors members affiliated with two of our major stockholders, PL Capital Advisors LLC (PL Capital) and Patriot Financial Partners.
However, in the future we may have disagreements with activist stockholders which could prove disruptive to our operations. Activist stockholders could seek to elect their own candidates to our board of directors or could take other actions intended to challenge our business strategy and corporate governance. Responding to actions by activist stockholders may adversely affect our profitability or business prospects, by diverting the attention of management and our employees from executing our strategic plan. Any perceived uncertainties as to our future direction or strategy arising from activist stockholder initiatives could also cause increased reputational, operational, financial, regulatory and other risks, harm our ability to raise new capital, or adversely affect the market price or increase the volatility of our securities.
Short sellers of our stock may be manipulative and may drive down the market price of our common stock.
Short selling is the practice of selling securities that the seller does not own but rather has borrowed or intends to borrow from a third party with the intention of buying identical securities at a later date to return to the lender. A short seller hopes to profit from a decline in the value of the securities between the sale of the borrowed securities and the purchase of the replacement shares. Some short sellers may seek to drive down the price of shares they have sold short by disseminating negative reports about the issuers of such shares.
Beginning on October 18, 2016, the Company became aware of certain allegations posted anonymously in various financial blog posts. The authors of the blog posts have typically disclosed that they hold a short position in the Company’s stock. Following the posting of the first blog on October 18, 2016, the market price of our common stock initially dropped significantly. While the price of our common stock subsequently increased, additional postings and other negative publicity initiated by the author of the blog and others have led to intense public scrutiny and may cause further volatility in our stock price and a decline in the value of a stockholder’s investment in the Company.
When the market price of a company's stock drops significantly, as ours did initially following the posting of the first blog, it is not unusual for stockholder lawsuits to be filed or threatened against the company and its board of directors and for a company to suffer reputational damage. Multiple lawsuits were in fact threatened against the Company shortly following the posting of the first blog, and as discussed under Item 3 of this report, the first of several putative class lawsuits against the Company was filed on January 23, 2017. These lawsuits, and any other lawsuits, have caused us to incur substantial costs and diverted the time and attention of our board and management, and may continue to do so in the future. In addition, reputational damage to the Company may affect our ability to attract and retain deposits and may cause our deposit costs to increase, which could adversely affect our liquidity and earnings. Reputational damage may also affect our ability to attract and retain loan customers and maintain and develop other business relationships, which could likewise adversely affect our earnings. Continued negative reports issued by short sellers could also negatively impact our ability to attract and retain employees.

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New accounting standards may result in a significant change to our recognition of credit losses and may materially impact our results of operations and financial condition.
In June 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued new authoritative accounting guidance under ASC Topic 326 “Financial Instruments - Credit Losses” amending the incurred loss impairment methodology in current accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) with a methodology that reflects lifetime expected credit losses (“CECL”) and requires consideration of a broader range of reasonable and supportable information for credit loss estimates, which goes into effect for us on January 1, 2020. CECL is generally thought to result in the earlier recognition of credit losses in financial statements.  Under the incurred loss model, we recognize losses when they have been incurred. CECL represents a departure from the incurred loss model.
CECL requires loans held for investment and held-to-maturity securities to be presented at the net amount expected to be collected (net of the allowance for credit losses). CECL also requires credit losses relating to available-for-sale debt securities to be recorded through an allowance for credit losses. In addition, the measurement of expected credit losses will take place at the time the financial asset is first added to the balance sheet (with periodic updates thereafter) and will be based on relevant information about past events, including historical experience, current conditions, and reasonable and supportable forecasts that affect the collectability of the reported amount.
The CECL model will materially impact how we determine our allowance for loan and lease losses and may require us to significantly increase our allowance for loan and lease losses. Furthermore, we may experience more fluctuations in our allowance for loan and lease losses, which may be significant. If we were required to materially increase our allowance for loan and lease losses, it may negatively impact our financial condition and results of operations. We are currently evaluating the new guidance and expect it to have an impact on our statements of operations and financial condition, the significance of which is not yet known. We expect the CECL model will require us to recognize a one-time cumulative adjustment to our allowance for loan and lease losses on January 1, 2020 in order to fully transition from the incurred loss model to the CECL model, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. The FRB, the OCC and the FDIC have adopted a rule that gives a banking organization the option to phase in over a three-year period the day-one adverse effects of CECL on its regulatory capital.
Uncertainty relating to the LIBOR calculation process and potential phasing out of LIBOR may adversely affect us.
On July 27, 2017, the Chief Executive of the United Kingdom Financial Conduct Authority, which regulates LIBOR, announced that it intends to stop persuading or compelling banks to submit rates for the calibration of LIBOR to the administrator of LIBOR after 2021. The announcement indicates that the continuation of LIBOR on the current basis cannot and will not be guaranteed after 2021. It is impossible to predict whether and to what extent banks will continue to provide LIBOR submissions to the administrator of LIBOR or whether any additional reforms to LIBOR may be enacted in the United Kingdom or elsewhere. At this time, no consensus exists as to what rate or rates may become acceptable alternatives to LIBOR and it is impossible to predict the effect of any such alternatives on the value of LIBOR-based securities and variable rate loans, debentures, or other securities or financial arrangements, given LIBOR's role in determining market interest rates globally. Uncertainty as to the nature of alternative reference rates and as to potential changes or other reforms to LIBOR may adversely affect LIBOR rates and the value of LIBOR-based loans and securities in our portfolio and may impact the availability and cost of hedging instruments and borrowings. If LIBOR rates are no longer available, and we are required to implement substitute indices for the calculation of interest rates under our loan agreements with our borrowers, we may incur significant expenses in effecting the transition, and may be subject to disputes or litigation with customers over the appropriateness or comparability to LIBOR of the substitute indices, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
None.
Item 2. Properties
As of December 31, 2018, the Company conducts its operations from its main and executive offices at 3 MacArthur Place, Santa Ana, California and 32 branch offices in Los Angeles, Orange, San Diego, Santa Barbara counties in California. For additional information, see Note 6 to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

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Item 3. Legal Proceedings
From time to time we are involved as plaintiff or defendant in various legal actions arising in the normal course of business.
On January 23, 2017, the first of three putative class action lawsuits, Garcia v. Banc of California, et al., Case No. 8:17-cv- 00118, was filed against Banc of California, James J. McKinney, Ronald J. Nicolas, Jr., and Steven A. Sugarman in the United States District Court for the Central District of California. Thereafter, two related putative class action lawsuits were filed in the United States District Court for the Central District of California: (1) Malak v. Banc of California, et al., Case No. 8:17-cv-00138 (January 26, 2017), asserting claims against Banc of California, James J. McKinney, and Steven A. Sugarman, and (2) Cardona v. Banc of California, et al., Case No. 2:17-cv-00621 (January 26, 2017), asserting claims against Banc of California, James J. McKinney, Ronald J. Nicolas, Jr., and Steven A. Sugarman. Those actions were consolidated, a lead plaintiff was appointed, and the lead plaintiff filed a Consolidated Amended Complaint against Banc of California, Steve A. Sugarman and James J. McKinney on May 31, 2017 alleging that the defendants violated sections 10(b) and 20(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
In general, the Consolidated Amended Complaint alleges that the purported concealment of the defendants’ alleged relationship with Jason Galanis caused various statements made by the defendants to be false and misleading. The defendants moved to dismiss the Consolidated Amended Complaint. The plaintiff thereafter dismissed Mr. McKinney, leaving the Company and Mr. Sugarman as the remaining defendants. On September 18, 2017, the district court granted in part and denied in part the defendants’ motions to dismiss. Specifically, the court denied the defendants’ motions as to the Company’s April 15, 2016 Proxy Statement which listed Mr. Sugarman’s positions with COR Securities Holdings Inc., COR Clearing LLC, and COR Capital LLC while omitting their alleged connections with Jason Galanis. The lawsuits purport to be brought on behalf of stockholders who purchased stock in the Company between August 15, 2016 through January 20, 2017. The Court granted class certification on May 31, 2018. The lawsuits seek an award of unspecified compensatory and punitive damages, an award of reasonable costs and expenses, including attorneys’ fees, and other further relief as the Court may deem just and proper. Trial is currently set for October 21, 2019. The Company believes that the consolidated action is without merit and intends to vigorously contest it.
On August 15, 2017, COR Securities Holdings, Inc., and COR Clearing LLC filed an action in the United States District Court for the Central District of California, captioned COR Securities Holdings, Inc., et al. v. Banc of California, N.A., et al., Case No. 8:17-cv-01403 DOC JCGx), against the Bank and Hugh F. Boyle, the Company’s and the Bank’s Chief Risk Officer. The lawsuit asserts claims under various state and federal statutes related to computer fraud and abuse, as well as a claim of common law fraud. The plaintiffs allege that the Bank inappropriately gained access to their confidential and privileged documents on a cloud storage site. On October 2, 2017, the defendants filed a motion to dismiss. The Defendants also answered and asserted counterclaims. On February 2, 2018, the court granted in part and denied in part the motion to dismiss. Trial is set for June 2019. The Bank believes that the action is without merit and intends to vigorously contest it.
On August 11, 2017, Carlos P. Salas, the Bank’s former Chief of Staff, filed an action in the Los Angeles Superior Court, captioned Carlos P. Salas v. Banc of California, Inc., et al., Case No. BC672208, against the Company and the Bank asserting claims for breach of contract, breach of the covenant of good faith and fair dealing, breach of an implied in fact contract, promissory estoppel, promissory fraud, declaratory relief, fraud/intentional misrepresentation, unfair business practices, wrongful termination, violation of the right to privacy and violation of California’s Investigative Consumer Reporting Agencies Act. In general, Mr. Salas alleges that he was constructively terminated as a Bank employee and suffered damages in excess of $4 million. He seeks both compensatory and punitive damages. On September 18, 2017, the Company and the Bank filed a motion to compel arbitration, as required by Mr. Salas’ written agreement with the Bank, On January 17, 2018, the court granted the motion to compel arbitration and stayed the court action. On February 19, 2019, the parties reached a settlement in principle through mediation. The settlement will not have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or liquidity.
On December 7, 2017, Heather Endresen filed an action in the Los Angeles Superior Court, captioned Heather Endresen v. Banc of California, Inc.; Banc of California, N.A., Case No. BC685641. Endresen’s complaint purports to state claims for retaliation, wrongful termination, breach of contract, breach of the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, and various statutory claims. Endresen dismissed the action without prejudice. On May 23, 2018, Endresen filed an action in the United States District Court for the Central District of California, captioned Heather Endresen v. Banc of California, Inc. and Banc of California, N.A., Case No. 8:18-cv-00899, asserting the claims she had made in the state court action and adding a claim for violation of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. The complaint does not specify any amount of alleged damages. On September 20, 2018, the court granted Banc of California, Inc. and Banc of California, N.A’s motion to compel arbitration and stayed the litigation on the Sarbanes-Oxley Act claim pending arbitration. On December 4, 2018, Endresen filed her demand for arbitration. On December 18, 2018, Banc of California, Inc. and Banc of California, N.A. filed their answer to the demand and denied all claims. The arbitration has been scheduled for February 18-26, 2020. The Company believes that the claims are without merit and intends to vigorously contest them.


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Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Not applicable

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PART II
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
The Company’s voting common stock (symbol BANC) has been listed on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) since May 29, 2014 and prior to that date was listed on the NASDAQ Global Market. The Company’s Class B non-voting common stock is not listed or traded on any national securities exchange or automated quotation system, and there currently is no established trading market for such stock. The approximate number of holders of record of the Company’s voting common stock as of December 31, 2018 was 1,386. Certain shares are held in “nominee” or “street” name and accordingly, the number of beneficial owners of such shares is not known or included in the foregoing number. There were three holders of record of the Company’s Class B non-voting common stock as of December 31, 2018. At December 31, 2018 there were 51,755,398 shares and 50,172,018 shares of voting common stock issued and outstanding, respectively, and 477,321 shares of Class B non-voting common stock issued and outstanding. The following table presents quarterly market price information for the Company’s voting common stock and quarterly per share cash dividend information for the Company's voting common stock and Class B non-voting common stock for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017. The per share cash dividends paid to holders of the Company's voting common stock and Class B non-voting common stock are identical.
 
Market Price Range
 
 
 
High
 
Low
 
Dividends
Quarter ended December 31, 2018
$
18.76

 
$
12.45

 
$
0.13

Quarter ended September 30, 2018
$
20.25

 
$
18.70

 
$
0.13

Quarter ended June 30, 2018
$
20.30

 
$
18.15

 
$
0.13

Quarter ended March 31, 2018
$
21.70

 
$
18.70

 
$
0.13

Total
 
 
 
 
$
0.52

 
 
Quarter ended December 31, 2017
$
23.05

 
$
19.65

 
$
0.13

Quarter ended September 30, 2017
$
22.10

 
$
17.15

 
$
0.13

Quarter ended June 30, 2017
$
22.60

 
$
19.90

 
$
0.13

Quarter ended March 31, 2017
$
20.95

 
$
14.65

 
$
0.13

Total
 
 
 
 
$
0.52

Dividend Policy
The timing and amount of cash dividends paid to the Company’s preferred and common stockholders depends on the Company’s earnings, capital requirements, financial condition and other relevant factors. The Company’s primary source of revenue at the holding company level is dividends from the Bank. The Company also has previously relied on the net proceeds of capital raising transactions as the primary source of funds for cash dividends to its preferred and common stockholders. To the extent the Company is limited in its ability to raise capital in the future, its ability to pay cash dividends to its stockholders could likewise be limited, especially if it is unable to increase the amount of dividends the Bank pays to the Company. See “Item 1A. Risk Factors - Our holding company relies on dividends from the Bank for substantially all of its income and the net proceeds of capital raising transactions are currently the primary source of funds for cash dividends to our preferred and common stockholders” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The Bank paid dividends of $94.3 million to Banc of California, Inc. during the year ended December 31, 2018. For a description of the regulatory restriction on the ability of the Bank to pay dividends to Banc of California, Inc., and on the ability of Banc of California, Inc. to pay dividends to its stockholders, see “Regulation and Supervision” included in Item 1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
As of December 31, 2018, the Company had 240,000 shares of preferred stock issued and outstanding, consisting of 115,000 shares of 7.375 percent Non-Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock, Series D, liquidation amount $1,000 per share (Series D Preferred Stock), and 125,000 shares of 7.00 percent Non-Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock, Series E, liquidation amount $1,000 per share (Series E Preferred Stock and together with the Series D Preferred Stock, the Preferred Stock). Each series of Preferred Stock ranks equally (pari passu) with the other series of Preferred Stock and senior to the Company's common stock in the payment of dividends and in the distribution of assets on any liquidation, dissolution or winding up of Banc of California, Inc.

39


Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
The following table presents information for the three months ended December 31, 2018 with respect to repurchases by the Company of its common stock:
 
Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer
 
 
Period
Total Number of Shares Purchased
 
Weighted-Average Price Paid Per Share
 
Total Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plans
 
Total Number of Shares That May Yet be Purchased Under the Plan
From October 1, 2018 to October 31, 2018
8,151

 
$
18.19

 

 

From November 1, 2018 to November 30, 2018
1,249

 
$
16.59

 

 

From December 1, 2018 to December 31, 2018
590

 
$
15.89

 

 

Total
9,990

 
$
17.85

 

 
 
On the Annual Shareholder Meeting held on May 31, 2018, shareholders approved the new 2018 Omnibus Stock Incentive Plan (the “2018 Plan”) effective August 17, 2018. Under the 2018 Plan, shares tendered or withheld to pay the exercise price of an Option and Shares tendered or withheld to satisfy tax withholding obligations with respect to any award shall not be available for future Awards under the 2018 Plan. No new equity awards are granted under the 2013 Omnibus Stock Incentive Plan (the “2013 Plan”) effective May 31, 2018.


40


Stock Performance Graph
The following graph and related discussion are being furnished solely to accompany this Annual Report on Form 10-K pursuant to Item 201(e) of Regulation S-K and shall not be deemed to be “soliciting materials” or to be “filed” with the SEC (other than as provided in Item 201) nor shall this information be incorporated by reference into any future filing under the Securities Act or the Exchange Act, whether made before or after the date hereof and irrespective of any general incorporation language contained therein, except to the extent that the Company specifically incorporates it by reference into a filing.
The following graph shows a comparison of stockholder return on Banc of California, Inc.’s voting common stock with the cumulative total returns for: (i) the NYSE Composite Index; (ii) the Standard and Poor’s (S&P) 500 Financials Index; and (iii) the Keefe, Bruyette, and Woods, Inc.'s (KBW) Bank Index. The graph assumes an initial investment of $100 and reinvestment of dividends. The graph is historical only and may not be indicative of possible future performance.
chart-ebedf3698ff45b6eb64.jpg
 
 
December 31,
Index
 
2013
 
2014
 
2015
 
2016
 
2017
 
2018
Banc of California, Inc.
 
$
100.00

 
$
89.09

 
$
117.85

 
$
143.73

 
$
175.45

 
$
116.40

NYSE Composite
 
$
100.00

 
$
104.22

 
$
97.53

 
$
106.31

 
$
123.16

 
$
109.37

S&P 500 Financials
 
$
100.00

 
$
115.20

 
$
113.44

 
$
139.31

 
$
170.21

 
$
148.03

KBW Bank Index
 
$
100.00

 
$
107.22

 
$
105.52

 
$
132.53

 
$
154.07

 
$
123.87



41


Annual Rate of Stockholders' Return
The following graph shows a comparison of stockholder return on Banc of California, Inc.’s voting common stock with the annual rate of return for: (i) the NYSE Composite Index; (ii) the S&P 500 Financials Index; and (iii) the KBW Bank Index. The graph is historical only and may not be indicative of possible future performance.
chart-c2566afb6deb500a935a01.jpg
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
Index
 
2015
 
2016
 
2017
 
2018
Banc of California, Inc.
 
32
 %
 
22
%
 
22
%
 
(34
)%
NYSE Composite
 
(6
)%
 
9
%
 
16
%
 
(11
)%
S&P 500 Financials
 
(2
)%
 
23
%
 
22
%
 
(13
)%
KBW Bank Index
 
(2
)%
 
26
%
 
16
%
 
(20
)%


42


Item 6. Selected Financial Data
The following table sets forth certain consolidated financial and other data of the Company at the dates and for the periods indicated. The information set forth below should be read in conjunction with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” included herein at Item 7 and the Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes thereto included herein at Item 8.
 
 
As of or For the Year Ended December 31,
($ in thousands, except per share data)
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016 (7)
 
2015
 
2014 (8)
Selected financial condition data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total assets
 
$
10,630,067

 
$
10,327,852

 
$
11,029,853

 
$
8,235,555

 
$
5,971,297

Cash and cash equivalents
 
391,592

 
387,699

 
439,510

 
156,124

 
231,199

Loans and leases receivable, net
 
7,638,681

 
6,610,074

 
5,994,308

 
5,148,861

 
3,919,642

Loans held-for-sale
 
8,116

 
67,069

 
298,018

 
293,264

 
918,036

Other real estate owned, net
 
672

 
1,796

 
2,502

 
1,097

 
423

Securities available-for-sale
 
1,992,500

 
2,575,469

 
2,381,488

 
833,596

 
345,695

Securities held-to-maturity
 

 

 
884,234

 
962,203

 

Bank owned life insurance
 
107,027

 
104,851

 
102,512

 
100,171

 
19,095

Time deposits in financial institutions
 

 

 
1,000

 
1,500

 
1,900

FHLB and other bank stock
 
68,094

 
75,654

 
67,842

 
59,069

 
42,241

Assets of discontinued operations
 
19,490

 
38,900

 
482,494

 
420,050

 
300,872

Deposits
 
7,916,644

 
7,292,903

 
9,142,150

 
6,303,085

 
4,671,831

Total borrowings
 
1,693,174

 
1,867,941

 
733,300

 
1,191,876

 
726,569

Liabilities of discontinued operations
 

 
7,819

 
34,480

 
20,856

 
14,853

Total stockholders' equity
 
945,534

 
1,012,308

 
980,239

 
652,405

 
503,315

Selected operations data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total interest income
 
$
422,796

 
$
389,190

 
$
369,844

 
$
253,807

 
$
179,645

Total interest expense
 
136,720

 
85,000

 
59,499

 
42,621

 
32,862

Net interest income
 
286,076

 
304,190

 
310,345

 
211,186

 
146,783

Provision for loan and lease losses
 
30,215

 
13,699

 
5,271

 
7,469

 
10,976

Total noninterest income
 
23,915

 
44,670

 
98,630

 
75,748

 
49,173

Total noninterest expense
 
232,785

 
308,268

 
303,215

 
210,299

 
170,285

Income from continuing operations before income taxes
 
46,991

 
26,893

 
100,489

 
69,166

 
14,695

Income tax expense (benefit)
 
4,844

 
(26,581
)
 
13,749

 
28,048

 
(8,102
)
Income from continuing operations
 
42,147

 
53,474

 
86,740

 
41,118

 
22,797

Income from discontinued operations before income taxes
 
4,596

 
7,164

 
48,917

 
35,100

 
11,771

Income tax expense
 
1,271

 
2,929

 
20,241

 
14,146

 
4,363

Income from discontinued operations
 
3,325

 
4,235

 
28,676

 
20,954

 
7,408

Net income
 
45,472

 
57,709

 
115,416

 
62,072

 
30,205

Dividends paid on preferred stock
 
19,504

 
20,451

 
19,914

 
9,823

 
3,640

Impact of preferred stock redemption
 
2,307

 

 

 

 

Net income available to common stockholders
 
23,661

 
37,258

 
95,502

 
52,249

 
26,565

Basic earnings per total common share
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income from continuing operations
 
$
0.38

 
$
0.64

 
$
1.36

 
$
0.79

 
$
0.65

Income from discontinued operations
 
$
0.07

 
$
0.08

 
$
0.61

 
$
0.57

 
$
0.26

Net income
 
$
0.45

 
$
0.72

 
$
1.97

 
$
1.36

 
$
0.91

Diluted earnings per total common share
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income from continuing operations
 
$
0.38

 
$
0.63

 
$
1.34

 
$
0.78

 
$
0.64

Income from discontinued operations
 
$
0.07

 
$
0.08

 
$
0.60

 
$
0.56

 
$
0.26

Net income
 
$
0.45

 
$
0.71

 
$
1.94

 
$
1.34

 
$
0.90


43


 
 
As of or For the Year Ended December 31,
($ in thousands, except per share data)
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016 (7)
 
2015
 
2014 (8)
Performance ratios of consolidated operations: (1)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Return on average assets
 
0.44
%
 
0.55
%
 
1.12
%
 
0.94
%
 
0.69
%
Return on average equity
 
4.57
%
 
5.72
%
 
12.73
%
 
10.14
%
 
7.31
%
Return on average tangible common equity (2)
 
3.76
%
 
5.79
%
 
16.97
%
 
14.22
%
 
10.10
%
Dividend payout ratio (3)
 
115.56
%
 
72.22
%
 
24.87
%
 
35.29
%
 
52.75
%
Net interest spread
 
2.67
%
 
2.92
%
 
3.15
%
 
3.35
%
 
3.54
%
Net interest margin (4)
 
2.95
%
 
3.11
%
 
3.30
%
 
3.52
%
 
3.72
%
Noninterest expense to average total assets
 
2.28
%
 
3.50
%
 
4.28
%
 
5.02
%
 
6.06
%
Efficiency ratio (5)
 
74.01
%
 
88.52
%
 
74.11
%
 
74.83
%
 
87.56
%
Efficiency ratio as adjusted (2), (5)
 
70.87
%
 
77.18
%
 
67.13
%
 
74.83
%
 
87.56
%
Average interest-earning assets to average interest-bearing liabilities
 
119.89
%
 
122.66
%
 
123.80
%
 
125.29
%
 
122.06
%
Asset quality ratios:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Allowance for loan and lease losses (ALLL)
 
$
62,192

 
$
49,333

 
$
40,444

 
$
35,533

 
$
29,480

Non-performing loans and leases
 
22,055

 
19,382

 
14,942

 
45,129

 
38,381

Non-performing assets
 
22,727

 
21,178

 
17,444

 
46,226

 
38,804

Non-performing assets to total assets
 
0.21
%
 
0.21
%
 
0.16
%
 
0.56
%
 
0.65
%
ALLL to non-performing loans and leases
 
281.99
%
 
254.53
%
 
270.67
%
 
78.74
%
 
76.81
%
ALLL to total loans and leases
 
0.81
%
 
0.74
%
 
0.67
%
 
0.69
%
 
0.75
%
Capital Ratios:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Average equity to average assets
 
9.73
%
 
9.58
%
 
8.77
%
 
9.25
%
 
9.51
%
Total stockholders' equity to total assets
 
8.89
%
 
9.80
%
 
8.89
%
 
7.92
%
 
8.43
%
Tangible common equity (TCE) to tangible assets (2)
 
6.34
%
 
6.78
%
 
6.00
%
 
4.93
%
 
6.20
%
Book value per common share
 
$
14.10

 
$
14.69

 
$
14.25

 
$
12.14

 
$
12.17

TCE per common share (2)
 
$
13.25

 
$
13.77

 
$
13.19

 
$
10.60

 
$
10.53

Book value per common share and per common share issuable under purchase contracts
 
$
14.10

 
$
14.69

 
$
14.20

 
$
11.95

 
$
11.51

TCE per common shares and per common share issuable under purchase contracts (2)
 
$
13.25

 
$
13.77

 
$
13.14

 
$
10.44

 
$
9.97

Banc of California, Inc.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total risk-based capital ratio
 
13.71
%
 
14.56
%
 
13.70
%
 
11.18
%
 
11.28
%
Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio
 
12.77
%
 
13.79
%
 
13.22
%
 
10.71
%
 
10.54
%
Common equity tier 1 capital ratio (6)
 
9.53
%
 
9.92
%
 
9.44
%
 
7.36
%
 
N/A

Tier 1 leverage ratio
 
8.95
%
 
9.39
%
 
8.17
%
 
8.07
%
 
8.57
%
Banc of California, N.A.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total risk-based capital ratio
 
15.71
%
 
16.56
%
 
14.73
%
 
13.45
%
 
12.04
%
Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio
 
14.77
%
 
15.78
%
 
14.12
%
 
12.79
%
 
11.29
%
Common equity tier 1 capital ratio (6)
 
14.77
%
 
15.78
%
 
14.12
%
 
12.79
%
 
N/A

Tier 1 leverage ratio
 
10.36
%
 
10.67
%
 
8.71
%
 
9.64
%
 
9.17
%
(1)
Consolidated operations include both continuing and discontinued operations.
(2)
Non-GAAP measure. See non-GAAP measures for reconciliation of the calculation.
(3)
Ratio of dividends declared per common share to basic earnings per common share.
(4)
Net interest income divided by average interest-earning assets.
(5)
Efficiency ratio represents noninterest expense, excluding loss on investments in alternative energy partnerships, net, as a percentage of net interest income plus noninterest income.
(6)
Common equity tier 1 capital ratio became required from 2015.
(7)
The Company completed its sale of The Palisades Group on May 5, 2016.
(8)
The Company completed its acquisitions of RenovationReady and the Banco Popular North America's Southern California branches (BPNA Branch Acquisition) on January 31, 2014 and November 8, 2014, respectively.


44


Non-GAAP Financial Measures
Under Item 10(e) of SEC Regulation S-K, public companies disclosing financial measures in filings with the SEC that are not calculated in accordance with GAAP must also disclose, along with each non-GAAP financial measure, certain additional information, including a presentation of the most directly comparable GAAP financial measure, a reconciliation of the non-GAAP financial measure to the most directly comparable GAAP financial measure, as well as a statement of the reasons why the company’s management believes that presentation of the non-GAAP financial measure provides useful information to investors regarding the company’s financial condition and results of operations and, to the extent material, a statement of the additional purposes, if any, for which the company’s management uses the non-GAAP financial measure.
Return on average tangible common equity and efficiency ratio, as adjusted, tangible common equity to tangible assets, and tangible common equity per common share and tangible common equity per common share and per common share issuable under purchase contracts constitute supplemental financial information determined by methods other than in accordance with GAAP. These non-GAAP measures are used by management in its analysis of the Company's performance.
Tangible common equity is calculated by subtracting preferred stock, goodwill, and other intangible assets from stockholders’ equity. Tangible assets are calculated by subtracting goodwill and other intangible assets from total assets. Banking regulators also exclude goodwill and other intangible assets from stockholders’ equity when assessing the capital adequacy of a financial institution.
Adjusted efficiency ratio is calculated by subtracting loss on investments in alternative energy partnerships from noninterest expense and adding total pre-tax adjustments for investments in alternative energy partnerships, which includes the loss on investments in alternative energy partnerships, to the sum of net interest income and noninterest income (total revenue). Management believes the presentation of these financial measures adjusting the impact of these items provides useful supplemental information that is essential to a proper understanding of the financial results and operating performance of the Company.
This disclosure should not be viewed as a substitute for results determined in accordance with GAAP, nor is it necessarily comparable to non-GAAP performance measures that may be presented by other companies.
The following tables provide reconciliations of the non-GAAP measures with financial measures defined by GAAP.
Return on Average Tangible Common Equity
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
($ in thousands)
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
Average total stockholders' equity
 
$
995,320

 
$
1,008,995

 
$
906,831

 
$
612,393

 
$
413,454

Less average preferred stock
 
(257,428
)
 
(269,071
)
 
(267,054
)
 
(161,288
)
 
(79,877
)
Less average goodwill
 
(37,144
)
 
(37,656
)
 
(39,244
)
 
(33,541
)
 
(32,326
)
Less average other intangible assets
 
(7,799
)
 
(11,375
)
 
(16,654
)
 
(22,222
)
 
(11,739
)
Average tangible common equity
 
$
692,949

 
$
690,893

 
$
583,879

 
$
395,342

 
$
289,512

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
 
$
45,472

 
$
57,709

 
$
115,416

 
$
62,072

 
$
30,205

Less preferred stock dividends and impact of preferred stock redemption
 
(21,811
)
 
(20,451
)
 
(19,914
)
 
(9,823
)
 
(3,640
)
Add amortization of intangible assets
 
3,007

 
3,928

 
4,851

 
5,836

 
4,079

Add impairment on intangible assets
 

 
336

 
690

 
258

 
48

Less tax effect on amortization and impairment of intangible assets (1)
 
(631
)
 
(1,492
)
 
(1,939
)
 
(2,133
)
 
(1,445
)
Adjusted net income
 
$
26,037

 
$
40,030

 
$
99,104

 
$
56,210

 
$
29,247

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Return on average equity
 
4.57
%
 
5.72
%
 
12.73
%
 
10.14
%
 
7.31
%
Return on average tangible common equity
 
3.76
%
 
5.79
%
 
16.97
%
 
14.22
%
 
10.10
%
(1) Utilized a 21 percent tax rate for 2018 and 35 percent tax rate for 2014 through 2017.

45


Efficiency ratio as adjusted to include the pre-tax effect of investments in alternative energy partnerships
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
($ in thousands)
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
Noninterest expense (1)
 
$
232,921

 
$
368,263

 
$
442,676

 
$
332,201

 
$
263,472

Loss on investments in alternative energy partnerships, net
 
(5,044
)
 
(30,786
)
 
(31,510
)
 

 

Total adjusted noninterest expense
 
$
227,877

 
$
337,477

 
$
411,166

 
$
332,201

 
$
263,472

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net interest income (1)
 
$
286,741

 
$
311,242

 
$
325,473

 
$
223,717

 
$
155,277

Noninterest income (1)
 
27,982

 
104,777

 
271,880

 
220,219

 
145,637

Total revenue
 
314,723

 
416,019

 
597,353

 
443,936

 
300,914

Tax credit from investments in alternative energy partnerships
 
9,647

 
38,196

 
33,405

 

 

Tax expense from tax basis reduction on investments in alternative energy partnerships
 
(1,023
)
 
(6,684
)
 
(5,846
)
 

 

Tax effect on tax credit and deferred tax expense
 
3,259

 
20,531

 
19,080

 

 

Loss on investments in alternative energy partnerships, net
 
(5,044
)
 
(30,786
)
 
(31,510
)
 

 

Total pre-tax adjustments for investments in alternative energy partnerships
 
6,839

 
21,257

 
15,129

 

 

Total adjusted revenue
 
$
321,562

 
$
437,276

 
$
612,482

 
$
443,936

 
$
300,914

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Efficiency ratio
 
74.01
%
 
88.52
%
 
74.11
%
 
74.83
%
 
87.56
%
Efficiency ratio as adjusted to include the pre-tax effect of investments in alternative energy partnerships
 
70.87
%
 
77.18
%
 
67.13
%
 
74.83
%
 
87.56
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Effective tax rate utilized for calculating tax effect on tax credit and deferred tax expense
 
27.42
%
 
39.45
%
 
40.91
%
 
%
 
%
(1)
Net interest income, noninterest income and noninterest expense includes income and expense from discontinued operations.






46


Tangible Common Equity to Tangible Assets and Tangible Common Equity per Common Share and per Common Share Issuable under Purchase Contracts
 
 
December 31,
($ in thousands, except per share data)
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
Total stockholders' equity
 
$
945,534

 
$
1,012,308

 
$
980,239

 
$
652,405

 
$
503,315

Less goodwill
 
(37,144
)
 
(37,144
)
 
(39,244
)
 
(39,244
)
 
(31,591
)
Less other intangible assets
 
(6,346
)
 
(9,353
)
 
(13,617
)
 
(19,158
)
 
(25,252
)
Less preferred stock
 
(231,128
)
 
(269,071
)
 
(269,071
)
 
(190,750
)
 
(79,877
)
Tangible common equity
 
$
670,916

 
$
696,740

 
$
658,307

 
$
403,253

 
$
366,595

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total assets
 
$
10,630,067

 
$
10,327,852

 
$
11,029,853

 
$
8,235,555

 
$
5,971,297

Less goodwill
 
(37,144
)
 
(37,144
)
 
(39,244
)
 
(39,244
)
 
(31,591
)
Less other intangible assets
 
(6,346
)
 
(9,353
)
 
(13,617
)
 
(19,158
)
 
(25,252
)
Tangible assets
 
$
10,586,577

 
$
10,281,355

 
$
10,976,992

 
$
8,177,153

 
$
5,914,454

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total stockholders' equity to total assets
 
8.89
%
 
9.80
%
 
8.89
%
 
7.92
%
 
8.43
%
Tangible common equity to tangible assets
 
6.34
%
 
6.78
%
 
6.00
%
 
4.93
%
 
6.20
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common stock outstanding
 
50,172,018

 
50,083,345

 
49,695,299

 
38,002,267

 
34,190,740

Class B non-voting non-convertible common stock outstanding
 
477,321

 
508,107

 
201,922

 
37,355

 
609,195

Total common stock outstanding
 
50,649,339

 
50,591,452

 
49,897,221

 
38,039,622

 
34,799,935

Minimum number of shares issuable under purchase contracts (1)
 

 

 
188,742

 
601,299

 
1,982,181

Total common stock outstanding and shares issuable under purchase contracts
 
50,649,339

 
50,591,452

 
50,085,963

 
38,640,921

 
36,782,116

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Book value per common share
 
$
14.10

 
$
14.69

 
$
14.25

 
$
12.14

 
$
12.17

TCE per common share
 
$
13.25

 
$
13.77

 
$
13.19

 
$
10.60

 
$
10.53

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Book value per common share and per common share issuable under purchase contracts
 
$
14.10

 
$
14.69

 
$
14.20

 
$
11.95

 
$
11.51

TCE per common share and per common share issuable under purchase contracts
 
$
13.25

 
$
13.77

 
$
13.14

 
$
10.44

 
$
9.97

(1) Purchase contracts relating to tangible equity units


47


Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Critical Accounting Policies
The Company follows accounting and reporting policies and procedures that conform, in all material respects, to GAAP and to practices generally applicable to the financial services industry, the most significant of which are described in Note 1 to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The preparation of Consolidated Financial Statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make judgments and accounting estimates that affect the amounts reported for assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses on the Consolidated Financial Statements and accompanying notes, and amounts disclosed as contingent assets and liabilities. While the Company bases estimates on historical experience, current information and other factors deemed to be relevant, actual results could differ from those estimates.
Accounting estimates are necessary in the application of certain accounting policies and procedures that are particularly susceptible to significant change. Critical accounting policies are defined as those that require the most complex or subjective judgment and are reflective of significant uncertainties, and could potentially result in materially different results under different assumptions and conditions. Management has identified the Company's most critical accounting policies and accounting estimates, which have been discussed with the appropriate committees of the Board of Directors, as follows:
Investment Securities
Under ASC 320, Investments - Debt and Equity Securities, investment securities must be classified as held-to-maturity, available-for-sale or trading. Management determines the appropriate classification at the time of purchase. The classification of securities is significant since it directly impacts the accounting for unrealized gains and losses on securities. Debt securities are classified as held-to-maturity and carried at amortized cost when management has the positive intent and the Company has the ability to hold the securities to maturity. Securities not classified as held-to-maturity are classified as available-for-sale and are carried at fair value, with the unrealized holding gains and losses, net of tax, reported in AOCI and do not affect earnings until realized unless a decline in fair value below amortized cost is considered to be OTTI.
The fair values of the Company’s securities are generally determined by reference to quoted prices from reliable independent third party sources and pricing services utilizing observable inputs. Certain of the Company’s fair values of securities may be determined by third party source and pricing services that may use models whose significant value drivers or assumptions may be unobservable and are significant to the fair value of the securities. These models are utilized when quoted prices are not available for certain securities or in markets where trading activity has slowed or ceased. When quoted prices are not available and are not provided by third party sources or pricing services, management judgment is necessary to determine fair value. As such, fair value is determined using discounted cash flow analysis models, incorporating default rates, estimation of prepayment characteristics and implied volatilities.
The Company evaluates all securities on a quarterly basis, and more frequently when economic conditions warrant additional evaluations, for determining if OTTI exists pursuant to guidelines established in ASC 320. In evaluating the possible impairment of securities, consideration is given to the length of time and the extent to which the fair value has been less than cost, the financial conditions and near-term prospects of the issuer, and the ability and intent of the Company to retain its investment in the issuer for a period of time sufficient to allow for any anticipated recovery in fair value. In analyzing an issuer’s financial condition, the Company may consider whether the securities are issued by the federal government or its agencies or government sponsored agencies, whether downgrades by bond rating agencies have occurred, and the results of reviews of the issuer’s financial condition.
If management determines that an investment experienced an OTTI, management must then determine the amount of the OTTI to be recognized in earnings. If management does not intend to sell the security and it is more likely than not that the Company will not be required to sell the security before recovery of its amortized cost basis less any current period loss, the OTTI will be separated into the amount representing the credit loss and the amount related to all other factors. The amount of OTTI related to the credit loss is determined based on the present value of cash flows expected to be collected and is recognized in earnings. The amount of the OTTI related to other factors will be recognized in AOCI, net of applicable taxes. The previous amortized cost basis less the OTTI recognized in earnings will become the new amortized cost basis of the investment. If management intends to sell the security or more likely than not will be required to sell the security before recovery of its amortized cost basis less any current period credit loss, the OTTI will be recognized in earnings equal to the entire difference between the investment’s amortized cost basis and its fair value at the balance sheet date. Any recoveries related to the value of these securities are recorded as an unrealized gain (as AOCI in stockholders’ equity) and not recognized in income until the security is ultimately sold.
The Company may, from time to time, dispose of an impaired security in response to asset/liability management decisions, future market movements, business plan changes, or if the net proceeds can be reinvested at a rate of return that is expected to recover the loss within a reasonable period of time.

48


Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses
The allowance for loan and lease losses is a reserve established through a provision for loan and lease losses charged to expense, and represents management’s best estimate of probable losses that may be incurred within the existing loan and lease portfolio as of the balance sheet date. Subsequent recoveries, if any, are credited to the allowance. The Company performs an analysis of the adequacy of the allowance at least on a quarterly basis. Management estimates the allowance balance required using past loan and lease loss experience, the nature and volume of the portfolio, information about specific borrower situations and estimated collateral values, economic conditions, and other factors. While management utilizes its best judgment and information available, the ultimate adequacy of the allowance for loan and lease losses is dependent upon a variety of factors beyond the Company’s control, including performance of the Company’s loan portfolio, the economy, changes in interest rates, and regulatory authorities altering their loan classification guidance.
The allowance consists of three elements: (i) specific valuation allowances established for probable losses on impaired loans and leases; (ii) quantitative valuation allowances calculated using loss experience for like loans and leases with similar characteristics and trends, adjusted, as necessary to reflect the impact of current conditions; and (iii) qualitative allowances based on economic and other factors that may be internal or external to the Company.
Deferred Income Taxes
Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are computed for differences between the financial statement and tax basis of assets and liabilities that will result in taxable or deductible amounts in the future based on enacted tax laws and rates applicable to the periods in which the differences are expected to affect taxable income. Deferred tax assets are also recognized for operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Accounting guidance requires that companies assess whether a valuation allowance should be established against the deferred tax assets based on the consideration of all available evidence using a “more likely than not” standard.
Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance when, in the opinion of management, it is more likely than not that some portion, or all, of the deferred tax asset will not be realized. In assessing the realization of deferred tax assets, management evaluates both positive and negative evidence on a quarterly basis, including the reversal of its taxable temporary differences, the existence of