Company Quick10K Filing
Quick10K
Diageo
Closing Price ($) Shares Out (MM) Market Cap ($MM)
$170.52 2,696 $459,651
20-F 2019-06-30 Annual: 2019-06-30
20-F 2018-06-30 Annual: 2018-06-30
20-F 2017-06-30 Annual: 2017-06-30
20-F 2016-06-30 Annual: 2016-06-30
ABEV Ambev 69,016
CCU United Breweries 8,221
COKE Coca Cola Bottling 3,238
COT Cott 1,689
MGPI MGP Ingredients 803
NBEV New Age Beverages 234
REED Reed's 101
WVVI Willamette Valley Vineyards 34
YVR Liquid Media Group 5
FMX Mexican Economic Development 0
DEO 2019-06-30
EX-1.1 diageoplcarticlesofassoc.htm
EX-2.4 exhibit24final.htm
EX-12.1 exhibit121.htm
EX-12.2 exhibit122.htm
EX-13.1 exhibit131.htm
EX-13.2 exhibit132.htm
EX-15.1 exhibit151.htm

Diageo Earnings 2019-06-30

DEO 20F Annual Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

20-F 1 a20-ff19p12.htm 20-F Document


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
 
FORM 20-F
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE
SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended: 30 June 2019
Commission file number 1-10691
DIAGEO plc
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)
England and Wales
(Jurisdiction of incorporation or organisation)
Lakeside Drive, Park Royal, London NW10 7HQ, England
(Address of principal executive offices)
Siobhan Moriarty, Company Secretary
Tel: +44 20 8978 6000
E-mail: the.cosec@diageo.com
Lakeside Drive, Park Royal, London NW10 7HQ, England
(Name, Telephone, E-mail and/or Facsimile number and Address of Company Contact Person)
Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
Title of each class
 
Trading symbol(s)
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
American Depositary Shares
 
DEO
 
New York Stock Exchange
Ordinary shares of 28101/108 pence each
 
 
 
New York Stock Exchange(i)
2.875% Guaranteed Notes due 2022
 
DEO/22
 
New York Stock Exchange
8.000% Guaranteed Notes due 2022
 
DEO/22A
 
New York Stock Exchange
7.450% Guaranteed Notes due 2035
 
DEO/35
 
New York Stock Exchange
4.250% Guaranteed Notes due 2042
 
DEO/42
 
New York Stock Exchange
(i)
Not for trading, but only in connection with the registration of American Depositary Shares representing such ordinary shares, pursuant to the requirements of the Securities and Exchange Commission.
Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act: None
Indicate the number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer’s classes of capital or common stock as of the close of the period covered by the Annual Report: 2,600,942,652 ordinary shares of 28101/108 pence each.


1





Indicate by check mark if each registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
Yes þ No ¨
If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if each registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Yes ¨ No þ
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes þ No ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ☐ No ☐
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. Indicate by check mark whether each registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer. See definition of “accelerated filer and large accelerated filer” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
 
Large Accelerated Filer þ             Accelerated Filer ¨             Non-Accelerated Filer ¨            Emerging growth company ¨
If an emerging growth company that prepares its financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, indicate by checkmark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ¨
 
 
The term “new or revised financial accounting standard” refers to any update issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board to its Accounting Standards Codification after April 5, 2012.
Indicate by check mark which basis of accounting the registrant has used to prepare the financial statements included in this filing:
 
U.S. GAAP  ¨
  
International Financial Reporting Standards
as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board þ
  
Other ¨
If “Other” has been checked in response to the previous question, indicate by check mark which financial statement item the registrant has elected to follow. Item 17 ¨ Item 18 ¨
If this is an annual report, indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ¨ No þ

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

2

Contents

 
 
 
5

  
Cross reference to Form 20-F
7

  
Introduction
9

  
Recent trends
10

  
Historical information
 
 
14

  
Strategic report
14

  
Business description
14

  
Our business model
16

  
Our strategy
22

  
Our brands
23

  
Our global reach
24

  
How we measure performance: key performance indicators
29

  
Chairman’s statement
32

  
Chief Executive’s statement
35

  
Market dynamics
38

  
Risk factors
47

  
Cautionary statement concerning forward-looking statements
 
  
 
49

  
Business review
49

  
Operating results 2019 compared with 2018
84

  
Liquidity and capital resources
86

  
Contractual obligations and commitments
86

  
Off-balance sheet arrangements
86

  
Risk management
87

  
Critical accounting policies
87

  
New accounting standards
88

  
Our role in society
110

  
Definitions and reconciliation of non-GAAP measures to GAAP measures
 
 
 
  
 
118

  
Governance
118

  
Board of Directors and Company Secretary
121

  
Executive Committee
124

  
Corporate governance report
136

  
Audit Committee report
140

 
Nomination Committee report
142

  
Directors’ remuneration report
174

  
Directors’ report

3

Contents (continued)

 
 
 
178

  
Financial statements
178

 
Report of independent registered public accounting firm
181

  
Consolidated income statement
182

  
Consolidated statement of comprehensive income
183

  
Consolidated balance sheet
184

  
Consolidated statement of changes in equity
185

  
Consolidated statement of cash flows
186

  
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
186

  
Accounting information and policies
190

  
Results for the year
206

  
Operating assets and liabilities
227

  
Risk management and capital structure
244

  
Other financial information
 
 
253

  
Additional information for shareholders
253

  
Legal proceedings
253

  
Articles of association
257

  
Exchange controls
257

  
Documents on display
257

  
Taxation
260

  
Warning to shareholders - share fraud
261

  
Exhibits
263

  
Signature
 
 
264

  
Glossary of terms and US equivalents


4

Cross reference to Form 20-F

 
 
 
 
 
Item
  
Required item in Form 20-F
  
Page(s)
Part I
  
 
  
 
1.
  
Identity of directors, senior management and advisers
  
Not applicable
2.
  
Offer statistics and expected timetable
  
Not applicable
3.
  
Key information
  
 
 
  
A. Selected financial data
  
10-13
 
  
B. Capitalisation and indebtedness
  
Not applicable
 
  
C. Reason for the offer and use of proceeds
  
Not applicable
 
  
D. Risk factors
  
38-46
4.
  
Information on the company
  
 
 
  
A. History and development of the company
  
7, 12, 18-21, 51, 55-57, 197-198, 199-201, 205-208, 250
 
  
B. Business overview
  
7, 18-23, 49-83, 190-191, 196-198
 
  
C. Organisational structure
  
252
 
  
D. Property, plant and equipment
  
18, 19, 49-83, 196, 214-216
4A.
  
Unresolved staff comments
  
Not applicable
5.
  
Operating and financial review and prospects
  
 
 
  
A. Operating results
  
10-13, 20, 23-28, 35-36, 49-83, 114, 198-199, 227-236
 
  
B. Liquidity and capital resources
  
10-13, 27, 58-59, 84-86, 114, 223-239, 250
 
  
C. Research and development, patents and licenses, etc.
  
20
 
  
D. Trend information
  
9, 32-37
 
  
E. Off-balance sheet arrangements
  
86
 
  
F. Tabular disclosure of contractual obligations
  
86
 
  
G. Safe harbor
  
6.
  
Directors, senior management and employees
  
 
 
  
A. Directors and senior management
  
118-122, 168
 
  
B. Compensation
  
148-173, 216-223
 
  
C. Board practices
  
118-123, 136-139, 153-155, 142-171
 
  
D. Employees
  
195
 
  
E. Share ownership
  
148-173, 242-243
7.
  
Major shareholders and related party transactions
  
 
 
  
A. Major shareholders
  
175
 
  
B. Related party transactions
  
172, 223, 250-251
 
  
C. Interests of experts and counsel
  
Not applicable
8.
  
Financial information
  
 
 
  
A. Consolidated statements and other financial information
  
181-252
 
  
B. Significant changes
  
252
9.
  
The offer and listing
  
 
 
  
A. Offer and listing details
  
1, 175
 
  
B. Plan of distribution
  
Not applicable
 
  
C. Markets
  
175
 
  
D. Selling shareholders
  
Not applicable
 
  
E. Dilution
  
Not applicable
 
  
F. Expenses of the issue
  
Not applicable

5

Cross reference to Form 20-F (continued)

 
 
 
 
 
Item
  
Required item in Form 20-F
  
Page(s)
10.
  
Additional information
  
 
 
  
A. Share capital
  
Not applicable
 
  
B. Memorandum and articles of association
  
253-256
 
  
C. Material contracts
  
153-154, 239-243
 
  
D. Exchange controls
  
257
 
  
E. Taxation
  
257-260
 
 
F. Dividends and paying agents
 
Not applicable
 
  
G. Statement by experts
  
Not applicable
 
 
H. Documents on display
 
257
 
  
I. Subsidiary information
  
Not applicable
11.
  
Quantitative and qualitative disclosures about market risk
  
86, 132-136, 227-236
12.
  
Description of securities other than equity securities
  
 
 
  
A. Debt securities
  
Not applicable
 
  
B. Warrants and rights
  
Not applicable
 
  
C. Other securities
  
Not applicable
 
  
D. American depositary shares
  
176
Part II
  
 
  
 
13.
  
Defaults, dividend arrearages and delinquencies
  
Not applicable
14.
  
Material modifications to the rights of security holders and use of proceeds
  
Not applicable
15.
  
Controls and procedures
  
 
 
  
A. Disclosure controls and procedures
  
132
 
  
B. Management’s report on internal control over financial reporting
  
134
 
  
C. Attestation report of the registered public accounting firm
  
178-180
 
  
D. Changes in internal control over financial reporting
  
134
16A.
  
Audit committee financial expert
  
139
16B.
  
Code of ethics
  
133
16C.
  
Principal accountant fees and services
  
138-139, 195
16D.
  
Exemptions from the listing standards for audit committees
  
Not applicable
16E.
  
Purchases of equity securities by the issuer and affiliated purchasers
  
57, 239-243, 252
16F.
  
Change in registrant’s certifying accountant
  
Not applicable
16G.
  
Corporate governance
  
134-135
16H.
  
Mine safety disclosure
  
Not applicable
Part III
  
 
  
 
17.
  
Financial statements
  
Not applicable
18.
  
Financial statements
  
See Item 8
19.
  
Exhibits
  
261-262
Additional information
  
 
 
  
Glossary of terms and US equivalents
  
264-265


6

Introduction

Diageo is a global leader in the beverage alcohol industry. Its geographic breadth and range of industry leading brands across categories and price points is unparalleled.

Diageo plc is incorporated as a public limited company in England and Wales. Diageo was incorporated as Arthur Guinness Son and Company Limited on 21 October 1886. The group was formed by the merger of Grand Metropolitan Public Limited Company (GrandMet) and Guinness plc (the Guinness Group) in December 1997. Diageo plc’s principal executive office is located at Lakeside Drive, Park Royal, London NW10 7HQ and its telephone number is +44 (0) 20 8978 6000. Diageo plc’s agent for service in the United States for the purposes of Diageo’s registration statement on Form F-3 (333-224340) is General Counsel, Diageo North America, Inc., 801 Main Avenue (6078-06), Norwalk, CT 06851.

This is the Annual Report on Form 20-F of Diageo plc for the year ended 30 June 2019. The information set out in this Form 20-F does not constitute Diageo plc’s statutory accounts under the UK Companies Act for the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 or 2017. The accounts for 2018 and 2017 have been delivered to the registrar of companies for England and Wales and those for 2019 will be delivered in due course.

This document contains forward-looking statements that involve risk and uncertainty. There are a number of factors that could cause actual results and developments to differ materially from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements, including factors beyond Diageo’s control. For more details, please refer to the Cautionary statement concerning forward-looking statements on pages 47-48.

The content of the company’s website (www.diageo.com) should not be considered to form a part of or be incorporated into this report. This report includes names of Diageo’s products, which constitute trademarks or trade names which Diageo owns or which others own and license to Diageo for use. In this report, the term ‘company’ refers to Diageo plc and terms ‘group’ and ‘Diageo’ refer to the company and its consolidated subsidiaries, except as the context otherwise requires. A glossary of terms used in this report is included at the end of the report.

The consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) and related interpretations as adopted for use in the European Union (EU) and as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB). IFRS as adopted by the EU differs in certain respects from IFRS as issued by the IASB. The differences have no impact on the group’s consolidated financial statements for the years presented. Unless otherwise indicated, all financial information contained in this document has been prepared in accordance with IFRS.

The financial performance expectations related to future organic net sales and organic operating profit (the financial performance expectations) included in this document have been prepared by and are the responsibility of Diageo’s management. PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP has not audited, reviewed, examined, compiled nor applied agreed-upon procedures with respect to the financial performance expectations and, accordingly, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP does not express an opinion or any other form of assurance with respect thereto. The PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP report included in this document relates to Diageo’s historical financial statements. It does not extend to the financial performance expectations and should not be read to do so. The financial performance expectations were not prepared with a view toward compliance with published guidelines of the Securities and Exchange Commission or the guidelines established by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants for preparation and presentation of prospective financial information.

Information presented

Organic movements and organic operating margins are before exceptional items. Commentary, unless otherwise stated, refers to organic movements. Share, unless otherwise stated, refers to value share. For a definition of organic movement and reconciliations of non-GAAP measures to GAAP measures see page 110.

The brand ranking information presented in this report, when comparing information with competitors, reflects data published by sources such as Impact Databank, Global Data, Nielsen and IWSR. Market data information and competitive set classifications are taken from independent industry sources in the markets in which Diageo operates. Diageo’s financial year end is 30 June, and such data may relate to dates other than 30 June or periods other than the year ended 30 June, such as calendar year end.


7

Introduction (continued)

Disclosures not included in Annual Report on Form 20-F

The following pages and sections of this document do not form part of the Annual Report on Form 20-F and are furnished to the SEC for information only:
 
Disclosures under the headings ‘We innovate’, ‘We make’, ‘We market’, ‘We sell’, ‘Broad portfolio’, ‘Markets’, ‘Global functions, support and governance’, ‘Our people’, ‘Our values’, ‘Our role in society’, ‘Our brands’, ‘Our geographic footprint’, ‘Brilliant execution’, ‘Efficient supply and procurement’, and ‘Financial strength’ in the section ‘Strategic report – Our business model’ on pages 14 and 15.

Disclosures under the headings ‘Our sustainability and responsibility priorities and our commitment to governance and ethics’, ‘Promoting positive drinking’, ‘Building thriving communities’, ‘Reducing our environmental impact’, and ‘Highest standards of governance and ethics’ in the section ‘Strategic report – Our strategy’ on page 17.

Disclosures included under the titles ‘Water withdrawal (%)’ and ‘Carbon emissions (%)’ and ‘Number of employees (%)’ in the section ‘Strategic report – Our global reach – Diageo reports as five regions’ on page 23.

Disclosures on pages 26 and 28 in the section ‘Strategic report – How we measure performance: key performance indicators’ of non-financial key performance indicators.

Disclosures under the heading ‘Culture’, ‘Diageo in society’ ‘Communities’ and ‘Looking ahead’ in the Chairman’s statement on pages 29 to 31.

Disclosures under the heading ‘Trusted and respected’ in the Chief Executive’s statement on pages 33 and 34.

Disclosures included under the titles ‘Safeguarding our future by earning trust and respect’, ‘Promoting positive drinking’, ‘Promoting inclusivity and human rights’, ‘Climate change, water stress and a responsible environmental strategy’ and ‘Diageo sites located in water-stressed areas’ in the section ‘Strategic report – Market dynamics’ on pages 36 and 37.

Disclosures included under the titles ‘Sustainability and responsibility’ on pages 61, 65, 69, 73, and 77 in relation to each reporting segment in the Business review.

Disclosures in the section ‘Strategic report – Our role in society’ on pages 88 to 109.

Disclosures under the heading ‘Relations with shareholders’, ‘Internal control and risk management’, ‘Political donations’ , ‘Going concern’, ‘Responsibility Statement’, ‘Directors' responsibilities in respect of the Annual Report and financial statements’ in the Corporate governance report on pages 131 to 134.



8

Recent trends

The following comments were made by Ivan Menezes, Chief Executive of Diageo, in Diageo’s preliminary results announcement on 25 July 2019:

“Diageo has delivered another year of strong performance. Organic volume and net sales growth was broad based across regions and categories, with new product innovation being a strong contributor. We expanded organic operating margin ahead of our guidance and increased investment behind our brands ahead of organic net sales growth.

Fiscal 19 has been another year of strong free cash flow delivery at £2.6 billion and we have returned £2.8 billion to shareholders via share buybacks. The Board has approved plans for an additional return to shareholders of up to £4.5 billion over Fiscal 20 to Fiscal 22.

Our focus on quality sustainable growth is backed by a culture of everyday efficiency that enables us to invest smartly in marketing and growth initiatives while expanding margins.

These results reflect the steady progress we are making and as we look ahead we see attractive opportunities to deliver consistent growth and create shareholder value. In the medium term I expect Diageo to maintain organic net sales growth in the mid-single digit range and to grow organic operating profit ahead of net sales in the range of 5%-7%.”

Brexit and related risks

There continues to be uncertainty with respect to the process surrounding the United Kingdom’s proposed exit from the European Union, and in relation to the political environment more generally in the United Kingdom. We continue to believe that, in the event of either a negotiated exit or no-deal scenario, the direct financial impact to Diageo will not be material. In the EU, we expect that the vast majority of our finished case goods will continue to trade tariff free, with no change to existing tariffs in either scenario. There remains uncertainty in relation to future trading arrangements between the UK and the rest of the world where today we rely on a number of existing EU Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) with third party countries. However, more recently, a number of countries have agreed with the UK to continue to trade on these terms in the event of a ‘no deal’ outcome. If the UK Government is unable to renew all of the existing FTAs on which we rely, trading could revert to WTO rules.

We have further considered the principal impact to our supply chain of a no-deal scenario which we have assessed as limited and believe that we have appropriate stock levels in place to mitigate this risk. The full implications of Brexit will not be understood until future tariffs, trade, regulatory, tax, and other free trade agreements to be entered into by the United Kingdom are established. Furthermore, we could experience changes to laws and regulations post Brexit, in areas such as intellectual property rights, employment, environment, supply chain logistics, data protection, and health and safety.

A cross-functional working group is in place that meets on a regular basis to identify and assess the consequences of Brexit, with all major functions within our business represented. We continue to monitor this risk area very closely, as well as the broader environment risks, including a continuing focus on identifying critical decision points to ensure potential disruption is minimised, and take prudent actions to mitigate these risks wherever practical.



9

Historical information

The following tables present selected consolidated financial data for Diageo for the five years ended 30 June 2019 and as at the respective year ends. The data presented below for the five years ended 30 June 2019 and the respective year ends has been derived from Diageo’s consolidated financial statements, audited by Diageo’s independent auditor, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP for each of the four years ended 30 June 2019. The group’s former auditor, KPMG LLP (KPMG) reported on the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2015.

Income statement data
 
 
 
Year ended 30 June
 
 
 
2019
£ million

 
2018
£ million

 
2017
£ million

 
2016
£ million

 
2015
£ million

Sales
 
19,294

 
18,432

 
18,114

 
15,641

 
15,996

Excise duties
 
(6,427
)
 
(6,269
)
 
(6,064
)
 
(5,156
)
 
(5,153
)
Net sales
 
12,867

 
12,163

 
12,050

 
10,485

 
10,813

Cost of sales
 
(4,866
)
 
(4,634
)
 
(4,680
)
 
(4,251
)
 
(4,610
)
Gross profit
 
8,001

 
7,529

 
7,370

 
6,234

 
6,203

Marketing
 
(2,042
)
 
(1,882
)
 
(1,798
)
 
(1,562
)
 
(1,629
)
Other operating expenses
 
(1,917
)
 
(1,956
)
 
(2,013
)
 
(1,831
)
 
(1,777
)
Operating profit
 
4,042

 
3,691

 
3,559

 
2,841

 
2,797

Non-operating items
 
144

 

 
20

 
123

 
373

Net interest and other finance charges
 
(263
)
 
(260
)
 
(329
)
 
(327
)
 
(412
)
Share of after tax results of associates and joint ventures
 
312

 
309

 
309

 
221

 
175

Profit before taxation
 
4,235

 
3,740

 
3,559

 
2,858

 
2,933

Taxation
 
(898
)
 
(596
)
 
(732
)
 
(496
)
 
(466
)
Profit from continuing operations
 
3,337

 
3,144

 
2,827

 
2,362

 
2,467

Discontinued operations
 

 

 
(55
)
 

 

Profit for the year
 
3,337

 
3,144

 
2,772

 
2,362

 
2,467

Weighted average number of shares
 
million

 
million

 
million

 
million

 
million

Shares in issue excluding own shares
 
2,418

 
2,484

 
2,512

 
2,508

 
2,505

Dilutive potential ordinary shares
 
10

 
11

 
11

 
10

 
12

 
 
2,428

 
2,495

 
2,523

 
2,518

 
2,517

Per share data
 
pence

 
pence

 
pence

 
pence

 
pence

Dividend per share
 
68.57

 
65.3

 
62.2

 
59.2

 
56.4

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic earnings per share
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Continuing operations
 
130.7

 
121.7

 
108.2

 
89.5

 
95.0

Discontinued operations
 

 

 
(2.2
)
 

 

 
 
130.7

 
121.7

 
106.0

 
89.5

 
95.0

Diluted earnings per share
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Continuing operations
 
130.1

 
121.1

 
107.7

 
89.1

 
94.6

Discontinued operations
 

 

 
(2.2
)
 

 

 
 
130.1

 
121.1

 
105.5

 
89.1

 
94.6


10

Historical information (continued)

Balance sheet data
 
 
 
As at 30 June
 
 
 
2019
£ million

 
2018
£ million

 
2017
£ million

 
2016
£ million

 
2015
£ million

Non-current assets
 
21,923

 
21,024

 
20,196

 
19,639

 
18,134

Current assets
 
9,373

 
8,691

 
8,652

 
8,852

 
7,670

Total assets
 
31,296

 
29,715

 
28,848

 
28,491

 
25,804

Current liabilities
 
(7,003
)
 
(6,360
)
 
(6,660
)
 
(6,187
)
 
(5,290
)
Non-current liabilities
 
(14,137
)
 
(11,642
)
 
(10,160
)
 
(12,124
)
 
(11,258
)
Total liabilities
 
(21,140
)
 
(18,002
)
 
(16,820
)
 
(18,311
)
 
(16,548
)
Net assets
 
10,156

 
11,713

 
12,028

 
10,180

 
9,256

Share capital
 
753

 
780

 
797

 
797

 
797

Share premium
 
1,350

 
1,349

 
1,348

 
1,347

 
1,346

Other reserves
 
2,372

 
2,133

 
2,693

 
2,625

 
1,994

Retained earnings
 
3,886

 
5,686

 
5,475

 
3,761

 
3,634

Equity attributable to equity shareholders of the parent company
 
8,361

 
9,948

 
10,313

 
8,530

 
7,771

Non-controlling interests
 
1,795

 
1,765

 
1,715

 
1,650

 
1,485

Total equity
 
10,156

 
11,713

 
12,028

 
10,180

 
9,256

Net borrowings
 
(11,277
)
 
(9,091
)
 
(7,892
)
 
(8,635
)
 
(9,527
)


11

Historical information (continued)

Notes to the historical information

1. Accounting policies The consolidated financial statements for each of the five years ended 30 June 2019 have been prepared in accordance with IFRS. The IFRS accounting policies applied by the group to prepare the financial information in this document are disclosed in the notes to the consolidated financial statements.

2. Exceptional items Exceptional items are those that in management’s judgement need to be disclosed by virtue of their size and/or nature. Such items are included within the income statement caption to which they relate, and are separately disclosed in the notes to the consolidated financial statements. An analysis of exceptional items is as follows:
 
 
 
Year ended 30 June
 
 
 
2019
£ million

 
2018
£ million

 
2017
£ million

 
2016
£ million

 
2015
£ million

Items included in operating profit
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Indirect tax in Korea
 
(35
)
 

 

 

 

Guaranteed minimum pension equalisation
 
(21
)
 

 

 

 

French tax audit penalty
 
(18
)
 

 

 

 

Brand, goodwill, tangible and other assets impairment
 

 
(128
)
 

 
(118
)
 

Competition authority investigation in Turkey
 

 

 
(33
)
 

 

Customer claim in India
 

 

 
(32
)
 

 

Disengagement agreements relating to United Spirits Limited
 

 

 
23

 
(49
)
 

Restructuring programmes
 

 

 

 

 
(82
)
Korea settlement
 

 

 

 

 
(146
)
Associate impairment
 

 

 

 

 
(41
)
 
 
(74
)
 
(128
)
 
(42
)
 
(167
)
 
(269
)
Non-operating items
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gains on sale of businesses
 
144

 

 
20

 
215

 
247

Step up gains
 

 

 

 

 
156

Other non-operating items
 

 

 

 
(92
)
 
(30
)
 
 
144

 

 
20

 
123

 
373

French tax audit interest
 
(9
)
 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Items included in taxation
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
French audit settlement
 
(61
)
 

 

 

 

Tax rate change in the Netherlands
 
51

 

 

 

 

US tax reform
 

 
354

 

 

 

UK transfer pricing settlement
 

 
(143
)
 

 

 

UK industrial building allowance
 

 
(21
)
 

 

 

Tax credit on exceptional operating items
 
4

 
13

 
11

 
7

 
51

Tax on sale of businesses
 
(33
)
 

 
(7
)
 
49

 

 
 
(39
)
 
203

 
4

 
56

 
51

Exceptional items in continuing operations
 
22

 
75

 
(18
)
 
12

 
155

Discontinued operations net of taxation (note 3)
 

 

 
(55
)
 

 

Exceptional items
 
22

 
75

 
(73
)
 
12

 
155


3. Discontinued operations In the year ended 30 June 2017 discontinued operations of £55 million, net of £9 million deferred tax comprise additional amounts payable to the UK Thalidomide Trust following an agreement reached in December 2016, updates to the discount and inflation rates applied to the existing thalidomide provision and legal costs.

12

Historical information (continued)

4. Dividends The Board expects that Diageo will pay an interim dividend in April and a final dividend in October of each year. Approximately 40% of the total dividend in respect of any financial year is expected to be paid as an interim dividend and approximately 60% as a final dividend. The payment of any future dividends, subject to shareholder approval, will depend upon Diageo’s earnings, financial condition and such other factors as the Board deems relevant. Proposed dividends are not considered to be a liability until they are approved by the Board for the interim dividend and by the shareholders at the Annual General Meeting for the final dividend.

The table below sets out the amounts of interim, final and total cash dividends paid by the company on each ordinary share. The dividends are translated into US dollars per ADS (each ADS representing four ordinary shares) at the actual rate on each of the respective dividend payment dates.
 
 
 
 
 
Year ended 30 June
 
 
 
 
 
2019
pence

 
2018
pence

 
2017
pence

 
2016
pence

 
2015
pence

Per ordinary share
 
Interim
 
26.10

 
24.90

 
23.70

 
22.60

 
21.50

 
 
Final
 
42.47

 
40.40

 
38.50

 
36.60

 
34.90

 
 
Total
 
68.57

 
65.30

 
62.20

 
59.20

 
56.40

 
 
 
 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$

Per ADS
 
Interim
 
1.36

 
1.39

 
1.18

 
1.27

 
1.28

 
 
Final
 
2.11

 
2.10

 
2.02

 
1.85

 
2.14

 
 
Total
 
3.47

 
3.49

 
3.20

 
3.12

 
3.42


Note: Subject to shareholders’ approval the final dividend for the year ended 30 June 2019 will be paid on 3 October 2019, and payment to US ADR holders will be made on 8 October 2019. In the table above, an exchange rate of £1 = $1.24 has been assumed for this dividend, but the exact amount of the payment to US ADR holders will be determined by the rate of exchange on 8 October 2019.

5. Net borrowings Net borrowings are defined as gross borrowings (short-term borrowings and long-term borrowings plus finance lease liabilities plus interest rate hedging instruments, cross currency interest rate swaps and funding foreign currency forwards and swaps used to manage borrowings) less cash and cash equivalents.

6. Share capital As at 30 June 2019 there were 2,601 million (20182,695 million) ordinary shares of 28101/108 pence each in issue with a nominal value of £753 million (2018£780 million). For the three years ended 30 June 2017 there were 2,754 million ordinary shares of 28101/108 pence each in issue with a nominal value of £797 million.

In the year ended 30 June 2019 the group purchased 94.7 million ordinary shares (201858.9 million), representing approximately 3.5% of the issued ordinary share capital (20182.1%) at an average price of £29.24 per share, and an aggregate cost of £2,775 million (including £6 million of transaction costs) (2018 – £25.43 per share, and an aggregate cost of £1,507 million including £9 million of transaction costs) under share buyback programmes. The programme completed on 10 July 2019 resulting in the repurchase of an additional 0.3 million shares at an average price of £33.73, and an aggregate cost of £26 million (including £17 million settlement payments for the full tranche) recognised as a financial liability at 30 June 2019. The shares purchased under the share buyback programmes were cancelled.


7. Exchange rates A substantial portion of the group’s assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses are denominated in currencies other than sterling. For a discussion of the impact of exchange rate fluctuations on the group’s financial position and results of operations, see note 15 to the consolidated financial statements.



13



Strategic report

Business description

Our business model

Diageo is a global leader in beverage alcohol with a portfolio of iconic spirits and beer brands.

We have a broad portfolio across categories and price points. Our portfolio and geographic reach position us to deliver sustainable performance and create value for our shareholders.

The consumer is at the heart of our business. Using our proven marketing and innovation skills, we aim to build and sustain strong brands that play a positive role in society.

Our organisation is structured in market-based model. This means we have greater agility and can better apply our strategy in individual countries to meet the diverse needs of our consumers and customers. It also enables us to quickly identify and shape consumer trends to support growth.

We use our local and global market expertise to identify and deliver against the most valuable growth opportunities. Our global supply capabilities enable us to manufacture and distribute our brands efficiently and effectively. Where it makes sense to do so, we source and produce locally.

We are passionate about our role in society and the responsibility we have to our stakeholders, communities and the environment.
 
We innovate

We make

We market

We sell
Led by consumer insights, we unlock new opportunities to recruit and re-recruit consumers to our brands. We innovate with new offerings that meet changing consumer demands.

We are the makers of premium spirits and beer, committed to the highest quality and standards.

We invest in world-class marketing to responsibly build vibrant brands that resonate with our consumers.

We extend our sales reach through leading activations and advocacy to ensure our brands are part of consumer celebrations around the world.

Key highlights

Brands
 
Countries
200+
 
180
Production sites
 
Employees
150+
 
28,400


14

Business description (continued)

How we operate

Broad portfolio

Each market has the flexibility to select the best portfolio of brands to capture unique consumer opportunities. We then invest in opportunities that we believe offer the most valuable growth.

Markets

We operate through a market-based structure so that we can act on local consumer insights and identify trends quickly to deliver locally relevant solutions.

Global functions, support and governance

Our markets are supported by global functional teams and a broad range of shared services. Together, these drive the sharing of best practice, enhance efficiency and help build in-market capabilities. We set our standards for governance, compliance and ethics globally.

Our people

We want all our employees around the world to reach their full potential and play their part in the success of our business. We have created an inclusive and diverse culture with shared values and a common purpose.

Our values

Passionate about consumers; be the best; freedom to succeed; proud of what we do; valuing each other.

Our role in society

We are committed to playing a positive role in society. We work to reduce alcohol harm and promote moderation, increase access to opportunities for local communities and reduce our environmental impact.

Our brands

We own two of the world’s five largest spirits brands by value, Johnnie Walker and Smirnoff, and 23 of the world’s top 100 spirits brands by value(i). We own Guinness, the 4th largest premium beer brand by value(ii).  

Our geographic footprint

We have broad reach in the United States and Europe and leading positions in many of the markets that are expected to generate most of the medium-term industry growth.

Brilliant execution

We use cutting-edge consumer insights and marketing. We innovate at scale and we develop winning relationships with our customers through distribution and sales.

Efficient supply and procurement

We work to high-quality manufacturing and environmental standards.

Financial strength

We aim to deliver consistent net sales value growth and margin expansion, as well as strong cash generation.

(i) Impact Databank Value Ratings May 2019.
(ii) Global Data, 2018.


15

Business description (continued)

Our strategy

The global spirits category has shown resilient, long-term growth. Our strategy is to support premiumisation in developed and emerging countries.

Everywhere we operate, we aim to do so in a responsible and sustainable way. Our broad portfolio means we can access different consumer occasions with our brands, across price points.

In developed markets, we support premiumisation through our premium core and reserve brands. In emerging markets, we aim to grow participation in international premium spirits. To support this, we selectively participate in attractive mainstream spirits segments. This means consumers can access our brands at affordable price points and we can shape responsible drinking trends by introducing consumers to branded products.

Beer is our second largest category after scotch and our global beer business is led by our premium brand, Guinness. Guinness is available in approximately 130 countries. We use a variety of routes to the consumer, depending on the most efficient model for each market. In Africa, we have a large beer business with a broad portfolio that reaches across price points.

Our focus on consumers, the balance of creative flair and data-led insight in our marketing and our track record for innovation, combined with our financial discipline and everyday efficiency, all support our goal to be a reliable compounder of growth. We aim to combine these to deliver a virtuous circle of consistent top-line performance, margin expansion and increased investment in our brands and business.


Our strategy is delivered through

Six executional priorities

Keep premium core vibrant

Ensuring we have a vibrant premium core is critical to our overall performance.

Continue to win in reserve

We build our reserve brands by ensuring they are available in the most influential outlets. We also build their reputations with the bartenders and consumers who set trends.

Drive innovation at scale

We build on our existing brands, anticipate new consumer occasions and create the brands of tomorrow with a focus on scale and speed.

Increase participation in mainstream spirits

Mainstream spirits is a sizeable and growing opportunity. We have invested in mainstream spirits and have a strong foundation from which to drive growth.

Build an advantaged route to consumer

Using insights, we understand where to invest our resources so that our brands are available in the right formats and locations for our consumers.

Embed productivity to drive out costs and invest in growth

We are focused on every day efficiency, effectiveness and agility to reduce costs and create fuel for our growth.



16

Business description (continued)

Our sustainability and responsibility priorities and our commitment to governance and ethics

Promoting positive drinking

We are committed to promoting positive drinking through encouraging moderation and tackling misuse.

Building thriving communities

We want to continue to make Diageo a great, safe, inclusive and diverse place to work for our people. We want to build sustainable supply chains and create programmes that empower communities and individuals, making a positive difference everywhere we live, work, source and sell.

Reducing our environmental impact

We aim to preserve the natural resources on which our-long-term success depends. We are working to reduce our impact in the areas of water, carbon, packaging and waste.

Highest standards of governance and ethics

We are constantly looking for ways to strengthen our culture of integrity and help our people make the right choices, to do business the right way, from grain to glass.

Outcomes of our strategy
① Efficient growth
③ Credibility and trust
② Consistent value creation
④ Engaged people
outcomesofourstrategy.jpg
We measure progress against our strategy using the following financial and non-financial indicators
Organic net sales growth
Return on average invested capital
Reach and impact of responsible drinking programmes ③ ④
Carbon emissions  ③
Organic operating margin improvement(i)  
Employee engagement index ③ ④
Total shareholder return
Earnings per share before exceptional items
 
Health and safety ③ ④
 
 
Water efficiency  ③
 
Free cash flow
 
 
 

(i) From July 2019, this financial indicator will be organic operating profit growth.

See our key performance indicators (KPIs) on pages 24-28.


17

Business description (continued)

Production

Diageo owns manufacturing production facilities across the globe, including maltings, distilleries, breweries, packaging plants, maturation warehouses, cooperages and distribution warehouses. Diageo’s brands are also produced at plants owned and operated by third parties and joint ventures at a number of locations throughout the world.

Capacity

The locations, principal activities, products, packaging production capacity and packaging production volume of Diageo owned principal production centres in the year ended 30 June 2019 are as follows:

Location
 
Principal products
 
Production capacity in millions of equivalent units(i)

 
Production volume in 2019 in millions of equivalent units

United Kingdom (Spirits)
 
Scotch whisky, gin, vodka, rum, ready to drink
 
96

 
53

UK, Ireland (Guinness)
 
Beer
 
8

 
8

Ireland (Baileys)
 
Irish cream liqueur
 
12

 
8

Italy (Santa Vittoria)
 
Vodka, rum, ready to drink
 
11

 
8

Turkey
 
Raki, vodka, gin, liqueur, wine
 
8

 
5

United States, Canada, US Virgin Islands
 
Vodka, gin, tequila, rum, Canadian whisky, American whiskey, progressive adult beverages, ready to drink
 
52

 
37

Brazil
 
Cachaça, vodka
 
10

 
4

Mexico
 
Tequila
 
3

 
3

Australia
 
Rum, vodka, ready to drink
 
4

 
2

Singapore
 
Finishing centre
 
7

 
1

India
 
Rum, vodka, whisky, scotch, brandy, gin, wine
 
64

 
41

Nigeria
 
Beer
 
7

 
6

South Africa
 
Spirits and ready to drink
 
4

 
4

East Africa (Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania)
 
Beer and spirits
 
17

 
15

Africa Regional Markets (Ethiopia, Cameroon, Ghana, Seychelles)
 
Beer
 
7

 
4


(i) Capacity represents ongoing production capacity. The production capacities quoted in the table are based on Diageo owned actual production levels for the year ended 30 June 2019 adjusted for the elimination of unplanned losses and inefficiencies. In addition, there are third party production arrangements with manufacturing facilities including brewers and co-packing partners licensed to produce Diageo brands.

Spirits

Spirits are produced in distilleries located worldwide. The group owns 29 Scotch whisky distilleries in Scotland, two whisky distilleries in Canada and two in the United States. Diageo produces Smirnoff internationally. Ketel One and Cîroc vodkas are purchased as finished product from The Nolet Group and Maison Villevert, respectively. Gin distilleries are located in both the United Kingdom and in Santa Vittoria, Italy. Baileys is produced in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. Rum is blended and bottled in the United States, Canada, Italy and the United Kingdom, and is distilled in the US Virgin Islands and in Australia, Venezuela and Guatemala. Raki is produced in Turkey, Chinese white spirits are produced in Chengdu, in the Sichuan province of China, cachaça is produced in Ceará State in Brazil and tequila in Mexico.

Diageo’s maturing Scotch whisky is located in warehouses in Scotland (the largest at Blackgrange holding approximately 50% of the group’s maturing Scotch whisky), its maturing Canadian whisky in Valleyfield and Gimli in Canada, its maturing American whiskey in Kentucky and Tennessee in the United States and maturing Chinese white spirit in Chengdu, China. In August 2018, the company opened the Guinness Open Gate Brewery & Barrel House in Relay, Maryland. It is a working brewery which is open to the public, and has an on-site brew pub, tap room and retail store.

Diageo continues to invest in our tequila facility in Mexico to enable additional capacity to support growth. The program includes a new distillery, bottling capacity expansion, wastewater treatment plan, tanking and liquid processing equipment as well as warehousing facilities for maturation, packaging materials, and finished goods.


18

Business description (continued)

Diageo opened the Roe & Co Irish whiskey distillery in June 2019. The iconic Guinness Power Station has been regenerated into a new visitor experience and urban distillery. A visit to the fully live, working distillery will also involve learning about the history of George Roe who was one of the most iconic names in Irish Whiskey in the nineteenth century.

The £150 million Scotch investment program focusing on whisky tourism is progressing. In April 2019, it was confirmed that the global flagship visitor experience for Johnnie Walker would be in Edinburgh city centre.

Diageo owns a controlling equity stake in United Spirits Limited (USL) which is the leading alcoholic beverage company in India selling almost 80 million equivalent cases per annum of Indian Made Foreign Liquor (IMFL). USL has a significant market presence across India and operates 16 owned sites as well as a network of leased and third party manufacturing facilities in India. USL owns several Indian brands such as McDowell’s (Indian whisky, rum and brandy), Black Dog (scotch), Signature (Indian whisky), Royal Challenge (Indian whisky), Antiquity (Indian whisky) and Bagpiper (Indian whisky).

Beer

Diageo’s principal brewing facility is at the St James’s Gate brewery in Dublin, Ireland. In addition, Diageo owns breweries in a number of African countries: Nigeria, Kenya, Ghana, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Tanzania, Uganda and the Seychelles.

Guinness flavour extract is shipped from Ireland to all overseas Guinness brewing operations which use the flavour extract to brew Guinness locally. Guinness is transported from Ireland to Great Britain in bulk to the Runcorn facility which carries out the kegging of Guinness Draught.

Guinness, Guinness Blonde, Kilkenny and Harp are brewed, under licence arrangements, by over 40 third parties across six continents with total volume of over 2 million hectolitres being sold in more than 130 countries.

Diageo is expanding capacity in Africa to support beer growth with the renovation and reopening of the Kisumu brewery in Kenya.

Ready to drink

Diageo produces a range of ready to drink products mainly in the United Kingdom, Italy, across Africa, Australia, the United States and Canada.

Property, plant and equipment

Diageo owns approximately 97% of the manufacturing, distilling, brewing, bottling and administration facilities it uses across the group’s worldwide operations. It holds approximately 3% of properties on leases in excess of 50 years. The principal production facilities are described above. As at 30 June 2019, Diageo’s land and buildings are included in the group’s consolidated balance sheet at a net book value of £1,201 million. Diageo’s two largest individual facilities, in terms of book value, are the Leven bottling, blending and warehousing facility in Scotland and St James’s Gate brewery in Dublin.

Raw materials and supply agreements

The group has several long-term contracts in place for the purchase of raw materials including glass, other packaging, spirit, cream, rum and grapes. Forward contracts are in place for the purchase of cereals to minimise the effects of short-term price fluctuations.

Cream is the principal raw material used in the production of Irish cream liqueur and is sourced from Ireland. Grapes and aniseed are used in the production of Raki and are sourced from suppliers in Turkey. Other raw materials purchased in significant quantities to produce spirits and beer are molasses, cereals, sugar and a number of flavors (such as juniper berries, agave, chocolate and herbs). These are sourced from suppliers around the world.

Many products are supplied to customers in glass bottles. Glass is purchased from a variety of multinational and local suppliers; the largest suppliers are Ardagh Packaging in the United Kingdom and Owens Illinois in the United States.


19

Business description (continued)

Competition

Diageo’s brands compete on the basis of consumer loyalty, quality and price.

In spirits, Diageo’s major global competitors are Pernod Ricard, Beam Suntory, Bacardi and Brown Forman, each of which has several brands that compete directly with Diageo’s brands. In addition, Diageo faces competition from regional and local companies in the countries in which it operates.

In beer, Diageo competes globally as well as on a regional and local basis (with the profile varying between regions) with several competitors, including AB InBev, Heineken, Molson Coors, Constellation Brands and Carlsberg.

Research and development

Innovation forms an important part of Diageo’s growth strategy, playing a key role in positioning its brands for continued growth in both the developed and emerging markets. The strength and depth of Diageo’s brand range provides a solid platform from which to drive innovation. Diageo continuously invests to deepen its understanding of shopper trends and changing consumer habits to inform product and packaging development. Supporting this, the group has ongoing programmes to develop new products across beverage alcohol categories which are managed internally by the innovation and research and development function.

Trademarks

Diageo produces, sells and distributes branded goods and is therefore substantially dependent on the maintenance and protection of its trademarks. All brand names mentioned in this document are trademarks. The group also holds numerous licences and trade secrets, as well as having substantial trade knowledge related to its products. The group believes that its significant trademarks are registered and/or otherwise protected (insofar as legal protection is available) in all material respects in its most important markets. Diageo also owns valuable patents and trade secrets for technology and takes all reasonable steps to protect these rights.

Regulations and taxes

Diageo’s worldwide operations are subject to extensive regulatory requirements regarding production, product liability, distribution, importation, marketing, promotion, sales, pricing, labelling, packaging, advertising, antitrust, labour, pensions, compliance and control systems and environmental issues. In the United States, the beverage alcohol industry is subject to strict federal and state government regulations. At the federal level, the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau of the U.S. Treasury Department oversees the industry, and each state as well as some local authorities in jurisdictions in which Diageo sells or produces products, have regulations. Federal, state and local regulations cover virtually every aspect of its operations, including production, distribution, marketing, promotion, sales, pricing, labelling, packaging and advertising.

Spirits and beer are subject to national import and excise duties in many markets around the world. Most countries impose excise duties on beverage alcohol products, although the form of such taxation varies significantly from a simple application to units of alcohol by volume, to advanced systems based on imported or wholesale value of the product. Several countries impose additional import duty on distilled spirits, often discriminating between categories (such as Scotch whisky or bourbon) in the rate of such tariffs. Within the European Union, such products are subject to different rates of excise duty in each country, but within an overall European Union framework, there are minimum rates of excise duties that can be applied.

Import and excise duties can have a significant impact on the final pricing of Diageo’s products to consumers. These duties have an impact on the competitive position as compared to other brands. The group devotes resources to encouraging the equitable taxation treatment of all beverage alcohol categories and to reducing government-imposed barriers to fair trading.

Advertising, marketing and sales of alcohol are subject to various restrictions in markets around the world. These range from a complete prohibition of alcohol in certain cultures and countries, such as in certain states in India, and through the prohibition of the import of spirits, wine and beer, to restrictions on the advertising style, media and messages used. In a number of countries, television is a prohibited medium for spirits brands and in other countries, television advertising, while permitted, is carefully regulated. Many countries also regulate the use of internet-based advertising and social media in connection with alcohol sales.

Spirits and beer are also regulated in distribution. In many countries, alcohol may only be sold through licensed outlets, both on and off-trade, varying from government or state operated monopoly outlets (for example, in Canada, Norway and certain US states) to the common system of licensed on-trade outlets (for example, licensed bars and restaurants) which prevails in much of the Western world (for example, in most US states and the European Union). In about one-third of the states in the United States, price changes must be filed or published 30 days to three months, depending on the state, before they become effective.


20

Business description (continued)

Labelling of beverage alcohol products is also regulated in many markets, varying from health warning labels to importer identification, alcohol strength and other consumer information. As well as producer, importer or bottler identification, specific warning statements related to the risks of drinking beverage alcohol products are required to be included on all beverage alcohol products sold in the United States and in other countries where Diageo operates. Expressions of political concern signify the uncertain future of beverage alcohol products advertising on network television in the United States. Any prohibitions on advertising or marketing could have an adverse impact on sales of the group.

Regulatory decisions and changes in the legal and regulatory environment could increase Diageo’s costs and liabilities or impact on its business activities.

Acquisitions and disposals

Diageo has made a number of acquisitions of brands, distribution rights and equity interests and disposals in premium drinks businesses. For a description of principal acquisitions and disposals since 1 July 2016, see note 9 to the consolidated financial statements.

On 28 September 2018 Diageo acquired the remaining 70% of Copper Dog Whisky Limited (CDWL) that it did not already own for an upfront valuation of £6.5 million and further earn-out payments based on CDWL achieving performance targets. The discounted current estimate for the earn-out payments is £10 million.

On 17 August 2018 Diageo completed the purchase of 20.29% of the share capital of Sichuan Shuijingfang Company Limited (SJF) for RMB 6,084 million (£696 million) and transaction costs of £7 million. This took Diageo’s shareholding in SJF from 39.71% to 60%. SJF was already controlled and therefore consolidated prior to the transaction.

On 9 April 2019 Diageo completed the purchase of a further 3.14% of the share capital of SJF for RMB 690 million (£79 million) and transaction costs of £2 million, which took Diageo's shareholding in SJF from 60% to 63.14%.

In addition, Diageo has made a number of smaller acquisitions of brands, distribution rights and equity interests in various drinks businesses.

Diageo completed the sale of a portfolio of 19 brands (Seagram’s VO, Seagram’s 83, Seagram’s Five Star, Popov, Myers’s, Parrot Bay, Yukon Jack, Romana Sambuca, Scoresby, Goldschlager, Relska, Stirrings, The Club, Booth’s, Black Haus, Peligroso, Grind, Piehole and John Begg) to Sazerac on 20 December 2018 for an aggregate consideration of $550 million (£435 million). Diageo will continue to provide manufacturing services for all disposed brands until December 2019 and for five brands up to December 2028.

Seasonality

Approximately 40% of Diageo’s annual net sales occur in the last four months of each calendar year.


21

Business description (continued)

Our brands

We have built a leading portfolio of brands across key categories and price points.

We invest in the sustainable growth of these brands and ensure they are positioned to meet the consumer opportunity in each market.

We own two of the world’s five largest spirits brands by value, Johnnie Walker and Smirnoff, and 23 of the world’s top 100(i)..

Guinness, our premium beer brand, is the 4th largest premium beer in the world by value(ii).

Global giants(iii)
Our business is built around six of our biggest global brands.
Johnnie Walker

Smirnoff

Baileys

Captain Morgan

Tanqueray

Guinness
Local stars(iv)
 
Reserve(v)
Can be individual to any one market and provide a platform for our business to grow.
 
Exceptional spirits brands at premium price points to capture the global luxury opportunity.
Crown Royal

Yenì Raki

Shui Jing Fang

Johnnie Walker Blue Label

Bulleit Bourbon

Don Julio
Buchanan’s

JɛB

Grand Old Parr

Tanqueray No. TEN

Ron Zacapa Centenario XO

Casamigos
Bundaberg

McDowell’s No. 1

Ypióca

Lagavulin

The Singleton of Glen Ord

Johnnie Walker Gold Label Reserve
Windsor

Black&White



Cîroc

Ketel One vodka

Talisker

(i)
Impact Databank Value Ratings, May 2019.
(ii)
Global Data, 2018.
(iii)
Global giants represent 41% of Diageo net sales.
(iv)
Local stars represent 20% of Diageo net sales.
(v)
Reserve brands represent 19% of Diageo net sales.

22

Business description (continued)

Our global reach

Our regional profile provides us with exposure to the greatest consumer growth opportunities in our sector.

We operate as a market-based business and our products are sold in over 180 countries. Each of our markets is accountable for its own performance and for driving growth. We employ 28,400 talented people across our global business.

% share of net sales by region(i)(ii) 

globalreach.jpg

(i)
The above diagram is intended to illustrate general geographic regions of the world in which Diageo has a presence and/or in which its products are sold, and is not intended to imply that Diageo has a presence in and/or that its products are sold in every country within a geographical region.
(ii)
Based on reported net sales for the year ended 30 June 2019. Does not include corporate net sales of £53 million.

% share by region

North America

Europe and Turkey

Africa

Latin America
and Caribbean

Asia
Pacific
Volume

20.1

18.4

13.7

9.1

38.7
Net sales(i)

34.9

22.9

12.4

8.8

21.0
Operating profit before exceptional items(ii)

45.2

23.6

6.4

8.5

16.3
Operating profit(iii)

45.8

23.4

6.5

8.6

15.7
Water withdrawal

12.2

39.5

38.5

1.3

8.5
Carbon emissions(iv)

9.3

40.5

38.9

3.2

8.1
Employees(v)

9.7

36.9

15.0

8.8

29.6

(i)
Excluding corporate net sales of £53 million.
(ii)
Excluding exceptional operating charges of £74 million (2018 – £128 million) and net corporate operating costs of £189 million (2018 – £158 million).
(iii)
Excluding net corporate operating costs of £210 million (2018 – £158 million).
(iv)
Excludes corporate offices which account for <2% of combined impacts.
(v)
Employees have been allocated to the region in which they reside.

23

Business description (continued)

How we measure performance: key performance indicators

GAAP measures - Financial GAAP performance measures similar to the financial non-GAAP key performance indicators are presented below.

NET SALES GROWTH (%)
OPERATING MARGIN IMPROVEMENT (bps)
BASIC EARNINGS PER SHARE (pence)
chart-d0d12ed9b82cf4fb40b.jpgchart-02e853a1d56a72caf94.jpgchart-bddddd15113f72c15a2.jpg
Definition
Definition
Definition
Sales growth after deducting excise duties.
The percentage point movement in operating profit, divided by net sales.
Profit attributable to equity shareholders of the parent company, divided by the weighted average number of shares in issue.
Performance
Performance
Performance
Reported net sales grew 5.8%, driven by organic growth and favourable exchange which was partially offset by acquisitions and disposals.
Reported operating margin increased by 107bps driven by organic operating margin improvement, lower exceptional operating charges offset by the impact of acquisitions and disposals and favourable exchange.
Basic eps of 130.7 pence increased by 9.0 pence driven by organic operating profit growth and lower finance charges which was partially offset by higher tax charge and net increase in exceptional charges.
 
NET CASH FROM OPERATING
ACTIVITIES (£ million)
RETURN ON CLOSING INVESTED
CAPITAL (%)
chart-5c4e52ea33aff861272.jpgchart-049b1b47cfcf1877a5c.jpg
Definition
Definition
Net cash from operating activities comprises the net cash flow from operating activities as disclosed on the face of the cash flow statement.
Profit for the year divided by net assets at the end of the financial year.
Performance
Performance
Net cash from operating activities increased by £164 million due to organic operating profit growth partially offset by unfavourable working capital movement and higher tax payments.
Return on closing invested capital increased by 610 bps principally driven by decrease in net assets.



24

Business description (continued)

We use the following 11 key performance indicators (KPIs) to measure our financial and non-financial performance

Our KPIs measure progress against our strategy. Our performance against our KPIs are explained below:

Relevance to strategy

Efficient growth
Consistent value creation
Credibility and trust
Engaged people

Financial
® 
Financial
® 
Financial
® 
Organic net sales growth (%)
6.1
%
Organic operating margin improvement (bps)
83
bps
Earnings per share before
exceptional items
(pence)(i)
130.8p
chart-509f2d141482b0aa5fd.jpgchart-f90e472f302ea27b385.jpgchart-f565f8499ebdc171f3a.jpg
Definition
Definition
Definition
Sales growth after deducting excise duties, excluding the impact of exchange rate movements, acquisitions and disposals.
The percentage point movement in operating profit before exceptional items, divided by net sales after excluding the impact of exchange rate movements and acquisitions and disposals.
Profit before exceptional items attributable to equity shareholders of the parent company, divided by the weighted average number of shares in issue.
Why we measure
Why we measure
Why we measure
This measure reflects our performance as the result of the choices made in terms of category and market participation, and Diageo’s ability to build brand equity, increase prices and grow market share.
The movement in operating margin measures the efficiency of the business. Consistent operating margin improvement is a business imperative, driven by investment choices, our focus on driving out costs across the business and improving mix.
Earnings per share reflects the profitability of the business and how effectively we finance our balance sheet. It is a key measure for our shareholders.
Performance
Performance
Performance
Organic net sales grew 6.1%, driven by 2.3% volume growth and 3.8% positive price/mix. Growth was broad based with all regions delivering net sales growth.
Organic operating margin improved 83bps driven by improved price/mix and our productivity programme partially offset by higher marketing spend.
Eps before exceptional items increased 12.2 pence driven by organic operating profit growth and lower finance charges partially offset by the impact from acquisitions and disposals and a higher tax expense.
More detail on page 51
More detail on page 52
More detail on page 52

25

Business description (continued)

Non-Financial
③ ④
Non-Financial
③ ④
Non-Financial
Positive drinking
Health and safety
(lost-time accident frequency per 1,000 full-time employees)
0.98
Water efficiency(ii)
(l/l)
4.64l/l
positivedrinkingkpia01.jpg chart-fe9dd4683a20ba65a9b.jpgchart-6e95fbeb7c5ac7e2eec.jpg
Definition
Definition
Definition
We report against three indicators for positive drinking.
Number of accidents per 1,000 full-time employees and directly supervised contractors resulting in time lost from work of one calendar day or more.
Ratio of the amount of water required to produce one litre of packaged product.
Why we measure
Why we measure
Why we measure
We support the World Health Organization’s (WHO) goal of reducing harmful drinking by 10% across the world by 2025 and we put resources and skills into a range of programmes around the world that aim to reduce harm and change behaviour. We have set ourselves stretching targets to measure our contribution to this area, focusing on tackling underage drinking and drink driving, in addition to promoting moderation.
Safety is a basic human right: everyone has the right to work in a safe environment, and our Zero Harm safety philosophy is that everyone should go home safe and healthy, every day, everywhere.
Water is the main ingredient in all of our brands. We aim to improve efficiency, and minimise our water use, particularly in water-stressed areas. This will ensure we can sustain production growth, address climate change risk and respond to the growing global demand for water, as scarcity increases.
Performance
Performance
Performance
We launched a new Positive Drinking strategy last year and this is the first year we have reported against these targets for 2025.
We achieved a milestone safety performance level of 0.98 lost-time accidents (LTAs) per 1,000 employees, our lowest rate ever. This represents a 7% reduction in LTAs compared with 2018. We continued to focus on markets in particular need of support, delivering improvements by increasing compliance with our core standards and programmes. We also maintained strong performance in our more established markets.
Water efficiency improved by 6% compared to 2018 and 43.8% versus our 2007 baseline.
More detail on pages 89-93
More detail on pages 106-108
More detail on pages 98-106

26

Business description (continued)

Financial
® 
Financial
Financial
® 
Free cash flow (£ million)

£2,608
m
Return on average invested capital (ROIC) (%)
15.1
%
Total shareholder return (%)
27%
chart-4d7c847bd55439e6f7d.jpgchart-c4506a04d8593f6b23a.jpgchart-09317379a879e59ba44.jpg
Definition
Definition
Definition
Free cash flow comprises the net cash flow from operating activities aggregated with the net cash received/paid for loans receivable and other investments, and the net cash cost paid for property, plant and equipment, and computer software.
Profit before finance charges and exceptional items attributable to equity shareholders divided by average invested capital. Invested capital comprises net assets aggregated with exceptional restructuring costs and goodwill at the date of transition to IFRS, excluding post employment liabilities, net borrowings and non-controlling interests.
Percentage growth in the value of a Diageo share (assuming all dividends and capital distributions are re-invested).
Why we measure
Why we measure
Why we measure
Free cash flow is a key indicator of the financial management of the business and reflects the cash generated by the business to fund payments to our shareholders and acquisitions.
ROIC is used by management to assess the return obtained from the group’s asset base. Improving ROIC builds financial strength to enable Diageo to attain its financial objectives.
Diageo’s Directors have a fiduciary responsibility to maximise long-term value for shareholders. We also monitor our relative TSR performance against our peers.
Performance
Performance
Performance
Free cash flow continued to be strong at £2.6 billion. Operating profit growth was partially offset by reduced operating working capital improvements year on year, increased investment in maturing inventory and higher tax payments.
ROIC before exceptional items increased 80bps as organic operating profit growth was partially offset by the impact from acquisitions and disposals and higher underlying tax charges.
Diageo delivered total shareholder return of 27% as dividends increased, a share buyback programme of £2.8 billion was executed and the share price benefited from underlying business improvements.
More detail on page 53
More detail on page 54
 

27

Business description (continued)

Non-Financial
Non-Financial
③ ④
Carbon emissions(iii) 
(1,000 tonnes CO2e)
586
Employee engagement index
(%)
75
%
chart-0c678d5a0532ec618a0.jpgchart-1ed678a3f2e1a31dde2.jpg
Definition
Definition
Absolute volume of carbon emissions, in 1,000 tonnes.
Measured through our Your Voice survey; includes metrics for employee satisfaction, loyalty, advocacy and pride.
Why we measure
Why we measure
Carbon emissions are a key element of Diageo’s, and our industry’s, environmental impact. Reducing our carbon emissions is a significant part of our efforts to mitigate climate change, positioning us well for a future low-carbon economy, while creating energy efficiencies and savings now.
Employee engagement is a key enabler of our strategy and performance. The survey allows us to measure, quantitatively and qualitatively, how far employees believe we are living our values. The results inform our ways of working, engagement strategies and leadership development.
Performance
Performance
Carbon emissions reduced by 5.9% in 2019, and cumulatively by 44.7% against the 2007 baseline despite increased production volume.
94% of our people participated in our Your Voice survey (22,615 of the 24,129 invited). 75% were identified as engaged, a decrease of 1% on last year. 89% declared themselves proud to work for Diageo, down 1% on 2018. Despite this small shift, we have maintained a strong engagement score in line with best in class benchmarks.
More detail on page 105
More detail on pages 108-109

Remuneration

Some KPIs are used as a measure in the incentives plans for the remuneration of executives. These are identified with the symbol ®.

See our Directors’ remuneration report from page 142 for more detail.

(i)
For reward purposes this measure is further adjusted for the impact of exchange rates and other factors not controlled by management, to ensure focus on our underlying performance drivers.
(ii)
In accordance with Diageo's environmental reporting methodologies, data for each of the four years in the period ended 30 June 2018 has been restated where relevant.
(iii)
In accordance with Diageo's environmental reporting methodologies and WRI/WBCSD GHG Protocol, data for each of the four years in the period ended 30 June 2018 has been restated where relevant.

28

Business description (continued)

Chairman’s statement

We want to have a positive impact wherever we operate and we are determined to earn trust and respect by doing business in the right way, from grain to glass. For Diageo to thrive, we must focus on the long term and continue to demonstrate the value we create for those around us.
 
Recommended final dividend per share
2019: 42.47p á5%
2018: 40.4p
Total dividend per share(i)
2019: 68.57p á5%
2018: 65.3p
Total shareholder return (%)
2018: 27%
2017: 23%

(i)
Includes final recommended dividend of 42.47p.

I am pleased to report another year of strong and consistent performance. Diageo continues to make good progress towards its ambition of becoming one of the best performing, most trusted and respected consumer products companies in the world and I would like to express my thanks to all our employees for their continued passion and commitment.

Culture

Under Ivan’s leadership, Diageo is being transformed into a more entrepreneurial and creative business. Proximity to the consumer and to the trade, the agility to adapt to a changing environment and speed in execution are increasingly the way in which Diageo operates, every day.

A culture of discipline and efficiency has also been embedded. This has resulted in significant operational savings, which have largely been reinvested in the most attractive opportunities. These investments not only support the growth of our brands and strengthen our portfolio, but have also allowed us to build more advanced capabilities through new technology and enhanced training.

Notwithstanding the progress we have made, we are not complacent and we continue working towards further improvement.

Opportunities for growth

We are a global leader in an industry that is growing and premiumising at the same time. Around the world, consumers are looking for more premium brands and experiences. Growth in total beverage alcohol is underpinned by strong consumer fundamentals: in developed markets, spirits are well positioned, on trend and premiumising. In emerging markets, we expect an additional 750 million consumers to be able to afford international-style spirits by 2030.

While we are leaders in global premium spirits and have a substantial presence in selected beer markets, we produce just 1.7% of the total beverage alcohol drinks consumed around the world. So there is ample opportunity for us to grow share. We continue to see consumers switching from beer and wine into spirits. In the United States, spirits are taking share from beer; in Europe, spirits are taking share from beer and wine; and in many markets in Africa, consumers are trading up from illicit alcohol into a regulated, well-manufactured product. Beer consumers are also trading up to more premium, flavourful and differentiated products. The trend to 'drink better, not more', is well established in many markets.

Our deep consumer insights and strong customer relationships, combined with the strength and breadth of our portfolio, mean that we are well positioned to take advantage of these favourable long-term growth trends.


29

Business description (continued)

The global environment

Diageo’s brands are enjoyed in more than 180 countries and international trade is at the heart of our business. Although we are not immune from volatility in the global environment, our broad footprint, across markets and categories, makes us more resilient and provides a natural hedge against instability in our operating environment.

In particular, while there is considerable uncertainty around Brexit, we have robust plans in place to cover all scenarios. We do not believe the direct financial impact to Diageo will be material. Nevertheless, we look forward to a clear resolution that will bring certainty to business in the United Kingdom.

Our stakeholders

We are committed to engaging and working constructively with all our stakeholders. Listening and responding to the views and needs of those who are touched by our operations is fundamental to building a sustainable future for our business, our brands and the communities in which we live, work, source and sell.

The Board was particularly pleased that our 2019 ‘Your Voice’ employee survey showed that 89% of our employees are proud to work for Diageo and 77% are extremely satisfied with Diageo as a place to work. We are committed to engaging with our employees and ensuring that their voices are heard at the highest levels in our business. In December, the Board agreed that I will take responsibility for workforce engagement, as the designated non-executive under the 2018 UK Corporate Governance Code. I look forward to working with our employees around the world in order to represent their views in the Boardroom. From 2020, we will issue an annual ‘workforce engagement statement’ explaining how the Board has gathered and reviewed employees’ views and how these have been considered in the Board’s decision making.

Diageo in society

We want to have a positive impact wherever we operate and we are determined to earn trust and respect by doing business in the right way, from grain to glass. At the core of our approach is a commitment to positive drinking through encouraging moderation and tackling misuse, which Ivan outlines in more detail in his statement.

For Diageo to thrive, we must focus on the long term and continue to demonstrate the value we create for those around us. Social purpose was a driving force for the founders of many of our brands and is part of the fabric of our company today.

Communities

As a global company, we have an important role to play in helping the communities where we live and work to thrive. This is why we are focused on the issues we believe matter most in the communities where we source our raw materials and where we make and sell our products. We take great care to build sustainable supply chains and work hard to protect the environment and the natural resources on which we rely. Our women’s empowerment programmes have supported around 400,000 women around the world. They provide women with equal access to the skills and resources they need to build a better future for themselves and their families.

Our Water of Life programme has reached more than 10 million people in India and Africa since 2006 – making a real difference by supplying vulnerable communities with clean water, sanitation and hygiene. This year, we reached 232,000 people through these programmes.

Our Learning for Life programme gives people around the world the opportunity to reach their full potential and enhance their employment opportunities, through training and education in the hospitality industry and other sectors. Since launching in 2008, over 140,000 people have participated in Learning for Life, and typically, more than 70% move into permanent jobs.


30

Business description (continued)

Creating value

In fiscal 2019, we have delivered another year of strong, consistent performance. And we continue to make good progress across the four areas of performance we measure: efficient growth, value creation, credibility and trust, and engaged people.

Our efficient growth key performance indicators (KPIs) continue to improve. At the same time, return on average invested capital (ROIC) and total shareholder return (TSR) both increased, to 15.1% and 27% respectively, reflecting continued value creation.

We continue to target dividend cover (the ratio of basic earnings per share before exceptional items to dividend per share) of between 1.8 and 2.2 times. The recommended final dividend is 42.47 pence per share, an increase of 5%. This brings the recommended full-year dividend to 68.57 pence per share and dividend cover to 1.9 times. We expect to maintain dividend increases at a mid-single digit rate until our dividend cover is comfortably back in range. Subject to shareholder approval, the final dividend will be paid to UK shareholders on 3 October 2019. Payment will be made to US ADR holders on 8 October 2019. This year, we purchased 94.7 million shares, returning £2.8 billion to shareholders. On 25 July, the Board approved plans for a further return of capital of up to £4.5 billion to shareholders over the three years ending 30 June 2022.

Board changes

In March 2018, we agreed with Ursula Burns that her appointment as Non-Executive Director would be delayed, as a result of her appointment as Executive Chairman at VEON Ltd, on an interim basis. In December, we agreed with Ursula, that in light of her continued commitments at VEON Ltd, she would not take up her appointment on the Diageo Board.

In April 2019, we announced the appointment of Debra Crew as Non-Executive Director. Debra’s significant experience in FMCG and in executive management, as a former CEO, should serve Diageo well and complement the current Board.

Looking ahead

We have continued to improve performance, while building a culture of which we can all be proud. There is, of course, more to do and we are very aware of current volatility in trade and geo-politics. Nevertheless, for the benefit of our stakeholders, we shall continue to focus on delivering sustainable performance and long-term value, which are the primary areas of focus for the Board and executive leadership team.


Javier Ferrán
Chairman

31

Business description (continued)

Chief Executive’s statement

We are determined to build a company that will prosper over the very long term. We continue to improve the quality and pace of execution in every part of our business: we are combining creative flair with leading-edge technology and we are investing in brand building, innovation, our route to consumer and data analysis.

Volume movement
  
Organic volume movement
2019: á 2.3%
2018: â 0.7%
  
2019: á 2.3%
2018: á 2.5%
Net sales movement
  
Organic net sales movement
2019: á 5.8%
2018: á 0.9%
  
2019: á 6.1%
2018: á 5.0%
Reported operating profit movement
  
Organic operating profit movement
2019: á 9.5%
2018: á 3.7%
  
2019: á 9.0%
2018: á 7.6%

Our ambition is to be one of the best performing, most trusted and respected consumer product companies. We have delivered another year of strong and consistent performance, thanks to the dedication and hard work of my 28,400 colleagues across Diageo. I am very proud of the company we are building together and the positive social and economic impact we have on the many communities around the world where we make and sell our brands.

Creating value

The global economy is becoming more volatile, with significant challenges to international trade and the institutions that have underpinned prosperity for many decades. Our business will not be immune to international disruption but the depth and breadth of our portfolio, as well as the discipline and focus of our people, give us confidence in our resilience as we navigate these headwinds.

We are determined to build a company that will prosper over the very long term. We continue to improve the quality and pace of execution in every part of our business. We combine creative flair with leading-edge technology and invest in brand building, innovation, our route to consumer and data analysis.

Our people are also proud of the positive impact our business makes around the world. The reach of our brands and marketing allows us to promote moderation and tackle alcohol misuse. We believe we are one of the leading companies in reducing carbon emissions and water use. Our global skills and empowerment programmes have helped hundreds of thousands of people in the communities where we live, work, source and sell.

Performance

Fiscal 2019 has been another year of strong performance. We have continued to execute our strategy consistently and effectively to deliver growth. Our broad geographic footprint and leading portfolio position us well to capture future growth. In international spirits, we have a leading position in the United States, the world’s largest profit pool, alongside leadership positions in many other markets. We strive to win with consumers through the combination of creative flair and data-led insight in marketing and innovation. This, coupled with our culture of everyday efficiency and financial discipline, supports our ambition to be a reliable compounder of growth. Our strategy is delivering consistent top-line performance, sustained margin expansion and increased investment in our brands and business.

Reported net sales were up 5.8%, with organic growth partially offset by acquisitions and disposals. All regions contributed to broad based organic net sales growth, which was up 6.1%. Reported operating profit grew 9.5%, driven by organic growth. We delivered organic operating profit growth of 9.0%, ahead of net sales growth. This was driven by improved price/ mix and benefits from our focus on everyday efficiency, partially offset by an 8% increase in marketing investment, and cost inflation.

Reported and organic net sales grew across all categories, with the exception of rum. Our global giant brands grew organic net sales 5%, with Johnnie Walker up 7%, Tanqueray up 19%, Guinness up 2%, Baileys up 4% and Smirnoff up 3%. Captain Morgan was down 2%. Our local stars were up 6% and reserve was up 11%, with particularly strong performances from Chinese white spirits, Ketel One and Don Julio, up 22%, 10% and 26%, respectively. Earnings per share before exceptionals was strongly up again this year, increasing 10.3%. This was primarily driven by higher organic operating profit and lower finance charges. We achieved another year of strong consistent free cash flow performance, delivering £2.6 billion.


32

Business description (continued)

We continue to invest and innovate to build our brands for the future. 'White Walker by Johnnie Walker' successfully recruited new consumers into the Johnnie Walker brand (see more on page 36). We also announced a £150 million investment in Scotch whisky tourism, including a new Johnnie Walker Experience in Edinburgh; a $130 million expansion of our Bulleit distillery in Kentucky; and we increased our shareholding in Sichuan Shuijingfang Co., Ltd, our super-premium baijiu business in China, from 40% to 63%.



2019 net sales by category (%)
chart-cee8a2883463d57ba8c.jpg
l
Scotch
25
%
l
Liqueurs
5
%
l
Vodka
11
%
l
Gin
4
%
l
US Whiskey
2
%
l
Tequila
4
%
l
Canadian Whisky
7
%
l
Beer
16
%
l
Rum
6
%
l
Ready to drink
6
%
l
IMFL Whisky
5
%
l
Other
9
%


Trusted and respected

We are proud to be the stewards of some of the most iconic brands in the world. These were built over generations by people who understood the importance of building a business for the long term, not just today. We are also determined to build a business that makes a positive impact on the issues that matter most to wider society.

We are passionate about the role our brands play in celebrations around the world and are committed to ensuring our products are used in a responsible way. We have a long-standing commitment to promoting positive drinking through encouraging moderation and tackling alcohol misuse. Thanks to the commitment and efforts of our colleagues around the world, we are making rapid progress towards our 2025 targets to educate five million young people, parents and teachers about the dangers of underage drinking; collect 50 million pledges to never drink and drive; and reach 200 million people with moderation messages through our brands.

Our customers around the world are rightly concerned about the environment and climate change, as we see extreme weather events and the resulting social dislocation becoming more common. We are determined to act and our progress is being recognised. Many of you will be familiar with CDP, formerly the Carbon Disclosure Project, the leading global disclosure system for environmental reporting. In February, Diageo and only 19 other companies out of 7,000 globally were rated “Double A” for climate and water performance. We were the only alcohol company to achieve this status year on year.

I am particularly pleased that we have been recognised for our work to promote inclusion and diversity. I believe inclusivity is at the heart of our company and the more we become representative of the consumers we serve, the more it will fuel our success. This year, we ranked fourth in the Thomson Reuters Global Diversity and Inclusion Index; were recognised in the Bloomberg Gender Equality Index; and were also ranked by Equileap as the top company for gender equality in the United Kingdom. Today, 40% of Diageo’s Executive Committee are women and we want our global senior leadership team to reach the same level of female participation by 2025 (we are currently at 36%).


33

Business description (continued)

This year, we put in place ground-breaking family leave policies for both men and women to support and retain parents within our business and to ensure that we continue to attract the best people possible to build their careers at Diageo. In April, we announced that all parents employed by Diageo in the United Kingdom are eligible for the same fully paid 26 weeks' leave, retaining benefits and bonuses regardless of gender. In May, we started a global roll-out of this ambitious new family leave policy, which offers female employees in all markets a minimum of 26 weeks of fully paid maternity leave. This policy sets a global minimum standard of four weeks' paternity leave on full pay in all markets, with a significant number of our businesses moving to 26 weeks’ fully paid paternity leave.

Outlook

Today, Diageo is a stronger, more agile business. We have embedded a culture of everyday efficiency and removed complexity, and we seek continuously to improve the way we operate. This enables us to anticipate and adapt to changing consumer trends and economic conditions more quickly.

As we look ahead to the three years ending 30 June 2022, I expect Diageo to maintain organic net sales growth in the mid-single digit range and to grow organic operating profit ahead of net sales in the range of 5% to 7%.

Our strategy is delivering, but we are not complacent and we continue to challenge ourselves. As we look to fiscal 2020 and beyond, we remain focused on building a strong and sustainable future for our business, our brands and the societies and communities where we live and work.


Ivan Menezes
Chief Executive


34

Business description (continued)

Market dynamics

Total beverage alcohol is an attractive industry, with a natural runway for growth when compared with other consumer goods categories.

Like all consumer sectors, the total beverage alcohol industry faces possible disruption, ranging from changes in consumer trends and regulation through to economic volatility and tariff changes. Our broad and diverse global portfolio provides a natural hedge to any volatility we may encounter. Our extensive consumer knowledge, gained through our local presence and use of data-driven insights, gives us a strong position from which to grow.

The global alcohol market today: broad-based, growing, profitable(i) 
 
550 million
new legal purchase age consumers are expected to enter the market by 2030.

750 million
consumers are expected to be able to afford international-style spirits over the next decade.

53%
of the global alcohol market, by volume, is spirits.

6 billion
equivalent units of alcohol sold each year.

£747 billion
retail sales value.

(i) Diageo estimates, Euromonitor, IWSR, internal analysis.

Key trends

We believe that drinking in a responsible way is part of a balanced lifestyle in many societies around the world. Drinking occasions and practices vary hugely depending on local culture, traditions and customs. They are constantly evolving, but long-term trends are positive for the industry – with sustained premiumisation, a growing preference for spirits and population growth all playing a part.

Consumers choosing to 'drink better'

Consumers are drinking ‘better, not more’. People are looking for products that stand out for their superior quality, authenticity and taste.

In developed markets, in response to sustained premiumisation of spirits, our premium-and-above brands are growing fastest. Our Reserve portfolio of brands capitalises on this premiumisation trend and recent launches, such as our new Villa Ascenti gin, strengthen our position.

In emerging markets, rising prosperity is enabling consumers to trade up to our international spirits brands. Meanwhile, our mainstream spirits brands, like Royal Challenge whisky in India, offer safe, affordable products to consumers in markets where informal alcohol – which is estimated to account for around 25% of global alcohol sales despite the associated health risks and loss of tax revenue – is widespread.

Growing preference for spirits

Consumers who drink alcohol are moving into spirits and away from beer and wine; as well as from illicit alcohol across Africa. This is a long-term trend – spirits are now 53% of total beverage alcohol by volume, up from 48% ten years ago. Gin is an example of a category benefiting from switching, starting in Europe and now accelerating in markets like Australia, South Africa and Brazil. In Brazil, consumer spend on the gin category has grown over 100% a year in the last five years and we have driven growth through the Tanqueray brand. Growth via the on-trade has been the key driver, ensuring a perfect serve with ice and tonic in premium occasions through our Copa Glass programme, supported by investments in marketing and ensuring availability in the right places. This has brought new consumers into the brand and into spirits – 20% of consumers are new to spirits; 50% coming from beer.

Drinking occasions and the route to consumer are changing

In developed markets, consumers are shifting away from late-night occasions towards food-related and more informal occasions.

Our market insight enables us to innovate existing brands, anticipate new consumer occasions and create the brands of tomorrow. In response to the growing early-evening occasion, we recently launched Smirnoff Infusions in the United Kingdom and United States. It is a new zero-sugar spirits-based drink infusing Smirnoff vodka with real fruit essences, designed to be served in a wine glass with soda and ice. Perfect for long summer evenings, it has an ABV of 23%, with the recommended serve containing 87 calories.


35

Business description (continued)

Our focus on route to consumer means we are well placed to seize new innovation opportunities. Our partnership with HBO, for which we created 'White Walker by Johnnie Walker', has recruited new consumers to our iconic Johnnie Walker Scotch brand and to the category, with social media and e-commerce playing a part. Technology and e-commerce are also changing the route to market. They are shifting the retail landscape, our interactions with on-trade and off-trade customers and the way we interact with consumers. Through our use of data we are constantly evolving our approach to each market and delivering multi-channel customer strategies.

The global economy

Political instability and changes in economic variables continue to have an impact across the global economy. We cannot change the environment in which we operate, but our global scale helps provide a natural hedge to changing variables. Our market-based model gives us the flexibility to identify and respond quickly to local dynamics. Our broad portfolio of brands means consumers can trade up or down depending on the economic environment.

Macro-economic trends are key considerations for our risk planning, outlined on pages 38-46. Understanding the long-term dynamics of our markets means we can anticipate, innovate and respond to key trends and unlock growth by drawing on the strength of our diverse portfolio and acting with agility.

Safeguarding our future by earning trust and respect

The expectations for businesses to be transparent, open and clear about their purpose have arguably never been greater. That is why earning trust and respect continue to be at the heart of our performance ambition. Stakeholders are increasingly challenging all businesses to show how they make a positive impact and the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals provide a framework for businesses to demonstrate their contribution to society.

Earning trust and respect is particularly important for our industry. While the majority of people who choose to enjoy alcohol do so moderately and responsibly, we know the misuse of alcohol can harm individuals and those around them. This can also have adverse impacts on our industry’s reputation and our long-term operating environment. As a global leader in premium alcohol, we are committed to promoting positive drinking, so that our brands and our business have a sustainable future.

As the stewards of brands which have been part of communities around the world for centuries, we understand the importance of long-term thinking and of earning the trust and respect of those around us. Our future success depends on us continuing to promote positive drinking, fostering inclusive economic growth and reducing our environmental impacts, while making sure we do business with integrity and respect for human rights.

Promoting positive drinking

We want to offer consumers the opportunity to ‘drink better, not more’ – an approach that both supports our social values and aligns with our commercial interests as a business making premium drinks. That means we are committed to promoting moderation, while campaigning to reduce harmful drinking and improving laws and industry standards. Our Positive Drinking strategy, described on page 89, includes ambitious targets for areas in which we can have the greatest impact in reducing harm: drink driving, underage drinking and excessive drinking. Through our work, we support the World Health Organization’s (WHO) goal of reducing harmful drinking by 10%.

Acting responsibly in a regulated marketplace

The beverage alcohol industry is highly regulated and that regulation varies widely between countries and jurisdictions. We comply with all laws and regulations, wherever we operate, as a minimum requirement. But we also advocate laws and industry standards, including minimum legal purchase age laws and maximum bloodalcohol concentration driving limits, in countries where these are not already in place. Such measures, as well as protecting individuals and communities, help ensure a sustainable market in which our products can be enjoyed responsibly. At the same time, we advocate against measures that are not based on evidence or which could have unintended consequences, such as pushing consumers toward illicit alcohol, which can be a risk to public health.


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Business description (continued)

Promoting inclusivity and human rights

‘We value each other’. This statement is one of our five core values and it has never been more relevant. Consumers, employees and many other stakeholders expect businesses to respect human rights and create an inclusive culture. Within our business, this is reflected in a strong policy framework and a strategic commitment to inclusion and diversity, including gender balance and health and safety (see more on pages 106-109). And it extends across our value chain: to our suppliers, distributors and consumers, through our human rights framework and our community programmes designed to empower women, help people develop their skills, and increase access to water, sanitation and hygiene (see more on pages 93-98). This commitment strengthens our supply chain, builds our employer brand and gives us the resilience we need to continue to perform in the future.

Climate change, water stress, and a responsible environmental strategy

Any business that relies on agricultural raw materials and water has both a responsibility to the environment around it and an exposure to environmental risks. Our environmental strategy, described in more detail on pages 98-106, is critical to our long-term success. Our programmes reduce carbon emissions and water use throughout our value chain. They also address waste and packaging, including plastic, and the use of more sustainable packaging materials. The linked phenomena of climate change and water stress are particularly material to our business and to the communities around us. With the oversight of our Climate Change Working Group, we are integrating the management of climaterelated issues into our business.

Our Water Blueprint defines our approach to water stewardship and prioritises our actions in areas we have defined as water-stressed, as illustrated on the map below. Along with improving water efficiency, we are replenishing the water used in water-stressed areas, supporting catchment area management to benefit all water users, and helping farmers improve water management in agriculture.

waterstressedareasmapa01.jpg

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Risk factors

Diageo believes the following to be the principal risks and uncertainties that could adversely impact the group. If any of these risks occur, Diageo’s business, financial condition and performance could suffer and the trading price and liquidity of its securities could decline. Because any global business of the kind Diageo is engaged in is inherently exposed to risks that become apparent only with the benefit of hindsight, risks of which Diageo is not presently aware or which Diageo does not currently deem to be material could also adversely impact Diageo’s business, financial condition and performance, including its ability to execute its strategy. The order of presentation of the risk factors below does not necessarily indicate the likelihood of their occurrence or the potential magnitude of their consequences.

Risks related to the global economy

Diageo’s business may be adversely impacted by unfavourable economic, political, social or other developments and risks in the countries in which it operates

Diageo has a presence in over 180 countries worldwide, and it may be adversely affected by unfavourable economic developments globally or in any of the countries where it has distribution networks, marketing companies or production facilities. In particular, Diageo’s business is dependent on general economic conditions in its most important markets, including in the United States, in the United Kingdom and the other countries that form the European Union, and in certain countries within the Asia Pacific region. A significant deterioration in economic conditions globally or in any of Diageo’s important markets, including economic slowdowns or recessions, increased unemployment levels, inflationary pressures and/or disruptions to credit and capital markets, could lead to decreased consumer confidence and consumer spending more generally, thus reducing consumer demand for Diageo’s products. Unfavourable economic conditions could also negatively impact Diageo’s customers, suppliers, distributors and financial counterparties, who may experience cash flow problems, increased credit defaults or other financial issues, which could lead to customer destocking as well as an increase in Diageo’s bad debt expense. In addition, volatility in the capital and credit markets caused by unfavourable economic developments and uncertainties could result in a reduction in the availability of, or an increase in the cost of, financing to Diageo. Diageo’s business could also be affected by other economic developments such as fluctuations in currency exchange rates, the imposition of any import, investment or currency restrictions (including the potential impact of any global, regional or local trade wars or any tariffs, duties or other restrictions or barriers imposed on the import or export of goods between territories, including but not limited to, imports into and exports from the United States, Canada, Mexico, the United Kingdom and/or the European Union), or any restrictions on the repatriation of earnings and capital. Any of these developments may have a material adverse effect on Diageo’s business and financial results.

Diageo’s operations are also subject to a variety of other risks and uncertainties related to its global operations, including adverse political, social or other developments. Political and/or social unrest or uncertainties (including in relation to the United Kingdom’s ongoing withdrawal process from the European Union), natural disasters, disease outbreaks, politically-motivated violence and terrorist threats and/or acts, including those which are specifically directed at the alcohol industry, may also occur in countries where Diageo has operations. Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on Diageo’s business, financial condition and performance.

Many of the above risks are heightened, or occur more frequently, in emerging markets. A substantial portion of Diageo’s operations is conducted in emerging markets, which represented approximately 42% of Diageo’s net sales for the year ended 30 June 2019. In general, emerging markets are also exposed to relatively higher risks attributable to unstable governments, corruption, crime and lack of law enforcement, undeveloped or biased legal systems, expropriation of assets, sovereign default, liquidity constraints, inflation, devaluation, price volatility and currency convertibility issues, as well as additional legal and regulatory risks and uncertainties. Developments in emerging markets can affect Diageo’s ability to import or export products and to repatriate funds, as well as impact levels of consumer demand (for example, in duty-free outlets at airports or in on-trade premises in affected regions) and therefore Diageo’s levels of sales or profitability. Any of these factors may affect Diageo disproportionately or in a different manner from its competitors, depending on Diageo’s specific exposure to any particular emerging market, and could have a material adverse effect on Diageo’s business and financial results.


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Business description (continued)

The United Kingdom’s withdrawal process from the European Union may continue to result in a sustained period of economic and political uncertainty and complexity, and may have a negative impact on economic conditions in Europe and on Diageo’s business and financial results

Diageo is headquartered in the United Kingdom and has significant production and investment in both England and Scotland. In June 2016, the United Kingdom voted by referendum to withdraw from membership in the European Union (“Brexit”), with the UK prime minister formally initiating the negotiation process for the departure of the United Kingdom from the European Union in March 2017. Although the potential impact of Brexit on Diageo’s business cannot be fully assessed until the detailed terms of the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union are finalised and the United Kingdom negotiates, concludes and implements successor trading arrangements with other countries, it is likely that this withdrawal process will continue to result in a sustained period of economic and political uncertainty and complexity. For example, in the event that the United Kingdom’s membership in the European Union terminates on or prior to the current deadline of 31 October 2019 set by the European Union without a withdrawal agreement in place (a “no deal” scenario), there remains uncertainty as to the terms under which the United Kingdom would trade with European Union countries as well as with third party countries with whom trade is currently conducted under EU Free Trade Agreements (“FTAs”). Although a number of countries have recently agreed with the United Kingdom to continue to trade under the terms of the existing FTAs even in a no deal scenario, in the event that the United Kingdom is unable to renew all of the existing FTAs on which UK companies rely, the United Kingdom’s trade with certain countries could revert to the tariffs and duties set by World Trade Organisation rules. This could have an adverse impact on trade, including causing short-term disruptions in the import into and export from the United Kingdom of goods which could be delayed as a result of the imposition of additional customs inspections and documentation checks. Diageo could also be subject to changes in laws and regulations following Brexit in areas such as intellectual property rights, employment, environment, supply chain logistics, data protection and health and safety.

The United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union could also negatively impact economic conditions in Europe more generally, which in turn could adversely impact global economic conditions. For instance, the negotiating process surrounding the terms of the departure of the United Kingdom from the European Union may continue to contribute to significant volatility in exchange rates, wider risks to supply chains across the European Union and ultimately lead to changes in market access or trading terms, including to customs duties, tariffs and/or industry-specific requirements and regulations, restrictions on the mobility of employees and generally increased legal and regulatory complexity and costs. This could have adverse effects on Diageo’s business and financial results.

The withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union could also have further implications for the constitutional makeup of the United Kingdom as a result of renewed discussions surrounding further devolved governments in Scotland and Northern Ireland and/or possible independence for Scotland following the outcome of the Brexit referendum. This could result in a further period of political uncertainty in the United Kingdom and otherwise adversely affect Diageo’s business and financial results, particularly since Diageo has substantial operations and inventory located in Scotland.

Risks related to Diageo’s industry

Demand for Diageo’s products may be adversely affected by many factors, including changes in consumer preferences and tastes and the adverse impacts of declining economies

Diageo’s portfolio of brands includes some of the world’s leading beverage alcohol brands, as well as a number of brands that are prominent in certain regional and/or country-specific markets. Maintaining Diageo’s competitive position depends on its continued ability to offer high-quality products that have a strong appeal to a wide range of consumers. Consumer preferences on a global, regional and/or local scale may shift due to a variety of factors, including changes in demographics, evolving social trends (including any shifts in consumer tastes towards small-batch craft alcohol, low or no alcohol beverages, or other alternative products), changes in travel, vacation or leisure activity patterns, weather conditions, public health regulations and/or health and wellness concerns, any or all of which may reduce consumers’ willingness to purchase beverage alcohol products from large producers such as Diageo or at all. Economic pressures could also cause consumers to choose products which have lower price points, including those of Diageo’s competitors, which may have an adverse effect on Diageo’s business and financial results. The competitive position of Diageo’s brands, as well as Diageo’s reputation more generally, could also be adversely affected by any failure by Diageo to provide consistent, reliable quality in its products or in its service levels to customers.

In addition, the social acceptability of Diageo’s products may decline due to negative publicity surrounding, and/or public concerns about, alcohol consumption. Such anti-alcohol publicity or sentiment could also result in regulatory action, litigation or customer complaints against companies in the beverage alcohol industry and have an adverse effect on Diageo’s business and financial results.


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Diageo’s business has historically benefited from the launch of new to world products or variants of existing brands (with recent examples including the launch of “White Walker by Johnnie Walker” and the Ketel One Botanical range), and continuing product innovation and the creation of variants to existing brands remain significant elements of Diageo’s growth plans. The launch and ongoing success of new products or brand extensions is inherently uncertain, especially with respect to such products’ initial and continuing appeal to consumers. The failure to successfully launch a new product or a variant of an existing brand, or to maintain the product’s initial popularity, can give rise to inventory write-offs and other costs, as well as negatively impact the consumer perception of and thus the growth of an existing brand. There can be no assurance of Diageo’s continuing ability to develop and launch successful new products or variants of existing products, or to ensure or extend the profitable lifespan of its existing products.
 
Diageo is subject to litigation specifically directed at the beverage alcohol industry, as well as to other litigation

Diageo and other companies operating in the beverage alcohol industry are, from time to time, exposed to class action or other private or governmental litigation and claims relating to product liability, alcohol advertising or distribution, alcohol abuse problems or other health consequences arising from the excessive consumption of or other misuse of alcohol, including underage drinking. Diageo may also be subject to litigation arising from legacy and discontinued activities, as well as other litigation in the ordinary course of its operations, including in connection with the acquisition or disposal of businesses or other assets. Diageo is further subject to the risk of litigation, enforcement or other regulatory actions by tax, customs, competition, environmental, anti-corruption and other relevant regulatory authorities, including with respect to the methodology for assessing importation value, transfer pricing or compliance matters. Diageo’s listing in the United States may also expose it to a higher risk of securities-related class action suits, particularly following any significant decline in the price of Diageo’s securities. Any such litigation or other actions may be expensive to defend and result in damages, penalties or fines as well as reputational damage to Diageo or its brands, and/or impact the ability of management to focus on other business matters, and may adversely affect Diageo’s business and financial results. For additional information with respect to legal proceedings, including certain litigation in India arising from Diageo’s acquisition of USL, see ‘Additional information for shareholders - Legal proceedings’ and note 18 to the consolidated financial statements.

Diageo is subject to tax uncertainties, including changes in tax obligations, tax laws, regulations and interpretations, as well as enforcement actions by tax authorities

Changes in the political and economic climate have resulted in an increased focus on tax collection in recent years, and tax authorities are showing an increased appetite to challenge the methodology used by multinational enterprises, even where a company complies with international best practice guidelines. Changes in tax law (including tax rates), tax treaties, accounting policies and accounting standards, including as a result of the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development’s review of base erosion and profit shifting and the European Union’s anti-tax abuse measures, combined with increased investments by governments in the digitisation of tax administration, could also result in increased levels of audit activity, investigations, litigation or other actions by relevant tax authorities. For example, as discussed in note 18 to the consolidated financial statements, in April 2019 the European Commission issued a decision finding that part of the Group Financing Exemption (as introduced in legislation by the British government in 2013) available under the UK controlled foreign company rules constitutes state aid, which could lead to liability for Diageo and other similarly situated companies. Although both the UK government and Diageo have recently appealed this decision to the General Court of the European Union, the UK government is nonetheless obliged to begin collection proceedings, and as such it is currently considered likely that Diageo will have to make a payment towards its potential liability in this respect during the year ending 30 June 2020. Diageo also operates in a large number of jurisdictions with complex tax and legislative regimes and whose related laws and regulations are open to subjective interpretation. These countries include Brazil and India, where Diageo is currently involved in a large number of tax cases. Assessing the potential financial exposure arising from these cases in Brazil and India is particularly challenging due to the uncertain fiscal environment in these jurisdictions. Any such investigations, litigation or other actions may result in damages, penalties or fines as well as reputational damage to Diageo or its brands, and as a result, adversely impact Diageo’s business and financial results. For additional information with respect to legal proceedings, including the Group Financing Exemption matter and potential tax liabilities in Brazil and India, see ‘Additional information for shareholders - Legal proceedings’ and note 18 to the consolidated financial statements.

Beverage alcohol products are also subject to national excise taxes, import duties, sales or value-added taxes and other types of direct and indirect taxes in most countries around the world, most of which are specific to individual jurisdictions. Increases in any such taxes, or the imposition of new taxes, could have a material adverse impact on Diageo’s revenue from sales or its margin, either through reducing the overall level of beverage alcohol consumption and/or by encouraging consumers to switch to lower-taxed categories of beverage alcohol.

In addition to the above, other changes in tax law (including increases in tax rates), tax treaties, related accounting policies and accounting standards could also increase Diageo’s cost of doing business and lead to a rise in Diageo’s effective tax rate, thus adversely affecting Diageo’s business and financial results.


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Climate change, or legal, regulatory or market measures to address climate change or other environmental concerns, may negatively affect Diageo’s business or operations, and water scarcity or water quality issues could negatively impact Diageo’s production costs and capacity

In recent years, there has been growing concern that carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere may have an adverse effect on global temperatures, weather patterns and the frequency and severity of extreme weather-related events and disasters (including hurricanes). In the event that climate change, or legal, regulatory or market measures enacted to address such climate change or other environmental concerns, has a negative effect on agricultural productivity in the various regions from which Diageo procures its raw materials, Diageo may be subject to decreased availability or increased prices for a number of raw materials that are necessary in the production of Diageo’s products, including hops, cereals, agave, sugar, grapes and cream.

Water, which is the main ingredient in substantially all of Diageo’s products and consumed within its agricultural supply chain, is also a limited resource in many parts of the world. As demand for water continues to increase, and as water becomes scarcer and the quality of available water deteriorates, Diageo may be affected by increased production costs (including due to increases in certain water-related taxes or related regulations) or capacity constraints, which in turn could adversely affect Diageo’s business and financial results.

Diageo is also required to report greenhouse gas emissions, energy usage data and related environmental information to a variety of entities, including complying with the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme. If Diageo is unable to accurately measure and disclose such data in a timely manner, it could be subject to penalties in certain jurisdictions. In addition, increased governmental or public pressure for further reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and/or to address any other perceived environmental issues could cause Diageo to incur increased costs for energy, transportation and raw materials, as well as potentially require it to make additional investments in facilities and equipment, thus adversely impacting Diageo’s business and financial results.

Any increases in the cost of production could affect Diageo’s profitability

The components that Diageo uses for the production of its beverage alcohol products are largely commodities purchased from suppliers which are subject to price volatility caused by factors outside of Diageo’s control, including changes in global and regional supply and demand, weather and/or agricultural conditions, fluctuations in relevant exchange rates and/or governmental controls. Fluctuations in the prices of various commodities, including energy prices, may result in unexpected increases in the cost of the raw materials Diageo uses in the production of its products, including the prices of the agricultural commodities, flavourings and other ingredients necessary for Diageo to produce its various beverages, as well as glass bottles and other packaging materials, thus increasing Diageo’s production costs. Diageo may also be adversely affected by shortages of any such materials, by increases in energy costs resulting in higher transportation, freight or other related operating costs, or by inflation in any of the jurisdictions in which it produces its products. Diageo may not be able to increase its prices to offset these increased costs without suffering reduced volume of products sold and/or decreased operating profit.

Risks related to regulation

Regulatory decisions and changes in the legal, and regulatory environment could increase Diageo’s costs and liabilities or limit its business activities

Diageo’s operations are subject to extensive regulatory requirements relating to production, distribution, importation, marketing, advertising, sales, pricing, labelling, packaging, product liability, antitrust, labour, pensions, compliance and control systems, and environmental issues. Changes in any such applicable laws, regulations or governmental or regulatory policies and/or practices could cause Diageo to incur material additional costs or liabilities that could adversely affect its business. In particular, governmental bodies in jurisdictions where Diageo operates may impose new labelling, product or production requirements, limitations on the marketing, advertising and/or promotion activities used to market beverage alcohol, restrictions on retail outlets, restrictions on importation and distribution or other restrictions on the locations or occasions where beverage alcohol is sold which directly or indirectly limit the sales of Diageo products. For example, in 2014 and 2015, respectively, the states of Kerala and Bihar in India announced the imposition of a total ban on alcohol consumption, while, more recently, the Supreme Court of India issued a ruling prohibiting the sale of alcohol in certain outlets near highways. Although the restrictions imposed on the sale of alcohol in Kerala and aspects of the highway ban have since been relaxed, legal and regulatory measures such as these have impacted, and are likely to continue to impact, the sale of Diageo’s products in India and/or in other jurisdictions, which in turn could adversely affect Diageo’s business and financial results.

Regulatory authorities under whose laws Diageo operates may also have enforcement power that can subject the group to actions such as product recalls, product seizures or other sanctions which could have an adverse effect on Diageo’s sales or damage its reputation. Any changes to the regulatory environment in which Diageo operates could also cause Diageo to incur material additional costs or liabilities, which could adversely affect Diageo’s performance.

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Diageo is subject to data privacy regulations in many of the markets in which it operates, and laws and regulations in this area are developing and changing on a continual basis. For example, Diageo is subject to the General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) adopted in the European Union in April 2016, which was required to be fully implemented in all member states by May 2018. Diageo incurred significant costs in connection with the implementation of the GDPR, and the introduction of, or changes in, similar data privacy laws and regulations in other jurisdictions in which Diageo operates are likely to continue to require substantial expenditure to make any necessary up front changes to security systems, policies, procedures and business practices, as well as for ongoing compliance costs. Breach of any of these laws or regulations could also lead to significant penalties (including, under the GDPR, a fine of up to 4% of global turnover) and/or damage to Diageo’s reputation, as well as impact Diageo’s ability to deliver on its digital productivity and growth plans.

Any failure by Diageo to comply with anti-corruption laws, sanctions, trade restrictions or similar laws or regulations, or any failure of Diageo’s related internal policies and procedures to comply with applicable law, may have a material adverse effect on Diageo’s business and financial results

Diageo produces and markets its products in a global scale, including in certain countries that, as a result of political and economic instability, a lack of well-developed legal systems and/or potentially corrupt business environments, have a higher level of corruption risk than other countries. There is increasing scrutiny and enforcement by regulators in many jurisdictions of anti-corruption laws, including pursuant to the US Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and the UK Bribery Act. Such enforcement has been enhanced by applicable regulations in the United States, which offer substantial financial rewards to whistle-blowers for reporting information that leads to monetary fines.
 
If Diageo or any of its associates fails to comply with anti-corruption laws (including anti-bribery laws), or with existing or new economic sanctions or trade restrictions imposed by the United States, the European Union or other national or international authorities that are applicable to Diageo or its associates, Diageo may be exposed to the costs associated with investigating potential misconduct as well as potential legal liability and/or reputational damage.

While Diageo has implemented and maintains internal practices, procedures and controls designed to ensure compliance with anti-corruption laws, sanctions, trade restrictions or similar laws and regulations, and routinely conducts investigations, either at its own initiative or in response to requests from regulators in connection with compliance with such internal controls, there is no guarantee that such procedures will be effective in preventing compliance failures at Diageo or at third parties with whom Diageo maintains business relationships.

Any investigations and lawsuits, regardless of the ultimate outcome of the proceeding, are time consuming and expensive and can divert the time and effort of Diageo’s personnel, including senior management, from its business. Adverse publicity, legal and enforcement proceedings, and enhanced government scrutiny can also have a negative impact on Diageo’s reputation. To the extent that violations of anti-corruption, sanctions and/or trade restriction laws and regulations, and/or Diageo’s internal policies and procedures, are found, or if Diageo’s internal policies and procedures are found not to comply with applicable law, possible regulatory sanctions, fines and other consequences may also be material.

Defective internal controls could adversely affect Diageo’s financial reporting and management processes, as well as the accuracy of public disclosures

Diageo has in place internal control and risk management systems in relation to its financial reporting process and its process for the preparation of consolidated financial statements. In addition, management undertakes a review of the consolidated financial statements in order to ensure that the financial position and results of the group are appropriately reflected therein. Diageo is required by the laws of various jurisdictions to publicly disclose its financial results, as well as developments that could materially affect its financial results. Regulators routinely review the financial statements of listed companies such as Diageo for compliance with existing, new or revised accounting and regulatory requirements. Should Diageo be subject to an investigation into potential non-compliance with accounting and disclosure requirements or be found to have breached any such requirements, this may lead to restatements of previously reported results and/or significant penalties. In addition, the reliability of financial reporting is important in ensuring that the business’ management and its results are based on reliable data. Flaws in internal control systems could adversely affect Diageo’s business and financial results, including Diageo’s ability to execute its strategy.

Accurate disclosures also provide investors and other market professionals with information to understand Diageo’s business. Defective internal controls could result in inaccuracies or lack of clarity in public disclosures that could create market uncertainty regarding the reliability of the data presented. As a result, defective internal controls could adversely affect Diageo’s business and financial results and/or the price of Diageo’s securities.


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Risks related to Diageo’s business

The value of Diageo’s brands and its net sales may be negatively affected by its failure to maintain its brand image and corporate reputation or adapt to a changing media environment

The value of Diageo’s brands and its profitability depends heavily on its ability to maintain its brand image and corporate reputation. Adverse publicity, whether or not justified, may tarnish Diageo’s reputation and cause consumers to choose products offered by its competitors. Such adverse publicity could arise as a result of a perceived failure by Diageo to make adequate positive social contributions, including in relation to the level of taxes paid by Diageo, or by any failure of internal controls or compliance breaches leading to violations of Diageo’s Code of Business Conduct, its other key policies or the laws or regulations of the jurisdictions in which it operates.

In addition, Diageo’s ability to maintain, extend, and expand its brand image depends on its ability to adapt to a rapidly changing media environment. Diageo maintains an online presence as part of its business operations, and increasingly relies on social media and online dissemination of advertising campaigns. Diageo’s reputation may suffer if it is perceived to fail to appropriately restrict access to its online content or if it breaches any marketing regulation, code or policy. In addition, the growing use of social and digital media increases the speed and extent that information or misinformation and opinions can be shared. Negative posts or comments about Diageo, its brands or its products on social or digital media, whether or not valid, could seriously damage Diageo’s brands and reputation.

Any failure to maintain, extend, and expand Diageo’s brand image or adapt to a changing media environment may have a material adverse effect on Diageo’s business and financial results.

Contamination, counterfeiting or other events could harm the integrity of customer support for Diageo’s brands and adversely affect the sales of those brands

The success of Diageo’s brands depends upon the positive image that consumers have of those brands, and contamination, whether arising accidentally, or through deliberate third party action, or other events that harm the integrity of or consumer support for those brands, could adversely affect their sales. Diageo purchases most of the raw materials for the production and packaging of its products from third party producers or on the open market. Diageo may be subject to liability if contaminants in those raw materials or defects in the distillation, fermentation or bottling process lead to reduced beverage quality or illness among, or injury to, Diageo’s consumers, or if the products do not otherwise comply with applicable food safety regulations. Diageo may also recall products in the event of contamination or damage. A significant product liability judgment or a widespread product recall may negatively impact sales and profitability of the affected brand or all of Diageo’s brands for a period of time depending on product availability, competitive reaction and consumer attitudes. Even if a product liability claim is unsuccessful or is not fully pursued, any resulting negative publicity could adversely affect Diageo’s reputation with existing and potential customers as well as its corporate and individual brand image.
 
Additionally, third parties may sell products which are either counterfeit versions of Diageo brands or inferior brands that look like Diageo brands, and consumers of Diageo brands could confuse Diageo products with such counterfeit products. A negative consumer experience with such a product could cause them to refrain from purchasing Diageo brands in the future and impair Diageo’s brand equity, thus adversely affecting Diageo’s business.

Diageo faces competition that may reduce its market share and margins

Diageo faces substantial competition from several international companies as well as regional and local companies (including craft breweries) in the countries in which it operates, and competes with drinks companies across a wide range of consumer drinking occasions. Within a number of categories, the beverage alcohol industry has been experiencing continuing consolidation among major global producers, as evidenced by business combinations of substantial value carried out by significant competitors in recent years. Consolidation is also taking place among Diageo’s customers in many countries. These trends may lead to stronger competitors, increased competitive pressure from customers, negative impacts on Diageo’s distribution network (including suboptimal routes to customers and consumers), downward pressure on prices, predatory marketing tactics by Diageo’s competitors and/or a decline in Diageo’s market share in any of these categories. Adverse developments in economic conditions or declines in demand or consumer spending may also result in intensified competition for market share, with potentially adverse effects on sales volumes and prices. Any of these factors may adversely affect Diageo’s results and potential for growth.


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Diageo may be adversely affected by disruption to production facilities, business service centres or information systems, including via cyber-attacks

Diageo operates production facilities around the world. If there was a technical failure, or a fire, explosion, flood or other significant event, at one or more of Diageo’s production facilities, this could result in significant damage to the facilities, plant or equipment, their surroundings and/or the local environment and/or injury or loss of life. Such an event could also lead to a loss of production capacity, result in regulatory action or legal liability, or damage Diageo’s reputation.

Diageo has a substantial inventory of aged product categories, including scotch whisky, which may mature over periods of up to 30 years or more. A substantial portion of this maturing inventory is stored in Scotland, and the loss through contamination, fire or other natural disaster of all or a portion of the stock of any one of those aged product categories could result in a significant reduction in supply of those products, and consequently, Diageo would not be able to meet consumer demand for those products as such demand arises. There can be no assurance that insurance proceeds would cover the replacement value of Diageo’s maturing inventory or other assets in the event that such assets were lost due to contamination, fire or natural disasters, destruction resulting from negligence or the acts of third parties, or failure of information systems or data infrastructure.

Diageo also relies on information technology systems to process, store and transmit large amounts of data. As with all large systems, Diageo’s information systems could also be subject to cyber-attacks (including phishing and ransomware attacks) by parties intent on disrupting production or other business processes or otherwise extracting or corrupting information. Such unauthorised access could disrupt Diageo’s business, including its beverage alcohol production capabilities, and/or lead to loss of assets or to outside parties having access to confidential information, including privileged data or strategic information of Diageo and its employees, customers and consumers. Such information could also be made public in a manner that harms Diageo’s reputation. The concentration of processes in business service centres also means that any sustained disruption to the facility or issue impacting the reliability of the information systems used could impact a large portion of Diageo’s business operations and, in some circumstances, could result in property damage, breaches of regulations, litigation, legal liabilities and reparation costs, thereby having a material adverse effect on Diageo’s business and financial results.

Diageo’s business may be adversely affected by increased costs for, or shortages of, talent, or by labour strikes or disputes

Diageo’s business could be adversely affected by labour or skill shortages or increased labour costs due to increased competition for employees, higher employee turnover or increased employee benefit costs. There is no guarantee that Diageo will continue to be able to recruit, retain and develop personnel possessing the skill sets that it requires to deliver its strategy, for example in relation to sales, marketing and innovation capability within markets, or in its senior management. The loss of senior management or other key personnel or the inability to identify, attract and retain qualified personnel in the future could make it difficult to manage Diageo’s operations and adversely affect Diageo’s business and financial results. In addition, labour strikes, work stoppages or slowdowns within Diageo’s operations or those of Diageo’s suppliers could adversely impact Diageo.

Diageo may not be able to derive the expected benefits from its business strategies, including in relation to expansion in emerging markets, acquisitions, productivity initiatives or inventory forecasting

There can be no assurance that Diageo’s business strategies will result in opportunities for growth and improved margins. Part of Diageo’s growth strategy includes expanding its business in certain emerging market countries (including in Africa) where consumer spending in general, and spending on Diageo’s products in particular, has historically not been significant, but where Diageo believes there are strong prospects for growth. There is no guarantee that this strategy will be successful, and some of these markets may represent a higher risk in terms of their changing regulatory environments and higher degrees of uncertainty over levels of consumer spending.

It is also possible that Diageo’s business strategies could give rise to further business combinations, acquisitions, disposals, joint ventures and/or partnerships (including any associated financing or the assumption of actual or potential liabilities, depending on the transaction contemplated). However, there can be no assurance that any such transaction would be completed and/or that it would deliver the anticipated benefits, cost savings or synergies. The success of any transaction also depends in part on Diageo’s ability to successfully integrate new businesses with its existing operations. Acquisitions may also expose Diageo to liabilities it may not be aware of at the time of the acquisition, for example if acquired companies and business do not act, or have not acted, in compliance with applicable laws and regulations. The ongoing issues in USL detailed in note 18 to the consolidated financial statements provide an example of integration and legal challenges.

Similarly, there can be no assurance that the global productivity programmes implemented by Diageo in order to drive efficiencies and cost savings, or other programmes designed to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of end-to-end operations, will deliver the expected benefits. Such programmes may also result in significant costs to Diageo or may have other adverse impacts on the business and operations of the group.

44

Business description (continued)


Certain of Diageo’s aged product categories may mature over periods of up to 30 years, and forecasts of demand for such products in future periods are subject to significant uncertainty. There is an inherent risk of forecasting error in determining the quantity of maturing stock to lay down in a given year for future consumption as a result of changes in business strategy, market demand and preferences, introductions of competing products and other changes in market conditions. Any forecasting error could lead to Diageo being unable to meet the objectives of its business strategy, future demand or lead to a future surplus of inventory and consequent write- down in value of maturing stocks. If Diageo is unable to accurately forecast demand for its products or efficiently manage its inventory, this may have a material adverse effect on Diageo’s business and financial results.

Diageo’s operations and financial results may be adversely affected by fluctuations in exchange rates and fluctuations in interest rates

Diageo is engaged in an international business that operates in, and makes sales into, countries with different currencies, while its financial results are presented in sterling. As a result, Diageo is subject to foreign currency risk due to exchange rate movements, which affects the sterling value of its transactions, as well as the translation to sterling of the results and underlying net assets of its operations. In particular, approximately 33% of Diageo’s net sales in the year ended 30 June 2019 were in US dollars, approximately 11% were in euros and approximately 14% were in sterling. Movements in exchange rates used to translate foreign currencies into sterling may have a significant impact on Diageo’s reported results of operations from year to year. Exchange rate fluctuations may also expose Diageo to increased interest expense on borrowings denominated in currencies which appreciate against the sterling. As a result, Diageo’s business and financial results may be adversely affected by fluctuations in exchange rates. In addition, Diageo may be adversely impacted by fluctuations in interest rates, mainly through increased interest expense.

Diageo’s operations and financial results may be adversely affected by movements in the value of assets and liabilities related to its pension plans

Diageo operates a number of pension plans throughout the world, which vary in accordance with local conditions and practices. The majority of these pension plans are defined benefit plans and are funded by payments to separately administered trusts or insurance companies. The ability of these pension plans to meet their pension obligations may be affected by, among other things, the performance of assets owned by these pension plans, the liabilities in connection with the pension plans, the underlying actuarial assumptions used to calculate the surplus or deficit in the plans, in particular the discount rate and long term inflation rates used to calculate the liabilities of the pension funds, and any changes in applicable laws and regulations. For example, the net position of Diageo’s post-employment plans improved by £554 million from a deficit of £491 million at 30 June 2017 to a surplus of £63 million at 30 June 2018, and then improved by another £129 million in the next fiscal year to a surplus of £192 million at 30 June 2019, primarily as a result of an increase in the market value of assets held by the plans. However, if there are significant declines in financial markets and/or deterioration in the value of fund assets or changes in discount rates or inflation rates, Diageo may need to make substantial contributions to these pension funds in the future.

Furthermore, if the market values of the assets held by Diageo’s pension funds decline, the valuations of assets by the pension trustees decline or the valuation of liabilities in connection with pension plans increase, pension expenses may increase which, as a result, could materially adversely affect Diageo’s financial position. There is no assurance that interest rates or inflation rates will remain constant, that pension fund assets can earn the assumed rate of return annually or that the value of liabilities will not fluctuate significantly. Diageo’s actual experience may also be significantly more negative than the assumptions used.

Diageo’s operations may be adversely affected by failure to maintain or renegotiate distribution, supply, manufacturing or licence agreements on favourable terms

Diageo’s business has a number of distribution, supply, manufacturing or licence agreements for brands owned by it or by other companies. These agreements vary depending on the particular brand, but tend to be for a fixed number of years. There can be no assurance that Diageo will be able to renegotiate its rights on favourable terms when these agreements expire or that they will not be terminated. Failure to renew these agreements on favourable terms, or any disputes with distributors of Diageo’s products or suppliers of raw materials, could have an adverse impact on Diageo’s business and financial results.


45

Business description (continued)

Diageo may not be able to protect its intellectual property rights

Given the importance of brand recognition to its business, Diageo has invested considerable effort in protecting its intellectual property rights, including trademark registration and domain names. Diageo’s patents cover some of its process technology, including some aspects of its bottle marking technology. Diageo also uses security measures and agreements to protect its confidential information and trade secrets. However, Diageo cannot be certain that the steps it has taken will be sufficient or that third parties will not infringe on or misappropriate its intellectual property rights in its brands or products. Moreover, some of the countries in which Diageo operates offer less intellectual property protection than Europe or North America. Given the attractiveness of Diageo’s brands to consumers, it is not uncommon for counterfeit products to be manufactured and traded in certain jurisdictions. Diageo cannot be certain that the steps it takes to assist the authorities to prevent, detect and eliminate counterfeit products will be effective in preventing material loss of profits or erosion of brand equity resulting from lower quality or even dangerous counterfeit product reaching the market. If Diageo is unable to protect its intellectual property rights against infringement or misappropriation, this could materially harm its future financial results and ability to develop its business.
 
Risks related to Diageo’s securities

It may be difficult to effect service of US process and enforce US legal process against Diageo and its directors

Diageo is a public limited company incorporated under the laws of England and Wales. The majority of Diageo’s directors and officers, and some of the experts named in this document, reside outside of the United States, principally in the United Kingdom. A substantial portion of Diageo’s assets, and all or a substantial portion of the assets of such persons, are located outside of the United States. Therefore, it may not be possible to effect service of process within the United States upon Diageo or these persons in order to enforce judgments of US courts against Diageo or these persons based on the civil liability provisions of US federal securities laws. There is also doubt as to the enforceability in England and Wales, in original actions or in actions for enforcement of judgments of US courts, of civil liabilities solely based on the US federal securities laws. In addition, punitive damages in actions brought in the United States or elsewhere may be unenforceable in England and Wales.

46

Business description (continued)

Cautionary statement concerning forward-looking statements

This document contains ‘forward-looking’ statements. These statements can be identified by the fact that they do not relate only to historical or current facts. In particular, forward-looking statements include all statements that express forecasts, expectations, plans, outlook, objectives and projections with respect to future matters, including trends in results of operations, margins, growth rates, overall market trends, the impact of changes in interest or exchange rates, the availability or cost of financing to Diageo, anticipated cost savings or synergies, expected investments, the completion of any strategic transactions or restructuring programmes, anticipated tax rates, changes in the international tax environment, expected cash payments, outcomes of litigation, anticipated changes in the value of assets and liabilities related to pension schemes and general economic conditions. By their nature, forward-looking statements involve risk and uncertainty because they relate to events and depend on circumstances that will occur in the future. There are a number of factors that could cause actual results and developments to differ materially from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements, including factors that are outside Diageo's control.

Factors that could cause actual results and developments to differ materially from those expressed or implied by forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to:

economic, political, social or other developments in countries and markets in which Diageo operates, which may contribute to a reduction in demand for Diageo’s products, adverse impacts on Diageo’s customer, supplier and/or financial counterparties, or the imposition of import, investment or currency restrictions (including the potential impact of any global, regional or local trade wars or any tariffs, duties or other restrictions or barriers imposed on the import or export of goods between territories, including but not limited to, imports into and exports from the United States, Canada, Mexico, the United Kingdom and/or the European Union);

the negotiating process surrounding, as well as the final terms of, the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union, which could lead to a sustained period of economic and political uncertainty and complexity whilst detailed withdrawal terms and any successor trading arrangements with other countries are negotiated, finalised and implemented, potentially adversely impacting economic conditions in the United Kingdom and Europe more generally as well as Diageo's business operations and financial performance ;

changes in consumer preferences and tastes, including as a result of changes in demographics, evolving social trends (including any shifts in consumer tastes towards small-batch craft alcohol, low or no alcohol, or other alternative products), changes in travel, vacation or leisure activity patterns, weather conditions, health concerns and/or a downturn in economic conditions;

any litigation or other similar proceedings (including with tax, customs, competition, environmental, anti-corruption or other regulatory authorities), including litigation directed at the beverage alcohol industry generally or at Diageo in particular;

changes in the domestic and international tax environment, including as a result of the OECD Base Erosion and Profit Shifting Initiative and EU anti-tax abuse measures, leading to uncertainty around the application of existing and new tax laws and unexpected tax exposures;

the effects of climate change, or legal, regulatory or market measures intended to address climate change, on Diageo’s business or operations, including on the cost and supply of water;

changes in the cost of production, including as a result of increases in the cost of commodities, labour and/or energy or as a result of inflation;

legal and regulatory developments, including changes in regulations relating to production, distribution, importation, marketing, advertising, sales, pricing, labelling, packaging, product liability, antitrust, labour, compliance and control systems, environmental issues and/or data privacy;

the consequences of any failure by Diageo or its associates to comply with anti-corruption, sanctions, trade restrictions or similar laws and regulations, or any failure of Diageo’s related internal policies and procedures to comply with applicable law or regulation;

the consequences of any failure of internal controls, including those affecting compliance with existing or new accounting and/or disclosure requirements;

Diageo’s ability to maintain its brand image and corporate reputation or to adapt to a changing media environment;

47

Business description (continued)


contamination, counterfeiting or other circumstances which could harm the level of customer support for Diageo’s brands and adversely impact its sales;

increased competitive product and pricing pressures, including as a result of actions by increasingly consolidated competitors or increased competition from regional and local companies, that could negatively impact Diageo’s market share, distribution network, costs and/or pricing;

any disruption to production facilities, business service centres or information systems, including as a result of cyber attacks;

increased costs for, or shortages of, talent, as well as labour strikes or disputes;

Diageo’s ability to derive the expected benefits from its business strategies, including in relation to expansion in emerging markets, acquisitions and/or disposals, cost savings and productivity initiatives or inventory forecasting;

fluctuations in exchange rates and/or interest rates, which may impact the value of transactions and assets denominated in other currencies, increase Diageo’s cost of financing or otherwise adversely affect Diageo’s financial results;

movements in the value of the assets and liabilities related to Diageo’s pension plans;

Diageo’s ability to renew supply, distribution, manufacturing or licence agreements (or related rights) and licences on favourable terms, or at all, when they expire; or

any failure by Diageo to protect its intellectual property rights.

All oral and written forward-looking statements made on or after the date of this document and attributable to Diageo are expressly qualified in their entirety by the above factors and by the principal risks set out in the ‘Risk factors’ section above. Any forward-looking statements made by or on behalf of Diageo speak only as of the date they are made. Diageo does not undertake to update forward-looking statements to reflect any changes in Diageo’s expectations with regard thereto or any changes in events, conditions or circumstances on which any such statement is based. The reader should, however, consult any additional disclosures that Diageo may make in any documents which it publishes and/or files with the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). All readers, wherever located, should take note of these disclosures.

This document includes names of Diageo's products, which constitute trademarks or trade names which Diageo owns, or which others own and license to Diageo for use. All rights reserved. © Diageo plc 2019.

The information in this document does not constitute an offer to sell or an invitation to buy shares in Diageo plc or an invitation or inducement to engage in any other investment activities.

This document may include information about Diageo’s target debt rating. A security rating is not a recommendation to buy, sell or hold securities and may be subject to revision or withdrawal at any time by the assigning rating organisation. Each rating should be evaluated independently of any other rating.

Past performance cannot be relied upon as a guide to future performance.



48

Business review

Operating results 2019 compared with 2018

Group financial review

Reported net sales were up 5.8% as organic growth was partially offset by acquisitions and disposals
Reported operating profit was up 9.5% driven by organic growth, lower exceptional operating charges and favourable exchange, partially offset by acquisitions and disposals
Organic results improved with volume growth of 2.3%
Organic net sales growth of 6.1%
Organic operating profit grew 9%
Free cash flow continued to be strong at £2.6bn
Net cash from operating activities was £3.2bn
Basic eps of 130.7 pence was up 7.4%
Eps before exceptional items increased 10% to 130.8 pence

chart-08baa469e126fd846e6.jpg chart-a4c1bca1a0c07a8a9e2.jpg chart-7c6706c65fa1e6ffabc.jpg chart-50acf358c01f426fe24.jpg
l
North America
l
Europe and Turkey
l
Africa
l
Latin America and Caribbean
l
Asia Pacific

(i)
Excluding corporate net sales of £53 million (2018 - £52 million).
(ii)
Excluding net corporate cost of £210 million (2018 - £158 million).
(iii)
Excluding exceptional operating charges of £74 million (2018 - £128 million) and net corporate operating costs of £189 million (2018 - £158 million).

49

Business review (continued)

Summary financial information
 
2019

 
2018

Volume
EUm
245.9

 
240.4

Net sales
£ million
12,867

 
12,163

Marketing
£ million
2,042

 
1,882

Operating profit before exceptional items
£ million
4,116

 
3,819

Exceptional operating items(i)
£ million
(74
)
 
(128
)
Operating profit