Company Quick10K Filing
CareView Communications
Closing Price ($) Shares Out (MM) Market Cap ($MM)
$0.00 139 $-0
10-Q 2019-11-14 Quarter: 2019-09-30
10-Q 2019-08-14 Quarter: 2019-06-30
10-Q 2019-05-14 Quarter: 2019-03-31
10-K 2019-03-29 Annual: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-11-14 Quarter: 2018-09-30
10-Q 2018-08-14 Quarter: 2018-06-30
10-Q 2018-05-15 Quarter: 2018-03-31
10-K 2018-03-30 Annual: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-11-09 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-Q 2017-08-10 Quarter: 2017-06-30
10-Q 2017-05-15 Quarter: 2017-03-31
10-K 2017-03-31 Annual: 2016-12-31
10-Q 2016-11-14 Quarter: 2016-09-30
10-Q 2016-08-15 Quarter: 2016-06-30
10-Q 2016-05-13 Quarter: 2016-03-31
10-K 2016-03-30 Annual: 2015-12-31
10-Q 2015-11-16 Quarter: 2015-09-30
10-Q 2015-08-14 Quarter: 2015-06-30
10-Q 2015-05-14 Quarter: 2015-03-31
10-K 2015-03-31 Annual: 2014-12-31
10-Q 2014-11-14 Quarter: 2014-09-30
10-Q 2014-08-14 Quarter: 2014-06-30
10-Q 2014-05-08 Quarter: 2014-03-31
10-K 2014-03-28 Annual: 2013-12-31
10-Q 2013-11-08 Quarter: 2013-09-30
10-Q 2013-08-09 Quarter: 2013-06-30
10-Q 2013-05-10 Quarter: 2013-03-31
10-K 2013-04-01 Annual: 2012-12-31
10-Q 2012-11-08 Quarter: 2012-09-30
10-Q 2012-08-08 Quarter: 2012-06-30
10-Q 2012-05-09 Quarter: 2012-03-31
10-K 2012-03-15 Annual: 2011-12-31
10-Q 2011-11-14 Quarter: 2011-09-30
10-Q 2011-08-22 Quarter: 2011-06-30
10-Q 2011-05-13 Quarter: 2011-03-31
10-K 2011-04-15 Annual: 2010-12-31
10-Q 2010-11-15 Quarter: 2010-09-30
8-K 2019-11-29 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2019-09-30 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2019-06-26 Amend Bylaw, Exhibits
8-K 2019-05-14 Enter Agreement, Off-BS Arrangement, Sale of Shares, Amend Bylaw, Shareholder Vote, Exhibits
8-K 2019-04-29 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2019-04-11 Amend Bylaw
8-K 2019-04-09 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2019-03-27 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2019-02-28 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2019-01-31 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-12-17 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-12-03 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-11-19 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-11-12 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-09-28 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-31 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-07-13 Enter Agreement, Off-BS Arrangement, Sale of Shares, Exhibits
8-K 2018-07-10 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-06-28 Enter Agreement, Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2018-06-14 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-05-31 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-02-23 Enter Agreement, Off-BS Arrangement, Sale of Shares, Exhibits
8-K 2018-02-02 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-01-24 Officers
8-K 2017-12-31 Officers, Exhibits
CRVW 2019-09-30
Note 1 – Basis of Presentation and Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements
Note 2 – Going Concern, Liquidity and Management’S Plan
Note 3 – Stockholders’ Equity
Note 4 – Other Current Assets
Note 5 – Property and Equipment
Note 6 – Other Assets
Note 7 – Other Current Liabilities
Note 8 – Income Taxes
Note 9 – Agreement with Pdl Biopharma, Inc.
Note 10 – Agreement with Healthcor
Note 11 – Joint Venture Agreement
Item 1. Legal Proceedings.
Item 1A. Risk Factors.
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities.
Item 6. Exhibits.
EX-31.1 ex31-1.htm
EX-31.2 ex31-2.htm
EX-32 ex32.htm

CareView Communications Earnings 2019-09-30

CRVW 10Q Quarterly Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

Comparables ($MM TTM)
Ticker M Cap Assets Liab Rev G Profit Net Inc EBITDA EV G Margin EV/EBITDA ROA
CNHC 12,949 11,626 877 0 149 771 5,714 0% 7.4 1%
RMES 1 1 0 0 -0 -0 -0 0.5 -13%
TCT 210 12 13 0 11 11 -200 0% -18.3 5%
VDI 1,766 1,288 779 0 465 632 222 0% 0.4 26%
POYE 0 0 0 0 -0 -0 -0 0.0 -1,973%
SCTF 0 0 0 0 -0 -0 -0 3.0 -33%
SEK 302,033 283,794 0 0 0 0 -0 0%
DAVEY 570 398 1,095 98 32 97 161 9% 1.7 6%
SLDV 25 6 2 0 13 19 -1 0% -0.0 53%
MBCC 216 243 112 0 -7 10 215 0% 21.5 -3%

10-Q 1 crvw-10q_093019.htm QUARTERLY REPORT crvw-10q_093019.htm

 

 

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One) 

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2019

 

or

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from________ to ___________

 

Commission File No. 000-54090

 

CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. 

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada

 

95-4659068

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

405 State Highway 121, Suite B-240, Lewisville, TX 75067

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(972) 943-6050

(Registrant’s telephone number)

 

N/A 

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: None

 

          Title of each class

 

  Trading Symbol

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☑ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes ☑ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

 

Large accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

 

Non-accelerated filer

Smaller reporting company

 

 

 

Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). 

Yes ☐ No ☑

 

The number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of Common Stock as of November 14, 2019 was 139,380,748.

 

 

 

 

 

CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

INDEX

 

 

 

 

Page

PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item. 1

Financial Statements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of September 30, 2019 (Unaudited) and December 31, 2018

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Three and Nine Months Ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 (Unaudited)

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity (Unaudited)

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 (Unaudited)

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

7

 

 

 

 

 

Item 2.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

25

 

 

 

 

 

Item 3.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

32

 

 

 

 

 

Item 4.

Controls and Procedures

32

 

 

 

 

PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

Legal Proceedings

33

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

33

 

 

 

 

 

Item 2.

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

33

 

 

 

 

 

Item 3.

Defaults Upon Senior Securities

33

 

 

 

 

 

Item 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

33

 

 

 

 

 

Item 5.

Other Information

33

 

 

 

 

 

Item 6.

Exhibits

34

 

2  

 

 

CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

    September 30,     December 31,  
    2019     2018  
    (unaudited)      
ASSETS  
Current Assets:                
Cash and cash equivalents   $ 926,249     $ 1,200,725  
Accounts receivable     1,236,850       1,276,992  
Other current assets     1,463,085       1,408,426  
Total current assets     3,626,184       3,886,143  
                 
Property and equipment, net     2,100,775       2,486,666  
                 
Other Assets:                
Restricted cash           750,000  
Intangible assets, net     797,004       746,140  
Right to use asset     126,182        
Other assets, net     278,408       310,592  
Total other assets     1,201,594       1,806,732  
Total assets   $ 6,928,553     $ 8,179,541  
                 
 LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT  
Current Liabilities:                
Accounts payable   $ 349,557     $ 509,298  
Notes payable, current portion, net of debt costs of $92,102 and $0     20,271,684       15,513,786  
Right to use liability, current portion     134,313        
Other current liabilities     3,621,985       1,416,240  
      24,377,539       17,439,324  
                 
Long-term Liabilities:                
Senior secured convertible notes, net of debt discount and debt costs of $11,196,481 and $14,431,614, respectively     69,638,663       64,374,606  
Notes payable, net of debt costs of $0 and $815,062     200,000       4,184,938  
Total long-term liabilities     69,838,663       68,559,544  
Total liabilities     94,216,202       85,998,868  
                 
Commitments and Contingencies                
                 
Stockholders’ Deficit:                
Preferred stock - par value $0.001; 20,000,000 shares authorized; no shares issued and outstanding            
Common stock - par value $0.001; 500,000,000 shares authorized at September 30, 2019 and 300,000,000 shares authorized at December 31, 2018; 139,380,748 shares issued and outstanding at September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018     139,381       139,381  
Additional paid in capital     84,207,552       84,027,883  
Accumulated deficit     (171,634,582 )     (161,986,591 )
Total stockholders’ deficit     (87,287,649 )     (77,819,327 )
Total liabilities and stockholders’ deficit   $ 6,928,553     $ 8,179,541  

 

The accompanying footnotes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

3  

 

 

CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

FOR THE THREE AND NINE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2019 AND 2018

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 30,
2019

 

 

September 30,
2018

 

 

September 30,
2019

 

 

September 30,
2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenues, net

 

$

1,621,962

 

 

$

1,512,075

 

 

$

4,641,418

 

 

$

4,603,200

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Network operations

 

 

708,349

 

 

 

791,082

 

 

 

2,130,861

 

 

 

2,643,197

 

General and administration

 

 

625,987

 

 

 

769,320

 

 

 

2,095,181

 

 

 

2,468,741

 

Sales and marketing

 

 

94,760

 

 

 

68,458

 

 

 

233,578

 

 

 

298,274

 

Research and development

 

 

410,364

 

 

 

358,864

 

 

 

1,123,884

 

 

 

1,040,444

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

178,250

 

 

 

307,069

 

 

 

539,598

 

 

 

1,022,644

 

Total operating expense

 

 

2,017,710

 

 

 

2,294,793

 

 

 

6,123,102

 

 

 

7,473,300

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating loss

 

 

(395,748

)

 

 

(782,718

)

 

 

(1,481,684

)

 

 

(2,870,100

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other income and (expense)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense

 

 

(2,769,755

)

 

 

(2,438,627

)

 

 

(8,173,586

)

 

 

(9,707,423

)

Interest income

 

 

118

 

 

 

711

 

 

 

680

 

 

 

2,642

 

Other income

 

 

930

 

 

 

6,199

 

 

 

6,599

 

 

 

18,234

 

Total other income (expense)

 

 

(2,768,707

)

 

 

(2,431,717

)

 

 

(8,166,307

)

 

 

(9,686,547

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loss before taxes

 

 

(3,164,455

)

 

 

(3,214,435

)

 

 

(9,647,991

)

 

 

(12,556,647

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Provision for income taxes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(3,164,455

)

 

$

(3,214,435

)

 

$

(9,647,991

)

 

$

(12,556,647

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss per share

 

$

(0.02

)

 

$

(0.02

)

 

$

(0.07

)

 

$

(0.09

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average number of common shares outstanding, basic and diluted

 

 

139,380,748

 

 

 

139,380,748

 

 

 

139,380,748

 

 

 

139,380,748

 

 

The accompanying footnotes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

4  

 

 

CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN EQUITY

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Stock

 

 

Paid in

 

 

Accumulated

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shares

 

 

Amount

 

 

Capital

 

 

Deficit

 

 

Total

 

Balance, December 31, 2018

 

 

139,380,748

 

 

$

139,381

 

 

$

84,027,883

 

 

$

(161,986,591

)

 

$

(77,819,327

)

Options granted as compensation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

54,613

 

 

 

 

 

 

54,613

 

Beneficial conversion features for senior secured convertible notes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6,391

 

 

 

 

 

 

6,391

 

Net loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(3,075,763

)

 

 

(3,075,763

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance, March 31, 2019

 

 

139,380,748

 

 

 

139,381

 

 

 

84,088,887

 

 

 

(165,062,354

)

 

 

(80,834,086

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Options granted as compensation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

54,320

 

 

 

 

 

 

54,320

 

Beneficial conversion features for senior secured convertible notes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14,411

 

 

 

 

 

 

14,411

 

Net loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(3,407,773

)

 

 

(3,407,773

)

Balance, June 30, 2019

 

 

139,380,748

 

 

 

139,381

 

 

 

84,157,618

 

 

 

(168,470,127

)

 

 

(84,173,128

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Options granted as compensation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

49,933

 

 

 

 

 

 

49,933

 

Beneficial conversion features for senior secured convertible notes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(3,101,407

)

 

 

(3,101,407

)

Balance, September 30, 2019

 

 

139,380,748

 

 

$

139,381

 

 

$

84,207,551

 

 

$

(171,571,534

)

 

$

(87,224,602

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance, December 31, 2017

 

 

139,380,748

 

 

$

139,381

 

 

$

83,617,896

 

 

$

(145,908,741

)

 

$

(62,151,464

)

Options granted as compensation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

89,049

 

 

 

 

 

 

89,049

 

Beneficial conversion features for senior secured convertible notes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

31,784

 

 

 

 

 

 

31,784

 

Revaluation of Rockwell Holdings I, LLC warrant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13,814

 

 

 

 

 

 

13,814

 

Net loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(4,801,061

)

 

 

(4,801,061

)

Balance, March 31, 2018

 

 

139,380,748

 

 

 

139,381

 

 

 

83,752,543

 

 

 

(150,709,802

)

 

 

(66,817,878

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Options granted as compensation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

58,649

 

 

 

 

 

 

58,649

 

Beneficial conversion features for senior secured convertible notes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

32,777

 

 

 

 

 

 

32,777

 

Revaluation of Rockwell Holdings I, LLC warrant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(4,541,151

)

 

 

(4,541,151

)

Balance, June 30, 2018

 

 

139,380,748

 

 

 

139,381

 

 

 

83,843,969

 

 

 

(155,250,953

)

 

 

(71,267,603

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Options granted as compensation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

58,416

 

 

 

 

 

 

58,416

 

Beneficial conversion features for senior secured convertible notes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

33,801

 

 

 

 

 

 

33,801

 

Revaluation of Rockwell Holdings I, LLC warrant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(3,214,435

)

 

 

(3,214,435

)

Balance, September 30, 2018

 

 

139,380,748

 

 

$

139,381

 

 

$

83,936,186

 

 

$

(158,465,388

)

 

$

(74,389,821

)

 

The accompanying footnotes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

5  

 

 

CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

FOR THE NINE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2019 AND 2018

(Unaudited)

 

    Nine Months Ended  
    September 30,
2019
    September 30,
2018
 
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITES                
Net loss   $ (9,647,991 )   $ (12,556,647 )
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash flows used in operating activities:                
Depreciation     500,546       985,927  
Bad debt expense     (7,588 )      
Amortization of debt discount and debt costs     3,255,935       2,810,889  
Amortization of deferred installation costs     67,360       115,088  
Amortization of deferred debt issuance and debt financing costs     722,959       225,720  
Amortization of intangible assets     39,052       36,717  
Interest incurred and paid in kind     1,978,923       4,506,987  
Stock based compensation related to options granted     158,866       206,114  
Stock based costs related to warrants issued           13,814  
Loss on disposal of assets           6,725  
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:                
Accounts receivable     47,730     (111,788 )
Other current assets     (54,658 )     (846,750 )
Other assets     123,073       12,295  
Accounts payable     (159,741 )     162,357  
Other current liabilities     2,103,099       26,168  
Net cash flows used in operating activities     (872,435 )     (4,406,384 )
                 
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES                
Purchase of property and equipment     (114,654 )     (431,222 )
Payment for deferred installation costs     (47,472 )     (56,401 )
Patent, trademark and other intangible asset costs     (89,915 )     (101,758 )
Net cash flows used in investing activities     (252,041 )     (589,381 )
                 
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES                
Proceeds from senior secured convertible promissory notes     50,000       3,050,000  
Proceeds from promissory notes     200,000        
Repayment of notes payable     (150,000 )     (150,000 )
Net cash flows provided by financing activities     100,000       2,900,000  
                 
Decrease in cash     (1,024,476 )     (2,095,765 )
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash, beginning of period     1,950,725       4,566,392  
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash, end of period   $ 926,249     $ 2,470,627  
                 
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURES OF CASH FLOW INFORMATION:  
                 
Cash paid for interest   $ 150,000     $ 2,025,000  
                 
Cash paid for income taxes   $     $  
                 
SUPPLEMENTAL SCHEDULE OF NON-CASH FINANCING ACTIVITIES:  
                 
Beneficial conversion features for senior secured convertible notes   $ 20,802     $ 98,363  
                 
Revaluation of warrants for modification of loan   $     $ 13,814  

 

The accompanying footnotes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

6  

 

 

CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

NOTE 1 – BASIS OF PRESENTATION AND RECENTLY ISSUED ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

 

Interim Financial Statements

 

The accompanying unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements of CareView Communications, Inc. (“CareView”, the “Company”, “we”, “us” or “our”) have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America (“GAAP”) for interim financial information and with the instructions to Form 10-Q.  Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by GAAP for complete financial statements.  In the opinion of management, such financial statements include all adjustments (consisting solely of normal recurring adjustments) necessary for the fair statement of the financial information included herein in accordance with GAAP and the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”).  The balance sheet at December 31, 2018 has been derived from the audited consolidated financial statements at that date but does not include all of the information and footnotes required by GAAP for complete financial statements.  The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the period.  Actual results could differ from those estimates.  Results of operations for interim periods are not necessarily indicative of results for the full year.  The accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and related notes included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018 as filed with the SEC on March 29, 2019.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

We adopted Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 606 (“ASC 606”) on January 1, 2018 using the full retrospective transition method for recognizing revenue.  The adoption of ASC 606 represents a change in accounting principle that will more closely align revenue recognition with the delivery of our services to our customers and will provide financial statement readers with enhanced disclosures.  We have employed the practical expedient discussed in ASC 606-10-55-18 related to invoicing as we have the right to consideration from our customers in the amount that corresponds directly with the value to the customer of our performance completed to date and therefore we recognize revenue upon invoicing as further discussed below.  Further, for those customers for which we are required to collect sales taxes, we record such sales taxes on a net basis which has no effect on the amount of revenue or expenses recognized as the sales taxes are a flow through to the taxing authority.

 

In accordance with ASC 606, revenue is recognized when a customer obtains control of promised goods or services. The amount of revenue recognized reflects the consideration to which we expect to be entitled to receive in exchange for these goods or services. The provisions of ASC 606 include a five-step process by which we determine revenue recognition, depicting the transfer of goods or services to customers in amounts reflecting the payment to which we expect to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. ASC 606 requires us to apply the following steps: (1) identify the contract with the customer; (2) identify the performance obligations in the contract; (3) determine the transaction price; (4) allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract; and (5) recognize revenue when, or as, we satisfy the performance obligation.

 

We offer CareView’s services through a subscription-based contract with each healthcare facility for a standard term of three to five years and have determined we have one performance obligation for our services.  We begin to bill monthly subscription fees to the healthcare facility upon official acceptance of the CareView System by the healthcare facility which is when the service is initiated.  When services begin, the customer simultaneously receives the use and benefit of that service and we recognize the revenue over time based on the service completed to date as the amount invoiced each month. The contract requires the healthcare facility to pay us the subscription fee monthly.  During the term of the contract, we provide continuous monitoring of the CareView System and are required to maintain and service all CareView System equipment.  If the healthcare facility requires additional services, the contract is amended accordingly. The company evaluated the disaggregation criteria of ASC 606 and determine that based on the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of our service revenues, there were no material differences that merited further disaggregation as compared to the total revenue as reported in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations.

 

7  

 

 

CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

We defer and capitalize all costs associated with the installation of the CareView System into a healthcare facility until the CareView System is fully operational and accepted by the healthcare facility.  Installation costs are specifically identifiable based on the amounts we are charged from third party installers or directly identifiable labor hours incurred for each installation.  Upon acceptance, the associated costs are expensed on a straight-line basis over the life of the contract with the healthcare facility.  These costs are included in network operations on the accompanying consolidated statements of operations. The table below details the activity in these deferred installation costs during the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018.

 

 

 

Nine Months Ended
September 30,

 

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

Balance, beginning of period

 

$

134,686

 

 

$

215,548

 

Additions

 

 

47,472

 

 

 

56,401

 

Transfer to expense

 

 

(67,360

)

 

 

(115,088

)

Balance, end of period

 

$

114,798

 

 

$

156,861

 

 

From time to time, we enter into contracts with healthcare facilities wherein full payment of the contractual obligation is paid in advance (“PIA Contracts”).  The transaction is recorded as a contract liability in our consolidated financial statements, with revenue recorded and the contract liability reduced as services are provided under the contract.  The table below details this activity during the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018.

 

 

 

Nine Months Ended
September 30,

 

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

Balance, beginning of period

 

$

58,559

 

 

$

17,430

 

Additions

 

 

175,370

 

 

 

192,507

 

Transfer to revenue

 

 

(131,527

)

 

 

(107,535

)

Balance, end of period

 

$

102,402

 

 

$

102,402

 

 

Based on our contracts, we invoice customers once our performance obligations have been satisfied, at which point payment is unconditional.  Accordingly, except in the case of PIA Contracts as detailed above, our contracts do not give rise to contract assets or liabilities under ASC 606.  Accounts receivable are recorded when the right to consideration becomes unconditional and are reported accordingly on our consolidated financial statements.

 

8  

 

 

CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Accounting Standard Update 2016-02, Leases

 

Under Topic 842, operating lease expense is generally recognized evenly over the term of the lease. The Company has an operating lease primarily consisting of office space with remaining lease terms of 12 months. We adopted Accounting Standard Update (“ASU”) 2016-02, Leases using the cumulative effect transition method for all long-term operating leases as of January 1, 2019.  The cumulative impact of the adoption of ASU 2016-02 to the condensed consolidated balance sheet as of January 31, 2019 was as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

Right to Use Asset

 

$

236,959

 

Right to Use Liability-ST

 

$

166,955

 

Right to Use Liability-LT

 

$

83,477

 

 

The adoption of ASU 2016-02 did not result in an adjustment to retained earnings.  The adoption of ASU-2016-02 represents a change in accounting principle.

 

Earnings Per Share

 

We calculate earnings per share (“EPS”) in accordance with GAAP, which requires the computation and disclosure of two EPS amounts, basic and diluted.  Basic EPS is computed based on the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period.  Diluted EPS is computed based on the weighted average number of common shares outstanding plus all potentially dilutive common shares outstanding during the period under the treasury stock method.  Such potential dilutive common shares consist of stock options, warrants and convertible debt.  Potential common shares totaling approximately 157,000,000 and 189,000,000 at September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively, have been excluded from the diluted earnings per share calculation as they are anti-dilutive due to our reported net loss.

 

CareView Connect

 

CareView Connect is a platform consisting of several products and applications targeted at improving level of care and efficiency. We offer an array of wearable and stationary buttons that allow a resident to summon help either for an emergency or assistance, which can be anything from toileting help to assistance putting on their shoes. We offer a mobile app capable of delivering an alert to the caregiver and allows them document information around that alert. This allows for workflows and reports around the alerts, i.e. how long before the alert was handled, what was the cause of the alert, and if not acknowledged in a timely manner then escalate the alert to another individual or group. This ensures that every alert is responded to timely and is verifiable.

 

The decision as to how the Company will distribute CareView Connect has yet to be determined. Our options include direct sales to the end user, lease/buy purchase plans, or the Company may retain ownership and bill for monitoring services, or a combination of these options. Pending the final distribution decision, the equipment included in the CareView Connect product line is recorded as prepaid equipment on the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements. Once the distribution decision is made, the CareView Connect equipment will be transferred to inventory or deployable fixed assets as appropriate.

 

Recently Issued and Newly Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

 

Aside from the change noted in Leases above, there have been no material changes to our significant accounting policies as summarized in NOTE 2 of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018.  We do not expect that the adoption of any recent accounting pronouncements will have a material impact on our accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

9  

 

 

CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

NOTE 2 – GOING CONCERN, LIQUIDITY AND MANAGEMENT’S PLAN

 

Our cash position at September 30, 2019 was approximately $926,000.

 

Accounting standards require management to evaluate our ability to continue as a going concern for a period of one year subsequent to the date of the filing of this Form 10-Q (“evaluation period”). As such, we have evaluated if cash and cash equivalents on hand and cash generated through operating activities would be sufficient to sustain projected operating activities through November 14, 2020. We anticipate that our current resources, along with cash generated from operations, will not be sufficient to meet our cash requirements throughout the evaluation period, including funding anticipated losses and scheduled debt maturities. We expect to seek additional funds from a combination of dilutive and/or nondilutive financings in the future. Because such transactions have not been finalized, receipt of additional funding is not considered probable under current accounting standards. If we do not generate sufficient cash flows from operations and obtain sufficient funds when needed, we expect that we would scale back our operating plan by deferring or limiting some, or all, of our capital spending, reducing our spending on travel, and/or eliminating planned headcount additions, as well as other cost reductions to be determined. Because such contingency plans have not been finalized (the specifics would depend on the situation at the time), such actions also are not considered probable for purposes of current accounting standards. Because, under current accounting standards, neither future cash generated from operating activities, nor management’s contingency plans to mitigate the risk and extend cash resources through the evaluation period, are considered probable, substantial doubt is deemed to exist about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. As we continue to incur losses, our transition to profitability is dependent upon achieving a level of revenues adequate to support its cost structure. We may never achieve profitability, and unless and until doing so, we intend to fund future operations through additional dilutive or non-dilutive financings. There can be no assurances, however, that additional funding will be available on terms acceptable to us, if at all.

 

NOTE 3 – STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

Common Stock

 

On April 11, 2019 the Board of Directors of the Company approved an amendment (the “Charter Amendment”) to our Articles of Incorporation to increase the number of authorized shares of Common Stock, par value $0.001, from 300,000,000 shares to 500,000,000 shares. Subsequently, on May 14, 2019, the Charter Amendment was approved by written consent of the holders of 72,863,770 shares of our Common Stock, representing approximately 52% of our outstanding shares of Common Stock, in lieu of a special meeting.  The Charter Amendment was filed with the Secretary of State of the State of Nevada on, and effective as of, June 26, 2019.  Also, on April 11, 2019, the Board of Directors approved an amendment to the Company’s Bylaws to amend Section 8, Action Without a Meeting, to replace the wording of that section in its entirety.

 

Warrants to Purchase Common Stock of the Company

 

We use the Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing model (“Black-Scholes Model”) to determine the fair value of warrants to purchase Common Stock of the Company (“Warrants”).  The Black-Scholes Model is an acceptable model in accordance with the GAAP.  The Black-Scholes Model requires the use of a number of assumptions including volatility of the stock price, the weighted average risk-free interest rate, and the weighted average term of the Warrant.

 

The risk-free interest rate assumption is based upon observed interest rates on zero coupon U.S. Treasury bonds whose maturity period is appropriate for the term of the Warrants.  Estimated volatility is a measure of the amount by which our stock price is expected to fluctuate each year during the expected life of the award.  Our estimated volatility is an average of the historical volatility of our stock prices (and that of peer entities whose stock prices were publicly available) over a period equal to the expected life of the awards.  Where appropriate we used the historical volatility of peer entities due to the lack of sufficient historical data of our stock price during 2007-2009.

 

10  

 

CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Warrant Activity during the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2019

 

On May 15, 2019, we issued 250,000 ten-year Warrants (with a fair value of $4,000) at an exercise price of $0.03 per share to a director.

 

Warrant Activity during the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2018

 

On February 23, 2018, we issued an aggregate of 487,500 ten-year Warrants (with a fair value of $10,237) at an exercise price of $0.05 per share to certain directors and officers and 25,000 ten-year Warrants (with a fair value of $525) at an exercise price of $0.05 per share to an entity.

 

On March 31, 2018, 2,500,000 Warrants issued in connection with a private placement completed in April 2013 expired and the fair value of $11,157 was written off and recorded as expense on the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

On July 10, 2018, we entered into the Ninth Amendment to the HealthCor Purchase Agreement (the “Ninth Amendment”) with HealthCor, pursuant to which they agreed to amend the HealthCor Purchase Agreement and the 2011 HealthCor Notes canceling 11,782,859 Warrants associated with the HealthCor Purchase Agreement and the 2011 HealthCor Notes (see NOTE 10 for further details).

 

Options to Purchase Common Stock of the Company

 

During the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, no options to purchase our Common Stock were granted.  During the nine months ended September 30, 2019, 938,665 Options expired, and 40,000 Options were canceled.  During the nine months ended September 30, 2018, no Options were granted.  During the same nine-month period, 686,836 Options expired and 214,997 Options were canceled.

 

A summary of our stock option activity and related information follows:

 

 

 

Number of Shares Under Options

 

 

Weighted Average Exercise Price

 

 

Weighted
Average
Remaining
Contractual
Life

 

 

Aggregate Intrinsic Value

 

Balance at December 31, 2018

 

 

21,700,293

 

 

$

0.27

 

 

 

7.1

 

 

$

 

Expired

 

 

(938,665

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canceled

 

 

(40,000

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance at September 30, 2019

 

 

20,721,628

 

 

$

0.25

 

 

 

6.5

 

 

$

 

Vested and Exercisable at September 30, 2019

 

 

14,082,298

 

 

$

0.33

 

 

 

5.8

 

 

$

 

 

Share-based compensation expense for Options charged to our operating results for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 ($158,866 and $206,114, respectively) is based on awards vested.  The estimate of forfeitures are to be recorded at the time of grant and revised in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from the estimates.  We have not included an adjustment to our stock-based compensation expense based on the nominal amount of the historical forfeiture rate.  We do, however, revise our stock-based compensation expense based on actual forfeitures during each reporting period.

 

11  

 

 

CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

At September 30, 2019, total unrecognized estimated compensation expense related to non-vested Options granted prior to that date was approximately $107,000, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of 1 year.  No tax benefit was realized due to a continued pattern of operating losses.

 

NOTE 4 – OTHER CURRENT ASSETS

 

Other current assets consist of the following:

 

 

 

September 30,
2019

 

 

December 31, 2018

 

Prepaid equipment

 

$

1,283,309

 

 

$

1,327,156

 

Oher prepaid expenses

 

 

166,246

 

 

 

66,888

 

Other current assets

 

 

13,530

 

 

 

14,382

 

TOTAL OTHER CURRENT ASSETS

 

$

1,463,085

 

 

$

1,408,426

 

 

NOTE 5 – PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

 

Property and equipment consist of the following:

 

 

 

September 30,
2019

 

 

December 31, 2018

 

Network equipment

 

$

12,388,147

 

 

$

12,302,328

 

Office equipment

 

 

305,250

 

 

 

293,709

 

Vehicles

 

 

217,004

 

 

 

217,004

 

Test equipment

 

 

192,384

 

 

 

175,603

 

Furniture

 

 

91,341

 

 

 

90,827

 

Warehouse equipment

 

 

9,524

 

 

 

9,524

 

Leasehold improvements

 

 

5,121

 

 

 

5,121

 

 

 

 

13,208,771

 

 

 

13,094,116

 

Less: accumulated depreciation

 

 

(11,107,996

)

 

 

(10,607,450

)

TOTAL PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

 

$

2,100,775

 

 

$

2,486,666

 

 

Depreciation expense for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 was $500,546 and $985,927, respectively.

 

12  

 

CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

NOTE 6 – OTHER ASSETS

 

Intangible assets consist of the following:

 

 

 

September 30, 2019

 

 

 

Cost

 

 

Accumulated Amortization

 

 

Net

 

Patents and trademarks

 

$

1,022,064

 

 

$

229,448

 

 

$

792,616

 

Other intangible assets

 

 

63,509

 

 

 

59,121

 

 

 

4,388

 

TOTAL INTANGIBLE ASSETS

 

$

1,085,573

 

 

$

288,569

 

 

$

797,004

 

 

 

 

December 31, 2018

 

 

 

Cost

 

 

Accumulated Amortization

 

 

Net

 

Patents and trademarks

 

$

932,149

 

 

$

192,995

 

 

$

739,154

 

Other intangible assets

 

 

63,508

 

 

 

56,522

 

 

 

6,986

 

TOTAL INTANGIBLE ASSETS

 

$

995,657

 

 

$  

249,517

 

 

$

746,140

 

 

Other assets consist of the following:

 

 

 

September 30, 2019

 

 

 

Cost

 

 

Accumulated Amortization

 

 

Net

 

Deferred installation costs

 

$

1,857,886

 

 

$

1,743,088

 

 

$

114,798

 

Prepaid license fee

 

 

249,999

 

 

 

132,513

 

 

 

117,486

 

Security deposit

 

 

46,124

 

 

 

 

 

 

46,124

 

TOTAL OTHER ASSETS

 

$

2,154,009

 

 

$

1,875,601

 

 

$

278,408

 

 

Other assets consist of the following:

 

 

 

December 31, 2018

 

 

 

Cost

 

 

Accumulated Amortization

 

 

Net

 

Deferred installation costs

 

$

1,810,414

 

 

$

1,675,728

 

 

$

134,686

 

Prepaid license fee

 

 

249,999

 

 

 

120,217

 

 

 

129,782

 

Security deposit

 

 

46,124

 

 

 

 

 

 

46,124

 

TOTAL OTHER ASSETS

 

$

2,106,537

 

 

$

1,795,945

 

 

$

310,592

 

 

13  

 

 

CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

NOTE 7 – OTHER CURRENT LIABILITIES

 

Other current liabilities consist of the following:

 

 

 

September 30,
2019

 

 

December 31, 2018

 

Accrued interest

 

$

2,963,381

 

 

$

750,548

 

Deferred commission

 

 

139,041

 

 

 

117,206

 

Accrued paid time off

 

 

108,999

 

 

 

129,773

 

Deferred revenue

 

 

102,402

 

 

 

58,559

 

Allowance for system removal

 

 

101,100

 

 

 

236,650

 

Accrued insurance

 

 

77,440

 

 

 

 

Other accrued liabilities

 

 

64,860

 

 

 

31,568

 

Accrued taxes

 

 

64,763

 

 

 

23,156

 

Accrued rent expense

 

 

 

 

 

68,780

 

TOTAL OTHER CURRENT LIABILITIES

 

$

3,621,985

 

 

$

1,416,240

 

 

NOTE 8 – INCOME TAXES

 

Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are determined based upon differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities and are measured using the enacted tax rates and laws that will be in effect when the differences are expected to reverse.  We do not expect to pay any significant federal or state income tax for 2019 as a result of the losses recorded during the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and the additional losses expected for the remainder of 2019 and net operating loss carry forwards from prior years.  Accounting standards require the consideration of a valuation allowance for deferred tax assets if it is “more likely than not” that some component or all of the benefits of deferred tax assets will not be realized.  As of September 30, 2019, we maintained a full valuation allowance for all deferred tax assets.  Based on these requirements, no provision or benefit for income taxes has been recorded.  There were no recorded unrecognized tax benefits at the end of the reporting period.

 

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Act”) was signed into law on December 22, 2017. Among its numerous changes to the Internal Revenue Code, the Act reduces U.S. corporate rates from 35% to 21%. Additionally, the Act limits the use of net operating loss carry backs, however any future net operating losses will instead be carried forward indefinitely. Net operating losses generated from January 1, 2018 are limited to offset 80% of current income, with the remainder of the net operating loss continuing to carry forward indefinitely. Net operating losses incurred before January 1, 2018 are not subject to the 80% limitations and will begin to expire in 2029. Based on an initial assessment of the Act, the Company believes that the most significant impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements will be limitations in tax deductions on interest expense. Under the Act, interest deductions disallowed from current income will carryforward indefinitely. The Act did not impact management’s valuation allowance position.

 

NOTE 9 – AGREEMENT WITH PDL BIOPHARMA, INC.

 

On June 26, 2015, we entered into a Credit Agreement (as subsequently amended) with PDL BioPharma, Inc. (“PDL”), as administrative agent and lender (“the Lender”) (the “PDL Credit Agreement”).  Under the PDL Credit Agreement the Lender made available to us up to $40 million in two tranches of $20 million each.  Tranche One was funded on October 8, 2015 (the “Tranche One Loan’).  Pursuant to the terms of the PDL Credit Agreement and having not met the Tranche Two Milestones by July 26, 2017, the Tranche Two funding was terminated in full.

 

14  

 

 

CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

From October 8, 2015 through May 14, 2019, the outstanding borrowings under the Tranche One Loan bore interest at the rate of 13.5% per annum, payable quarterly.  On May 15, 2019, pursuant to the terms of the Fifth Amendment to the PDL Credit Agreement (see below for additional details), the interest increased to 15.5% per annum, payable quarterly.  Also, on May 15, 2019, pursuant to the terms of the Fourteenth Amendment to the PDL Modification Agreement (see below for additional details), the minimum cash balance requirement of $750,000 was reduced to $0.

 

On June 26, 2015, we issued Warrants to PDL for the purchase of an aggregate of 4,444,445 shares of our Common Stock at an exercise price of $0.45 per share (the “PDL Warrant”).

 

On October 7, 2015, we entered into a First Amendment to the PDL Credit Agreement (the “First Amendment”).  The First Amendment modified the conditions precedent to the funding of each tranche, such that, among other things, we no longer need to attain a specified milestone relating to the placement of our products in order for the Lender to fund us the Tranche One Loan.  Contemporaneously with the execution of the First Amendment we borrowed the Tranche One Loan and issued to the Lender a term note in the principal amount of $20 million (the “Tranche One Term Note”), payable in accordance with the terms of the PDL Credit Agreement, as amended.  On October 7, 2015, we also amended and restated the PDL Warrant changing the exercise price from $0.45 to $0.40 per share (the “Amended PDL Warrant”).  We evaluated whether there was an increase in fair value which would require recognition of additional costs.  No such increase in fair value was noted and no adjustment to the PDL Warrant valuation was necessary.

 

On December 28, 2017, the Company and PDL Investment Holdings, LLC (as assignee of PDL) (“PDL Investment”) entered into a Binding Forbearance Term Sheet (the “Forbearance Term Sheet”) in order to modify certain provisions of the PDL Credit Agreement to prevent any Events of Default from occurring on December 31, 2017.  This Forbearance Term Sheet was the governing document until February 2, 2018, at which time, the Company and PDL Investment entered into a Modification Agreement (the “PDL Modification Agreement”), effective December 28, 2017, with respect to the PDL Credit Agreement which reiterated the terms included in the Forbearance Term Sheet and effective February 2, 2018, entered into certain consents and amendments with respect to other existing agreements.  In accordance with GAAP, we accounted for this transaction as a debt modification, wherein consideration given to PDL was recorded as deferred closing costs and all third-party payments were considered an expense and recorded as such on the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements.  Details of the PDL Modification Agreement, as amended, are included in our Form 10-K filed with the SEC on March 29, 2019.

 

Pursuant to the terms of the PDL Modification Agreement, as amended, the first principal payment on the Tranche One Loan due on December 31, 2017 in the amount of $1,666,667, and similar principal payments due on March 31, 2018, June 30, 2018, September 30, 2018, December 31, 2018, March 31, 2019, June 30, 2019, and September 30, 2019 have been delayed and are included in the payment due on November 30, 2019 (see Fifteenth Amendment to the PDL Modification Agreement below for additional details).

 

In accordance with the PDL Credit Agreement, as amended, quarterly interest only payments of $675,000 for each of the first 12 interest payment dates (December 31, 2015 through September 30, 2018) were made timely. Pursuant to the terms of the PDL Modification Agreement, as amended, quarterly interest payments due on December 31, 2018, March 31, 2019, June 30, 2019, and September 30, 2019 have been delayed and are also included in the payment due on September 30, 2019 (see Fifteenth Amendment to the PDL Modification Agreement below for additional details).

 

The obligations under the PDL Credit Agreement, as modified, are secured by a pledge of substantially all of the assets of the Company and certain of its domestic subsidiaries.  We executed a Subordination and Intercreditor Agreement (the “Subordination and Intercreditor Agreement”), with the Lender, HealthCor, the 2015 Investors, the February 2018 Investors, the July 2018 Investors, and the 2019 Investor (as defined in NOTE 10) pursuant to which we granted first-priority liens on our pledged assets to the Lender and second-priority liens on such pledged assets to HealthCor, the 2015 Investors, the February 2018 Investors, the July 2018 Investors, and the 2019 Investor.

 

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CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

The PDL Credit Agreement, as modified, contains customary affirmative covenants for transactions of this type and other affirmative covenants agreed to by the Company and the Lender, including, among others, the provision of annual and quarterly reports, maintenance of property, insurance, compliance with laws and contractual obligations and payment of taxes.  The PDL Credit Agreement, as modified, contains customary negative covenants for transactions of this type and other negative covenants agreed to by the Company and the Lender, including, among others, restrictions on the incurrence of indebtedness, the granting of liens, making restricted payments and investments, entering into affiliate transactions and transferring assets.  The PDL Credit Agreement, as modified, calls for a reduction of our operating expenses compared to such expense incurred in October 2017 by at least (i) $113,000 for January 2018, (ii) $148,000 for February 2018 and (iii) $167,000 for each other month for the duration of the Modification Period (see Fourteenth Amendment to the PDL Modification Agreement below for additional details).  We are in compliance with this covenant as of the date of this filing.  The PDL Credit Agreement, as modified, also provides for a number of customary events of default, including payment, bankruptcy, covenant, representation and warranty and judgment defaults.

 

In addition, contemporaneously with the execution of the PDL Credit Agreement the Company and the Lender executed (i) a Registration Rights Agreement (as amended in the PDL Modification Agreement as discussed above) pursuant to which we agreed to provide the Lender with certain registration rights with respect to the shares of Common Stock issuable upon exercise of the PDL Warrant, (ii) a Guarantee and Collateral Agreement pursuant to which certain of our subsidiaries guaranteed the performance of our obligations under the PDL Credit Agreement, as modified, and granted the Lender a security interest in such subsidiaries’ tangible and intangible assets securing our performance of the same, and (iii) a Patent Security Agreement and a Trademark Security Agreement pursuant to which we granted the Lender a security interest in a certain subsidiary’s tangible and intangible assets securing the performance of our obligations under the PDL Credit Agreement, as modified.

 

On January 31, 2019, February 28, 2019, March 29, 2019 and April 29, 2019, the Company and Lender entered into the Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, and Thirteenth Amendments to the PDL Modification Agreement, as previously amended, respectively, pursuant to which the parties agreed to amend the PDL Modification Agreement to provide that (A) the dates on which the Lender may elect, in the Lender’s sole discretion, to terminate the Modification Period would be July 31, 2018 and, pursuant to the Thirteenth Amendment to the PDL Modification Agreement, May 15, 2019 (rather than January 31, February 28, March 31, and April 30, respectively) (with each such date permitted to be extended by the Lender in its sole discretion); (B) the Company could satisfy its obligations under the PDL Modification Agreement, as amended, to obtain financing by obtaining (a) at least $2,050,000 in net cash proceeds from the issuance of Capital Stock (other than Disqualified Capital Stock) or Debt on or prior to February 23, 2018 and (b) an additional (i) $750,000 in net cash proceeds from the issuance of Capital Stock (other than Disqualified Capital Stock) or Debt on or prior to July 13, 2018 and (ii) $750,000 in net cash proceeds from the issuance of Capital Stock (other than Disqualified Capital Stock) or Debt on or prior to May 15, 2019 (rather than January 31, February 28, March 31, and April 30, respectively) (resulting in aggregate net cash proceeds of at least $3,550,000); and (C) the Company’s quarterly interest payments that would otherwise have been due to Lender on December 31, 2018 and March 31, 2019 would be deferred until May 15, 2019 (the end of the extended Modification Period) and that such deferral would be a Covered Event.

 

On April 9, 2019, the Company, PDL Investment entered into a Fourth Amendment to PDL Credit Agreement (the “Fourth Amendment to the PDL Credit Agreement”), wherein the Company executed an Amended and Restated Tranche One Term Note in the principal amount of $20,000,000 to PDL Investments (the “Amended Tranche One Loan”), pursuant to which the parties agreed, among other things, to amend the note from registered to unregistered form.

 

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CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

On May 15, 2019, the Company, the Lender, Steven G. Johnson (our Chief Executive Officer, President, Secretary and Treasurer), individually, and Dr. James R. Higgins (a member of our board of directors), individually (Mr. Johnson and Dr. Higgins, collectively, the “Tranche Three Lenders”) entered into a Fifth Amendment to the PDL Credit Agreement (the “Fifth PDL Credit Agreement Amendment”), pursuant to which the parties agreed to amend the PDL Credit Agreement to, among other things, (i) provide for a new tranche of term loan in the aggregate principal amount of $200,000, from the Tranche Three Lenders, with a maturity date of October 7, 2020 and bearing interest at the rate of 15.5% per annum, payable quarterly in arrears (subject to the terms of the PDL Modification Agreement, as amended) (the “Tranche Three Loan”); (ii) increase the interest rate for outstanding borrowings under the Amended Tranche One Loan from 13.5% per annum to 15.5% per annum, payable quarterly in arrears (subject to the terms of the PDL Modification Agreement, as amended), effective May 15, 2019,; and (iii) provide for the issuance of the Twelfth Amendment Note, pursuant to the terms of the Twelfth Amendment to the HealthCor Agreement (see Note 10 for details).  Under the accounting standards, we determined that the restructuring of the Tranche One Loan resulted in a troubled debt restructuring. As the future cash flows were greater than the carrying amount of the debt at the date of the amendment, we accounted for the change prospectively using the new effective interest rate.  Also on May 15, 2019, upon the execution of the Fifth PDL Credit Agreement Amendment, (i) the Company sold and issued the Tranche Three Lenders term notes in the aggregate principal amount of $200,000, payable in accordance with the terms of the PDL Credit Agreement (the “Tranche Three Loans”), $150,000 from Mr. Johnson and $50,000 from Dr. Higgins, and (ii) the Company issued a warrant for the purchase of 250,000 shares of Common Stock, with an exercise price per share equal to $0.03 (subject to adjustment as described therein) and an expiration date of May 15, 2029 (the “Tranche Three Loan Warrant”), to Dr. Higgins in connection with his Tranche Three Loan. Mr. Johnson declined to be issued a Tranche Three Loan Warrant.

 

On May 15, 2019 the Company and the Lender entered into the Fourteenth Amendment to the PDL Modification Agreement (the “Fourteenth Amendment to the PDL Modification Agreement”), pursuant to which, in connection with the Twelfth Amendment to the HealthCor Purchase Agreement (see NOTE 10 for further details) and the Fifth Amendment to the PDL Credit Agreement, the parties agreed to amend the PDL Modification Agreement, as previously amended, to provide that (A) the dates on which the Lender may elect, in the Lender’s sole discretion, to terminate the Modification Period would be July 31, 2018 and September 30, 2019 (with each such date permitted to be extended by the Lender in its sole discretion); (B) the Borrower could satisfy its obligations under the PDL Modification Agreement, as amended, to obtain financing by obtaining (a) at least $2,050,000 in net cash proceeds from the issuance of Capital Stock (other than Disqualified Capital Stock) or Debt on or prior to February 23, 2018 and (b) an additional (i) $1,000,000 in net cash proceeds from the issuance of Capital Stock (other than Disqualified Capital Stock) or Debt on or prior to July 13, 2018 and (ii) $250,000 in net cash proceeds from the issuance of Capital Stock (other than Disqualified Capital Stock) or Debt on or prior to May 15, 2019 (resulting in aggregate net cash proceeds of at least $3,300,000); (C) the Liquidity required during the Modification Period would be lowered to $0 from $750,000; and (D) the Company’s interest payments that would otherwise be due to Lender on December 31, 2018, March 31, 2019 and June 30, 2019 would be deferred until September 30, 2019 (the end of the extended Modification Period) and that such deferrals would be a Covered Event.

 

On September 30, 2019, the Company, the Borrower, the Subsidiary Guarantor and the Lender entered into a Fifteenth Amendment to Modification Agreement (the “Fifteenth Modification Agreement Amendment”), pursuant to which the parties agreed to amend the Modification Agreement to provide that the dates on which the Lender may elect, in the Lender’s sole discretion, to terminate the Modification Period would be July 31, 2018 and November 30, 2019 (with each such date permitted to be extended by the Lender in its sole discretion); and that the Borrower’s interest payments that would otherwise be due to Lender on December 31, 2018, March 31, 2019, June 30, 2019, and September 30, 2019 would be deferred until November 30, 2019 (the end of the extended Modification Period) and that such deferrals would be a Covered Event.

 

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CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

The Company has evaluated the Fifteenth Amendment and as the effective borrowing rate under the restructured agreement is less than the effective borrowing rate on the old agreement, a concession is deemed to have been granted under ASC 470-60-55-10. As a concession has been granted, the agreement is to be accounted for as a troubled debt restructuring by debtors (TDR) under ASC 470-60.

 

Accounting Treatment

 

In connection with the PDL Credit Agreement, as amended, we issued the PDL Warrant to the Lender. The fair value of the PDL Warrant at issuance was $1,257,778, which has been recorded as deferred issuance costs in the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements. The deferred debt issuance and closing costs associated with the PDL Credit Agreement, as amended, have been presented as contra debt in accordance with the accounting standards. In December 2017, in connection with the PDL Modification Agreement, as amended, the Amended PDL Warrant was again amended (the “Second Amendment to the PDL Warrant’) resulting in an increase in fair value of $44,445, which was recorded as additional deferred debt issuance costs in the accompanying consolidated financial statements. As of September 30, 2019, the Amended PDL Warrant has not been exercised. At September 30, 2019, the outstanding balance of certain debt issuance and closing costs related to the PDL Credit Agreement totaling $92,102 was recorded as deferred closing costs in the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements. Historically, the deferred closing costs had been presented as other assets, as the costs were incurred prior the first draw down. The costs should have been reclassified as a direct deduction of the debt when the funds were provided.  The costs are presented as a direct deduction from the debt as of September 30, 2019, and $815,062 of such costs that were historically presented as other assets have been reclassified as contra debt in the consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2018.  Management evaluated this classification error on prior period financial statements and concluded the impact was immaterial. Through December 31, 2018, these costs were amortized to interest expense using the straight-line method over the term of the PDL Credit Agreement, as amended.

 

During the nine months ended the Company and Lender entered into six amendments to the PDL Modification Agreement (as detailed above), resulting in restructuring of the PDL Credit Agreement and the accounting treatment of the related costs.  Under debt modification under ASC 470-50/troubled debt guidance under ASC 470-60, we determined that the first of the six amendments qualified for modification accounting, while the final five qualified for troubled debt restructuring accounting.  As appropriate, we expensed the debt issuance costs paid to third parties, recognized the costs paid to PDL as a deferred debt issuance costs and accounted for the change in the effective interest rate prospectively.  For the three- and nine-month periods ended September 30, 2019 $200,712 and $722,959, respectively, was amortized to interest expense.  For the three- and nine-month periods ended September 30, 2018 $75,240 and $225,720, respectively, was amortized to interest expense.

 

At September 30, 2019, pursuant to the terms of the PDL Modification Agreement, as amended, $2,858,611 was recorded as accrued interest on the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

The Tranche Three Warrant issued with the Fifth PDL Credit Agreement Amendment did not contain features requiring liability accounting and were recorded at fair value on the date of issuance with the offsetting credit recorded in equity. The value allocated to the Tranche Three Loan Warrant was $3,704 and was recorded as interest expense at June 30, 2019.

 

At September 30, 2019, total PDL debt outstanding was of $20,000,000 presented as current on the accompanying consolidated financial statements and net of deferred issuance costs of $92,000.

 

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CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

NOTE 10 – AGREEMENT WITH HEALTHCOR

 

On April 21, 2011, we entered into a Note and Warrant Purchase Agreement (as subsequently amended) with HealthCor Partners Fund, LP (“HealthCor Partners”) and HealthCor Hybrid Offshore Master Fund, LP (“HealthCor Hybrid” and, together with HealthCor Partners, “HealthCor”) (the “HealthCor Purchase Agreement”) .  Pursuant to the terms of the HealthCor Purchase Agreement, we sold and issued Senior Secured Convertible Notes to HealthCor in the principal amount of $9,316,000 and $10,684,000, respectively (collectively the “2011 HealthCor Notes”). The 2011 HealthCor Notes have a maturity date of April 20, 2021. We also issued Warrants to HealthCor for the purchase of an aggregate of up to 5,488,456 and 6,294,403 shares, respectively, of our Common Stock at an exercise price of $1.40 per share (collectively the “2011 HealthCor Warrants”).  So long as no event of default has occurred, the outstanding principal balances of the 2011 HealthCor Notes accrue interest from April 21, 2011 through April 20, 2016 (the “First Five-Year Note Period”) at the rate of 12.5% per annum, compounding quarterly and shall be added to the outstanding principal balances of the 2011 HealthCor Notes on the last day of each calendar quarter. Interest accruing from April 21, 2016 through April 20, 2021 (the “Second Five Year Note Period”) at a rate of 10% per annum, compounding quarterly, may be paid quarterly in arrears in cash or, at our option, such interest may be added to the outstanding principal balances of the 2011 HealthCor Notes on the last day of each calendar quarter. For the period from April 21, 2016 through September 30, 2018 interest has been added to the outstanding principal balance. Pursuant to the terms of the Ninth Amendment, as discussed below, the accrual of interest has been suspended after September 30, 2018.  From the date any event of default occurs, the interest rate, then applicable, shall be increased by five percent (5%) per annum. HealthCor has the right, upon an event of default, to declare due and payable any unpaid principal amount of the 2011 HealthCor Notes then outstanding, plus previously accrued but unpaid interest and charges, together with the interest then scheduled to accrue (calculated at the default rate described in the immediately preceding sentence) through the end of the First Five Year Note Period or the Second Five Year Note Period, as applicable.  Subject to the terms of the Ninth Amendment as discussed below, HealthCor’s ability to convert any portion of the outstanding and unpaid accrued interest on and principal balances of the 2011 HealthCor Notes into fully paid and non-assessable shares of our Common Stock has been eliminated.

 

On January 31, 2012, we entered into the Second Amendment to the HealthCor Purchase Agreement with HealthCor (the “Second Amendment”) amending the HealthCor Purchase Agreement and sold Senior Secured Convertible Notes to HealthCor in the principal amounts of $2,329,000 and $2,671,000, respectively (collectively the “2012 HealthCor Notes”). As provided by the Second Amendment, the 2012 HealthCor Notes are in substantially the same form as the 2011 HealthCor Notes, with changes to the “Issuance Date,” “Maturity Date,” “First Five-Year Note Period” and other terms to take into account the timing of the issuance of the 2012 HealthCor Notes. The 2012 HealthCor Notes have a maturity date of January 30, 2022. In addition, the provisions regarding interest payments, interest acceleration, optional conversion, negative covenants, and events of default, preemptive rights and registration rights are the same as those of the 2011 HealthCor Notes. At any time after January 30, 2012, HealthCor is entitled to convert any portion of the outstanding and unpaid accrued interest on and principal balances of the 2012 HealthCor Notes into fully paid and non-assessable shares of our Common Stock at a conversion rate of $1.25 per share, subject to adjustment in accordance with anti-dilution provisions set forth in the 2012 HealthCor Notes. Pursuant to the terms of the Ninth Amendment, as discussed below, the accrual of interest has been suspended after September 30, 2018

 

On August 20, 2013, we entered into a Third Amendment to the HealthCor Purchase Agreement with HealthCor (the “Third Amendment”) to redefine our minimum cash balance requirements. Previously we were required to maintain a minimum cash balance of $5,000,000 and should we drop below that balance, it triggered a default. The Third Amendment allowed for a reduced minimum cash period, as defined in the HealthCor Purchase Agreement, which allowed us to drop below $5,000,000, but not below $4,000,000. All other terms and conditions of the HealthCor Purchase Agreement, including all amendments thereto, remain the same. Upon entering the reduced minimum cash period (which occurred on October 7, 2013), we had 120 days to return our minimum cash balance to the original $5,000,000. On January 16, 2014, we increased our cash balance to in excess of the original $5,000,000 minimum allowable balance.

 

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CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

On January 16, 2014, we entered into a Fourth Amendment to the HealthCor Purchase Agreement with HealthCor (the “Fourth Amendment”) and sold Senior Secured Convertible Notes to HealthCor in the principal amounts of $2,329,000 and $2,671,000 (collectively the ‘‘2014 HealthCor Notes’’). As provided by the Fourth Amendment, the 2014 HealthCor Notes are in substantially the same form as the 2011 HealthCor Notes, with changes to the “Issuance Date,” “Maturity Date,” “First Five-Year Note Period” and other terms to take into account the timing of the issuance of the 2014 HealthCor Notes. The 2014 HealthCor Notes have a maturity date of January 15, 2024. In addition, the provisions regarding interest payments, interest acceleration, optional conversion, negative covenants, and events of default, preemptive rights and registration rights are the same as those of the 2011 HealthCor Notes. At any time after January 16, 2014, HealthCor is entitled to convert any portion of the outstanding and unpaid accrued interest on and principal balances of the 2014 HealthCor Notes into fully paid and non-assessable shares of our Common Stock at a conversion rate of $0.40 per share, subject to adjustment in accordance with anti-dilution provisions set forth in the 2014 HealthCor Notes. Additionally, we issued Warrants to HealthCor for the purchase of an aggregate of up to 4,000,000 shares of our Common Stock at an exercise price of $0.40 per share (collectively the “2014 HealthCor Warrants”). As of September 30, 2019, the underlying shares of our Common Stock related to the 2014 HealthCor Notes totaled approximately 25,000,000.

 

On December 4, 2014, we entered into a Fifth Amendment to the HealthCor Purchase Agreement (the “Fifth Amendment”) with HealthCor and certain additional investors (such additional investors, the “2015 Investors” and, collectively with HealthCor, the “Investors”) and agreed to sell and issue (i) additional notes in the initial aggregate principal amount of $6,000,000,with a conversion price per share of $0.52 (subject to adjustment as described therein) (the “Fifth Amendment Notes”) and (ii) additional Warrants for an aggregate of up to 3,692,308 shares of our Common Stock at an exercise price per share of $0.52 (subject to adjustment as described therein) (the “Fifth Amendment Warrants”). As provided by the Fifth Amendment, the Fifth Amendment Notes are in substantially the same form as the 2011 HealthCor Notes, with changes to the “Issuance Date,” “Maturity Date,” “First Five-Year Note Period” and other terms to take into account the timing of the issuance of the Fifth Amendment Notes. The Fifth Amendment Notes have a maturity date of February 16, 2025. In addition, the provisions regarding interest payments, interest acceleration, optional conversion, negative covenants, and events of default, preemptive rights and registration rights are the same as those of the 2011 HealthCor Notes. The 2015 Investors are composed of all but one of our current directors and one of our officers. On February 17, 2015, the Company and the Investors closed on the transactions contemplated by the Fifth Amendment. In connection with this closing, the Company and the Investors entered into an Amended and Restated Pledge and Security Agreement (the “Amended Security Agreement”), amending and restating that certain Pledge and Security Agreement dated as of April 20, 2011, and an Amended and Restated Intellectual Property Security Agreement (the “Amended IP Security Agreement”), amending and restating that certain Intellectual Property Security Agreement dated as of April 20, 2011. As of September 30, 2019, the underlying shares of our Common Stock related to the Fifth Amendment Notes totaled approximately 3,000,000 to HealthCor and 17,000,000 to the 2015 Investors.

 

On March 31, 2015, we entered into the Sixth Amendment to the HealthCor Purchase Agreement (the “Ninth Amendment”) pursuant to which, among other things, (i) the requirement to maintain a minimum cash balance of $5,000,000 was reduced to a minimum cash balance of $2,000,000 and (ii) the amendment provision was revised to permit the HealthCor Purchase Agreement to be amended by the Company and the holders of the majority of the Common Stock underlying the outstanding notes and warrants to purchase shares of our Common Stock sold pursuant to the HealthCor Purchase Agreement. On March 31, 2015, we also issued a warrant to HealthCor to purchase up to an aggregate of 1,000,000 shares of our Common Stock in consideration for certain prior waivers of the minimum cash balance requirement in the HealthCor Purchase Agreement (the “Ninth Amendment Warrant”). The Ninth Amendment Warrant has an exercise price per share of $0.53 (subject to adjustment as described therein) and an expiration date of March 31, 2025.

 

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CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

On June 26, 2015, we (i) entered into a Seventh Amendment to the HealthCor Purchase Agreement (the “Seventh Amendment”) pursuant to which the HealthCor Purchase Agreement was amended to permit the Company to enter into and perform its obligations under the PDL Credit Agreement (as detailed in NOTE 9); (ii) executed an Amendment to the Registration Rights Agreement between the Company and HealthCor dated April 21, 2011 (the “RR Agreement”) pursuant to which the RR Agreement was amended to make its priority of registration consistent with the Registration Rights Agreement executed by the Company and PDL; (iii) amended the 2011 HealthCor Notes to extend the maturity date, in the event that Tranche Two of the PDL Credit Agreement is funded, for such notes to 90 days after the earlier of the Tranche Two maturity date or repayment date, but not later than December 31, 2022, (iv) amended the 2012 HealthCor Notes, to set the maturity date at January 30, 2022 and, in the event that Tranche Two of the PDL Credit Agreement is funded, to extend such maturity date to 90 days after the earlier of the Tranche Two maturity date or repayment date, but later than December 31, 2022; and (v) amended each of the Senior Secured Convertible Notes issued under the HealthCor Purchase Agreement (the “HealthCor Notes”) to, among other things, subordinate the HealthCor Notes to the loans under the PDL Credit Agreement and to increase certain event of default acceleration and payment thresholds. ). As pertains to (iii) and (iv) above, pursuant to the terms of the PDL Credit Agreement and having not met the Tranche Two Milestones by July 26, 2017, the Tranche Two funding was terminated in full.

 

On February 23, 2018, we entered into an Eighth Amendment to the HealthCor Purchase Agreement (the “Eighth Amendment”) with HealthCor, the 2015 Investors and certain investors (such additional investors, the “February 2018 Investors”) and agreed to sell and issue (i) additional notes in the initial aggregate principal amount of $2,050,000,with a conversion price per share of $0.05 (subject to adjustment as described therein) (the “Eighth Amendment Notes”) and (ii) additional Warrants for an aggregate of up to 512,500 shares of our Common Stock at an exercise price per share of $0.05 (subject to adjustment as described therein) (the “Eighth Amendment Warrants”). As provided by the Eighth Amendment, the Eighth Amendment Notes are in substantially the same form as the 2011 HealthCor Notes, with changes to the “Issuance Date,” “Maturity Date,” “First Five-Year Note Period” and other terms to take into account the timing of the issuance of the Eighth Amendment Notes. The Eighth Amendment Notes have a maturity date of February 22, 2028. In addition, the provisions regarding interest payments, interest acceleration, optional conversion, negative covenants, and events of default, preemptive rights and registration rights are the same as those of the 2011 HealthCor Notes. The 2018 Investors are composed of all but one of our current directors, one of our officers and an entity. As of September 30, 2019, the underlying shares of our Common Stock related to the Eighth Amendment Notes totaled approximately 50,000,000 to the February 2018 Investors.

 

On July 10, 2018, we entered into the Ninth Amendment to the HealthCor Purchase Agreement (the “Ninth Amendment”) with HealthCor, the 2015 Investors and the February 2018 Investors, pursuant to which the parties agreed to amend the HealthCor Purchase Agreement, the 2011 HealthCor Notes, the 2012 HealthCor Notes, the 2014 HealthCor Notes, the Fifth Amendment Notes and the Eighth Amendment Notes, as applicable, to (i) remove the rights of the holders of the 2011 HealthCor Notes and the 2012 HealthCor Notes to convert such notes to Common Stock after September 30, 2018; (ii) suspend the accrual of interest on the 2011 HealthCor Notes and the 2012 HealthCor Notes for periods after September 30, 2018; (iii) provide for the potential earlier repayment of the 2011 HealthCor Notes and the 2012 HealthCor Notes by the Company, 120 calendar days following a written demand for payment by the holder of such notes; provided, however, that such written demand may not be given prior to the twelve-month anniversary of the date on which the obligations of the Company under the PDL Credit Agreement are repaid in full; (iv) cancel the 2011 HealthCor Warrants; (v) provide for the seniority of the 2011 HealthCor Notes and the 2012 HealthCor Notes in right of payment over notes subsequently issued pursuant to the Purchase Agreement, including the 2014 HealthCor Notes, the Fifth Amendment Notes and the Eighth Amendment Notes; (vi) amend the terms of the 2014 HealthCor Notes, the Fifth Amendment Notes and the Eighth Amendment Notes to reflect the seniority in payment of the 2011 HealthCor Notes and 2012 HealthCor Notes; and (vii) reduce the number of shares of Common Stock that the Company must at all times have authorized and reserved for the purpose of issuance upon conversion of the notes issued pursuant to the HealthCor Purchase Agreement (collectively, the “Notes”) and exercise of the warrants issued pursuant to the HealthCor Purchase Agreement (collectively, the “Warrants”), from at least 120% of the aggregate number of shares of Common Stock then issuable upon full conversion of the Notes and exercise of the Warrants to at least 100% of such aggregate number of shares.  In addition, on July 10, 2018, along with PDL, HealthCor, the 2015 Investors and the February 2018 Investors, we entered into a Second Amendment to the Subordination and Intercreditor Agreement, to amend the Subordination and Intercreditor Agreement dated as of September 26, 2015, as amended to provide that, in the event of a sale of the Company’s hospital assets, after the net proceeds are first applied to repay obligations under the PDL Credit Agreement, as amended, until paid in full, up to the next $5,000,000 of such net proceeds may be retained by the Company for working capital purposes before all remaining net proceeds are then applied to repay the obligations under the Notes in accordance with the priorities set forth in the HealthCor Purchase Agreement and the Notes.

 

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CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

On July 13, 2018, we entered into the Tenth Amendment to the HealthCor Purchase Agreement with HealthCor, the 2015 Investors, the February 2018 Investors and certain investors (all of which are directors of the Company) (such additional investors, the “July 2018 Investors”), pursuant to which we sold and issued convertible secured promissory notes for an aggregate of $1,000,000 to the July 2018 Investors with a conversion price per share equal to $0.05 (subject to adjustment as described therein) (the “Tenth Amendment Notes”) As provided by the Tenth Amendment, the Tenth Amendment Notes are in substantially the same form as the 2011 HealthCor Notes, with changes to the “Issuance Date,” “Maturity Date,” “First Five-Year Note Period” and other terms to take into account the timing of the issuance of the Tenth Amendment Notes. The Tenth Amendment Notes have a maturity date of July 12, 2028. In addition, the provisions regarding interest payments, interest acceleration, optional conversion, negative covenants, and events of default, preemptive rights and registration rights are the same as those of the 2011 HealthCor Notes.  As of September 30, 2019, the underlying shares of our Common Stock related to the Tenth Amendment Notes totaled approximately 23,000,000 to the July 2018 Investors.

 

On March 27, 2019, we entered into the Eleventh Amendment to the HealthCor Purchase Agreement, as amended, with HealthCor, the 2015 Investors, the February 2018 Investors and the July 2018 Investors, pursuant to which all parties agreed to amend and restate Section 5.3 Minimum Cash Balance (“Section 5.3”), wherein the requirement of maintaining a minimum cash balance has been removed and any breach of Section 5.3 has been waived in perpetuity.

 

On May 15, 2019, we entered into the Twelfth Amendment to HealthCor Purchase Agreement with HealthCor, the 2015 Investors, the February 2018 Investors, the July 2018 Investors, and an investor (a member of our board of directors) (such additional investor, the “2019 Investor”), pursuant to which we sold and issued a convertible secured promissory note for $50,000 to the 2019 Investor with a conversion price per share equal to $0.03 (subject to adjustment as described therein) (the “Twelfth Amendment Note”) As provided by the Twelfth Amendment, the Twelfth Amendment Notes are in substantially the same form as the 2011 HealthCor Notes, with changes to the “Issuance Date,” “Maturity Date,” “First Five-Year Note Period” and other terms to take into account the timing of the issuance of the Twelfth Amendment Notes. The Twelfth Amendment Notes have a maturity date of May 15, 2029. In addition, the provisions regarding interest payments, interest acceleration, optional conversion, negative covenants, and events of default, preemptive rights and registration rights are the same as those of the 2011 HealthCor Notes.  As of September 30, 2019, the underlying shares of our Common Stock related to the Twelfth Amendment Note totaled approximately 2,000,000 to the 2019 Investor.

 

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CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Accounting Treatment

 

When issuing debt or equity securities convertible into common stock at a discount to the fair value of the common stock at the date the debt or equity financing is committed, a company is required to record a beneficial conversion feature (“BCF”) charge. We had three separate issuances of equity securities convertible into common stock that qualify under this accounting treatment, (i) the 2011 HealthCor Notes, (ii) the 2012 HealthCor Notes and (iii) the 2014 HealthCor Notes. Because the conversion option and the 2011 HealthCor Warrants on the 2011 HealthCor Notes were originally classified as a liability when issued due to the down round provision and the removal of the provision requiring liability treatment, and subsequently reclassified to equity on December 31, 2011 when the 2011 HealthCor Notes were amended, only the accrued interest capitalized as payment in kind (‘‘PIK’’) since reclassification qualifies under this accounting treatment. We recorded an aggregate of $3,289,639 and $2,746,081 in interest for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively, related to these transactions. The face amount of the 2012 HealthCor Notes, 2014 HealthCor Notes, the Fifth Amendment Notes and the Eighth Amendment Notes and all accrued PIK interest also qualify for BCF treatment as discussed above. Under the accounting standards, we determined that the restructuring of the HealthCor notes, pursuant to the terms of the Ninth Amendment, resulted in a troubled debt restructuring. As the future cash flows were greater than the carrying amount of the debt at the date of the amendment, we accounted for the change prospectively using the new effective interest rate. During the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, we recorded a BCF of $51,123 and $98,363, respectively. The BCF was recorded as a charge to debt discount and a credit to additional paid in capital, with the debt discount, using the effective interest method, amortized to interest expense over the term of the notes.

 

As Warrants were issued with the Fifth Amendment Notes, the proceeds were allocated to the instruments based on relative fair value as the warrants did not contain any features requiring liability treatment and therefore were classified as equity. The value allocated to the Fifth Amendment Warrants was $1,093,105, which was recorded as debt discount with the credit to additional paid in capital. We recorded an aggregate of $25,443 and $21,456 in interest for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively, related to the Fifth Amendment Notes and Fifth Amendment Warrants. The carrying value of the Fifth Amendment Notes at December 31, 2018 approximates fair value as the interest rates used are those currently available to us and would be considered level 3 inputs under the fair value hierarchy.  The Sixth Amendment Warrants also did not contain features requiring liability accounting and were recorded at fair value on the date of issuance with the offsetting credit recorded in equity. The value allocated to the Sixth Amendment Warrant was $378,000, which was recorded as debt costs with the credit to additional paid in capital. We recorded an aggregate of $43,352 and $43,352 in interest expense for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively.  The Eighth Amendment Warrants also did not contain features requiring liability accounting and were recorded at fair value on the date of issuance with the offsetting credit recorded in equity. The value allocated to the Eighth Amendment Warrants was $10,707, which was recorded as interest expense at September 30, 2019.

 

At September 30, 2019, total HealthCor and Other investor debt outstanding was of $69,638,663 presented on the accompanying consolidated financial statements as long-term and net of debt discount of $11,196,481.

 

NOTE 11 – JOINT VENTURE AGREEMENT

 

On November 16, 2009, we entered into a Master Investment Agreement (the “Rockwell Agreement”) with Rockwell Holdings I, LLC, a Wisconsin limited liability (“Rockwell”). Under the terms of the Rockwell Agreement, we used funds from Rockwell to fully implement the CareView System™ in Hillcrest Medical Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma (“Hillcrest”) and Saline Memorial Hospital in Benton, Arkansas (“Saline”) (the “Project Hospital(s)”). CareView-Hillcrest, LLC and CareView-Saline, LLC were created as the operating entities for the Project Hospitals under the Rockwell Agreement (the “Project LLCs”).

 

23  

 

CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

On January 31, 2017, under the terms of the Rockwell Agreement, wherein we had the option to purchase Rockwell’s interest in the Project LLCs, we exercised that right by entering into a Settlement and LLC Interest Purchase Agreement with Rockwell (the “Settlement Agreement). Pursuant to the terms of the Settlement Agreement, we paid Rockwell the aggregate amount of $1,213,786 by the issuance of a promissory note to Rockwell for $1,113,786 (the “Rockwell Note”) and a cash payment of $100,000. Pursuant to the terms of the Rockwell Note, we were to make quarterly principal payments of $100,000, with each payment being made on the last day of each calendar quarter beginning with the first payment date of March 31, 2017 and continuing on the last business day of each subsequent quarter through September 30, 2019. The final payment due on December 31, 2019 was to be a balloon payment of $13,786 representing the remaining principal balance plus all accrued and unpaid interest. Effective February 2, 2018, pursuant to the terms of the PDL Modification Agreement, as amended, we entered into an amendment to the Rockwell Note wherein the quarterly payments under the Rockwell Note were reduced to $50,000 per quarter, through the end of the PDL Modification Period, September 30, 2019. The final balloon payment of $461,287 representing the remaining principal plus all accrued and unpaid interest is due on December 31, 2019.  We were not in default of any conditions under the Settlement Agreement and amended Rockwell Note as of September 30, 2019.

 

As additional consideration to Rockwell for entering into the Rockwell Agreement, we granted Rockwell Warrants to purchase 1,151,206 shares of our Common Stock on the date of the Rockwell Agreement, and, using the Black-Scholes Model, valued the Warrants at $1,124,728 (the “Project Warrant”), which amount was fully amortized at December 31, 2015. Pursuant to the terms of the Settlement Agreement, the expiration date of the Project Warrant was extended from November 16, 2017 to November 16, 2022. All other provisions of the Project Warrant remained unchanged. At the time of the extension, the Project Warrant were revalued resulting in a $11,512 increase in fair value, which has been recorded as non-cash costs included in general and administration expense in the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements. Effective February 2, 2018, pursuant to the terms of the PDL Modification Agreement, we entered into an amendment to the Project Warrant wherein the Project Warrant’s exercise price was changed from $0.52 to $0.05, resulting in a $13,814 increase in fair value, which was recorded as non-cash costs included in general and administration expense in the consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

At September 30, 2019, total Rockwell debt outstanding was $363,786 presented as current on the accompanying consolidated financial statements.

 

24  

 

  

Item 2.  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

General

 

The following discussion and analysis provide information which our management believes to be relevant to an assessment and understanding of our results of operations and financial condition. This discussion should be read together with our financial statements and the notes to the financial statements, which are included in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q (the “Report”). This information should also be read in conjunction with the information contained in our Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) on March 29, 2019, including the audited consolidated financial statements and notes included therein as of and for the year ended December 31, 2018. The reported results will not necessarily reflect future results of operations or financial condition.

 

Throughout this Annual Report on Form 10-K (the “Report”), the terms “we,” “us,” “our,” “CareView,” or “Company” refers to CareView Communications, Inc., a Nevada corporation, and unless otherwise specified, includes our wholly owned subsidiaries, CareView Communications, Inc., a Texas corporation (“CareView-TX”) and CareView Operations, LLC, a Nevada limited liability company (“CareView Operations”) (collectively known as the “Company’s Subsidiaries”).

 

We maintain a website at www.care-view.com and our Common Stock trades on the OTCQB under the symbol “CRVW.”

 

Company Overview

 

Our mission is to be the leading provider of products and on-demand application services for the healthcare industry, specializing in bedside video monitoring, software tools to improve hospital communications and operations, and patient education and entertainment packages. Our proprietary, high-speed data network system is the next generation of patient care monitoring that allows real-time bedside and point-of-care video monitoring designed to improve patient safety and overall hospital costs. The entertainment packages and patient education enhance the patient’s quality of stay. Reported results from CareView-driven facilities prove that our products reduce falls, reduce the cost of sitter fees, increase patient satisfaction and reduce bed turnaround time to increase patient flow. For patients, we have a convenient in-room, entertainment package that includes high-speed Internet, access to first-run on-demand movies and visual connectivity to family and friends from anywhere in the world. For the hospital, we offer tools to provide superior patient care, peace of mind and customer service satisfaction.

 

CareView System

 

Our CareView System® suite of video monitoring, guest services and related applications connect patients, families and healthcare providers. Through the use of telecommunications technology and the Internet, our evolving products and on-demand services greatly increase the access to quality medical care and education for patients/consumers and healthcare professionals. We understand the importance of providing high quality patient care in a safe environment and believe in partnering with hospitals to improve the quality of patient care and safety by providing a system that monitors continuously. We are committed to providing an affordable video monitoring tool to improve the practice of nursing, create a better work environment and make the patient’s hospital stay more informative and satisfying. Our suite of products and services can simplify and streamline the task of preventing and managing patients’ falls, enhance patient safety, improve quality of care and reduce costs associated with bringing information technology directly to patients, families and healthcare providers. Our products and services can be used in all types of hospitals, nursing homes, adult living centers and selected outpatient care facilities domestically and internationally.

 

CareView’s secure video monitoring system connects the patient room to a touchscreen monitor at the nursing station or a mobile handheld device, allowing the nursing staff to maintain a level of visual contact with each patient. This configuration enhances the use of the nurse call system, reduces unnecessary steps to and from patient rooms, and facilitates a host of modules for patient safety and workflow improvements. The CareView System suite can be easily configured to meet the individual privacy and security requirements of any hospital or nursing facility. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (“HIPAA’) compliant, patient approved video record can be included as part of the patient’s medical record and serves as additional documentation of bedside care, procedures performed, patient and hospital ancillary activities, safety or care incidents, support to necessitate additional clinical services, and, if necessary, as evidence. Additional HIPAA-compliance features allow privacy options to be enabled at any time by the patient, nurse or physician.

 

25  

 

 

In addition to patient safety and security, we also provide a suite of services to increase patient satisfaction scores and enhance the overall image of the hospital including first-run on-demand movies, Internet access via the patient’s television, and video visits with family and friends from most places throughout the world. Through continued investment in patient care technology, our products and services help hospitals and assisted living facilities build a safe, high quality healthcare delivery system that best serves the patient, while striving for the highest level of satisfaction and comfort.

 

CareView System Products and Services Agreement with Healthcare Facilities

 

We offer our products and services through a subscription-based model with healthcare facilities through a Products and Services Agreement (the “P&S Agreement(s)”). During the term of the P&S Agreement, we provide continuous monitoring of the CareView System’s products and services deployed to a healthcare facility and maintain and service all equipment installed by us. Terms of each P&S Agreement require the healthcare facility to pay us a monthly subscription fee based on the number of selected, installed and activated services. None of the services provided through the Primary Package or GuestView module are paid or reimbursed by any third-party provider including insurance companies, Medicare or Medicaid. We also enter into corporate-wide agreements with healthcare companies (the “Master Agreement(s)”), wherein the healthcare facilities that are a part of these healthcare companies enter into individual facility level agreements that are substantially similar to our P&S Agreements.

 

Master Agreements and P&S Agreements are currently negotiated for a period of five years with a minimum of two or three years; however, older P&S Agreements were negotiated for a five-year period with a provision for automatic renewal. P&S Agreements specific to pilot programs (“P&S Pilot Agreements”) contain pricing terms substantially similar to P&S Agreements, are generally three or six-months in length and can be extended on a month-to-month basis as required. We own all rights, title, and interest in and to the equipment we install at each location and agree to maintain and repair it; although, we may charge for repairs or replacements due to damage or misuse. We are not responsible for maintaining data arising from use of the CareView System or for transmission errors, corruption or compromise of data carried over local or interchange telecommunication carriers. We grant each healthcare facility a limited, revocable, non-transferable and non-exclusive license to use the software, network facilities, content and documentation on and in the CareView System suite to the extent, and only to the extent, necessary to access, explore and otherwise use the CareView System suite in real time. Such non-exclusive license expires upon termination of the P&S Agreement.

 

We use specific terminology in an effort to better define and track the staging and billing of the individual components of the CareView System suite. The CareView System suite includes three components which are separately billed; the Room Control Platform (the “RCP”), the Nurse Station, and mobile devices (each component referred to as a “unit”). The term “bed” refers to each healthcare facility bed as part of the overall potential volume that a healthcare facility represents. For example, if a healthcare facility has 200 beds, the aggregate of those beds is the overall potential volume of that healthcare facility. The term “bed” is often used interchangeably with “Room Control Platform” or “RCP” as this component of the CareView System consistently resides within each room where the “bed” is located. On average, there are six Nurse Stations for each 100 beds. The term “deployed” means that the units have been delivered to the healthcare facility but have not yet been installed at their respective locations within the facility. The term “installed” means that the units have been mounted and are operational. The term “billable” refers to the aggregate of all units on which we charge fees. Units become billable once they are installed and the required personnel have been trained in their use. Units are only deployed upon the execution of a P&S Agreement or P&S Pilot Agreement.

 

CareView Connect

 

Our mission is to be the leading provider of resident monitoring products and services for the long-term care industry. We took what we learned in our medical facility business and applied it to developing a product to serve the long-term care market. With CareView ConnectTM Quality of Life System (“CareView Connect”), CareView has again positioned itself as a technology leader with its innovative suite of products specifically designed for all aspects of the long-term care market, including: Nursing Care, Home Care, Assisted Living and Independent Living.

 

With this mission in mind, in the second quarter of 2018, the Company introduced a new sensor product that will have application in both the assisted living center market and the home health market. CareView Connect leverages both passive and active sensors to track the activities of daily life. CareView Connect provides peace of mind by using data from the resident’s activity, existing conditions, and environment to notify a caregiver of potential emergencies and identify the need for dignified support. CareView Connect consists of a small emergency assist button, two motion sensors, one sleep sensor, and one event sensor. Resident activity levels, medication administration, sleep patterns, and requests for assistance can all be monitored depending on which options are selected.

 

26  

 

 

The skilled nursing home market consists of approximately 2,000,000 beds, which is double the size of the current hospital/healthcare facility bed market. The assisted living center market is even larger at approximately 3,000,000 beds. Our products flow naturally into the nursing home space as it is substantially the same setting as hospital rooms. To service this intended expansion, we have hired sales staff to pursue new business in these markets and we anticipate that we will sign new contracts in these markets before the end of 2019.

 

Our Products and Services

 

CareView Connect is a platform consisting of several products and applications targeted at improving level of care and efficiency. CareView is building a cohesive and tightly integrated solution that solves several problems that long-term care facilities face. We offer an array of wearable and stationary buttons that allow a resident to summon help either for an emergency or assistance, which can be anything from toileting help to assistance putting on their shoes. We offer a mobile app capable of delivering an alert to the caregiver and allows them document information around that alert. This allows for workflows and reports around the alerts, i.e. how long before the alert was handled, what was the cause of the alert, and if it was not acknowledged in a timely manner then the alert is escalated to another individual or group. This ensures that every alert is responded to timely and is verifiable. In addition, the caregiver usually is carrying out a litany of daily activities directed at each facility resident.

 

Alert Management and Monitoring System

 

CareView Connect provides a suite of hardware and software that facilitate a data-driven solution for alert management and monitoring. CareView Connect’s solution provides additional context, including location of the resident, which improves response time by the staff. The alert system includes a documentation platform that allows the facility’s staff to classify reason for alerts and provides metrics around response time. CareView Connect’s solution involves several passive sensors that monitor the resident.

 

Caregiver Platform

 

The caregiver platform includes a “Leave of Absence” component, which allows the facility to document when the resident is outside of their room for a duration of time. This information is incorporated with known data from the workflows and sensors to improve awareness. The Caregiver Connect mobile application provides a convenient and intuitive interface to the CareView Connect platform. The caregiver can use the mobile app to capture important information and interface with critical workflows, such as acknowledging and documenting alert presses by the resident. CareView Connect also provides a product focused on capturing and measuring the mental state and pain experienced by the resident. “How are you feeling today?” provides a convenient way to capture information about the mental state of the resident using emojis. Similarly, “What is your pain today?” allows the staff to categorize and document pain. Connect Resident is a tablet application intended for the resident’s direct use. This product currently supports video conferencing with a remote caregiver, becoming a communications conduit for tele-health. Connect Resident also supports “How are you feeling today?”, which allows the resident to submit this information directly.

 

Quality of Life Metrics

 

CareView is developing its own algorithm for measuring quality of life based on “best of breed” research and leveraging the data collected by the platform. CareView Connect’s Quality of Life Metrics focuses on several categories, including Physical Activity, Bodily Pain, General Health, Vitality, Social Interaction, Mental Health, and Sleep Quality. Leveraging this data, the facility and their staff have improved visibility into the health and well-being of their residents. By applying machine learning and predictive analytics, subtle patterns and trends that may not otherwise be visible become actionable. The facility can use this information to present a more compassionate and capable level of care, differentiating the facility from their competition. The Quality of Life Metrics information can be made available to the family and loved ones, opening a new channel of remote awareness and care. Because the information is collected automatically, the family gains awareness on issues of which their loved ones may normally be unaware. The Connect Family mobile application allows family members to monitor their loved one and receive alerts and notifications based on their preferences.

 

CareView is working to integrate additional sensors into the platform, including a ballistocardiogram (BCG) sensor, which allows for improved monitoring and metrics around sleep quality, such as heart and respiration rate. Additional sensors include medical devices, such as scales, pulse oximeters, blood glucose meters, and blood pressure monitors.

 

27  

 

 

Pricing Structure and Revenue Streams

 

The CareView Connect suite of products and services offers multiple pricing models. We work with each facility on pricing to offer an affordable package based on the demographics of the residents of the facility. The pricing structure with each facility is negotiated separately. Typically, we offer the CareView Connect basic package at a price per monitored room with varying price structures based on number of sensors and number of residents in each facility.

 

Group Purchasing Agreement with HealthTrust Purchasing Group, LP

 

On December 14, 2016, the Company entered into a Group Purchasing Agreement with HealthTrust Purchasing Group, L.P. (“HealthTrust”) (the “HealthTrust GPO Agreement”), the nation’s only committed-model Group Purchasing Organization (“GPO”) headquartered in Nashville, Tennessee. HealthTrust serves approximately 1,600 acute care facilities and members in more than 26,000 other locations, including ambulatory surgery centers, physician practices, long-term care and alternate care sites. The agreement was effective on January 1, 2017 and all CareView System components and modules are available for purchase by HealthTrust’s exclusive membership. HealthTrust members may order CareView’s products and services included in the agreement directly from CareView.

 

On October 1, 2018, the Company added CareView Connect to the HealthTrust GPO Agreement.

 

Summary of Product and Service Usage

 

The following table shows the number of healthcare facilities using our products and services including the number of installed hospitals, installed Bed Equivalent Units (“BEUs”) and billable BEUs as of September 30, 2019.  BEUs are calculated by dividing the monthly revenue derived from healthcare facility’s P&S or P&S Pilot Agreement by the unit price charge for an RCP.  The table also shows the number of pilot programs in place and hospital proposals pending approval, estimated bed count if the pilot programs and pending proposals result in executed contracts, and the estimated total number of licensed beds available under the pilot programs and hospital proposals. There are no assurances that the pilot programs will be extended, or the pending proposals will be approved to ultimately result in the number of estimated BEUs. Further, there are no assurances that we will have access to the total number of staffed beds in each healthcare facility.

 

Installed
Hospitals

 

Installed
BEUs

 

Billable
BEU

 

Total
Staffed Beds
in
Contracted/
Pilot
Hospitals

 

Potential
BEUs
Available
Under
Current
Contract/
Pilot
Contracts(*)

 

BEUs in
Negotiation
Prior to
Contract/

Pilot

107

 

9,652

 

9,741

 

173,551

 

58,568

 

45,680

  

 

(*) This number represents management’s best estimate of the number of units available to us in hospitals that are currently under contract.  We assume that in any given acute care facility, our products and services are appropriate for deployment in approximately 70% of the total staffed beds.  If we have specific information from a current contracted or pilot hospital that the number of potential BEUs in that hospital is either higher or lower than 70%, specific number has been used in the aggregate estimate .

 

28  

 

 

Results of Operations

 

Three months ended September 30, 2019 compared to three months ended September 30, 2018

 

 

 

Three Months Ended
September 30,

 

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

Increase
(Decrease)

 

    (000’s)  

Revenue

 

$

1,622

 

 

$

1,512

 

 

$

110

 

Operating expenses

 

 

2,018

 

 

 

2,295

 

 

 

(277

)

Operating loss

 

 

(396

)

 

 

(783

)

 

 

(387

)

Other, net

 

 

(2,768

)

 

 

(2,431

)

 

 

337

 

Net loss

 

$

(3,164

)

 

$

(3,214

)

 

$

(50

)

 

Revenue

 

Revenue increased approximately $110,000 for the three months ended September 30, 2019 as compared to the same period in 2018. Hospitals with billable BEUs increased to 105 on September 30, 2019 from 102 on September 30, 2018.  The increase in revenue is a result of new hospital billing as well as organic growth within our existing customer base. Of the 105 hospitals with billable BEUs on September 30, 2019, one hospital group accounted for 23% of the total. Billable BEUs for all hospitals totaled 9,741 on September 30, 2019 as compared to 7,978 on September 30, 2018.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Our principal operating costs include the following items as a percentage of total operating expense.

 

 

 

Three Months Ended
September 30,

 

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

Human resource costs, including non-cash compensation

 

 

57

%

 

 

51

%

Professional and consulting costs

 

 

4

%

 

 

11

%

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

9

%

 

 

13

%

Oher product deployment costs

 

 

4

%

 

 

6

%

Travel and entertainment expense

 

 

8

%

 

 

5

%

Other expenses

 

 

18

%

 

 

14

%

 

Operating expenses decreased by 12% as a result of the following items:

 

 

 

(000’s)

 

Human resource costs, including benefits

 

$

39

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

(129

)

Other product deployment costs, excluding human resources and travel and entertainment expense

 

 

(74

)

Professional and consulting costs

 

 

(184

)

Travel and entertainment expense

 

 

43

 

Other expenses

 

 

28

 

 

 

$

(277

)

 

Human resource related costs (including salaries and benefits) increased primarily as a result of a higher average head count during the three months ended September 30, 2019 compared to the same period in 2018. While we had 56 employees at September 30, 2019 as compared to 54 for the comparable date for the prior year, on average we employed 55 employees over the course of current period as compared to 57 for the comparable prior year period. Depreciation and amortization expense decrease by approximately $129,000, primarily as a result of a reduction in depreciation expense as certain deployable assets purchased have become fully depreciated in 2019. Other product development costs decreased primarily as a result of decreases in product deployment and installation costs and related non-capital equipment costs. Professional and consulting fees decreased approximately $184,000, primarily as a result of decreased legal and consulting fees. Travel and entertainment expense increased approximately $43,000 as a result of a higher product installations during the three-month period ended September 30, 2019 compared to the same period in 2018. For the comparable periods, other expenses increased approximately $28,000, primarily a result of an increase in Rent, utilities and maintenance of $28,000, increase in Sales and property tax costs $14,000, increase in Sales and marketing costs $11,000, increase in Other expenses $10,000, offset by a decrease in Research and development non-personnel and travel costs ($26,000), and Non-cash compensation ($9,000). 

 

29  

 

 

Other, net

 

Other non-operating income and expense increased by $337,000, or 14%, for the three months ended September 30, 2019 in comparison to the same period in 2018, primarily as a result of the Tenth through Fifteenth Amendments to the PDL Modification Agreement, as amended, with PDL BioPharma, Inc. (see NOTE 9 in the accompanying Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for further details).

 

Net Loss

 

As a result of the factors above, our net loss of approximately $3,164,000 for the three months ended decreased approximately $50,000, or 2%, as compared to approximately $3,214,000 of net loss for the same period in 2018.

 

Nine months ended September 30, 2019 compared to nine months ended September 30, 2018

 

 

 

Nine Months Ended
September 30,

 

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

Increase
(Decrease)

 

    (000’s)  

Revenue

 

$

4,641

 

 

$

4,603

 

 

$

38

 

Operating expenses

 

 

6,123

 

 

 

7,473

 

 

 

(1,350

)

Operating loss

 

 

(1,482

)

 

 

(2,870

)

 

 

(1,388

)

Other, net

 

 

(8,166

)

 

 

(9,687

)

 

 

(1,521

)

Net loss

 

$

(9,648

)

 

$

(12,557

)

 

$

(2,909

)

 

Revenue

 

Revenue increased approximately $38,000 for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 as compared to the same period in 2018. Hospitals with billable BEUs increased to 105 on September 30, 2019 from 102 on September 30, 2018.  The increase in revenue is a result of new hospital billing as well as organic growth within our existing customer base. Of the 105 hospitals with billable BEUs on September 30, 2019, one hospital group accounted for 23% of the total. Billable BEUs for all hospitals totaled 9,741 on September 30, 2019 as compared to 7,978 on September 30, 2018.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Our principal operating costs include the following items as a percentage of total operating expense.

 

 

 

Nine Months Ended
September 30,

 

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

Human resource costs, including non-cash compensation

 

 

54

%

 

 

53

%

Professional and consulting costs

 

 

6

%

 

 

9

%

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

9

%

 

 

14

%

Oher product deployment costs

 

 

4

%

 

 

6

%

Travel and entertainment expense

 

 

8

%

 

 

6

%

Other expenses

 

 

19

%

 

 

12

%

 

30  

 

 

Operating expenses decreased by 18% as a result of the following items:

 

 

 

(000’s)

 

Human resource costs, including benefits

 

$

(490

)

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

(483

)

Other product deployment costs, excluding human resources and travel and entertainment expense

 

 

(226

)

Professional and consulting costs

 

 

(273

)

Travel and entertainment expense

 

 

38

 

Other expenses

 

 

84

 

 

 

$

(1,350

)

 

Human resource related costs (including salaries and benefits) decreased primarily as a result of a lower average head count during the nine months ended September 30, 2019 compared to the same period in 2018. While we had 56 employees at September 30, 2019 as compared to 54 for the comparable date for the prior year, on average we employed 55 employees over the course of current period as compared to 63.77 for the comparable prior year period. Depreciation and amortization expense decrease by approximately $483,000, primarily as a result of a reduction in depreciation expense as certain deployable assets purchased have become fully depreciated in 2019. Other product development costs decreased $226,000 primarily as a result of decreases in product deployment and installation costs and related non-capital equipment costs. Professional and consulting fees decreased approximately $273,000, primarily as a result of decreased legal and consulting fees. Travel and entertainment expense increased approximately $38,000 as a result of an increase in product installations during the nine-month period ended September 30, 2019 compared to the same period in 2018. For the comparable periods, other expenses increased approximately $84,000, primarily a result a change in disposal of assets $87,000, an increase in sales and property taxes $104,000, and an increase in rent expense related to common area maintenance costs $62,000, partially offset by reductions in Non-cash compensation, Sales and Marketing and Research and Development non-personnel and travel costs ($172,000) and increase in Miscellaneous other expenses $3,000.

 

Other, net

 

Other non-operating income and expense decreased by approximately $1,521,000, or 16%, for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 in comparison to the same period in 2018, primarily as a result of the Tenth through Fifteenth Amendments to the PDL Modification Agreement, as amended, with PDL BioPharma, Inc. (see NOTE 9 in the accompanying Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for further details).

 

Net Loss

 

As a result of the factors above, our net loss of approximately $9,648,000 for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 decreased approximately $2,909,000, or 23%, as compared to approximately $12,557,000 of net loss for the same period in 2018.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Our cash position at September 30, 2019 was approximately $926,249.

 

Accounting standards require management to evaluate our ability to continue as a going concern for a period of one year subsequent to the date of the filing of this Form 10-Q (“evaluation period”). As such, we have evaluated if cash and cash equivalents on hand and cash generated through operating activities would be sufficient to sustain projected operating activities through November 14, 2020. We anticipate that our current resources, along with cash generated from operations, will not be sufficient to meet our cash requirements throughout the evaluation period, including funding anticipated losses and scheduled debt maturities. We expect to seek additional funds from a combination of dilutive and/or non-dilutive financings in the future. Because such transactions have not been finalized, receipt of additional funding is not considered probable under current accounting standards. If we do not generate sufficient cash flows from operations and obtain sufficient funds when needed, we expect that we would scale back our operating plan by deferring or limiting some, or all, of our capital spending, reducing our spending on travel, and/or eliminating planned headcount additions, as well as other cost reductions to be determined. Because such contingency plans have not been finalized (the specifics would depend on the situation at the time), such actions also are not considered probable for purposes of current accounting standards. Because, under current accounting standards, neither future cash generated from operating activities, nor management’s contingency plans to mitigate the risk and extend cash resources through the evaluation period, are considered probable, substantial doubt is deemed to exist about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. As we continue to incur losses, our transition to profitability is dependent upon achieving a level of revenues adequate to support its cost structure. We may never achieve profitability, and unless and until doing so, we intend to fund future operations through additional dilutive or non-dilutive financings. There can be no assurances, however, that additional funding will be available on terms acceptable to us, if at all.

 

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As of September 30, 2019, we had no material off-balance sheet arrangements.

 

In the ordinary course of business, we enter into agreements with third parties that include indemnification provisions which, in our judgment, are normal and customary for companies in our industry sector. These agreements are typically with business partners, clinical sites, and suppliers. Pursuant to these agreements, we generally agree to indemnify, hold harmless, and reimburse indemnified parties for losses suffered or incurred by the indemnified parties with respect to our product candidates, use of such product candidates, or other actions taken or omitted by us. The maximum potential amount of future payments we could be required to make under these indemnification provisions is unlimited. We have not incurred material costs to defend lawsuits or settle claims related to these indemnification provisions. As a result, the estimated fair value of liabilities relating to these provisions is minimal. Accordingly, we have no liabilities recorded for these provisions as of September 30, 2019.

 

In the normal course of business, we may be confronted with issues or events that may result in a contingent liability. These generally relate to lawsuits, claims, environmental actions or the actions of various regulatory agencies. We consult with counsel and other appropriate experts to assess the claim. If, in our opinion, we have incurred a probable loss as set forth by accounting principles generally accepted in the U.S., an estimate is made of the loss and the appropriate accounting entries are reflected in our financial statements. After consultation with legal counsel, we do not anticipate that liabilities arising out of currently threatened lawsuits and claims, if any, will have a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 

Critical Accounting Estimates

 

Please refer to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018 filed with the Commission on March 29, 2019 and incorporated herein by reference, for detailed explanations of our critical accounting estimates, which have not changed significantly during the three months ended September 30, 2019.

 

New Accounting Pronouncements

 

Aside from the change noted in Leases as summarized in NOTE 1 of the accompanying financial statements, there have been no material changes to our significant accounting policies as summarized in NOTE 2 of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018. We do not expect that the adoption of any recent accounting pronouncements will have a material impact on our accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

Recent Events

 

None.

 

Item 3.  Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

 

None.

 

Item 4.  Controls and Procedures

 

Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

Disclosure controls and procedures are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in the reports filed or submitted under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”) is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time period specified in the SEC’s rules and forms and is accumulated and communicated to our management, as appropriate, in order to allow timely decisions in connection with required disclosure.

 

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Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

Pursuant to Rule 13a-15(b) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (“Exchange Act”), we carried out an evaluation, with the participation of our management, including Steve G. Johnson, our Chief Executive Officer (“CEO”) and principal executive officer, and Jason T. Thompson, our principal financial officer and chief accounting officer, of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined under Rule 13a-15(e) under the Exchange Act) as of the end of the period covered by this Report.

 

Based upon that evaluation, our CEO and Chief Accounting Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of September 30, 2019 to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our CEO and Chief Accounting Officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

Changes in Internal Controls

 

During the three months ended September 30, 2019, there were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1.  Legal Proceedings.

 

None.

 

Item 1A.  Risk Factors.

 

Our Company is a “smaller reporting company” as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act, and as such, is not required to provide the information required under this Item.

 

Item 2.  Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.

 

None.

 

Item 3.  Defaults Upon Senior Securities.

 

None.

 

Item 4.  Mine Safety Disclosures.

 

Not applicable.

 

Item 5.  Other Information.

 

None.

 

33  

 

 

Item 6.  Exhibits.

 

Exhibit No.

Date of Document

Name of Document

31.1

11/14/19

Certification of Chief Executive Officer of Periodic Report pursuant to Rule 13a-14a and Rule 14d-14(a)*

31.2

11/14/19

Certification of Chief Financial Officer of Periodic Report pursuant to Rule 13a-14a and Rule 15d-14(a)*

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11/14/19

Certifications pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002*

101.INS

n/a

XBRL Instance Document*

101.SCH

n/a

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document*

101.CAL

n/a

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document*

101.DEF

n/a

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document*

101.LAB

n/a

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document*

101.PRE

n/a

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document*

 

 

*

Filed herewith.

 

34  

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Company has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

DATE:  November 14, 2019 

 

 

 

 

CAREVIEW COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

   

 

 

 

 

By:

/s/ Steven G. Johnson

 

 

Steven G. Johnson

 

 

Chief Executive Officer

 

 

Principal Executive Officer

 

 

 

 

By:

/s/ Jason T. Thompson

 

 

Jason T. Thompson

 

 

Principal Financial Officer

 

 

Chief Accounting Officer

 

35