Company Quick10K Filing
Blake Insomnia Therapeutics
10-Q 2019-05-31 Filed 2019-07-15
10-Q 2019-02-28 Filed 2019-04-23
10-Q 2018-11-30 Filed 2019-02-27
10-K 2018-08-31 Filed 2019-02-20
10-Q 2018-05-31 Filed 2018-07-16
10-Q 2018-02-28 Filed 2018-06-07
10-Q 2017-11-30 Filed 2018-06-07
10-K 2017-08-31 Filed 2018-04-26
10-Q 2017-05-31 Filed 2017-07-17
10-Q 2017-02-28 Filed 2017-04-18
10-Q 2016-11-30 Filed 2017-01-18
10-K 2016-08-31 Filed 2016-12-07
10-Q 2016-05-31 Filed 2016-08-17
10-Q 2016-02-29 Filed 2016-04-20
10-Q 2015-11-30 Filed 2016-01-14
10-K 2015-08-31 Filed 2015-12-15
10-Q 2015-05-31 Filed 2015-07-15
10-Q 2015-02-28 Filed 2015-04-20
10-Q 2014-11-30 Filed 2015-01-26
10-K 2014-08-31 Filed 2014-12-19
10-Q 2014-05-31 Filed 2014-08-12
10-Q 2014-02-28 Filed 2014-04-30
10-Q 2013-11-30 Filed 2014-01-14
10-K 2013-08-31 Filed 2013-12-18
10-Q 2013-05-31 Filed 2013-08-16
8-K 2019-07-08
8-K 2019-05-17
8-K 2019-05-07
8-K 2018-02-01

BKIT 10Q Quarterly Report

Part I - Financial Information
Item 1. Financial Statements
Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 4. Controls and Procedures
Part II - Other Information
Item 1. Legal Proceedings
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Item 5. Other Information
Item 6. Exhibits
EX-31.1 bkit_ex311.htm
EX-31.2 bkit_ex312.htm
EX-32.1 bkit_ex321.htm

Blake Insomnia Therapeutics Earnings 2019-05-31

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow
0.10.0-0.1-0.1-0.2-0.32012201420172020
Assets, Equity
0.10.0-0.1-0.1-0.2-0.32012201420172020
Rev, G Profit, Net Income
0.10.10.0-0.0-0.1-0.12012201420172020
Ops, Inv, Fin

10-Q 1 bkit_10q.htm FORM 10-Q bkit_10q.htm

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

x

Quarterly Report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the quarterly period ended May 31, 2019

 

¨

Transition Report pursuant to 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the transition period from __________ to__________

 

Commission File Number: 000-55022

 

 BioHemp International, Inc.

 (Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada

 

46-0780380

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

 

(IRS Employer Identification No.)

 

244, 5th Avenue, Suite A-154

New York, N.Y. 10001

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

+1 (646) 453-4912

(Registrant’s telephone number)

 

_____________________________________________________________

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  x Yes     ¨ No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). x Yes     ¨ No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company.

 

Large accelerated filer

¨

Accelerated filer

¨

Non-accelerated filer

¨

Smaller reporting company

x

Emerging growth company

x

 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). ¨ Yes    x No

 

State the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date: 2,487,063 common shares as of May 31, 2019

 

 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 
2
 
Table of Contents

 

PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements

 

Our financial statements included in this Form 10-Q are as follows:

 

 

These financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America for interim financial information and the SEC instructions to Form 10-Q. In the opinion of management, all adjustments considered necessary for a fair presentation have been included. Operating results for the interim period ended May 31, 2019 are not necessarily indicative of the results that can be expected for the full year.

 

 
3
 
Table of Contents

 

BioHemp International, Inc.

formerly Blake Insomnia Therapeutics, Inc.

Balance Sheets

 

 

 

As of

May 31,

 

 

As of

August 31,

 

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

 

(Unaudited)

 

 

(Audtited)

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current Assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash

 

$-

 

 

$-

 

Total Current Assets

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL ASSETS

 

$-

 

 

$-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                       LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes payable

 

$112,500

 

 

$139,500

 

Accounts payable

 

 

39,141

 

 

 

31,533

 

Accounts payable-related party

 

 

30,827

 

 

 

21,040

 

Due to related party

 

 

11,637

 

 

 

11,637

 

Accrued interest

 

 

43,266

 

 

 

32,955

 

Total Current Liabilities

 

 

237,371

 

 

 

236,665

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Liabilities

 

 

237,371

 

 

 

236,665

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders' Equity (Deficit)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock ($0.0001 par value; 10,000,000 authorized; no shares issued and outstanding)

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Common stock ($0.0001 par value, 100,000,000 shares authorized; 2,487,063 (2019-32,517) shares issued and outstanding)

 

 

249

 

 

 

3

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

247,686

 

 

 

220,932

 

Deficit accumulated during the development stage

 

 

(485,306)

 

 

(457,600)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Stockholders' Equity (Deficit)

 

 

(237,371)

 

 

(236,665)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL LIABILITIES & STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT)

 

$-

 

 

$-

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

 
F-1
 
Table of Contents

 

BioHemp International, Inc.

formerly Blake Insomnia Therapeutics, Inc

Statements of Operations

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

For the three months

 

 

For the three months

 

 

For the nine months

 

 

For the nine months

 

 

 

ended

 

 

ended

 

 

ended

 

 

ended

 

 

 

May 31, 2019

 

 

May 31, 2018

 

 

May 31, 2019

 

 

May 31, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenues

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Revenues

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Costs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Expenses

 

 

6,115

 

 

 

10,624

 

 

 

17,395

 

 

 

11,624

 

Patent Costs

 

 

-

 

 

 

1,978

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

1,978

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Operating Costs

 

 

6,115

 

 

 

12,602

 

 

 

17,395

 

 

 

13,602

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other (Expense)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest Expense

 

 

(3,336)

 

 

(3,487)

 

 

(10,311)

 

 

(10,463)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Other (Expense)

 

 

(3,336)

 

 

(3,487)

 

 

(10,311)

 

 

(10,463)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net Loss

 

 

(9,451)

 

 

(16,089)

 

 

(27,706)

 

 

(24,065)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic loss per share

 

 

(0.02)

 

 

(0.49)

 

 

(0.14)

 

 

(0.74)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average number of common shares outstanding

 

 

512,754

 

 

 

32,517

 

 

 

193,764

 

 

 

32,517

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

 
F-2
 
Table of Contents

 

BioHemp International, Inc.

formerly Blake Insomnia Therapeutics, Inc.

Statements of Cash Flows

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

For the nine months

 

 

For the nine months

 

 

 

ended

 

 

ended

 

 

 

May 31, 2019

 

 

May 31, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net (loss)

 

$(27,706)

 

$(24,065)

Adjustments to reconcile net (loss) to net cash provided by (used in) operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Increase (decrease) in accounts payable

 

 

17,395

 

 

 

13,602

 

Increase (decrease) in accrued interest

 

 

10,311

 

 

 

10,463

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash  (used in) operating activities

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from notes paybable

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash at beginning of period

 

 

-

 

 

 

84

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash at end of period

 

$-

 

 

$84

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supplemental Disclosures of Cash Flow Information:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash Paid For:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest

 

$-

 

 

$-

 

Income Taxes

 

$-

 

 

$-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non cash transactions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shares issued for debt

 

$27,000

 

 

$-

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements. 

  

 
F-3
 
Table of Contents

 

BioHemp International, Inc.

formerly Blake Insomnia Therapeutics, Inc.

Statement of Changes in Stockholders' Equity

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common

 

 

Additional

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common

 

 

Stock

 

 

Paid-in

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock

 

 

Amount

 

 

Capital

 

 

Deficit

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balances, August 31, 2017

 

 

32,517

 

 

$3

 

 

$220,932

 

 

$(412,939)

 

$(191,464)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss for the period ended May 31, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(24,065)

 

 

(24,065

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance, May 31, 2018

 

 

32,517

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

220,932

 

 

 

(437,004)

 

 

(191,464)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balances, August 31, 2018

 

 

32,517

 

 

$3

 

 

$220,932

 

 

$(457,600)

 

$(236,665)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conversion of notes payable to shares

 

 

2,454,546

 

 

 

246

 

 

 

26,754

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

27,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss for period ended May 31, 2019

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(27,706)

 

 

(27,706)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balances, May 31, 2019

 

 

2,487,063

 

 

$249

 

 

$247,686

 

 

$(485,306)

 

$(237,371)
 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these audited financial statements.

 

 

F-4

 
Table of Contents

  

BioHemp International, Inc..

(formerly Blake Insomnia Therapeutics, Inc.)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(A Development Stage Company)

May 31, 2019

 

1. NATURE OF OPERATIONS

 

BioHemp International, Inc. (formerly Blake Insomnia Therapeutics Inc.) (“The Company”) was incorporated in the State of Nevada on August 11, 2012 as Book It Local, Inc. to develop its online booking system to help consumers find and hire live entertainment for weddings, corporate events, private parties, night clubs, grand openings, and other events. On September 1, 2015, the Company changed its name to Blake Insomnia Therapeutics Inc. On May 22, 2019, The Company changed its name to BioHemp International, Inc. The Company is in the development stage with no revenues and a limited operating history.

 

2. GOING CONCERN CONSIDERATION

 

These financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern, which contemplates, among other things, the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. The Company has incurred a cumulative net loss of $485,306 since its inception and requires capital for its contemplated operation and marketing activities to take place. The Company’s ability to raise additional capital through the future issuances of common stock is unknown. The obtainment of additional financing, the successful development of the Company’s contemplated plan of operations, and its transition, ultimately, to the attainment of profitable operations are necessary for the Company to continue operations. The ability to successfully resolve these factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern.

 

Future issuances of the Company’s equity or debt securities will be required in order for the Company to continue to finance its operations and continue as a going concern. The Company’s present revenues are insufficient to meet operating expenses. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that may result from the outcome of these aforementioned uncertainties.

 

3. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The financial statements of the Company have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America and are presented in US dollars. The Company’s year-end is August 31.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with original maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents.

 

Use of Estimates and Assumptions

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires that management makes estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

 
F-5
 
Table of Contents

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company recognizes revenue when it is realized or realizable and earned less estimated future doubtful accounts. The Company considers revenue realized or realizable and earned when all of the following criteria are met:

 

(i) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists,

 

(ii) the services have been rendered and all required milestones achieved,

 

(iii) the sales price is fixed or determinable, and

 

(iv) collectability is reasonably assured.

 

On January 1, 2017, the Company adopted the new accounting standard ASC 606, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers” and all the related amendments (“new revenue standard”) to all contracts using the modified retrospective method, while prior period amounts are not adjusted and continue to be reported in accordance with historic accounting standards under Topic 605. The adoption has had an immaterial impact to the Company’s comparative net income and as such comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under the accounting standards in effect for those periods. We expect the impact of the adoption of the new standard to be immaterial to the Company’s net income on an ongoing basis.

 

Foreign Currency Translation

 

The financial statements are presented in United States dollars. In accordance with ASC 830, “Foreign Currency Matters”, foreign denominated monetary assets and liabilities are translated into their United States dollar equivalents using foreign exchange rates which prevailed at the balance sheet date. Revenue and expenses are translated at average rates of exchange during the year. Gains or losses resulting from foreign currency transactions are included in results of operations.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

The Company accounts for stock-based compensation using the fair value method following the guidance set forth in section 718-10 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for disclosure about Stock-Based Compensation. This section requires a public entity to measure the cost of employee services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments based on the grant-date fair value of the award (with limited exceptions). That cost will be recognized over the period during which an employee is required to provide service in exchange for the award- the requisite service period (usually the vesting period). No compensation cost is recognized for equity instruments for which employees do not render the requisite service.

 

 
F-6
 
Table of Contents

 

Development Stage Company

 

The Company complies with Financial Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 915 and Securities and Exchange Commission Act Guide 7 for its characterization of the Company as development stage enterprise.

 

Fair Value for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities

 

The Company follows paragraph 825-10-50-10 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for disclosures about fair value of its financial instruments and paragraph 820-10-35-37 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“Paragraph 820-10-35-37”) to measure the fair value of its financial instruments. Paragraph 820-10-35-37 establishes a framework for measuring fair value in accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (U.S. GAAP), and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. To increase consistency and comparability in fair value measurements and related disclosures, Paragraph 820-10-35-37 establishes a fair value hierarchy which prioritizes the inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value into three broad levels. The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs. The three levels of fair value hierarchy defined by Paragraph 820-10-35-37 are described below:

 

Level 1

Quoted market prices available in active markets for identical assets or liabilities as of the reporting date.

Level 2

Pricing inputs other than quoted prices in active markets included in Level 1, which are either directly or indirectly observable as of the reporting date.

Level 3

Pricing inputs that are generally observable inputs and not corroborated by market data.

 

The carrying amounts of the Company’s financial assets and liabilities, such as cash, approximate their fair values because of the short maturity of these instruments.

 

The Company does not have any assets or liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring or a non-recurring basis, consequently, the Company did not have any fair value adjustments for assets and liabilities measured at fair value at May 31, 2019, nor gains or losses are reported in the statement of operations that are attributable to the change in unrealized gains or losses relating to those assets and liabilities still held at the reporting date for the period ended May 31, 2019.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company follows the accrual method of accounting for income taxes. Under this method, deferred income tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the estimated tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying values and their respective income tax basis (temporary differences). The effect on the deferred income tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. At May 31, 2019 a full deferred tax asset valuation allowance has been provided and no deferred tax asset has been recorded.

 

Basic and Diluted Net Income (Loss) per Share

 

The Company computes net income (loss) per share in accordance with ASC 260, “Earnings per Share” which requires presentation of both basic and diluted earnings per share (EPS) on the face of the income statement. Basic EPS is computed by dividing net income (loss) available to common shareholders (numerator) by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding (denominator) during the period. Diluted EPS gives effect to all dilutive potential common shares outstanding during the period including stock options, using the treasury stock method, and convertible preferred stock, using the if-converted method. In computing diluted EPS, the average stock price for the period is used in determining the number of shares assumed to be purchased from the exercise of stock options or warrants. Diluted EPS excludes all dilutive potential common shares if their effect is anti-dilutive.

 

 
F-7
 
Table of Contents

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

From time to time, new accounting pronouncements are issued by the FASB or other standard setting bodies that are adopted by the Company as of the specified effective date. Unless otherwise discussed, the Company believes that the effect of recently issued standards that are not yet effective will not have a material effect on its consolidated financial position or results of operations upon adoption.

 

In May 2014, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2014-09 (“ASU 2014-09”), Revenue from Contracts with Customers, which supersedes the revenue recognition requirements in ASC Topic 605, Revenue Recognition, and most industry-specific guidance. The new standard requires that an entity recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. ASU 2014-09 also requires additional disclosure about the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from customer contracts, including significant judgments and changes in judgments and assets recognized from costs incurred to obtain or fulfill a contract. In July 2015, the FASB approved a one-year deferral of the effective date of this standard to annual reporting periods, and interim reporting periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2017. The Company adopted this standard effective January 1, 2018 using the modified retrospective method. The adoption of this guidance did not have a significant impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In July 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-11, Simplifying the Measurement of Inventory (“ASU 2015- 11”). ASU 2015-11, which simplifies the measurement of inventories valued under most methods, including the Company’s inventories valued under FIFO — the first-in, first-out cost method. Inventories valued under LIFO — the last-in, first-out method — are excluded. Under this new guidance, inventories valued under these methods would be valued at the lower of cost and net realizable value, with net realizable value defined as the estimated selling price less reasonable costs to sell the inventory. This guidance is effective for annual reporting beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim periods within the year of adoption, with early application permitted. The Company adopted this standard on January 1, 2017. The adoption of this guidance did not have a significant impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In January 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-01, “Financial Instruments - Overall (Subtopic 825-10): Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities,” which addresses the recognition, measurement, presentation and disclosure of financial assets and liabilities. This ASU primarily affects the accounting for equity investments, financial liabilities under the fair value option and the presentation and disclosure requirements for financial instruments. In addition, this ASU clarifies the valuation allowance assessment when recognizing deferred tax assets resulting from unrealized losses on available-for-sale debt securities. This standard became effective on January 1, 2018. This standard did not have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures for the year ended |August 31, 2018.

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), or ASU 2016-02. ASU 2016-02 requires that lessees recognize in the statement of financial position for all leases (with the exception of short-term leases) a lease liability, which is a lessee’s obligation to make lease payments arising from a lease, measured on a discounted basis, and a right-of-use asset, which is an asset representing the lessee’s right to use the underlying asset for the lease term. ASU 2016-02 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years, with early adoption permitted. Lessees must apply a modified retrospective transition approach for leases existing at, or entered into after, the beginning of the earliest comparative period presented in the financial statements. The modified retrospective approach would not require any transition accounting for leases that expired before the earliest comparative period presented. Lessees may not apply a full retrospective transition approach. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have a significant impact on our financial statements.

 

 
F-8
 
Table of Contents

 

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-09, Compensation—Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting (“ASU 2016-09”). ASU 2016-09 will simplify the income tax consequences, accounting for forfeitures and classification on the statements of consolidated cash flows. ASU 2016-09 is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2016, and interim periods within those annual periods, with early adoption permitted. As a result of adopting ASU No. 2016-09 during the year ended The adoption of this standard had no significant impact on our financial statements.

 

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-15, Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments (a consensus of the Emerging Issues Task Force), or ASU 2016-15. The amendments in ASU 2016-15 address eight specific cash flow issues and apply to all entities that are required to present a statement of cash flows under FASB Accounting Standards Codification 230, Statement of Cash Flows. The amendments in ASU 2016-15 are effective for public business entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted, including adoption during an interim period. We have evaluated the impact of ASU No. 2016-15 and noted it had no impact on our financial statements for the year ended August 31, 2018.

 

In November 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Restricted Cash (a consensus of the FASB Emerging Issue Task Force), or ASU 2016-18. This new standard addresses the diversity that exists in the classification and presentation of changes in restricted cash on the statement of cash flows. The amendments in ASU 2016-18 require that a statement of cash flows explain the change during the period in the total of cash, cash equivalents, and amounts generally described as restricted cash or restricted cash equivalents. Therefore, amounts generally described as restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents should be included with cash and cash equivalents when reconciling the beginning-of-period and end-of-period total amounts shown on the statement of cash flows. This guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within the year of adoption, with early adoption permitted. Our financial statements reflect this standard for the year ended August 31, 2018.

 

In July 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-11, “Earnings Per Share (ASC 260) Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity (ASC 480) Derivatives and Hedging (ASC 815),” which addresses the complexity of accounting for certain financial instruments with down round features. Down round features are features of certain equity-linked instruments (or embedded features) that result in the strike price being reduced on the basis of the pricing of future equity offerings. Current accounting guidance creates cost and complexity for entities that issue financial instruments (such as warrants and convertible instruments) with down round features that require fair value measurement of the entire instrument or conversion option. For public business entities, the amendments in Part I of ASU 2017-11 are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2018. The Company has concluded that the retroactive provisions of ASU 2017-11 should have no impact on the accounting for the Company.

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU No. 2018-13, “Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Disclosure Framework-Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement (“ASU 2018-13”). The amendments in ASU 2018-13 modify the disclosure requirements on fair value measurements based on the concepts in the Concepts Statement, including the consideration of costs and benefits. The amendments on changes in unrealized gains and losses, the range and weighted average of significant unobservable inputs used to develop Level 3 fair value measurements, and the narrative description of measurement uncertainty should be applied prospectively for only the most recent interim or annual period presented in the initial fiscal year of adoption. All other amendments should be applied retrospectively to all periods presented upon their effective date. The amendments are effective for all entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted, including adoption in an interim period. The Company is currently evaluating ASU 2018-13 and its impact on its condensed consolidated financial statements.

  

 
F-9
 
Table of Contents

 

4. MATERIAL AGREEMENTS

 

On February 6, 2017, the Company and Sajo Consulting LLC announced entry into a Letter of Intent to provide joint development and commercialization of Zleepax™, in combination with formulations to produce a series of oral drug products to aid in the treatment of insomnia. This venture looks to develop a product to treat transient insomnia through the mechanism of Blake’s proprietary formula.

 

On February 1, 2018, the Company entered into a consulting agreement with a former director. In consideration, the company agreed to compensate him with a 5% royalty for a period of 5 years for any revenue generated by us from sales of Zleepax and any new product or services derived from Zleepax.

 

On March 12, 2019 the Company authorized the issuance of 25,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock to FJ Investments International, Inc, in preparation of a pending acquisition and investment agreement with FJ. The deal was fully executed on July 10, 2019.

 

5. NOTES PAYABLE

 

On August 31, 2014 the Company issued a promissory note payable in the amount of $5,000. The note is due on August 31, 2015 and bears interest at 10% per annum.

 

On November 20, 2014 the Company issued a promissory note payable in the amount of $10,000. The note is due on demand and bears interest at 10% per annum

 

On January 18, 2015 the Company issued a promissory note payable in the amount of $10,000. The note is due on demand and bears interest at 10% per annum.

 

On June 24, 2015 the Company issued a promissory note payable in the amount of $12,500. The note is due on demand and bears interest at 10% per annum.

 

On December 10, 2015 the Company issued a promissory note payable in the amount of $15,000. The note is due on demand and bears interest at 10% per annum.

 

On July 29, 2016 the Company issued a promissory note payable in the amount of $15,000. The note is due on demand and bears interest at 10% per annum.

 

On September 19, 2016 the Company issued a promissory note payable in the amount of $42,000. The note is due on demand and bears interest at 10% per annum. On May 8, 2019, $13,500 of the Note was converted into 1,227,273 shares of the Company’s common stock. On May 18, 2019, $13,500 of the Note was converted into 1,227,273 shares of the Company’s common stock

 

On March 17, 2017 the Company issued a promissory note payable in the amount of $10,000. The note is due on demand and bears interest at 10% per annum.

 

On April 19, 2017 the Company issued a promissory note payable in the amount of $20,000. The note is due on demand and bears interest at 10% per annum.

 

The interest expense for the periods ended May 31, 2019 and May 31, 2018 is $10,311 and $10,463, respectively.

 

 
F-10
 
Table of Contents

 

6. RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

The President of the Company provides management and office premises to the Company for no compensation. The effects of this immaterial to the financial statements taken as a whole.

 

As at February 28, 2019 there is a balance owing to the shareholder of $11,637. This balance is non-interest bearing and has no specified terms of repayment.

 

7. STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

In August 2012, the Company authorized the issue of 100,000,000 common shares of the Company at par value of $.0001and authorized the issue of 10,000,000 preferred shares at par value of $.0001.

 

On October 26, 2018 the Company completed a 1,000 to 1 reverse stock split of the common shares. The stock split has been recorded in these financial statements retroactively.

 

On May 8, 2019, the Company issued 1,227,273 shares of its common stock for conversion of a note payable.

 

On May 18, 2019, the Company issued 1,227,273 shares of its common stock for conversion of a note payable.

 

At May 31, 2019, there are total of 2,487,063 common shares of the Company issued and outstanding.

 

8. SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

On July 2, 2019, the Company issued 1,363,637 shares of its common stock for conversion of a note payable.

 

 
F-11
 
Table of Contents

 

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

Forward-Looking Statements

 

Certain statements, other than purely historical information, including estimates, projections, statements relating to our business plans, objectives, and expected operating results, and the assumptions upon which those statements are based, are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. These forward-looking statements generally are identified by the words “believes,” “project,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “estimates,” “intends,” “strategy,” “plan,” “may,” “will,” “would,” “will be,” “will continue,” “will likely result,” and similar expressions. We intend such forward-looking statements to be covered by the safe-harbor provisions for forward-looking statements contained in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, and are including this statement for purposes of complying with those safe-harbor provisions. Forward-looking statements are based on current expectations and assumptions that are subject to risks and uncertainties which may cause actual results to differ materially from the forward-looking statements. Our ability to predict results or the actual effect of future plans or strategies is inherently uncertain. Factors which could have a material adverse effect on our operations and future prospects on a consolidated basis include, but are not limited to: changes in economic conditions, legislative/regulatory changes, availability of capital, interest rates, competition, and generally accepted accounting principles. These risks and uncertainties should also be considered in evaluating forward-looking statements and undue reliance should not be placed on such statements. We undertake no obligation to update or revise publicly any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. Further information concerning our business, including additional factors that could materially affect our financial results, is included herein and in our other filings with the SEC.

 

Company Overview

 

We are a New York-based pharmaceutical company devoted to improving nighttime and daytime quality of life for people with insomnia. We have developed Zleepax, which is the first sleep aid with beta blockers as the major active agent.

 

First generation beta blockers inhibited natural melatonin secretion and had a negative impact on sleep. Recent publications have shown that certain third-generation beta blockers actually improve quality of sleep for patients with mild hypertension. These third-generation beta blockers has been widely used to treat hypertension since the early 1990s, is well tolerated in chronic use, has an attractive side-effect profile, and should thus perform excellently applied as a sleep enhancer. Our patent application covers the use of beta blockers—alone or in combination with other anti-insomnia drugs—for the treatment of stress-related insomnia.

 

Since our inception, we have been attempting to raise money to implement our business plan, but, as yet, we have not been able to secure the funds necessary to do so. Due to the difficulties the Company has encountered with raising sufficient capital to implement the Company’s business strategy, the Board has considered various alternatives, and determined that it is in the best interests of the Company and its shareholders to transition to a new market and business focus.

 

The Company plans to focus on establishing a foothold on the fast-growing consumer hemp and cannabidiol (CBD) market. With the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, which formally legalized hemp crop and its extracts, primarily CBD, the Board believes that the consumer market in the US is poised for exponential growth, with projections that the CBD market is expected to reach an estimated value of $22 billion by 2022.

 

The Company is looking to capitalize and leverage the public markets to acquire market share through consolidation and business acquisitions. The Company will seek to create a platform that will combine equity and capital to facilitate acquisitions of premium branded products.

 

Our fiscal year end is August 31. Our principal offices are located at 244, 5th Avenue, Suite A-154 New York, N.Y. 10001. Our phone number is +1 (646) 453-4912.

 

 
4
 
Table of Contents

 

Results of Operation for Three and Nine Months Ended May 31, 2019 and 2018

 

Revenues

 

We generated no revenue for the three and nine months ended May 31, 2019 and 2018. We do not anticipate earnings revenues until we are able to obtain government approval on and sell our drug products.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Operating expenses increased to $6,115 for the three months ended May 31, 2019 from $12,602 for the three months ended May 31, 2018. Our operating expenses for the nine months ended May 31, 2019 consisted of administrative expenses of $17,395. Our operating expenses for the nine months ended May 31, 2018 consisted of administrative expenses of $13,602.

 

We expect that our operating expenses will likely increase in future quarters as clinical trials commence and we engage in other operations to bring our drug products to market.

 

Interest Expenses

 

We had interest expenses of $3,336 for the three months ended May 31, 2019, compared with interest expenses of $3,487 for the three months ended May 31, 2018.

 

Net Loss

 

Net loss for the three months ended May 31, 2019 was $9,451, compared to net loss of $16,089 for the three months ended May 31, 2018.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

As of May 31, 2019, we had current assets of $0. Our total current liabilities as of May 31, 2019 were $237,371. We therefore had negative working capital of $237,371 as of May 31, 2019.

 

Financing activities provided $0 for the three months ended May 31, 2019, as compared with cash provided of $0 for the same period ended 2018.

 

Based upon our current financial condition, we do not have sufficient cash to operate our business at the current level for the next twelve months. We intend to fund operations through increased sales and debt and/or equity financing arrangements, which may be insufficient to fund expenditures or other cash requirements. We plan to seek additional financing in a private equity offering to secure funding for operations. There can be no assurance that we will be successful in raising additional funding. If we are not able to secure additional funding, the implementation of our business plan will be impaired. There can be no assurance that such additional financing will be available to us on acceptable terms or at all.

 

 
5
 
Table of Contents

 

Off Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

As of May 31, 2019, there were no off-balance sheet arrangements.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

In December 2001, the SEC requested that all registrants list their most “critical accounting polices” in the Management Discussion and Analysis. The SEC indicated that a “critical accounting policy” is one which is both important to the portrayal of a company’s financial condition and results, and requires management’s most difficult, subjective or complex judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates about the effect of matters that are inherently uncertain.

 

Our accounting policies are discussed in detail in the footnotes to our financial statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended August 31, 2018. We do not consider any of our accounting policies as critical.

 

Going Concern

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared in conformity with generally accepted accounting principle, which contemplate our continuation as a going concern. However, we have no revenues as of February 28, 2019. We currently have negative working capital, and have not completed our efforts to establish a stabilized source of revenues sufficient to cover operating costs over an extended period of time.

 

Management anticipates that we will be dependent, for the near future, on additional investment capital to fund operating expenses. We intend to position the company so that we may be able to raise additional funds through the capital markets. In light of management’s efforts, there are no assurances that we will be successful in this or any of our endeavors or become financially viable and continue as a going concern.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

 

We do not expect the adoption of recently issued accounting pronouncements to have a significant impact on our results of operation, financial position or cash flow.

 

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

A smaller reporting company is not required to provide the information required by this Item.

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures

 

Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

We conducted an evaluation, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures, as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, as of May 31, 2019, to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports filed or submitted by us under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the Securities Exchange Commission’s rules and forms, including to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports filed or submitted by us under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our principal executive and principal financial officer, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Based on that evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that as of May 31, 2019, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective at the reasonable assurance level due to the material weaknesses identified and described below.

 

 
6
 
Table of Contents

 

Our principal executive officers do not expect that our disclosure controls or internal controls will prevent all error and all fraud. Although our disclosure controls and procedures were designed to provide reasonable assurance of achieving their objectives and our principal executive officers have determined that our disclosure controls and procedures are effective at doing so, a control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute assurance that the objectives of the system are met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented if there exists in an individual a desire to do so. There can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions.

 

Remediation Plan to Address the Material Weaknesses in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. Management identified the following three material weaknesses that have caused management to conclude that, as of May 31, 2019, our disclosure controls and procedures, and our internal control over financial reporting, were not effective at the reasonable assurance level:

 

 

1.We do not have written documentation of our internal control policies and procedures. Written documentation of key internal controls over financial reporting is a requirement of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act as of the period ending May 31, 2019. Management evaluated the impact of our failure to have written documentation of our internal controls and procedures on our assessment of our disclosure controls and procedures and has concluded that the control deficiency that resulted represented a material weakness.

 

 

 

 

2.We do not have sufficient segregation of duties within accounting functions, which is a basic internal control. Due to our size and nature, segregation of all conflicting duties may not always be possible and may not be economically feasible. However, to the extent possible, the initiation of transactions, the custody of assets and the recording of transactions should be performed by separate individuals. Management evaluated the impact of our failure to have segregation of duties on our assessment of our disclosure controls and procedures and has concluded that the control deficiency that resulted represented a material weakness.

 

 

 

 

3.Effective controls over the control environment were not maintained. Specifically, a formally adopted written code of business conduct and ethics that governs our employees, officers, and directors was not in place. Additionally, management has not developed and effectively communicated to employees its accounting policies and procedures. This has resulted in inconsistent practices. Further, our Board of Directors does not currently have any independent members and no director qualifies as an audit committee financial expert as defined in Item 407(d)(5)(ii) of Regulation S-K. Since these entity level programs have a pervasive effect across the organization, management has determined that these circumstances constitute a material weakness.

 

To address these material weaknesses, management performed additional analyses and other procedures to ensure that the financial statements included herein fairly present, in all material respects, our financial position, results of operations and cash flows for the periods presented. Accordingly, we believe that the financial statements included in this report fairly present, in all material respects, our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows for the periods presented.

 

To remediate the material weakness in our documentation, evaluation and testing of internal controls we plan to engage a third-party firm to assist us in remedying this material weakness once resources become available.

 

We intend to remedy our material weakness with regard to insufficient segregation of duties by hiring additional employees in order to segregate duties in a manner that establishes effective internal controls once resources become available.

 

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

No change in our system of internal control over financial reporting occurred during the period covered by this report, the period ended May 31, 2019, that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

 
7
 
Table of Contents

 

PART II – OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings

 

We are not a party to any pending legal proceeding. We are not aware of any pending legal proceeding to which any of our officers, directors, or any beneficial holders of 5% or more of our voting securities are adverse to us or have a material interest adverse to us.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors

 

We are a smaller reporting company as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and are not required to provide the information under this item.

 

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

 

On May 8, 2019, the Company issued 1,227,273 shares of its common stock for conversion of a note payable.

 

On May 18, 2019, the Company issued 1,227,273 shares of its common stock for conversion of a note payable.

 

Item 3. Defaults upon Senior Securities

 

None

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

 

N/A

 

Item 5. Other Information

 

On January 31, 2018, Birger Jan Olsen agreed to transfer his 18,000,000 shares of common stock in the Company to FJ Investments, Inc., a Utah corporation pursuant to a Stock Purchase Agreement. Mr. Olsen received proceeds of $5,000. The source of the consideration paid to Mr. Olsen was the existing funds of the purchaser. The Form 10 information required by Item 5.01 of Form 8-K is contained in this annual report on Form 10-K.

 

As a result of this transaction, there has been a change in control of the company. There are no arrangements known to the company, the operation of which may, at a subsequent date, result in a change in control of the registrant.

 

Item 6. Exhibits

 

 

**Provided herewith

 

 
8
 
Table of Contents

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

 

BioHemp International, Inc.

 Date: July 12, 2019  
By:/s/ Daniel Blum

 

Name

Daniel Blum

 
 Title

President, Chief Executive Officer, and Director

 

  

 

9