Company Quick10K Filing
Lincoln National Life Insurance
Price-0.00 EPS52
Shares10 P/E-0
MCap-0 P/FCF0
Net Debt-2,238 EBIT429
TEV-2,238 TEV/EBIT-5
TTM 2019-09-30, in MM, except price, ratios
10-Q 2020-09-30 Filed 2020-11-09
10-Q 2020-06-30 Filed 2020-08-10
10-Q 2020-03-31 Filed 2020-05-12
10-K 2019-12-31 Filed 2020-03-13
10-Q 2019-09-30 Filed 2019-11-04
10-Q 2019-06-30 Filed 2019-08-05
10-Q 2019-03-31 Filed 2019-05-06
10-K 2018-12-31 Filed 2019-03-13
10-Q 2018-09-30 Filed 2018-11-06
10-Q 2018-06-30 Filed 2018-08-07
10-Q 2018-03-31 Filed 2018-05-09
10-K 2017-12-31 Filed 2018-03-13
8-K 2018-01-19

C865 10K Annual Report

Part I
Item 1. Business
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 2. Properties
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Part II
Item 5. Market for Registrant’S Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6. Selected Financial Data
Item 7. Management’S Narrative Analysis of The Results of Operations
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures
Item 9B. Other Information
Part III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11. Executive Compensation
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services
Part IV
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules
EX-31.1 c865-20171231xex31_1.htm
EX-31.2 c865-20171231xex31_2.htm
EX-32.1 c865-20171231xex32_1.htm
EX-32.2 c865-20171231xex32_2.htm

Lincoln National Life Insurance Earnings 2017-12-31

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow
3302641981326602016201720182020
Assets, Equity
4.33.42.51.50.6-0.32016201720182020
Rev, G Profit, Net Income
2.21.40.5-0.3-1.2-2.02016201720182020
Ops, Inv, Fin

10-K 1 c865-20171231x10k.htm 10-K LNL 10K 4Q17



UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C20549  



FORM 10-K  



(Mark One)

     Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934  

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017  

OR









     Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934  

For the transition period from                      to                     

 

Commission File Number 1-6028  



THE LINCOLN NATIONAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)  





 



 

Indiana

35-0472300

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

(I.R.SEmployer Identification No.)



 

1300 South Clinton Street, Fort Wayne, Indiana

46802

(Address of principal executive offices)

(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (260)  455-2000  



Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: None

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: Common Stock, par value $2.50



Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  Yes      No  



Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.  Yes      No  



Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes      No  



Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes      No      



Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  



Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.  Large accelerated filer      Accelerated filer  Non-accelerated filer  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)  Smaller reporting company      Emerging growth company  

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.



Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).  Yes      No   



As of March 7, 2018, 10,000,000 shares of common stock of the registrant ($2.50 par value) were outstanding, all of which were directly owned by Lincoln National Corporation



Documents Incorporated by Reference:  None





THE REGISTRANT MEETS THE CONDITIONS SET FORTH IN GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS I(1) (a) AND (b) OF

FORM 10-K AND IS THEREFORE FILING THIS FORM 10-K WITH THE REDUCED DISCLOSURE FORMAT.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________





 


 

The Lincoln National Life Insurance Company

 

Table of Contents





 

 

 

 

 

Item

 

 

 

 

       Page

PART I

 

1.

Business 

 

 

Overview 

 

 

Business Segments and Other Operations



 

 

Annuities



 

 

Retirement Plan Services



 

 

Life Insurance



 

 

Group Protection

 

 

 

Other Operations

 

 

Reinsurance

 

 

Reserves

 

 

Investments

 

 

Financial Strength Ratings

 

 

Regulatory

10 

 

 

Employees

15 



 

 

1A.

Risk Factors

15 



 

 

1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

28 



 

 

2.

Properties

28 



 

 

3.

Legal Proceedings

28 



 

 

4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

28 



 

PART II

 

5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities 

29 



 

 

6.

Selected Financial Data

29 



 

 

7.

Management’s Narrative Analysis of the Results of Operations

30 

 

 

Forward-Looking Statements – Cautionary Language

30 



 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

31 



 

Acquisitions and Dispositions

38 

 

 

Results of Consolidated Operations

38 

 

 

Results of Annuities 

40 

 

 

Results of Retirement Plan Services 

41 

 

 

Results of Life Insurance

43 

 

 

Results of Group Protection

44 

 

 

Results of Other Operations

45 



 

Realized Gain (Loss)

46 



 

Reinsurance

48 

 

 

Review of Consolidated Financial Condition

49 

 

 

   Liquidity and Capital Resources

49 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 

 


 



 



 

 

Item

Page



 

 

7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

52 



 

 

8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data 

59 



 

 

9.

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

136 



 

 

9A.

Controls and Procedures

136 



 

 

9B.

Other Information

136 



 

PART III

 



 

 

10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

136 



 

 

11.

Executive Compensation

136 



 

 

12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

136 



 

 

13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

136 



 

 

14.

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

137 



 

PART IV

 



 

 

15.

Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules

137 



 

 

 

Index to Exhibits 

138 



 

 

 

Signatures

139 



 

 

 

Index to Financial Statement Schedules 

FS-1

 

 


 



PART I



The “Business” section and other parts of this Form 10-K contain forward-looking statements that involve inherent risks and uncertaintiesStatements that are not historical facts, including statements about our beliefs and expectations, and containing words such as “believes,” “estimates,” “anticipates,” “expects” or similar words are forward-looking statementsOur actual results may differ materially from the projected results discussed in the forward-looking statementsFactors that could cause such differences include, but are not limited to, those discussed in “Item 1ARisk Factors” and in the “Forward-Looking Statements – Cautionary Language” in “Part II – Item 7Management’s Narrative Analysis of the Results of Operations” (“MNA”) of the Form 10-KOur consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements (“Notes”) are presented in “Part II – Item 8Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.”



Item 1Business

 

OVERVIEW



The Lincoln National Life Insurance Company (“LNL” or the “Company,” which also may be referred to as “we,” “our” or “us”) is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lincoln National Corporation (“LNC” or the “Parent Company”).  We own 100% of the outstanding common stock of one insurance company subsidiary, Lincoln Life & Annuity Company of New York (“LLANY”). We also own several non-insurance companies, including Lincoln Financial Distributors, Inc. (“LFD”), our wholesale distributor, and Lincoln Financial Advisors Corporation, part of LNC’s retail distributor, Lincoln Financial Network (“LFN”).  LNL’s principal businesses consist of underwriting annuities, deposit-type contracts and life insurance through multiple distribution channels.  LNL is licensed and sells its products throughout the U.S. and several U.S. territories.  As of December 31, 2017, LNL had consolidated assets of $281.9 billion and consolidated stockholder’s equity of $18.4 billion.

 

We provide products and services and report results through four segments as follows:







 



 

Business Segments

 

Annuities

 

Retirement Plan Services

 

Life Insurance

 

Group Protection

 



We also have Other Operations, which includes the financial data for operations that are not directly related to the business segments



The results of LFN and LFD are included in the segments for which they distribute productsLFD distributes our individual products and services, retirement plans and corporate-owned universal life insurance and variable universal life insurance (“COLI”) and bank-owned universal life insurance and variable universal life insurance (“BOLI”) products and servicesThe distribution occurs primarily through consultants, brokers, planners, agents, financial advisors, third-party administrators (“TPAs”) and other intermediariesGroup Protection distributes its products and services primarily through employee benefit brokers, TPAs and other employee benefit firms.  As of December 31, 2017, LFD had approximately 525 internal and external wholesalers (including sales and relationship managers).  As of December 31, 2017, LFN offered LNL and non-proprietary products and advisory services through a national network of approximately 8,925 active producers who placed business with us within the last 12 months



Financial information in the tables that follow is presented in accordance with United States of America generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”), unless otherwise indicated.  We provide revenues, income (loss) from operations and assets attributable to each of our business segments and Other Operations in Note 21.



Acquisitions and Dispositions



On July 16, 2015, we closed on the sale of Lincoln Financial Media Company with Entercom Communications Corp. (“Entercom Parent”) and Entercom Radio, LLCWe received $75 million in cash, net of transaction expenses, and $28 million face amount of perpetual cumulative convertible preferred stock of Entercom Parent.



For further information about acquisitions and divestitures, see Notes 3 and 25.



1


 

BUSINESS SEGMENTS AND OTHER OPERATIONS



ANNUITIES



Overview



The Annuities segment provides tax-deferred investment growth and lifetime income opportunities for its clients by offering fixed (including indexed) and variable annuitiesThe “fixed” and “variable” classifications describe whether we or the contract holders bear the investment risk of the assets supporting the contractThis also determines the manner in which we earn investment margin profits from these products, either as investment spreads for fixed products or as asset-based fees charged to variable products



Annuities have several features that are attractive to customersAnnuities are unique in that contract holders can select a variety of payout alternatives to provide an income flow for lifeMany annuity contracts also include guarantee features (living and death benefits) that are not found in any other investment vehicle and, we believe, make annuities attractive especially in times of economic uncertaintyIn addition, growth on the underlying principal in certain annuities is granted tax-deferred treatment, thereby deferring the tax consequences of the growth in value until withdrawals are made from the accumulation values, often at lower tax rates occurring during retirement.



Products



In general, an annuity is a contract between an insurance company and an individual or group in which the insurance company, after receipt of one or more premium payments, agrees to pay an amount of money either in one lump sum or on a periodic basis (i.e., annually, semi-annually, quarterly or monthly), beginning on a certain date and continuing for a period of time as specified in the contract or as requestedPeriodic payments can begin within 12 months after the premium is received (referred to as an immediate annuity) or at a future date in time (referred to as a deferred annuity)This retirement vehicle helps protect an individual from outliving his or her money



Variable Annuities



A variable annuity provides the contract holder the ability to direct the investment of premium deposits into one or more variable sub-accounts (“variable funds”) offered through the product (“variable portion”) and, for a specified period, into a fixed account with a guaranteed return (“fixed portion”)The value of the variable portion of the contract holder’s account varies with the performance of the underlying variable funds chosen by the contract holder



Our variable funds include the Managed Risk Strategies fund options, a series of funds that embed volatility risk management and, with some funds, capital protection strategies, inside the funds themselvesThese funds seek to reduce equity market volatility risk for both the contract holder and us.



We charge mortality and expense assessments and administrative fees on variable annuity accounts to cover insurance and administrative expensesThese assessments are built into accumulation unit values, which when multiplied by the number of units owned for any variable fund equals the contract holder’s account value for that variable fund.  In addition, for some contracts, we impose surrender charges, which are typically applicable during the early years of the annuity contract, with a declining level of surrender charges over time.

 

We offer guaranteed benefit riders with certain of our variable annuity products, such as a guaranteed death benefit (“GDB”), a guaranteed withdrawal benefit (“GWB”), a guaranteed income benefit (“GIB”) and a combination of such benefits



The GDB features offered in 2017 included those where we contractually guarantee to the contract holder that upon death, depending on the particular product, we will return no less than:  the current contract value; the total deposits made to the contract, adjusted to reflect any partial withdrawals; the highest contract value on a specified anniversary date adjusted to reflect any partial withdrawals following the contract anniversary.



In 2017, we offered product riders including the Lincoln Lifetime IncomeSM Advantage 2.0 (Managed Risk) and Lincoln Market SelectSM Advantage riders, which are hybrid benefit riders combining aspects of GWB and GIBThese benefit riders allow the contract holder the ability to take income at a maximum rate of up to 5.85%  for Lincoln Lifetime IncomeSM Advantage 2.0 (Managed Risk) and 5% for Lincoln Market SelectSM Advantage of the guaranteed amount when they are above the lifetime income age or income through i4LIFE® Advantage with the GIBLincoln Lifetime Income Advantage 2.0 (Managed Risk) and Lincoln Market Select Advantage riders provide higher income if the contract holder delays withdrawals



We also offered the i4LIFE® Advantage, i4LIFE® Advantage Guaranteed Income Benefit (Managed Risk) and i4LIFE® Advantage Guaranteed Income Benefit riders.  These riders allow variable annuity contract holders access and control during a portion of the income distribution phase of their contractThis added flexibility allows the contract holder to access the account value for transfers, additional withdrawals and other service features like portfolio rebalancing



We also offered the 4LATER® Advantage (Managed Risk) riderThis rider provides a minimum income base used to determine the GIB floor when a client begins income payments under i4LIFE Advantage Guaranteed Income Benefit (Managed Risk)4LATER Advantage (Managed Risk) rider provides growth during the accumulation phase through both a 5% enhancement to the income base

2


 

each year a withdrawal is not taken for a specified period of time and an annual step-up of the income base to the current contract valueContract holders under the 4LATER Advantage (Managed Risk) rider are subject to the allocation of their account value to our Managed Risk Strategies fund options and certain fixed-income options.



We design and actively manage the features and structure of our guaranteed benefit riders to maintain a competitive suite of products consistent with profitability and risk management goalsTo mitigate the increased risks associated with guaranteed benefits, we developed a dynamic hedging programThe customized dynamic hedging program uses equity, interest rate and currency futures positions, interest rate and total return swaps and equity-based options depending upon the risks underlying the guaranteesFor more information on our hedging program, see “Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates – Derivatives” in the MNA.  For information regarding risks related to guaranteed benefits, see “Item 1ARisk Factors – Market Conditions – Changes in the equity markets, interest rates and/or volatility affect the profitability of our products with guaranteed benefits; therefore, such changes may have a material adverse effect on our business and profitability.”



Fixed Annuities

 

A fixed annuity preserves the principal value of the contract while guaranteeing a minimum interest rate to be credited to the accumulation valueOur fixed annuity product offerings as of December 31, 2017, consisted of traditional fixed-rate and fixed indexed deferred annuities, as well as fixed-rate immediate and deferred income annuities with various payment options, including lifetime incomes.  Fixed annuity contracts are general account obligations.  We bear the investment risk for fixed annuity contracts.  To protect from premature withdrawals, we impose surrender charges.  Surrender charges are typically applicable during the early years of the annuity contract, with a declining level of surrender charges over time.  We expect to earn a spread between what we earn on the underlying general account investments supporting the fixed annuity product line and what we credit to our fixed annuity contract holders’ accounts.



We offer single and flexible premium fixed deferred annuitiesSingle premium fixed deferred annuities are contracts that allow only a single premium to be paidFlexible premium fixed deferred annuities are contracts that allow multiple premium payments on either a scheduled or non-scheduled basis.



Our fixed indexed annuities allow the contract holder to choose between a fixed interest crediting rate and an indexed interest crediting rate, which is based on the performance of the Standard & Poor’s (“S&P”) 500 Index® (“S&P 500”) or the S&P 500 Daily Risk Control 5%TM Index.  The indexed interest credit is guaranteed never to be less than zeroAvailable with certain of our fixed indexed annuities, Lincoln Lifetime IncomeSM Edge provides the contract holder a guaranteed lifetime withdrawal benefitWe use derivatives to hedge the equity market risk associated with our fixed indexed annuity productsFor more information on our hedging program, see “Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates – Derivatives” and “Realized Gain (Loss)” in the MNA.



Distribution  



The Annuities segment distributes its individual fixed and variable annuity products through LFDLFD’s distribution channels give the Annuities segment access to its target marketsLFD distributes the segment’s products to a large number of financial intermediaries, including LFNThe financial intermediaries include wire/regional firms, independent financial planners, financial institutions and managing general agents.



Competition

 

The annuities market is very competitive and consists of many companies, with no one company dominating the market for all productsThe Annuities segment competes with numerous other financial services companiesThe main factors upon which entities in this market compete are distribution channel access and the quality of wholesalers, investment performance, cost, product features, speed to market, brand recognition, financial strength ratings, crediting rates and client service.

 

RETIREMENT PLAN SERVICES



Overview



The Retirement Plan Services segment provides employers with retirement plan products and services, primarily in the defined contribution retirement plan marketplaceDefined contribution plans are a popular employee benefit offered by employers large and small across a wide spectrum of industriesWhile our focus is employer-sponsored defined contribution plans, we also serve the defined benefit plan and individual retirement account (“IRA”) markets on a limited basis.  We provide a variety of plan investment vehicles, including individual and group variable annuities, group fixed annuities and mutual fund-based programsWe also offer a broad array of plan services including plan recordkeeping, compliance testing, participant education and trust and custodial services through our affiliated trust company, the Lincoln Financial Group Trust Company.



Products and Services



The Retirement Plan Services segment currently brings three primary offerings to the employer-sponsored market:  LINCOLN DIRECTORSM group variable annuity, LINCOLN ALLIANCE® program and Multi-Fund® variable annuity



3


 

LINCOLN DIRECTOR group variable annuity is a 401(k) defined contribution retirement plan solution available to small businesses, typically those with plans having less than $10 million in account values.  The LINCOLN DIRECTOR product offers participants a broad array of investment options from several fund families and a fixed account.  In 2017, several enhancements were introduced to the DIRECTOR product offering including more fund choices, enhanced services and additional pricing options.  The Retirement Plan Services segment earns revenue through asset charges and/or separate account charges, which are used to pay our fees for recordkeeping services.  We also receive fees from the underlying mutual fund companies for the services we provide, and we earn investment margins on assets in the fixed account. 



LINCOLN DIRECTOR and Multi-Fund products are variable annuities.  The LINCOLN ALLIANCE program is a mutual fund-based record-keeping platform.  These offerings primarily cover the 403(b), 401(k) and 457 plan marketplace.  The 403(b) plans are available to educational institutions, not-for-profit healthcare organizations and certain other not-for-profit entities; 401(k) plans are generally available to for-profit entities; and 457 plans are available to not-for-profit entities and state and local government entities.  The investment options for our annuities encompass the spectrum of asset classes with varying levels of risk and include both equity and fixed-income. 



The LINCOLN ALLIANCE program is a defined contribution retirement plan solution aimed at small, mid and large market employers, typically those that have defined contribution plans with $10 million or more in account valueThe target market is primarily healthcare providers, public sector employers, corporations and educational institutionsThe program bundles our traditional fixed annuity products with the employer’s choice of mutual funds, along with recordkeeping, plan compliance services and customized employee education servicesThe program allows the use of any mutual fundWe earn fees for our recordkeeping and educational services and other services that we provide to plan sponsors and participants.  We also earn investment margins on fixed annuities.



Multi-Fund variable annuity is a defined contribution retirement plan solution with full-bundled administrative services and investment choices for small- to mid-sized healthcare, education, governmental and not-for-profit employers sponsoring 403(b), 457(b) and 401(a)/(k) plans.  The product is available to the employer through the Multi-Fund group variable annuity contract or directly to the individual participant through the Multi-Fund Select variable annuity contract.  We earn mortality and expense charges, investment income on the fixed account and surrender charges from this product.  We also receive fees for services that we provide to funds in the underlying separate accounts.



Additionally, we offer other products and services that complement our primary offerings:



·

The Lincoln Next Step® series of products is a suite of mutual fund-based IRAs available exclusively for participants in Lincoln-serviced retirement plans and their spouses.  The products can accept rollovers and transfers from other providers as well as ongoing contributions.  The Lincoln Next Step® IRA product has no annual account charges and offers an array of mutual fund investment options provided by 20 fund families all offered at net asset value.  The Lincoln Next Step Select® IRA has an annual record keeping charge and offers an even wider array of mutual fund investment options from over 20 families, all at net asset value.  We earn 12b-1 and service fees on the mutual funds within the product.

·

The Lincoln Secured Retirement IncomeSM product is a GWB made available through a group variable annuity contract.  This product is intended to fulfill future needs of retirement security.  By offering a GWB inside a retirement plan, we provide plan sponsors a solution that gives participants the ability to participate in the market and receive guaranteed income for life while still maintaining access to their plan account balance.

·

Through a group annuity contract, we offer fixed annuity products to retirement plans where we do not provide plan recordkeeping services.  The fixed annuity is used within small, mid-large and large market employers covering the 403(b), 401(a)/(k) and 457 plan marketplaces.  The annuity provides a conservative investment option for those plan participants seeking stability.  In some cases, we earn investment margins on assets in the fixed account, and in other product versions we earn a fee on assets in the underlying custodial account.



Distribution



Retirement Plan Services products are primarily distributed in two ways: through our Institutional Retirement Distribution team and by LFD.  Wholesalers distribute these products through advisors, consultants, banks, wirehouses, TPAs and individual planners.  We remain focused on wholesaler productivity, increasing relationship management expertise and growing the number of broker-dealer relationships.



The Multi-Fund® program is sold primarily by affiliated advisorsThe LINCOLN ALLIANCE® program is sold primarily through consultants, registered independent advisors and both affiliated and non-affiliated financial advisors, planners and wirehouses.  LINCOLN DIRECTORSM group variable annuity is sold in the small marketplace by intermediaries, including financial advisors, TPAs and planners.



Competition



The retirement plan marketplace is very competitive and is comprised of many providers with no one company dominating the market for all products.  As stated above, we compete with numerous other financial services corporations in the small, mid and large employer markets.  The main factors upon which entities in this market compete are product strength, technology, service model delivery, participant education models, quality wholesale distribution access to intermediary firms and comprehensive marketing efforts to create brand recognition.  Our key differentiator is our high-touch, high-tech service model, which is proven to drive positive outcomes for plan sponsors and participants.

4


 

LIFE INSURANCE



Overview



The Life Insurance segment focuses on the creation and protection of wealth for its clients by providing life insurance products, including term insurance, both single (including COLI and BOLI) and survivorship versions of universal life insurance (“UL”), variable universal life insurance (“VUL”) and indexed universal life insurance (“IUL”) products, a linked-benefit product (which is UL with riders providing for long-term care costs) and a critical illness rider, which can be attached to UL, VUL or IUL policies.  Some of our products include secondary guarantees, which are discussed more fully belowGenerally, this segment has higher sales during the second half of the year with the fourth quarter being the strongest.  Mortality margins, morbidity margins, investment margins, expense margins and surrender fees drive life insurance profits

 

Similar to the annuity product classifications described above, life products can be classified as “fixed” (including indexed) or “variable” contractsThis classification describes whether we or the contract holders bear the investment risk of the assets supporting the policyThis also determines the manner in which we earn investment margin profits from these products, either as investment spreads for fixed products or as asset-based fees charged to variable products



Products



We offer four categories of life insurance products consisting of:



UL



UL insurance products provide life insurance with account values that earn rates of return based on company-declared interest ratesContract holder account values are invested in our general account investment portfolio, so we bear the risk of investment performanceWe offer a variety of UL products, such as Lincoln LifeGuarantee® UL, Lincoln LifeCurrent® UL and Lincoln LifeReserve® UL



In a UL contract, contract holders typically have flexibility in the timing and amount of premium payments and the amount of death benefit, provided there is sufficient account value to cover all policy charges for cost of insurance and expenses for the coming periodUnder certain contract holder options and market conditions, the death benefit amount may increase or decreasePremiums received on a UL product, net of expense loads and charges, are added to the contract holder’s account value and accrued with interest.  The client has access to their account value (or a portion thereof), less surrender charges and policy loan payoffs, through contractual liquidity features such as loans, partial withdrawals and full surrendersLoans and withdrawals reduce the death benefit amount payable and are limited to certain contractual maximums (some of which are required under state law), and interest is charged on all loansOur UL contracts assess surrender charges against the policies’ account values for full or partial surrenders and certain policy changes that occur during the contractual surrender charge period.



We also offer fixed IUL products that function similarly to a traditional UL policy, with the added flexibility of allowing contract holders to have portions of their account values earn credits based on the performance of indexes such as the S&P 500.  These products include Lincoln WealthAdvantage® IUL and Lincoln LifeReserve® IUL Accumulator.



As mentioned previously, we offer survivorship versions of our individual UL and IUL products.  These products insure two lives with a single policy and pay death benefits upon the second death.  These products include Lincoln LifeGuarantee® SUL and Lincoln WealthPreserve® Survivorship IUL.



A UL policy with a lifetime secondary guarantee can stay in force, even if the base policy cash value is zero, as long as secondary guarantee requirements have been metThese products include Lincoln LifeGuarantee® UL and Lincoln LifeGuarantee® SULThe secondary guarantee requirement is based on the payment of a required minimum premium or on the evaluation of a reference value within the policy, calculated in a manner similar to the base policy account value, but using different expense charges, cost of insurance charges and credited interest rates.  The parameters for the secondary guarantee requirement are listed in the contractAs long as the contract holder pays the minimum premium or funds the policy to a level that keeps this calculated reference value positive, the policy is guaranteed to stay in force.  The reference value has no actual monetary value to the contract holder; it is only a calculated value used to determine whether or not the policy will lapse should the base policy cash value be less than zero. 



Our secondary guarantee benefits maintain the flexibility of a traditional UL policy, which allows a contract holder to take loans or withdrawalsAlthough loans and withdrawals are likely to shorten the time period of the secondary guarantee, the guarantee is not automatically or completely forfeitedThe length of the guarantee may be increased at any time through additional excess premium deposits



VUL



VUL products are UL products that provide a return on account values linked to an underlying investment portfolio of variable funds offered through the productThe value of the variable portion of the contract holder’s account is driven by the performance of the underlying variable funds chosen by the contract holderAs the return on the investment portfolio increases or decreases, the account value of the VUL policy will increase or decrease.  In addition, VUL products offer a fixed account option that is managed by us.  As with fixed UL products, contract holders have access, within contractual maximums, to account values through loans, withdrawals and

5


 

surrendersSurrender charges are assessed during the surrender charge period, ranging from 0 to 20 years depending on the product.  Our single life VUL products include Lincoln AssetEdge® VUL and Lincoln VULONE.  Our COLI products are also VUL-type products.



We also offer survivorship versions of our individual VUL products, Lincoln SVULONE and Lincoln Preservation Edge® SVULThese products insure two lives with a single policy and pay death benefits upon the second death



We offer lifetime guaranteed benefit riders with certain of our VUL products, Lincoln VULONE and Lincoln SVULONEThe ONE rider features contractually guarantee to the contract holder that upon death, as long as secondary guarantee requirements have been met, the death benefit will be payable even if the account value equals zero.



Linked-Benefit Life Products and Products with Critical Illness Riders



Our linked-benefit life product,  Lincoln MoneyGuard®, combines UL with long-term care insurance through the use of riders.  One type of rider allows the contract holder to accelerate death benefits on a tax-free basis in the event of a qualified long-term care need, reducing the remaining death benefit.  Another rider extends the long-term care insurance benefits for an additional limited period of time if the death benefit is fully accelerated.  Certain policies also provide a reduced death benefit to the contract holder’s beneficiary if the death benefit has been fully accelerated as long-term care benefits during the contract holder’s life.



Some life products provide for critical illness insurance by the use of riders attached to UL, VUL or IUL policies.  These riders allow the contract holder to accelerate death benefits on a tax-free basis in the event of a qualified critical illness condition. 



Term Life Insurance



Term life insurance provides a fixed death benefit for a scheduled period of time.  Some of our term life insurance products give the policyholder the option to reduce the death benefit at a future time.  Scheduled policy premiums are required to be paid at least annually.  These products include Lincoln TermAccel® Level Term and Lincoln LifeElements® Level Term. 



Distribution

 

The Life Insurance segment’s products are sold through LFDLFD provides the Life Insurance segment with access to financial intermediaries in the following primary distribution channels:  wire/regional firms; independent planner firms (including LFN); financial institutions; and managing general agents/independent marketing organizationsLFD distributes COLI products and services to small- to mid-sized banks and mid- to large-sized corporations, primarily through intermediaries who specialize in one or both of these markets and who are serviced through a network of internal and external LFD sales professionals.



Competition  



The life insurance market is very competitive and consists of many companies with no one company dominating the market for all products.  Principal competitive factors include product features, price, underwriting and issue process, customer service and insurers’ financial strength.  With our broad distribution network, we compete in the three primary needs of life insurance:  death benefit protection, accumulation and linked benefits (MoneyGuard®).  In addition, we use automated underwriting within a defined criteria as well as LincXpress®, a simplified issue process, both of which are seen as marketplace competitive advantages.



Underwriting

 

In the context of life insurance, underwriting is the process of evaluating medical and non-medical information about an individual and determining the effect these factors statistically have on mortalityThis process of evaluation is often referred to as risk classificationOf course, no one can accurately predict how long any individual will live, but certain risk factors can affect life expectancy and are evaluated during the underwriting process



Claims Administration

 

Claims service is handled primarily in-house, and claims examiners are assigned to each claim notification based on coverage amount, type of claim and the experience of the examinerClaims meeting certain criteria are referred to senior claims examinersA formal quality assurance program is carried out to ensure the consistency and effectiveness of claims examining activitiesA network of in-house legal counsel, compliance officers, medical personnel and an anti-fraud investigative unit also support claims examinersA special team of claims examiners, in conjunction with claims management, focus on more complex claims matters such as claims incurred during the contestable period, beneficiary disputes and litigated claims.

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GROUP PROTECTION



Overview



The Group Protection segment offers group non-medical insurance products, including term life, disability,  dental, vision and accident and critical illness benefits and services to the employer marketplace through various forms of employee-paid and employer-paid plans.  Although we sell to employer groups of all sizes, our target market is to employers with at least 100 employees and fewer than 5,000 employees.



Products



Life Insurance



We offer employer-sponsored group term life insurance products including basic, optional and voluntary term life insurance to employees and their dependentsAdditional benefits may be provided in the event of a covered individual’s accidental death or dismemberment



Disability Insurance



We offer short- and long-term employer-sponsored group disability insurance, which protects an employee against loss of wages due to illness or injuryShort-term disability generally provides weekly benefits for up to 26 weeks following a short waiting period, ranging from 1 to 30 daysLong-term disability provides benefits following a longer waiting period, usually between 90 and 180 days and provides benefits for a longer period, at least 2 years and typically extending to normal (Social Security) retirement age.  The monthly benefits provided are subject to reduction when Social Security benefits are also paid.



Absence Management



We offer to manage employers family medical and company leave in conjunction with our disability coverageThe service provides a simple, compliant way to report and manage both leave and disability through a single source with integrated intake, claims management, communications and reporting, along with state of the art self-service capabilities via a mobile application and web portal



Dental and Vision



We offer a variety of employer-sponsored group dental insurance plans, which cover a portion of the cost of eligible dental procedures for employees and their dependentsProducts offered include indemnity coverage, which does not distinguish benefits based on a dental provider’s participation in a network arrangement, a Preferred Provider Organization (“PPO”) product that does reflect the dental provider’s participation in the PPO network arrangement, including an agreement with network fee schedules, and a Dental Health Maintenance Organization product that limits benefit coverage to a closed panel of network providers.



We offer comprehensive employer-sponsored fully-insured vision plans with a wide range of benefits for protecting employees’ and their covered dependents’ sight and vision healthAll plans provide access to a national network of providers, with in and out-of-network benefits



Accident and Critical Illness Insurance



We offer employer-sponsored group accident insurance products for employees and their covered dependentsThis product is predominantly purchased on an employee-paid basisAccident insurance provides scheduled benefits for over 30 types of benefit triggers related to accidental causes, and it is available for non-occupational accidents exclusively or on a 24-hour coverage basis.



We offer employer-sponsored group critical illness insurance to employees and their covered dependentsThis product is predominantly purchased on an employee-paid basisThe coverage provides for lump sum payouts upon the occurrence of one of the specified critical illness benefit triggers covered within a critical illness insurance policyThis product also includes Lincoln CareCompass®, a package of benefits and services that assists employees and their family members in prevention, early detection and treatment of critical illness events.



Distribution



The segment’s products are marketed primarily through a national distribution system.  The managers and marketing representatives develop business through employee benefit brokers, consultants, TPAs and other employee benefit firms that work with employers to provide access to our products.



Competition



The group protection marketplace is very competitivePrincipal competitive factors include particular product features, price, quality of customer service and claims management, technological capabilities, quality and efficiency of distribution and financial strength ratingsIn this market, the Group Protection segment competes with a number of major companies and regionally with other companies offering all or some of the products within our product set.  In addition, there is competition in attracting brokers to actively market our products

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and attracting and retaining sales representatives to sell our productsKey competitive factors in attracting brokers and sales representatives include product offerings and features, financial strength, support services and compensation.   



Underwriting



The Group Protection segment’s underwriters evaluate the risk characteristics of each employer groupGenerally, the relevant characteristics evaluated include employee census information (such as age, gender, income and occupation), employer industry classification, geographic location, benefit design elements and other factorsThe segment employs detailed underwriting policies, guidelines and procedures designed to assist the underwriter to properly assess and quantify risksThe segment uses technology to efficiently review, price and issue smaller cases, utilizing its underwriting staff on larger, more complex casesIndividual underwriting techniques (including evaluation of individual medical history information) may be used on certain covered individuals selecting larger benefit amountsFor voluntary and other forms of employee paid coverages, minimum participation requirements are used to obtain a better spread of risk and minimize the risk of anti-selection.



Claims Administration



Claims for the Group Protection segment are managed by in-house claim specialists and outsourced third-party resourcesClaims are evaluated for eligibility and payment of benefits pursuant to the group insurance contract and in compliance with federal and state regulationsDisability claims management is especially important to segment results, as results depend on both the incidence and the length of approved disability claimsThe segment employs a variety of clinical experts, including internal and external medical professionals and rehabilitation specialists, to evaluate medically supported functional capabilities, assess employability and develop return to work plansThe accuracy and speed of life claims are important customer service and risk management factorsSome life policies provide for the waiver of premium coverage in the event of the insured’s disability where our disability claims management expertise is utilizedDental claims management focuses on assisting plan administrators and members with the rising costs of insurance by utilizing tools to optimize dental claims payment accuracy through advanced claims review and validation, improved data analysis, enhanced clinical review of claims and provider utilization monitoring.



OTHER OPERATIONS



Other Operations includes the financial data for operations that are not directly related to the business segmentsOther Operations includes investments related to the excess capital in us or LLANY; corporate investments; benefit plan net liability; the unamortized deferred gain on indemnity reinsurance related to the sale to Swiss Re Life & Health America, Inc(“Swiss Re”) in 2001; the results of certain disability income business; our run-off Institutional Pension business in the form of group annuity and insured funding-type of contracts; debt; and strategic digitization expense.  Other Operations also included our investment in media properties that were sold in July 2015, as described above.  For more information on our strategic digitization initiative, see “Item 7. Management’s Narrative Analysis Results of Consolidated Operations – Additional Information.”



REINSURANCE

   

Our reinsurance strategy is designed to protect us and LLANY against the severity of losses on individual claims and unusually serious occurrences in which a number of claims produce an aggregate extraordinary loss.  Although reinsurance does not discharge us from our primary liabilities to our contract holders for losses insured under the insurance policies, it does make the assuming reinsurer liable to us or LLANY for the reinsured portion of the risk.  Because we bear the risk of nonpayment by one or more of our reinsurers, we primarily cede reinsurance to well-capitalized, highly rated unaffiliated reinsurers.  We also utilize inter-company reinsurance agreements to manage our statutory capital position as well as our hedge program for variable annuity guarantees.



As of December 31, 2017,  the policy for our reinsurance program was to retain up to $20 million on a single insured life.  As the amount we retain varies by policy, we reinsured approximately 25% of the mortality risk on newly issued life insurance contracts in 2017.  As of December 31, 2017, approximately 35% of our total individual life in-force amount was reinsured. 



Some portions of our deferred annuity business have been reinsured on either a coinsurance or a modified coinsurance (“Modco”) basis with other companies to limit our exposure associated with fixed and variable annuities.  In a coinsurance program, the reinsurer shares proportionally in all financial terms of the reinsured policies (i.e., premiums, expenses, claims, etc.) based on their respective percentage of the risk.  In a Modco program, we as the ceding company retain the reserves, as well as the assets backing those reserves, and the reinsurer shares proportionally in all financial terms of the reinsured policies based on their respective percentage of the risk. 



In addition, we acquire other reinsurance to cover products other than as discussed above with retentions and limits that management believes are appropriate for the circumstances.  For example, we use reinsurance to cover larger life and disability claims in our Group Protection business.



We obtain reinsurance from a diverse group of reinsurers, and we monitor concentration and financial strength ratings of our principal reinsurers.  Swiss Re and Lincoln National Reinsurance Company (Barbados) Limited (“LNBAR”), a wholly-owned reinsurance subsidiary of LNC, represent our largest reinsurance exposure.  LNBAR is an affiliate of LNL as both are wholly-owned subsidiaries of LNC, but LNBAR is not a subsidiary of LNL.  LNBAR assumes risk from LNL under certain variable annuity contracts and certain UL contracts with secondary guarantees.  The amounts recoverable from reinsurers were $6.5 billion as of December 31, 2017, of which $1.9 

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billion was recoverable from Swiss Re related to the sale of our reinsurance business to Swiss Re and $2.1 billion were recoverable from LNBAR.    



For more information regarding reinsurance, see “Reinsurance” in the MNA and Note 9.    For risks involving reinsurance, see “Item 1ARisk Factors – Operational Matters – We face risks of non-collectability of reinsurance and increased reinsurance rates, which could materially affect our results of operations.”  



RESERVES



The applicable insurance laws under which insurance companies operate require that they report, as liabilities, policy reserves to meet future obligations on their outstanding policiesThese reserves are the amounts that, with the additional premiums to be received and interest thereon compounded annually at certain assumed rates, are calculated to be sufficient to meet the various policy and contract obligations as they matureThese laws specify that the reserves shall not be less than reserves calculated using certain specified mortality and morbidity tables, interest rates and methods of valuation



For more information on reserves, see “Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates – Derivatives – GLB” and “Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates – Future Contract Benefits and Other Contract Holder Obligations” in the MNA.



See “Regulatory” below for information on permitted practices and proposed regulations that may impact the amount of statutory reserves necessary to support our current insurance liabilities



For risks related to reserves, see “Item 1ARisk Factors – Market Conditions – Changes in interest rates and sustained low interest rates may cause interest rate spreads to decrease and changes in interest rates may also result in increased contract withdrawals,” “Item 1ARisk Factors – Legislative, Regulatory and Tax – Attempts to mitigate the impact of Regulation XXX and Actuarial Guideline 38 may fail in whole or in part resulting in an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations and “Item 1ARisk Factors – Operational MattersWe face risks of non-collectability of reinsurance and increased reinsurance rates, which could materially affect our results of operations.”      



INVESTMENTS

 

An important component of our financial results is the return on invested assetsOur investment strategy is to balance the need for current income with prudent risk management, with an emphasis on generating sufficient current income to meet our obligationsThis approach requires the evaluation of risk and expected return of each asset class utilized, while still meeting our income objectivesThis approach also permits us to be more effective in our asset-liability management because decisions can be made based upon both the economic and current investment income considerations affecting assets and liabilitiesInvestments we make must comply with the insurance laws and regulations of the states of domicile of us and LLANY. 



Derivatives are used primarily for hedging purposes and, to a lesser extent, income generationHedging strategies are employed for a number of reasons including, but not limited to, hedging certain portions of our exposure to changes in our GDB, GWB and GIB liabilities, interest rate fluctuations, the widening of bond yield spreads over comparable maturity U.S. government obligations and credit, foreign exchange and equity risksIncome generation strategies include credit default swaps through replication synthetic asset transactionsThese derivatives synthetically create exposure in the general account to corporate debt, similar to investing in the credit markets.



For additional information on our investments, including carrying values by category, quality ratings and net investment income, see Notes 1 and 5.



FINANCIAL STRENGTH RATINGS

   

The Nationally Recognized Statistical Ratings Organizations rate the financial strength of us and LLANY.

 

Rating agencies rate insurance companies based on financial strength and the ability to pay claims, factors more relevant to contract holders than investorsWe believe that the ratings assigned by nationally recognized, independent rating agencies are material to our operationsThere may be other rating agencies that also rate our insurance companies, which we do not disclose in our reports



Insurer Financial Strength Ratings

 

The insurer financial strength rating scales of A.MBest, Fitch Ratings (“Fitch”), Moody’s Investors Service (“Moody’s”) and S&P are characterized as follows:

 

·

A.MBest – A++ to S 

·

Fitch – AAA to C 

·

Moody’s – Aaa to C

·

S&P – AAA to D

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As of March 7, 2018, the financial strength ratings of us and LLANY, as published by the principal rating agencies that rate us, were as follows:







 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



A.M. Best

 

Fitch

 

Moody's

 

S&P

 

Insurer Financial Strength Ratings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LNL

A+

 

A+

 

A1

 

AA-

 



(2nd of 16)

 

(5th of 19)

 

(5th of 21)

 

(4th of 21)

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LLANY

A+

 

A+

 

A1

 

AA-

 



(2nd of 16)

 

(5th of 19)

 

(5th of 21)

 

(4th of 21)

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



A downgrade of the financial strength rating of us or LLANY could affect our competitive position in the insurance industry and make it more difficult for us to market our products, as potential customers may select companies with higher financial strength ratings



All of our financial strength ratings are on outlook stable, except for Fitch’s ratings, which are on outlook positive.  All of our ratings are subject to revision or withdrawal at any time by the rating agencies, and therefore, no assurance can be given that we or LLANY can maintain these ratingsEach rating should be evaluated independently of any other rating.



REGULATORY



Insurance Regulation

 

Similar to other insurance companies, we are subject to regulation and supervision by the states, territories and countries in which they are licensed to do businessThe extent of such regulation varies, but generally has its source in statutes that delegate regulatory, supervisory and administrative authority to supervisory agenciesIn the U.S., this power is vested in state insurance departments

 

In supervising and regulating insurance companies, state insurance departments, charged primarily with protecting contract holders and the public rather than investors, enjoy broad authority and discretion in applying applicable insurance laws and regulation for that purpose.  We are domiciled in the state of Indiana.  LLANY is domiciled in the state of New York.



The insurance departments of the domiciliary states exercise principal regulatory jurisdiction over us.  The extent of regulation by the states varies, but in general, most jurisdictions have laws and regulations governing standards of solvency, adequacy of reserves, reinsurance, capital adequacy, licensing of companies and agents to transact business, prescribing and approving policy forms, regulating premium rates for some lines of business, prescribing the form and content of financial statements and reports, regulating the type and amount of investments permitted and standards of business conduct.  Insurance company regulation is discussed further under “Restrictions on Dividends and Other Payments.” 



As part of their regulatory oversight process, state insurance departments conduct periodic, generally once every three to five years, examinations of the books, records, accounts and business practices of insurers domiciled in their states.  Examinations are generally carried out in cooperation with the insurance regulators of other states under guidelines promulgated by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (“NAIC”).  State and federal insurance and securities regulatory authorities and other state law enforcement agencies and Attorneys General also, from time to time, make inquiries and conduct examinations or investigations regarding the compliance by our company, as well as other companies in our industry, with, among other things, insurance laws and securities laws.  Us, LLANY and our captive reinsurance subsidiaries are subject to periodic financial examinations by their respective domiciliary state insurance regulators.  We have not received any material adverse findings resulting from state insurance department examinations of our insurance and captive reinsurance subsidiaries conducted during the three-year period ended December 31, 2017.



State insurance laws and regulations require us and LLANY to file financial statements with state insurance departments everywhere we do business, and our operations and accounts are subject to examination by those departments at any timeOur U.S.  insurance companies prepare statutory financial statements in accordance with accounting practices and procedures prescribed or permitted by these departmentsThe NAIC has approved a series of statutory accounting principles that have been adopted, in some cases with minor modifications, by virtually all state insurance departmentsChanges in these statutory accounting principles can significantly affect our capital and surplus.  For more information, see “Item 1A.  Risk Factors Legislative, Regulatory and Tax –

Attempts to mitigate the impact of Regulation XXX and Actuarial Guideline 38 may fail in whole or in part resulting in an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.



The NAIC’s adoption of the new Valuation Manual that defines a principles-based reserving framework for newly issued life insurance policies was effective January 1, 2017Principles-based reserving places a greater weight on our past experience and anticipated future experience as well as considers current economic conditions in calculating life insurance product reserves in accordance with statutory accounting principles.  We adopted the new framework for primarily our newly issued term business in 2017 and will phase in the framework prior to January 1, 2020, for all other newly issued life insurance productsWe believe that these changes may reduce our future use of captive reinsurance subsidiaries and LNBAR for reserve financing transactions for our life insurance businessAdditionally, the NAIC through its various committees, task forces and working groups has been evaluating the adequacy of existing NAIC model regulations with a focus on targeted improvements to the statutory reserving and accounting framework for variable annuitiesFor more

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information, see “Item 1ARisk Factors – Legislative, Regulatory and Tax  Changes in accounting standards issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board or other standard-setting bodies may adversely affect our financial statements.



For more information on statutory reserving and our use of captive reinsurance structures, see “Review of Consolidated Financial Condition – Liquidity and Capital Resources – Sources of Liquidity and Cash Flow – Statutory Capital and Surplus” in the MNA. 



Restrictions on Dividends and Other Payments

 

We are subject to certain insurance department regulatory restrictions as to the transfer of funds and payment of dividends to LNC.  Under Indiana laws and regulations, we may pay dividends to LNC without prior approval of the Indiana Insurance Commissioner (the “Commissioner”), only from unassigned surplus or must receive prior approval of the Commissioner to pay a dividend if such dividend, along with all other dividends paid within the preceding 12 consecutive months, would exceed the statutory limitation.  The current statutory limitation is the greater of 10% of our contract holders’ surplus, as shown on our last annual statement on file with the Commissioner or our statutory net gain from operations for the previous 12 months, but in no event to exceed statutory unassigned surplus.  Indiana law gives the Commissioner broad discretion to disapprove requests for dividends in excess of these limits.  LLANY, a New York-domiciled insurance company, is bound by similar restrictions under New York law, with the applicable statutory limitation on dividends equal to the lesser of 10% of surplus to contract holders as of the immediately preceding calendar year or net gain from operations for the immediately preceding calendar year, not including realized capital gains.



Indiana law also provides that following the payment of any dividend, our contract holders’ surplus must be reasonable in relation to our outstanding liabilities and adequate for our financial needs, and permits the Commissioner to bring an action to rescind a dividend that violates these standards. 



Risk-Based Capital

 

The NAIC has adopted risk-based capital (“RBC”) requirements for life insurance companies to evaluate the adequacy of statutory capital and surplus in relation to investment and insurance risksThe requirements provide a means of measuring the minimum amount of statutory surplus appropriate for an insurance company to support its overall business operations based on its size and risk profileThere are five major risks involved in determining the requirements:







 

 

 

 

Category

 

Name

 

Description

Asset risk affiliates

 

C-0

 

Risk of assets' default for certain affiliated investments

Asset risk others

 

C-1

 

Risk of assets' default of principal and interest or fluctuation in fair value

Insurance risk

 

C-2

 

Risk of underestimating liabilities from business already written or inadequately pricing



 

 

 

business to be written in the future

Interest rate risk, health credit

C-3

 

Risk of losses due to changes in interest rate levels, risk that health benefits prepaid to

risk and market risk

 

 

 

providers become the obligation of the health insurer once again and risk of loss due



 

 

 

to changes in market levels associated with variable products with guarantees

Business risk

 

C-4

 

Risk of general business



A company’s risk-based statutory surplus is calculated by applying factors and performing calculations relating to various asset, premium, claim, expense and reserve items.  Regulators can then measure adequacy of a company’s statutory surplus by comparing it to the RBC determined by the formula.  Under RBC requirements, regulatory compliance is determined by the ratio of a company’s total adjusted capital, as defined by the NAIC, to its company action level of RBC (known as the RBC ratio), also as defined by the NAIC.  Accordingly, factors that have an impact on the total adjusted capital for us and LLANY, such as the permitted practices discussed above, will also affect our RBC levels.  Four levels of regulatory attention may be triggered if the RBC ratio is insufficient:  

 

·

“Company action level” – If the RBC ratio is between 75% and 100%, then the insurer must submit a plan to the regulator detailing corrective action it proposes to undertake; 

·

“Regulatory action level” – If the RBC ratio is between 50% and 75%, then the insurer must submit a plan, but a regulator may also issue a corrective order requiring the insurer to comply within a specified period;

·

“Authorized control level” – If the RBC ratio is between 35% and 50%, then the regulatory response is the same as at the “Regulatory action level,” but in addition, the regulator may take action to rehabilitate or liquidate the insurer; and

·

“Mandatory control level” – If the RBC ratio is less than 35%, then the regulator must rehabilitate or liquidate the insurer

 

As of December 31, 2017,  our RBC ratio and the ratio reported by LLANY to our respective states of domicile and the NAIC each exceeded the “company action level.”  We believe that we will be able to maintain our RBC ratios in excess of “company action level” through prudent underwriting, claims handling, investing and capital management.  However, no assurances can be given that developments affecting us or LLANY, many of which could be outside of our control, will not cause our RBC ratios to fall below our targeted levels.  These developments may include, but may not be limited to:  changes to the manner in which the RBC ratio is calculated; new regulatory requirements for calculating reserves, such as principles-based reserving; economic conditions leading to higher levels of impairments of securities in our general accounts; and an inability to finance life reserves.



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See “Item 1A. Risk Factors – Liquidity and Capital Position – A decrease in our capital and surplus may result in a downgrade to our insurer financial strength ratings and “Item 1ARisk Factors – Legislative, Regulatory and Tax – Our businesses are heavily regulated and changes in regulation may affect our capital requirements or reduce our profitability.



Privacy Regulations



In the course of our business, we collect and maintain personal data from our customers including personally identifiable non-public financial and health information, which subjects us to regulation under federal and state privacy lawsThese laws require that we institute certain policies and procedures in our business to safeguard this information from improper use or disclosureWhile we employ a robust and tested information security program, if federal or state regulators establish further regulations for addressing customer privacy, we may need to amend our policies and adapt our internal procedures.  For information regarding cybersecurity risks, see “Item 1A.  Risk Factors – Operational Matters – Our information systems may experience interruptions or breaches in security and a failure of disaster recovery systems could result in a loss or disclosure of confidential information, damage to our reputation and impairment of our ability to conduct business effectively.

   

Federal Initiatives



The U.S.  federal government does not directly regulate the insurance industry; however, federal initiatives from time to time can impact the insurance industryAlthough much of the initial rulemaking has been completed, the implementation process continues and the marketplace continues to evolve in the changing regulatory environment 



Financial Reform Legislation



Since it was enacted in 2010, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (“Dodd-Frank Act”) has imposed considerable reform in the financial services industry.  The ongoing implementation continues to present challenges and uncertainties for financial market participants.  For instance, the Dodd-Frank Act and corresponding global initiatives imposed significant changes to the regulation of derivatives transactions, which we use to mitigate many types of risk in our businessThe mandate to clear interest rate swaps requires us to post initial margin in support of these transactions, which was not required when we and our industry peers were permitted to transact these trades in the over-the-counter market.  We also expect increased clearing costs as the marketplace responds to the evolving regulatory environment, including changes to capital requirements imposed on our bank counterparties



Swap documentation and processing requirements continue to change in light of new rules for margining uncleared swaps, and the ultimate impact on our derivatives use remains unclearThe exchange of variation margin in over-the counter trades is already part of our standard practice, but the requirement to post initial margin beginning in 2020 will require us to manage our derivatives trading and the attendant liquidity requirements in ways we continue to evaluateAlthough these rules provide some flexibility in the categories of eligible collateral, it is still possible that we may be required to hold more of our assets in cash and other low-yielding investments in order to satisfy margin requirementsDocumentation requirements attendant to the new margining regime are potentially burdensome and costlyThe new regulations may reduce the level of risk exposure we have to our derivatives counterparties (currently managed by holding collateral), but will increase our exposure to central clearinghouses and clearing members with which we transactCentral clearinghouses and regulators alike continue to evaluate the appropriate allocation of risk in the event of the failure of a clearing member or clearinghouse, and the results of these deliberations may change our use of derivatives in ways we cannot yet determineThe standardization of derivatives products for clearing may make customized products unavailable or uneconomical, potentially decreasing the effectiveness of some of our hedging activitiesAs implementation of the new regulatory framework continues in the U.S. and abroad, and the marketplace continues to evolve, the extent to which our derivatives costs and strategies may change and the extent to which those changes may affect the range or pricing of our products remains uncertain.

 

In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act requires new regulations governing broker-dealers and investment advisersIn particular, the fiduciary standard rulemaking could potentially have broad implications for how our products are designed and sold in the future.  In January 2011, the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) released a study on the obligations and standards of conduct of financial professionals, as required under the Dodd-Frank ActThe SEC staff recommended establishing a uniform fiduciary standard for investment advisers and broker-dealers when providing investment advice about securities, including guidance for principal trading and definitions of the duties of loyalty and care owed to retail customers that would be consistent with the standard that currently applies to investment advisersA more uniform fiduciary standard could potentially affect our business in areas including, but not limited to:  design and availability of proprietary products; commission-based compensation arrangements; advertising and other communications; use of finders or solicitors of clients (i.e., business contacts who provide referrals); and continuing education requirements for advisors.



Additional provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act include, among other things, the creation of a new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to protect consumers of certain financial products; and changes to certain corporate governance rulesThe SEC has postponed rule making on a number of these provisions indefinitely.  In December 2013, the new Federal Insurance Office established under the Dodd-Frank Act issued a wide-ranging report on the state of insurance regulation in the U.S., together with a series of recommendations on ways to monitor and improve the regulatory environmentThe ultimate impact of these recommendations on our business is undeterminable at this time.

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Department of Labor Regulation



On April 8, 2016, the Department of Labor (“DOL”) released the DOL Fiduciary Rule, which became effective on June 9, 2017, and substantially expanded the range of activities that are considered to be fiduciary investment advice under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (“ERISA”) and the Internal Revenue Code.  The DOL Fiduciary Rule provided for a phased implementation of the provisions of this new regulation, with the first part effective on June 9, 2017, and full implementation on January 1, 2018.  Under the DOL Fiduciary Rule, the investment-related information and support that our advisors and employees may provide to plan sponsors, participants and IRA holders on a non-fiduciary basis is more limited than what was previously allowed by regulation.  As a result, changes to the methods that we use to (i) deliver products and services, and (ii) pay and receive compensation for our investment-related products and services have occurred, which may impact future sales or margins.  In addition, to the extent that advisors with our affiliated retail broker-dealers (LFN) provide fiduciary investment advice as defined in the DOL Fiduciary Rule, it could expose those broker-dealers and their advisors to additional risk of legal liability in connection with that advice, which ultimately impacts us.



On February 3, 2017, President Trump directed the DOL to prepare an updated economic and legal analysis on whether the DOL Fiduciary Rule (i) has harmed or is likely to harm investors due to a reduction of Americans’ access to certain retirement savings offerings, retirement product structures, retirement savings information or related advice, (ii) has resulted in dislocations or disruptions within the retirement services industry that may adversely affect investors or retirees and (iii) is likely to cause an increase in litigation and an increase in prices that investors or retirees must pay to gain access to retirement services.



On April 7, 2017, the DOL issued a final rule delaying the applicability date of the DOL Fiduciary Rule and related exemptions from April 10, 2017, to June 9, 2017.  On November 27, 2017, the DOL issued another final rule extending the transition period and delaying full implementation from January 1, 2018, to July 1, 2019.  The DOL also changed some requirements initially released in April 2016, including (i) advisors relying on the Best Interest Contract Exemption will need to adhere to the Impartial Conduct Standards during the transition period of June 9, 2017, through July 1, 2019, but will not need to send certain disclosures to retirement investors during that time period and (ii) advisors will be permitted to rely on Prohibited Transaction Exemption 84-24 until July 1, 2019, for the sale of all annuities and insurance, provided they adhere to that exemption’s Impartial Conduct Standards as of June 9, 2017.  As a result of this latest delay and the directive to the DOL to further study the effects of the DOL Fiduciary Rule on the retail retirement market, there may be additional changes to the DOL Fiduciary Rule and/or further delays to these dates.



Federal Tax Legislation

 

On December 22, 2017, President Trump signed into law the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Act”).  The Tax Act results in sweeping reforms, including tax rate reductions for corporations and individuals, an expansion of the tax base through the elimination or reduction of specified deductions and credits and incentives related to growth and development including providing for the immediate write-off of qualifying capital investment.  Specific provisions that affect corporations generally relate to limitations on the deductibility of expenses related to interest, executive compensation and business entertainment.  The Tax Act repeals the ability to carry back tax losses to prior tax years and also repeals the corporate Alternative Minimum Tax.



The Tax Act contains a number of provisions that directly impact insurance companies.  Specifically, there are changes to the calculation of tax reserves associated with policyholder liabilities, modifications to the computations of capitalized expenses for tax purposes of amounts incurred to originate or acquire insurance contracts (commonly referred to as the DAC tax) and changes to the proration formula used to determine the amount of dividends eligible to be included in the dividends-received deduction.



The vast majority of the provisions in the Tax Act are effective January 1, 2018.  As noted, the changes to the Internal Revenue Code are significant and broad-based and will require interpretation as companies move forward with implementing the changes.  We expect clarifying guidance to be released in the future in the form of a technical corrections bill, administrative guidance or Treasury regulations. 



The uncertainty of federal funding and the future of the Social Security Disability Insurance (“SSDI”) program can have a substantial impact on the entire group benefit market, because SSDI benefits are a direct offset to the cost of group disability benefits. Congress alleviated some of this uncertainty by passing the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015. As a result, the Social Security Administration’s 2017 Annual Report projects that the SSDI reserves will not be depleted until 2034.



Health Care Reform Legislation



In March 2010, President Obama signed into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which was subsequently amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation ActThis legislation, as well as subsequent state and federal laws and regulations, includes provisions that provide for additional taxes to help finance the cost of these reforms and substantive changes and additions to health care and related laws, which could potentially impact some of our lines of business.  We continue to monitor efforts by the government to repeal or replace provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and those effects on our businesses.



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Patriot Act



The USA PATRIOT Act of 2001 includes anti-money laundering and financial transparency laws as well as various regulations applicable to broker-dealers and other financial services companies, including insurance companiesFinancial institutions are required to collect information regarding the identity of their customers, watch for and report suspicious transactions, respond to requests for information by regulatory authorities and law enforcement agencies and share information with other financial institutionsAs a result, we are required to maintain certain internal compliance practices, procedures and controls.



ERISA Considerations



ERISA is a comprehensive federal statute that applies to U.S. employee benefit plans sponsored by private employers and labor unionsPlans subject to ERISA include pension and profit sharing plans and welfare plans, including health, life and disability plansERISA provisions include reporting and disclosure rules, standards of conduct that apply to plan fiduciaries and prohibitions on transactions known as “prohibited transactions,” such as conflict-of-interest transactions and certain transactions between a benefit plan and a party in interestERISA also provides for a scheme of civil and criminal penalties and enforcementOur insurance, asset management, plan administrative services and other businesses provide services to employee benefit plans subject to ERISA, including services where we may act as an ERISA fiduciaryIn addition to ERISA regulation of businesses providing products and services to ERISA plans, we become subject to ERISA’s prohibited transaction rules for transactions with those plans, which may affect our ability to enter transactions, or the terms on which transactions may be entered, with those plans, even in businesses unrelated to those giving rise to party in interest status



Broker-Dealer and Securities Regulation



In addition to being registered under the Securities Act of 1933, some of our separate accounts as well as mutual funds that we sponsor are registered as investment companies under the Investment Company Act of 1940, and the shares of certain of these entities are qualified for sale in some or all states and the District of ColumbiaWe also have several subsidiaries that are registered as broker-dealers under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (“Exchange Act”) and are subject to federal and state regulation, including, but not limited to, the Financial Industry Regulation Authority’s (“FINRA”) net capital rulesIn addition, we have several subsidiaries that are registered investment advisors under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940Agents, advisors and employees registered or associated with any of our broker-dealer subsidiaries are subject to the Exchange Act and to examination requirements and regulation by the SEC, FINRA and state securities commissionersRegulation also extends to various parent entities that employ or control those individualsThe SEC and other governmental agencies and self-regulatory organizations, as well as state securities commissions in the U.S., have the power to conduct administrative proceedings that can result in censure, fines, the issuance of cease-and-desist orders or suspension and termination or limitation of the activities of the regulated entity or its employees



Environmental Considerations

 

Federal, state and local environmental laws and regulations apply to our ownership and operation of real propertyInherent in owning and operating real property are the risks of hidden environmental liabilities and the costs of any required clean-upUnder the laws of certain states, contamination of a property may give rise to a lien on the property to secure recovery of the costs of clean-up, which could adversely affect our commercial mortgage lendingIn several states, this lien has priority over the lien of an existing mortgage against such propertyIn addition, in some states and under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (“CERCLA”), we may be liable, as an “owner” or “operator,” for costs of cleaning-up releases or threatened releases of hazardous substances at a property mortgaged to usWe also risk environmental liability when we foreclose on a property mortgaged to usFederal legislation provides for a safe harbor from CERCLA liability for secured lenders that foreclose and sell the mortgaged real estate, provided that certain requirements are metHowever, there are circumstances in which actions taken could still expose us to CERCLA liabilityApplication of various other federal and state environmental laws could also result in the imposition of liability on us for costs associated with environmental hazards

 

We routinely conduct environmental assessments for real estate we acquire for investment and before taking title through foreclosure to real property collateralizing mortgages that we holdAlthough unexpected environmental liabilities can always arise, based on these environmental assessments and compliance with our internal procedures, we believe that any costs associated with compliance with environmental laws and regulations or any clean-up of properties would not have a material adverse effect on our results of operations



Intellectual Property



We rely on a combination of copyright, trademark, patent and trade secret laws to establish and protect our intellectual propertyWe have implemented a patent strategy designed to protect innovative aspects of our products and processes which we believe distinguish us from competitorsWe currently own several issued U.S. patents



We have an extensive portfolio of trademarks and service marks that we consider important in the marketing of our products and services, including, among others, the trademarks of the Lincoln National and Lincoln Financial names, the Lincoln silhouette logo and the combination of these marksTrademark registrations may be renewed indefinitely subject to continued use and registration requirementsWe regard our trademarks as valuable assets in marketing our products and services and intend to protect them against infringement and dilution.



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EMPLOYEES



As of December 31, 2017, we had a total of 8,947 employeesIn addition, we had a total of 1,147 planners and agents who had active sales contracts with us or LLANY.  None of our employees are represented by a labor union, and we are not a party to any collective bargaining agreementsWe consider our employee relations to be good.    



Item 1A.  Risk Factors



You should carefully consider the risks described belowThe risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones facing our CompanyAdditional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or that we currently deem immaterial may also impair our business operationsIf any of these risks actually occur, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially affectedIn that case, the value of our securities could decline substantially.



Legislative, Regulatory and Tax



Our businesses are heavily regulated and changes in regulation may affect our capital requirements or reduce our profitability.



State Regulation



We are subject to extensive supervision and regulation in the states in which we do businessThe supervision and regulation relate to numerous aspects of our business and financial conditionThe primary purpose of the supervision and regulation is the protection of our insurance contract holders, and not our investorsThe extent of regulation varies, but generally is governed by state statutesThese statutes delegate regulatory, supervisory and administrative authority to state insurance departmentsThis system of supervision and regulation covers, among other things:

 

·

Standards of minimum capital requirements and solvency, including RBC measurements;

·

Restrictions on certain transactions, including, but not limited to, reinsurance between us and our affiliates;

·

Restrictions on the nature, quality and concentration of investments;

·

Restrictions on the receipt of reinsurance credit;

·

Restrictions on the types of terms and conditions that we can include in the insurance policies offered by our primary insurance operations;

·

Limitations on the amount of dividends that we can pay;

·

Licensing status of the company;

·

Certain required methods of accounting pursuant to statutory accounting principles (“SAP”);

·

Reserves for unearned premiums, losses and other purposes;

·

Payment of policy benefits (claims); and

·

Assignment of residual market business and potential assessments for the provision of funds necessary for the settlement of covered claims under certain policies provided by impaired, insolvent or failed insurance companies.



State insurance regulators and the NAIC regularly re-examine existing laws and regulations applicable to insurance companies and their products.  Changes in these laws and regulations, or in interpretations thereof, sometimes lead to additional expense, statutory reserves and/or RBC requirements for the insurer and, thus, could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.  For example, the NAIC is currently considering changes to the accounting and reserve regulations related to variable annuity business: however, this effort is still ongoing and has not yet reached a point where we can determine what impact it could have on our financial condition or results of operations.  The NAIC is also addressing modifications to the C-1 capital charges used in the NAIC RBC formula, which may impact the level of the C-1 related RBC we are required to hold.



Although we endeavor to maintain all required licenses and approvals our businesses may not fully comply with the wide variety of applicable laws and regulations or the relevant authority’s interpretation of the laws and regulations, which may change from time to time.  Also, regulatory authorities have relatively broad discretion to grant, renew or revoke licenses and approvalsIf we do not have the requisite licenses and approvals or do not comply with applicable regulatory requirements, the insurance regulatory authorities could preclude or temporarily suspend us from carrying on some or all of our activities or impose substantial finesFurther, insurance regulatory authorities have relatively broad discretion to issue orders of supervision, which permit such authorities to supervise the business and operations of an insurance company.  As of December 31, 2017, no state insurance regulatory authority had imposed on us any material fines or revoked or suspended any of our licenses to conduct insurance business in any state or issued an order of supervision with respect to either LLANY or us, which would have a material adverse effect on our results of operations or financial condition.



Attempts to mitigate the impact of Regulation XXX and Actuarial Guideline 38 may fail in whole or in part resulting in an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.



The Valuation of Life Insurance Policies Model Regulation (“XXX”) requires insurers to establish additional statutory reserves for term life insurance policies with long-term premium guarantees and UL policies with secondary guarantees.  In addition, Actuarial Guideline 38 (“AG38”) clarifies the application of XXX with respect to certain UL insurance policies with secondary guarantees.  Virtually all of our

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newly issued term and a portion of our newly issued UL insurance products are affected by XXX and AG38.  The application of both AG38 and XXX involve numerous interpretations.  If state insurance departments do not agree with our interpretations, we may have to increase reserves related to such policies.  The New York State Department of Financial Services does not recognize the NAIC revisions to AG38 in applying the New York law governing the reserves to be held for UL and VUL products containing secondary guarantees.  The change, which was effective as of December 31, 2013, impacted our New York-domiciled insurance subsidiary, LLANY.  Although LLANY discontinued the sale of these products in early 2013, the change affected those policies previously sold.  As of December 31, 2017, we completed the phased in increase in reserves over five years, for a total of $450 million. 



We have implemented, and plan to continue to implement, reinsurance and capital management transactions to mitigate the capital impact of XXX and AG38, including the use of captive reinsurance subsidiaries and LNBAR.  The NAIC adopted Actuarial Guideline 48 (“AG48”) regulating the terms of these arrangements that are entered into or amended in certain ways after December 31, 2014This guideline imposed restrictions on the types of assets that can be used to support the reinsurance in these kinds of transactions.  While we have executed AG48 compliant reserve financing transactions, we cannot provide assurance that in light of AG48 and/or future rules and regulations that we will be able to continue to efficiently implement transactions or take other actions to mitigate the impact of XXX or AG38 on future sales of term and UL insurance productsIf we are unable to continue to efficiently implement such solutions for any reason, we may realize lower than anticipated returns and/or reduced sales on such products



Federal Regulation



In addition, our broker-dealer and investment advisor subsidiaries as well as our variable annuities and variable life insurance products, are subject to regulation and supervision by the SEC and FINRA.  These laws and regulations generally grant supervisory agencies and self-regulatory organizations broad administrative powers, including the power to limit or restrict the subsidiaries from carrying on their businesses in the event that they fail to comply with such laws and regulations.  The foregoing regulatory or governmental bodies, as well as the DOL and others, have the authority to review our products and business practices and those of our agents, advisors, registered representatives, associated persons and employeesIn recent years, there has been increased scrutiny of the insurance industry by these bodies, which has included more extensive examinations, regular sweep inquiries and more detailed review of disclosure documentsThese regulatory or governmental bodies may bring regulatory or other legal actions against us if, in their view, our practices, or those of our agents or employees, are improperThese actions can result in substantial fines, penalties or prohibitions or restrictions on our business activities and could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.



Department of Labor regulation defining fiduciary could cause changes to the manner in which we deliver products and services as well as changes in nature and amount of compensation and fees.



On April 8, 2016, the DOL released the DOL Fiduciary Rule, which became effective on June 9, 2017, and substantially expanded the range of activities that are considered to be fiduciary investment advice under ERISA and the Internal Revenue Code.  The DOL Fiduciary Rule provided for a phased implementation of the provisions of this new regulation, with the first part effective on June 9, 2017, and full implementation on January 1, 2018.  Under the DOL Fiduciary Rule, the investment-related information and support that our advisors and employees may provide to plan sponsors, participants and IRA holders on a non-fiduciary basis is more limited than what was previously allowed by regulation.  As a result, changes to the methods that we use to (i) deliver products and services, and (ii) pay and receive compensation for our investment-related products and services have occurred, which may impact future sales or margins.  In addition, to the extent that advisors with our affiliated retail broker-dealers (LFN) provide fiduciary investment advice as defined in the DOL Fiduciary Rule, it could expose those broker-dealers and their advisors to additional risk of legal liability in connection with that advice, which ultimately impacts us.



On February 3, 2017, President Trump directed the DOL to prepare an updated economic and legal analysis on whether the DOL Fiduciary Rule (i) has harmed or is likely to harm investors due to a reduction of Americans’ access to certain retirement savings offerings, retirement product structures, retirement savings information or related advice, (ii) has resulted in dislocations or disruptions within the retirement services industry that may adversely affect investors or retirees and (iii) is likely to cause an increase in litigation and an increase in prices that investors or retirees must pay to gain access to retirement services. 



On April 7, 2017, the DOL issued a final rule delaying the applicability date of the DOL Fiduciary Rule and related exemptions from April 10, 2017, to June 9, 2017.  On November 27, 2017, the DOL issued another final rule extending the transition period and delaying full implementation from January 1, 2018, to July 1, 2019.  The DOL also changed some requirements initially released in April 2016, including (i) advisors relying on the Best Interest Contract Exemption will need to adhere to the Impartial Conduct Standards during the transition period of June 9, 2017, through July 1, 2019, but will not need to send certain disclosures to retirement investors during that time period and (ii) advisors will be permitted to rely on Prohibited Transaction Exemption 84-24 until July 1, 2019, for the sale of all annuities and insurance, provided they adhere to that exemption’s Impartial Conduct Standards as of June 9, 2017.  As a result of this latest delay and the directive to the DOL to further study the effects of the DOL Fiduciary Rule on the retail retirement market, there may be additional changes to the DOL Fiduciary Rule and/or further delays to these dates. 



Changes in U.S. federal income tax law could impact our tax costs and the products that we sell.



On December 22, 2017, President Trump signed into law the Tax Act. The Tax Act includes tax rate reductions for both individuals and businesses (corporations and unincorporated entities) with the reduction in the U.S. marginal tax rate for corporations from 35% to 21% being one of the central provisions of the Tax Act.  The Tax Act expands the tax base through the elimination or reduction of specified deductions and credits and provides incentives related to growth and development.  Specific provisions that affect corporations generally

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relate to changes to the deductibility of interest expense, limitations on deductions for executive compensation and business entertainment and the repeal of the corporate Alternative Minimum Tax.



The changes made by the Tax Act will have a number of impacts on our business.  Notably, the change to the new 21% marginal corporate income tax rate is expected to lower our overall effective tax rate in future periods.  In addition, with the corporate rate reduction, we are required to remeasure our GAAP net deferred tax liability and statutory net admitted deferred tax asset in the period in which the law is enacted.  Accordingly, we revalued our deferred tax balances in the fourth quarter of 2017 to give effect to the law change.  In addition, there are several tax law changes that are specific to insurance companies, namely changes to the proration formula used to determine the amount of dividends eligible for the dividends-received deduction, changes to the calculation of tax reserves associated with policyholder liabilities and modifications to the computations of capitalized expenses for tax purposes of amounts incurred to originate or acquire insurance contracts (commonly referred to as the DAC tax).  These provisions will result in changes to our overall cash tax obligations following the effective date of the legislation, so for periods beginning after January 1, 2018.



In general, life insurance companies are allowed a dividends-received deduction that reduces the amount of dividend income subject to tax based on the ‘company share’ of net investment income.  The determination of the dividends-received deduction, and specifically the proration formula previously used to compute the company share, has changed.  Under the Tax Act, the company share is set at 70% of all qualifying dividends received.  This change to the company share percentage, coupled with a reduction in the general corporate dividend exclusion percentage, will reduce the amount of the deduction, which is a significant component of the difference between our actual tax expense and expected amount determined using the federal statutory tax rate.  Our income tax provision for the year ended December 31, 2017, included a tax benefit for the separate account dividends-received deduction of $210 million relating to the 2017 tax year, excluding one-time adjustments.  We expect that the changes made by the Tax Act will significantly decrease the amount of this tax benefit in 2018.



The Tax Act changed the computation of life insurance tax reserves for purposes of determining taxable income.  The method for computing reserves has changed such that the amount of the reserve for non-variable contracts will be the greater of (i) the net surrender value of the contracts or (ii) 92.81% of the tax reserve method applicable to such contracts.  The tax reserve method is generally defined as reserves established under statutory reserving principles, excluding reserves that are generally not deductible for federal income tax purposes.  For variable contracts, the tax reserve will be the greater of (i) the net surrender value of the contract or, (ii) the portion of the reserve that is separately accounted for under Section 817 plus 92.81% of the excess, if any, over the net surrender value.  Notably, the changes to the computation of tax reserves applies not only to new business (contracts to be issued in the future) but also to in-force policies and related reserves; the impact of the reduction in the tax reserves on in-force contracts is brought into taxable income ratably over an eight-year period beginning in 2018.



The Tax Act also changed the rules for determining the amount of DAC tax that we capitalize as an item of taxable income.  Specifically, the Tax Act increases the capitalization rates that are applied to net premiums received and also extends the amortization period for recovering and deducting such costs from 10 years to 15 years.



We continue to review and analyze the provisions of the Tax Act, including the actual and potential impact of the Tax Act on our GAAP equity and statutory RBC, future earnings, free cash flows and the sales and pricing of our products.  The impact of the Tax Act may differ from these estimates due to, among other things, changes in interpretations and assumptions we have made, guidance that may be issued and actions we may take as a result of the Tax Act.



Legal and regulatory actions are inherent in our businesses and could result in financial losses or harm our businesses.



We are, and in the future may be, subject to legal and regulatory actions in the ordinary course of our insurance and retirement operationsPending legal actions include proceedings relating to aspects of our businesses and operations that are specific to us and proceedings that are typical of the businesses in which we operateSome of these proceedings have been brought on behalf of various alleged classes of complainantsIn certain of these matters, the plaintiffs are seeking large and/or indeterminate amounts, including punitive or exemplary damagesSubstantial legal liability in these or future legal or regulatory actions could have a material financial effect or cause significant harm to our reputation, which in turn could materially harm our business prospectsSee Note 13 for a description of legal and regulatory proceedings and actions



Implementation of the provisions of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act may subject us to substantial additional federal regulation, and we cannot predict the effect on our business, results of operations, cash flows or financial condition.



Since it was enacted in 2010, the Dodd-Frank Act has brought wide-ranging changes to the financial services industry, including changes to the rules governing derivatives; a study by the SEC of the rules governing broker-dealers and investment advisers with respect to individual investors and investment advice, followed potentially by rulemaking; the creation of a new Federal Insurance Office within the U.S. Treasury to gather information and make recommendations regarding regulation of the insurance industry; the creation of a resolution authority to unwind failing institutions; the creation of a new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to protect consumers of certain financial products; and changes to executive compensation and certain corporate governance rules, among other things.



Significant rulemaking across numerous agencies within the federal government has been implemented since the enactment of the Dodd-Frank Act.  Complete implementation has yet to take place, given shifting priorities following the U.S. 2016 election; therefore, the ultimate impact of these provisions on our businesses (including product offerings), results of operations and liquidity and capital resources remains uncertain.

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Changes in accounting standards issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board or other standard-setting bodies may adversely affect our financial statements.



Our financial statements are prepared in accordance with GAAP as identified in the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards CodificationTM (“ASC”)From time to time, we are required to adopt new or revised accounting standards or guidance that are incorporated into the FASB ASCIt is possible that future accounting standards we are required to adopt could change the current accounting treatment that we apply to our consolidated financial statements and that such changes could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.



Specifically, the FASB is working on a project that could result in significant changes to how we account for and report our insurance contracts, including contract riders and embedded derivatives, and deferred acquisition costs (“DAC”)Depending on the magnitude of the changes ultimately adopted by the FASB, the proposed changes to GAAP may impose special demands on issuers in the areas of employee training, internal controls, contract fulfillment and disclosure and may affect how we manage our business, as it may affect other business processes such as design of compensation plans, product design, etcThe effective dates and transition methods are not known; however, issuers may be required to or may choose to adopt the new standards retrospectivelyIn this case, the issuer will report results under the new accounting method as of the effective date, as well as for all periods presented.



We are subject to SAPAny changes in the method of calculating reserves for our life insurance and annuity products under SAP may result in increased reserve requirements.



The NAIC continues to review the statutory accounting and capital requirements for variable annuities for potential changes with assistance from Oliver Wyman.  Additional testing of potential changes occurred during 2017, and Oliver Wyman presented their recommendations to the NAIC working group on December 1, 2017.  The NAIC working group opened these recommendations for comment until March 2, 2018.  Once any changes are finalized by the NAIC, the resulting new variable annuity framework could result in changes in reserve and/or capital requirements and statutory surplus and could impact the volatility of those item(s).     



The NAIC is also addressing modifications to the C-1 capital charges used in the NAIC RBC formula, which may impact the level of the C-1 related RBC we are required to hold.



Market Conditions



Weak conditions in the global capital markets and the economy generally may materially adversely affect our business and results of operations.



Our results of operations are materially affected by conditions in the global capital markets and the economy generally, both in the U.S. and elsewhere around the worldContinued unconventional easing from the major central banks, slowing of global growth, continued impact of falling global energy and other commodity prices, and the ability of the U.S. government to proactively address the fiscal imbalance remain key challenges for markets and our businessThese macro-economic conditions may have an adverse effect on us given our credit and equity market exposureIn the event of extreme prolonged market events, such as the global credit crisis and recession that occurred during 2008 and 2009, we could incur significant lossesEven in the absence of a market downturn, we are exposed to substantial risk of loss due to market volatility.



Factors such as consumer spending, business investment, domestic and foreign government spending, the volatility and strength of the capital markets, the potential for inflation or deflation and uncertainty over domestic and foreign government actions all affect the business and economic environment and, ultimately, the amount and profitability of our businessIn an economic downturn characterized by higher unemployment, lower disposable income, lower corporate earnings, lower business investment and lower consumer spending, the demand for our financial and insurance products could be adversely affectedIn addition, we may experience an elevated incidence of claims and lapses or surrenders of policiesOur contract holders may choose to defer paying insurance premiums or stop paying insurance premiums altogetherAdverse changes in the economy could affect earnings negatively and could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.



Changes in interest rates and sustained low interest rates may cause interest rate spreads to decrease and changes in interest rates may also result in increased contract withdrawals.



Interest rate fluctuations and/or a sustained period of low interest rates could negatively affect our profitabilitySome of our products, principally fixed annuities and UL, including IUL and linked-benefit UL, have interest rate guarantees that expose us to the risk that changes in interest rates will reduce our spread, or the difference between the amounts that we are required to pay under the contracts and the amounts we are able to earn on our general account investments intended to support our obligations under the contractsSpreads are an important component of our net incomeDeclines in our spread or instances where the returns on our general account investments are not enough to support the interest rate guarantees on these products could have a material adverse effect on our businesses or results of operationsIn addition, low rates increase the cost of providing variable annuity living benefit guarantees, which could negatively affect our variable annuity profitability



In periods when interest rates are declining or remain at low levels, we may have to reinvest the cash we receive as interest or return of principal on our investments in lower yielding instruments reducing our spreadMoreover, borrowers may prepay fixed-income securities, commercial mortgages and mortgage-backed securities in our general account in order to borrow at lower market rates, which

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exacerbates this riskLowering interest crediting rates helps to mitigate the effect of spread compression on some of our productsHowever, because we are entitled to reset the interest rates on our fixed-rate annuities only at limited, pre-established intervals, and since many of our contracts have guaranteed minimum interest or crediting rates, our spreads could still decreaseAs of December 31, 2017,  43% of our annuities business, 86% of our retirement plan services business and 99% of our life insurance business with guaranteed minimum interest or crediting rates are at their guaranteed minimums.



Our expectation for future spreads is an important component in the amortization of DAC and value of business acquired (“VOBA”) as it affects the future profitability of the business.  Currently, new money rates continue to be at historically low levels.  The Federal Reserve Board forecasts point toward short-term rates likely moving above 2% at the end of 2018.  For additional information on interest rate risks, see “Part II – Item 7AQuantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk – Interest Rate Risk.”



A decline in market interest rates could also reduce our return on investments that do not support particular policy obligationsDuring periods of sustained lower interest rates, our recorded policy liabilities may not be sufficient to meet future policy obligations and may need to be strengthened, thereby reducing net income in the affected reporting periodAccordingly, declining interest rates may materially affect our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows and significantly reduce our profitability.



Increases in market interest rates may also negatively affect our profitabilityIn periods of rapidly increasing interest rates, we may not be able to replace the assets in our general account with higher yielding assets needed to fund the higher crediting rates necessary to keep our interest-sensitive products competitiveWe, therefore, may have to accept a lower spread and thus lower profitability or face a decline in sales and greater loss of existing contracts and related assetsIncreases in interest rates may cause increased surrenders and withdrawals of insurance productsIn periods of increasing interest rates, policy loans and surrenders and withdrawals of life insurance policies and annuity contracts may increase as contract holders seek to buy products with perceived higher returnsThis process may lead to a flow of cash out of our businessesThese outflows may require investment assets to be sold at a time when the prices of those assets are lower because of the increase in market interest rates, which may result in realized investment lossesA sudden demand among consumers to change product types or withdraw funds could lead us to sell assets at a loss to meet the demand for fundsFurthermore, unanticipated increases in withdrawals and termination may cause us to unlock our DAC and VOBA assets, which would reduce net incomeAn increase in market interest rates could also have a material adverse effect on the value of our investment portfolio, for example, by decreasing the estimated fair values of the fixed-income securities that comprise a substantial portion of our investment portfolioAn increase in interest rates could also result in decreased fee income associated with a decline in the value of variable annuity account balances invested in fixed-income funds.



Because the equity markets and other factors impact the profitability and expected profitability of many of our products, changes in equity markets and other factors may significantly affect our business and profitability.



The fee income that we earn on variable annuities is based primarily upon account values and partially based upon account values for VUL insurance policies.  Because strong equity markets result in higher account values, strong equity markets positively affect our net income through increased fee income.  Conversely, a weakening of the equity markets results in lower fee income and may have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and capital resources.



The increased fee income resulting from strong equity markets increases the estimated gross profits (“EGPs”) from variable insurance products as do better than expected lapses, mortality rates and expensesAs a result, higher EGPs may result in lower net amortized costs related to DAC, deferred sales inducements (“DSI”), VOBA, deferred front-end loads (“DFEL”) and changes in future contract benefitsHowever, a decrease in the equity markets, as well as worse than expected increases in lapses, mortality rates and expenses, depending upon their significance, may result in higher net amortized costs associated with DAC, DSI, VOBA, DFEL and changes in future contract benefits and may have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and capital resources.



Changes in the equity markets, interest rates and/or volatility affect the profitability of our products with guaranteed benefits; therefore, such changes may have a material adverse effect on our business and profitability.



Certain of our variable annuity products include optional guaranteed benefit ridersThese include GDB, GWB and GIB ridersOur GWB, GIB and 4LATER® (a form of GIB rider) features have elements of both insurance benefits accounted for under the Financial Services – Insurance – Claim Costs and Liabilities for Future Policy Benefits Subtopic of the FASB ASC (“benefit reserves”) and embedded derivatives accounted for under the Derivatives and Hedging and the Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures Topics of the FASB ASC (“embedded derivative reserves”)We calculate the value of the embedded derivative reserve and the benefit reserves based on the specific characteristics of each guaranteed living benefit featureThe amount of reserves related to GDB for variable annuities is related to the difference between the value of the underlying accounts and the GDB, calculated using a benefit ratio approachThe GDB reserves take into account the present value of total expected GDB payments, the present value of total expected GDB assessments over the life of the contract, claims paid to date and assessments to dateReserves for our GIB and certain GWB with lifetime benefits are based on a combination of fair value of the underlying benefit and a benefit ratio approachThe benefit ratio approach takes into account, among other things, the present value of expected GIB payments, the present value of total expected GIB assessments over the life of the contract, claims paid to date and assessments to dateThe amount of reserves related to those GWB that do not have lifetime benefits is based on the fair value of the underlying benefit.



Both the level of expected payments and expected total assessments used in calculating the benefit reserves are affected by the equity marketsThe liabilities related to fair value are impacted by changes in equity markets, interest rates, volatility, foreign exchange rates and credit spreadsAccordingly, strong equity markets, increases in interest rates and decreases in volatility will generally decrease the reserves

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calculated using fair valueConversely, a decrease in the equity markets along with a decrease in interest rates and an increase in volatility will generally result in an increase in the reserves calculated using fair value.



Increases in reserves would result in a charge to our earnings in the quarter in which the increase occurs.  Our guaranteed benefit obligations are reinsured among both LNBAR and third-party reinsurance counterparties on either a Modco or coinsurance basis.

 

We remain liable for the guaranteed benefits in the event that the reinsurance counterparties are unable or unwilling to pay, resulting in a reduction to net income.  These, individually or collectively, may have a material adverse effect on net income, financial condition or liquidity.



Liquidity and Capital Position



Adverse capital and credit market conditions may affect our ability to meet liquidity needs, access to capital and cost of capital.



We need liquidity to pay our operating expenses and interest on our debt, to maintain our securities lending activities and to replace certain maturing liabilities.  Without sufficient liquidity, we will be forced to curtail our operations, and our business will suffer.  The principal sources of liquidity are insurance premiums and fees, annuity considerations and cash flow from our investment portfolio and assets, consisting mainly of cash or assets that are readily convertible into cash.



In the event that current resources do not satisfy our needs, we may have to seek additional financing.  The availability of additional financing will depend on a variety of factors such as market conditions, the general availability of credit, the volume of trading activities, the overall availability of credit to the financial services industry, our credit capacity, as well as the possibility that customers or lenders could develop a negative perception of our long- or short-term financial prospects if we incur large investment losses or if the level of our business activity decreases due to a market downturn.  Similarly, our access to funds may be impaired if regulatory authorities or rating agencies take negative actions against us.  Our internal sources of liquidity may prove to be insufficient, and in such case, we may not be able to successfully obtain additional financing on favorable terms, or at all.



Disruptions, uncertainty or volatility in the capital and credit markets may also limit our access to capital required to operate our business, most significantly our insurance operations.  Such market conditions may limit our ability to replace, in a timely manner, maturing liabilities; satisfy statutory capital requirements; generate fee income and market-related revenue to meet liquidity needs; and access the capital necessary to grow our business.  As such, we may be forced to delay raising capital, issue shorter term securities than we prefer or bear an unattractive cost of capital which could decrease our profitability and significantly reduce our financial flexibility.  Our results of operations, financial condition, cash flows and statutory capital position could be materially adversely affected by disruptions in the financial markets.



A decrease in our capital and surplus may result in a downgrade to our insurer financial strength ratings.



In any particular year, statutory surplus amounts and RBC ratios may increase or decrease depending on a variety of factors, including the amount of statutory income or losses generated by us and LLANY (which itself is sensitive to equity market and credit market conditions), the amount of additional capital we or LLANY must hold to support business growth, changes in reserving requirements, such as principles-based reserving, our inability to obtain reserve relief, changes in equity market levels, the value of certain fixed-income and equity securities in our investment portfolio, the value of certain derivative instruments that do not get hedge accounting treatment, changes in interest rates and foreign currency exchange rates, as well as changes to the NAIC RBC formulas.  The RBC ratio is also affected by the product mix of the in-force book of business (i.e., the amount of business without guarantees is not subject to the same level of reserves as the business with guarantees).  Most of these factors are outside of our control.  Our insurer financial strength ratings are significantly influenced by our statutory surplus amounts and RBC ratios.  The RBC ratio of LNL is an important factor in the determination of our financial strength ratings.  In addition, rating agencies may implement changes to their internal models that have the effect of increasing or decreasing the amount of statutory capital we must hold in order to maintain our current ratings.  In extreme scenarios of equity market declines, the amount of additional statutory reserves that we are required to hold for our variable annuity guarantees may increase at a rate greater than the rate of change of the markets.  Increases in reserves reduce the statutory surplus used in calculating our RBC ratios.  To the extent that our statutory capital resources are deemed to be insufficient to maintain a particular rating by one or more rating agencies, we may seek to raise additional capital through debt financing, which may be on terms not as favorable as in the past. 



Alternatively, if we were not to raise additional capital in such a scenario, either at our discretion or because we were unable to do so, our financial strength ratings might be downgraded by one or more rating agencies.  For more information on risks regarding our ratings, see “Covenants and Ratings – A downgrade in our financial strength ratings could limit our ability to market products, increase the number or value of policies being surrendered and/or hurt our relationships with creditors” below.



An inability to access our credit facilities could result in a reduction in our liquidity and lead to downgrades in our credit and financial strength ratings.



We rely upon a $2.5 billion unsecured facility, which expires on June 30, 2021We also have other facilities that we enter into in the ordinary course of businessSee “Review of Consolidated Financial Condition – Liquidity and Capital Resources – Sources of Liquidity and Cash Flow – Financing Activities” in the MNA and Note 12.



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We rely on the credit facilities as a potential source of liquidity.  We also use the credit facility as a potential backstop to provide variable annuity statutory reserve credit.  While our variable annuity hedge assets supporting the funds withheld reinsurance liability have normally exceeded the statutory reserves, in certain stressed market conditions, it is possible that the hedge assets supporting the funds withheld reinsurance liability could be less than the statutory reserve.  The credit facility is available to provide reserve credit to us in such a case.  If we were unable to access our facility in such circumstances, it could materially impact our capital position.  The availability of these facilities could be critical to our financial strength ratings and our ability to meet our obligations as they come due in a market when alternative sources of credit are tight.  The credit facilities contain certain administrative, reporting, legal and financial covenants.  We must comply with covenants under our credit facilities.



Our right to borrow funds under these facilities is subject to the fulfillment of certain important conditions, including our compliance with all covenants, and our ability to borrow under these facilities is also subject to the continued willingness and ability of the lenders that are parties to the facilities to provide fundsOur failure to comply with the covenants in the credit facilities or fulfill the conditions to borrowings, or the failure of lenders to fund their lending commitments (whether due to insolvency, illiquidity or other reasons) in the amounts provided for under the terms of the facilities, would restrict our ability to access these credit facilities when needed and, consequently, could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.



Assumptions and Estimates



As a result of changes in assumptions, estimates and methods in calculating reserves, our reserves for future policy benefits and claims related to our current and future business as well as businesses we may acquire in the future may prove to be inadequate.



We establish and carry, as a liability, reserves based on estimates of how much we will need to pay for future benefits and claimsFor our insurance products, we calculate these reserves based on many assumptions and estimates, including, but not limited to, estimated premiums we will receive over the assumed life of the policies, the timing of the events covered by the insurance policies, the lapse rate of the policies, the amount of benefits or claims to be paid and the investment returns on the assets we purchase with the premiums we receive.



The sensitivity of our statutory reserves and surplus established for our variable annuity base contracts and riders to changes in the equity markets will vary depending on the magnitude of the declineThe sensitivity will be affected by the level of account values relative to the level of guaranteed amounts, product design and reinsuranceStatutory reserves for variable annuities depend upon the cumulative equity market impacts on the business in force, and therefore, result in non-linear relationships with respect to the level of equity market performance within any reporting period.



The assumptions and estimates we use in connection with establishing and carrying our reserves are inherently uncertainAccordingly, we cannot determine with precision the ultimate amount or the timing of the payment of actual benefits and claims or whether the assets supporting the policy liabilities will grow to the level we assume prior to payment of benefits or claimsIf our actual experience is different from our assumptions or estimates, our reserves may prove to be inadequate in relation to our estimated future benefits and claimsIncreases in reserves have a negative effect on income from operations in the quarter incurred.



If our businesses do not perform well and/or their estimated fair values decline or the price of LNC’s common stock does not increase, we may be required to recognize an impairment of our goodwill or to establish a valuation allowance against the deferred income tax asset, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.



Goodwill represents the excess of the acquisition price incurred to acquire subsidiaries and other businesses over the fair value of their net assets as of the date of acquisitionWe test goodwill at least annually for indications of value impairment with consideration given to financial performance, mergers and acquisitions and other relevant factors.  In addition, certain events, including a significant and adverse change in regulations, including tax law changes, legal factors, accounting standards or the business climate, an adverse action or assessment by a regulator or unanticipated competition, would cause us to review the carrying amounts of goodwill for impairment.  Impairment testing is performed based upon estimates of the fair value of the “reporting unit” to which the goodwill relates.  During the fourth quarter of 2017, we recorded goodwill impairment of $905 million related to our Life Insurance segment.  Subsequent reviews of goodwill could result in an impairment of goodwill, and such write-downs could have a material adverse effect on our net income and book value, but will not affect our or LLANY’s statutory capitalAs of December 31, 2017, we had a total of $1.4 billion of goodwill on our Consolidated Balance Sheets



For more information on goodwill, see “Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates – Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets” in the MNA and Notes 2 and 10.



Deferred income tax represents the tax effect of the differences between the book and tax basis of assets and liabilitiesDeferred tax assets are assessed periodically by management to determine if they are realizable.  As of December 31, 2017, we had a deferred tax asset of $798 millionFactors in management’s determination include the performance of the business, including the ability to generate capital gains from a variety of sources and tax planning strategiesIf, based on available information, it is more likely than not that the deferred income tax asset will not be realized, then a valuation allowance must be established with a corresponding charge to net incomeSuch valuation allowance could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

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The determination of the amount of allowances and impairments taken on our investments is highly subjective and could materially impact our results of operations or financial condition.



The determination of the amount of allowances and impairments varies by investment type and is based upon our periodic evaluation and assessment of known and inherent risks associated with the respective asset classSuch evaluations and assessments are revised as conditions change and new information becomes availableManagement updates its evaluations regularly and reflects changes in allowances and impairments in operations as such evaluations are revisedThere can be no assurance that our management has accurately assessed the level of impairments taken and allowances reflected in our financial statementsFurthermore, additional impairments may need to be taken or allowances provided for in the futureHistorical trends may not be indicative of future impairments or allowances.



We regularly review our available-for-sale (“AFS”) securities for declines in fair value that we determine to be other-than-temporaryFor an equity security, if we do not have the ability and intent to hold the security for a sufficient period of time to allow for a recovery in value, we conclude that an other-than-temporary impairment (“OTTI”) has occurred, and the amortized cost of the equity security is written down to the current fair value, with a corresponding change to realized gain (loss) on our Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss)When assessing our ability and intent to hold the equity security to recovery, we consider, among other things, the severity and duration of the decline in fair value of the equity security as well as the cause of decline, a fundamental analysis of the liquidity, business prospects and overall financial condition of the issuer.



For a debt security, if we intend to sell a security or it is more likely than not we will be required to sell a debt security before recovery of its amortized cost basis and the fair value of the debt security is below amortized cost, we conclude that an OTTI has occurred and the amortized cost is written down to current fair value, with a corresponding change to realized gain (loss) on our Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss)If we do not intend to sell a debt security or it is not more likely than not we will be required to sell a debt security before recovery of its amortized cost basis but the present value of the cash flows expected to be collected is less than the amortized cost of the debt security (referred to as the credit loss), we conclude that an OTTI has occurred, and the amortized cost is written down to the estimated recovery value with a corresponding change to realized gain (loss) on our Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss), as this is also deemed the credit portion of the OTTIThe remainder of the decline to fair value is recorded in other comprehensive income (loss) (“OCI”) to unrealized OTTI on AFS securities on our Consolidated Statements of Stockholders Equity, as this is considered a noncredit (i.e., recoverable) impairment



In June 2016, the FASB issued amendments to the accounting guidance for measuring credit losses on financial instrumentsFor more information regarding the new accounting standard, see “ASU 2016-13, Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments in Note 2.



Related to our unrealized losses, we establish deferred tax assets for the tax benefit we may receive in the event that losses are realizedThe realization of significant realized losses could result in an inability to recover the tax benefits and may result in the establishment of valuation allowances against our deferred tax assetsRealized losses or impairments may have a material adverse impact on our results of operations and financial condition.



Our valuation of fixed maturity, equity and trading securities may include methodologies, estimations and assumptions which are subject to differing interpretations and could result in changes to investment valuations that may materially adversely affect our results of operations or financial condition.



Fixed maturity, equity and trading securities and short-term investments, which are reported at fair value on our Consolidated Balance Sheets, represented the majority of our total cash and invested assetsWe have categorized these securities into a three-level hierarchy, based on the priority of the inputs to the respective valuation techniqueThe fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (Level 1) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3).



The determination of fair values in the absence of quoted market prices is based on valuation methodologies, securities we deem to be comparable and assumptions deemed appropriate given the circumstancesThe fair value estimates are made at a specific point in time, based on available market information and judgments about financial instruments, including estimates of the timing and amounts of expected future cash flows and the credit standing of the issuer or counterpartyFactors considered in estimating fair value include coupon rate, maturity, estimated duration, call provisions, sinking fund requirements, credit rating, industry sector of the issuer and quoted market prices of comparable securitiesThe use of different methodologies and assumptions may have a material effect on the estimated fair value amounts.



During periods of market disruption, including periods of significantly increasing/decreasing or high/low interest rates, rapidly widening credit spreads or illiquidity, it may be difficult to value certain securities if trading becomes less frequent and/or market data becomes less observableThere may be certain asset classes that were in active markets with significant observable data that become illiquid due to the current financial environmentIn such cases, more securities may fall to Level 3 and thus require more subjectivity and management judgmentAs such, valuations may include inputs and assumptions that are less observable or require greater estimation, as well as valuation methods which are more sophisticated or require greater estimation, thereby resulting in values which may be less than the value at which the investments may be ultimately soldFurther, rapidly changing and unprecedented credit and equity market conditions could materially impact the valuation of securities as reported within our consolidated financial statements and the period-to-period changes in value could vary significantlyDecreases in value may have a material adverse effect on our results of operations or financial condition.

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Significant adverse mortality experience may result in the loss of, or higher prices for, reinsurance.



We reinsure a significant amount of the mortality risk on fully underwritten, newly issued, individual life insurance contractsWe regularly review retention limits for continued appropriateness and they may be changed in the futureIf we were to experience adverse mortality or morbidity experience, a significant portion of that would be reimbursed by our reinsurersProlonged or severe adverse mortality or morbidity experience could result in increased reinsurance costs, and ultimately, reinsurers being unwilling to offer coverageIf we are unable to maintain our current level of reinsurance or purchase new reinsurance protection at comparable rates to what we are paying currently, we may have to accept an increase in our net exposures or revise our pricing to reflect higher reinsurance premiums or bothIf this were to occur, we may be exposed to reduced profitability and cash flow strain or we may not be able to price new business at competitive rates.



Catastrophes may adversely impact liabilities for contract holder claims.



Our insurance operations are exposed to the risk of catastrophic mortality, such as a pandemic, an act of terrorism, natural disaster or other event that causes a large number of deaths or injuriesSignificant influenza pandemics have occurred three times in the last century, but the likelihood, timing or severity of a future pandemic cannot be predictedAdditionally, the impact of climate change could cause changes in weather patterns, resulting in more severe and more frequent natural disasters such as forest fires, hurricanes, tornados, floods and storm surgesIn our group insurance operations, a localized event that affects the workplace of one or more of our group insurance customers could cause a significant loss due to mortality or morbidity claimsThese events could cause a material adverse effect on our results of operations in any period and, depending on their severity, could also materially and adversely affect our financial condition.



The extent of losses from a catastrophe is a function of both the total amount of insured exposure in the area affected by the event and the severity of the eventPandemics, natural disasters and man-made catastrophes, including terrorism, may produce significant damage in larger areas, especially those that are heavily populatedClaims resulting from natural or man-made catastrophic events could cause substantial volatility in our financial results for any fiscal quarter or year and could materially reduce our profitability or harm our financial conditionAlso, catastrophic events could harm the financial condition of our reinsurers and thereby increase the probability of default on reinsurance recoveriesAccordingly, our ability to write new business could also be affected.



Consistent with industry practice and accounting standards, we establish liabilities for claims arising from a catastrophe only after assessing the probable losses arising from the eventWe cannot be certain that the liabilities we have established or applicable reinsurance will be adequate to cover actual claim liabilities, and a catastrophic event or multiple catastrophic events could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.



Operational Matters



Our enterprise risk management policies and procedures may leave us exposed to unidentified or unanticipated risk, which could negatively affect our businesses or result in losses.



We have devoted significant resources to develop our enterprise risk management policies and procedures and expect to continue to do so in the futureNonetheless, our policies and procedures to identify, monitor and manage risks may not be fully effectiveMany of our methods of managing risk and exposures are based upon our use of observed historical market behavior or statistics based on historical modelsAs a result, these methods may not predict future exposures, which could be significantly greater than the historical measures indicate, such as the risk of pandemics causing a large number of deathsOther risk management methods depend upon the evaluation of information regarding markets, clients, catastrophe occurrence or other matters that is publicly available or otherwise accessible to us, which may not always be accurate, complete, up-to-date or properly evaluatedManagement of operational, legal and regulatory risks requires, among other things, policies and procedures to record properly and verify a large number of transactions and events, and these policies and procedures may not be fully effective.



We face risks of non-collectability of reinsurance and increased reinsurance rates, which could materially affect our results of operations.



We follow the insurance practice of reinsuring with other insurance and reinsurance companies a portion of the risks under the policies written by us and LLANY (known as “ceding”)As of December 31, 2017, we ceded $237.1 billion of life insurance in force to reinsurers for reinsurance protectionAlthough reinsurance does not discharge us from our primary obligation to pay contract holders for losses insured under the policies we issue, reinsurance does make the assuming reinsurer liable to us or LLANY for the reinsured portion of the riskAs of December 31, 2017, we had $6.5 billion of reinsurance receivables from reinsurers for paid and unpaid losses, for which they are obligated to reimburse us under our reinsurance contractsOf this amount, $1.9 billion related to the sale of our reinsurance business to Swiss Re in 2001 through an indemnity reinsurance agreement and $2.1 billion related to LNBAR.  Swiss Re has funded a trust to support this businessThe balance in the trust changes as a result of ongoing reinsurance activity and was $2.5 billion as of December 31, 2017.  Furthermore, we hold trading securities to support the $269 million of funds withheld liabilities related to the Swiss Re treaties for which we would have the right of offset to the corresponding reinsurance receivables in the event of a default by Swiss ReLNBAR also has funded trusts to support the business ceded.  The balances in the trusts change as a result of ongoing reinsurance activity and totaled $1.9 billion as of December 31, 2017.  In addition, we hold trading securities, available for sale securities and derivative assets to support the $2.6 billion of funds withheld liabilities related to the treaties for which we would have the right of setoff to the corresponding reinsurance receivables in the event of a default by LNBAR.



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The balance of the reinsurance is due from a diverse group of reinsurersThe collectability of reinsurance is largely a function of the solvency of the individual reinsurersWe perform annual credit reviews on our reinsurers, focusing on, among other things, financial capacity, stability, trends and commitment to the reinsurance businessWe also require assets in trust, letters of credit (“LOCs”) or other acceptable collateral to support balances due from reinsurers not authorized to transact business in the applicable jurisdictionsDespite these measures, a reinsurer’s insolvency, inability or unwillingness to make payments under the terms of a reinsurance contract, especially Swiss Re, could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.



Reinsurers also may attempt to increase rates with respect to our existing reinsurance arrangements.  The ability of our reinsurers to increase rates depends upon the terms of each reinsurance contract.  Some of our reinsurance contracts contain provisions that limit the reinsurer’s ability to increase rates on in-force business; however, some do not.  An increase in reinsurance rates may affect the profitability of our insurance business.  Additionally, such a rate increase could result in our recapture of the business, which may result in a need for additional reserves and increase our exposure to claims.  While in recent years, we have faced a number of rate increase actions on in-force business, our management of those actions has not had a material effect on our results of operations or financial condition.  However, there can be no assurance that the outcome of future rate increase actions would similarly result in no material effect.  See Note 13 for a description of reinsurance related actions.



Competition for our employees is intense, and we may not be able to attract and retain the highly skilled people we need to support our business.



Our success depends, in large part, on our ability to attract and retain key peopleIntense competition exists for the key employees with demonstrated ability, and we may be unable to hire or retain such employeesThe unexpected loss of services of one or more of our key personnel could have a material adverse effect on our operations due to their skills, knowledge of our business, their years of industry experience and the potential difficulty of promptly finding qualified replacement employeesWe compete with other financial institutions primarily on the basis of our products, compensation, support services and financial conditionSales in our businesses and our results of operations and financial condition could be materially adversely affected if we are unsuccessful in attracting and retaining key employees, including financial advisors, wholesalers and other employees, as well as independent distributors of our products.



We may not be able to protect our intellectual property and may be subject to infringement claims.



We rely on a combination of contractual rights and copyright, trademark, patent and trade secret laws to establish and protect our intellectual propertyAlthough we use a broad range of measures to protect our intellectual property rights, third parties may infringe or misappropriate our intellectual propertyWe may have to litigate to enforce and protect our copyrights, trademarks, patents, trade secrets and know-how or to determine their scope, validity or enforceability, which represents a diversion of resources that may be significant in amount and may not prove successfulAdditionally, complex legal and factual determinations and evolving laws and court interpretations make the scope of protection afforded our intellectual property uncertain, particularly in relation to our patentsThe loss of intellectual property protection or the inability to secure or enforce the protection of our intellectual property assets could have a material adverse effect on our business and our ability to compete.



We also may be subject to costly litigation in the event that another party alleges our operations or activities infringe upon another party’s intellectual property rights.  We may be subject to claims by third parties for breach of patent, copyright, trademark, trade secret or license usage rightsAny such claims and any resulting litigation could result in significant liability for damagesIf we were found to have infringed a third-party patent or other intellectual property rights, we could incur substantial liability, and in some circumstances could be enjoined from providing certain products or services to our customers or utilizing and benefiting from certain copyrights, trademarks, trade secrets or licenses, or alternatively could be required to enter into costly licensing arrangements with third parties, all of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.



Our information systems may experience interruptions or breaches in security and a failure of disaster recovery systems could result in a loss or disclosure of confidential information, damage to our reputation and impairment of our ability to conduct business effectively.



Our information systems are critical to the operation of our businessWe collect, process, maintain, retain and distribute large amounts of personal financial and health information and other confidential and sensitive data about our customers in the ordinary course of our businessOur business therefore depends on our customers’ willingness to entrust us with their personal informationAny failure, interruption or breach in security could result in disruptions to our critical systems and adversely affect our customer relationshipsAlthough hackers have attempted and continue to try to infiltrate our computer systems, to date, we have not had a material security breachWhile we employ a robust and tested information security program, given the increasing sophistication of cyberattacks, a cyberattack could occur and persist for an extended period of time without detection.  There can be no assurance that any such failure, interruption or security breach will not occur or, if any does occur, that it will be detected in a timely manner or that it can be sufficiently remediated



In the event of a disaster such as a natural catastrophe, epidemic, industrial accident, blackout, computer virus, terrorist attack, cyberattack or war, unanticipated problems with our disaster recovery systems could have a material adverse impact on our ability to conduct business and on our results of operations and financial condition, particularly if those problems affect our computer-based data processing, transmission, storage and retrieval systems and destroy valuable dataIn addition, in the event that a significant number of our managers were unavailable following a disaster, our ability to effectively conduct business could be severely compromisedThese interruptions also may interfere with our suppliers’ ability to provide goods and services and our employees’ ability to perform their job responsibilities.



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The failure of our computer systems and/or our disaster recovery plans for any reason could cause significant interruptions in our operations and result in a failure to maintain the security, confidentiality or privacy of sensitive data, including personal information relating to our customersThe occurrence of any such failure, interruption or security breach of our systems could damage our reputation, result in a loss of customer business, subject us to additional regulatory scrutiny, or expose us to civil litigation and financial liability.



Although we conduct due diligence, negotiate contractual provisions and, in many cases, conduct periodic reviews of our vendors, distributors, and other third parties that provide operational or information technology services to us to confirm compliance with our information security standards, the failure of such third parties’ computer systems and/or their disaster recovery plans for any reason might cause significant interruptions in our operations and result in a failure to maintain the security, confidentiality or privacy of sensitive data, including personal information relating to our customers.  Such a failure could harm our reputation, subject us to regulatory sanctions and legal claims, lead to a loss of customers and revenues and otherwise adversely affect our business and financial results.  While we maintain cyber liability insurance that provides both third-party liability and first party liability coverages, our insurance may not be sufficient to protect us against all losses.



Acquisitions of businesses may not produce anticipated benefits resulting in operating difficulties, unforeseen liabilities or asset impairments, which may adversely affect our operating results and financial condition.



We may experience unanticipated difficulties or delays in completing the proposed acquisition of Liberty Life Assurance Company of Boston (“Liberty”) and our ability to achieve certain financial benefits we anticipate from the acquisition of Liberty, or other businesses, will depend in part upon our ability to successfully close the transaction in a timely manner.  Factors such as receiving the required governmental or regulatory approvals or a disruption to our or the acquired entity’s business could impact our ability to close the transaction.  Once completed, an acquired business may not perform as projected, expense and revenue synergies may not materialize as expected and costs associated with the integration may be greater than anticipated.  Our financial results could be adversely affected by unanticipated performance issues, unforeseen liabilities, transaction-related charges, diversion of management time and resources to acquisition integration challenges or growth strategies, loss of key employees, amortization of expenses related to intangibles, charges for impairment of long-term assets or goodwill and indemnifications.



Covenants and Ratings



A downgrade in our financial strength ratings could limit our ability to market products, increase the number or value of policies being surrendered and/or hurt our relationships with creditors.



Nationally recognized rating agencies rate the financial strength of both us and LLANY.  Each of the rating agencies reviews its ratings periodically, and our current ratings may not be maintained in the future.



Our financial strength ratings, which are intended to measure our ability to meet contract holder obligations, are an important factor affecting public confidence in most of our products and, as a result, our competitiveness.  A downgrade of the financial strength rating of us or LLANY could affect our competitive position in the insurance industry by making it more difficult for us to market our products as potential customers may select companies with higher financial strength ratings and by leading to increased withdrawals by current customers seeking companies with higher financial strength ratings.  This could lead to a decrease in fees as net outflows of assets increase, and therefore, result in lower fee income.  Furthermore, sales of assets to meet customer withdrawal demands could also result in losses, depending on market conditions. 



All of our ratings are subject to revision or withdrawal at any time by the rating agencies, and therefore, no assurance can be given that we can maintain these ratings.  See “Item 1. Business – Financial Strength Ratings” and “Liquidity and Capital Resources – Sources of Liquidity and Cash Flow” in the MNA for a description of our ratings.



Certain blocks of our insurance business purchased from third-party insurers under indemnity reinsurance agreements may require us to place assets in trust, secure letters of credit or return the business, if the financial strength ratings and/or capital ratios of us or LLANY are not maintained at specified levels.



Under certain indemnity reinsurance agreements, we and LLANY, provide 100% indemnity reinsurance for the business assumed; however, the third-party insurer, or the “cedent,” remains primarily liable on the underlying insurance businessUnder these types of agreements, as of December 31, 2017, we held statutory reserves of $5.6 billionThese indemnity reinsurance arrangements require that we, as the reinsurer, maintain certain insurer financial strength ratings and capital ratiosIf these ratings or capital ratios are not maintained, depending upon the reinsurance agreement, the cedent may recapture the business, or require us to place assets in trust or provide LOCs at least equal to the relevant statutory reservesUnder our reinsurance arrangement, we held approximately $3.3 billion of statutory reserves.  We must maintain an A.M.  Best financial strength rating of at least B++, an S&P financial strength rating of at least BBB- and a Moody’s financial strength rating of at least Baa3This arrangement may require us to place assets in trust equal to the relevant statutory reservesUnder LLANY’s largest indemnity reinsurance arrangement, we held approximately $1.5 billion of statutory reserves as of December 31, 2017.  LLANY must maintain an A.M.  Best financial strength rating of at least B+, an S&P financial strength rating of at least BB+ and a Moody’s financial strength rating of at least Ba1, as well as maintain an RBC ratio of at least 160% or an S&P capital adequacy ratio of 100%, or the cedent may recapture the businessUnder two other LLANY arrangements, by which we established $739 million of statutory reserves, LLANY must maintain an A.M.  Best financial strength rating of at least B++, an S&P financial strength rating of at least BBB- and a Moody’s financial strength rating of at least Baa3One of these arrangements also requires LLANY to maintain an RBC ratio of at least 185% or an S&P capital adequacy ratio of 115%Each of these arrangements may require

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LLANY to place assets in trust equal to the relevant statutory reservesAs of December 31, 2017,  our and LLANY’s RBC ratios exceeded the required ratioSee “Item 1Business – Financial Strength Ratings” for a description of our financial strength ratings.



If the cedent recaptured the business, we and LLANY would be required to release reserves and transfer assets to the cedentSuch a recapture could adversely impact our future profitsAlternatively, if we and LLANY established a security trust for the cedent, the ability to transfer assets out of the trust could be severely restricted, thus negatively impacting our liquidity.



Investments



Some of our investments are relatively illiquid and are in asset classes that have been experiencing significant market valuation fluctuations.



We hold certain investments that may lack liquidity, such as privately placed fixed maturity securities, mortgage loans, policy loans and other limited partnership interestsThese asset classes represented 26% of the carrying value of our total cash and invested assets as of December 31, 2017.



If we require significant amounts of cash on short notice in excess of normal cash requirements or are required to post or return collateral in connection with our investment portfolio, derivatives transactions or securities lending activities, we may have difficulty selling these investments in a timely manner, be forced to sell them for less than we otherwise would have been able to realize, or both.



The reported value of our relatively illiquid types of investments, our investments in the asset classes described in the paragraph above and, at times, our high quality, generally liquid asset classes, do not necessarily reflect the lowest current market price for the assetIf we were forced to sell certain of our assets in the current market, there can be no assurance that we would be able to sell them for the prices at which we have recorded them, and we might be forced to sell them at significantly lower prices.



We invest a portion of our invested assets in investment funds, many of which make private equity investmentsThe amount and timing of income from such investment funds tends to be uneven as a result of the performance of the underlying investments, including private equity investmentsThe timing of distributions from the funds, which depends on particular events relating to the underlying investments, as well as the funds’ schedules for making distributions and their needs for cash, can be difficult to predictAs a result, the amount of income that we record from these investments can vary substantially from quarter to quarter



Defaults on our mortgage loans and write-downs of mortgage equity may adversely affect our profitability.



Our mortgage loans face default risk and are principally collateralized by commercial propertiesThe performance of our mortgage loan investments may fluctuate in the futureIn addition, some of our mortgage loan investments have balloon payment maturitiesAn increase in the default rate of our mortgage loan investments could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial conditionFurther, any geographic or sector exposure in our mortgage loans may have adverse effects on our investment portfolios and consequently on our consolidated results of operations or financial conditionWhile we seek to mitigate this risk by having a broadly diversified portfolio, events or developments that have a negative effect on any particular geographic region or sector may have a greater adverse effect on the investment portfolios to the extent that the portfolios are exposed.



The difficulties faced by other financial institutions could adversely affect us.



We have exposure to many different industries and counterparties, and routinely execute transactions with counterparties in the financial services industry, including brokers and dealers, commercial banks, investment banks and other institutionsMany of these transactions expose us to credit risk in the event of default of our counterpartyIn addition, with respect to secured transactions, our credit risk may be exacerbated when the collateral held by us cannot be realized upon or is liquidated at prices not sufficient to recover the full amount of the related loan or derivative exposureWe also may have exposure to these financial institutions in the form of unsecured debt instruments, derivative transactions and/or equity investmentsThese parties may default on their obligations to us due to bankruptcy, lack of liquidity, downturns in the economy or real estate values, operational failure, corporate governance issues or other reasonsA downturn in the U.S. or other economies could result in increased impairmentsThere can be no assurance that any such losses or impairments to the carrying value of these assets would not materially and adversely affect our business and results of operations.



Our requirements to post collateral or make payments related to declines in market value of specified assets may adversely affect our liquidity and expose us to counterparty credit risk.



Many of our transactions with financial and other institutions, including settling futures positions, specify the circumstances under which the parties are required to post collateralThe amount of collateral we may be required to post under these agreements may increase under certain circumstances, which could adversely affect our liquidityIn addition, under the terms of some of our transactions, we may be required to make payments to our counterparties related to any decline in the market value of the specified assets.

26


 

Our investments are reflected within our consolidated financial statements utilizing different accounting bases, and, accordingly, there may be significant differences between cost and fair value that are not recorded in our consolidated financial statements.



Our principal investments are in fixed maturity and equity securities, mortgage loans on real estate, policy loans, short-term investments, derivative instruments, limited partnerships and other invested assetsThe carrying value of such investments is as follows:

 

·

Fixed maturity and equity securities are classified as AFS, except for those designated as trading securities, and are reported at their estimated fair valueThe difference between the estimated fair value and amortized cost of such securities (i.e., unrealized investment gains and losses) is recorded as a separate component of OCI, net of adjustments to DAC, contract holder related amounts and deferred income taxes;

·

Fixed maturity and equity securities designated as trading securities are recorded at fair value with subsequent changes in fair value recognized in realized gain (loss)However, in certain cases, the trading securities support reinsurance arrangements.  In those cases, offsetting the changes to fair value of the trading securities are corresponding changes in the fair value of the embedded derivative liability associated with the underlying reinsurance arrangementIn other words, the investment results for the trading securities, including gains and losses from sales, are passed directly to the reinsurers through the contractual terms of the reinsurance arrangementsThese types of securities represent 44% of our trading securities;

·

Short-term investments include investments with remaining maturities of one year or less, but greater than three months, at the time of acquisition and are stated at amortized cost, which approximates fair value;

·

Also, mortgage loans on real estate are carried at unpaid principal balances, adjusted for any unamortized premiums or discounts and deferred fees or expenses, net of valuation allowances;

·

Policy loans are carried at unpaid principal balances;

·

Real estate joint ventures and other limited partnership interests are carried using the equity method of accounting; and

·

Other invested assets consist principally of derivatives with positive fair valuesDerivatives are carried at fair value with changes in fair value reflected in income from non-qualifying derivatives and derivatives in fair value hedging relationshipsDerivatives in cash flow hedging relationships are reflected as a separate component of OCI.



Investments not carried at fair value on our consolidated financial statements, principally, mortgage loans, policy loans and real estate, may have fair values that are substantially higher or lower than the carrying value reflected on our consolidated financial statementsIn addition, unrealized losses are not reflected in net income unless we realize the losses by either selling the security at below amortized cost or determine that the decline in fair value is deemed to be other-than-temporary (i.e., impaired)Each of such asset classes is regularly evaluated for impairment under the accounting guidance appropriate to the respective asset class.



Competition



Intense competition could negatively affect our ability to maintain or increase our profitability.



Our businesses are intensely competitiveWe compete based on a number of factors, including name recognition, service, the quality of investment advice, investment performance, product features, price and perceived financial strength and claims-paying ratings.  Our competitors include insurers, broker-dealers, investment advisors, asset managers, hedge funds and other financial institutionsA number of our business units face competitors that have greater market share, offer a broader range of products or have higher financial strength ratings than we do.



In recent years, there has been consolidation and convergence among companies in the financial services industry resulting in increased competition from large, well-capitalized financial services firmsMany of these firms also have been able to increase their distribution systems through mergers or contractual arrangementsFurthermore, larger competitors may have lower operating costs and an ability to absorb greater risk while maintaining their financial strength ratings, thereby allowing them to price their products more competitively



Our sales representatives are not captive and may sell products of our competitors.



We sell our annuity and life insurance products through independent sales representativesThese representatives are not captive, which means they may also sell our competitors’ productsIf our competitors offer products that are more attractive than ours, or pay higher commission rates to the sales representatives than we do, these representatives may concentrate their efforts in selling our competitors’ products instead of ours.

27


 

Item 1B.  Unresolved Staff Comments



None.



Item 2.  Properties



Our principal executive office is currently located in Fort Wayne, Indiana.  LNL or our subsidiaries own or lease approximately 2.5 million square feet of office and other space.  Space that is owned or leased includes office space in: (i) Fort Wayne, Indiana, primarily for our Annuities and Retirement Plan Services segments; (ii) Greensboro, North Carolina, primarily for our Life Insurance segment; Omaha, Nebraska and Atlanta, Georgia, primarily for our Group Protection segment.  A subsidiary of LNC, our Parent Company, leases space in: (i) Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, which includes space for LFN; and (ii) Radnor, Pennsylvania for the corporate center and for LFD.  Additional office space is owned or leased in other U.S. cities for branch offices.  For information on the expense related to our leased space, see Note 13.  This discussion regarding properties does not include information on field offices and investment properties.



Item 3Legal Proceedings



For information regarding legal proceedings, see “Regulatory and Litigation Matters” in Note 13, which is incorporated herein by reference.



Item 4.  Mine Safety Disclosures



Not applicable.











28


 

PART II



Item 5.  Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

(a)    Stock Market and Dividend Information

 

All of our outstanding common stock is owned by LNC.  There is no established public trading market for our common stock.  For discussion regarding The Lincoln National Life Insurance Company’s payment of dividends and restrictions on dividends, see Notes 14 and 19 in the accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements presented in “Item 8.  Financial Statements and Supplementary Data,” as well as in “Part I – Item 1.  Business – Regulatory – Insurance Regulation – Restrictions on Dividends and Other Payments.”







During the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, we paid dividends of $955 million and $949 million, respectively.  We expect that we could pay dividends of approximately $1.2 billion in 2018 without prior approval from the respective state commissioners.



(b)    Not Applicable

 

(c)    Not Applicable



Item 6.  Selected Financial Data



Item omitted.    

29


 

Item 7Management’s Narrative Analysis of the Results of Operations



The Lincoln National Life Insurance Company (“LNL”) and its subsidiaries are referred to collectively in this Form 10-K as the “Company,” “we,” “our” and “us.” LNL is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lincoln National Corporation (“LNC”).  Management’s narrative analysis of the results of operations (“MNA”)  in 2017 and 2016 compared with the immediately preceding year of LNL and its consolidated subsidiaries should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements (“Notes”) presented in “Part II – Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data,” as well as “Forward-Looking Statements – Cautionary Language,” “Part I – Item 1A Risk Factors,” “Part II – Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk” and the Company’s consolidated financial statements included elsewhere herein.



The Company’s consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with United States of America generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”), unless otherwise indicated.  See Note 1 for a discussion of GAAP.  Management’s narrative analysis is presented pursuant to General Instructions I(2) (a) of Form 10-K in lieu of Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.



See “Part I – Item 1 – Business” and Note 1 for a description of the business.



Operating revenues and income (loss) from operations are the financial performance measures we use to evaluate and assess the results of our segments.  Accordingly, we define and report operating revenues and income (loss) from operations by segment in Note 21.  Our management believes that operating revenues and income (loss) from operations explain the results of our ongoing businesses in a manner that allows for a better understanding of the underlying trends in our current businesses because the excluded items are unpredictable and not necessarily indicative of current operating fundamentals or future performance of the business segments, and, in many instances, decisions regarding these items do not necessarily relate to the operations of the individual segments.  In addition, we believe that our definitions of operating revenues and income (loss) from operations will provide readers with a more valuable measure of our performance because it better reveals trends in our business. 



FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS –  CAUTIONARY LANGUAGE



This Annual Report on Form 10-K, including “Risk Factors,” “Management’s Narrative Analysis of the Results of Operations” and “Business,” contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (“PSLRA”).  A forward-looking statement is a statement that is not a historical fact and, without limitation, includes any statement that may predict, forecast, indicate or imply future results, performance or achievements, and may contain words like: “believe,” “anticipate,” “expect,” “estimate,” “project,” “will,” “shall” and other words or phrases with similar meaning in connection with a discussion of future operating or financial performance.  In particular, these include statements relating to future actions, trends in our businesses, prospective services or products, future performance or financial results and the outcome of contingencies, such as legal proceedings.  We claim the protection afforded by the safe harbor for forward-looking statements provided by the PSLRA.



Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from the results contained in the forward-looking statements.  Risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to vary materially, some of which are described within the forward-looking statements, include, among others:



·

Deterioration in general economic and business conditions that may affect account values, investment results and claims experience;

·

Adverse capital and credit market conditions could affect our ability to raise capital, if necessary, and may cause us to realize impairments on investments;

·

Legislative, regulatory or tax changes that affect:  the cost of, or demand for, our subsidiaries’ products; our ability to conduct business; the impact of recently enacted U.S. federal tax reform legislation on our business, earnings and capital; and the effect of the Department of Labor’s (“DOL”) regulation defining fiduciary;

·

Actions taken by reinsurers to raise rates on in-force business;

·

Declines in or sustained low interest rates causing a reduction in investment income, the interest margins of our businesses, and demand for our products;

·

Rapidly increasing interest rates causing contract holders to surrender life insurance and annuity policies, thereby causing realized investment losses, and reduced hedge performance related to variable annuities;

·

The initiation of legal or regulatory proceedings against us, and the outcome of any legal or regulatory proceedings;

·

A decline in the equity markets causing a reduction in the sales of our subsidiaries’ products; a reduction of asset-based fees that we charge on various investment and insurance products; and an increase in liabilities related to guaranteed benefit features of our variable annuity products;

·

Changes in our assumptions related deferred acquisition costs or value of business acquired; (9) ineffectiveness of our risk management policies and procedures;

·

A deviation in actual experience regarding future persistency, mortality, morbidity, interest rates or equity market returns from the assumptions used in pricing our products;

·

Changes in accounting principles, practices or policies;

·

Lowering of one or more of our financial strength ratings;

·

Inability to protect our intellectual property rights or claims of infringement of the intellectual property rights of others;

30


 

·

Interruption in telecommunication, information technology or other operational systems or failure to safeguard the confidentiality or privacy of sensitive data on such systems from cyberattacks or other breaches of our data security systems;

·

The adequacy and collectability of reinsurance that we have purchased;

·

Acts of terrorism, a pandemic, war or other man-made and natural catastrophes that may adversely affect our businesses and the cost and availability of reinsurance;

·

Competitive conditions, including pricing pressures, new product offerings and the emergence of new competitors, that may affect the level of premiums and fees that our subsidiaries can charge for their products;

·

The unknown effect on our businesses resulting from evolving market preferences and the changing demographics of our client base;

·

Possible difficulties in executing, integrating and realizing projected results of acquisitions, divestitures and restructurings; and

·

The unanticipated loss of key management, financial planners or wholesalers.



We do not intend, and are under no obligation, to update any particular forward-looking statement included in this document.  See “Risk Factors” included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for a discussion of certain risks relating to our business and investment in our securities.



CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES



We have identified the accounting policies below as critical to the understanding of our results of operations and our financial condition.  In applying these critical accounting policies in preparing our financial statements, management must use critical assumptions, estimates and judgments concerning future results or other developments, including the likelihood, timing or amount of one or more future events.  Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.  On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our assumptions, estimates and judgments based upon historical experience and various other information that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances.  For a detailed discussion of other significant accounting policies, see Note 1.



DAC, VOBA, DSI and DFEL



Accounting for intangible assets requires numerous assumptions, such as estimates of expected future profitability for our operations and our ability to retain existing blocks of life and annuity business in forceOur accounting policies for deferred acquisition costs (“DAC”),  value of business acquired (“VOBA”),  deferred sales inducements (“DSI”) and deferred front-end loads (“DFEL”) affect the Annuities, Retirement Plan Services, Life Insurance and Group Protection segments



Deferrals



Qualifying deferrable acquisition expenses are recorded as an asset on our Consolidated Balance Sheets as DAC for products we sold during a period or VOBA for books of business we acquired during a period.  In addition, we defer costs associated with DSI and revenues associated with DFEL.  DSI increases interest credited and reduces income when amortized.  DFEL is a liability included within other contract holder funds on our Consolidated Balance Sheets, and when amortized, increases fee income on our Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss). 



We incur certain costs that can be capitalized in the acquisition of insurance contracts.  Only those costs incurred that result directly from and are essential to the successful acquisition of new or renewal insurance contracts may be capitalized as deferrable acquisition costs.  This determination of deferability must be made on a contract-level basis.  Some examples of acquisition costs that are subject to deferral include the following:



·

Employee, agent or broker commissions;

·

Wholesaler production bonuses;

·

Renewal commissions and bonuses to agents or brokers;

·

Medical and inspection fees;

·

Premium-related taxes and assessments; and

·

A portion of the salaries and benefits of certain employees involved in the underwriting, contract issuance and processing, medical and inspection and sales force contract selling functions.



All other acquisition-related costs, including costs incurred by the insurer for soliciting potential customers, market research, training, administration, management of distribution and underwriting functions, unsuccessful acquisition or renewal efforts and product development, are considered non-deferrable acquisition costs and must be expensed in the period incurred. 



In addition, the following indirect costs are considered non-deferrable acquisition costs and must be charged to expense in the period incurred: 



·

Administrative costs;

·

Rent;

·

Depreciation;

·

Occupancy costs;

31


 

·

Equipment costs (including data processing equipment dedicated to acquiring insurance contracts);

·

Trail commissions; and

·

Other general overhead.



Amortization



DAC for variable annuity and deferred fixed annuity contracts and universal life insurance (“UL”) and variable universal life insurance (“VUL”) policies is amortized over the lives of the contracts in relation to the incidence of estimated gross profits (“EGPs”) derived from the contracts.  Certain broker commissions or broker-dealer expenses that vary with and are related to sales of mutual fund products, respectively, are expensed as incurred rather than deferred and amortized.  For our traditional products, we amortize deferrable acquisition costs either on a straight-line basis or as a level percent of premium of the related contracts, depending on the block of business. 



EGPs vary based on a number of sources including policy persistency, mortality, fee income, investment margins, expense margins and realized gains and losses on investments, including assumptions about the expected level of credit-related losses.  Each of these sources of profit is, in turn, driven by other factors.  For example, assets under management and the spread between earned and credited rates drive investment margins; net amount at risk drives the level of cost of insurance charges and reinsurance premiums.  The level of separate account assets under management is driven by changes in the financial markets (equity and bond markets, hereafter referred to collectively as “equity markets”) and net flows.  Realized gains and losses on investments include amounts resulting from differences in the actual level of impairments and the levels assumed in calculating EGPs.



We generally amortize DAC, VOBA, DSI and DFEL in proportion to our EGPs for interest-sensitive products.  When actual gross profits are higher in the period than EGPs, we recognize more amortization than planned.  When actual gross profits are lower in the period than EGPs, we recognize less amortization than planned.  In a calendar year where the gross profits for a certain group of policies, or “cohorts,” are negative, our actuarial process limits, or floors, the amortization expense offset to zero.  For a discussion of the periods over which we amortize our DAC, VOBA, DSI and DFEL see “DAC, VOBA, DSI and DFEL” in Note 1.



Unlocking



We conduct our annual comprehensive review of the assumptions and projection models underlying the amortization of DAC, VOBA, DSI, DFEL, embedded derivatives and reserves for life insurance and annuity products in the third quarter of each year.  As a result of this review, we recorded unlocking on an annual basis that resulted in increases and decreases to the carrying values of these items.  See “DAC, VOBA, DSI and DFEL” in Note 1 for a detailed discussion of our unlocking process.



Details underlying the effect to income (loss) from continuing operations from unlocking (in millions) were as follows:









 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



For the Years Ended December 31,

 

 



2017

 

2016

 

2015

 

 

Income (loss) from operations:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annuities

$

31

 

$

(8

)

$

31

 

 

Retirement Plan Services

 

(1

)

 

(2

)

 

2

 

 

Life Insurance

 

(16

)

 

11

 

 

(111

)

 

Excluded realized gain (loss)

 

 -

 

 

(1

)

 -

(2

)

 

Income (loss) from continuing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

operations

$

14

 

$

 -

 

$

(80

)

 



Unlocking was driven primarily by the following:



2017



·

For Annuities, we updated our policyholder behavior and separate account fees assumptions and other items, partially offset by updating our interest rate assumptions.

·

For Retirement Plan Services, we updated our interest rate and separate account fees assumptions, partially offset by updating our maintenance expense assumptions and other items.

·

For Life Insurance, we updated our mortality margin and interest rate assumptions, partially offset by updating our policyholder behavior, morbidity and maintenance expense assumptions and other items.



2016



·

For Annuities, we updated our capital markets and interest rate assumptions and other items, partially offset by updating our policyholder behavior assumptions.

·

For Retirement Plan Services, we updated our policyholder behavior, capital markets and interest rate assumptions, partially offset by updating other items.

32


 

·

For Life Insurance, we updated certain in-force policy charges, maintenance expense assumptions and other items, partially offset by updating our interest rate and mortality assumptions.



2015



As part of our annual comprehensive review in the third quarter of 2015, we lowered our long-term new money investment yield assumption to reflect the current new money rates and lower anticipated future interest rates.  This reduction in the interest rate assumption resulted in resetting the path of new money investment rates, reflecting a gradual annual recovery over five years to a rate 50 basis points below our prior ultimate long-term assumption.  As a result of lowering the ultimate long-term assumption 50 basis points, we recorded unfavorable unlocking of $118 million, after-tax, for Life Insurance, $2 million, after-tax, for Annuities, and $1 million, after-tax, for Retirement Plan Services.



·

For Annuities, we updated our policyholder behavior and variable annuity expense assessments assumptions, partially offset by updating our capital markets and interest rate assumptions.

·

For Retirement Plan Services, we updated our policyholder behavior assumptions, substantially offset by updating our capital markets and interest rate assumptions and other items.

·

For Life Insurance, we updated our interest rate and mortality assumptions, partially offset by updating our premium persistency and policyholder behavior assumptions and other items.


Reversion to the Mean



Because returns within the variable sub-accounts (“variable funds”) have a significant effect on the value of variable annuity and VUL products and the fees earned on these accounts, EGPs could increase or decrease with movements in variable fund returns; therefore, significant and sustained changes in variable funds have had and could in the future have an effect on DAC, VOBA, DSI and DFEL amortization for our variable annuity, annuity-based 401(k) and VUL businesses.



As variable fund returns do not move in a systematic manner, we reset the baseline of account values from which EGPs are projected, which we refer to as our reversion to the mean (“RTM”) process.  Under our RTM process, on each valuation date, future EGPs are projected using stochastic modeling of a large number of market scenarios in conjunction with best estimates of lapse rates, interest rate spreads and mortality to develop a statistical distribution of the present value of future EGPs for our variable annuity, annuity-based 401(k) and VUL blocks of business.  Because variable fund returns are unpredictable, the underlying premise of this process is that best estimate projections of future EGPs need not be affected by random short-term and insignificant deviations from expectations in variable fund returns.  However, long-term or significant deviations from expected variable fund returns require a change to best estimate projections of EGPs and unlocking of DAC, VOBA, DSI, DFEL and changes in future contract benefits.  The statistical distribution is designed to identify when the deviations from expected returns have become significant enough to warrant a change of the future variable fund growth rate assumption. 



The stochastic modeling performed for our variable annuity blocks of business as described above is used to develop a range of reasonably possible future EGPs.  We compare the range of the present value of the future EGPs from the stochastic modeling to that used in our amortization model.  A set of intervals around the mean of these scenarios is utilized to calculate two separate statistical ranges of reasonably possible EGPs.  These intervals are then compared to the present value of the EGPs used in the amortization model.  If the present value of EGPs utilized for amortization were to exceed the reasonable range of statistically calculated EGPs, a revision of the EGPs used to calculate amortization would be considered.  If a revision is deemed necessary, future EGPs would be re-projected using the current account values at the end of the period during which the revision occurred along with a long-term variable fund growth rate assumption such that the re-projected EGPs would be our best estimate of EGPs.



Our practice is not necessarily to unlock immediately after exceeding the first of the two statistical ranges, but, rather, if we stay between the first and second statistical range for several quarters, we would likely unlock.  Additionally, if we exceed the ranges as a result of a short-term market reaction, we would not necessarily unlock.  However, if the second statistical range is exceeded for more than one quarter, it is likely that we would unlock.  While this approach reduces adjustments to DAC, VOBA, DSI and DFEL due to short-term fluctuations, significant changes in variable fund returns that extend beyond one or two quarters could result in a significant favorable or unfavorable unlocking.  Notwithstanding these intervals, if a severe decline or increase in variable fund values were to occur or should other circumstances suggest that the present value of future EGPs no longer represents our best estimate, we could determine that a revision of the EGPs is necessary.



Our long-term variable fund growth rate assumption, which is used in the determination of DAC, VOBA, DSI and DFEL amortization for the variable component of our variable annuity and VUL products, is an immediate drop of approximately 10% followed by growth going forward of 6.5% to 8.25% depending on the block of business and reflecting differences in contract holder fund allocations between fixed-income and equity-type investmentsIf we had unlocked our RTM assumption as of December 31, 2017, we would have recorded a favorable unlocking of approximately $240 million, pre-tax, for Annuities, approximately $45 million, pre-tax, for Life Insurance and approximately $30 million, pre-tax, for Retirement Plan Services

33


 

Investments



Invested assets are an integral part of our operations, and we invest in fixed maturity and equity securities that are primarily classified as available-for-sale and carried at fair value with the difference from amortized cost included in stockholder’s equity as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income.



Investment Valuation



Our measurement of fair value is based on assumptions used by market participants in pricing the asset or liability, which may include inherent risk, restrictions on the sale or use of an asset or non-performance risk (“NPR”), which would include our own credit risk.  Our estimate of an exchange price is the price in an orderly transaction between market participants to sell the asset or transfer the liability (“exit price”) in the principal market, or the most advantageous market in the absence of a principal market, for that asset or liability, as opposed to the price that would be paid to acquire the asset or receive a liability (“entry price”).  We categorize our financial instruments carried at fair value into a three-level fair value hierarchy, based on the priority of inputs to the respective valuation technique.  The three-level hierarchy for fair value measurement is defined in Note 1.



For the categories and associated fair value of our available-for-sale (“AFS”) fixed maturity securities classified within Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy as of December 31, 2017 and 2016, see Notes 1 and 20. 



Our investments are valued using the appropriate market inputs based on the investment type, and include benchmark yields, reported trades, broker-dealer quotes, issuer spreads, two-sided markets, benchmark securities, bids, offers and reference dataIn addition, market indicators and industry and economic events are monitored, and further market data is acquired if certain triggers are met.  We incorporate the issuer’s credit rating and a risk premium, if warranted, given the issuer’s industry and the security’s time to maturityWe use an internationally recognized pricing service as our primary pricing source, and we do not adjust prices received from third parties or obtain multiple prices when measuring the fair value of our investmentsWe generally use prices from the pricing service rather than broker quotes because we have documentation from the pricing service on the observable market inputs they use, as compared to the limited information on the pricing inputs from broker quotes.  For private placement securities, we use pricing matrices that utilize observable pricing inputs of similar public securities and Treasury yields as inputs to the fair value measurementIt is possible that different valuation techniques and models, other than those described above, could produce materially different estimates of fair value



When the volume and level of activity for an asset or liability has significantly decreased in relation to normal market activity for the asset or liability, we believe that the market is not active.  Activities that may indicate a market is not active include fewer recent transactions in the market, price quotations that lack current information and/or vary substantially over time or among market makers, limited public information, uncorrelated indexes with recent fair values of assets and abnormally wide bid-ask spreadAs of December 31, 2017, we evaluated the markets that our securities trade in and concluded that none were inactiveWe will continue to re-evaluate this conclusion, as needed, based on market conditions.



We use unobservable inputs to measure the fair value of securities trading in less liquid or illiquid markets with limited or no pricing informationWe obtain broker quotes for securities such as synthetic convertibles, index-linked certificates of deposit and collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”) when sufficient security structure or other market information is not available to produce an evaluationFor broker-quoted only securities, non-binding quotes from market makers or broker-dealers are obtained from sources recognized as market participantsBroker-quoted securities are based solely on receipt of updated quotes from a single market maker or a broker-dealer recognized as a market participantOur broker-quoted only securities are generally classified as Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy



In order to validate the pricing information and broker quotes, we employ, where possible, procedures that include comparisons with similar observable positions, comparisons with subsequent sales and observations of general market movements for those security classesOur primary third-party pricing service has policies and processes to ensure that it is using objectively verifiable observable market dataThe pricing service regularly reviews the evaluation inputs for securities covered, including broker quotes, executed trades and credit information, as applicableIf the pricing service determines it does not have sufficient objectively verifiable information about a security’s valuation, it discontinues providing a valuation for the securityThe pricing service regularly publishes and updates a summary of inputs used in its valuations by major security typeIn addition, we have policies and procedures in place to review the process that is utilized by the third-party pricing service and the output that is provided to us by the pricing serviceOn a periodic basis, we test the pricing for a sample of securities to evaluate the inputs and assumptions used by the pricing service, and we perform a comparison of the pricing service output to an alternative pricing sourceIn addition, we check prices provided by our primary pricing service to ensure that they are not stale or unreasonable by reviewing the prices for unusual changes from period to period based on certain parameters or for lack of change from one period to the nextIf such anomalies in the pricing are observed, we may use pricing information from another pricing source



Valuation of Alternative Investments



Recognition of investment income on alternative investments is delayed due to the availability of the related financial statements, which are generally obtained from the partnerships’ general partners, as our venture capital, real estate and oil and gas portfolios are generally reported to us on a three-month delay, and our hedge funds are reported to us on a one-month delayIn addition, the effect of annual audit adjustments related to completion of calendar-year financial statement audits of the investees are typically received during the first or second quarter of each calendar yearAccordingly, our investment income from alternative investments for any calendar year period

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may not include the complete effect of the change in the underlying net assets for the partnership for that calendar year periodRecorded audit adjustments affect our investment income on alternative investments in the period that the adjustments are recorded



Write-Downs for OTTI and Allowance for Losses



We regularly review our AFS securities for declines in fair value that we determine to be other-than-temporaryFor additional details, see Notes 1 and 5.



For certain securitized fixed maturity securities with contractual cash flows, including asset-backed securities (“ABS”), we use our best estimate of cash flows for the life of the security to determine whether there is an other-than-temporary impairment (“OTTI”) of the securityIn addition, we review for other indicators of impairment as required by the Investments – Debt and Equity Securities Topic of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards CodificationTM (“ASC”).



As the discussion in Notes 1 and 5 indicates, there are risks and uncertainties associated with determining whether declines in the fair value of investments are other-than-temporaryThese include subsequent significant changes in general overall economic conditions, as well as specific business conditions affecting particular issuers, future financial market effects such as interest rate spreads, stability of foreign governments and economies, future rating agency actions and significant accounting, fraud or corporate governance issues that may adversely affect certain investmentsIn addition, there are often significant estimates and assumptions that we use to estimate the fair values of securities as described in “Investment Valuation.”  We continually monitor developments and update underlying assumptions and financial models based upon new information

 

Write-downs and allowances for losses on select mortgage loans, real estate and other investments are established when the underlying value of the property is deemed to be less than the carrying valueAll mortgage loans that are impaired have an established allowance for credit lossChanging economic conditions affect our valuation of mortgage loansIncreasing vacancies, declining rents and the like are incorporated into the discounted cash flow analysis that we perform for monitored loans and may contribute to the establishment of (or an increase in) an allowance for credit lossesIn addition, we continue to monitor the entire commercial mortgage loan portfolio to identify riskAreas of emphasis include properties that have deteriorating credits or have experienced debt-service coverage and/or loan-to-value reductionWhere warranted, we have established or increased loss reserves based upon this analysis



For more information about the valuation of our financial instruments carried at fair value, see “Investment Valuation” above and Note 20.



Derivatives



We maintain an overall risk management strategy that incorporates the use of derivative instruments to minimize significant unplanned fluctuations in earnings that are caused by interest rate risk, foreign currency exchange risk, equity market risk, default risk, basis risk and credit riskAssessing the effectiveness of these hedging programs and evaluating the carrying values of the related derivatives often involve a variety of assumptions and estimatesOur accounting policies for derivatives and the potential effect on interest spreads in a falling rate environment are discussed in “Item 7AQuantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk,” Notes 1 and 6.    



We carry our derivative instruments at fair value, which we determine through valuation techniques or models that use market data inputs or independent broker quotationsThe fair values fluctuate from period to period due to the volatility of the valuation inputs, including but not limited to swap interest rates, interest and equity volatility and equity index levels, foreign currency forward and spot rates, credit spreads and correlations, some of which are significantly affected by economic conditionsThe effect to revenue is reported in realized gain (loss) and such amount along with the associated federal income taxes is excluded from income (loss) from operations of our segments



Certain of our variable annuity contracts reported within future contract benefits contain embedded derivatives that are carried at fair value on a recurring basis and are all classified as Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy, including our guaranteed living benefit (“GLB”) reserves embedded derivatives, a portion of which may be reported in either other assets or other liabilities.  These embedded derivatives are valued based on a stochastic projection of scenarios of the embedded derivative cash flowsThe scenario assumptions, at each valuation date, are those we view to be appropriate for a hypothetical market participant and include assumptions for capital markets, actuarial lapse, benefit utilization, mortality, risk margin, administrative expenses and a margin for profitIn addition, an NPR component is determined at each valuation date that reflects our risk of not fulfilling the obligations of the underlying liabilityThe spread for the NPR is added to the discount rates used in determining the fair value from the net cash flowsWe believe these assumptions are consistent with those that would be used by a market participant; however, as the related markets develop, we will continue to reassess our assumptionsIt is possible that different valuation techniques and assumptions could produce a materially different estimate of fair valueChanges in the fair value of these embedded derivatives result primarily from changes in market conditionsFor more information, see Notes 1 and 20.



GLB



We are exposed to selected risk and income statement volatility caused by changes in the equity markets, interest rates and market-implied volatilities associated with the Lincoln SmartSecurity® Advantage guaranteed withdrawal benefit (“GWB”) feature and our i4LIFE® Advantage and 4LATER® Advantage guaranteed income benefit (“GIB”) features that are available in our variable annuity products.  We have certain GLB variable annuity products with GWB and GIB features that are embedded derivatives.  Certain features of these

35


 

guarantees, notably our GIB, 4LATER®, Lincoln Lifetime IncomeSM Advantage and Lincoln Market SelectSM Advantage features, have elements of both insurance benefits accounted for under the Financial Services – Insurance – Claim Costs and Liabilities for Future Policy Benefits Subtopic of the FASB ASC (“benefit reserves”) and embedded derivative reserves.  We calculate the value of the embedded derivative reserve and the benefit reserve based on the specific characteristics of each GLB feature.  These GLB features are reinsured among various reinsurance counterparties on either a modified coinsurance (“Modco”) or coinsurance basis. 



We cede a portion of the GLB features to Lincoln National Reinsurance Company (Barbados) Limited (“LNBAR”) on a funds withheld Modco basis.  The funds withheld arrangement includes a dynamic hedging strategy designed to mitigate selected risk.  This dynamic hedging strategy utilizes options and total return swaps on U.S.-based equity indices, and futures on U.S.-based and international equity indices, as well as interest rate futures, interest rate swaps and currency futures.  The notional amounts of the underlying hedge instruments are such that the magnitude of the change in the value of the hedge instruments due to changes in equity markets, interest rates and implied volatilities is designed to offset the magnitude of the change in the GLB embedded derivative reserves and GLB benefit reserves assumed by LNBAR caused by changes in equity markets, as well as the change in GLB embedded derivative reserves caused by changes in interest rates and implied volatilities.



As part of the current hedging program, equity market, interest rate and market-implied volatility conditions are monitored on a daily basis.  The hedge positions are rebalanced based upon changes in these factors as needed.  While we actively manage our hedge positions, these positions may not completely offset changes in the fair value of embedded derivative reserves and benefit reserves caused by movements in these factors due to, among other things, differences in timing between when a market exposure changes and corresponding changes to the hedge positions, extreme swings in the equity markets, interest rates and market-implied volatilities, realized market volatility, contract holder behavior, divergence between the performance of the underlying funds and the hedging indices, divergence between the actual and expected performance of the hedge instruments or our ability to purchase hedging instruments at prices consistent with the desired risk and return trade-off.  The hedging results do not impact LNL due to the funds withheld arrangement with LNBAR, which causes the financial impact of the derivatives, as well as the cash flow activity, to be reflected on LNBAR.







Standard & Poor’s 500 Index® Benefits



Our indexed annuity and indexed universal life insurance (“IUL”) contracts permit the holder to elect a fixed interest rate return or a return where interest credited to the contracts is linked to the performance of the Standard & Poor’s (“S&P”) 500 Index® (“S&P 500”).  Contract holders may elect to rebalance among the various accounts within the product at renewal dates, either annually or biannually.  At the end of each 1-year or 2-year indexed term, we have the opportunity to re-price the indexed component by establishing different participation rates, caps, spreads or specified rates, subject to contractual guarantees.  We purchase S&P 500 options that are highly correlated to the portfolio allocation decisions of our contract holders, such that we are economically hedged with respect to equity returns for the current reset period.  The mark-to-market of the options held generally offsets the change in value of the embedded derivative within the indexed annuity, both of which are recorded as a component of realized gain (loss) on our Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss).  The Derivatives and Hedging and the Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures Topics of the FASB ASC require that we calculate fair values of index options we may purchase in the future to hedge contract holder index allocations in future reset periods.  These fair values represent an estimate of the cost of the options we will purchase in the future, discounted back to the date of the balance sheet, using current market indicators of volatility and interest rates.  Changes in the fair values of these liabilities are included as a component of realized gain (loss) on our Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss).  For information on our S&P 500 benefits hedging results, see our discussion in “Realized Gain (Loss)” below.



Future Contract Benefits and Other Contract Holder Obligations



Reserves



Reserves are the amounts that, with the additional premiums to be received and interest thereon compounded annually at certain assumed rates, are calculated to be sufficient to meet the various policy and contract obligations as they mature.  Establishing adequate reserves for our obligations to contract holders requires assumptions to be made regarding mortality and morbidity.  The applicable insurance laws under which insurance companies operate require that they report, as liabilities, policy reserves to meet future obligations on their outstanding contracts.  These laws specify that the reserves shall not be less than reserves calculated using certain specified mortality and morbidity tables, interest rates and methods of valuation.



The reserves reported in our consolidated financial statements contained herein are calculated in accordance with GAAP and differ from those specified by the laws of the various states and carried in our statutory financial statements.  These differences arise from the use of mortality and morbidity tables, interest, persistency and other assumptions that we believe to be more representative of the expected experience for these contracts than those required for statutory accounting purposes and from differences in actuarial reserving methods. 



The assumptions on which reserves are based are intended to represent an estimation of experience for the period that policy benefits are payable.  If actual experience is better than or equal to the assumptions, then reserves should be adequate to provide for future benefits and expenses.  If experience is worse than the assumptions, additional reserves may be required.  This would result in a charge to our net income during the period the increase in reserves occurred.  The key experience assumptions include mortality rates, policy persistency and interest rates.  We periodically review our experience and update our policy reserves for new issues and reserve for all claims incurred, as we believe appropriate.



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GDB



The reserves related to the guaranteed death benefits (“GDB”) features available in our variable annuity products are based on the application of a “benefit ratio” (the present value of total expected benefit payments over the life of the contract divided by the present value of total expected assessments over the life of the contract) to total variable annuity assessments received in the period.  The level and direction of the change in reserves will vary over time based on the emergence of the benefit ratio and the level of assessments associated with the variable annuity.  These GDB features are reinsured with LNBAR on a funds withheld coinsurance basis. 



Within the funds withheld arrangement, we utilize a delta hedging strategy for variable annuity products with a GDB feature, which uses futures on U.S.-based equity market indices to hedge against movements in equity markets.  The hedging strategy is designed to hedge LNBAR’s exposure to earnings volatility that results from equity market driven changes in the reserve for GDB contracts.  The hedging results do not impact LNL due to the funds withheld arrangement with LNBAR, which causes the financial impact of the derivatives, as well as the cash flow activity, to be reflected on LNBAR.



UL Products with Secondary Guarantees



We issue UL contracts where we provide a secondary guarantee to the contract holder.  The policy can remain in force, even if the base policy account value is zero, as long as contractual secondary guarantee requirements have been met.  The reserves related to UL products with secondary guarantees are based on the application of a benefit ratio the same as our GDB features, which are discussed above.  The level and direction of the change in reserves will vary over time based on the emergence of the benefit ratio and the level of assessments associated with the contracts.  For more discussion, see “Results of Life Insurance” below.



Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets



Goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite lives are not amortized, but are reviewed for impairment annually as of October 1 and more frequently if an event occurs or circumstances change that would more likely than not reduce the fair value of a reporting unit below its carrying value.  Intangibles that do not have indefinite lives are amortized over their estimated useful lives.  As discussed in Note 2, we early adopted Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2017-04, “Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment” during 2017, which eliminates the use of a two-step test in the evaluation of goodwill impairment.  As a result of our adoption of ASU 2017-04, we perform a quantitative goodwill impairment test where the fair value of the reporting unit is determined and compared to the carrying value of the reporting unit.  If the carrying value of the reporting unit exceeds the reporting unit’s fair value, goodwill is impaired and written down to the reporting unit’s fair value.  The results of one test on one reporting unit cannot subsidize the results of another reporting unit. 



For the purposes of the evaluation of the carrying value of goodwill, our reporting units (Annuities, Retirement Plan Services, Life

Insurance and Group Protection) correspond with our reporting segments.



The fair values of our reporting units are comprised of the value of in-force (i.e., existing) business and the value of new business.  Specifically, new business is representative of cash flows and profitability associated with policies or contracts we expect to issue in the future, reflecting our forecasts of future sales volume and product mix over a 10-year period.  To determine the values of in-force and new business, we use a discounted cash flows technique that applies a discount rate reflecting the market expected, weighted-average rate of return adjusted for the risk factors associated with operations to the projected future cash flows for each reporting unit.



As of October 1, 2017, we performed our annual quantitative goodwill impairment test for our reporting units.  As discussed in Note 2, our early adoption of ASU 2017-04 resulted in impairment of the Life Insurance reporting unit goodwill of $905 million during the fourth quarter of 2017 driven primarily from the impact of the December 22, 2017, enactment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Act”) that increased the carrying value of the Life Insurance reporting unit in excess of its fair value.  As of October 1, 2017, the fair value was well in excess of each reporting unit’s carrying value for Annuities, Retirement Plan Services and Group Protection.   



We apply significant judgment when determining the estimated fair value of our reporting units.  Factors that can influence the value of goodwill include the capital markets, competitive landscape, regulatory environment, consumer confidence and any items that can directly or indirectly affect new business future cash flows.  Factors that could affect production levels and profitability of new business include mix of new business, pricing changes, customer acceptance of our products and distribution strength.  Spread compression and related effects to profitability caused by lower interest rates affect the valuation of in-force business more significantly than the valuation of new business, as new business pricing assumptions reflect the current and anticipated future interest rate environment.  Estimates of fair value are inherently uncertain and represent only management’s reasonable expectation regarding future developments



Examples of unfavorable changes to assumptions or factors that could result in future impairment include, but are not limited to, the following:



·

Lower expectations for future sales levels or future sales profitability;

·

Higher discount rates on new business assumptions;

·

Weakened expectations for the ability to execute future reserve financing transactions for life insurance business over the long-term or expectations for significant increases in the associated costs;

·

Legislative, regulatory or tax changes that affect the cost of, or demand for, our subsidiaries’ products, the required amount of

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reserves and/or surplus, or otherwise affect our ability to conduct business, including changes to statutory reserve requirements or changes to risk-based capital (“RBC”) requirements; and

·

Valuations of significant mergers or acquisitions of companies or blocks of business that would provide relevant market-based inputs for our impairment assessment that could support less favorable conclusions regarding the estimated fair value of our reporting units.



Refer to Note 10 of our consolidated financial statements for goodwill and specifically identifiable intangible assets by segment.



Income Taxes



Management uses certain assumptions and estimates in determining the income taxes payable or refundable for the current year, the deferred income tax liabilities and assets for items recognized differently in its financial statements from amounts shown on its income tax returns and the federal income tax expense.  Determining these amounts requires analysis and interpretation of current tax laws and regulations.  Management exercises considerable judgment in evaluating the amount and timing of recognition of the resulting income tax liabilities and assets.  These judgments and estimates are re-evaluated on a continual basis as regulatory and business factors change.  Legislative changes to the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, modifications including the Tax Act, new regulations, administrative rulings or court decisions could increase or decrease our effective tax rate.



The application of GAAP requires us to evaluate the recoverability of our deferred tax assets and establish a valuation allowance, if necessary, to reduce our deferred tax asset to an amount that is more likely than not to be realizable.  Considerable judgment and the use of estimates are required in determining whether a valuation allowance is necessary, and if so, the amount of such valuation allowance.  In evaluating the need for a valuation allowance, we consider many factors, including:  the nature and character of the deferred tax assets and liabilities; taxable income in prior carryback years; future reversals of existing temporary differences; the length of time carryovers can be utilized; and any tax planning strategies we would employ to avoid a tax benefit from expiring unused.  Although realization is not assured, management believes it is more likely than not that the deferred tax assets, including our capital loss deferred tax asset, will be realized.  For additional information on our income taxes, see Note 7.



ACQUISITIONS AND DISPOSITIONS



For information about acquisitions and divestitures, see Notes 3 and 25.





RESULTS OF CONSOLIDATED OPERATIONS



Details underlying the consolidated results (in millions) were as follows:



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



For the Years Ended December 31,

 



2017

 

2016

 

2015

 

Net Income (Loss)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income (loss) from operations:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annuities

$

1,072

 

$

971

 

$

1,032

 

Retirement Plan Services

 

142

 

 

121

 

 

134

 

Life Insurance

 

522

 

 

464

 

 

296

 

Group Protection

 

103

 

 

65

 

 

42

 

Other Operations

 

(30

)

 

 -

 

 

(73

)

Excluded realized gain (loss), after-tax

 

(409

)

 

(450

)

 

(260

)

Gain (loss) on early extinguishment of debt, after-tax

 

(3

)

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

Income (loss) from reserve changes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(net of related amortization) on business

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sold through reinsurance, after-tax

 

 -

 

 

2

 

 

2

 

Net impact from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

 

1,526

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

Impairment of intangibles, after-tax

 

(905