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Burzynski Research Institute
10-K 2019-02-28 Annual: 2019-02-28
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BZYR 2019-02-28
Part I
Item 1. Business
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 2. Properties
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Part II
Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity; Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6. Selected Financial Data
Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures
Item 9B. Other Information
Part III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11. Executive Compensation
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services
Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
Item 16. Form 10-K Summary
EX-31.1 a19-8091_1ex31d1.htm
EX-31.2 a19-8091_1ex31d2.htm
EX-32.1 a19-8091_1ex32d1.htm
EX-32.2 a19-8091_1ex32d2.htm

Burzynski Research Institute Earnings 2019-02-28

BZYR 10K Annual Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

10-K 1 a19-8091_110k.htm 10-K

Table of Contents

 

 

 

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark One)

x      ANNUAL REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended February 28, 2019

 

o         TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from                to               

 

Commission file number 000-23425

 

BURZYNSKI RESEARCH INSTITUTE, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware

 

76-0136810

(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

 

9432 Katy Freeway

 

 

Houston, Texas

 

77055

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code:  (713) 335-5697

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

(Title of each class)

 

Trading Symbol(s)

 

(Name of each exchange on which registered)

None

 

 

 

None

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:  Common Stock, $.001 par value

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes o No x

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act.  Yes o  No x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes x  No o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).  Yes x No o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company.  See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer o

Accelerated filer o

Non-accelerated filer o

Smaller reporting company x

Emerging growth company o

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes o No x

 

As of August 29, 2018, the aggregate market value of the Common Stock held by non-affiliates was approximately $1,073,638, based on the last reported sales price of the Registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter.  For purposes of this disclosure, shares of Common Stock held by persons who hold more than 5% of the outstanding shares of common stock and shares held by officers and directors of the registrant have been excluded as such persons may be deemed to be affiliates.

 

As of May 1, 2019, there were 131,448,444 shares of the Registrant’s Common Stock outstanding.

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

 

Documents incorporated by reference:  None.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

 

FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This report contains forward-looking statements, including statements regarding future financial performance and results and other statements that are not historical facts. Such statements are included in “Business,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and elsewhere in this report. When used in this report, words such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “could,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “expect,” “estimate,” “intend,” “plan,” “predict,” “potential,” “continue” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Although the Company believes that the expectations reflected in these forward-looking statements are reasonable, there can be no assurance that actual results or developments anticipated by the Company will be realized or, even if realized, that they will have the expected effects on its business or operations. Actual results could differ materially from those contemplated by the forward-looking statements as a result of certain factors beyond the Company’s control including: the ability to develop safe and efficacious drugs, the failure to achieve positive clinical trials, the failure to successfully commercialize our products, competition and technological change and existing and future regulations affecting our business.

 


Table of Contents

 

BURZYNSKI RESEARCH INSTITUTE, INC.

 

FORM 10-K

 

FISCAL YEAR ENDED FEBRUARY 28, 2019

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I

 

3

 

 

 

ITEM 1.

BUSINESS

3

ITEM 1A.

RISK FACTORS

15

ITEM 2.

PROPERTIES

24

ITEM 3.

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

24

ITEM 4.

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

24

 

 

 

PART II

 

25

 

 

 

ITEM 5.

MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY; RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

25

ITEM 6.

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

25

ITEM 7.

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

25

ITEM 8.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

27

ITEM 9.

CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

27

ITEM 9A.

CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

28

ITEM 9B.

OTHER INFORMATION

28

 

 

 

PART III

 

29

 

 

 

ITEM 10.

DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

29

ITEM 11.

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

30

ITEM 12.

SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

31

ITEM 13.

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

31

ITEM 14.

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES

33

 

 

 

PART IV

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 15.

EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

34

ITEM 16.

FORM 10-K SUMMARY

34

 


Table of Contents

 

PART I

 

ITEM 1.                        BUSINESS

 

General

 

Burzynski Research Institute, Inc. (the “Company”) was incorporated under the laws of the State of Delaware in 1984 in order to engage in the research, production, marketing, promotion and sale of certain medical chemical compounds composed of growth-inhibiting peptides, amino acid derivatives and organic acids which are known under the trade name “Antineoplastons.” The Company believes Antineoplastons are useful in the treatment of human cancer and is currently reviewing data of its Phase II clinical trials of Antineoplastons relating to the treatment of various cancers.  Antineoplastons have not been approved for sale or use by the Food and Drug Administration of the United States Department of Health and Human Services (“FDA”) or anywhere in the world. In the event Antineoplastons receive such approval and are registered in the United States, Canada, or Mexico, of which there can be no assurance, the Company will commence commercial operations, which shall include the production, marketing, promotion and sale of Antineoplastons in the United States, Canada, or Mexico. In 2004, the FDA approved the designation of Antineoplastons as an “orphan drug” under the Orphan Drug Act of 1983. See “Orphan Drug Designation” below for a detailed description of this designation and its meaning. The Company currently provides Antineoplastons solely for use by Stanislaw R. Burzynski, M.D., Ph.D. (“Dr. Burzynski”) in clinical research.

 

The Company has not generated any significant operating revenue since its inception. The Company’s sole source of funding for its operations has been and continues to be payments made by Dr. Burzynski from funds generated from Dr. Burzynski’s medical practice pursuant to various arrangements between the Company and Dr. Burzynski. See Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.” The Company reports funds pursuant to such arrangements as additional paid-in capital. See Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” The Company does not expect to generate significant operating revenue until such time, if any, as Antineoplastons are approved for use and sale by the FDA. However, the Company may seek additional funding for operations through the sale of its securities.

 

Antineoplastons

 

Dr. Burzynski commenced his cancer research in 1967 focusing on the isolation of various biochemicals produced by the human body as part of the body’s possible defense against cancer. In the course of his research, Dr. Burzynski identified certain peptides, amino acid derivatives and organic acids in these biochemicals which appear to inhibit the growth of cancer cells. These derivatives were given the name “Antineoplastons” by Dr. Burzynski.

 

Antineoplastons are found in the bodily fluids of humans and food and were initially isolated by Dr. Burzynski from normal human blood and urine. Dr. Burzynski believes these substances counteract the development of cancerous growth through a biochemical process which does not inhibit the growth of normal tissues. To date, Dr. Burzynski has developed six formulations of natural Antineoplastons and six synthetic formulations of Antineoplastons. The Phase III clinical trial currently sponsored by the Company (which has not started enrollment) will involve the use of two formulations of synthetic Antineoplastons known as A10 and AS2-1 injections.

 

Orphan Drug Designation

 

On September 3, 2004, the FDA granted the Company’s request for “orphan drug designation” (“ODD”) for the Company’s Antineoplastons (A10 & AS2-1 Antineoplaston) for treatment for patients with brain stem glioma and, on October 30, 2008, the FDA granted the Company’s request for ODD for Antineoplastons (A10 and AS2-1 Antineoplaston) for the treatment of gliomas. In enacting the Orphan Drug Act of 1983, Congress sought to provide incentives to promote the development of drugs for the treatment of rare diseases. A drug may be considered for orphan drug designation if the drug is intended to treat a rare disease or condition affecting fewer than 200,000 people in the United States or, even if the drug treats a disease affecting more than 200,000 people in the United States, the drug is not expected to be profitable from sales in the United States. Subject to applicable laws and regulations, the first sponsor to obtain FDA marketing approval for a drug with orphan drug designation for the designated disease or condition receives limited marketing exclusivity for seven years; no other sponsor may bring to market the “same drug” for the treatment of the same disease or condition for a period of seven years from the date the application is approved by the FDA. A drug with orphan drug designation must meet the same criteria for safety and efficacy as a drug without orphan drug designation. Please see “Government Regulation” for a description of the regulatory approval process with the FDA and other regulatory agencies.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Phase II Clinical Trials

 

The Company began Phase II clinical studies in 1994 with four studies. At that time, a number of patients were also receiving Antineoplastons at Dr. Burzynski’s clinic in Houston, Texas (the “Burzynski Clinic”) outside these clinical trials. On February 23, 1996, the FDA requested that all then-current patients of the Burzynski Clinic desiring to continue Antineoplaston treatment be admitted to a Phase II Study, according to Protocol CAN-1. This action resulted in the formation of six cohorts of patients in the CAN-1 study, with the largest group suffering from primary brain tumors.

 

The Company received IRB approval on February 4, 2015 for FDA reviewed, open label, phase II study of Antineoplaston A10 and AS2-1 in patients with a Diffuse Intrinsic Brainstem Glioma (DIPG) in five treatment groups based on patients age and prior treatment.

 

On April 20, 2016, the Company received a full clinical hold letter from the FDA based on FDA’s inspection of S.R. Burzynski’s manufacturing facility in March 2015.  On April 27, 2016, the Company requested to change the full clinical hold to partial clinical hold to allow patient #1 (“patient #1”) to continue the Antineoplaston treatment according to protocol BT-55, since the patient was enrolled before the full clinical hold was imposed.  Based on the FDA’s position regarding the Company’s request on April 27, 2016 and the Company’s teleconference with the FDA on May 3, 2016, the Company removed patient #1 from the study.

 

A temporary restraining order from the US District Court of Rhode Island allowed the resumption of patient #1’s Antineoplaston therapy on May 17, 2016.  As a result of such temporary restraining order, a subsequent letter from the FDA dated May 26, 2016 informed the Company that the full clinical hold was replaced and a partial clinical hold was imposed.  As a result, patient #1 restarted treatment under IND 43742.

 

On June 14, 2016, the FDA issued a letter to the Company in connection with the FDA’s inspection of S.R. Burzynski’s manufacturing facility (the “SRB Manufacturing”) in March 2015.  The SRB Manufacturing addressed the issues raised in the letter in a response letter submitted to the FDA on July 5, 2016 and in subsequent letters.

 

On February 20, 2017, BRI informed the FDA the death of patient #1 on February 19, 2017. No new patients can be enrolled to protocol BT-55 or BT-52 until partial hold on IND 43742 is lifted. On August 24, 2017, the FDA imposed a full clinical hold on IND 43742 until deficiencies regarding the SRB Manufacturing are resolved.

 

All Phase II clinical trials were for the treatment of a wide variety of cancers using only a combination of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1.  Most of the trials involve the use of intravenous formulations of Antineoplastons; however, a few trials use oral formulations. Dr. Burzynski acts as principal investigator for all clinical trials pursuant to a Royalty Agreement between the Company and Dr. Burzynski. See “Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.” All of the clinical trials were conducted at the Burzynski Clinic. Each trial provided for the admission of up to 40 patients, except the CAN-1 study, in which 133 patients were enrolled.

 

Nineteen publications by Burzynski Clinic resulting from the trials have been published in peer-reviewed medical journals:

 

(1) Burzynski, S., Janicki, T., Burzynski, G., Marszalek, A. Long-term survival (>13 years) in a child with recurrent diffuse pontine gliosarcoma: A case report. J Ped Hematol Oncol 2013; doi: 10.1097/MPH.0000000000000020;

 

(2) Burzynski, S.R., Janicki, T.J., Burzynski, G.S.  A phase II study of antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in adult patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. Final report (Protocol BT-21). J Cancer Ther 2014;5:946-956;

 

(3) Burzynski, S.R., Janicki, T.J., Burzynski, G.S., Marszalek, A., Brookman, S.  A phase II study of antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in children with recurrent, refractory or progressive primary brain tumors. Final report (Protocol BT-22). J Cancer Ther 2014;5:977-988;

 

(4) Burzynski, S.R., Janicki, T.J., Burzynski, G.S., Marszalek, A.  A phase II study of antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in children with high-grade glioma. Final report (Protocol BT-06), and review of recent trials. J Cancer Ther 2014;5:565-577;

 

(5)Burzynski S.R., Burzynski G.S., Janicki T.J. Recurrent glioblastoma multiforme - A strategy for long-term survival. Journal of Cancer Therapy, 2014,5,957-976;

 

(6) Burzynski, S.R., Janicki, T.J., Burzynski, G.S.  A phase II study of antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in adult patients with recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma. Final report (Protocol BT-15). Cancer and Clinical Oncology; Vol. 4, No. 2, 2015;

 

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Table of Contents

 

(7) Burzynski, S.R., Janicki, T.J., Burzynski, G.S., Marszalek, A.  A phase II study of antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in patients with brainstem gliomas.  The report on non-diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (Protocol BT-11). J Cancer Ther 2015;6:334-344;

 

(8) Burzynski, S.R., Janicki, T.J., Burzynski, G.S., Marszalek, A.  A phase II study of antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in adult patients with newly-diagnosed anaplastic astrocytoma. Final report (Protocol BT-08). Cancer Clin Oncol 2015;4(1):28-38;

 

(9) Burzynski, S.R., Janicki, T.J., Burzynski, G.S., Marszalek, A. The response and survival of children with recurrent diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma based on phase II study of antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in patients with brainstem glioma. Child’s Nervous System 2014;30(12):2051-2061;

 

(10) Burzynski, S.R., Burzynski,. Marszalek, A., Janicki, J., Martinez-Canca, J. Long-term survival (over 20 years), complete response and normal childhood development in medulloblastoma treated with Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1. J Neurol Stroke 2015, 2(3): 00054;

 

(11) Burzynski, S.R., Burzynski, G.S., Marszalek, A., Janicki, T.J., Martinez-Canca, J.F. Long-term survival over 21 years and pathologically confirmed complete response in pediatric anaplastic astrocytoma: A case report. J Neurol Stroke 2015;2(6):00072;

 

(12) Burzynski, S.R., Janicki, J., Burzynski, G. Comprehensive genomic profiling of recurrent classic glioblastoma in a patient surviving eleven years following antineoplaston therapy. Cancer Clin Oncol 2015;4(2)41-52;

 

(13) Burzynski, S.R., Burzynski, G., Janicki, J., Marszalek, A. Complete response and Long-term survival (>20 years) of a child with tectal glioma: A case report. Pediatr Neurosurg DOI: 10.1159/000369907;

 

(14) Burzynski, S.R., Janicki, J., Burzynski, G. A phase II study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 adult patients with primary brain tumors. Final Report (Protocol BT-09) Journal of Cancer Therapy, 2015, 6, 1063-1074;

 

(15) Burzynski, S.R., Janicki, J., Burzynski, G. Primary CNS tumors and Leptomeningeal, Disseminated and/or Multicentric disease in children treated in Phase II studies with Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1. Cancer and Clinical Oncology; Vol. 5, No. 2; 2016;

 

(16) Burzynski, S.R., Janicki, J., Burzynski, G. A phase II study of antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in children with low-grade astrocytomas—Final report (Protocol BT-13). Cancer Ther 2016; 7(12):837-850.

 

(17) Burzynski, S.R., Janicki, J., Burzynski, G. Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in the Treatment of children with optic pathway glioma: Final Report for protocol BT-23. Cancer and Clinical Oncology; Vol. 6, No. 1; 2017.

 

(18) Burzynski, S.R., Janicki, J., Burzynski, G. A phase II study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in children with brain tumors. Final Report (Protocol BT-10). Journal of Cancer Therapy, 2017,8, 173-187.

 

(19) Burzynski S.R., Janicki, T., Beenken, S.  Treatment of Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme (rGBM) with Antineoplaston AS2-1 in Combination with Targeted Therapy. Cancer and Clinical Oncology; Vol.8, No. 1; 2019.

 

One additional publication has been published in 2015 by Kurume University Medical Center in Japan: (20) Ogata, Y., Matono K., Tsuda, H., Ushijima, M., Uchida, S., Akagi, Y., Shirouzu, K. Randomized Phase II Study of 5-Fluorouracil Hepatic Arterial Infusion with or without Antineoplastons as an Adjuvant Therapy after Hepatectomy for Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer. PLOS One (Public Library of Science) DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0120064.

 

Prior to approving a New Drug Application (“NDA”), the FDA requires that a drug’s safety and efficacy be demonstrated in “well-controlled” clinical trials.  The efficacy of the Company’s trials is determined by the protocol specified endpoint of “objective response” (i.e., significant shrinkage or disappearance of the tumor).  Several types of controls are acceptable to the FDA. One of these is a “Historic Control.” Under a Historic Control if the course of a disease is well-known, the response of patients taking a drug can be compared to a historic group of patients with that disease. For example, it is known that the tumors of patients suffering from primary malignant brain tumors (“PMBT”) will continue to grow, eventually causing the patient’s death. If a drug is administered to a patient with PMBT and the tumors of the patient disappear or shrink significantly, an assumption is made that there has been a response to the drug. The results of other clinical trials conducted or published when the Company’s protocol were active are used by us as historical control.

 

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Table of Contents

 

All of the Company’s clinical trials, except one, involve the use of Historic Controls. Further, all trials except the CAN-1 study are “prospective clinical trials” (“PCT”). A PCT is a clinical trial wherein patients are accrued into and follow the clinical trial protocol from the very beginning of the trial. A retrospective trial is a trial in which data from patients treated prior to the start of a clinical trial is considered. Results of retrospective trials are, in most instances, not acceptable to the FDA. In addition, there are no clinical trials being conducted that involve “double blind” studies and all but one clinical trial involve no randomization into multiple treatment groups.

 

The ultimate goal of any treatment for cancer is patient survival. However, the FDA has determined that requiring exhaustive data showing improved patient survival may unnecessarily delay the approval of new cancer drugs. For that reason, the FDA may grant marketing approval for a new drug product on the basis of adequate and well-controlled clinical trials establishing that the drug has an effect on a surrogate endpoint (“Milestone”) that is reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit. Each of the Company’s Phase II trials describes such Milestones which are used to determine success or failure of the treatment employed. In most of the trials, the Milestones are radiographic evidence of tumor shrinkage by X-ray, computer aided tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Where appropriate, tumor markers such as Prostate Specific Antigen, blood counts, or bone marrow biopsy are used in order to assess a tumor’s growth.

 

Where tumor size is used as the Milestone, each clinical trial protocol describes a “complete response” as a complete disappearance of all tumors with no recurrence of tumors for at least four weeks. A “partial response” is described as at least a 50% reduction in total tumor size, with such reduction lasting at least four weeks. An “objective response” is described as either a complete or partial response for protocols BT-06, BT-07, BT-08, BT-09, BT-10, BT-11, BT-12, BT-13, BT-15, BT-21, BT-22 and BT-23. “Stable disease” is described as less than 50% reduction in size but no more than 25% increase in size of the tumor mass lasting for at least twelve weeks and 50% increase in CAN-1 protocol.

 

The protocols of the Company’s clinical trials involve a two-stage design, wherein the first stage proceeds until the Company admits 20 patients into the trial. After a specified time period, if there were zero responses by the first 20 patients, the trial would be discontinued and the drug declared to have less than desired activity. If there was at least one response, the trial would be continued until forty patients had been accrued. If the study continued, the following conclusions according to protocols based on 40 patients can be made: If there were three or fewer responses, then there is less than desired activity. If there were four or more responses, then there was sufficient evidence to conclude that the Antineoplaston regimen used showed beneficial activity.

 

Certain prospective Phase II protocols which reached a Milestone as of February 28, 2019:

 

·                  Protocol BT-06, involving the study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in children with high grade glioma (study and special exception patients).  Objective responses: 4 patients (2 patients with a complete response and 2 patients with a partial response); Stable disease: 3 patients.

 

·                  Protocol BT-07, involving the study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in patients with glioblastoma multiforme, not treated with radiation therapy or chemotherapy (study and special exception patients).  Objective responses: 5 patients (2 patients with a complete response and 3 patients with a partial response); Stable disease: 5 patients.

 

·                  Protocol BT-08, involving the study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in patients with anaplastic astrocytoma. Objective responses: 4 patients (3 patients with a complete response and 1 patient with a partial response); Stable disease: 5 patients.

 

·                  Protocol BT-09, involving the study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in patients with brain tumors. Objective responses: 9 patients (4 patients with a complete response and 5 patients with a partial response); Stable disease: 12 patients.

 

·                  Protocol BT-10, involving the study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in children with brain tumors. Objective responses: 7 patients (2 patients with a complete response and 5 patients with a partial response); Stable disease: 5 patients.

 

·                  Protocol BT-11, involving the study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in patients with brainstem glioma. Objective responses: 9 patients (5 patients with a complete response and 4 patients with a partial response); Stable disease: 8 patients.

 

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Table of Contents

 

·                  Protocol BT-12, involving the study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in children with primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET). Objective responses: 4 patients (3 patients with a complete response and 1 patient with a partial response); Stable disease: 1 patient.

 

·                  Protocol BT-13, involving the study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in children with low grade astrocytoma. Objective responses: 5 patients (4 patients with a complete response and 1 patient with a partial response); Stable disease: 4 patients.

 

·                  Protocol BT-15, involving the study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in adult patients with anaplastic astrocytoma. Objective responses: 5 patients (2 patients with a complete response and 3 patients with a partial response); Stable disease: 6 patients.

 

·                  Protocol BT-21, involving the study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in adults with primary malignant brain tumors. Objective responses: 4 patients (2 patients with a complete response and 2 patients with a partial response); Stable disease: 4 patients.

 

·                  Protocol BT-22, involving a study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in children with primary malignant brain tumors (study and special exception patients). Objective responses: 5 patients (1 patient with a complete response and 4 patients with a partial response); Stable disease: 8 patients.

 

·                  Protocol BT-23, involving a study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in children with visual pathway glioma. Objective responses: 4 patients (2 patients with a complete response and 2 patients with a partial response); Stable disease: 3 patients.

 

·                  Protocol CAN-1, involving a study of Antineoplastons A-10 and AS2-1 in 35 evaluable brain tumor patients. Complete and partial responses were obtained in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme, astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, mixed glioma, medulloblastoma, and malignant meningioma. Objective responses: 17 patients (12 patients with a complete response and 5 patients with a partial response); Stable disease: 11 patients.

 

The results of Protocols BT-06, BT-07, BT-08, BT-09, BT-10, BT-11, BT-12, BT-13, BT-15, BT-20, BT-21, BT-22 and BT-23 are set forth below (as of November 30, 2018).

 

Protocol
Number

 

Patients
Accrued

 

Evaluable
Patients

 

Number and
Percentage of
Patients Showing
Complete
Response**

 

Number and
Percentage of
Patients Showing
Partial
Response**

 

Number and
Percentage of
Patients Showing
Stable Disease**

 

Number and
Percentage of
Patients Showing
Progressive
Disease**

 

BT-06*

 

19

 

11

 

2

 

18.2

%

2

 

18.2

%

3

 

27.3

%

4

 

36.4

%

BT-07*

 

102

 

69

 

2

 

2.9

%

3

 

4.3

%

5

 

7.2

%

59

 

85.5

%

BT-08

 

19

 

18

 

3

 

16.7

%

1

 

5.5

%

5

 

27.8

%

9

 

50.0

%

BT-09

 

40

 

31

 

4

 

12.9

%

5

 

16.1

%

12

 

38.7

%

10

 

32.3

%

BT-10

 

34

 

30

 

2

 

6.7

%

5

 

16.7

%

5

 

16.7

%

18

 

60.0

%

BT-11

 

40

 

31

 

5

 

16.1

%

4

 

12.9

%

8

 

25.8

%

14

 

45.2

%

BT-12

 

13

 

12

 

3

 

25.0

%

1

 

8.3

%

1

 

8.3

%

7

 

58.3

%

BT-13

 

11

 

9

 

4

 

44.4

%

1

 

11.1

%

4

 

44.4

%

0

 

0.0

%

BT-15

 

27

 

21

 

2

 

9.5

%

3

 

14.3

%

6

 

28.6

%

10

 

47.6

%

BT-21

 

40

 

27

 

2

 

7.4

%

2

 

7.4

%

4

 

14.8

%

19

 

70.4

%

BT-22*

 

43

 

32

 

1

 

3.1

%

4

 

12.5

%

8

 

25.0

%

19

 

59.4

%

BT-23

 

12

 

8

 

2

 

25.0

%

2

 

25.0

%

3

 

37.5

%

1

 

12.5

%

 


*                 includes Special Exception patients

**          percentage is calculated vs. evaluable patients

 

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The Phase II Study according to Protocol CAN-1 included 35 evaluable brain tumor patients. Complete and partial responses were obtained in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme, astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, mixed glioma, medulloblastoma, and malignant meningioma. The treatment with Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 resulted in 17 (48.6%) cases of objective responses and 11 (31.4%) cases of stable disease defined as less than 50% reduction, or less than 50% increase in size of the tumor mass, lasting for at least 12 weeks. The largest group of evaluable patients involved in the study had glioblastoma multiforme. Six of the cases were classified as complete and partial responses, four obtained stabilization and four developed progression of the disease.

 

Of the 2,297 patients who have received at least one dose of Antineoplastons, the serious adverse events (SAEs) which have been experienced are as follows:  hemoglobin (grade 3: 3 patients; grade 4: 1 patient), extravasation (grade 3: 1 patient), pain related to the central venous catheter (grade 3: 1 patient), fatigue (grade 3: 2 patients; grade 4: 1 patient), fever (grade 3: 2 patients), injection site reaction (grade 3: 1 patient), vomiting (grade 3: 2 patients), hypernatremia (grade 3: 2 patients; grade 4: 28 patients; grade 5: 6 patients-not confirmed by autopsy), confusion (grade 3: 1 patient), seizure (grade 3: 1 patient), somnolence (grade 3: 8 patients; grade 4: 1 patient), pain: head/headache (grade 3: 2 patients) and pain: joint (grade 3: 1 patient). 491 out of 2,298 patients experienced hypernatremia that was possibly related to the study drug, regardless of severity.

 

Notwithstanding the response results of the trials that have reached a Milestone, management believes it is likely that the FDA may require additional clinical trials based upon such protocols to be conducted by an institution not affiliated with the Company or Dr. Burzynski before advising that an NDA filing is warranted. In addition, the FDA has indicated it will not accept the efficacy data, but will accept toxicity data generated by the Phase II study according to Protocol CAN-1 because the trial was partially retrospective. At this time, the Company cannot predict if and/or when it will submit an NDA to the FDA, nor can the Company estimate the number or type of additional trials the FDA may require. Further, there can be no assurance that an NDA for Antineoplastons, as a treatment for cancer, will ever be approved by the FDA.

 

No assurance can be given that any new IND for clinical tests on humans will be approved by the FDA for human clinical trials on cancer or other diseases, that the results of such human clinical trials will prove that Antineoplastons are safe or effective in the treatment of cancer or other diseases, or that the FDA would approve the sale of Antineoplastons in the United States.

 

Phase III Clinical Trials

 

On January 13, 2009, the Company announced that it reached an agreement with the FDA that enabled the Company to move forward immediately with a pivotal Phase III clinical trial of combination Antineoplaston therapy plus radiation therapy in patients with newly-diagnosed, diffuse, intrinsic brainstem glioma. The agreement was made under the FDA’s Special Protocol Assessment procedure and means that the design and planned analysis of the Phase III study is acceptable to support a regulatory submission seeking new drug approval. However, the FDA placed a full clinical hold on IND 43,742 regarding such Phase III clinical trial. Please see the section below entitled “Clinical Hold on Phase II and Phase III Clinical Trials.”

 

Clinical Hold on Phase II and Phase III Clinical Trials

 

In a letter dated June 25, 2012, the Company informed the FDA of a serious adverse event in which a patient who was receiving Antineoplastons developed grade 4 hypernatremia and subsequently died. The Antineoplaston-related hypernatremia was categorized by the investigator as possibly related to the study drug.  Of the 2298 patients who have received at least one dose of Antineoplastons, the serious adverse events (SAEs) which have been experienced are as follows:  hemoglobin (grade 3: 0.13%; grade 4: 0.04%), extravasation (grade 3: 0.04%), pain (grade 3: 0.04%), fatigue (grade 3: 0.09%; grade 4: 0.04%), fever (grade 3: 0.09%), injection site reaction (grade 3: 0.04%), vomiting (grade 3: 0.09%), hypernatremia (grade 3: 0.09%; grade 4: 1.12%; grade 5: 0.26%), confusion (grade 3: 0.04%), seizure (grade 3: 0.04%), somnolence (grade 3: 0.35%; grade 4: 0.04%), pain: head/headache (grade 3: 0.09%) and pain: joint (grade 3: 0.04%).

 

On July 30, 2012, the FDA placed a partial clinical hold for enrollment of new pediatric patients under single patient protocols or in any of the active Phase II or Phase III studies under investigational new drug application (“IND”) 43,742.  The FDA imposed this partial clinical hold because, according to the FDA, insufficient information had been submitted by the Company to allow the FDA to determine whether the potential patient benefit justifies the potential risks of treatment use, and that the potential risks are not unreasonable in the context of the disease or condition to be treated.  The FDA cited 21 C.F.R. § 312.42(b)(2)(i), 21 C.F.R. § 312.42(b)(1)(iv), and 21 C.F.R. § 312.42(b)(3)(i), as grounds for imposition of a clinical hold; and 21 C.F.R. § 312.305(a)(2), a criteria for expanded access use.  The FDA advised the Company that until it resolved the matter to FDA’s satisfaction, the Company could not enroll new pediatric patients in any protocol under such IND.  The Company later notified the FDA in a September 24, 2012 letter that it was closing pediatric protocol BT-10 (under IND 43,742) for enrollment effective September 25, 2012, and that it would also terminate the protocol once all active patients had completed the study. As of February 17, 2015, all patients discontinued treatment under protocol BT-10 and such protocol was closed as of March 10, 2015.

 

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In a teleconference on January 9, 2013 between the FDA and the Company, followed by a letter of the same date, the FDA notified the Company that the agency was placing IND 43,742 on partial clinical hold, due to a lack of a complete response to the issues raised by the FDA and what the FDA deemed a misleading, erroneous, and incomplete investigator brochure.  The FDA cited 21 C.F.R. § 312.42(b)(2)(i) and 21 C.F.R. § 312.42(b)(1)(iii), as grounds for imposition of a clinical hold.  The FDA further advised the Company that until it resolved the matter to the FDA’s satisfaction, that the Company could not enroll new adult or pediatric patients in any protocol under such IND.  The FDA also placed protocol BT-52 on clinical hold due to what the FDA deemed to be an unreasonable and significant risk of illness or injury to human subjects.  The FDA cited 21 C.F.R. § 312.42(b)(2)(i) and 21 C.F.R.§ 312.42(B)(1)(i), as grounds for imposition of a clinical hold.  The FDA advised the Company that until it resolved the matter to FDA’s satisfaction, the Company could not legally conduct the identified clinical study under such IND.  In a teleconference with the FDA on September 16, 2013 and pursuant to the Company’s notification letter dated September 17, 2013, the Company notified the FDA that the proposed Phase III protocol BT-54 had been withdrawn from further consideration.

 

After several amendments to the IND which were reviewed by the FDA, the FDA concluded that BT-52 can be initiated and partial clinical hold was removed by the FDA on June 20, 2014.

 

Additionally, the Company received IRB approval on February 4, 2015 for FDA reviewed, open label, phase II study of Antineoplaston A10 and AS2-1 in patients with a Diffuse Intrinsic Brainstem Glioma (DIPG) in five treatment groups based on patients age and prior treatment.

 

On April 20, 2016, the Company received a full clinical hold letter from the FDA based on FDA’s inspection of S.R. Burzynski’s manufacturing facility in March 2015.  On April 27, 2016, the Company requested to change the full clinical hold to partial clinical hold to allow patient #1 to continue the Antineoplaston treatment according to protocol BT-55, since the patient was enrolled before the full clinical hold was imposed.  Based on the FDA’s position regarding the Company’s request on April 27, 2016 and the Company’s teleconference with the FDA on May 3, 2016, the Company removed patient #1 from the study.

 

A temporary restraining order from the US District Court of Rhode Island allowed the resumption of patient #1’s Antineoplaston therapy on May 17, 2016.  As a result of such temporary restraining order, a subsequent letter from the FDA dated May 26, 2016 informed the Company that the full clinical hold was replaced and a partial clinical hold was imposed.  As a result, Patient #1 restarted treatment under IND 43742.

 

On June 14, 2016, the FDA issued a letter to the Company in connection with the FDA’s inspection of S.R. Burzynski’s manufacturing facility in March 2015.  The SRB Manufacturing addressed the issues raised in the letter in a response letter submitted to the FDA on July 5, 2016 and in subsequent letters.

 

On February 20, 2017, BRI informed the FDA the death of patient #1 on February 19, 2017. No new patients can be enrolled to protocol BT-55 or BT-52 until partial hold on IND 43742 is lifted. On August 24, 2017, the FDA imposed a full clinical hold on IND 43742 until deficiencies regarding the SRB Manufacturing are resolved.

 

Complaint Filed by the Texas Medical Board Against Dr. Burzynski

 

On March 3, 2017, the Texas Medical Board issued their final ruling regarding the complaint filed on December 11, 2013 and subsequently amended in July 2014 and November 2014, against Dr. Stanislaw R. Burzynski, who serves as our President and the Chairman of our Board of Directors.  The Texas Medical Board made allegations that Dr. Burzynski had acted unprofessionally and failed to meet standards of care under the state’s Medical Practice Act. In the final ruling, the Texas Medical Board found that Dr. Burzynski was subject to sanction for various failures that included supervision of foreign medical graduates, untimely and insufficient informed consent, medical record support documentation, tumor measurement reporting inaccuracy, and lack of disclosure of ownership interest in a pharmacy.  As a result, Dr. Burzynski was reprimanded.  His Texas license was suspended for five years but that suspension was stayed and he was placed under probation under terms and conditions that include having billing practice monitored by a billing monitor for 12 consecutive monitoring cycles, enrolling and completing a physicians education program ethics course, following informed consent protocol, passing the Medical Jurisprudence Examination, and compliance with the Medical Practice Act and other statutes regulating Dr. Burzynski’s practice.  As requested as part of the terms and conditions, Dr. Burzynski has completed payment of an administrative penalty and restitution, submission of all informed consent forms for review,  submission of an ownership interest disclosure form for review, and he has completed continuing medical education.  The Company does not believe that the final order will have an adverse impact on current activities at the Burzynski clinic.   However, if any outcomes or changes arise relating to similar matters or future allegations, this could result in substantial harm to the Company’s business and operations.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Government Regulation

 

The FDA imposes substantial requirements upon, and conditions precedent to, the introduction of therapeutic drug products to the marketplace.  Seeking marketing authorization for a new drug is a lengthy, complex, and costly process.  To seek FDA approval for Antineoplastons, the Company must first complete extensive preclinical and clinical research, and submit data from this research and supporting information to the FDA to demonstrate that the use of Antineoplastons for the indication sought meets the statutory standards for safety and effectiveness, manufacturing and controls, and labeling.

 

The approval process takes many years, requires the expenditure of substantial resources and may involve ongoing requirements for post-marketing studies. Additional government regulation may be established that could prevent or delay regulatory approval of Antineoplastons. Moreover, there can be no assurance that the Company can satisfy FDA requirements to gain approval for Antineoplastons in the United States or that FDA approval for the sale of Antineoplastons in the United States will be obtained. If regulatory approval is granted, the approval may include significant limitations on the indicated uses for which Antineoplastons may be marketed.

 

The effect of the FDA drug approval process for Antineoplastons may impose costly procedures upon the Company’s activities which may furnish a competitive advantage to the other companies that compete with the Company in the field of cancer treatment drugs. The extent of potentially adverse government regulations which might arise from future legislation or administrative action cannot be predicted.

 

The Investigational New Drug Application Process in the United States is governed by regulations established by the FDA which strictly control the use and distribution of investigational drugs in the United States. The guidelines require that an IND, filed by a sponsor, contain sufficient information to justify administering the drug to humans, that the application include relevant information on the chemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of the drug derived from chemical, laboratory and animal or in vitro testing, and that a protocol be provided for the initial study of the new drug to be conducted on humans.

 

In order to conduct a clinical trial of a new drug on humans, a sponsor must prepare and submit to the FDA a comprehensive IND. Such application must contain an investigator’s brochure, a description of the composition, manufacture and control of the drug substance and the drug product, sufficient information to assure the proper identification, quality, purity and strength of the investigational drug, a description of the drug substance, including its physical, chemical, and biological characteristics, the general method of preparation of the drug substance, a list of all components including interactive ingredients, adequate information about pharmacological and toxicological studies of the drug involving laboratory animals or in vitro tests on the basis of which the sponsor has concluded that it is reasonably safe to conduct the proposed clinical investigation and a summary of any previous human experience with the drug. Where there has been widespread use of the drug outside of the United States or otherwise, it is possible in some limited circumstances to use well-documented clinical experience in place of some other pre-clinical work.

 

The focal point of the IND is on the general investigational plan and the protocols for specific human studies. The sponsor of the study is subject to numerous requirements for the proper conduct and oversight of the study, including the protection of human subjects.  The plan is carried out in three phases, and earlier phase trials are not necessarily predictive of results in later clinical trials.  Phase I includes the initial introduction of an investigational new drug into humans and may be conducted in patients or normal volunteer subjects. The studies are closely monitored to determine the metabolism and pharmacologic actions of the drug in humans and the potential side effects and, if possible, to gain early evidence on effectiveness. During Phase I testing, sufficient information about the drug is gathered to design well-controlled, scientifically valid Phase II studies. Phase II includes controlled clinical studies conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the drug for a particular indication in patients with the disease or condition under study and to determine the common short-term side effects and risks associated with the drug. Phase II studies are controlled, closely monitored and conducted in a relatively small number of patients, usually involving no more than several hundred subjects. Phase III includes expanded controlled and uncontrolled trials and are intended to gather the additional information about effectiveness and safety that is needed to evaluate the overall benefit-risk relationship of the drug and to provide an adequate basis for physician labeling. Phase III studies usually include anywhere from several hundred to several thousand subjects.

 

An IND will automatically become effective 30 days after receipt by the FDA, unless before that time the FDA raises concerns about issues such as the conduct of the trials as outlined in the IND. After the IND becomes effective, the investigation is permitted to proceed, during which the sponsor must keep the FDA informed of new studies, including animal studies, make progress reports on the study or studies covered by the IND, and also be responsible for informing FDA and clinical investigators immediately of unforeseen serious side effects or injuries. There can be no assurance that Phase I, Phase II or Phase III testing will be completed successfully by the Company within any specified period of time, if at all. Furthermore, the Company or the FDA may suspend clinical trials at any time on various grounds, including a finding that the subjects or patients are being exposed to an unacceptable health risk.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Assuming successful completion of the clinical studies, the results of the studies, together with other detailed information, including, among other information, details concerning the manufacture and composition of the drug, proposed labeling, environmental impact and the scientific rationale for the drug, its intended use and the potential benefits of the drug product are submitted to the FDA in the form of an NDA requesting approval to market the drug. If the FDA finds the NDA submission and the manufacturing process to be acceptable and to meet the criteria for approval, the FDA will issue an approval letter.  If the FDA determines that an NDA cannot be approved as submitted, it will send the applicant a “Complete Response” letter to indicate that the review cycle for an application is complete, that the application is not ready for approval, and to describe specific deficiencies. In addition to the postmarketing requirements that apply to all marketed drugs, the FDA may impose, as a condition of approval, postmarketing requirements such as postmarketing study commitments, or other limitations or restrictions.  Product approvals may be withdrawn by the FDA, following notice of opportunity for a hearing if problems concerning safety or efficacy of a drug or the sponsor’s compliance with regulatory requirements.

 

The Company’s use of Milestones to predict the benefits of Antineoplastons is relevant to the FDA approval process. If surrogate endpoints are used, for regular approval (i.e., the longstanding FDA route of drug approval based on the demonstration of clinical benefit) an applicant must show direct evidence of clinical benefit or improvement in an established surrogate for clinical benefit. For “accelerated approval,” a process potentially available for pharmaceutical agents that treat serious or life-threatening diseases and conditions, surrogate endpoints must be reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit. When appropriate, the Company intends to pursue opportunities for accelerated review of its products. However, the Company has not yet received any accelerated approvals for any of the Company’s product candidates.  The Company cannot predict the ultimate effect of this review process on the timing or likelihood of FDA review of any of its products. Adequacy as a surrogate endpoint for regular or accelerated approval is highly dependent upon a variety of factors including effect size, effect duration, and benefits of other available therapy.

 

A drug’s approval under the accelerated approval regulations is conditioned on the conduct of postapproval clinical studies to verify and describe the actual clinical benefit. Further, the FDA may also impose postmarketing restrictions to assure safe use of a drug product that was subject to accelerated approval.  For drugs approved under FDA’s accelerated procedures, the FDA may withdraw approval of the drug on an expedited basis if the applicant fails to perform the required postmarketing study with due diligence, use of the drugs demonstrates that post-marketing restrictions are inadequate to assure safe use of the drug, the applicant fails to adhere to the postmarketing restrictions agreed upon, the promotional materials are false or misleading, or other evidence demonstrates that the drug is not shown to be safe or effective under its conditions of use.

 

The testing and approval process requires substantial time, effort and financial resources, and there can be no assurance that any approval will be granted for any product or that approval will be granted according to any schedule. Moreover, if regulatory approval of a drug is granted, the approval will be limited to specific indications. There can be no assurance that any of the Company’s product candidates will receive regulatory approvals for commercialization.

 

Please see “Orphan Drug Designation” for a description of the FDA’s orphan drug designation under the Orphan Drug Act of 1983 as it applies to the Company’s Antineoplastons.

 

Even if the regulatory approvals for the Company’s products are obtained, its products and its manufacturing facility are subject to ongoing compliance obligations. The FDA will require postmarketing monitoring and reporting related to the safety of the Company’s products. The Company’s drug manufacturing facility, and the facility of any third-party contracted to manufacture the products, must comply with the FDA’s current good manufacturing practice (“GMP”) regulations, which are strictly enforced. Manufacturing facilities will be subject to periodic inspection by FDA. Full technical compliance requires manufacturers to expend funds, time and effort in the area of production and quality control. In addition, discovery of problems with a product after approval or failure to comply with applicable FDA or other applicable regulatory requirements may result in enforcement actions and restrictions on a product, manufacturer, or holder of an approved NDA, including restrictions on the product, manufacturer or facility, including warning letters, suspension of regulatory approvals, operating restrictions, delays in obtaining new product approvals, withdrawal of the product from the market, product recalls, fines, injunctions and criminal prosecution. New government requirements may be established that could delay or prevent regulatory approval of the Company’s products under development or impose additional compliance obligations before or after approval.

 

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The Company’s research and development involves the controlled use of hazardous materials, chemicals and various radioactive compounds. Although the Company believes its procedures for handling and disposing of those materials comply with state and federal regulations, the risk of accidental contamination or injury from these materials cannot be eliminated. If an accident of this type occurs, the Company could be held liable for resulting damages, which could be material to its financial condition and business. The Company is also subject to numerous environmental, health and workplace safety laws and regulations, including those governing laboratory procedures and the handling of biohazardous materials. Additional federal, state and local laws and regulations affecting the Company may be adopted in the future. Any violation of these laws and regulations, and the cost of compliance, could materially and adversely affect the Company. For the year ended February 28, 2019, the Company spent approximately $15,000 on environmental compliance matters. The Company expects to spend approximately $10,000 for repairs and upgrades during the fiscal year ending February 29, 2020.

 

Government Notices and Regulations

 

On March 15, 2013, the Company received a Notice of Inspectional Observations (FDA Form 483) from the FDA.  During an inspection, the FDA observed (1) failure to monitor the progress of an investigation conducted under the IND and (2) failure to obtain from an investigator sufficient financial information to allow complete and accurate certification or disclosure statements.  In response to the observations, the Company provided explanation as to the nature of monitoring procedures, initiated new monitoring practices (effective May 2013) engaging scientifically qualified individuals to conduct Good Clinical Practice (GCP) monitoring and project management, initiated a process to collect financial disclosure information from sub-investigators and amended protocols to reflect current understanding of response criteria.

 

On December 3, 2013, the Company received a Warning Letter from the FDA.  The FDA noted concerns regarding the (1) failure to ensure proper monitoring of the investigations and failure to ensure that the investigations are conducted in accordance with the general investigational plan and protocols contained in the IND; and (2) failure to obtain from an investigator sufficient financial information to allow the sponsor to submit complete and accurate certification or disclosure statements.  In order to address the FDA concerns, the Company provided information regarding ongoing review of patient information, agreed to submit protocol amendments to reflect current standard of practice for corticosteroid use, separated monitoring activities between the Company and the Burzynski Clinic, revised the informed consent and checklist, and updated financial disclosures.

 

The Company received IRB approval on February 4, 2015 for FDA reviewed, open label, phase II study of Antineoplaston A10 and AS2-1 in patients with a Diffuse Intrinsic Brainstem Glioma (DIPG) in five treatment groups based on patients age and prior treatment.

 

On April 20, 2016, the Company received a full clinical hold letter from the FDA based on FDA’s inspection of S.R. Burzynski’s manufacturing facility in March 2015.  On April 27, 2016, the Company requested to change the full clinical hold to partial clinical hold to allow patient #1 to continue the Antineoplaston treatment according to protocol BT-55, since the patient was enrolled before the full clinical hold was imposed.  Based on the FDA’s position regarding the Company’s request on April 27, 2016 and the Company’s teleconference with the FDA on May 3, 2016, the Company removed patient #1 from the study.

 

A temporary restraining order from the US District Court of Rhode Island allowed the resumption of patient #1’s Antineoplaston therapy on May 17, 2016.  As a result of such temporary restraining order, a subsequent letter from the FDA dated May 26, 2016 informed the Company that the full clinical hold was replaced and a partial clinical hold was imposed.  As a result, patient #1 restarted treatment under IND 43742.

 

On June 14, 2016, the FDA issued a letter to the Company in connection with the FDA’s inspection of S.R. Burzynski’s manufacturing facility in March 2015.  The Company addressed the issues raised in the letter in a response letter submitted to the FDA on July 5, 2016 and in subsequent letters.

 

On February 20, 2017 BRI informed the FDA the death of patient #1 on February 19, 2017. No new patients can be enrolled to protocol BT-55 or BT-52 until full hold on IND 43742 is lifted.

 

Phase 3 clinical trial will commence upon availability of funds and until full hold on IND 43742 is lifted.

 

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Research and Development

 

The Company’s principal research and development efforts currently focus on Antineoplastons. The anticancer activity of these compounds has been documented in preclinical studies employing the methods of cell culture, pharmacology, cell biology, molecular biology, experimental therapeutics and animal models of cancer. At the level of Phase II clinical studies, the Company believes the anticancer activity of Antineoplastons is supported by preliminary results from FDA-authorized, Phase II clinical trials.

 

The cellular mechanism underlying the anticancer effects of Antineoplastons continues to be investigated in both the Company’s own basic preclinical research program and in independent laboratories around the world. A review of this work suggests several mechanisms that may underlie the antineoplastic activity of Antineoplastons. For example, it has been found, in cell culture experiments, that Antineoplastons induce pathologically undifferentiated cancer cells to assume a more normal state of differentiation. Cell culture experiments have also shown that Antineoplaston components can kill some cancer cells by activating the cell’s intrinsic “suicide” program. It must be noted that data collected in cell culture experiments may or may not indicate the mechanism of action of Antineoplastons in humans.

 

At a more molecular or sub-cellular level, cell culture experiments have shown that Antineoplastons can block biochemical pathways involving oncogenes required to produce abnormal cell growth. In addition, cell culture experiments have shown that Antineoplastons can increase the expression of anticancer tumor suppressor genes. Although these experiments were conducted using human cancer cells, they may or may not indicate the mechanism of Antineoplaston action in humans.

 

In addition to the original family of Antineoplaston compounds (the “Parental Generation”), the Company continues its development of a second generation of Antineoplastons. In cell culture experiments, the second generation Antineoplastons, which were developed by the Company, have been shown to be significantly more potent than the Parental Generation.

 

The Company uses various scientific reagents from several different suppliers to conduct its research activities.

 

Total research and development costs for the fiscal years ended February 28, 2019, and 2018 were approximately $1,146,000 and $1,280,000, respectively.

 

Intellectual Property

 

Since 1984, eight patents involving the formulation, preparation, manufacture, production, use, dosage and treatment of cancer with Antineoplastons (the “Patents”) have been issued to Dr. Burzynski by the United States Patent Office and the Patent Offices of 34 other countries. The Patents for cancer treatment and diagnosis in the United States and Canada are licensed to the Company pursuant to a License Agreement dated June 29, 1983, as superseded by an Amended License Agreement dated April 24, 1989 and a Second Amended License Agreement dated March 1, 1990 (collectively, the “License Agreement”). Pursuant to the License Agreement, the Company holds an exclusive right in the United States, Canada, and Mexico (the “Territory”) to use, manufacture, develop, sell, distribute, sub-license and otherwise exploit all of Dr. Burzynski’s rights, title, and interests, including patent rights, in Antineoplastons in the treatment and diagnosis of cancer. See “Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.”  The Company will not be able to exploit such rights until such time as Antineoplastons are approved, of which there can be no assurance, by the FDA for sale in the United States. The License Agreement is to continue in effect until the expiration of the last Patent that was licensed under the agreement or termination pursuant to certain other provisions. The Company and Dr. Burzynski also entered into a Royalty Agreement, dated March 25, 1997, and a First Amended Royalty Agreement, dated September 29, 1997 (collectively, the “Royalty Agreement”), pursuant to which Dr. Burzynski will receive a royalty interest from all future sales, distribution, and manufacture of Antineoplastons by the Company. The Company owns, pursuant to the License Agreement, exclusive rights to eight issued United States Patents, four issued Canadian Patents and one issued Mexican Patent.

 

The five initial United States Patents (the “Initial Patents”) relate to: (i) Determination of Antineoplastons in body tissue or fluids as a testing procedure to aid in the diagnosis of cancer; (ii) Processes for the preparation of purified fractions of Antineoplastons from human urine; (iii) Processes for the synthetic production of Antineoplastons and methods of treating neoplastic disease (cancer); (iv) Administration of Antineoplastons to humans; and (v) Methods of synthesizing A-10. The last of the Initial Patents expired on January 11, 2009, however, the Company does not believe the expiration of any of the Initial Patents will have a material adverse effect on the Company.

 

The sixth United States Patent (the “2000 U.S. Patent”) covers Liposomal Antineoplaston therapies with markedly improved anticancer activity. The 2000 U.S. Patent expired on May 14, 2017.

 

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The seventh United States Patent (the “2001 U.S. Patent”) is for a treatment regimen for the administration of phenylacetylglutamine, phenylacetylisoglutamine, and/or phenylacetate. The 2001 U.S. Patent expired on July 23, 2018.

 

The eighth United States Patent (the “2005 U.S. Patent”) relates to a divisional application to the 2001 U.S. Patent. The 2005 U.S. Patent expired on July 31, 2018.

 

The four Canadian Patents (the “Canadian Patents”) relate to: (i) Processes for the preparation of purified fractions of Antineoplastons from human urine, (ii) Processes for the synthetic production of Antineoplastons and methods of treating neoplastic disease (cancer), (iii) Liposomal formulation of Antineoplastons and (iv) Treatment regimen for the administration of phenylacetylglutamine. The Canadian Patents expired or will expire on June 4, 2002, November 14, 2006, May 14, 2017 and July 2, 2019, respectively; however, the Company does not believe the expiration of the Canadian Patents will have a material adverse effect on the Company.

 

The Mexican Patent relates to a treatment regimen for the administration of phenylacetylglutamine. This patent expired  on January 14, 2019.

 

The Company also depends upon unpatented proprietary technology, and may determine in appropriate circumstances that its interest would be better served by reliance upon trade secrets or confidentiality agreements rather than patents.

 

The Company’s success will depend in part on its ability to enforce patent protection for its products, preserve its trade secrets, and operate without infringing on the proprietary rights of third parties in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. Because of the substantial length of time and expense associated with bringing new products through development and regulatory approval to the marketplace, the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries place considerable importance on obtaining and maintaining patent and trade secret protection for new technologies, products and processes. There can be no assurance that the Company will develop additional products and methods that are patentable or that present or future patents will provide sufficient protection to the Company’s present or future technologies, products and processes. In addition, there can be no assurance that others will not independently develop substantially equivalent proprietary information, design around the Company’s patents or obtain access to the Company’s know-how or that others will not successfully challenge the validity of the Company’s patents or be issued patents which may prevent the sale of one or more of the Company’s product candidates, or require licensing and the payment of significant fees or royalties by the Company to third parties in order to enable the Company to conduct its business. Legal standards relating to the scope of claims and the validity of patents in the fields in which the Company is pursuing research and development are still evolving, are highly uncertain and involve complex legal and factual issues. No assurance can be given as to the degree of protection or competitive advantage any patents issued to the Company will afford, the validity of any such patents or the Company’s ability to avoid violating or infringing any patents issued to others. Further, there can be no guarantee that any patents issued to or licensed by the Company will not be infringed upon by the products of others. Litigation and other proceedings involving the defense and prosecution of patent claims can be expensive and time consuming, even in those instances in which the outcome is favorable to the Company, and can result in the diversion of resources from the Company’s other activities. An adverse outcome could subject the Company to significant liabilities to third parties, require the Company to obtain licenses from third parties or require the Company to cease any related research and development activities or sales.

 

The Company depends upon the knowledge, experience and skills (which are not patentable) of its key scientific and technical personnel. To protect its rights to its proprietary information, the Company requires all employees, consultants, advisors and collaborators to enter into confidentiality agreements which prohibit the disclosure of confidential information to anyone outside the Company and require disclosure and assignment to the Company of their ideas, developments, discoveries and inventions. There can be no assurance that these agreements will effectively prevent the unauthorized use or disclosure of the Company’s confidential information.

 

ANTINEOPLASTON® is a trademark registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

 

Competition

 

There are many companies, universities, research teams and scientists, both private and government-sponsored, that are engaged in research to produce cancer treatment agents and that have greater financial resources and larger research staffs and facilities than the Company. In addition, there are other companies and entities, both private and government-sponsored, that are engaged in research aimed at compounds similar or related to the Company’s Antineoplastons. To the extent that the United States Government also conducts research or supports other companies or individuals in their research, such companies or individuals may have a competitive advantage over the Company.

 

Employees

 

As of February 28, 2019, the Company had no full-time employees.

 

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ITEM 1A.               RISK FACTORS

 

An investment in our common stock involves significant risks. You should carefully consider the risks described below and the other information in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including our financial statements and related notes, before you decide to invest in our common stock. If any of the following risks or uncertainties actually occurs, our business, results of operations or financial condition could be materially harmed, the trading price of our common stock could decline and you could lose all or part of your investment. The risks and uncertainties described below are those that we currently believe may materially affect us; however, they may not be the only ones that we face. Additional risks and uncertainties of which we are unaware or currently deem immaterial may also become important factors that may harm our business.

 

Risks Relating to our Business

 

Products that appear promising in research and development may be delayed or may fail to reach later stages of clinical development.

 

The successful development of pharmaceutical products is highly uncertain. Products that appear promising in research and development may be delayed or fail to reach later stages of development. Additionally, the ongoing or future trials for Antineoplaston may fail to demonstrate that our product candidate is sufficiently safe and effective to warrant further development. Furthermore, decisions regarding the further development of product candidates must be made with limited and incomplete data, which makes it difficult to accurately predict whether the allocation of limited resources and the expenditure of additional capital on specific product candidates will result in desired outcomes. Preclinical and clinical data can be interpreted in different ways, and negative or inconclusive results or adverse medical events during a clinical trial could delay, limit or prevent the development of a product candidate, which could harm our business, financial condition or the trading price of our securities. There can be no assurance as to whether or when we will receive regulatory approvals for any of our product candidates.

 

There is no assurance that Antineoplaston will be safe, effective or receive regulatory approval.

 

The risks associated with the development of Antineoplaston are significant. Clinical data may fail to establish that Antineoplaston is effective in treating brain cancer or may indicate safety profile concerns not indicated by our current clinical data. If the results of our current trials or of future trials do not indicate a favorable safety and efficacy profile for Antineoplaston, or otherwise fail to support the continued development of Antineoplaston, a substantial decline in the price of our common stock could result. There can be no assurance as to whether we will be able to successfully develop and commercialize Antineoplaston.

 

Our source of funding is limited.  If we fail to obtain additional financing when needed, we may be unable to complete the development, regulatory approval and commercialization of Antineoplaston.

 

The Company has incurred negative cash flows since inception, and expects to continue to expend substantial funds to continue its research and development programs.  The Company’s existing resources may be insufficient to fund the Company’s operating expenses and capital requirements.  The Company’s sole source of funding for its operations has been and continues to be payments made by Dr. Burzynski from funds generated from Dr. Burzynski’s medical practice pursuant to the Research Funding Agreement. While the Company anticipates that Dr. Burzynski will continue to fund the Company’s research costs, there is no assurance that Dr. Burzynski will be able to continue to fund the Company’s operations pursuant to the Research Funding Agreement or otherwise. Because the Company currently is entirely dependent upon the contributions for research provided by Dr. Burzynski under the Research Funding Agreement, the Company would not be able to continue conducting its clinical trials if Dr. Burzynski ceased funding the Company’s research. In such event, the Company would be required to find immediate funding which may not be available on acceptable terms or at all. If this were to occur and the Company were not able to find adequate sources of funding, the Company would be required to cease operations. Even with Dr. Burzynski’s continued contributions under the Research Funding Agreement, the Company may be required to seek additional capital through equity or debt financing or the sale of assets until the Company’s operating revenues are sufficient to cover operating costs and provide positive cash flow; however, there can be no assurance that the Company will be able to raise such additional capital on acceptable terms to the Company. In addition, there can be no assurance that the Company will achieve positive operating cash flow.

 

If financing is available, it may be on terms that adversely affect the interests of our existing stockholders or restrict our ability to conduct our operations. To the extent that we raise additional funds through collaboration and licensing arrangements, we may be required to relinquish some rights to our technologies or product candidates, or grant licenses on terms that are not favorable to us. Our actual capital requirements will depend on numerous factors, including:

 

·                  activities and arrangements related to the commercialization of our product candidates;

 

·                  the progress of our research and development programs;

 

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·                  the progress of pre-clinical and clinical testing of our product candidates;

 

·                  the time and cost involved in obtaining regulatory approvals for our product candidates;

 

·                  the cost of filing, prosecuting, defending and enforcing any patent claims and other intellectual property rights with respect to our intellectual property;

 

·                  our capacity to enter into collaborative or licensing agreements;

 

·                  the effect of competing technological and market developments; and

 

·                  the terms of any collaborative, licensing and other arrangements that we may establish.

 

If we require additional financing and cannot secure sufficient financing on acceptable terms, we may need to delay, reduce or eliminate some or all of our research and development programs, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition.

 

We have a history of net losses, we anticipate additional losses and we may not become profitable.

 

We have incurred net losses in each fiscal year since we commenced our research activities. Our losses have resulted primarily from expenses incurred in research and development of our product candidate. We may make significant capital commitments to fund the development of our product candidates. If these development efforts are unsuccessful, the development costs would be incurred without any future revenue, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition. We do not know when or if we will complete our product development efforts, receive regulatory approval for any of our product candidates, or successfully commercialize any approved products. As a result, it is difficult to predict the extent of any future losses or the time required to achieve profitability, if at all. Any failure of our products to complete successful clinical trials and obtain regulatory approval and any failure to become and remain profitable could adversely affect the price of our common stock and our ability to raise capital and continue operations.

 

The failure to enroll patients for clinical trials may cause delays in developing our product candidates.

 

We may encounter delays if we are unable to enroll enough patients to timely initiate or complete clinical trials. Patient enrollment depends on many factors, including, the size of the patient population, the nature of the protocol, the proximity of patients to clinical sites and the eligibility criteria for the trial and competition for patients in completing trials. We are focused on the treatment of cancer patients, which can be a difficult patient population to recruit. If we fail to enroll patients for clinical trials, our clinical trials may be delayed or suspended, which could delay our ability to generate revenues or raise capital to fund our operations.

 

There is no assurance that we will be granted regulatory approval for Antineoplaston.

 

There can be no assurance that our clinical trials for Antineoplaston will demonstrate sufficient safety and efficacy to obtain the requisite regulatory approvals. A number of companies in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries, including our company, have suffered significant setbacks in advanced clinical trials, even after promising results in earlier trials. Further, we may be unable to submit applications to regulatory agencies within the time frame we currently expect. Once submitted, applications must be approved by various regulatory agencies before we can commercialize the product described in the application. Additionally, even if applications are submitted, regulatory approval may not be obtained for any of our product candidates, and regulatory agencies could require additional studies to verify safety or efficacy, which could make further development of our product candidates impracticable. If our product candidates are not shown to be safe and effective in clinical trials, we may not receive regulatory approval, which would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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Clinical trials are expensive and time consuming, and any failure or delay in commencing or completing clinical trials for our product candidates could severely harm our business.

 

Our product candidates must undergo extensive pre-clinical studies and clinical trials as a condition to regulatory approval. Pre-clinical studies and clinical trials are expensive and take many years to complete. The commencement and completion of clinical trials for our product candidates may be delayed by many factors, including:

 

·                  safety issues or side effects;

 

·                  delays in patient enrollment and variability in the number and types of patients available for clinical trials, including the placement by the FDA of any clinical hold for the enrollment of new patients;

 

·                  poor effectiveness of product candidates during clinical trials;

 

·                  governmental or regulatory delays and changes in regulatory requirements, policy and guidelines;

 

·                  our ability to obtain regulatory approval to commence a clinical trial and conduct a trial in accordance with good clinical practices;

 

·                  our ability to manufacture or obtain from third parties materials sufficient for use in pre-clinical studies and clinical trials; and

 

·                  varying interpretation of data by the FDA and similar foreign regulatory agencies.

 

It is possible that Antineoplaston will never complete clinical trials in any of the markets in which we intend to sell those product candidates. Accordingly, we may not receive the regulatory approvals necessary to market Antineoplaston. Any failure or delay in commencing or completing clinical trials or obtaining regulatory approvals for product candidates would prevent or delay their commercialization and severely harm our business and financial condition.

 

We depend on the Burzynski Clinic (and, possibly, in the future, other third-parties) to conduct and manage our clinical trials. If the Burzynski Clinic and these other third-parties do not successfully carry out their contractual duties or meet expected timelines, we may face costs and delays that may prevent or delay us from obtaining regulatory approval for or commercializing our product candidates, which could substantially harm our business.

 

We rely on clinical investigators and the Burzynski Clinic to enroll patients and to manage our clinical trials.   We control only certain aspects of these third-parties’ activities. Nevertheless, we are responsible for ensuring that each of our studies is conducted in accordance with the prescribed protocol, and the applicable legal, regulatory and scientific standards. Moreover, the FDA and foreign regulatory agencies require us to comply with regulations and standards, commonly referred to as good clinical practices, for conducting, recording and reporting the results of clinical trials to assure that data and reported results are credible and accurate and that the trial participants are adequately protected. Our reliance on third parties does not relieve us of these responsibilities and requirements. If these third parties do not successfully carry out their contractual duties or regulatory obligations or meet expected deadlines, if the third parties need to be replaced or if the quality or accuracy of the data they obtain is compromised due to the failure to adhere to our clinical protocols or regulatory requirements or for other reasons, our pre-clinical development activities or clinical trials may be extended, delayed, suspended or terminated, and we may not be able to obtain regulatory approval for our product candidates.

 

Antineoplaston may never achieve market acceptance even if we obtain regulatory approval.

 

Even if we receive regulatory approvals for the commercial sale of Antineoplaston, the commercial success of Antineoplaston will depend on, among other things, its acceptance by physicians, patients, third-party payers such as health insurance companies and other members of the medical community as a therapeutic and cost-effective alternative to competing products and treatments. New patterns of care, alternative new treatments or different reimbursement and payor paradigms, possibly due to economic conditions or governmental policies, could negatively impact the commercial viability of Antineoplaston. If our product candidates fail to gain market acceptance, we may be unable to earn sufficient revenue to continue our business. Market acceptance of, and demand for, any product that we may develop and commercialize will depend on many factors, including:

 

·                  our ability to provide acceptable evidence of safety and efficacy;

 

·                  the prevalence and severity of adverse side effects;

 

·                  availability, relative cost and relative efficacy of alternative and competing treatments;

 

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·                  the effectiveness of our marketing and distribution strategy;

 

·                  publicity concerning our products or competing products and treatments; and

 

·                  our ability to obtain sufficient third-party insurance coverage or reimbursement.

 

If our product candidates do not become widely accepted by physicians, patients, third-party payers and other members of the medical community, our business, financial condition and results of operations would be materially and adversely affected.

 

Our product candidates may cause undesirable side effects that could delay or prevent their regulatory approval or commercialization.

 

Common side effects that occur in cancer patients undergoing treatment with our product candidates include hypokalemia, fatigue, hypernatremia, nausea, somnolence, vomiting, headaches, edema, and hyponatremia. Because our product candidates have been tested in relatively small patient populations and for limited durations to date, additional side effects may be observed as their development progresses. Undesirable side effects caused by any of our product candidates could cause us or regulatory authorities to interrupt, delay or discontinue clinical trials and could result in the denial, cancellation or withdrawal of regulatory approval by the FDA or other regulatory authorities for any or all targeted indications. This, in turn, could prevent us from commercializing our product candidates and generating revenues from their sale.

 

Even if regulatory approval is received for our product candidates, the later discovery of previously unknown problems with a product, manufacturer or facility may result in restrictions, including withdrawal of the product from the market.

 

Approval of a product candidate may be conditioned upon certain limitations and restrictions as to the drug’s use, or upon the conduct of further studies, and may be subject to continuous review. After approval of a product, if any, there will be significant ongoing regulatory compliance obligations, and if we fail to comply with these requirements, we could be subject to penalties, including:

 

·                  warning letters;

 

·                  fines;

 

·                  product recalls;

 

·                  withdrawal of regulatory approval;

 

·                  operating restrictions;

 

·                  disgorgement of profits;

 

·                  injunctions; and

 

·                  criminal prosecution.

 

Regulatory agencies may require us to delay, restrict or discontinue clinical trials on various grounds, including a finding that the subjects or patients are being exposed to an unacceptable health risk. In addition, all statutes and regulations governing the conduct of clinical trials are subject to change in the future, which could affect the cost of such clinical trials. Any unanticipated delays in clinical studies could delay our ability to generate revenues and harm our financial condition and results of operations.

 

If we are unable to maintain and enforce our proprietary rights, we may not be able to compete effectively or operate profitably.

 

Our proprietary rights to our product candidates are derived from the License Agreement between the Company and Dr. Stanislaw Burzynski.  Pursuant to such License Agreement, the Company has the exclusive right in the United States, Canada and Mexico to use, manufacture, develop, sell, distribute, sublicense and otherwise exploit all of Mr. Burzynski’s rights, title and interest in Antineoplaston in the treatment and diagnosis of cancer.  The License Agreement will terminate upon the earlier of the expiration of the last patent licensed to the Company, or upon termination by Dr. Burzynski, at his option, if Dr. Burzynski is removed as a director or officer of the Company without his consent, if the Company files for bankruptcy or is the subject of any proceeding under applicable bankruptcy laws where such proceeding is not dismissed within 90 days from the date a petition is filed, or if any

 

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shareholder or group of shareholders acting in concert becomes the beneficial owner of the Company’s securities having voting power equal to or greater than the voting power of the securities Dr. Burzynski holds. Because we do not own the patents related to Antineoplaston, we do not control the patent prosecution of subject matter that we license from Dr. Burzynski.  Accordingly, we are unable to exercise the same degree of control over our intellectual property and we would need to involve Dr. Burzynski in legal proceedings to enforce these intellectual property rights.

 

Our success is dependent in part on maintaining and enforcing our intellectual property and will depend in large part on our ability and Dr. Burzynski to:

 

·                  defend patents once issued;

 

·                  preserve trade secrets; and

 

·                  operate without infringing the patents and proprietary rights of third parties.

 

The degree of future protection for our proprietary rights is uncertain. For example:

 

·                  Dr. Burzynski might not have been the first to make the inventions covered by any of his patents, if issued, or his pending patent applications;

 

·                  Dr. Burzynski might not have been the first to file patent applications for these inventions;

 

·                  under our license agreement with Dr. Burzynski, he is responsible for the prosecution of patents related to Antineoplaston, and he may not effectively prosecute and protect those patents;

 

·                  others may independently develop similar or alternative technologies or products and/or duplicate any of our technologies and/or products;

 

·                  it is possible that none of Dr. Burzynski’s pending patent applications will result in issued patents or, if issued, these patents may not be sufficient to protect our technology or provide us with a basis for commercially-viable products and may not provide us with any competitive advantages;

 

·                  if Dr. Burzynski’s pending applications issue as patents, they may be challenged by third parties as infringed, invalid or unenforceable under U.S. or foreign laws;

 

·                  if issued, the patents under which we hold rights may not be valid or enforceable, or have expired; or

 

·                  we and/or Dr. Burzynski may develop additional proprietary technologies that are not patentable and which may not be adequately protected through trade secrets, if for example a competitor were to independently develop duplicative, similar or alternative technologies.

 

The patent position of biotechnology and pharmaceutical firms is highly uncertain and involves many complex legal and technical issues. Many of our licensed patents have expired.  There is no clear policy involving the breadth of claims allowed in patents or the degree of protection afforded under patents. Although we believe our potential rights under patent applications provide a competitive advantage, it is possible that patent applications licensed to us will not result in patents being issued, or that, if issued, the patents will later be invalidated or not give us an advantage over competitors with similar products or technology, nor can we assure you that we can obtain, maintain and enforce all our proprietary rights necessary to develop and commercialize our product candidates.

 

If we are unable to obtain intellectual property rights to develop or market our products or we infringe on a third-party patent or other intellectual property rights, we may need to alter or terminate a product development program.

 

If our product candidates infringe or conflict with the rights of others, we may not be able to manufacture or market our product candidates, which could have a material and adverse effect on us. Issued patents held by others may limit our ability to develop commercial products. All issued patents are entitled to a presumption of validity under the laws of the United States. If we need licenses to such patents to permit us to develop or market our product candidates, we may be required to pay significant fees or royalties, and we cannot be certain that we would be able to obtain such licenses on commercially reasonable terms, if at all. Competitors or third parties may obtain patents that may cover subject matter we use in developing the technology required to bring our products to market, that we use in producing our products, or that we use in treating patients with our products.

 

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Additionally, it is not possible to predict with certainty what patent claims may issue from pending patent applications. In the United States, for example, patent prosecution can proceed in secret prior to issuance of a patent. As a result, third parties may be able to obtain patents with claims relating to our product candidates or technology, which they could attempt to assert against us. Further, as we develop our products, third parties may assert that we infringe the patents currently held or licensed by them and it is difficult to provide the outcome of any such action. Ultimately, we could be prevented from commercializing a product, or forced to cease some aspect of our business operations, as a result of claims of patent infringement or violation of other intellectual property rights, which could have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We may incur substantial costs as a result of litigation or other proceedings relating to patent and other intellectual property rights, and we may be unable to protect our rights in, or to use, our technology.

 

There has been significant litigation in the biotechnology industry over patents and other proprietary rights and if we become involved in any litigation, it could consume a substantial portion of our resources, regardless of the outcome of the litigation. Others may challenge the validity, inventorship, ownership, enforceability or scope of our licensed patents or other technology used in or otherwise necessary for the development and commercialization of our product candidates. We may not be successful in defending against any such challenges. If these legal actions are successful, in addition to any potential liability for damages, we could be required to obtain a license, grant cross-licenses and pay substantial royalties in order to continue to manufacture or market the affected products.

 

Moreover, the cost of litigation to uphold the validity of patents to prevent infringement or to otherwise protect our proprietary rights can be substantial. If the outcome of litigation is adverse to us, third parties may be able to use the challenged technologies without payment to us. There is also the risk that, even if the validity of a patent were upheld, a court would refuse to stop the other party from using the inventions, including on the ground that its activities do not infringe that patent. There is no assurance that we would prevail in any legal action or that any license required under a third-party patent would be made available on acceptable terms or at all. If any of these events were to occur, our business, financial condition and results of operations would be materially and adversely effected.

 

We face substantial competition, which may result in others discovering, developing or commercializing products before, or more successfully, than we do.

 

The life sciences industry is highly competitive, and we face significant competition from many pharmaceutical, biopharmaceutical and biotechnology companies that are researching and marketing products designed to address cancer indications for which we are currently developing products or for which we may develop products in the future. Our future success depends on our ability to demonstrate and maintain a competitive advantage with respect to the design, development and commercialization of our product candidates. We expect any product candidate that we commercialize on our own will compete with existing, market-leading products and products in development.

 

Many of our potential competitors have substantially greater financial, technical and personnel resources than we have. In addition, many of these competitors have significantly greater commercial infrastructures than we have. Our ability to compete successfully will depend largely on our ability to:

 

·                  design and develop products that are superior to other products in the market;

 

·                  attract qualified scientific, medical, sales and marketing and commercial personnel;

 

·                  obtain patent and/or other proprietary protection for our processes and product candidates;

 

·                  obtain required regulatory approvals; and

 

·                  successfully collaborate with others in the design, development and commercialization of new products.

 

Established competitors may invest heavily to quickly discover and develop novel compounds that could make our product candidates obsolete. In addition, any new product that competes with a generic market-leading product must demonstrate compelling advantages in efficacy, convenience, tolerability and safety in order to overcome severe price competition and to be commercially successful. If we are not able to compete effectively against our current and future competitors, our business will not grow and our financial condition and operations will suffer.

 

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If we are unable to enter into agreements with partners to perform sales and marketing functions, or build these functions ourselves, we will not be able to commercialize our product candidates.

 

We currently do not have any internal sales, marketing or distribution capabilities. In order to commercialize any of our product candidates, we must either acquire or internally develop a sales, marketing and distribution infrastructure or enter into agreements with partners to perform these services for us. We may not be able to enter into such arrangements on commercially acceptable terms, if at all. Factors that may inhibit our efforts to commercialize our product candidates without entering into arrangements with third parties include:

 

·                  our inability to recruit and retain adequate numbers of effective sales and marketing personnel;

 

·                  the inability of sales personnel to obtain access to or persuade adequate numbers of physicians to prescribe our products;

 

·                  the lack of complementary products to be offered by sales personnel, which may put us at a competitive disadvantage relative to companies with more extensive product lines; and

 

·                  unforeseen costs and expenses associated with creating a sales and marketing organization.

 

If we are not able to partner with a third party and are not successful in recruiting sales and marketing personnel or in building a sales and marketing and distribution infrastructure, we will have difficulty commercializing our product candidates, which would adversely affect our business and financial condition.

 

We depend on key individuals to maintain and manage our business in a rapidly changing market.

 

The continued services of our executive officers are essential to our success. Any of our executive officers, including our Chief Executive Officer, Dr. Stanislaw Burzynski, M.D., and Chief Financial Officer, Patryk Goscianski, may resign at any time. These individuals are in charge of the strategic planning and operations of our business and the loss of the services of one or more of these individuals could disrupt our operations and damage our ability to grow our business. We do not currently have key person life insurance policies covering any of our officers.

 

Our business is subject to complex environmental legislation that increases both our costs and the risk of noncompliance.

 

Our business involves the use of hazardous material, which requires us to comply with environmental regulations. We face increasing complexity in our product development as we adjust to new and upcoming requirements relating to the materials composition of many of our product candidates. If we use hazardous materials in a manner that causes contamination or injury or violates laws, we may be liable for damages. Environmental regulations could have a material adverse effect on the results of our operations and our financial position. We maintain insurance for any liability associated with our hazardous materials activities, and it is possible in the future that our coverage would be insufficient if we incurred a material environmental liability.

 

If we fail to establish and maintain proper and effective internal controls, our ability to produce accurate financial statements on a timely basis could be impaired, which would adversely affect our consolidated operating results, our ability to operate our business, and our stock price, and could result in litigation or similar actions.

 

Ensuring that we have adequate internal financial and accounting controls and procedures in place to produce accurate financial statements on a timely basis is a costly and time-consuming effort that needs to be re-evaluated frequently. Failure on our part to have effective internal financial and accounting controls would cause our financial reporting to be unreliable, could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition, and could cause the trading price of our common stock to fall dramatically. Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of our financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with U.S. GAAP. Our management does not expect that our internal control over financial reporting will prevent or detect all errors and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the control system’s objectives will be met. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that misstatements due to error or fraud will not occur or that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the company will have been detected.

 

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We cannot be certain that the actions we have taken to ensure we have adequate internal controls over financial reporting will be sufficient. In future periods, if the process required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act reveals any material weaknesses or significant deficiencies, the correction of any such material weaknesses or significant deficiencies could require remedial measures which could be costly and time-consuming. In addition, in such a case, we may be unable to produce accurate financial statements on a timely basis. Any associated accounting restatement could create a significant strain on our internal resources and cause delays in our release of quarterly or annual financial results and the filing of related reports, increase our cost and cause management distraction. Any of the foregoing could cause investors to lose confidence in the reliability of our consolidated financial statements, which could cause the market price of our common stock to decline and make it more difficult for us to finance our operations and growth.

 

We may face risks related to securities litigation that could result in significant legal expenses and settlement or damage awards.

 

We may in the future become subject to claims and litigation alleging violations of the securities laws or other related claims, which could harm our business and require us to incur significant costs. We are generally obliged, to the extent permitted by law, to indemnify our current and former directors and officers who are named as defendants in these types of lawsuits. Any future litigation may require significant attention from management and could result in significant legal expenses, settlement costs or damage awards that could have a material impact on our financial position, results of operations, and cash flows.

 

Risks Related to the Ownership of Our Common Stock

 

An active, liquid trading market for our common stock may not develop.

 

We cannot predict the extent to which investor interest in our company will lead to the development of an active and liquid trading market. If an active and liquid trading market does not develop, you may have difficulty selling any of our common stock that you purchase. The market price of our common stock may decline, and you may not be able to sell your shares of our common stock at or above the price you paid, or at all.

 

Our principal shareholders, executive officers and directors own a significant percentage of our common stock and will continue to have significant control of our management and affairs, and they can take actions that may be against your best interests.

 

Our executive officers, current directors and holders of five percent or more of our common stock beneficially own an aggregate of approximately 81.0% of our outstanding common stock as of May 1, 2019. This significant concentration of share ownership may adversely affect the trading price for our common stock because investors often perceive disadvantages in owning stock in companies with controlling shareholders. Also, as a result, these shareholders, acting together, may be able to control our management and affairs and matters requiring shareholder approval, including the election of directors and approval of significant corporate transactions, such as mergers, consolidations or the sale of substantially all of our assets. Consequently, this concentration of ownership may have the effect of delaying or preventing a change in control, including a merger, consolidation or other business combination involving us, or discouraging a potential acquirer from making a tender offer or otherwise attempting to obtain control, even if such a change in control would benefit our other shareholders.

 

Investors may face significant restrictions on the resale of our common stock due to federal regulations of penny stocks.

 

Our common stock will be subject to the requirements of Rule 15(g)-9, promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act as long as the price of our common stock is below $5.00 per share. Under such rule, broker-dealers who recommend low-priced securities to persons other than established customers and accredited investors must satisfy special sales practice requirements, including a requirement that they make an individualized written suitability determination for the purchaser and receive the purchaser’s consent prior to the transaction. The Securities Enforcement Remedies and Penny Stock Reform Act of 1990, also requires additional disclosure in connection with any trades involving a stock defined as a penny stock.

 

Generally, the SEC defines a penny stock as any equity security not traded on an exchange or quoted on NASDAQ that has a market price of less than $5.00 per share. The required penny stock disclosures include the delivery, prior to any transaction, of a disclosure schedule explaining the penny stock market and the risks associated with it. Such requirements could severely limit the market liquidity of the securities and the ability of purchasers to sell their securities in the secondary market.

 

In addition, various state securities laws impose restrictions on transferring “penny stocks” and as a result, investors in the common stock may have their ability to sell their shares of the common stock impaired.

 

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The trading price of our common stock may be volatile.

 

The market prices for and trading volumes of securities of biotechnology companies, including our securities, have been historically volatile. The market has from time to time experienced significant price and volume fluctuations unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies. The market price of our common shares may fluctuate significantly due to a variety of factors, including:

 

·                  the results of pre-clinical testing and clinical trials by us, our competitors and/or companies that are developing products that are similar to ours (regardless of whether such products are potentially competitive with ours);

 

·                  public concern as to the safety of products developed by us or others;

 

·                  changes in the expected or actual timing of our development programs or our competitors’ potential development programs;

 

·                  governmental regulations;

 

·                  developments in patent or other proprietary rights;

 

·                  litigation;

 

·                  general market conditions in our industry or in the economy as a whole;

 

·                  Additions or departures of key personnel;

 

·                  comments made on social media platforms, including magazines, blogs, websites, message boards and other forms of Internet-based communications;

 

·                  difficulty with the market quickly interpreting and understanding complex data;

 

·                  the issuance of additional shares of common stock, or securities convertible into, or exercisable or exchangeable for, shares of our common stock in connection with financings, acquisitions or otherwise;

 

·                  the incurrence of debt; and

 

·                  development concerning collaborations.

 

We may seek to raise additional capital in the future; however, such capital may not be available to us on reasonable terms, if at all, when or as we require additional funding. If we issue additional shares of our common stock or other securities that may be convertible into, or exercisable or exchangeable for, our common stock, our existing stockholders would experience further dilution.

 

Future financings may involve the issuance of debt, equity and/or securities convertible into or exercisable or exchangeable for our equity securities. These financings may not be available to us on reasonable terms or at all when and as we require funding. If we are able to consummate financings, the trading price of our common stock could be adversely affected and/or the terms of such financings may adversely affect the interests of our existing stockholders. Any failure to obtain additional working capital when required would have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition and would be expected to result in a decline in our stock price. Any issuances of our common stock, preferred stock, or securities such as warrants or notes that are convertible into, exercisable or exchangeable for, our capital stock, would have a dilutive effect on the voting and economic interest of our existing stockholders.

 

Because we do not expect to pay dividends on our common stock, stockholders will benefit from an investment in our common stock only if it appreciates in value.

 

We have never paid cash dividends on our common shares and have no present intention to pay any dividends in the future. We are not profitable and do not expect to earn any material revenues for at least several years, if at all. As a result, we intend to use all available cash and liquid assets in the development of our business. Any future determination about the payment of dividends will be made at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend upon our earnings, if any, capital requirements, operating and financial conditions and on such other factors as our board of directors deems relevant. As a result, the success of an investment in our common stock will depend upon any future appreciation in its value. There is no guarantee that our common stock will appreciate in value or even maintain the price at which stockholders have purchased their shares.

 

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We may fail to comply with public company obligations, including the securities laws and regulations. Such compliance is costly and requires significant management resources.

 

We are a small company with limited resources. The federal securities laws and regulations, including the corporate governance and other requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, impose complex and continually changing regulatory requirements on our operations and reporting. These requirements have increased and will continue to increase our legal compliance costs.

 

ITEM 2.                                                PROPERTIES

 

The Company does not own or invest in real estate, interests in real estate, real estate mortgages or securities of or interests in persons primarily engaged in real estate activities.

 

The Company conducts its business in premises owned by Dr. Burzynski and his wife, Dr. Barbara Burzynski (the “Burzynskis”). Pursuant to arrangements with the Burzynskis (see “Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence—Research Funding Arrangements”), the Company occupies (i) 675 square feet at 12707 Trinity Drive, Stafford, Texas for office, laboratory and medical research purposes and (ii) 540 square feet at 9432 Katy Freeway, Houston, Texas for its executive offices. Management of the Company believes that each of these properties is adequately covered by insurance.

 

ITEM 3.                        LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

The Company’s activities are subject to regulation by various governmental agencies, including the FDA, which regularly monitor the Company’s operations and often impose requirements on the conduct of its clinical trials and other aspects of the Company’s business operations. The Company’s policy is to comply with all such regulatory requirements. From time to time, the Company is also subject to potential claims by patients and other potential claimants commonly arising out of the operation of a medical practice. The Company seeks to minimize its exposure to claims of this type wherever possible.

 

Currently, the Company is not a party to any material pending legal proceedings. Moreover, the Company is not aware of any such legal proceedings that are contemplated by governmental authorities with respect to the Company.

 

ITEM 4.                        MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Not applicable.

 

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PART II

 

ITEM 5.                        MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY; RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

The Company’s Common Stock trades on the OTCBB. A public trading market having the characteristics of depth, liquidity and orderliness depends upon the existence of market makers as well as the presence of willing buyers and sellers, which are circumstances over which the Company does not have control. There can be no assurance that the market will provide significant liquidity for the Company’s Common Stock. As a result, an investment in the Company’s Common Stock may be highly illiquid. Investors may not be able to sell their shares readily or at all when the investor needs or desires to sell.

 

The following table sets forth closing high and low bid prices of the shares of Common Stock of the Company for the periods indicated (as reported by OTC Markets Group Inc.).

 

 

 

Price Range

 

 

 

High

 

Low

 

Fiscal year ended February 28, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

First Quarter

 

$

0.055

 

$

0.035

 

Second Quarter

 

0.045

 

0.02

 

Third Quarter

 

0.04

 

0.015

 

Fourth Quarter

 

0.05

 

0.021

 

Fiscal year ended February 28, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

First Quarter

 

$

0.10

 

$

0.05

 

Second Quarter

 

0.09

 

0.03

 

Third Quarter

 

0.08

 

0.04

 

Fourth Quarter

 

0.08

 

0.04

 

 

The quotations set forth above reflect inter-dealer prices, without retail mark-up, mark-down or commission, and may not represent actual transactions.

 

As of May 1, 2019, there were approximately 2,010 holders of record of the Company’s Common Stock, as shown on the records of the Transfer Agent and Registrar of the Common Stock. Since many shares may be held by investors in nominee names, such as the name of their broker or their broker’s nominee, the number of record holders often bears little relationship to the number of beneficial owners of the Common Stock.

 

The Company has never paid cash dividends on its Common Stock and the Board of Directors intends to retain all of its earnings, if any, to finance the development and expansion of its business. However, there can be no assurance that the Company can successfully expand its operations, or that such expansion will prove profitable. Future dividend policy will depend upon the Company’s earnings, capital requirements, financial condition and other factors considered relevant by the Company’s Board of Directors.

 

ITEM 6.                        SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

None.

 

ITEM 7.                        MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

The following is a discussion of the financial condition of the Company as of February 28, 2019 and 2018  and the results of operations for the fiscal years ended February 28, 2019 and 2018. It should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and the notes thereto included elsewhere in this report. The following discussion contains forward-looking statements.

 

Introduction

 

The Company has generated no significant revenue since its inception, and does not expect to generate any operating revenues until such time, if any, as Antineoplastons are approved for use and sale by the FDA. The Company’s sole source of funding is Dr. Burzynski, who funds the Company’s operations from his medical practice pursuant to certain agreements between

 

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Dr. Burzynski and the Company. See “Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.”  Funds received by the Company from Dr. Burzynski are reported as additional paid-in capital to the Company.

 

The Company is primarily engaged as a research and development facility of drugs currently being tested for the use in the treatment of cancer, and provides consulting services.  All clinical trials were closed for enrollment by the Company as of September 24, 2012. The Company is currently conducting one FDA approved clinical trial. The Company holds the exclusive right in the United States, Canada and Mexico to use, manufacture, develop, sell, distribute, sublicense and otherwise exploit all the rights, titles and interest in Antineoplaston drugs used in the treatment and diagnosis of cancer, once an Antineoplaston drug is approved for sale by the FDA. See “Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.

 

On September 3, 2004, the FDA granted the Company’s request for “orphan drug designation” (“ODD”) for the Company’s Antineoplastons (A10 & AS2-1 Antineoplaston) for treatment of patients with brain stem glioma and, on October 30, 2008, the FDA granted the Company’s request for ODD for Antineoplastons (A10 and AS2-1 Antineoplaston) for the treatment of all gliomas.

 

On January 13, 2009, the Company announced that the Company had reached an agreement with the FDA for the Company to move forward with a pivotal Phase III clinical trial of combination Antineoplaston therapy plus radiation therapy in patients with newly diagnosed diffuse, intrinsic brainstem gliomas (“DBSG”).  The agreement was made under the FDA’s Special Protocol Assessment (SPA) procedure, meaning that the design and planned analysis of the Phase III study of combination Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 (“ANP therapy”) plus radiation therapy (“RT”) in patients with newly-diagnosed, diffuse, intrinsic brainstem glioma (protocol “BT-52”), is acceptable to support a regulatory submission seeking new drug approval.  Protocol BT-52, at the FDA’s request, was revised in 2014 to study only patients with diffuse, intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG), which accounts for ~80% of brainstem gliomas. The study is a randomized, international phase III study of combination ANP therapy + RT vs. RT alone in patients with newly diagnosed DIPG in order to assess overall survival and tolerability.  The study’s objective is to evaluate overall survival of patients with newly-diagnosed DIPG who receive combination Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 plus RT versus RT alone.  Safety is also being assessed.  The study of BT-52 will commence upon availability of funds.

 

On September 16, 2013, the Company notified the FDA that it had withdrawn protocol BT-54 from further consideration. This was to be a randomized phase III study of combination Antineoplaston therapy vs. Temozolomide in children ages > 6 months to < 18 years with recurrent and/or progressive optic pathway glioma, after Carboplatin or Cisplatin Therapy, in order to assess progression free survival and tolerability. However, after SPA, the FDA advised the Company that it would not receive approval for the proposed BT-54 Phase III clinical trial.

 

Results of Operations

 

Fiscal Year Ended February 28, 2019 Compared to Fiscal Year Ended February 28, 2018

 

Research and development costs were approximately $1,146,000 and $1,280,000 for the fiscal years ended February 28, 2019 and 2018, respectively.  The decrease of $134,000 or 11% was due to a decrease in personnel costs of $95,000, a decrease in facility and equipment costs of $84,000, a decrease in other research and development costs of $9,000, offset by an increase in material costs of $19,000 and an increase in consulting and quality control costs of $35,000, as a result of cost cuts made due to a decrease in production related to the hold on clinical trials.

 

General and administrative expenses were approximately $492,000 and $333,000 for the fiscal years ended February 28, 2019 and 2018, respectively.  The increase of $159,000 or 48% was due to an increase in legal and professional fees of $136,000 and an increase in other general and administrative expenses of $23,000, as a result of requirements imposed by the FDA.

 

The Company had net losses of approximately $1,600,000 for each of the fiscal years ended February 28, 2019 and 2018.  The net loss from 2018 to 2019 was primarily static due to an overall increase in general and administrative expenses of the Company, offset by a decrease in research and development costs as described above.  As of February 28, 2019, the Company had a total stockholders’ deficit of approximately $(187,000).

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

The Company’s operations have been funded entirely by Dr. Burzynski with funds generated from Dr. Burzynski’s medical practice. Effective March 1, 1997, the Company entered into a Research Funding Agreement with Dr. Burzynski (the “Research Funding Agreement”), pursuant to which the Company agreed to undertake all scientific research in connection with the development of new or improved Antineoplastons for the treatment of cancer and Dr. Burzynski agreed to fund the Company’s Antineoplaston research for that purpose. Under the Research Funding Agreement, the Company hires such personnel as is required to conduct

 

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Antineoplaston research, and Dr. Burzynski funds the Company’s research expenses, including expenses to conduct the clinical trials. Dr. Burzynski also provides the Company laboratory and research space as needed to conduct the Company’s research activities. The Research Funding Agreement also provides that Dr. Burzynski may fulfill his funding obligations in part by providing the Company such administrative support as is necessary for the Company to manage its business. Dr. Burzynski pays the full amount of the Company’s monthly and annual budget of expenses for the operation of the Company, together with other unanticipated but necessary expenses which the Company incurs. In the event the research results in the approval of any additional patents for the treatment of cancer, Dr. Burzynski shall own all such patents, but shall license to the Company the patents based on the same terms, conditions and limitations as are in the current license between Dr. Burzynski and the Company. Dr. Burzynski has unlimited and free access to all equipment which the Company owns, so long as such use does not conflict with the Company’s use of such equipment, including without limitation, all equipment used in the manufacturing of Antineoplastons used in the clinical trials. The amounts which Dr. Burzynski is obligated to pay under the agreement shall be reduced dollar for dollar by the following: (1) any income which the Company receives for services provided to other companies for research and/or development of other products, less such identifiable marginal or additional expenses necessary to produce such income, or (2) the net proceeds of any stock offering or private placement which the Company receives during the term of the agreement up to a maximum of $1,000,000 in a given Company fiscal year.

 

The Company entered into a third amendment to the Research Funding Agreement, effective March 1, 2007, whereby the Company and Dr. Burzynski extended the term thereof until February 28, 2008, with an automatic renewal for an additional one year term, unless one party notifies the other party at least thirty days prior to the expiration of the term of the agreement of its intention not to renew the agreement.  Subject to the foregoing, the term of the Research Funding Agreement was renewed and extended until February 28, 2020, which is also automatically renewable for an additional one year term unless one party notifies the other party at least thirty days prior to the expiration of the term of the agreement of its intention not to renew the agreement.

 

The Research Funding Agreement automatically terminates in the event that Dr. Burzynski owns less than fifty percent (50%) of the outstanding shares of the Company, or is removed as President and/or Chairman of the Board of the Company, unless Dr. Burzynski notifies the Company in writing of his intention to continue the agreement notwithstanding this automatic termination provision.

 

The Company estimates that it will spend approximately $1,200,000 in the fiscal year ending February 29, 2020. The Company estimates that ninety-five percent (95%) of this amount will be spent on research and development and the continuance of FDA approved clinical trials. While the Company anticipates that Dr. Burzynski will continue to fund the Company’s research and FDA related costs, there is no assurance that Dr. Burzynski will be able to continue to fund the Company’s operations pursuant to the Research Funding Agreement or otherwise. In addition, Dr. Burzynski’s medical practice has successfully funded the Company’s research activities over the last 25 years and, in 1997, his medical practice was expanded to include traditional cancer treatment options such as chemotherapy, immunotherapy, hormonal therapy and gene targeted therapy in response to FDA requirements that cancer patients utilize more traditional cancer treatment options in order to be eligible to participate in the Company’s Antineoplaston clinical trials.

 

Because the Company currently is entirely dependent upon the contributions for research provided by Dr. Burzynski under the Research Funding Agreement, the Company would not be able to continue conducting its clinical trials if Dr. Burzynski ceased funding the Company’s research. In such event, the Company would be required to find immediate funding which may not be available on acceptable terms or at all. If this were to occur and the Company were not able to find adequate sources of funding, the Company would be required to cease operations. Even with Dr. Burzynski’s continued contributions under the Research Funding Agreement, the Company may be required to seek additional capital through equity or debt financing or the sale of assets until the Company’s operating revenues are sufficient to cover operating costs and provide positive cash flow; however, there can be no assurance that the Company will be able to raise such additional capital on acceptable terms to the Company. In addition, there can be no assurance that the Company will ever achieve positive operating cash flow.

 

ITEM 8.                        FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

The Company’s Annual Financial Statements, Notes to Financial Statements and the report of Pannell Kerr Forster of Texas, P.C. (“PKF”), independent registered public accounting firm, with respect thereto, referred to in the Table of Contents to the Financial Statements, appear elsewhere in this report beginning on Page F-2.

 

ITEM 9.                        CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

 

None.

 

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ITEM 9A.               CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

(a) Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures. Within the 90 days prior to the date of this report, the Company carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of the Company’s management, including the Company’s principal executive officer and principal financial officer, of the effectiveness of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures pursuant to Rule 13a-14 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Based upon that evaluation, the Company’s principal executive officer and principal financial officer concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are effective and designed to ensure that the information required to be included in periodic Securities and Exchange Commission filings is recorded, processed, summarized and reported on a timely basis. A controls system cannot provide absolute assurance, however, that the objectives of the controls system are met, and no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within a company have been detected.

 

Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. The Company’s management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act). Our internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States.

 

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Therefore, even those systems determined to be effective can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving their control objectives.

 

The Company’s management, with the participation of the Company’s principal executive officer and principal financial officer, evaluated the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of February 28, 2019. In making this assessment, the Company’s management used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) in Internal Control — Integrated Framework. Based on this evaluation, the Company’s management, with the participation of the principal executive officer and principal financial officer, concluded that, as of February 28, 2019, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting was effective.

 

This annual report does not include an attestation report of the Company’s registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management’s report was not subject to attestation by the Company’s registered public accounting firm pursuant to temporary rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission that permit the company to provide only management’s report in this annual report.

 

(b) Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting. There were no significant changes in the Company’s internal controls or in other factors that could significantly affect internal controls subsequent to the date of the evaluation above.

 

ITEM 9B.               OTHER INFORMATION

 

None.

 

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PART III

 

ITEM 10.                 DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

Set forth below are the names, ages and positions of the Company’s directors and executive officers:

 

Name

 

Age

 

Office

Stanislaw R. Burzynski, M.D., Ph.D.

 

75

 

Director and President

Barbara Burzynski, M.D.

 

77

 

Director

Carlton Hazlewood, Ph.D.

 

82

 

Director

Gregory S. Burzynski, M.D.

 

38

 

Director

Patryk P. Goscianski, M.B.A.

 

40

 

Treasurer and Secretary

Tomasz Janicki, M.D.

 

52

 

Vice President of Clinical Trials

 

STANISLAW R. BURZYNSKI, M.D., PH.D., has been the President and Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Company since its inception in 1984. He also served as the Company’s Secretary and Treasurer until March 1, 2012. Dr. Burzynski is a physician in private practice in Houston, Texas specializing in the treatment of cancer. Dr. Burzynski is the husband of Barbara Burzynski, M.D. and father of Gregory S. Burzynski, who are each directors of the Company.

 

Currently listed in Who’s Who In The World and a member in good standing with both the American and World Medical Associations, Dr. Burzynski is an internationally recognized physician and scientist who has pioneered the development and use of biologically active peptides in diagnosing, preventing, and treating cancer since 1967. In 1967, Dr. Burzynski graduated with distinction with an M.D. degree from the Medical Academy in Lublin, Poland, finishing first in his class of 250, and he subsequently earned his Ph.D. in Biochemistry.

 

From 1970 to 1977, he was a researcher and Assistant Professor at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. At Baylor, Dr. Burzynski’s research was sponsored and partially funded by the National Cancer Institute. Also at Baylor, he authored and co-authored sixteen publications, including five concerning his research on peptides and their effect on human cancer. Four of these publications were also co-authored by other doctors associated with M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute and Baylor College of Medicine. In May 1977, Dr. Burzynski received a Certificate of Appreciation from Baylor College of Medicine and in that same year founded the Company.

 

Dr. Burzynski is a member of the American Medical Association, American Association for Cancer Research, Harris County Medical Society, New York Academy of Sciences, Society for Neuroscience, Texas Medical Association, the Society of Sigma Xi, and the Society of Neuro-oncology. He is the author of over 360 scientific publications, presenter of scientific papers at major international conventions, and has been awarded 244 patents covering 43 countries for his Antineoplaston treatment and other inventions. Other groups are working in conjunction with him, including researchers at the University of Kurume Medical School in Japan.

 

BARBARA BURZYNSKI, M.D., a Director since 1984 and the wife of Dr. Burzynski, has been the Chairman of the Department of Pharmacy of the Burzynski Clinic since 1977. From January 1976 to July 1977, she was a Research Assistant in the Department of Pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine. She was a physician at the Medical Academy, Lublin, Poland, from 1970 to 1975. Dr. Barbara Burzynski graduated with an M.D. in 1966 from the Medical Academy, Lublin, Poland, and has published six publications on studies with Antineoplastons.

 

CARLTON HAZLEWOOD, PH.D. has been a Director of the Company since 1997. He also serves as Chairman of the IRB, an independent review board for the Company’s clinical trials designated according to federal regulations. Dr. Hazlewood currently operates his own consulting company, Research Consultant’s International, is president of Petroclean, L.L.C. and is an adjunct professor at Kingwood College. In addition, Dr. Hazlewood was employed in various capacities by the Baylor College of Medicine from 1965 until December 31, 1997, where he was a professor of Molecular Biology and Biophysics. Dr. Hazlewood received his Ph.D. in Medical Physiology from the University of Tennessee. Dr. Hazlewood is a prolific writer on medical topics and has been recognized for his research with numerous awards, honors and research grants.

 

GREGORY S. BURZYNSKI, M.D. has been a Director of the Company since 2011.  Dr. Gregory Burzynski is a licensed medical doctor who has worked at the Burzynski Clinic in Houston, Texas since July 2010.  After Dr. Gregory Burzynski graduated from Jagiellonian University Medical College in 2007, he was accepted in the internal medicine residency program of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Austin, Texas.  He is currently the Vice President of the Burzynski Clinic.  In addition, Dr. Gregory Burzynski is board certified in internal medicine and has been involved in co-authoring numerous publications regarding Antineoplastons. He is the son of Dr. Stanislaw Burzynski and Dr. Barbara Burzynski.

 

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PATRYK P. GOSCIANSKI, M.B.A. was appointed as the Treasurer and the Secretary of the Company on March 1, 2012. Mr. Goscianski currently works at Burzynski Clinic.  Mr. Goscianski joined Burzynski Clinic in Houston, TX in 2011 and holds the positions of Director of Finance and Director of Administration, where he oversees the external financial reporting for Burzynski Clinic as well as manages various other accounting, finance and administrative functions. In the past few years, Mr. Goscianski has worked for a variety of companies in areas of finance and business consulting. Mr. Goscianski holds a Bachelor of Business Administration degree from Texas State University and a Masters of Business Administration degree from the University of North Alabama.

 

TOMASZ JANICKI, M.D. was appointed as the Vice President of Clinical Trials of the Company on March 1, 2012.  Dr. Janicki currently works at Burzynski Clinic. Dr. Janicki joined Burzynski Clinic in 1997 as Research Associate and has served as Director of Medical Documentation at Burzynski Clinic since 2002.  Dr. Janicki has been involved in the administrative oversight of the Research Department at Burzynski Clinic, and has co-authored 80 publications and presentations for the advancement and acceleration of research and clinical trials at Burzynski Clinic. Dr. Janicki received his M.D. degree from Medical University in Wroclaw, Poland. Dr. Janicki is the son-in-law of Dr. Stanislaw Burzynski.

 

Audit Committee Financial Expert

 

The Company has not established an Audit Committee. Therefore, the Board of Directors has not designated any of its members as an “audit committee financial expert” as defined by the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance

 

Based solely upon a review of Forms 3 and 4 and amendments thereto furnished to the Company under Rule 16a-3(e) during the fiscal year ended February 28, 2019 and Form 5 and amendments thereto furnished to the Company with respect to such period, the Company is not aware of any director, officer, or beneficial owner of more than 10% of any class of equity securities of the Company registered pursuant to Section 12 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”) that has failed to file on a timely basis, as disclosed in the above forms, reports required by Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act during the Company’s most recent fiscal year.

 

Code of Ethics

 

The Company has adopted a code of ethics that applies to our chief executive officer, chief financial officer, chief accounting officer and all persons performing similar functions. The Company hereby undertakes to provide a copy of this code of ethics to any person, without charge upon request made in writing to: Investor Relations, 9432 Katy Freeway, Houston, Texas 77055.

 

ITEM 11.                 EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE

 

 

 

Annual Compensation

 

Long-Term Compensation

 

 

 

Fiscal

 

 

 

 

 

Other Annual

 

Restricted

 

Securities

 

LTIP

 

All Other

 

Name and Principal

 

Year

 

 

 

Bonus

 

Compensation

 

Stock

 

Underlying

 

Payouts

 

Compensation

 

Position

 

Ending

 

Salary($)

 

($)

 

($)

 

Awards($)

 

Options/SARs($)

 

($)

 

($)

 

Stanislaw R. Burzynski,

 

2017

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

M.D., Ph.D.,  President and

 

2018

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

Chairman of the Board of Directors (1)

 

2019

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Patryk P. Goscianski, M.B.A.,

 

2017

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

Treasurer and Secretary (2)

 

2018

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

 

 

2019

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tomasz Janicki, M.D., Vice

 

2017

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

President of Clinical

 

2018

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

Trials (3)

 

2019

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

-0-

 

 

30


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(1) In May of 2000, Dr. Burzynski began drawing his entire salary through his medical practice and is not currently compensated by the Company for his services.

 

(2) Mr. Goscianski is not currently compensated by the Company for his services.

 

(3) Dr. Janicki is not currently compensated by the Company for his services.

 

Directors do not receive any compensation for serving as directors; however, directors are reimbursed for all ordinary and necessary expenses incurred in attending meetings of the Board of Directors or otherwise incurred in their capacity as directors. In addition, any director also serving as a director of the IRB, the independent review board for the Company’s clinical trials designated according to federal regulations, is compensated by the IRB approximately $1,200 annually for serving as a director of the IRB.

 

ITEM 12.                           SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

The following table sets forth, as of May 1, 2019, the number of outstanding shares of Common Stock (the Company’s only class of voting securities) owned by (i) each person known by the Company to beneficially own more than 5% of its outstanding Common Stock, (ii) each director, (iii) each named executive officer, and (iv) all officers and directors as a group. The address for all of the beneficial owners listed below is the Company’s address.

 

Name of
beneficial owner

 

Amount and nature of
beneficial ownership

 

Percent of class (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stanislaw R. Burzynski, M.D., Ph.D.

 

106,368,278

 

80.9

%

Barbara Burzynski, M.D.

 

106,368,278

(2)

80.9

%

Carlton Hazlewood

 

0

 

*

 

Gregory S. Burzynski, M.D.

 

55,912

 

*

 

Patryk P. Goscianski, M.B.A.

 

0

 

*

 

Tomasz Janicki, M.D.

 

55,912

(3)

*

 

All Directors and Executive Officers as a group (6 persons)

 

106,480,102

 

81.0

%

 


*Less than one percent.

 

(1)         Percentages shown are based upon 131,448,444 shares of Common Stock outstanding as of May 1, 2019. Certain shares are deemed beneficially owned by more than one person listed in the table.

 

(2)         All of the shares listed above for Dr. Barbara Burzynski are included in the total number of shares for Dr. Burzynski, her husband.

 

(3)         All shares are owned by Kinga Szopa, who is the spouse of Dr. Tomasz Janicki.

 

ITEM 13.                 CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

 

Dr. Burzynski is the President and Chairman of the Board of the Company, as well as the beneficial owner of 80.9% of the Company’s outstanding Common Stock. Since 1983, Dr. Burzynski has personally funded and supported the Company’s operations out of funds generated from his medical practice pursuant to various agreements with the Company.

 

Effective July 5, 2012, the Company entered into the Marketing Agreement with WMC and SRB, an entity wholly-owned and controlled by Dr. Burzynski.  Under the Marketing Agreement, WMC agreed to (i) provide SRB with various marketing and consulting services to assist SRB in locating and developing cancer or health related centers in certain foreign markets and (ii) make payments to the Company equal the WMC Payment. In consideration of the WMC Payment, the Company agreed to grant to WMC warrants to acquire an aggregate of 2,000,000 shares of the Company’s Common Stock, exercisable at $0.10 per share with a ten year exercise period, with 1,000,000 shares vesting upon execution of the agreement and the remaining 1,000,000 shares to vest upon the first closing of a transaction by SRB as a result of the services provided by WMC under the Marketing Agreement. The fair market value of the vested warrants as of the date of grant was measured using the Black-Scholes option pricing model and totaled approximately $160,000 or $0.16 per warrant.

 

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Table of Contents

 

License Agreement

 

The Company entered into the License Agreement with Dr. Burzynski which gives the Company the exclusive right in the Territory (composed of the United States, Canada and Mexico) to use, manufacture, develop, sell, distribute, sublicense and otherwise exploit all of his rights, title and interests in Antineoplastons in the treatment and diagnosis of cancer, including but not limited to any patent rights which may be granted in these countries. The License Agreement will terminate upon the earlier of the expiration of the last patent licensed to the Company, or termination by Dr. Burzynski, at his option, if he is removed as a director or officer of the Company without his consent, if the Company files for bankruptcy or is the subject of any proceeding under applicable bankruptcy laws where such proceeding is not dismissed within 90 days from the date a petition is filed, or if any shareholder or group of shareholders acting in concert becomes the beneficial owner of the Company’s securities having voting power equal to or greater than the voting power of the securities Dr. Burzynski holds. Amendments to the License Agreement on April 24, 1984 and on March 1, 1990 granted Dr. Burzynski the limited right to manufacture, use, and exploit Antineoplastons in the Company’s exclusive territory solely for the purpose of enabling Dr. Burzynski to treat patients in his medical practice until such date that the FDA may approve the sale of Antineoplastons for the treatment of cancer in the United States.

 

Research Funding Arrangements

 

Effective March 1, 1997, the Company entered into the Research Funding Agreement with Dr. Burzynski and terminated all of the prior funding agreements between the Company and Dr. Burzynski. Pursuant to the Research Funding Agreement:

 

·        The Company agreed to undertake all scientific research in connection with the development of new or improved Antineoplastons for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. The Company will hire such personnel as is required to fulfill its obligations under the agreement;

 

·        Dr. Burzynski agreed to fund in its entirety all basic research which the Company undertakes in connection with the development of other Antineoplastons or refinements to existing Antineoplastons for the treatment of cancer and other diseases;

 

·        Dr. Burzynski agreed to pay the expenses to conduct the clinical trials for the Company;

 

·        Dr. Burzynski agreed to provide the Company such laboratory, research space and office space as the Company needs at no charge to the Company;

 

·        The parties agreed that Dr. Burzynski may fulfill his obligations in part by providing such administrative staff as is necessary for the Company to manage its business, at no cost to the Company;

 

·        Dr. Burzynski agreed to pay the full amount of the monthly and annual budget of expenses for the operation of the Company, together with such other unanticipated but necessary expenses which the Company incurs. Payments from Dr. Burzynski to the Company of the monthly budget shall be made in two equal installments on the first and fifteenth of each month;

 

·        In the event the research described in the agreement results in the approval of any additional patents, Dr. Burzynski shall own all such patents, but shall license to the Company the patents based on the same terms, conditions and limitations as provided by the License Agreement;

 

·        Dr. Burzynski shall have unlimited and free access to all equipment which the Company owns, so long as such use is not in conflict with the Company’s use of such equipment, including without limitation to all equipment used in manufacturing of Antineoplastons used in the clinical trials;

 

·        The amounts which Dr. Burzynski is obligated to pay under the agreement shall be reduced dollar for dollar by the following:

 

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·        Any income which the Company receives for services provided to other companies for research and/or development of other products, less such identifiable marginal or additional expenses necessary to produce such income (such as the purchase of chemicals, products or equipment solely necessary to engage in such other research and development activity); and

 

·        The net proceeds of any stock offering or private placement which the Company receives during the term of the agreement up to a maximum of $1,000,000 in a given Company fiscal year.

 

Effective March 1, 2007, the Company entered into a third amendment to the Research Funding Agreement, whereby the Company and Dr. Burzynski extended the term thereof until February 28, 2008, with an automatic renewal for an additional one year term, unless one party notifies the other party at least thirty days prior to the expiration of the term of the agreement of its intention not to renew the agreement.  In addition to the foregoing termination provisions, the agreement automatically terminates in the event that Dr. Burzynski owns less than fifty percent of the outstanding shares of the Company, or is removed as President and/or Chairman of the Board of the Company, unless Dr. Burzynski notifies the Company in writing of his intention to continue the agreement notwithstanding this automatic termination provision. Subject to the foregoing, the term of the Research Funding Agreement was renewed and extended until February 28, 2020, which is also automatically renewable for an additional one year term unless one party notifies the other party at least thirty days prior to the expiration of the term of the agreement of its intention not to renew the agreement.

 

Royalty Agreement

 

The Company and Dr. Burzynski entered into the Royalty Agreement, pursuant to which Dr. Burzynski agreed to act as the principal clinical investigator of the clinical trials necessary for obtaining FDA approval for interstate marketing of Antineoplastons. The Company and Dr. Burzynski agreed that in the event the Company receives FDA approval for interstate marketing and distribution, of which there can be no assurance, the Company shall pay Dr. Burzynski a royalty of 10% (ten percent) of the Company’s gross income, which royalty shall be paid on all gross receipts from all future sales, distributions and manufacture of Antineoplastons.

 

Pursuant to the Royalty Agreement, Dr. Burzynski retains the right to either (i) produce Antineoplaston products for use in his medical practice to treat up to 1,000 patients, at any one time, without paying any fees to the Company or (ii) purchase from the Company Antineoplaston products to treat up to 1,000 patients, at any one time, at a price equal to cost plus 10% (ten percent). Dr. Burzynski has the right to lease or purchase all the manufacturing equipment located at 12707 Trinity Drive, Stafford, Texas at a fair market price. The Royalty Agreement further provides that the Company will have the right, when and if Antineoplastons are approved for use and sale by the FDA, (i) to produce all Antineoplaston products to be sold or distributed in the United States, Canada and Mexico for the treatment of cancer and (ii) to lease from Dr. Burzynski the entire premises located at 12707 Trinity Drive, Stafford, Texas at terms and rates competitive with those available in the real estate market at that time, provided that Dr. Burzynski does not need the facility for his use.

 

ITEM 14.                 PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES

 

The following table sets forth the aggregate fees billed to the Company by its independent registered public accounting firm, PKF, for fiscal years ended February 28, 2019 and 2018, respectively:

 

 

 

2019

 

2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Audit Fees

 

$

35,410

 

$

34,825

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Audit-Related Fees

 

0

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tax Fees

 

0

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All Other Fees

 

0

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

$

35,410

 

$

34,825

 

 

Audit Fees were for professional services rendered for the audit of BRI’s financial statements and review of the interim financial statements included in quarterly reports and services that are normally provided in connection with statutory and regulatory filings or engagements.

 

33


Table of Contents

 

Audit-Related Fees are for assurance and related services that are reasonably related to the performance of the audit or review of BRI’s financial statements and are not reported under “Audit Fees.”  There were no Audit-Related Fees incurred in fiscal years 2019 or 2018.

 

Tax Fees were for professional services for federal and state tax compliance, tax advice and tax planning.  There were no Tax Fees incurred in fiscal years 2019 or 2018.

 

All Other Fees were for services other than the services reported above.  There were no other fees incurred in fiscal years 2019 or 2018.

 

Audit Committee’s Pre-Approval Policies and Procedures.  As disclosed above in Item 10, the Company does not have an Audit Committee.  The Board of Directors has not adopted any pre-approval policies or procedures.

 

ITEM 15.      EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

 

(a) (1) The financial statements are listed on the Table of Contents to Financial Statements to this report beginning on page F-1.

 

(a)(2) Financial Statement Schedules. Financial statement schedules have been omitted, as the information required to be set forth therein is included in the Financial Statements or Notes thereto appearing in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

(a)(3)  Exhibits. See the Exhibit immediately following Item 16. Form 10-K Summary of this Form 10-K.

 

ITEM 16.      FORM 10-K SUMMARY

 

None.

 

34


Table of Contents

 

EXHIBIT INDEX

 

EXHIBIT NO.

 

EXHIBIT NAME

 

 

 

3.1

 

Certificate of Incorporation of the Company, as amended (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 3(i) — (iii) to Form 10-SB filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 25, 1997 (File No. 000-23425)).

 

 

 

3.2

 

Amended Bylaws of the Company (incorporated by reference from Exhibit (3)(iv) to Form 10-SB filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 25, 1997 (File No. 000-23425)).

 

 

 

4.1

 

Form of Certificate Representing Common Stock (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 4.1 to Form 10-KSB filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 2, 2001 (File No. 000-23425)).

 

 

 

10.1

 

License Agreement, effective as of June 29, 1983, by and between the Company and Dr. Stanislaw R. Burzynski (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10(1) to Form 10-SB filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 25, 1997 (File No. 000-23425)).

 

 

 

10.2

 

Amended License Agreement, dated April 2, 1984, by and between the Company and Dr. Stanislaw R. Burzynski (incorporated by referenced from Exhibit 10(2) to Form 10-SB filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 25, 1997 (File No. 000-23425)).

 

 

 

10.3

 

Second Amended License Agreement, dated March 1, 1990, by and between the Company and Dr. Stanislaw R. Burzynski (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10(3) to Form 10-SB filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 25, 1997 (File No. 000-23425)).

 

 

 

10.4

 

Research Funding Agreement, effective as of March 1, 1997, by and between the Company and Dr. Stanislaw R. Burzynski (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10(4) to Form 10-SB filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 25, 1997 (File No. 000-23425)).

 

 

 

10.5

 

First Amendment to Research Funding Agreement, effective as of March 1, 2001, by and between the Company and Dr. Stanislaw R. Burzynski (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.5 to Form 10-KSB filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 2, 2001 (File No. 000-23425)).

 

 

 

10.6

 

Second Amendment to the Research Funding Agreement, effective as of February 29, 2004, by and between the Company and Dr. Stanislaw R. Burzynski (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.6 to Form 10-KSB filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on June 1, 2004 (File No. 000-23425)).

 

 

 

10.7

 

Royalty Agreement, dated March 25, 1997, by and between the Company and Dr. Stanislaw R. Burzynski (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10(5) to Form 10-SB filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 25, 1997 (File No. 000-23425)).

 

 

 

10.8

 

First Amended Royalty Agreement, dated September 29, 1997, by and between the Company and Dr. Stanislaw R. Burzynski (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10(6) to Form 10-SB filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 25, 1997 (File No. 000-23425)).

 

 

 

10.9

 

Third Amendment to Research Funding Agreement, effective as of March 1, 2007, by and between the Company and Dr. Stanislaw R. Burzynski (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.9 to Form 10-KSB filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 29, 2007 (File No. 000-23425)).

 

 

 

24

 

Power of Attorney (Included with the Signature Page).

 

 

 

31.1

 

Certification pursuant to Rules 13a-14 and 15d-14 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, filed herewith (Chief Executive Officer).

 

 

 

31.2

 

Certification pursuant to Rules 13a-14 and 15d-14 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, filed herewith (Principal Financial Officer).

 

35


Table of Contents

 

EXHIBIT NO.

 

EXHIBIT NAME

32.1

 

Certification furnished pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (Chief Executive Officer).

 

 

 

32.2

 

Certification furnished pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (Principal Financial Officer).

 

 

 

101.INS

 

XBRL Instance Document

 

 

 

101.SCH

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document

 

 

 

101.CAL

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document

 

 

 

101.DEF

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document

 

 

 

101.LAB

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document

 

 

 

101.PRE

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

 

36


Table of Contents

 

SIGNATURES

 

In accordance with Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

 

BURZYNSKI RESEARCH INSTITUTE, INC.

 

 

 

 

By:

/s/ Stanislaw R. Burzynski

 

 

Stanislaw R. Burzynski,

 

 

President and Chairman of the Board of Directors

 

 

Date: May 29, 2019

 

 

Each person whose signature appears below constitutes and appoints Dr. Stanislaw R. Burzynski his/her true and lawful attorney-in-fact and agent, with full power of substitution and resubstitution, severally, for him/her in his/her name, place and stead, in any and all capacities, to sign any and all amendments to this report, and to file the same, with all exhibits thereto and other documents in connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange Commission, granting unto said attorney-in-fact and agent full power and authority to do and perform each and every act and thing requisite and necessary to be done in and about the premises, as fully to all intents and purposes as he/she might or could do in person, hereby ratifying and confirming all that said attorney-in-fact and agent may lawfully do or cause to be done by virtue hereof.

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

/s/ Stanislaw R. Burzynski

 

 

Stanislaw R. Burzynski

 

Date: May 29, 2019

President and Chairman of the Board of Directors (principal executive officer)

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ Patryk P. Goscianski

 

 

Patryk P. Goscianski

 

Date: May 29, 2019

Secretary and Treasurer

 

 

(principal financial officer and principal accounting officer)

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ Barbara Burzynski

 

 

Barbara Burzynski

 

Date: May 29, 2019

Director

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ Carlton Hazlewood

 

 

Carlton Hazlewood

 

Date: May 29, 2019

Director

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ Gregory S. Burzynski

 

 

Gregory S. Burzynski, M.D.

 

Date: May 29, 2019

Director

 

 

 

37


Table of Contents

 

Burzynski Research Institute, Inc.

 

Financial Statements

 

For the years ended
February 28, 2019 and 2018

 

CONTENTS

 

 

Page

 

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

F-2

 

 

Balance Sheets

F-3

 

 

Statements of Operations

F-4

 

 

Statements of Stockholders’ Deficit

F-5

 

 

Statements of Cash Flows

F-6

 

 

Notes to Financial Statements

F-7

 


Table of Contents

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders

of Burzynski Research Institute, Inc.

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying balance sheets of Burzynski Research Institute, Inc. (the “Company”) as of February 28, 2019 and 2018, and the related statements of operations, stockholders’ deficit, and cash flows for each of the years in the two year period ended February 28, 2019, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the financial statements). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of February 28, 2019 and 2018, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the years in the two year period ended February 28, 2019, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

/s/ Pannell Kerr Forster of Texas, P.C.

 

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2010.

 

May 29, 2019

Houston, Texas

 

F-2


Table of Contents

 

BURZYNSKI RESEARCH INSTITUTE, INC.

BALANCE SHEETS

At February 28, 2019 and 2018

 

 

 

2019

 

2018

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

708

 

$

506

 

Prepaid expenses

 

21,464

 

28,423

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total current assets

 

22,172

 

28,929

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

$

22,172

 

$

28,929

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

101,065

 

$

41,941

 

Accrued liabilities

 

107,755

 

94,688

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

 

208,820

 

136,629

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total liabilities

 

208,820

 

136,629

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commitments and contingencies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ deficit

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock, $.001 par value; 200,000,000 shares authorized; 131,448,444 shares issued and outstanding as of February 28, 2019 and 2018

 

131,449

 

131,449

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

121,705,250

 

120,146,481

 

Retained deficit

 

(122,023,347

)

(120,385,630

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total stockholders’ deficit

 

(186,648

)

(107,700

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ deficit

 

$

22,172

 

$

28,929

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

F-3


Table of Contents

 

BURZYNSKI RESEARCH INSTITUTE, INC.

STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

For the Years Ended February 28, 2019 and 2018

 

 

 

2019

 

2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating expenses

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

$

1,145,934

 

$

1,280,470

 

General and administrative

 

491,783

 

332,631

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total operating expenses

 

1,637,717

 

1,613,701

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating loss before other income

 

(1,637,717

)

(1,613,101

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other income

 

 

1,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loss before provision for income tax

 

(1,637,717

)

(1,612,101

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income tax expense

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(1,637,717

)

$

(1,612,101

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss per common share:

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and diluted

 

$

(0.01

)

$

(0.01

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average common shares outstanding:

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and diluted

 

131,448,444

 

131,448,444

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

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BURZYNSKI RESEARCH INSTITUTE, INC.

STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT

For the Years Ended February 28, 2019 and 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional

 

 

 

Total

 

 

 

Common Stock

 

Paid-in

 

Retained

 

Stockholders’

 

 

 

Shares

 

Amount

 

Capital

 

Deficit

 

Deficit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance February 29, 2017

 

131,448,444

 

$

131,449

 

$

118,609,079

 

$

(118,773,529

)

$

(33,001

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash contributed by S.R. Burzynski M.D., Ph.D. and related parties

 

 

 

319,268

 

 

319,268

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FDA clinical trial expenses paid directly by S.R. Burzynski M.D., Ph.D.

 

 

 

1,218,134

 

 

1,218,134

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

 

 

 

(1,612,101

)

(1,612,101

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance February 28, 2018

 

131,448,444

 

131,449

 

120,146,481

 

(120,385,630

)

(107,700

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash contributed by S.R. Burzynski M.D., Ph.D. and related parties

 

 

 

477,718

 

 

477,718

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FDA clinical trial expenses paid directly by S.R. Burzynski M.D., Ph. D.

 

 

 

1,081,051

 

 

1,081,051

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

 

 

 

(1,637,717

)

(1,637,717

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance February 28, 2019

 

131,448,444

 

$

131,449

 

$

121,705,250

 

$

(122,023,347

)

$

(186,648

)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

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BURZYNSKI RESEARCH INSTITUTE, INC.

STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

For the Years Ended February 28, 2019 and 2018

 

 

 

2019

 

2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(1,637,717

)

$

(1,612,101

)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

FDA clinical trial expenses paid directly by S.R. Burzynski M.D., Ph. D.

 

1,081,051

 

1,218,134

 

Change in operating assets and liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Prepaid expenses

 

6,959

 

(28,423

)

Retainer

 

 

10,000

 

Accounts payable

 

59,124

 

22,289

 

Accrued liabilities

 

13,067

 

70,608

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NET CASH USED IN OPERATING ACTIVITIES

 

(477,516

)

(319,493

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES

 

 

 

 

 

Cash contribution recorded

 

477,718

 

319,268

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NET CASH PROVIDED BY FINANCING ACTIVITIES

 

477,718

 

319,268

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH

 

202

 

(225

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH AT BEGINNING OF YEAR

 

506

 

731

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH AT END OF YEAR

 

$

708

 

$

506

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUPPLEMENTAL CASH FLOW DISCLOSURES:

 

 

 

 

 

Cash Paid During the Year For:

 

 

 

 

 

Interest

 

$

 

$

31,471

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

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BURZYNSKI RESEARCH INSTITUTE, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

1.                                      Background, Basis of Presentation, Economic Dependency and Significant Accounting

 

Policies:

 

Background and Basis of Presentation

 

The financial statements of Burzynski Research Institute, Inc. (the “Company” or “BRI”), a Delaware corporation, include expenses incurred related to clinical trials, which were sanctioned by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1993, for Antineoplaston drugs used in the treatment of cancer.  These expenses are incurred directly by S.R. Burzynski, M.D., Ph.D. (Dr. Burzynski or “SRB”) on behalf of the Company and have been reported as research and development costs and as additional paid-in capital.  Other funds received from Dr. Burzynski have also been reported as additional paid-in capital.  Expenses related to Dr. Burzynski’s medical practice (unrelated to the clinical trials) have not been included in these financial statements.  Dr. Burzynski is the President, Chairman of the Board and owner of over 81.0% of the outstanding common stock of the Company, and also is the inventor and original patent holder of certain drug products known as “Antineoplastons,” which he has licensed to the Company.

 

The Company and Dr. Burzynski have entered into various agreements, as further described in Note 2, which provide the Company the exclusive right in the United States, Canada and Mexico to use, manufacture, develop, sell, distribute, sublicense and otherwise exploit all the rights, titles and interest in Antineoplaston drugs used in the treatment of cancer, once the drug is approved for sale by the FDA.

 

The Company is primarily engaged as a research and development facility for Antineoplaston drugs being tested for the use in the treatment of cancer.  The Company’s IND 43742 is currently under full clinical hold and the Company cannot enroll new patients into any clinical trials until the full clinical hold is removed by the FDA. At this time, none of the Antineoplaston drugs have received FDA approval; further, there can be no assurance that FDA approval will be granted.

 

BRI’s administrative offices are located in Houston, Texas; its research and production facilities are in Stafford, Texas. The Company operates primarily as a research and development facility of Antineoplaston drugs currently being tested for the use in the treatment of cancer, and provides consulting services.  Segment information is not presented since all of the Company’s operations are attributed to a single reportable segment.  The Company has had no significant revenue from external sources.  The Company is currently conducting clinical trials on various Antineoplastons in accordance with FDA regulations, however, at this time none of the Antineoplaston drugs have received FDA approval; further, there can be no assurance FDA approval will be granted.

 

Economic Dependency

 

BRI has generated no significant revenues since its inception.  As of February 28, 2019, the Company had a working capital deficit of approximately $186,648 and accumulated deficit of approximately $122,023,000.  For the years ended February 28, 2019 and 2018, the Company incurred losses of approximately $1,600,000.

 

Dr. Burzynski has funded the capital and operational needs of the Company since its inception from revenues generated through his medical practice pursuant to various agreements as described in Note 2.

 

The Company is economically dependent on its funding from Dr. Burzynski through his medical practice.  In the past, a portion of Dr. Burzynski’s patients have been admitted and treated as part of the clinical trial programs.  The Company’s IND 43742 is currently under full clinical hold and the Company cannot enroll new patients into any clinical trials until the full clinical hold is removed by the FDA.  The FDA imposes numerous regulations and requirements’ regarding these patients and the Company is subject to inspection at any time by the FDA.  These regulations are complex and subject to interpretation and though it is management’s intention to comply fully with all such regulations, there is the risk that the Company is not in compliance and is thus subject to sanctions imposed by the FDA.

 

In addition, as with any medical practice, Dr. Burzynski is subject to potential claims by patients and other potential claimants commonly arising out of the operation of a medical practice.  The risks associated with Dr. Burzynski’s medical practice directly affect his ability to fund the operations of BRI.

 

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Significant Accounting Policies

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments purchased with an original maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are recorded at cost and depreciated using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets, which range from 5 to 10 years.  Expenditures for major renewals and betterments that extend the useful lives of property and equipment are capitalized; maintenance and repairs are charged against earnings as incurred.  Upon disposal of assets, the related cost and accumulated depreciation are removed from the accounts and any resulting gain or loss is recognized currently in the Statement of Operations.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company uses the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes, under which deferred income taxes are recognized for the tax consequences of temporary differences by applying the enacted statutory tax rate applicable to future years to differences between financial statement carrying amounts and the tax basis of existing assets and liabilities.

 

Valuation allowances are established when necessary to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount expected to be realized.  Income tax expense is the tax payable or refundable for the period plus or minus the change during the period in deferred tax assets and liabilities.  The costs incurred related to the conduct of FDA approved clinical trials incurred directly by Dr. Burzynski within his medical practice are deducted by Dr. Burzynski and are not included in the Company’s tax provision.  The portion of the Texas gross margin tax that is based on income is treated as income taxes and included in the income tax provision.

 

Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 740, Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes, clarifies the accounting for income taxes by prescribing the minimum recognition threshold a tax position is required to meet before being recognized in the financial statements. ASC 740 also provides guidance on derecognition, measurement, classification, interest and penalties, accounting during interim periods, disclosure, and transition. For the years ended February 28, 2019 and 2018, no uncertain tax positions were identified.

 

Loss Per Common Share

 

The Company accounts for loss per share in accordance with FASB ASC 260, Earnings per Share. Basic loss per share amounts are calculated by dividing net loss by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during each period. Diluted loss per share is calculated by dividing net loss by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the periods, including the dilutive effect of all common stock equivalents. Dilutive options and warrants that are issued during a period or that expire or are canceled during a period are reflected in the computations for the time they were outstanding during the periods being reported. During the years ended February 28, 2019 and 2018, 1,600,000 warrants and stock options were excluded from the calculation of diluted loss per share because their effect would be anti-dilutive.

 

Research and Development

 

Research and development cost are charged to operations in the period incurred.  Equipment used in research and development activities, which have alternative uses, is capitalized.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The carrying value of cash and accounts payable approximates fair value due to the short term maturity of these instruments.  None of the financial instruments are held for trading purposes.

 

Management Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the dates of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reported periods.  The

 

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significant estimates are the allocation of payroll and other expenses between the clinical trial expenses reported with BRI and Dr. Burzynski’s medical practice expenses.  Department managers review at least quarterly the duties of each employee in their department and estimate the percentage of time each employee spends between clinical trials and the medical practice.  Payroll costs are allocated between clinical trials and the medical practice based on these percentages.  Other expenses are allocated based on the percentage of payroll allocated to either clinical trials or the medical practice.  Management believes that the estimates and allocations are reasonable.  Actual results could differ from these estimates.

 

Stock Options and Warrants

 

The Company accounts for stock-based compensation under the provisions of FASB ASC 718, “Compensation — Stock Compensation,” which requires the measurement and recognition of compensation expense for all share-based payment awards made to employees and non-employee officers based on estimated fair values as of the date of grant. Compensation expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period.

 

The Company accounts for share-based payments to non-employees, with guidance provided by FASB ASC 505-50, “Equity-Based Payments to Non-Employees.”

 

The Company did not grant any options or warrants and no options or warrants previously granted vested in any of the periods presented in these financial statements. Thus, there was no effect on net loss and earnings per share regarding the provisions of FASB ASC 718 or FASB ASC 505-50 in any of the periods presented.

 

2.                                     Agreements With, and Other Related Party Transactions:

 

The Company has agreements with its majority shareholder and President Dr. Burzynski as further described below:

 

License Agreement

 

Dr. Burzynski is the owner of patents involving the formulation, preparation, manufacture, production, use, dosage and treatment with Antineoplastons.  The United States Patent Office and Patent Offices of thirty-four other countries have issued the patents.  The Patents for cancer treatment and diagnosis in the United States and Canada are licensed to the Company pursuant to a License Agreement.

 

The License Agreement grants to the Company the exclusive right, in the United States, Canada, and Mexico, to use, manufacture, develop, sell, distribute, sub-license and otherwise exploit all of Dr. Burzynski’s rights, title, and interests, including patent rights, in Antineoplaston drugs in the treatment and diagnosis of cancer.  The Company will not be able to exploit such rights until such time as Antineoplastons are approved, of which there can be no assurance, by the FDA for sale in the United States and the appropriate authority in Canada and Mexico.

 

The Agreement gives Dr. Burzynski the right to make, use, sell, distribute, and otherwise exploit Antineoplastons in connection with the treatment of patients in his medical practice.

 

The License Agreement will terminate upon the earlier of the expiration of the last patent licensed to the Company, or termination by Dr. Burzynski, at his option, if he is removed as a director or officer of the Company without his consent, if the Company files for bankruptcy or if any shareholder or group of shareholders acting in concert becomes the beneficial owner of the Company’s securities having voting power equal to or greater than the voting power of the securities Dr. Burzynski holds.

 

Under the License Agreement, the Company currently owns exclusive rights to eight (8) issued United States Patents, four (4) issued Canadian Patents and one (1) issued Mexican Patent.

 

The five initial United States Patents (the “Initial Patents”) relate to: (i) Determination of Antineoplastons in body tissue or fluids as a testing procedure to aid in the diagnosis of cancer; (ii) Processes for the preparation of purified fractions of Antineoplastons from human urine; (iii) Processes for the synthetic production of Antineoplastons and methods of treating neoplastic disease (cancer); (iv) Administration of Antineoplastons to humans; and (v) Methods of synthesizing A-10.  All of these Initial Patents have expired as of February 28, 2009. The Company does not believe the expiration of any of the Initial Patents will have a material adverse effect on the Company.

 

The sixth United States Patent (the “2000 U.S. Patent”) covers Liposomal Antineoplaston therapies with markedly improved anti-cancer activity.  The 2000 U.S. Patent expired May 14, 2017.

 

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The seventh United States Patent (the “2001 U.S. Patent”) is for a treatment regimen for the administration of phenylacetylglutamine, phenylacetylisoglutamine, and/or phenylacetate.  The 2001 U.S. Patent expired on July 23, 2018.

 

The eighth United States Patent (the “2005 U.S. Patent”) relates to a divisional application to the 2001 U.S. Patent.  The 2005 U.S. Patent was issued in September 2005 and expired on July 31, 2018.

 

The four Canadian Patents (the “Canadian Patents”) relate to: (i) Processes for the preparation of purified fractions of Antineoplastons from human urine, (ii) Processes for the synthetic production of Antineoplastons and methods of treating neoplastic disease (cancer), (iii) Liposomal formulation of Antineoplastons and (iv) Treatment regimen for the administration of phenylacetylglutamine.  The Canadian Patents expired or will expire on June 4, 2002, November 14, 2006, May 14, 2017, and July 2, 2019, respectively; however, the Company does not believe the Canadian Patents that expired in 2002, 2006, or 2017 will have a material adverse effect on the Company.

 

The Mexican Patent relates to a treatment regimen for the administration of phenylacetylglutamine.  This patent expired on January 14, 2019.

 

Research Funding Agreement

 

Effective March 1, 1997, Dr. Burzynski restructured his funding arrangement with the Company and entered into a Research Funding Agreement.  Under this agreement the two parties agreed to the following:

 

1.                                     The Company agrees to undertake all scientific research in connection with the development of new or improved Antineoplastons for the treatment of cancer.  The Company will hire such personnel as is required to fulfill its obligations under the agreement.

 

2.                                     Dr. Burzynski agrees to fund in its entirety all basic research, which the Company undertakes in connection with the development of other Antineoplastons or refinements to existing Antineoplastons for the treatment of cancer.

 

3.                                     As FDA approval of Antineoplastons will benefit both parties, Dr. Burzynski agrees to pay the expenses to conduct the clinical trials for the Company.

 

4.                                     Dr. Burzynski agrees to provide the Company such laboratory and research space as the Company needs at the Trinity Drive facility in Stafford, Texas, and such office space as is necessary at Trinity Drive and at his medical facility.

 

5.                                     In the event the research described in the agreement results in the approval of any additional patents for the treatment of cancer, Dr. Burzynski shall own all such patents, but shall license to the Company the patents based on the same terms, conditions and limitations as is in the current license between the parties.

 

6.                                     Dr. Burzynski shall have unlimited and free access to all equipment which the Company owns, so long as such use is not in conflict with the Company’s use of such equipment, including without limitation to all equipment used in manufacturing of Antineoplastons used in the clinical trials.

 

7.                                     The amounts, which Dr. Burzynski is obligated to pay under the agreement, shall be reduced dollar for dollar by the following:

 

a. Any income which the Company receives for services provided to other companies for research and/or development of other products, less such identifiable marginal or additional expenses necessary to produce such income (such as the purchase of chemicals, products or equipment) solely necessary to engage in such other research and development activity, and

 

b. The net proceeds of any stock offering or private placement, which the Company receives during the term of the engagement up to a maximum of $1,000,000 in a given Company fiscal year.

 

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8.                                     Effective March 1, 2018, the term of the Research Funding Agreement was extended to February 28, 2019, and is automatically renewable for an additional one-year term thereafter, unless one party notifies the other party at least thirty days prior to the expiration of the term of the agreement of its intention not to renew the agreement.  In addition to the foregoing termination provisions, the agreement automatically terminates in the event that Dr. Burzynski owns less than fifty percent of the outstanding shares of the Company, or is removed as President and/or Chairman of the Board of the Company, unless Dr. Burzynski notifies the Company in writing of his intention to continue the agreement notwithstanding this automatic termination provision.

 

Royalty Agreement

 

The Company entered into a royalty agreement with Dr. Burzynski whereby upon receiving FDA approval for interstate marketing and distribution, the Company agrees to pay Dr. Burzynski a royalty interest equivalent to 10% of the Company’s gross income, which royalty interest shall include gross receipts from all future sales, distributions and manufacture of Antineoplastons.  Dr. Burzynski will have the right to either produce Antineoplaston products for use in his medical practice to treat up to 1,000 patients without paying any fees to the Company, or purchase from the Company Antineoplaston products for use in his medical practice to treat up to 1,000 patients at a price of the Company’s cost to produce the Antineoplaston products plus 10%.  Dr. Burzynski will also have the right to either lease or purchase all the manufacturing equipment located at 12707 Trinity Drive, Stafford, Texas at a fair market price.  The Company will also have the right to lease from Dr. Burzynski the entire premise located at 12707 Trinity Drive, Stafford, Texas at arms-length terms at rates competitive with those available in the market at that time, provided that Dr. Burzynski does not need the facility for his use.

 

The term of this agreement is indefinite and will continue until such time as both parties agree it is not in their mutual interest to continue.

 

Other Related Party Transactions

 

Dr. Burzynski owns the production facility located at Trinity Drive.  There is no formal lease agreement between Dr. Burzynski and the Company; however, the Research Funding Agreement described above provides that Dr. Burzynski will allow the Company the use of the building.  In addition, the Royalty Agreement states that after FDA approval is granted (though approval is not assured) the Company may rent the facility at competitive rates if Dr. Burzynski does not need the facility for his use.  The actual facility costs are included in the financial statements as set forth in Note 5.  In addition, Dr. Burzynski’s medical clinic performs certain administrative functions such as accounting, and allows the Company the use of some office space.   Since May of 2000, Dr. Burzynski’s entire salary is paid through his medical practice and he is not compensated directly by the Company for his services.

 

The Company has received all significant funding from Dr. Burzynski through either cash contributed to the Company or the payment of the cost to conduct FDA approved clinical trials through his medical practice, as disclosed in Note 1.  The following is a summary of the capital contributed and clinical trial costs paid by Dr. Burzynski for the years ended February 28, 2019 and 2018, respectively:

 

 

 

2019

 

2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital contributed

 

$

477,718

 

$

319,268

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clinical trial costs paid direct

 

$

1,081,051

 

$

1,218,134

 

 

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3.                                     Employee Benefits:

 

Employees of SRB receive health care benefits as well as group dental insurance, vision, short-term and long-term disability insurance, and life insurance, under PPO options, from which employees may choose coverage. Employees pay pre-tax premiums from $0 to $2,554 per month depending upon the insurance coverage selected by the employee.

 

4.                                      Lease commitments:

 

Dr. Burzynski leases certain equipment used in the clinical trials under leases originally maturing in one to four years.  These costs are included in general and administrative expenses and also included in contributed capital by Dr. Burzynski.  Rent expense incurred under these leases was $69,974 and $69,978 for the years ended February 28, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

As explained in Note 2, Dr. Burzynski owns the facility used by the Company to perform research and produce its drug products.  There is currently no lease agreement; however, the facility’s costs are included in the accompanying financial statements as rental expense.  The rental expense is derived from not only utilities and expenses normally incurred by a tenant but also mortgage interest, insurance, property taxes and building depreciation.  Rent expense totaled $108,337 and $154,506 for 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

5.                                     Income Taxes:

 

The costs incurred related to the conduct of FDA approved clinical trials incurred directly by Dr. Burzynski within his medical practice are deducted by Dr. Burzynski and are not included in the Company’s tax provision.

 

The actual income tax benefit attributable to the Company’s losses for the years ended February 28, 2019 and 2018 differ from the amounts computed by applying the U.S. federal income tax rate of 21% to the pretax loss as a result of the following:

 

 

 

2019

 

2018

 

Expected benefit

 

$

(343,921

)

$

(338,541

)

Effect of expenses deducted directly by Dr. Burzynski

 

343,921

 

338,541

 

Other adjustments

 

(16,579

)

(60,630

)

Change in valuation allowance

 

16,579

 

60,630

 

Income tax expense

 

$

 

$

 

 

The components of the Company’s deferred income tax assets as of February 28, 2019 and 2018 are as follows:

 

 

 

2019

 

2018

 

Deferred tax assets:

 

 

 

 

 

Net operating loss carryforwards

 

$

155,548

 

$

138,969

 

Alternative minimum tax credit carryforwards

 

42,603

 

42,603

 

Total deferred tax assets

 

198,151

 

181,572

 

Less valuation allowance

 

(198,151

)

(181,572

)

Net deferred tax assets

 

$

 

$

 

 

The Company’s ability to utilize net operating loss carryforwards and alternative minimum tax credit carryforwards will depend on its ability to generate adequate future taxable income.  The Company has no historical earnings on which to base an expectation of future taxable income.  Accordingly, a valuation allowance for the total deferred tax assets has been provided.

 

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The Company has net operating loss carryforwards available to offset future income in the amount of $661,756 as of February 28, 2019.  The net operating loss carryforwards expire as of February 28 or 29 of the following years:

 

2022

 

$

29,250

 

2023

 

$

73,401

 

2024

 

$

69,394

 

2025

 

$

13,475

 

2026

 

$

46,972

 

2027

 

$

31,220

 

2028

 

$

7,737

 

2029

 

$

31,868

 

2030

 

$

 

2031

 

$

 

2032

 

$

 

2033

 

$

207,097

 

2034

 

$

76,643

 

2035

 

$

 

2036

 

$

 

2037

 

$

74,699

 

 

As a result of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (the “Act”), net operating loss carryforwards generated in years beginning after December 31, 2017 will carryforward indefinitely, and will apply to 80% of future taxable income. For the year ended February 28, 2019, the Company had a net operating loss carryforward in the amount of $78,948 that will carryforward in accordance with the Act.

 

In addition, the Company has alternative minimum tax credit carryforwards of $42,603 at February 28, 2019.

 

6.                                     Equity Transactions:

 

On September 14, 1996, the Company granted 600,000 stock options, with an exercise price of $0.35 per share, to an officer who is no longer with the Company.  The options vested as follows:

 

400,000 options

 

September 14, 1996

100,000 options

 

June 1, 1997

100,000 options

 

June 1, 1998

 

The options are valid in perpetuity. None of the options have been exercised as of February 28, 2019.

 

On June 1, 2009, the Company approved the issuance of 60,000 shares of the Company’s Common Stock as compensation for services rendered to the Company and were fair valued at approximately $9,400.  The shares were sold pursuant to an exemption from registration under Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, to a single accredited investor and did not involve a public offering.

 

Effective July 5, 2012, the Company entered into a Marketing and Consulting Agreement (the “Marketing Agreement”) with Worldwide Medical Consultants, Inc. (“WMC”) and CARIGEN, LTD (“SRB”), an entity wholly-owned and controlled by Dr. Burzynski, pursuant to which WMC will (i) provide SRB with various marketing and consulting services to assist SRB in locating and developing cancer or health related centers in certain foreign markets and (ii) make payments to the Company equal to 10% of each consulting fee received by WMC for the aforementioned services provided to SRB, net of certain expenses incurred by WMC (“WMC Payment”). In consideration of the WMC Payment, the Company agreed to grant to WMC warrants to acquire an aggregate of 2,000,000 shares of the Company’s Common Stock, exercisable at $0.10 per share with a ten year exercise period, with 1,000,000 shares vesting upon execution of the agreement and the remaining 1,000,000 shares to vest upon the first closing of a transaction by SRB as a result of the services provided by WMC under the Marketing Agreement. The fair market value of the vested warrants as of the date of grant was measured using the Black-Scholes option pricing model and totaled approximately $160,000 or $0.16 per warrant. As of February 28, 2019, none of the aforementioned warrants have been exercised and no additional vesting has occurred.

 

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7.                                     Commitments and Contingencies and Supply Source:

 

In the ordinary course of conducting business, the Company may be a party to legal proceedings and claims.  As of February 28, 2019, the Company does not expect the final outcome of any such matters to have a material adverse effect on its financial position, results of operations, or cash flows.

 

As described in Note 2, the Company entered a Royalty Agreement with Dr. Burzynski.  Under that agreement, upon FDA approval, the Company is obligated to provide Dr. Burzynski the right to produce Antineoplaston products to treat up to 1,000 patients without paying any fees to the Company or the right to purchase Antineoplaston products to treat up to 1,000 patients at cost plus 10%. As such, Dr. Burzynski supplies all of the Antineoplaston products to the Company.

 

No patients were treated during the year ended February 28, 2019 or 2018. Management estimates the current production facilities have the capacity to produce product to treat approximately 1,000 patients per year.  There is space available at the current site to expand the facility for increased capacity if necessary.

 

The Company received approximately 80% of the chemicals used in producing Antineoplastons from three suppliers during the year ended February 28, 2019 and 86% from four suppliers during the year ended February 28, 2018.  Dr. Burzynski has established additional vendors to supply these chemicals should there be a loss of these suppliers.

 

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