Company Quick10K Filing
Quick10K
Diebold Nixdorf
Closing Price ($) Shares Out (MM) Market Cap ($MM)
$12.76 77 $977
10-K 2018-12-31 Annual: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-09-30 Quarter: 2018-09-30
10-Q 2018-06-30 Quarter: 2018-06-30
10-Q 2018-03-31 Quarter: 2018-03-31
10-K 2017-12-31 Annual: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-09-30 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-Q 2017-06-30 Quarter: 2017-06-30
10-Q 2017-03-31 Quarter: 2017-03-31
10-K 2016-12-31 Annual: 2016-12-31
10-Q 2016-09-30 Quarter: 2016-09-30
10-Q 2016-06-30 Quarter: 2016-06-30
10-Q 2016-03-31 Quarter: 2016-03-31
10-K 2015-12-31 Annual: 2015-12-31
10-Q 2015-09-30 Quarter: 2015-09-30
10-Q 2015-06-30 Quarter: 2015-06-30
10-Q 2015-03-31 Quarter: 2015-03-31
10-K 2014-12-31 Annual: 2014-12-31
10-Q 2014-09-30 Quarter: 2014-09-30
10-Q 2014-06-30 Quarter: 2014-06-30
10-Q 2014-03-31 Quarter: 2014-03-31
10-K 2013-12-31 Annual: 2013-12-31
8-K 2019-04-14 Officers
8-K 2019-02-22 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2019-02-13 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-01-28 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2019-01-14 Regulation FD
8-K 2019-01-03 Officers, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-10-31 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-10-31 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-09-30 Officers, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-09-09 Officers, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-30 Enter Agreement, Off-BS Arrangement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-27 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-01 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-01 Earnings
8-K 2018-05-22 Officers, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-04-24 Officers, Shareholder Vote, Exhibits
8-K 2018-04-17 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-03-21 Officers
8-K 2018-02-21 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2018-02-13 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-02-06 Officers
EW Edwards Lifesciences 39,620
BIP Brookfield Infrastructure Partners 11,680
BKU Bankunited 3,520
SFIX Stitch Fix 2,630
FFG FBL Financial Group 1,610
CHMG Chemung Financial 239
ZEUS Olympic Steel 186
NETE Net Element 23
HLAB Hash Labs 0
XDSL Mphase Technologies 0
DBD 2018-12-31
Part I
Item 1: Business
Item 1A: Risk Factors
Item 1B: Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 2: Properties
Item 3: Legal Proceedings
Item 4: Mine Safety Disclosures
Part II
Item 5: Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6: Selected Financial Data
Item 7: Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 7A: Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 8: Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Note 2: Earnings (Loss) per Share
Note 3: Share-Based Compensation and Equity
Note 4: Income Taxes
Note 5: Inventories
Note 6: Property, Plant and Equipment
Note 7: Investments
Note 8: Goodwill and Other Assets
Note 9: Guarantees and Product Warranties
Note 10: Restructuring
Note 11: Debt
Note 12: Redeemable Noncontrolling Interests
Note 13: Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss
Note 14: Acquisitions and Divestitures
Note 15: Benefit Plans
Note 16: Leases
Note 17: Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities
Note 18: Fair Value of Assets and Liabilities
Note 19: Commitments and Contingencies
Note 20: Segment and Net Sales Information
Note 21: Quarterly Financial Information (Unaudited)
Note 22: Supplemental Guarantor Information
Item 9: Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A: Controls and Procedures
Item 9B: Other Information
Part III
Item 10: Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11: Executive Compensation
Item 12: Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Item 13: Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence
Item 14: Principal Accountant Fees and Services
Part IV
Item 15: Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
Item 16: Form 10-K Summary
EX-4.1(II) dbd12312018ex-41ii.htm
EX-4.1(III) dbd12312018ex-41iii.htm
EX-10.2(VII) dbd12312018ex-102vii.htm
EX-10.9(V) dbd12312018ex-109v.htm
EX-10.36 dbd12312018ex-1036.htm
EX-21.1 dbd12312018ex-211.htm
EX-23.1 dbd12312018ex-231.htm
EX-24.1 dbd12312018ex-241.htm
EX-31.1 dbd12312018ex-311.htm
EX-31.2 dbd12312018ex-312.htm
EX-32.1 dbd12312018ex-321.htm
EX-32.2 dbd12312018ex-322.htm

Diebold Nixdorf Earnings 2018-12-31

DBD 10K Annual Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

10-K 1 dbd12312018-10k.htm FORM 10-K Document


UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K
x
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018
OR
o
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the transition period from    to
Commission file number 1-4879
Diebold Nixdorf, Incorporated
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Ohio
34-0183970
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 
 
5995 Mayfair Road,
P.O. Box 3077, North Canton, Ohio
44720-8077
(Address of principal
executive offices)
(Zip Code)
Registrants telephone number, including area code (330) 490-4000
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Shares $1.25 Par Value
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes x  No o
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act. Yes o  No x
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x  No o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes x  No o
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. x
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer x
Accelerated filer o
Non-accelerated filer o
Smaller reporting company o
Emerging growth company o
 
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes o  No x
Approximate aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates as of June 29, 2018, based upon the closing price on the New York Stock Exchange on June 29, 2018, was $906,522,734.
Number of common shares outstanding as of February 25, 2019 was 76,563,308.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Listed hereunder are the documents, portions of which are incorporated by reference, and the parts of this Form 10-K into which such portions are incorporated:
Diebold Nixdorf, Incorporated Proxy Statement for 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held on or about April 25, 2019, portions of which are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Form 10-K.




TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




PART I

ITEM 1: BUSINESS
(dollars in millions)

GENERAL

Diebold Nixdorf, Incorporated (collectively with its subsidiaries, the Company) is a world leader in enabling Connected Commerce. The Company automates, digitizes and transforms the way people bank and shop. The Company’s integrated solutions connect digital and physical channels conveniently, securely and efficiently for millions of consumers every day. As an innovation partner for nearly all of the world's top 100 financial institutions and a majority of the top 25 global retailers, the Company delivers unparalleled services and technology that power the daily operations and consumer experience of banks and retailers around the world. The Company has a presence in more than 100 countries with approximately 23,000 employees worldwide.

Strategy
The Company seeks to continually enhance the consumer experience at bank and retail locations while simultaneously streamlining cost structures and business processes through the smart integration of hardware, software and services. The Company partners with other leading technology companies and regularly refines its research and development (R&D) spend to support a better transaction experience for consumers.

DN Now Transformation Activities

Commensurate with its strategy, the Company has evolved its multi-year transformation program called DN Now to relentlessly focus on its customers and improve operational excellence. Key activities underway include:

Transitioning to a streamlined and customer-centric operating model
Implementing a services modernization plan which focuses on upgrading certain customer touchpoints, automating incident reporting and response, and standardizing service offerings and internal processes
Streamlining the product range of automated teller machines (ATMs) and manufacturing footprint
Improving working capital management through greater focus and efficiency of payables, receivables and inventory
Reducing administrative expenses, including finance, information technology (IT) and real estate
Increasing sales productivity through improved coverage and compensation arrangements
Standardizing back-office processes to automate reporting and better manage risks
Optimizing the portfolio of businesses to improve overall profitability

These work streams are designed to improve the Company’s profitability and net leverage while establishing a foundation for future growth. The gross annualized savings target for DN Now is approximately $400 through 2021, of which $160 is anticipated to be realized during 2019. In order to achieve these savings, the Company has and will continue to restructure the workforce, integrate and optimize systems and processes, transition workloads to lower cost locations and consolidate real estate holdings. By executing on these and other operational improvement activities, the Company expects to increase customer intimacy and satisfaction, while providing career enrichment opportunities for employees and enhancing value for shareholders.

CONNECTED COMMERCE SOLUTIONS

The Company’s operating structure is focused on its two customer segments — Banking and Retail. Leveraging a broad portfolio of solutions, the Company offers customers the flexibility to purchase the combination of services, software and systems that drive the most value to their business.

Banking

The Company provides integrated solutions for financial institutions of all sizes designed to help drive operational efficiencies, differentiate the consumer experience, grow revenue and manage risk. Banking operations are managed within two geographic regions. The Eurasia region includes the developed economies of Western Europe as well as the emerging economies of Eastern Europe, Asia, the Middle East and Africa. The Americas region encompasses the United States (U.S.), Canada, Mexico and Latin America.

For banking clients, services represents the largest operational component of the Company. Diebold Nixdorf AllConnectSM Services was launched in 2018 to power the business operations of financial institutions of all sizes. This as-a-service offering provides financial institutions with the capabilities and technology needed to make physical distribution channels as agile, integrated, efficient and differentiated as their digital counterparts by leveraging a data-driven Internet of Things (IoT) infrastructure. The Company’s product-related services resolve incidents through remote service capabilities or an on-site visit. The portfolio includes first and second line maintenance, preventive maintenance, “on-demand” and total implementation services.


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Managed services and outsourcing consists of managing the end-to-end business processes, technology integration and day-to-day operation of the self-service channel and the bank branch. Our integrated business solutions include self-service fleet management, branch life-cycle management and ATM as-a-service capabilities.

From a product perspective, the banking portfolio consists of cash recyclers and dispensers, intelligent deposit terminals, teller automation and kiosk technologies, as well as physical security solutions. The Company assists financial institutions to increase the functionality, availability and security within their ATM fleet.

The Company’s software encompasses front-end applications for consumer connection points as well as back-end platforms which manage channel transactions, operations and integration. These hardware-agnostic software applications facilitate millions of transactions via ATMs, kiosks, and other self-service devices, as well as via online and mobile digital channels.

In 2017, the Company introduced DN Vynamic™ Software, the first end-to-end Connected Commerce software portfolio in the banking marketplace designed to simplify and enhance the consumer experience. In addition, DN Vynamic suite's open application program interface (API) architecture is built to simplify operations by eliminating the traditional focus on internal silos and enabling tomorrow's inter-connected partnerships between financial institutions and payment providers. In addition, with a shared analytic and transaction engine, the DN Vynamic platform can generate new insights to enhance operations across any channel - putting consumer preferences, not the technology, at the heart of the experience.

An important enabler of the Company’s software offerings is the professional service employees who provide systems integration, customization, project management and consulting. The Company's advisory services team collaborates with customers to refine the end-user experience, improve business processes, refine existing staffing models and deploy technology to automate both branches and stores.

Retail

The Company’s comprehensive portfolio of retail solutions, software and services improves the checkout process for retailers while enhancing shopping experiences for consumers.

The DN Vynamic software suite for retailers provides a comprehensive, modular solution capable of enabling Connected Commerce across multiple channels, improving end-to-end store processes and facilitating continuous consumer engagements in support of a digital ecosystem. This includes click & collect, reserve & collect, in-store ordering and return-to-store processes across the retailers' physical and digital sales channels. Operational data from a number of sources, such as enterprise resource planning (ERP), point of sale (POS), store systems and customer relationship management systems (CRM), may be integrated across all customer connection points to create seamless and differentiated consumer experiences.

Diebold Nixdorf AllConnect Services for retailers include maintenance and availability services to continuously improve retail self-service fleet availability and performance. These include: total implementation services to support both current and new store concepts; managed mobility services to centralize asset management and ensure effective, tailored mobile capability; monitoring and advanced analytics providing operational insights to support new growth opportunities; and store life-cycle management to proactively monitor store IT endpoints and enable improved management of internal and external suppliers and delivery organizations.

Service personnel supervise store openings, renewals and transformation projects, with attention to local details and customers’ global IT infrastructure.

The retail systems portfolio includes modular, integrated and mobile POS and self-checkout (SCO) terminals that meet evolving automation and omnichannel requirements of consumers. The Company also provides SCO terminals and ordering kiosks that facilitate an efficient and user-friendly purchasing experience. The BEETLE /iSCAN EASY eXpress, hybrid products, can alternate from attended operation to self-checkout with the press of a button as customer conditions warrant. The K-Two Kiosk automates routine tasks and in-store transactions, offers order-taking abilities at quick service restaurants (QSRs) and fast casual restaurants, displays product information, sells tickets and presents functionality that furthers store automation and digitalization. Supplementing the POS system is a broad range of peripherals, including printers, scales and mobile scanners, as well as the cash management portfolio, which offers a wide range of banknote and coin processing systems.

COMPETITION

The Company competes with global, regional and local competitors to provide technology solutions for financial institutions and retailers. The Company differentiates its offerings by providing a wide range of innovative solutions that leverage innovations in advanced security, biometric authentication, mobile connectivity, contactless transactions, cloud computing and IoT. Based upon independent industry surveys from Retail Banking Research (RBR), the Company is a leading service provider and manufacturer of self-service solutions across the globe.

Competitors in the self-service banking market include NCR, Nautilus Hyosung, GRG Banking Equipment, Glory Global Solutions, Oki Data and Triton Systems, as well as a number of local manufacturing and service providers such as Fujitsu and Hitachi-Omron

4


in Asia Pacific (AP); Hantle/GenMega in North America (NA); KEBA in Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA); and Perto in Latin America (LA). In Brazil, the Company provides election systems, lottery terminals and product support to the Brazil government. Competition in this market segment is based upon technology pre-qualification demonstrations.

In a number of markets, the Company sells to, but also competes with, independent ATM deployers such as Cardtronics, Payment Alliance International and Euronet.

In the retail market, the Company is a leader in helping the majority of retailers headquartered in Europe transform their stores to a consumer-centric approach by providing electronic POS (ePOS), automated checkout solutions, cash management, software and services. The Company competes with some of the key players highlighted above plus other technology firms such as Toshiba and Fujitsu, and specialized software players such as GK Software, Oracle, Aptos and PCMS. Many retailers also work with proprietary software solutions.

For its services offerings, the Company perceives competition to be fragmented, especially in the product-related services segment. While other manufacturers provide basic levels of product support, the competition also includes local and regional third-party providers. With respect to higher value managed services, the Company competes with large IT service providers such as IBM, Atos, Fiserv and DXC Technology.

In the self-service software market, the Company, in addition to the key hardware players highlighted above, competes with several smaller, niche software companies like KAL, or with the internal software development teams of banks and retailers.

OPERATIONS

The Company’s operating results and the amount and timing of revenue are affected by numerous factors, including production schedules, customer priorities, sales volume and mix. During the past several years, the Company has honed its offerings to become a total solutions provider with a focus on Connected Commerce. As a result of the emphasis on services and software, the nature of the Company's workforce is changing and requires new skill sets in areas such as:

Advanced security and compliance measures,
Advanced sensors,
Modern field services operations,
Cloud computing,
Analytics, and
As-a-service software expertise.

The principal raw materials used by the Company in its manufacturing operations are steel, plastics, electronic parts and components and spare parts, which are purchased from various major suppliers. These materials and components are generally available in ample quantities.

The Company carries working capital mainly related to trade receivables and inventories. Inventories generally are manufactured or purchased as orders are received from customers. The Company’s normal and customary payment terms generally range from 30 to 90 days from date of invoice. The Company generally does not offer extended payment terms. The Company
also provides financing arrangements to customers that are largely classified and accounted for as sales-type leases.

PRODUCT BACKLOG

The Company's product backlog was $1,012.7 and $1,026.7 as of December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. The backlog generally includes orders estimated or projected to be shipped or installed within 18 months. Although the Company believes the orders included in the backlog are firm, some orders may be canceled by customers without penalty, and the Company may elect to permit cancellation of orders without penalty where management believes it is in the Company's best interests to do so. Historically, the Company has not experienced significant cancellations within its product backlog. Additionally, over 50 percent of the Company's revenues are derived from its service business, for which backlog information is not measured. Therefore, the Company does not believe that its product backlog, as of any particular date, is necessarily indicative of revenues for any future period.

PATENTS, TRADEMARKS, LICENSES

The Company owns patents, trademarks and licenses relating to certain products across the globe. While the Company regards these as items of importance, it does not deem its business as a whole, or any industry segment, to be materially dependent upon any one item or group of items. The Company intends to protect and defend its intellectual property, including pursuit of infringing third parties for damages and other appropriate remedies.


5


ENVIRONMENTAL

Compliance with federal, state and local environmental protection laws during 2018 had no material effect upon the Company’s business, financial condition or results of operations.

EMPLOYEES

At December 31, 2018, the Company employed approximately 23,000 associates globally. The Company conducts business in more than 100 countries.

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

Refer to Item 10 of this annual report on Form 10-K for information on the Company's executive officers, which is incorporated herein by reference.

AVAILABLE INFORMATION

The Company uses its Investor Relations web site, http://investors.dieboldnixdorf.com, as a channel for routine distribution of important information, including stock information, news releases, investor presentations and financial information. The Company posts filings as soon as reasonably practicable after they are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), including its annual, quarterly, and current reports on Forms 10-K, 10-Q, and 8-K; its proxy statements; registration statements; and any amendments to those reports or statements. All such postings and filings are available on the Company’s Investor Relations web site free of charge. In addition, this web site allows investors and other interested persons to sign up to automatically receive e-mail alerts when the Company posts news releases and financial information on its web site. Investors and other interested persons can also follow the Company on Twitter at http://twitter.com/dieboldnixdorf. The SEC also maintains a web site, www.sec.gov, that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC. The content on any web site referred to in this annual report on Form 10-K is not incorporated by reference into this annual report unless expressly noted.


6


ITEM 1A: RISK FACTORS
(dollars and euros in millions)

The following are certain risk factors that could affect the Company's business, financial condition, operating results and cash flows. These risk factors should be considered in connection with evaluating the forward-looking statements contained in this annual report on Form 10-K because they could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statement. The risk factors highlighted below are not the only ones the Company faces. If any of these events actually occur, the Company's business, financial condition, operating results or cash flows could be negatively affected.

The Company cautions the reader to keep these risk factors in mind and refrain from attributing undue certainty to any forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this annual report on Form 10-K.

The Company may fail to realize all of the anticipated strategic and financial benefits sought from the 2016 acquisition of Diebold Nixdorf AG (the Acquisition).

The Company may not realize all of the anticipated benefits of the Acquisition. The success of the Acquisition depends upon, among other things, the Company’s ability to combine its business with Diebold Nixdorf AG’s business in a manner that facilitates growth in the value-added services sector and realizes anticipated cost savings. The operations and personnel of the Acquisition involves complex operational, technological and personnel-related challenges. This process can be time-consuming and expensive, and it may disrupt the businesses of the Company. The Company believes that the Acquisition will provide an opportunity for revenue growth in managed services, professional services, installation and maintenance services.

However, the Company must successfully combine the Acquisition in a manner that permits these anticipated benefits to be realized. In addition, the Company must achieve the anticipated growth and cost savings without adversely affecting current revenues and investments in future growth. Further, providing managed services, professional services, installation and maintenance services can be highly complex and can involve the design, development, implementation and operation of new solutions and the transitioning of clients from their existing systems and processes to a new environment. If the Company is not able to effectively provide value-added services and successfully achieve the growth and cost savings objectives, the anticipated benefits of the Acquisition may not be realized fully, or at all, or may take longer to realize than expected.

The Company may not be able to achieve, or may be delayed in achieving, the goals of its DN Now initiatives, and this may adversely affect its operating results and cash flow.

The Company's DN Now initiatives consist of a customer-focused operating model designed to increase profitable sales, improve gross margin, improve operating efficiencies and reduce operating costs. Although the Company has achieved a substantial amount of annual cost savings associated with the cost-cutting initiatives of DN Now, it may be unable to sustain the cost savings that it has achieved or may be unable to achieve additional cost savings. If the Company is unable to achieve, or has any unexpected delays in achieving, the goals of DN Now, its results of operations and cash flows may be adversely affected. Even if the Company meets its goals as a result of its DN Now initiatives, it may not receive the expected financial benefits of these initiatives, within the expected timeframe or at all.

The Company is exposed to additional litigation risk and uncertainty with respect to the remaining minority shareholders of Diebold Nixdorf AG.

As a result of the Acquisition, the Company continues to be exposed to litigation risk and uncertainty associated with the remaining minority shareholders of Diebold Nixdorf AG. The adequacy of both forms of compensation payments to minority shareholders agreed under the terms of the Domination and Profit and Loss Transfer Agreement between Diebold Holding Germany Inc. & Co. KGaA (Diebold KGaA), a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company and Diebold Nixdorf AG (the DPLTA) has been challenged by certain minority shareholders of Diebold Nixdorf AG, who have initiated court-led appraisal proceedings under German law. The Company cannot rule out that the competent court in such appraisal proceeding may adjudicate a higher exit compensation or recurring payment obligation (in each case, including interest thereon) than agreed upon in the DPLTA, the financial impact and timing of which is uncertain. Furthermore, on January 31, 2019, Diebold KGaA entered into a merger agreement with Diebold Nixdorf AG pursuant to which Diebold Nixdorf AG shall be merged with and into Diebold KGaA. In this context, a squeeze-out of the remaining minority shareholders of Diebold Nixdorf AG against adequate cash compensation will be carried out. The timing of when the merger becomes effective as well as its ultimate financial impact remain uncertain.

The Company’s failure to meet its debt service obligations could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition and results of operations.

The Company’s high level of indebtedness could adversely affect the Company’s operations and liquidity. The Company’s level of indebtedness could, among other things:

make it more difficult for the Company to pay or refinance its debts as they become due during adverse economic and industry conditions because the Company may not have sufficient cash flows to make its scheduled debt payments;

7


cause the Company to use a larger portion of its cash flow to fund interest and principal payments, reducing the availability of cash to fund working capital, capital expenditures, R&D and other business activities;
limit the Company’s ability to take advantage of significant business opportunities, such as acquisition opportunities, and to react to changes in market or industry conditions;
cause the Company to be more vulnerable to general adverse economic and industry conditions;
cause the Company to be disadvantaged compared to competitors with less leverage;
result in a downgrade in the credit rating of the Company or indebtedness of the Company or its subsidiaries, which could increase the cost of borrowings; and
limit the Company’s ability to borrow additional monies in the future to fund working capital, capital expenditures, R&D and other business activities.

In addition, the agreements governing the Company's indebtedness contain restrictive covenants that limit its ability to engage in activities that may be in its long-term best interest. The Company's failure to comply with those covenants could result in an event of default that, if not cured or waived, could result in the acceleration of all its debt.

The Company may also incur additional long-term debt and working capital lines of credit to meet future financing needs, which would increase its total indebtedness. Although the terms of its existing and future credit agreements and of the indenture governing its high-yield senior notes (the Indenture) contain restrictions on the incurrence of additional debt, including secured debt, these restrictions are subject to a number of important exceptions and debt incurred in compliance with these restrictions could be substantial. If the Company and its restricted subsidiaries incur significant additional debt, the related risks that the Company faces could intensify.

The Company may not be able to generate sufficient cash to service all of its indebtedness and may be forced to take other actions to satisfy its obligations under its indebtedness, which may not be successful.

The Company's ability to make scheduled payments or refinance its debt obligations depends on its financial condition and operating performance, which are subject to prevailing economic and competitive conditions and to certain financial, business, legislative, regulatory and other factors beyond its control. The Company may be unable to maintain a level of cash flows from operating activities sufficient to permit the payment of principal, premium, if any, and interest on its indebtedness.

If the Company's cash flows and capital resources are insufficient to fund its debt service obligations, the Company could face substantial liquidity problems and could be forced to reduce or delay investments and capital expenditures or to dispose of material assets or operations, seek additional debt or equity capital or restructure or refinance its indebtedness. The Company may not be able to effect any such alternative measures, if necessary, on commercially reasonable terms or at all and, even if successful, those alternative actions may not allow the Company to meet its scheduled debt service obligations. In addition, the terms of the Company's existing or future debt arrangements may restrict it from effecting any of these alternatives.

The Company's existing revolving credit facility, letter of credit in the revolver, Delayed Draw Term Loan A Facility and Term Loan A Facility mature in December 2020. As of December 31, 2018, $125.0 was outstanding under the revolving credit facility in addition to $27.5 letters of credit, $160.5 was outstanding under the Delayed Draw Term Loan A Facility and $126.3 million was outstanding under the Term Loan A Facility. Although the Company intends to refinance the amounts outstanding under the revolving credit facility and Term Loan A Facility prior to maturity, there can be no assurance it will be able to do so on commercially reasonable terms or at all. The Company's inability to generate sufficient cash flows to satisfy its debt obligations, or to refinance any of its indebtedness on commercially reasonable terms or at all, would materially and adversely affect its financial position and results of operations.

The terms of the credit agreement governing the Company's revolving credit facility and term loans (the Credit Agreement) and the Indenture restrict its current and future operations, particularly its ability to respond to changes or to take certain actions.

The Credit Agreement and the Indenture contain a number of restrictive covenants that impose significant operating and financial restrictions on the Company and may limit its ability to engage in acts that may be in its long-term best interest, including restrictions on its ability to:

incur additional indebtedness and guarantee indebtedness;
pay dividends or make other distributions or repurchase or redeem capital stock;
prepay, redeem or repurchase certain debt;
issue certain preferred stock or similar equity securities;
make loans and investments;
sell assets;
incur liens;
enter into transactions with affiliates;
alter the businesses the Company conducts;
enter into agreements restricting the Company's subsidiaries’ ability to pay dividends; and
consolidate, merge or sell all or substantially all of the Company's assets.


8


In addition, the restrictive covenants in the Credit Agreement require the Company to maintain specified financial ratios and satisfy other financial condition tests. Although it entered into an amendment to the Credit Agreement in August 2018 to, among other things, revise certain of the Company's financial covenants, upon the occurrence of certain events, the financial covenants, including the Company's net leverage ratio, will revert to pre-amendment levels. The Company's ability to meet the financial ratios and tests can be affected by events beyond its control, and it may be unable to meet them.

A breach of the covenants or restrictions under the Indenture or under the Credit Agreement could result in an event of default under the applicable indebtedness. Such a default may allow the creditors to accelerate the related debt and may result in the acceleration of any other debt to which a cross-acceleration or cross-default provision applies. In addition, an event of default under the Credit Agreement would permit the lenders under the Company's revolving credit facility to terminate all commitments to extend further credit under that facility. Furthermore, if the Company were unable to repay the amounts due and payable under its revolving credit facility and term loans, those lenders could proceed against the collateral granted them to secure that indebtedness. In the event the Company's lenders or noteholders accelerate the repayment of its borrowings, the Company and its subsidiaries may not have sufficient assets to repay that indebtedness. As a result of these restrictions, the Company may be:

limited in how it conduct its business;
unable to raise additional debt or equity financing to operate during general economic or business downturns; and
unable to compete effectively or to take advantage of new business opportunities.

These restrictions may affect the Company's ability to grow in accordance with its strategy. In addition, the Company's financial results, its substantial indebtedness and its credit ratings could adversely affect the availability and terms of its financing.

The Company may not be successful divesting its non-core and/or non-accretive businesses.

The Company has a plan to divest certain non-core and/or non-accretive businesses to, among other things, simplify its business and reduce its debt. However, there can be no assurance that it will be successful in selling any assets. It may incur substantial expenses associated with identifying and evaluating potential sales. The process of exploring any sales may be time consuming and disruptive to its business operations, and if it is unable to effectively manage the process, its business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected. It also cannot assure that any potential sale, if consummated, will prove to be beneficial to its shareholders. Any potential sale would be dependent upon a number of factors that may be beyond its control, including, among other factors, market conditions, industry trends, the interest of third parties in the assets and the availability of financing to potential buyers on reasonable terms.

In addition, while it evaluates asset sales, the Company is exposed to risks and uncertainties, including potential difficulties in retaining and attracting key employees, distraction of its management from other important business activities, and potential difficulties in establishing and maintaining relationships with customers, suppliers, lenders, sureties and other third parties, all of which could harm its business.

Demand for and supply of the Company's services and products may be adversely affected by numerous factors, some of which it cannot predict or control. This could adversely affect its operating results.

Numerous factors may affect the demand for and supply of the Company's services and products, including:

changes in the market acceptance of its services and products;
customer and competitor consolidation;
changes in customer preferences;
declines in general economic conditions;
disruptive technologies;
changes in environmental regulations that would limit its ability to service and sell products in specific markets;
macro-economic factors affecting retail stores and banks, credit unions and other financial institutions may lead to cost-cutting efforts by customers, including branch closures, which could cause it to lose current or potential customers or achieve less revenue per customer; and
availability of purchased products.

If any of these factors occur, the demand for and supply of the Company's services and products could suffer, which could adversely affect its results of operations.


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The Company’s ability to deliver products that satisfy customer requirements is dependent on the performance of its subcontractors and suppliers, as well as on the availability of raw materials and other components.

The Company relies on other companies, including subcontractors and suppliers, to provide and produce raw materials, integrated components and sub-assemblies and production commodities included in, or used in the production of, its products. If one or more of the Company's subcontractors or suppliers experiences delivery delays or other performance problems, it may be unable to meet commitments to its customers or incur additional costs. In some instances, the Company depends upon a single source of supply. Any service disruption from one of these suppliers, either due to circumstances beyond the supplier’s control, such as geo-political developments, or as a result of performance problems or financial difficulties, could have a material adverse effect on the Company's ability to meet commitments to its customers or increase its operating costs.

Increased energy, raw material and labor costs could reduce the Company's operating results.

Energy prices, particularly petroleum prices, are cost drivers for the Company's business. In recent years, the price of petroleum has been highly volatile, particularly due to the unstable political conditions in the Middle East and increasing international demand from emerging markets. Price increases in fuel and electricity costs, such as those increases that may occur from climate change legislation or other environmental mandates, may continue to increase cost of operations. Any increase in the costs of energy would also increase the Company's transportation costs.

The primary raw materials in the Company's services, software and systems solutions are steel, plastics, and electronic parts and components. The majority of raw materials are purchased from various local, regional and global suppliers pursuant to supply contracts. However, the price of these materials can fluctuate under these contracts in tandem with the pricing of raw materials.

The Company cannot assure that its labor costs going forward will remain competitive or will not increase. In the future, the Company's labor agreements may be amended, or become amendable, and new agreements could have terms with higher labor costs. In addition, labor costs may increase in connection with the Company's growth. The Company may also become subject to collective bargaining agreements in the future in the event that non-unionized workers may unionize.

Although the Company attempts to pass on higher energy, raw material and labor costs to its customers, it is often not possible given the competitive markets in which it operates.

In addition to the Acquisition, the Company may be unable to successfully and effectively manage acquisitions, divestitures and other significant transactions, which could harm its operating results, business and prospects.

As part of its business strategy, the Company frequently engages in discussions with third parties regarding possible investments, acquisitions, strategic alliances, joint ventures, divestitures and outsourcing arrangements, and enters into agreements relating to such transactions in order to further its business objectives. In order to pursue this strategy successfully, it must identify suitable candidates, successfully complete transactions, some of which may be large and complex, and manage post-closing issues such as the integration of acquired companies or employees and the divestiture of combined businesses, operations and employees. Integration, divestiture and other risks of these transactions can be more pronounced in larger and more complicated transactions, or if multiple transactions are pursued simultaneously. If it fails to identify and successfully complete transactions that further its strategic objectives, it may be required to expend resources to develop products and technology internally. This may put it at a competitive disadvantage and it may be adversely affected by negative market perceptions, any of which may have a material adverse effect on its revenue, gross margin and profitability.

Integration and divestiture issues are complex, time-consuming and expensive and, without proper planning and implementation, could significantly disrupt the Company's business. The challenges involved in integrating and divesting include:

combining service and product offerings and entering into new markets in which the Company is not experienced;
convincing customers and distributors that any such transaction will not diminish client service standards or business focus, preventing customers and distributors from deferring purchasing decisions or switching to other suppliers or service providers (which could result in additional obligations to address customer uncertainty), and coordinating service, sales, marketing and distribution efforts;
consolidating and rationalizing corporate IT infrastructure, which may include multiple systems from various acquisitions and integrating software code;
minimizing the diversion of management attention from ongoing business concerns;
persuading employees that business cultures are compatible, maintaining employee morale and retaining key employees, integrating employees into the Company, correctly estimating employee benefit costs and implementing restructuring programs;
coordinating and combining administrative, service, manufacturing, R&D and other operations, subsidiaries, facilities and relationships with third parties in accordance with local laws and other obligations while maintaining adequate standards, controls and procedures; 
achieving savings from supply chain and administration integration; and
efficiently divesting combined business operations which may cause increased costs as divested businesses are de-integrated from embedded systems and operations.

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The Company evaluates and enters into these types of transactions on an ongoing basis. It may not fully realize all of the anticipated benefits of any transaction and the time frame for achieving benefits of a transaction may depend partially upon the actions of employees, suppliers or other third parties. In addition, the pricing and other terms of its contracts for these transactions require it to make estimates and assumptions at the time it enters into these contracts, and, during the course of its due diligence, it may not identify all of the factors necessary to estimate costs accurately. Any increased or unexpected costs, unanticipated delays or failure to achieve contractual obligations could make these agreements less profitable or unprofitable.

The Company's business may be affected by general economic conditions, cyclicality and uncertainty and could be adversely affected during economic downturns.

Demand for the Company's services and products is affected by general economic conditions and the business conditions of the industries in which it sells its services and products. The business of most of the Company's customers, particularly its financial institution and retail customers, is, to varying degrees, cyclical and has historically experienced periodic downturns. Under difficult economic conditions, customers may seek to reduce discretionary spending by forgoing purchases of the Company's services and products. This risk is magnified for capital goods purchases such as ATMs, retail systems and physical security products. In addition, downturns in the Company's customers’ industries, even during periods of strong general economic conditions, could adversely affect the demand for the Company's services and products, and its sales and operating results.

In particular, continuing economic difficulties in the global markets have led to an economic recession in certain markets in which the Company operates. As a result of these difficulties and other factors, including new or increased regulatory burdens, financial institutions and retail customers have failed and may continue to fail, resulting in a loss of current or potential customers, or deferred or canceled orders, including orders previously placed. Any customer deferrals or cancellations could materially affect the Company's sales and operating results.

The Company faces competition that could adversely affect its sales and financial condition.

All phases of the Company's business are highly competitive. Some of its services and products are in direct competition with similar or alternative services or products provided by its competitors. The Company encounters competition in price, delivery, service, performance, product innovation, product recognition and quality.

Because of the potential for consolidation in any market, the Company's competitors may become larger, which could make them more efficient and permit them to be more price-competitive. Increased size could also permit them to operate in wider geographic areas and enhance their abilities in other areas such as R&D and customer service. As a result, this could also reduce the Company's profitability.

The Company expects that its competitors will continue to develop and introduce new and enhanced services and products. This could cause a decline in market acceptance of the Company's services and products. In addition, the Company's competitors could cause a reduction in the prices for some of its services and products as a result of intensified price competition. Also, the Company may be unable to effectively anticipate and react to new entrants in the marketplace competing with its services and products.

Competitive pressures can also result in the loss of major customers. An inability to compete successfully could have an adverse effect on the Company's operating results, financial condition and cash flows in any given period.

Additional tax expense or additional tax exposures could affect the Company's future profitability.

The Company is subject to income taxes in both the U.S. and various non-U.S. jurisdictions, and its domestic and international tax liabilities are dependent upon the distribution of income among these different jurisdictions. If the Company decides to repatriate cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments residing in international tax jurisdictions, there could be further negative impact on foreign and domestic taxes. The Company's tax expense includes estimates of additional tax that may be incurred for tax exposures and reflects various estimates and assumptions, including assessments of future earnings of the Company that could affect the valuation of its net deferred tax assets. The Company's future results could be adversely affected by changes in the effective tax rate as a result of a change in the mix of earnings in countries with differing statutory tax rates, changes in the overall profitability of the Company, changes in tax legislation, changes in the valuation of deferred tax assets and liabilities, the results of audits and examinations of previously filed tax returns and continuing assessments of its income tax exposures.

Additionally, the Company's future results could be adversely affected by the results of indirect tax audits and examinations, and continuing assessments of its indirect tax exposures. A loss contingency is reasonably possible if it has a more than remote but less than probable chance of occurring. Although management believes the Company has valid defenses with respect to its indirect tax positions, it is reasonably possible that a loss could occur in excess of the estimated accrual. The Company estimated the aggregate risk at December 31, 2018 to be up to $106.1 for its material indirect tax matters. The aggregate risk related to indirect taxes is adjusted as the applicable statutes of limitations expire. It is reasonably possible that the Company could be required to pay taxes, penalties and interest related to this matter or other open years, which could be material to its financial condition and results of operations.

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In international markets, the Company competes with local service providers that may have competitive advantages.

In a number of international markets in each region where the Company operates, for instance in Brazil and China, it faces substantial competition from local service providers that offer competing services and products. Some of these companies may have a dominant market share in their territories and may be owned by local stakeholders. This could give them a competitive advantage. Local providers of competing services and products may also have a substantial advantage in attracting customers in their countries due to more established branding in that country, greater knowledge with respect to the tastes and preferences of customers residing in that country and/or their focus on a single market. As a U.S. based multi-national corporation, the Company must ensure its compliance with both U.S. and foreign regulatory requirements.

Because the Company's operations are conducted worldwide, they are affected by risks of doing business abroad.

The Company generates a significant percentage of revenue from operations conducted outside the U.S. Revenue from international operations amounted to approximately 77.1 percent in 2018, 77.2 percent in 2017 and 67.0 percent in 2016 of total revenue during these respective years.

Accordingly, international operations are subject to the risks of doing business abroad, including, among other things, the following:

fluctuations in currency exchange rates, particularly in EMEA (primarily the euro (EUR) and Great Britain pound sterling (GBP)), Mexico (peso), Thailand (baht) and Brazil (real);
transportation and supply chain delays and interruptions;
political and economic instability and disruptions, including the impact of trade agreements;
the failure of foreign governments to abide by international agreements and treaties;
restrictions on the transfer of funds;
the imposition of duties, tariffs and other taxes;
import and export controls;
changes in governmental policies and regulatory environments;
ensuring the Company's compliance with U.S. laws and regulations and applicable laws and regulations in other jurisdictions, including the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), the U.K. Bribery Act, and applicable laws and regulations in other jurisdictions;
increasingly complex laws and regulations concerning privacy and data security, including the European Union’s (EU) General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR);
labor unrest and current and changing regulatory environments;
the uncertainty of product acceptance by different cultures;
the risks of divergent business expectations or cultural incompatibility inherent in establishing strategic alliances with foreign partners;
difficulties in staffing and managing multi-national operations;
limitations on the ability to enforce legal rights and remedies;
reduced protection for intellectual property rights in some countries; and
potentially adverse tax consequences, including repatriation of profits.

Any of these events could have an adverse effect on the Company's international operations by reducing the demand for its services and products or decreasing the prices at which it can sell its services and products, thereby adversely affecting its financial condition or operating results. The Company may not be able to continue to operate in compliance with applicable customs, currency exchange control regulations, transfer pricing regulations or any other laws or regulations to which it may be subject. In addition, these laws or regulations may be modified in the future, and the Company may not be able to operate in compliance with those modifications.

Significant developments from the recent and potential changes in U.S. trade policies could have a material adverse effect on the Company and its financial condition and results of operations.

The U.S. government has indicated its intent to alter its approach to international trade policy and in some cases to renegotiate, or potentially terminate, certain existing bilateral or multi-lateral trade agreements and treaties with foreign countries. On various dates in July, August and September 2018, the U.S. government implemented additional tariffs of 25 percent and 10 percent (increasing to 25 percent on January 1, 2019) on certain goods imported from China. The Company manufactures a substantial amount of its products in China and are presently subjected to these additional tariffs. These tariffs, and other governmental action relating to international trade agreements or policies, the adoption and expansion of trade restrictions, or the occurrence of a trade war may adversely impact demand for the Company's products, costs, customers, suppliers and/or the U.S. economy or certain sectors thereof and, as a result, adversely impact its business. These additional tariffs may cause the Company to increase prices to its customers, which may reduce demand, or, if it is unable to increase prices, result in lowering its margin on products sold. It remains unclear what the U.S. or foreign governments will or will not do with respect to tariffs, international trade agreements and policies on a short-term or long-term basis. The Company cannot predict future trade policy or the terms of any renegotiated trade agreements and their impacts on its business.


12


As a result of these tariffs and other governmental action, the Company is presently shifting some of its supply base and sourcing to mitigate the risk of higher tariffs. Any shift may not be fully successful in reducing its costs, or fully off-setting the impact of tariffs.

The Company may be exposed to liabilities under the FCPA, which could harm its reputation and have a material adverse effect on its business.

The Company is subject to compliance with various laws and regulations, including the FCPA and similar worldwide anti-bribery laws, which generally prohibit companies and their intermediaries from engaging in bribery or making other improper payments to foreign officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business or gaining an unfair business advantage. The FCPA also requires proper record keeping and characterization of such payments in the Company's reports filed with the SEC.

The Company's employees and agents are required to comply with these laws. The Company operates in many parts of the world that have experienced governmental and commercial corruption to some degree, and strict compliance with anti-bribery laws may conflict with local customs and practices. Foreign companies, including some that may compete with the Company, may not be subject to the FCPA and may follow local customs and practices. Accordingly, such companies may be more likely to engage in activities prohibited by the FCPA, which could have a significant adverse impact on the Company's ability to compete for business in such countries.

Despite the Company's commitment to legal compliance and corporate ethics, it cannot ensure that its policies and procedures will always protect it from intentional, reckless or negligent acts committed by its employees or agents. Violations of these laws, or allegations of such violations, could disrupt the Company's business and result in financial penalties, debarment from government contracts and other consequences that may have a material adverse effect on its reputation, business, financial condition or results of operations. Future changes in anti-bribery or economic sanctions laws and enforcement could also result in increased compliance requirements and related expenses that may also have a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition or results of operations.

The Company has a significant amount of long-term assets, including goodwill and other intangible assets, and any future impairment charges could adversely impact its results of operations.

The Company reviews long-lived assets, including property, plant and equipment and identifiable amortizing intangible assets, for impairment whenever changes in circumstances or events may indicate that the carrying amounts are not recoverable. If the fair value is less than the carrying amount of the asset, a loss is recognized for the difference. Factors which may cause an impairment of long-lived assets include significant changes in the manner of use of these assets, negative industry or market trends, a significant under-performance relative to historical or projected future operating results, or a likely sale or disposal of the asset before the end of its estimated useful life.

As of December 31, 2018, the Company had $827.1 of goodwill. The Company’s four reporting units are defined as Eurasia Banking, Americas Banking, EMEA Retail and Rest of World Retail. Management concluded during a second and third quarter interim goodwill impairment tests for 2018 that a portion of the Company’s goodwill was not recoverable and recorded a $217.5 non-cash impairment loss for the year ended December 31, 2018. The techniques used in its qualitative and quantitative assessment and goodwill impairment tests incorporate a number of estimates and assumptions that are subject to change. Although the Company believes these estimates and assumptions are reasonable and reflect market conditions forecast at the assessment date, any changes to these assumptions and estimates due to market conditions or otherwise may lead to an outcome where impairment charges would be required in future periods.

System security risks, systems integration and cybersecurity issues could disrupt the Company's internal operations or services provided to customers, and any such disruption could adversely affect revenue, increase costs, and harm its reputation and stock price.

Experienced computer programmers and hackers may be able to penetrate the Company's network security and misappropriate its own confidential information or those of its customers, corrupt data, create system disruptions or cause shutdowns. A network security breach could be particularly harmful if it remains undetected for an extended period of time. Groups of hackers may also act in a coordinated manner to launch distributed denial of service attacks, or other coordinated attacks, that may cause service outages or other interruptions. The Company could incur significant expenses in addressing problems created by network security breaches, such as the expenses of deploying additional personnel, enhancing or implementing new protection measures, training employees or hiring consultants. Further, such corrective measures may later prove inadequate. Moreover, actual or perceived security vulnerabilities in the Company's services and products could cause significant reputational harm, causing it to lose existing or potential customers. Reputational damage could also result in diminished investor confidence. Actual or perceived vulnerabilities may also lead to claims against the Company. Although its license agreements typically contain provisions that eliminate or limit its exposure to such liability, there is no assurance these provisions will withstand legal challenges. The Company could also incur significant expenses in connection with customers’ system failures.

In addition, sophisticated hardware and operating system software and applications that the Company produces or procures from third parties may contain defects in design or manufacture, including “bugs” and other problems that could unexpectedly interfere

13


with the operation of the system. The costs to eliminate or alleviate security problems, viruses and bugs could be significant, and the efforts to address these problems could result in interruptions, delays or cessation of service that could impede sales, manufacturing, distribution or other critical functions.

Portions of the Company's IT infrastructure also may experience interruptions, delays or cessations of service or produce errors in connection with systems integration or migration work that takes place from time to time. The Company may not be successful in implementing new systems, and transitioning data and other aspects of the process could be expensive, time consuming, disruptive and resource-intensive. Such disruptions could adversely impact the ability to fulfill orders, service customers and interrupt other processes and, in addition, could adversely impact its ability to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting. Delayed sales, lower margins, lost customers or diminished investor confidence resulting from these disruptions could adversely affect the Company's financial results, stock price and reputation.

Privacy and information security laws are complex, and if the Company fails to comply with applicable laws, regulations and standards, or fails to properly maintain the integrity of its data, protect its proprietary rights to its systems or defend against cybersecurity attacks, the Company may be subject to government or private actions due to privacy and security breaches, any of which could have a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition and results of operations or materially harm our reputation.

The Company is subject to a variety of laws and regulations in the U.S. and other countries that involve matters central to its business, including user privacy, security, rights of publicity, data protection, content, intellectual property, distribution, electronic contracts and other communications, competition, protection of minors, consumer protection, taxation, and online-payment services. These laws can be particularly restrictive in countries outside the U.S. Both in the U.S. and abroad, these laws and regulations constantly evolve and remain subject to significant change. In addition, the application and interpretation of these laws and regulations are often uncertain, particularly in the new and rapidly evolving industry in which it operates. Because the Company stores, processes and uses data, some of which contains personal information, it is subject to complex and evolving federal, state, and foreign laws and regulations regarding privacy, data protection, content, and other matters. Many of these laws and regulations are subject to change and uncertain interpretation, and could result in investigations, claims, changes to the Company's business practices, increased cost of operations, and declines in user growth, retention, or engagement, any of which could seriously harm its business.

Several proposals have recently been adopted or are currently pending before federal, state, and foreign legislative and regulatory bodies that could significantly affect our business. The GDPR in the EU, which went into effect in May 2018, placed new data protection obligations and restrictions on organizations and may require the Company to further change its policies and procedures. If the Company is not compliant with GDPR requirements, it may be subject to significant fines and its business may be seriously harmed. The California Consumer Privacy Act goes into effect in January 2020, with a lookback to January 2019, and places additional requirements on the handling of personal data.

An inability to attract, retain and motivate key employees could harm current and future operations.

In order to be successful, the Company must attract, retain and motivate executives and other key employees, including those in managerial, professional, administrative, technical, sales, marketing and IT support positions. It also must keep employees focused on its strategies and goals. Hiring and retaining qualified executives, engineers and qualified sales representatives are critical to its future, and competition for experienced employees in these areas can be intense. The failure to hire or loss of key employees could have a significant impact on the Company's operations.

The Company may not be able to generate sufficient cash flows to fund its operations and make adequate capital investments.

The Company's cash flows from operations depend primarily on sales and service margins. To develop new service and product technologies, support future growth, achieve operating efficiencies and maintain service and product quality, the Company must make significant capital investments in manufacturing technology, facilities and capital equipment, R&D, and service and product technology. In addition to cash provided from operations, the Company has from time to time utilized external sources of financing. Depending upon general market conditions or other factors, the Company may not be able to generate sufficient cash flows to fund its operations and make adequate capital investments, either in whole or in part. In addition, any tightening of the credit markets may limit the Company's ability to obtain alternative sources of cash to fund its operations.

Although the Company has paid dividends on its common shares in the past, the declaration and payment of future dividends, as well as the amount thereof, are subject to the declaration by the Company’s board of directors. The amount and size of any future dividends will depend on the Company’s results of operations, financial condition, capital levels, cash requirements, future prospects and other factors.


14


New service and product developments may be unsuccessful.

The Company is constantly looking to develop new services and products that complement or leverage the underlying design or process technology of its traditional service and product offerings. The Company makes significant investments in service and product technologies and anticipates expending significant resources for new software-led services and product development over the next several years. There can be no assurance that the Company's service and product development efforts will be successful, that the roll out of any new services and products will be timely, that it will be able to successfully market these services and products or that margins generated from sales of these services and products will recover costs of development efforts.

The Company's ability to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting may be insufficient to allow it to accurately report its financial results or prevent fraud, and this could cause its financial statements to become materially misleading and adversely affect the trading price of its common shares.

The Company requires effective internal control over financial reporting in order to provide reasonable assurance with respect to its financial reports and to effectively prevent fraud. Internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements because of its inherent limitations, including the possibility of human error, the circumvention or overriding of controls, or fraud. Therefore, even effective internal controls can provide only reasonable assurance with respect to the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements. If the Company cannot provide reasonable assurance with respect to its financial statements and effectively prevent fraud, its financial statements could become materially misleading, which could adversely affect the trading price of its common shares.

If the Company is not able to maintain the adequacy of its internal control over financial reporting, including any failure to implement required new or improved controls, or if the Company experiences difficulties in the implementation of or the implemented controls required in connection with the Acquisition, its business, financial condition and operating results could be harmed. Any material weakness could affect investor confidence in the accuracy and completeness of its financial statements. As a result, the Company's ability to obtain any additional financing, or additional financing on favorable terms, could be materially and adversely affected. This, in turn, could materially and adversely affect its business, financial condition and the market value of its securities and require it to incur additional costs to improve its internal control systems and procedures. In addition, perceptions of the Company among customers, lenders, investors, securities analysts and others could also be adversely affected.

Management identified control deficiencies as of December 31, 2018 that constituted material weaknesses. Throughout 2018, the Company enhanced, and will continue to enhance, its internal controls over financial reporting. The Company had ineffective information technology general controls (ITGCs) used for financial reporting by certain entities throughout the organization, ineffective implementation and operation of controls over inventory valuation and ineffective controls over non-routine transactions. For more information regarding the material weaknesses refer to Item 9A of this annual report on Form 10-K. The Company is still considering the full extent of the procedures to implement in order to remediate these material weaknesses. The Company can give no assurances that any additional material weakness will not arise in the future due to its failure to implement and maintain adequate internal control over financial reporting. In addition, although the Company has been successful historically in strengthening its controls and procedures, those controls and procedures may not be adequate to prevent or identify irregularities or ensure the fair presentation of its financial statements included in its periodic reports filed with the SEC.

Low investment performance by the Company's pension plan assets may result in an increase to its net pension liability and expense, which may require it to fund a portion of its pension obligations and divert funds from other potential uses.

The Company sponsors several defined benefit pension plans that cover certain eligible employees across the globe. The Company's pension expense and required contributions to its pension plans are directly affected by the value of plan assets, the projected rate of return on plan assets, the actual rate of return on plan assets and the actuarial assumptions it uses to measure the defined benefit pension plan obligations.

A significant market downturn could occur in future periods resulting in a decline in the funded status of the Company's pension plans and causing actual asset returns to be below the assumed rate of return used to determine pension expense. If return on plan assets in future periods perform below expectations, future pension expense will increase.

The Company establishes the discount rate used to determine the present value of the projected and accumulated benefit obligations at the end of each year based upon the available market rates for high-quality, fixed income investments. The Company matches the projected cash flows of its pension plans against those generated by high-quality corporate bonds. The yield of the resulting bond portfolio provides a basis for the selected discount rate. An increase in the discount rate would reduce the future pension expense and, conversely, a decrease in the discount rate would increase the future pension expense.

Based on current guidelines, assumptions and estimates, including investment returns and interest rates, the Company plans to make contributions to its pension plans as well as benefits payments directly from the Company of approximately $50 in 2019. The Company anticipates reimbursement of approximately $13 for certain benefits paid from its trustee in 2019. Changes in the current assumptions and estimates could result in contributions in years beyond 2019 that are greater than the projected 2019 contributions required. The Company cannot predict whether changing market or economic conditions, regulatory changes or

15


other factors will further increase its pension expenses or funding obligations, diverting funds it would otherwise apply to other uses.

The Company's businesses are subject to inherent risks, some for which it maintains third-party insurance and some for which it self-insures. The Company may incur losses and be subject to liability claims that could have a material adverse effect on its financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

The Company maintains insurance policies that provide limited coverage for some, but not all, of the potential risks and liabilities associated with its businesses. The policies are subject to deductibles and exclusions that result in the Company's retention of a level of risk on a self-insurance basis. For some risks, the Company may not obtain insurance if it believes the cost of available insurance is excessive relative to the risks presented. As a result of market conditions, premiums and deductibles for certain insurance policies can increase substantially, and in some instances, certain insurance may become unavailable or available only for reduced amounts of coverage. As a result, the Company may not be able to renew its existing insurance policies or procure other desirable insurance on commercially reasonable terms, if at all. Even where insurance coverage applies, insurers may contest their obligations to make payments. The Company's financial condition, results of operations and cash flows could be materially and adversely affected by losses and liabilities from uninsured or under-insured events, as well as by delays in the payment of insurance proceeds, or the failure by insurers to make payments. The Company also may incur costs and liabilities resulting from claims for damages to property or injury to persons arising from its operations.

The Company's assumptions used to determine its self-insurance liability could be wrong and materially impact its business.

The Company evaluates its self-insurance liability based on historical claims experience, demographic factors, severity factors and other actuarial assumptions. However, if future occurrences and claims differ from these assumptions and historical trends, the Company's business, financial results and financial condition could be materially impacted by claims and other expenses.

An adverse determination that the Company's services, products or manufacturing processes infringe the intellectual property rights of others, an adverse determination that a competitor has infringed its intellectual property rights, or its failure to enforce its intellectual property rights could have a materially adverse effect on its business, operating results or financial condition.

As is common in any high technology industry, others have asserted from time to time, and may assert in the future, that the Company's services, products or manufacturing processes infringe their intellectual property rights. A court determination that its services, products or manufacturing processes infringe the intellectual property rights of others could result in significant liability and/or require it to make material changes to its services, products and/or manufacturing processes. The Company is unable to predict the outcome of assertions of infringement made against it.

The Company also seeks to enforce its intellectual property rights against infringement. In October 2015, the Company filed a complaint with the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) and the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Ohio alleging that Nautilus Hyosung Inc., and its subsidiary Nautilus Hyosung America Inc., infringed upon the Company's patents. In February 2017, the ITC determined that Nautilus Hyosung products infringed two of the Company's patents and issued an exclusion order and cease and desist order which bars the importation and sale of certain Nautilus Hyosung deposit automation enabled ATMs and modules in the U.S. In February 2016, Nautilus Hyosung filed complaints against the Company in front of the ITC and U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Texas alleging the Company infringed certain Nautilus Hyosung patents. Those ITC proceedings have now concluded and the Company has successfully defeated all claims raised by Nautilus Hyosung in the ITC. The Company will continue to vindicate its intellectual property against infringement by others.

The Company cannot predict the outcome of actions to enforce its intellectual property rights, and, although it seeks to enforce its intellectual property rights, it cannot guarantee that it will be successful in doing so. Any of the foregoing could have a materially adverse effect on the Company's business, operating results or financial condition.

Changes in laws or regulations or the manner of their interpretation or enforcement could adversely impact the Company's financial performance and restrict its ability to operate its business or execute its strategies.

New laws or regulations, or changes in existing laws or regulations or the manner of their interpretation or enforcement, could increase the Company's cost of doing business and restrict its ability to operate its business or execute its strategies. This includes, among other things, the possible taxation under U.S. law of certain income from foreign operations, compliance costs and enforcement under applicable securities laws, including the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank Act), the German Securities Trading Act (Wertpapierhandelsgesetz) and Regulation (EU) No. 596/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of April 16, 2014 as well as costs associated with complying with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 and the regulations promulgated thereunder.

Economic conditions and regulatory changes leading up to and following the United Kingdom's (U.K.) likely exit from the EU could have a material adverse effect on the Company's business and results of operations.

The U.K.’s anticipated exit from the EU (Brexit) and the resulting significant change to the U.K.’s relationship with the EU and with countries outside the EU (and the laws, regulations and trade deals impacting business conducted between them) could disrupt

16


the overall economic growth or stability of the U.K. and the EU and negatively impact the Company’s European operations.  The U.K. is currently negotiating the terms of Brexit, with the U.K. due to exit the EU on March 29, 2019. In November 2018, the U.K. and the EU agreed upon a draft withdrawal agreement that set out the terms governing the U.K.’s departure, including, among other things, a transition period to allow for a future trade deal to be agreed upon. Because the draft withdrawal agreement was rejected by the U.K. Parliament on January 15, 2019, there is significant uncertainty about the terms and timing under which the U.K. will leave the EU. It is possible that Brexit will result in the Company’s EU operations becoming subject to materially different, and potentially conflicting, laws, regulations or tariffs, which could require costly new compliance initiatives or changes to legal entity structures or operating practices. Furthermore, in the event the U.K. leaves the EU with no agreement, there may be additional adverse impacts on immigration and trade between the U.K. and the EU or countries outside the EU.

The Company's actual operating results may differ significantly from its guidance.

From time to time, the Company releases guidance, including any guidance that it may include in the reports that it files with the SEC regarding its future performance. This guidance, which consists of forward-looking statements, is prepared by its management and is qualified by, and subject to, the assumptions and the other information included in this annual report on Form 10-K, as well as the factors described under “Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation — Forward-Looking Statement Disclosure.” The Company's guidance is not prepared with a view toward compliance with published guidelines of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, and neither its independent registered public accounting firm nor any other independent or outside party compiles or examines the guidance and, accordingly, no such person expresses any opinion or any other form of assurance with respect thereto.

Guidance is based upon a number of assumptions and estimates that, while presented with numerical specificity, are inherently subject to business, economic and competitive uncertainties and contingencies, many of which are beyond the Company's control and are based upon specific assumptions with respect to future business decisions, some of which will change. The principal reason that the Company releases such data is to provide a basis for its management to discuss its business outlook with analysts and investors. The Company does not accept any responsibility for any projections or reports published by any such persons.

Guidance is necessarily speculative in nature, and it can be expected that some or all of the assumptions of the guidance furnished by the Company will not materialize or will vary significantly from actual results. Accordingly, the Company's guidance is only an estimate of what management believes is realizable as of the date of release. Actual results will vary from the guidance. Investors should also recognize that the reliability of any forecasted financial data diminishes the farther in the future that the data are forecast. In light of the foregoing, investors are urged to put the guidance in context and not to place undue reliance on it.

Anti-takeover provisions could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire the Company.

Certain provisions of the Company's charter documents, including provisions limiting the ability of shareholders to raise matters at a meeting of shareholders without giving advance notice, may make it more difficult for a third party to gain control of its board of directors and may have the effect of delaying or preventing changes in the Company's control or management. This could have an adverse effect on the market price of the Company's common shares. Additionally, Ohio corporate law provides that certain notice and informational filings and special shareholder meeting and voting procedures must be followed prior to consummation of a proposed control share acquisition, as defined in the Ohio Revised Code. Assuming compliance with the prescribed notice and information filings, a proposed control share acquisition may be made only if, at a special meeting of shareholders, the acquisition is approved by both a majority of its voting power represented at the meeting and a majority of the voting power remaining after excluding the combined voting power of the interested shares, as defined in the Ohio Revised Code. The application of these provisions of the Ohio Revised Code also could have the effect of delaying or preventing a change of control.


17


ITEM 1B: UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

ITEM 2: PROPERTIES

The Company's corporate office is located in North Canton, Ohio. The Company owns or leases and operates manufacturing facilities in Greensboro, North Carolina, Brazil and Germany. The Company leases software development centers in Canada and Mexico. The following are the principal locations in which the Company owns or leases and operates selling, service and administrative offices in its three segments, Eurasia Banking, Americas Banking and Retail:
Americas
 
EMEA
 
AP
Bolivia
 
Honduras
 
Algeria
 
Italy
 
Slovakia
 
Australia
Brazil
 
Jamaica
 
Austria
 
Luxembourg
 
South Africa
 
China
Canada
 
Mexico
 
Belgium
 
Malta
 
Spain
 
Hong Kong
Chile
 
Nicaragua
 
Czech Republic
 
Morocco
 
Sweden
 
India
Colombia
 
Panama
 
Denmark
 
Netherlands
 
Switzerland
 
Indonesia
Costa Rica
 
Paraguay
 
Finland
 
Nigeria
 
Turkey
 
Malaysia
Dominican Republic
 
Peru
 
France
 
Norway
 
Ukraine
 
Myanmar
Ecuador
 
Uruguay
 
Germany
 
Poland
 
United Arab Emirates
 
Philippines
El Salvador
 
United States
 
Greece
 
Portugal
 
United Kingdom
 
Singapore
Guatemala
 
Venezuela
 
Hungary
 
Romania
 
 
 
Taiwan
 
 
 
 
Ireland
 
Russia
 
 
 
Thailand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Vietnam

The Company considers that its properties are generally in good condition, are well maintained, and are generally suitable and adequate to carry on the Company's business.

ITEM 3: LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
(dollars in millions)

At December 31, 2018, the Company was a party to several lawsuits that were incurred in the normal course of business, none of which individually or in the aggregate is considered material by management in relation to the Company's financial position or results of operations. In management's opinion, the Company's consolidated financial statements would not be materially affected by the outcome of those legal proceedings, commitments, or asserted claims.

In addition to the routine legal proceedings noted above, the Company was a party to the legal proceedings described below at December 31, 2018:

Indirect Tax Contingencies

The Company accrues non-income tax liabilities for indirect tax matters when management believes that a loss is probable and the amounts can be reasonably estimated, while contingent gains are recognized only when realized. In the event any losses are sustained in excess of accruals, they are charged against income. In evaluating indirect tax matters, management takes into consideration factors such as historical experience with matters of similar nature, specific facts and circumstances, and the likelihood of prevailing. Management evaluates and updates accruals as matters progress over time. It is reasonably possible that some of the matters for which accruals have not been established could be decided unfavorably to the Company and could require recognizing future expenditures. Also, statutes of limitations could expire without the Company paying the taxes for matters for which accruals have been established, which could result in the recognition of future gains upon reversal of these accruals at that time.

At December 31, 2018, the Company was a party to several routine indirect tax claims from various taxing authorities globally that were incurred in the normal course of business, none of which individually or in the aggregate is considered material by management in relation to the Company’s financial position or results of operations. In management’s opinion, the consolidated financial statements would not be materially affected by the outcome of these indirect tax claims and/or proceedings or asserted claims.

In addition to these routine indirect tax matters, the Company was a party to the proceedings described below:

The Company has challenged multiple customs rulings in Thailand seeking to retroactively collect customs duties on previous imports of ATMs. In August 2017, the Supreme Court of Thailand ruled in the Company's favor in one of the matters, finding that Customs' attempt to collect duties for importation of ATMs is improper. The surviving matters remain at various stages of the appeals process and the Company will use the Supreme Court's decision in support of its position in those matters. Management

18


remains confident that the Company has a valid legal position in these appeals. Accordingly, the Company does not have any amount accrued for this contingency.

At December 31, 2017, the Company had an accrual related to the Brazil indirect tax of $4.9, which related to allegations of improper importation of certain components into Brazil's free trade zone that would nullify certain indirect tax incentives. During 2018, the statute of limitations expired and the entire accrual was reversed.

A loss contingency is reasonably possible if it has a more than remote but less than probable chance of occurring. Although management believes the Company has valid defenses with respect to its indirect tax positions, it is reasonably possible that a loss could occur in excess of the estimated accrual. The Company estimated the aggregate risk at December 31, 2018 to be up to $106.1 for its material indirect tax matters, of which $27.0 relates to the Thailand customs matter disclosed above. The aggregate risk related to indirect taxes is adjusted as the applicable statutes of limitations expire.

ITEM 4: MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.

19


PART II

ITEM 5: MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

The common shares of the Company are listed on the New York Stock Exchange with a symbol of “DBD.” The price ranges of common shares of the Company for the periods indicated below are as follows:
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
High
 
Low
 
High
 
Low
 
High
 
Low
1st Quarter
$
19.05

 
$
12.90

 
$
31.85

 
$
24.90

 
$
29.80

 
$
22.84

2nd Quarter
$
16.40

 
$
11.43

 
$
30.70

 
$
25.50

 
$
28.81

 
$
23.10

3rd Quarter
$
13.40

 
$
3.55

 
$
28.50

 
$
17.95

 
$
29.01

 
$
23.95

4th Quarter
$
4.90

 
$
2.41

 
$
23.50

 
$
16.00

 
$
25.90

 
$
21.05

Full Year
$
19.05

 
$
2.41

 
$
31.85

 
$
16.00

 
$
29.80

 
$
21.05


There were 39,993 shareholders of the Company at December 31, 2018, which includes an estimated number of shareholders who had shares held in their accounts by banks, brokers, and trustees for benefit plans and the agent for the dividend reinvestment plan.

On the basis of amounts paid and declared quarterly, the annualized dividends per share were $0.10, $0.40 and $0.96 in 2018, 2017 and 2016, respectively.

Information concerning the Company’s share repurchases made during the fourth quarter of 2018 is as follows:
Period
 
Total Number of Shares Purchased (1)
 
Average Price Paid Per Share
 
Total Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plans
 
Maximum Number of Shares that May Yet Be Purchased Under the Plans (2)
October
 
699

 
$
3.98

 

 
2,426,177

November
 
640

 
$
3.97

 

 
2,426,177

December
 
17,870

 
$
3.11

 

 
2,426,177

Total
 
19,209

 
$
3.17

 

 
 

(1)
All shares were surrendered or deemed surrendered to the Company in connection with the Company’s stock-based compensation plans.

(2)
The total number of shares repurchased as part of the publicly announced share repurchase plan was 13,450,772 as of December 31, 2018. The plan was approved by the Board of Directors in April 1997. The Company may purchase shares from time to time in open market purchases or privately negotiated transactions. The Company may make all or part of the purchases pursuant to accelerated share repurchases or Rule 10b5-1 plans. The plan has no expiration date. The following table provides a summary of Board of Director approvals to repurchase the Company's outstanding common shares:

 
 
Total Number of Shares
Approved for Repurchase
1997
 
2,000,000

2004
 
2,000,000

2005
 
6,000,000

2007
 
2,000,000

2011
 
1,876,949

2012
 
2,000,000

 
 
15,876,949


20


PERFORMANCE GRAPH

The graph below compares the cumulative five-year total return provided shareholders on Diebold Nixdorf, Inc.'s common shares relative to the cumulative total returns of the S&P 500 index, the S&P Midcap 400 index and two customized peer groups, whose individual companies are listed in footnotes 1 and 2 below. An investment of $100 (with reinvestment of all dividends) is assumed to have been made in the Company's common shares, in each index and in each of the peer groups on December 31, 2013 and its relative performance is tracked through December 31, 2018.

The Compensation Committee of the Company's Board of Directors annually reviews and approves the selection of peer group companies, adjusting the group from time to time based on changes in the Company's industry and the Company’s operations, the current peer group and the comparability of our peer group companies.
a5yeargraph.jpg
 
(1)
There are fifteen companies included in the Company's 2018 peer group, which are: Alliance Data Systems Corp., Benchmark Electronics Inc., Global Payments Inc., Harris Corp., Juniper Networks Inc., Logitech International SA, Motorola Solutions Inc., NCR Corp., Netapp Inc., Pitney Bowes Inc., Sabre Corp., Total Systems Services, Unisys Corp., Western Union Co. and Zebra Technologies Corp.

(2)
The thirteen companies included in the Company's 2017 peer group are: Alliance Data Systems Corp., Benchmark Electronics Inc., Global Payments Inc., Harris Corp., Juniper Networks Inc., Logitech International SA, Motorola Solutions Inc., NCR Corp., Netapp Inc., Pitney Bowes Inc., Western Union Co., Unisys Corp. and Zebra Technologies Corp.

21


ITEM 6: SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The following table should be read in conjunction with “Part II - Item 7 - Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Part II - Item 8 - Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this annual report on Form 10-K.
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
(in millions, except per share data)
Results of operations
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net sales
$
4,578.6

 
$
4,609.3

 
$
3,316.3

 
$
2,419.3

 
$
2,734.8

(Loss) income from continuing operations, net of tax
$
(566.0
)
 
$
(213.9
)
 
$
(179.3
)
 
$
57.8

 
$
104.7

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic and diluted earnings (loss) per common share
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Loss from continuing operations, net of tax
$
(7.48
)
 
$
(3.20
)
 
$
(2.68
)
 
$
0.89

 
$
1.62

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common dividends paid per share
$
0.10

 
$
0.40

 
$
0.96

 
$
1.15

 
$
1.15

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Consolidated balance sheet data (as of period end)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total assets
$
4,311.9

 
$
5,222.0

 
$
5,270.3

 
$
2,242.4

 
$
2,342.1

Total debt
$
2,239.5

 
$
1,853.8

 
$
1,798.3

 
$
638.2

 
$
505.4

Redeemable noncontrolling interests
$
130.4

 
$
492.1

 
$
44.1

 
$

 
$



22

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS as of December 31, 2018
DIEBOLD NIXDORF, INCORPORATED AND SUBSIDIARIES
(unaudited)
(in millions, except per share amounts)

ITEM 7: MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Significant Highlights

During 2018, Diebold Nixdorf:

Hired Gerrard Schmid to serve as president and chief executive officer.
Named Jeffrey Rutherford as interim senior vice president, chief financial officer, and subsequently appointed him to this role on a full-time basis.
Added Bruce Besanko and Ellen Costello to the Board of Directors
Launched the DN Now transformation program which is comprised of multiple work streams designed to relentlessly focus on our customers and improve operational excellence. This program is targeting gross annualized savings of approximately $400 through 2021.
Raised $650.0 through a new term loan and revised the Company’s credit facility covenants. This enhanced liquidity provides financial flexibility, facilitates acquiring the remaining shares of Diebold Nixdorf AG and supports DN Now initiatives.
Partnered with Mastercard® on key technology and services agreements to strengthen the Company's Connected Commerce offerings and further bridge physical and digital transactions.
Ranked as one of the Top 10 Technology Companies on the 2018 IDC Financial Insights FinTech Rankings.
Won Windows 10 ATM product upgrades with several North America financial institutions, including an agreement with a regional U.S. bank for more than 500 DN Vynamic software licenses and a new managed services agreement.
Enabled the first integrated, digital kiosk in the Middle East in partnership with Emirates NBD.
Entered an agreement with Banco Bolivariano in Ecuador to implement the DN Vynamic Mobile Banking suite.
Was identified as the largest manufacturer of ATMs by Retail Banking Research's report "Global ATM Market and Forecasts to 2023."
Secured a global frame agreement, including North America, to provide kiosks and services for one of the world's largest quick-service restaurants.
Signed a $70.0, multi-year services contract covering about 1,000 Marks & Spencer stores in Western Europe.
Secured a multiyear managed services agreement valued at $68.0 for new POS devices and related software at a leading European home improvement retailer.

OVERVIEW

Management’s discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes that appear elsewhere in this annual report on Form 10-K. For additional information regarding general information regarding the Company, its business, strategy, competitors and operations, refer to Item 1 of this annual report on Form 10-K.

Business Drivers

The business drivers of the Company's future performance include, but are not limited to:

Demand for services on distributed IT assets such as ATMs, POS and SCO, including managed services and professional services;
Timing of system upgrades and/or replacement cycles for ATMs, POS and SCO;
Demand for software products and professional services;
Demand for security products and services for the financial, retail and commercial sectors;
Demand for innovative technology in connection with the Company's Connected Commerce strategy;
Integration of sales force, business processes, procurement, and internal IT systems; and
Realization of cost reductions, which leverage the Company's global scale, reduce overlap and improve operating efficiencies.

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes that appear elsewhere in this annual report on Form 10-K.

23

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS as of December 31, 2018
DIEBOLD NIXDORF, INCORPORATED AND SUBSIDIARIES
(unaudited)
(in millions, except per share amounts)

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

2018 comparison with 2017

Net Sales

The following table represents information regarding our net sales for the years ended December 31:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Percent of Total Net Sales for the Year Ended
 
2018
 
2017
 
% Change
 
% Change in CC (1)
 
2018
 
2017
Segments
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Eurasia Banking
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Services
$
1,111.8

 
$
1,133.1

 
(1.9
)
 
(4.0
)
 
24.3
 
24.6
Products
688.4

 
770.3

 
(10.6
)
 
(12.5
)
 
15.0
 
16.7
Total Eurasia Banking
$
1,800.2

 
$
1,903.4

 
(5.4
)
 
(7.4
)
 
39.3
 
41.3
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Americas Banking
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Services
$
1,025.8

 
$
1,043.9

 
(1.7
)
 
(0.7
)
 
22.4
 
22.6
Products
489.9

 
481.7

 
1.7

 
3.7

 
10.7
 
10.5
Total Americas Banking
$
1,515.7

 
$
1,525.6

 
(0.6
)
 
0.7

 
33.1
 
33.1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Retail
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Services
$
651.9

 
$
608.3

 
7.2

 
4.7

 
14.3
 
13.2
Products
610.8

 
572.0

 
6.8

 
3.1

 
13.3
 
12.4
Total Retail
$
1,262.7

 
$
1,180.3

 
7.0

 
3.9

 
27.6
 
25.6
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total net sales
$
4,578.6

 
$
4,609.3

 
(0.7
)
 
(1.8
)
 
100.0

100.0
(1) The Company calculates constant currency by translating the prior-year period results at the current year exchange rate. 

Net sales decreased $30.7 or 0.7 percent including a net favorable currency impact of $55.4 primarily related to the euro, partially offset by the Brazil real. Additionally, prior year net sales were adversely impacted $30.4 related to deferred revenue purchase accounting adjustments (Deferred Revenue Adjustments). The following results include the impact of foreign currency and purchase accounting adjustments:

Segments

Eurasia Banking net sales decreased $103.2, including a net favorable currency impact of $41.3, mainly related to the euro. Prior year net sales were adversely impacted $18.3, including a net unfavorable currency impact of $1.4, related to Deferred Revenue Adjustments. Excluding currency and Deferred Revenue Adjustments, net sales decreased $164.2 due to lower product volume related to fewer product deployments and projects, particularly in Thailand, Turkey, Indonesia, the Middle East and Australia. In addition, services in India decreased as a result of a low-margin maintenance contract roll off. Net sales declined from the Company’s strategic decision to reduce its product and services portfolio in India and China as market conditions became less favorable. These decreases were partially offset by increased unit replacements in Germany related to Windows 10 migrations.

Americas Banking net sales decreased $9.9, including a net unfavorable currency impact of $20.6 related to the Brazil real. Excluding currency, net sales increased $10.7 from higher software license volume in Brazil, professional services volume in North America and higher product volume, particularly in Mexico, Canada and Ecuador. These increases were partially offset by lower product volume in the U.S. as well as low-profit maintenance contract base roll offs of two customers in North America and $4.1 of lower electronic security revenue in Chile due to the business divestiture in September 2017.

Retail net sales increased $82.4, including a net favorable currency impact of $34.7 mainly related to the euro. Prior year net sales were adversely impacted $12.1, including a net unfavorable currency impact of $1.0, related to Deferred Revenue Adjustments. Excluding currency and Deferred Revenue Adjustments, net sales increased $34.6 due to a large North

24

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS as of December 31, 2018
DIEBOLD NIXDORF, INCORPORATED AND SUBSIDIARIES
(unaudited)
(in millions, except per share amounts)

America kiosk project as well as higher POS activity in Central Eastern Europe, the U.K, France and Spain. These increases were partially offset by lower product volume from the Eurasia non-core businesses and large prior year non-recurring POS and kiosk activity in Germany for multiple customers as well as lower lottery equipment volume in Brazil.

Gross Profit

The following table represents information regarding our gross profit for the years ended December 31:
 
2018
 
2017
 
$ Change
 
% Change
Gross profit - services
$
625.2

 
$
675.2

 
$
(50.0
)
 
(7.4)
Gross profit - products
265.7

 
324.6

 
(58.9
)
 
(18.1)
Total gross profit
$
890.9

 
$
999.8

 
$
(108.9
)
 
(10.9)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gross margin - services
22.4
%
 
24.2
%
 

 
 
Gross margin - products
14.9
%
 
17.8
%
 


 
 
Total gross margin
19.5
%
 
21.7
%
 


 
 

Services gross margin decreased 1.8 percent including higher non routine charges of $10.9 primarily related to a spare parts inventory provision of $24.5 and other charges of $1.6 while the prior year was adversely impacted by Deferred Revenue Adjustments of $15.2. Restructuring was $9.5 lower compared to the prior year. Excluding non-routine and restructuring expenses, services gross margin decreased 1.6 percent due in part to higher retail services cost in the Eurasia non-core businesses and higher one-time banking services cost in Brazil in the second quarter of 2018. Additionally, an unfavorable customer mix on professional services volume in Eurasia drove lower margin in the retail segment as well as an unfavorable service customer mix in the Eurasia banking segment and higher services cost in China and Indonesia. These decreases were partially offset by a large, low-margin maintenance contract roll off in India.

Product gross margin decreased 2.9 percent, including slightly lower non routine charges of $0.8, primarily from reduced Purchase Accounting Adjustments of $36.4, related to amortization and prior-year Deferred Revenue Adjustments and a benefit from the Brazil indirect tax accrual reversal of $9.0, in addition to lower integration of $0.6 and legal and consulting expense of $0.6, partially offset by higher inventory provision charges of $45.8. Restructuring expense increased $8.9 compared to the prior year. Excluding non-routine and restructuring expenses, product gross margin decreased 2.2 percent, primarily from an unfavorable banking customer mix in the Americas as well as expedited freight cost from supply chain delays in the first half of 2018. Additionally, the retail segment was impacted by an unfavorable customer mix in Brazil, related to license volume, and increased cost and unfavorable customer mix in Eurasia. These decreases were partially offset by increased gross margin in the Eurasia banking segment primarily from a favorable customer mix in various countries, particularly in Germany, Thailand and the Middle East.

Operating Expenses

The following table represents information regarding our operating expenses for the years ended December 31:
 
2018
 
2017
 
$ Change
 
% Change
Selling and administrative expense
$
885.6

 
$
933.7

 
$
(48.1
)
 
(5.2)
Research, development and engineering expense
157.4

 
155.5

 
1.9

 
1.2
Impairment of assets
217.5

 
3.1

 
214.4

 
N/M
(Gain) loss on sale of assets, net
(6.7
)
 
1.0

 
(7.7
)
 
N/M
Total operating expenses
$
1,253.8

 
$
1,093.3

 
$
160.5

 
14.7

Selling and administrative expense in 2018 decreased $48.1 including lower non-routine charges of $22.0 and higher restructuring of $12.1. Excluding the impact of restructuring and non-routine charges and a net unfavorable currency impact of $9.6, due primarily to the euro, selling and administrative expense was lower by $47.8, mostly from cost reduction initiatives across the Company related to DN Now as well as an increased benefit from the mark-to-market adjustment of the legacy Wincor Nixdorf stock option program of $3.4, partially offset by the retail segment from increased investment in the new North America retail sales organization.

Non-routine cost in selling and administrative expenses were $153.4 and $175.4 in 2018 and 2017, respectively. The components of the non-routine expenses in 2018 pertained to purchase accounting adjustments of $89.1 related to intangible asset amortization, integration cost totaling $43.4, legal and consulting cost of $18.3 and executive severance of $2.7. Selling and administrative

25

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS as of December 31, 2018
DIEBOLD NIXDORF, INCORPORATED AND SUBSIDIARIES
(unaudited)
(in millions, except per share amounts)

expense included restructuring charges of $33.4 and $21.3 in 2018 and 2017, respectively, primarily due to the workforce alignment actions under the DN Now plan.

Research, development and engineering expense in 2018 increased $1.9 due to higher restructuring cost of $4.1 and an unfavorable currency impact of $4.4, primarily related to the euro, partially offset by lower non-routine expense of $0.3. Excluding restructuring and the impact of currency, expense was down $6.3 mostly from DN Now initiatives and lower associate related expense.

As a result of certain impairment triggering events, the Company performed an impairment test of goodwill for its four reporting units during the third quarter of 2018. Based on the results of the impairment testing, the Company recorded a non-cash goodwill impairment loss of $134.4 related to the Eurasia Banking, EMEA Retail and Rest of World Retail reporting units during 2018. During the second quarter of 2018, the Company performed an impairment test of goodwill for all of its LoB reporting units due to the change in its reportable operating segments which resulted in a $83.1 non-cash impairment loss. The year ended December 31, 2018 recorded impairment of $217.5, related to the impairment of goodwill in the second and third quarters, compared to $3.1 in the same prior year period related to information technology transformation and integration activities.

The gain on sale of assets in 2018 was primarily related to a gain on sale of buildings in North America of $4.8, the liquidation of the Barbados operating entity of $3.3 and a gain related to a sale of a maintenance contract in Brazil and a certain China investment. This gain on sale of assets was partially offset by the loss pertaining to a settlement of certain matters related to an Americas divestiture in the second quarter of 2018.

Operating Profit (Loss)

The following table represents information regarding our operating profit (loss) for the years ended December 31:
 
2018
 
2017
 
$ Change
 
% Change
Operating loss
$
(362.9
)
 
$
(93.5
)
 
$
(269.4
)
 
288.1
Operating margin
(7.9
)%
 
(2.0
)%
 

 
 

The operating loss increased, compared to the prior year, mostly due to higher non-routine expense, including the non-cash goodwill impairment, and incremental restructuring expense. Excluding non-routine and restructuring expense, operating loss increased $57.9 from lower gross profit in the retail and Americas banking segments, partially offset by higher gross profit in the Eurasia banking segment as well as favorable selling and administrative expense attributable to DN Now initiatives.

Other Income (Expense)

The following table represents information regarding our other income (expense) for the years ended December 31:
 
2018
 
2017
 
$ Change
 
% Change
Interest income
$
8.7

 
$
20.3

 
$
(11.6
)
 
(57.1)
Interest expense
(154.9
)
 
(117.3
)
 
(37.6
)
 
32.1
Foreign exchange loss, net
(2.5
)
 
(3.9
)
 
1.4

 
35.9
Miscellaneous, net
(4.0
)
 
2.5

 
(6.5
)
 
N/M
Other income (expense)
$
(152.7
)
 
$
(98.4
)
 
$
(54.3
)
 
55.2

Interest income in 2018 decreased, primarily as a result of overall lower average balances as well as lower U.S. market returns on nonqualified plans and repatriation of cash in Brazil and EMEA. Interest expense was higher compared to the prior year due to higher domestic interest rates and the additional $650.0 of Term Loan A-1 Facility debt with higher incremental interest rates and related fee amortization. Miscellaneous, net in 2018 was unfavorably impacted by higher cost and lower benefits associated with the company owned life insurance.



26

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS as of December 31, 2018
DIEBOLD NIXDORF, INCORPORATED AND SUBSIDIARIES
(unaudited)
(in millions, except per share amounts)

Income (Loss) from Continuing Operations, net of tax

The following table represents information regarding our net income from continuing operations, net of tax for the years ended December 31:
 
2018
 
2017
 
$ Change
 
% Change
Net loss
$
(566.0
)
 
$
(213.9
)
 
$
(352.1
)
 
N/M
Percent of net sales
(12.4
)%
 
(4.6
)%
 

 
 
Effective tax rate
7.2
 %
 
14.7
 %
 


 
 

The loss before taxes and net loss increased primarily due to the reasons described above. Net loss was also impacted by the change in the income tax expense.

The effective tax rate for 2018 was 7.2 percent and is primarily due to a goodwill impairment charge, the U.S. Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the Tax Act), valuation allowances on certain foreign and state jurisdictions, foreign tax credits and the higher interest expense burden resulting from the debt restructuring. More specifically, the expense on the loss reflects the reduction of the U.S. federal corporate income tax rate from 35 percent to 21 percent, refinement of the transition tax under U.S. SEC's Staff Accounting Bulletin (SAB) 118, a goodwill impairment charge, which for tax purposes is primarily nondeductible and the business interest deduction limitation. As a result of the Company’s debt restructuring activity during the year, a full valuation allowance was required on the current year nondeductible business interest expense. In addition, the overall effective tax rate is impacted by the jurisdictional income (loss) and varying respective statutory rates.

The effective tax rate for 2017 was 14.7 percent on the overall loss from continuing operations. The U.S. enacted the Tax Act, which was signed into law on December 22, 2017. The Tax Act changed many aspects of U.S. corporate income taxation and included a reduction of the corporate income tax rate from 35 percent to 21 percent, implementation of a territorial tax system and imposition of a tax on deemed repatriated earnings of foreign subsidiaries. The resulting impact to the Company was an estimated $45.1 reduction to deferred income taxes for the income tax rate change and an estimated one-time non-cash charge of $36.6 related to deferred foreign earnings.

Due to the complexities involved in accounting for the recently enacted Tax Act, the SAB 118 requires that the Company include in its financial statements the reasonable estimate of the impact of the Tax Act on earnings to the extent such reasonable estimate has been determined. The Company recorded a reasonable estimate of such effects, the net one-time charge related to the Tax Act may differ, possibly materially, due to, among other things, further refinement of its calculations, changes in interpretations and assumptions, additional guidance that may be issued by the U.S. Government, and actions and related accounting policy decisions the Company may take as a result of the Tax Act. The Company completed its analysis over a one-year measurement period ending December 31, 2018 and any adjustments during this measurement period were included in net loss from continuing operations as an adjustment to income tax expense in the reporting period when such adjustments are determined.

Segment Net Sales and Operating Profit Summary

The following tables represent information regarding the Company's net sales and operating profit by reporting segment:
Eurasia Banking:
2018
 
2017
 
$ Change
 
% Change
Net sales
$
1,800.2

 
$
1,903.4

 
$
(103.2
)
 
(5.4
)
Segment operating profit
$
147.1

 
$
126.8

 
$
20.3

 
16.0

Segment operating profit margin
8.2
%
 
6.7
%
 
 
 
 

Eurasia Banking net sales decreased $103.2, including a net favorable currency impact of $41.3 mainly related to the euro. Prior year net sales were adversely impacted $18.3, including a net unfavorable currency impact of $1.4, related to Deferred Revenue Adjustments. Excluding currency and Deferred Revenue Adjustments, net sales decreased $164.2 due to lower product volume related to fewer product deployments and projects, particularly in Thailand, Turkey, Indonesia, the Middle East and Australia. In addition, services in India decreased as a result of a low-margin maintenance contract roll off. In addition, net sales declined from the Company’s strategic decision to reduce its product and services portfolio in India and China as market conditions became less favorable. These decreases were partially offset by increased unit replacements in Germany related to Windows 10 migrations.

Segment operating profit increased $20.3, compared to the prior year, including a net favorable currency impact of $3.6. Excluding the impact of currency, operating profit increased $16.7 mostly from lower operating expenses tied to the DN Now plan and increased product gross profit related to higher margin pull through on a favorable customer mix, particularly in Germany, Thailand

27

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS as of December 31, 2018
DIEBOLD NIXDORF, INCORPORATED AND SUBSIDIARIES
(unaudited)
(in millions, except per share amounts)

and the Middle East. These increases were partially offset by lower services revenue and associated profit in various Asia Pacific countries as well as higher services cost in China and Indonesia in addition to lower margin pull through on software revenue attributable to an unfavorable customer mix and higher cost in various countries.

Segment operating profit margin increased in 2018, primarily as a result of lower operating expense related to the DN Now plan, as well as higher product gross profit, partially offset by lower services and software gross profit.
Americas Banking:
2018
 
2017
 
$ Change
 
% Change
Net sales
$
1,515.7

 
$
1,525.6

 
$
(9.9
)
 
(0.6
)
Segment operating profit
$
27.6

 
$
68.1

 
$
(40.5
)
 
(59.5
)
Segment operating profit margin
1.8
%
 
4.5
%
 
 
 
 

Americas Banking net sales decreased $9.9 including a net unfavorable currency impact of $20.6 related to the Brazil real. Excluding currency, net sales increased $10.7 from higher software license volume in Brazil, professional services volume in North America and higher product volume, particularly in Mexico, Canada and Ecuador. These increases were partially offset by lower product volume in the U.S. as well as low-profit maintenance contract base roll offs of two customers in North America and $4.1 lower electronic security revenue in Chile due to the business divestiture in September 2017.

Segment operating profit decreased $40.5, compared to the prior year including a net favorable currency impact of $0.4. Excluding the impact of currency, operating profit decreased $40.9, adversely impacted by one-time services cost in Brazil from the second quarter of 2018. Additionally, product gross profit decreased mostly from higher freight cost, primarily related to supply chain delays in the first half of 2018 in North America and Mexico as well as an unfavorable customer mix in Mexico. Partially offsetting these decreases, selling and administrative expense was lower from cost reduction initiatives related to the DN Now plan and the Company’s annual incentive program as well as higher software gross profit from increased professional services activity in North America.

Segment operating profit margin decreased in 2018, primarily as a result of higher freight and one time services cost in the first three quarters of 2018, partially offset by lower selling and administrative expense.

Retail:
2018
 
2017
 
$ Change
 
% Change
Net sales
$
1,262.7

 
$
1,180.3

 
$
82.4

 
7.0

Segment operating profit
$
50.3

 
$
87.9

 
$
(37.6
)
 
(42.8
)
Segment operating profit margin
4.0
%
 
7.4
%
 
 
 
 

Retail net sales increased $82.4, including a net favorable currency impact of $34.7 mainly related to the euro. Prior year net sales were adversely impacted $12.1, including a net unfavorable currency impact of $1.0, related to Deferred Revenue Adjustments. Excluding currency and Deferred Revenue Adjustments, net sales increased $34.6 due to a large North America kiosk project as well as higher POS activity in Central Eastern Europe, the U.K, France and Spain. These increases were partially offset by lower product volume from the Eurasia non-core businesses and large prior year non-recurring POS and kiosk activity in Germany for multiple customers as well as lower lottery equipment volume in Brazil.

Segment operating profit decreased $37.6 compared to the prior-year including a $2.6 net favorable currency impact. Excluding currency, Retail operating profit decreased $40.2 primarily due to the under performance from the Eurasia non-core businesses in addition to low-margin service and product revenue unfavorably impacting gross profit in various countries in Eurasia. The current year was also unfavorably impacted by higher selling and administrative expense from developing the North America retail sales organization.

Segment operating profit margin decreased in 2018, primarily as a result of the under performance of the non-core businesses and an unfavorable customer mix driving lower gross margin on higher revenue in addition to increased operating expense.





28

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS as of December 31, 2018
DIEBOLD NIXDORF, INCORPORATED AND SUBSIDIARIES
(unaudited)
(in millions, except per share amounts)

2017 comparison with 2016

Net Sales

The following table represents information regarding our net sales for the years ended December 31:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Percent of Total Net Sales for the Year Ended
 
2017
 
2016
 
% Change
 
% Change in CC (1)
 
2017
 
2016
Segments
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Eurasia Banking
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Services
$
1,133.1

 
$
637.3

 
77.8

 
71.3

 
24.6
 
19.2
Products
770.3

 
595.3

 
29.4

 
25.8

 
16.7
 
18.0
Total Eurasia Banking
$
1,903.4

 
$
1,232.6

 
54.4

 
49.5

 
41.3
 
37.2
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Americas Banking
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Services
$
1,043.9

 
$
1,068.1

 
(2.3
)
 
(3.2
)
 
22.6
 
32.2
Products
481.7

 
499.2

 
(3.5
)
 
(4.5
)
 
10.5
 
15.0
Total Americas Banking
$
1,525.6

 
$
1,567.3

 
(2.7
)
 
(3.6
)
 
33.1
 
47.2
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Retail
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Services
$
608.3

 
$
202.6

 
200.2

 
181.2

 
13.2
 
6.1
Products
572.0

 
313.8

 
82.3

 
72.4

 
12.4
 
9.5
Total Retail
$
1,180.3

 
$
516.4

 
128.6

 
115.3

 
25.6
 
15.6
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total net sales
$
4,609.3

 
$
3,316.3

 
39.0

 
35.4

 
100.0
 
100.0
(1) The Company calculates constant currency by translating the prior-year period results at the current year exchange rate. 

Net sales increased $1,293.0 or 39.0 percent, including incremental net sales from the Acquisition of $1,517.7 and a net favorable currency impact of $88.3 primarily related to the euro and the Brazil real. 2017 net sales were adversely impacted $30.4 related to Deferred Revenue Adjustments, which was an increase of $14.2 compared to the prior year. The amounts attributable to the Acquisition are impacted by the alignment and integration of customer portfolios, solution offerings and operations between the legacy companies, which may result in unfavorable comparisons to prior year. The following results include the impact of foreign currency and purchase accounting adjustments:

Segments

Eurasia Banking net sales increased $670.8, which included incremental net sales from the Acquisition of $756.7, a net favorable currency impact of $40.9 mainly related to the euro and higher Deferred Revenue Adjustments of $8.5. Excluding the impact of the Acquisition, currency and Deferred Revenue Adjustments, net sales decreased $118.3 due mostly to lower banking product project activity in EMEA as well as unfavorable structural changes in the Asia Pacific market, partially offset by higher managed services net sales in Asia Pacific.

Americas Banking net sales decreased $41.7, which included incremental net sales from the Acquisition of $79.7 and a net favorable currency impact of $15.7 mostly related to the Brazil real. Excluding the impact of the Acquisition, currency and Deferred Revenue Adjustments, net sales decreased $137.1 mostly attributable to decreased product volumes, primarily in Mexico, North America and Brazil, as well as the run-off of multi-vendor service contracts in North America.

Retail net sales increased $663.9, which included incremental net sales from the Acquisition of $681.3, a net favorable currency impact of $31.7 mainly related to the Brazil real and higher Deferred Revenue Adjustments of $5.7. Excluding the impact of the Acquisition, currency and Deferred Revenue Adjustments, net sales decreased $43.4, mostly from lower voting machine volume in Brazil, partially offset by increased services and software revenue in EMEA and higher product volume and the associated services in Asia Pacific.

A more detailed discussion of segment net sales is included under "Segment Net Sales and Operating Profit Summary" below.


29

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS as of December 31, 2018
DIEBOLD NIXDORF, INCORPORATED AND SUBSIDIARIES
(unaudited)
(in millions, except per share amounts)


Gross Profit

The following table represents information regarding our gross profit for the years ended December 31:
 
2017
 
2016
 
$ Change
 
% Change
Gross profit - services
$
675.2

 
$
526.9

 
$
148.3

 
28.1
Gross profit - products
324.6

 
184.8

 
139.8

 
75.6
Total gross profit
$
999.8

 
$
711.7

 
$
288.1

 
40.5
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gross margin - services
24.2
%
 
27.6
%
 

 
 
Gross margin - products
17.8
%
 
13.1
%
 

 
 
Total gross margin
21.7
%
 
21.5
%
 

 
 

Services gross margin decreased 3.4 percent due in part to the impact of the Acquisition, which utilizes a third-party labor model to support its services revenue stream, resulting in a dilutive effect on margins. Services gross margin was adversely impacted by higher non-routine cost of $10.8 primarily related to purchase accounting adjustments associated with the Acquisition and higher restructuring charges of $8.9. Additionally, gross margin was also impacted by lower contract maintenance revenue in Americas combined with increased labor costs and investments. The labor investments are a result of higher turnover rates of technicians and the associated training to support additional product lines.

Product gross margin increased 4.7 percent mostly as a result of lower non-routine cost of $27.8 related to higher purchase accounting adjustments to record inventory acquired in the Acquisition at fair value in the prior year. Additionally, the incremental gross profit associated with the Acquisition includes higher margin business across both banking and retail solutions. This increase was partially offset by higher restructuring of $5.2.

Operating Expenses

The following table represents information regarding our operating expenses for the years ended December 31:
 
2017
 
2016
 
$ Change
 
% Change
Selling and administrative expense
$
933.7

 
$
761.2

 
$
172.5

 
22.7
Research, development and engineering expense
155.5

 
110.2

 
45.3

 
41.1
Impairment of assets
3.1

 
9.8

 
(6.7
)
 
(68.4)
Loss on sale of assets, net
1.0

 
0.3

 
0.7

 
N/M
Total operating expenses
$
1,093.3

 
$
881.5

 
$
211.8

 
24.0

The selling and administrative expense in 2017 increased $172.5 inclusive of incremental expenses from the Acquisition of $272.4 and a net unfavorable currency impact of $17.9. Excluding the impact of currency and the Acquisition, selling and administrative expense decreased $117.8 from the overall cost reductions tied to DN2020 as well as lower non-routine and restructuring costs and lower incentive compensation expense related to the Company's annual incentive plans.

Selling and administrative non-routine expenses were $175.4 and $150.8 in 2017 and 2016, respectively. The primary components of the non-routine expenses in 2017 pertained to acquisition and divestiture costs, including related integration activities, totaling $85.0, purchase accounting adjustments of $85.0 related to intangible asset amortization and executive severance of $5.4. The year-over-year increase was primarily related to incremental purchase accounting and integration expenses offset by a decrease in legal, acquisition and divestiture costs. Selling and administrative expense included restructuring charges of $21.3 and $28.8 in 2017 and 2016, respectively.

Research, development and engineering expense increased $45.3 due to incremental expense associated with the Acquisition of $62.7. Excluding the incremental impact of the Acquisition, expense was favorably impacted by the benefits of streamlining the cost structure as part of the Company's integration activities. Research, development and engineering expense included restructuring reversals of $1.1 in 2017 compared to $5.1 of restructuring costs in 2016.

In 2017, the Company recorded impairments totaling $3.1 related to IT transformation and integration activities.


30

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS as of December 31, 2018
DIEBOLD NIXDORF, INCORPORATED AND SUBSIDIARIES
(unaudited)
(in millions, except per share amounts)

In 2017, the loss on sale of assets was primarily related to the divestiture of the Company's electronic security (ES) business in Chile and from building closures in EMEA due to integration efforts. These losses were partially offset by a gain on sale of assets primarily related to the Company's divestiture of its business in the U.K. and its ES business in Mexico.

Operating expense as a percent of net sales in 2017 was 23.7 percent compared with 26.6 percent in 2016 due to increased revenue and overall cost reductions tied to DN2020 which more than offset the incremental operating costs from the Acquisition.

Operating Profit (Loss)

The following table represents information regarding our operating profit (loss) for the years ended December 31:
 
2017
 
2016
 
$ Change
 
% Change
Operating loss
$
(93.5
)
 
$
(169.8
)
 
$
76.3

 
(44.9)
Operating margin
(2.0
)%
 
(5.1
)%
 

 
 

The operating loss decreased in 2017 compared to 2016 primarily due to higher gross margin that more than offset an increase in operating expense, which included amortization of acquired intangible assets, restructuring and non-routine costs related to acquisitions and divestitures.

Other Income (Expense)

The following table represents information regarding our other income (expense) for the years ended December 31:
 
2017
 
2016
 
$ Change
 
 % Change
Interest income
$
20.3

 
$
21.5

 
$
(1.2
)
 
(5.6)
Interest expense
(117.3
)
 
(101.4
)
 
(15.9
)
 
15.7
Foreign exchange loss, net
(3.9
)
 
(2.1
)
 
(1.8
)
 
(85.7)
Miscellaneous, net
2.5

 
3.1

 
(0.6
)
 
(19.4)
Other income (expense)
$
(98.4
)
 
$
(78.9
)
 
$
(19.5
)
 
24.7

The decrease in interest income in 2017 compared with 2016 was a result of lower interest income of the Company's marketable securities, which were primarily held for cash management in Brazil. Interest expense was higher in 2017 associated with the financing required for the Acquisition, offset by improved interest rates from the Company's repricing certain of its debt in May 2017. Foreign exchange loss, net in 2017 was unfavorable as a result of the incremental impact of the Acquisition. Miscellaneous, net in 2016 included a mark-to-market net gain of $9.2 associated with the Company's foreign currency option contracts entered and foreign currency forward contract and $6.3 in financing fees related to the Company’s bridge financing required for the Acquisition.

Income (Loss) from Continuing Operations, Net of Tax

The following table represents information regarding our income (loss) from continuing operations, net of tax, for the years ended December 31:
 
2017
 
2016
 
$ Change
 
% Change
Loss from continuing operations, net of tax
$
(213.9
)
 
$
(179.3
)
 
$
(34.6
)
 
19.3
Percent of net sales
(4.6
)%
 
(5.4
)%
 

 
 
Effective tax rate (benefit)
14.7
 %
 
(27.7
)%
 

 
 

Loss from continuing operations, net of tax was $213.9. This was primarily due to the reasons described above and the change in income tax (benefit) expense.

The effective tax rate for 2017 was 14.7 percent on the overall loss from continuing operations. The Tax Act changed many aspects of U.S. corporate income taxation and included a reduction of the corporate income tax rate from 35 percent to 21 percent, implementation of a territorial tax system and imposition of a tax on deemed repatriated earnings of foreign subsidiaries. The resulting impact to the Company is an estimated $45.1 reduction to deferred income taxes for the income tax rate change and an estimated one-time, non-cash charge of $36.6 related to deferred foreign earnings.


31

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS as of December 31, 2018
DIEBOLD NIXDORF, INCORPORATED AND SUBSIDIARIES
(unaudited)
(in millions, except per share amounts)

The effective tax rate benefit for 2016 of 27.7 percent on the overall loss from continued operations. The benefit on the overall loss was negatively impacted by the Acquisition including a valuation allowance for certain post-acquisition losses and non-deductible acquisition related expenses. The overall effective tax rate was decreased further by the jurisdictional income (loss) and varying respective statutory rates within the acquired entities.

Equity in (loss) earnings of unconsolidated subsidiaries, net consisted primarily of income from the Aisino and Inspur strategic alliances in China.

Income from Discontinued Operations, Net of Tax

The closing of the NA ES divestiture occurred on February 1, 2016 and the Company recorded a gain (loss) on sale, net of tax, of $145.0 in 2016. Additionally, the income from discontinued operations, net of tax includes a net loss of $1.3 as a result of the operations included through February 1, 2016.

Segment Revenue and Operating Profit Summary

The following tables represent information regarding our revenue and operating profit by reporting segment for the years ended December 31:
Eurasia Banking:
2017
 
2016
 
$ Change
 
% Change
Net sales
$
1,903.4

 
$
1,232.6

 
$
670.8

 
54.4
Segment operating profit
$
126.8

 
$
88.2

 
$
38.6

 
43.8
Segment operating profit margin
6.7
%
 
7.2
%
 
 
 
 

Eurasia Banking net sales increased $670.8, which included incremental net sales from the Acquisition of $756.7, a net favorable currency impact of $40.9 mainly related to the euro and higher Deferred Revenue Adjustments of $8.5. Excluding the impact of the Acquisition, currency and Deferred Revenue Adjustments, net sales decreased $118.3 due mostly to lower banking product project activity in EMEA as well as unfavorable structural changes in the Asia Pacific market, partially offset by higher managed services net sales in Asia Pacific.

Segment operating profit increased $38.6 including an incremental impact from the Acquisition of $98.7 in 2017. Excluding the incremental portion from the Acquisition, operating profit decreased $60.1 in 2017 mostly from lower product gross profit driven by declined project activity as well as unfavorable structural changes in the Asia Pacific market and higher operating expense. The unfavorable product gross profit and operating expense was partially offset by higher software and services gross profit.

Segment operating profit margin decreased due in part to the impact of the Acquisition, which utilizes a higher third-party labor model to support its service and software revenue stream, resulting in a dilutive effect on margins in 2017.
Americas Banking:
2017
 
2016
 
$ Change
 
% Change
Net sales
$
1,525.6

 
$
1,567.3

 
$
(41.7
)
 
(2.7
)
Segment operating profit
$
68.1

 
$
101.8

 
$
(33.7
)
 
(33.1
)
Segment operating profit margin
4.5
%
 
6.5
%
 
 
 
 

Americas Banking net sales decreased $41.7, which included incremental net sales from the Acquisition of $79.7 and a net favorable currency impact of $15.7 mostly related to the Brazil real. Excluding the impact of the Acquisition, currency and Deferred Revenue Adjustments, net sales decreased $137.1 mostly attributable to decreased product volumes, primarily in Mexico, North America and Brazil, as well as the run-off of multi-vendor service contracts in North America.

Segment operating profit decreased $33.7 in 2017. The incremental portion from the Acquisition accounted for $23.6 in segment operating profit in 2017. Excluding the incremental portion from the Acquisition, operating profit decreased $57.3 mostly from lower services gross profit as a result of contract maintenance revenue declines combined with increased labor investments in addition to decreased product installation volume. The labor investments are a result of higher turnover rates of technicians and the associated training to support additional product lines partially offset by lower operating expenses from cost saving initiatives

Segment operating profit margin decreased due to higher services cost, partially offset by the positive impact of the Acquisition.


32

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS as of December 31, 2018
DIEBOLD NIXDORF, INCORPORATED AND SUBSIDIARIES
(unaudited)
(in millions, except per share amounts)

Retail:
2017
 
2016
 
$ Change
 
% Change
Net sales
$
1,180.3

 
$
516.4

 
$
663.9

 
128.6
Segment operating profit
$
87.9

 
$
34.0

 
$
53.9

 
158.5
Segment operating profit margin
7.4
%
 
6.6
%
 
 
 
 

Retail net sales increased $663.9, which included incremental net sales from the Acquisition of $681.3, a net favorable currency impact of $31.7 mainly related to the Brazil real and higher Deferred Revenue Adjustments of $5.7. Excluding the impact of the Acquisition, currency and Deferred Revenue Adjustments, net sales decreased $43.4, mostly from lower voting machine volume in Brazil, partially offset by increased services and software revenue in EMEA and higher product volume and the associated services in Asia Pacific.

Segment operating profit increased $53.9 in 2017. The incremental portion from the Acquisition accounted for $55.7 in segment operating profit in 2017. Excluding the incremental portion from the Acquisition, operating profit decreased $1.8 due to slightly higher operating expenses, partially offset by higher services gross profit from the Eurasia non-core business.

Segment operating profit margin increased due primarily to the positive impact of the Acquisition in 2016.

Refer to note 20 for further details of segment revenue and operating profit.

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

Capital resources are obtained from income retained in the business, borrowings under the Company’s senior notes, committed and uncommitted credit facilities and operating and capital leasing arrangements. Management expects that the Company’s capital resources will be sufficient to finance planned working capital needs, R&D activities, investments in facilities or equipment, pension contributions, the payment of guaranteed dividends and any repurchases of the Company’s common shares for at least the next 12 months. The Company had $105.3 and $8.0 of restricted cash at December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively, primarily related to the acquisition of the remaining shares in Diebold Nixdorf AG. At December 31, 2018, $386.6 or 94.8 percent of the Company’s cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments reside in international tax jurisdictions. Repatriation of certain international held funds could be negatively impacted by potential payments for certain foreign taxes. The Company has earnings in certain jurisdictions available for repatriation of $1,364.3 with no additional tax expense primarily as a result of the Tax Act. The Company has made acquisitions in the past and may make acquisitions in the future. Part of the Company's strategy is to optimize the business portfolio through divestitures and complementary acquisitions. The Company intends to finance any future acquisitions with cash and short-term investments, cash provided from operations, borrowings under available credit facilities, proceeds from debt or equity offerings and/or the issuance of common shares.

The Company's total cash and cash availability as of December 31, 2018 and 2017 was as follows:
 
2018
 
2017
Cash and cash equivalents (excluding restricted cash)
$
353.1

 
$
535.2

Additional cash availability from:
 
 
 
Uncommitted lines of credit
28.0

 
216.9

Revolving facility
347.5

 
445.0

Short-term investments
33.5

 
81.4

 Total cash and cash availability
$
762.1

 
$
1,278.5


The following table summarizes the results of our consolidated statement of cash flows for the years ended December 31:
Net cash flow provided by (used in)
2018
 
2017
 
2016
Operating activities - continuing operations
$
(104.1
)
 
$
37.1

 
$
39.3

Investing activities - continuing operations
34.4

 
(120.8
)
 
(923.3
)
Financing activities - continuing operations
10.9

 
(63.7
)
 
881.3

Discontinued operations, net

 

 
351.3

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash
(18.7
)
 
37.9

 
(8.0
)
Net increase (decrease) in cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash
$
(77.5
)
 
$
(109.5
)
 
$
340.6



33

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS as of December 31, 2018
DIEBOLD NIXDORF, INCORPORATED AND SUBSIDIARIES
(unaudited)
(in millions, except per share amounts)

During 2018, cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash decreased $77.5 primarily due to operating activities as well as payments of $47.2, $62.1, $129.6 and $64.9 for integration initiatives, restructuring programs, interest on debt and income taxes, respectively. These uses were offset by the cash provided by financing and investing activities related to the proceeds received from the Term A-1 Loan Facility and proceeds from the monetization of the company owned life insurance plans.

Operating Activities. Cash flows from operating activities can fluctuate significantly from period to period as working capital needs and the timing of payments for income taxes, restructuring activities, pension funding and other items impact reported cash flows. Net cash used by operating activities was $104.1 for the year ended December 31, 2018, a decrease of $141.2 from $37.1 cash provided for the year ended December 31, 2017. The overall decrease was primarily due to deferred revenue and finance receivables combined with an increased operating loss primarily from integration initiatives and restructuring programs. These decreases were partially offset by lower working capital balances. Additional detail is included below:

Cash flows from continuing operating activities during the year ended December 31, 2018 compared to the year ended December 31, 2017 were impacted by a $352.1 increase in loss from continuing operations, net of tax. Refer to Results of Operations discussed above for further discussion of the Company's loss from continuing operations, net of tax.

The net aggregate of trade accounts receivable, inventories and accounts payable provided $11.4 and $39.4 in operating cash flows during the year ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. The decrease is primarily a result of increased cash utilization by accounts payable as a result of critical supplier payments that were made in the current year caused by reduced terms and vendor collection efforts in the second half of the year. Inventory cash use increased compared to the prior year due to increased build up of inventory to satisfy various customer demand. Partially offsetting the changes in inventory and accounts payable, the increase in cash provided by trade receivables was primarily related to higher cash collected in connection with the Company's DN Now working capital management initiative.

Deferred revenue used $42.4 of operating cash during the year ended December 31, 2018, compared to a $26.0 provide in the year ended December 31, 2017. The decrease in cash flow associated with deferred revenue is related to lower customer prepayments primarily in the Americas compared to the prior year as certain customers switched from a yearly prepayment to quarterly or monthly installments.

The aggregate of income taxes and deferred income taxes used $61.3 of operating cash during the year ended December 31, 2018, compared to $22.1 used in 2017. Refer to note 4 for additional discussion on income taxes.

In the aggregate, the other combined certain assets and liabilities used $23.5 and $89.2 in 2018 and 2017, respectively. The decreased use of $65.7 in 2018 primarily due to lower payments related to restructuring and integration and the timing of payments related to VAT and deferred costs. These decreases were partially offset by non-cash changes in accruals for cash compensation plans and insurance.

The most significant changes in adjustments to net income include the goodwill impairment and non-routine inventory charge. The goodwill impairment of $217.5 in 2018 compared to $3.1 asset impairment in 2017. The inventory charge of $74.5 in 2018 relates to the Company's focus on streamlining its product portfolio and harvesting inventory resulting in the increased non-cash inventory charge. Other significant items include depreciation and amortization expense and additional share-based compensation expense.

Investing Activities. Net cash provided by investing activities was $34.4 for the year ended December 31, 2018 compared to net cash used in investing activities of $120.8 for the year ended December 31, 2017. The $155.2 change was primarily due to the monetization of the Company's investment in the company owned life insurance plans, utilization of short-term investments in Brazil for cash needs across the organization and a decrease in cash spent on capital expenditures. The maturities and purchases of investments primarily related to short-term investment activity in Brazil and for 2017 also include the Company's investment in Kony. The proceeds from the sale of assets primarily include cash from the sale of a building in North America for 2018 and divestitures of the legacy Diebold business in the U.K. and the ES businesses located in Mexico and Chile in 2017.

The Company anticipates capital expenditures of approximately $80 in 2019 to be utilized for improvements to the Company's product line. Currently, the Company finances these investments primarily with funds provided by income retained in the business, borrowings under the Company's committed and uncommitted credit facilities, and operating and capital leasing arrangements. 

Financing Activities. Net cash provided by financing activities was $10.9 for the year ended December 31, 2018 compared to net cash used by financing activities of $63.7 for the year ended 2017, a change of $74.6. The increase was primarily due to an additional $650.0 in proceeds received from the Term Loan A-1 Facility and an increase in net borrowings of the Revolving Facility. The increase in borrowings were partially offset by $337.7 in debt repayments and higher cash distributions primarily related to the redemption of shares and cash compensation to Diebold Nixdorf AG minority shareholders of $377.2 compared to $17.6 in 2017. Refer to note 11 for details of the Company's cash flows related to debt borrowings and repayments.

34

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS as of December 31, 2018
DIEBOLD NIXDORF, INCORPORATED AND SUBSIDIARIES
(unaudited)
(in millions, except per share amounts)


Benefit Plans. The Company plans to make contributions to its retirement plans as well as benefits payments directly from the Company of approximately $50 for the year ended December 31, 2019. The Company anticipates reimbursement of approximately $13 for certain benefits paid from its trustee in 2019. Beyond 2019, minimum statutory funding requirements for the Company's U.S. pension plans may become more significant. The actual amounts required to be contributed are dependent upon, among other things, interest rates, underlying asset returns and the impact of legislative or regulatory actions related to pension funding obligations. The Company has adopted a pension investment policy designed to achieve an adequate funded status based on expected benefit payouts and to establish an asset allocation that will meet or exceed the return assumption while maintaining a prudent level of risk. The plan's target asset allocation adjusts based on the plan's funded status. As the funded status improves or declines, the debt security target allocation will increase and decrease, respectively. Management monitors assumptions used for our actuarial projections as well as any funding requirements for the plans.

Payments due under the Company's other post-retirement benefit plans are not required to be funded in advance. Payments are made as medical costs are incurred by covered retirees and are principally dependent upon the future cost of retiree medical benefits under these plans. The Company expects the other post-retirement benefit plan payments to be approximately $1 in 2019. Refer to note 15 for further discussion of the Company's pension and other post-retirement benefit plans.

Dividends. The Company paid dividends of $7.7, $30.6 and $64.6 in the years ended December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016, respectively. Annualized dividends per share were $0.10, $0.40 and $0.96 for the years ended December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016, respectively. In May 2018, the Company announced its decision to reallocate future dividend funds towards debt reduction and other capital resource needs.

Contractual Obligations. The following table summarizes the Company’s approximate obligations and commitments to make future payments under contractual obligations as of December 31, 2018:
 
 
 
Payment due by period
 
Total
 
Less than 1 year
 
1-3 years
 
3-5 years
 
More than 5 years
Short-term uncommitted lines of credit (1)
$
20.9

 
$
20.9

 
$

 
$

 
$

Long-term debt
2,293.5

 
28.6

 
464.7

 
1,400.2

 
400.0

Interest on debt (2)
1,002.5

 
175.3

 
396.9

 
369.2

 
61.1

Diebold Nixdorf AG minority shareholders cash compensation
3.4

 
3.4

 

 

 

Redeemable noncontrolling interest of DN AG minority shareholders (3)
99.1

 
99.1

 

 

 

Minimum operating lease obligations
223.8

 
81.4

 
93.5

 
40.3

 
8.6

Purchase commitments
8.9

 
5.3

 
3.6

 

 

Total
$
3,652.1

 
$
414.0

 
$
958.7

 
$
1,809.7

 
$
469.7

(1) 
The amount available under the short-term uncommitted lines at December 31, 2018 was $28.0. Refer to note 11 for additional information.
(2) 
Amounts represent estimated contractual interest payments on outstanding long-term debt and notes payable. Rates in effect as of December 31, 2018 are used for variable rate debt.
(3) 
A portion of cash is restricted to fund the purchase of the remaining shares of Diebold Nixdorf AG.

At December 31, 2018, the Company also maintained uncertain tax positions of $49.5, for which there is a high degree of uncertainty as to the expected timing of payments (refer to note 4).

Refer to note 11 for additional information regarding the Company's debt obligations.

Refer to note 17 for additional information regarding the Company's hedging and derivative instruments.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements. The Company enters into various arrangements not recognized in the consolidated balance sheets that have or could have an effect on its financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources. The principal off-balance sheet arrangements that the Company enters into are guarantees, operating leases (refer to note 9) and sales of finance receivables. The Company provides its global operations guarantees and standby letters of credit through various financial institutions to suppliers, customers, regulatory agencies and insurance providers. If the Company is not able to comply with its contractual obligations, the suppliers, regulatory agencies and insurance providers may draw on the pertinent bank (refer to note 17 ). The Company has sold finance receivables to financial institutions while continuing to service the receivables. The Company records these sales by removing finance receivables from the consolidated balance sheets and recording gains and losses in the consolidated statement of operations (refer to note 7).

35

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS as of December 31, 2018
DIEBOLD NIXDORF, INCORPORATED AND SUBSIDIARIES
(unaudited)
(in millions, except per share amounts)


CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES

Management’s discussion and analysis of the Company’s financial condition and results of operations are based upon the Company’s consolidated financial statements. The consolidated financial statements of the Company are prepared in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States (U.S. GAAP). The preparation of the accompanying consolidated financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions about future events. These estimates and the underlying assumptions affect the amounts of assets and liabilities reported, disclosures about contingent assets and liabilities and reported amounts of revenues and expenses. Such estimates include revenue recognition, the valuation of trade and financing receivables, inventories, goodwill, intangible assets, other long-lived assets, legal contingencies, guarantee obligations, and assumptions used in the calculation of income taxes, pension and post-retirement benefits and customer incentives, among others. These estimates and assumptions are based on management’s best estimates and judgment. Management evaluates its estimates and assumptions on an ongoing basis using historical experience and other factors. Management monitors the economic conditions and other factors and will adjust such estimates and assumptions when facts and circumstances dictate. As future events and their effects cannot be determined with precision, actual results could differ significantly from these estimates.

The Company’s significant accounting policies are described in note 1 to the consolidated financial statements, which is contained in Item 8 of this annual report on Form 10-K. Management believes that, of its significant accounting policies, its policies concerning revenue recognition, allowances for credit losses, inventory reserves, goodwill, long-lived assets, taxes on income, contingencies and pensions and post-retirement benefits are the most critical because they are affected significantly by judgments, assumptions and estimates. Additional information regarding these policies is included below.

Revenue Recognition. Revenue is measured based on consideration specified in a contract with a customer and excludes amounts collected on behalf of third parties. The amount of consideration can vary depending on discounts, rebates, refunds, credits, price concessions, incentives, performance bonuses, penalties, or other similar items contained in the contract with the customer of which generally these variable consideration components represents minimal amount of net sales. The Company recognizes revenue when it satisfies a performance obligation by transferring control over a product or service to a customer.

The Company's payment terms vary depending on the individual contracts and are generally fixed fee. The Company recognizes advance payments and billings in excess of revenue recognized as deferred revenue. In certain contracts where services are provided prior to billing, the Company recognizes a contract asset within trade receivables and other current assets.

Taxes assessed by a governmental authority that are both imposed on and concurrent with a specific revenue-producing transaction and that are collected by the Company from a customer are excluded from revenue.

The Company recognizes shipping and handling fees billed when products are shipped or delivered to a customer and includes such amounts in net sales. Although infrequent, shipping and handling associated with outbound freight after control over a product has transferred to a customer is not a separate performance obligation, rather is accounted for as a fulfillment cost. Third-party freight payments are recorded in cost of sales.

The Company includes a warranty in connection with certain contracts with customers, which are not considered to be separate performance obligations. The Company provides its customers a manufacturer’s warranty and records, at the time of the sale, a corresponding estimated liability for potential warranty costs. For additional information on product warranty refer to note 9. The Company also has extended warranty and service contracts available for its customers, which are recognized as separate performance obligations. Revenue is recognized on these contracts ratably as the Company has a stand-ready obligation to provide services when or as needed by the customer. This input method is the most accurate assessment of progress toward completion the Company can apply.

Product revenue is recognized at the point in time that the customer obtains control of the product, which could be upon delivery or upon completion of installation services, depending on contract terms. The Company’s software licenses are functional in nature (the IP has significant stand-alone functionality); as such, the revenue recognition of distinct software license sales is at the point in time that the customer obtains control of the rights granted by the license.

Professional services integrate the commercial solution with the customer's existing infrastructure and helps define the optimal user experience, improve business processes, refine existing staffing models and deploy technology to meet branch and store automation objectives. Revenue from professional services are recognized over time, because the customer simultaneously receives and consumes the benefits of the Company’s performance as the services are performed or when the Company’s performance creates an asset with no alternative use and the Company has an enforceable right to payment for performance completed to date. Generally revenue will be recognized using an input measure, typically costs incurred. The typical contract length for service is generally one year and is billed and paid in advance except for installations, among others.


36

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS as of December 31, 2018
DIEBOLD NIXDORF, INCORPORATED AND SUBSIDIARIES
(unaudited)
(in millions, except per share amounts)

Services may be sold separately or in bundled packages. For bundled packages, the Company accounts for individual services separately if they are distinct. A distinct service is separately identifiable from other items in the bundled package if a customer can benefit from it on its own or with other resources that are readily available to the customer. The consideration (including any discounts) is allocated between separate services or distinct obligations in a bundle based on their stand-alone selling prices. The stand-alone selling prices are determined based on the prices at which the Company separately sells the products or services. For items that are not sold separately, the Company estimates stand-alone selling prices using the cost plus expected margin approach. Revenue on service contracts is recognized ratably over time, generally using an input measure, as the customer simultaneously receives and consumes the benefits of the Company’s performance as the services are performed. In some circumstances, when global service supply chain services are not included in a term contract and rather billed as they occur, revenue on these billed work services are recognized at a point in time as transfer of control occurs.

The following is a description of principal solutions offered within the Company's two main industry segments that generate the Company's revenue.

Banking