Company Quick10K Filing
Platinum Eagle Acquisition
Price10.13 EPS0
Shares104 P/E171
MCap1,058 P/FCF24
Net Debt407 EBIT32
TEV1,465 TEV/EBIT46
TTM 2019-09-30, in MM, except price, ratios
10-K 2019-12-31 Filed 2020-03-13
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EAGL 10K Annual Report

Part I
Item 1. Business
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 2. Properties
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Part II
Item 5. Market for Registrant’S Common Equity, Related Shareholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6. Selected Financial Data
Item 7. Management’S Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures
Item 9B. Other Information
Part III
Item 10. Directors, Executives, Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11. Executive Compensation
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management Related Shareholder Matters
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services
Part IV
Item 14. Exhibits
EX-4.6 th-20191231ex463695d2b.htm
EX-10.21 th-20191231ex102180bdb.htm
EX-23.1 th-20191231ex23103b0dc.htm
EX-31.1 th-20191231ex311494dca.htm
EX-31.2 th-20191231ex3129f4329.htm
EX-32.1 th-20191231ex321c7309b.htm
EX-32.2 th-20191231ex322708a21.htm

Platinum Eagle Acquisition Earnings 2019-12-31

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow
0.70.60.40.30.10.02016201720182020
Assets, Equity
0.10.10.0-0.0-0.1-0.12016201720182020
Rev, G Profit, Net Income
0.40.20.1-0.1-0.2-0.42016201720182020
Ops, Inv, Fin

10-K 1 th-20191231x10k.htm 10-K th_Current_Folio_10K

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549


FORM 10-K


ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019

OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from           to

Commission file number 001-38343


TARGET HOSPITALITY CORP.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)


 

 

 

 

Delaware

 

 

98-1378631

(State or other jurisdiction of

 

 

(I.R.S. Employer

incorporation or organization)

 

 

Identification No.)

 

2170 Buckthorne Place, Suite 440

 The Woodlands,  TX 77380-1775

(Address, including zip code, of principal executive offices)

 

(800) 832‑4242

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 (Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

 

 

Title of each class

Trading Symbol(s)

Name of each exchange on which is registered

Common stock, par value $0.0001 per share

TH

The Nasdaq Capital Market

Warrants to purchase common stock

THWWW

The Nasdaq Capital Market


 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

Yes ☐   No ☒

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.

Yes ☐   No ☒

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15 (d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes    ☒  No  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes    ☒  No  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

 

Large accelerated filer ☐

Accelerated filer ☒

Non-accelerated filer ☐

Smaller reporting company ☐

 

Emerging growth company ☒

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes  ☐  No  ☒.

The aggregate market value of common shares held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was last sold, or the average bid and asked price of such common equity, as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter, June 28, 2019, was $314,734,067.

There were 105,277,765 shares of Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per share, issued and 102,297,898 outstanding as of March 9, 2020.

Documents Incorporated by Reference

The information required by Part III of this Report, to the extent not set forth herein, is incorporated herein by reference from the registrant's definitive proxy statement relating to the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held in 2020, which definitive proxy statement shall be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days after the end of the fiscal year to which this Report relates.

 

 

 

Target Hospitality Corp.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Annual Report on FORM 10‑K

December 31, 2019

PART I  

 

Item 1.  Business 

3

Item 1A. Risk Factors 

22

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments 

43

Item 2. Properties 

43

Item 3. Legal Proceedings 

45

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 

45

 

 

PART II 

46

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Shareholder Matters and Issuer Purchase of Equity Securities 

46

Item 6. Selected Financial Data 

49

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 

54

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 

68

Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data 

71

Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure 

116

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures 

116

Item 9B. Other Information 

117

 

 

PART III 

118

Item 10.  Directors, Executives, Officers and Corporate Governance 

118

Item 11. Executive Compensation 

118

Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management Related Shareholder Matters 

118

Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence 

118

Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services 

118

 

 

PART IV 

119

Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules 

119

SIGNATURES 

124

 

 

 

Part I

Item 1. Business

Unless the context otherwise requires, references to “we”, “us”, “our”, “the Company”, or “Target Hospitality” refer to Target Hospitality Corp. and its consolidated subsidiaries.

 

Overview

 

Our company, Target Hospitality, is the largest vertically integrated specialty rental and hospitality services company in the United States. We own an extensive network of geographically relocatable specialty rental accommodation units with approximately 13,800 beds across 25 sites. The majority of our revenues are generated under multi-year committed contracts which provide visibility to future earnings and cash flows. We believe our customers enter into contracts with us because of our differentiated scale and ability to deliver premier accommodations and in-house culinary and hospitality services across many key geographies in which they operate.  Approximately 75.6% of our revenue was earned from specialty rental with vertically integrated hospitality, specifically lodging and related ancillary services, whereas the remaining 24.4% of revenues were earned through leasing of lodging facilities (18.6%) and construction fee income (5.8%) for the year ended December 31, 2019. For the year ended December 31, 2019, we generated revenues of $321.1 million.

For additional information on our revenue related to December 31, 2018 and 2017, refer to “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” located in Part II, Item 7 within this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Our company was formed from two leading businesses in the sector, Target Logistics Management, LLC (“Target”) and RL Signor Holdings, LLC (“Signor’). Signor was founded in 1990, and Target, though initially founded in 1978, began operating as a specialty rental and hospitality services company in 2006. Our company operates across the U.S. primarily in the Permian Basin in the southwest U.S. and Bakken Basin in North Dakota, which are the highest producing oil and gas basins in the country. We also own and operate the largest family residential center in the U.S., serving asylum-seeking women and children. Using the “Design, Develop, Build, Own, Operate, and Maintain” (“DDBOOM”) business model, Target Hospitality provides comprehensive turnkey solutions to customers’ unique needs, from the initial planning stages through the full cycle of development and ongoing operations. We provide cost-effective and customized specialty rental accommodations, culinary services and hospitality solutions, including site design, construction, operations, security, housekeeping, catering, concierge services and health and recreation facilities.

We deliver end-to-end specialty rental and hospitality services across several end markets in the U.S. and are known for high quality accommodations and vertically integrated specialty rental and hospitality services.

We primarily operate in the Permian and Bakken basins, which are some of the most active oil and gas regions in the world. We have established a leadership position in providing a fully integrated service offering to our large customer base, which is comprised of major and independent oil producers, oilfield service companies, midstream companies, refineries, government and government service providers. Our company is built on the foundation of the following core values: safety, care, excellence, integrity and collaboration.

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Picture 3

Background

 

Target Hospitality Corp. was originally known as Platinum Eagle Acquisition Corp. (“Platinum Eagle”) and was a blank check company incorporated on July 12, 2017 as a Cayman Islands exempted company formed for the purpose of effecting a merger, share exchange, asset acquisition, share purchase, reorganization or similar business combination with one or more businesses. We completed an initial public offering in January 2018, after which our securities were listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market (“Nasdaq”).

On March 12, 2019, we discontinued our existence as a Cayman Islands exempted company under the Cayman Islands Companies Law (2018 Revision) and, pursuant to Section 388 of the General Corporation Law of the State of Delaware (the “DGCL”), continued our existence under the DGCL as a corporation incorporated in the State of Delaware (the “Domestication”). Thereafter, on March 15, 2019, the Company changed its name to Target Hospitality in accordance with the terms of: (i) the agreement and plan of merger, dated as of November 13, 2018, as amended on January 4, 2019 (the “Signor Merger Agreement”), by and among Platinum Eagle, Signor Merger Sub LLC, a Delaware limited liability company and wholly owned subsidiary of Platinum Eagle and sister company to the Holdco Acquiror (as defined below) (“Signor Merger Sub”), Arrow Holdings S.a.r.l., a Luxembourg société à responsabilité limitée (the “Arrow Seller”) and Signor Parent (as defined below), and (ii) the agreement and plan of merger, dated as of November 13, 2018, as amended

4

 

 

on January 4, 2019 (the “Target Merger Agreement” and, together with the Signor Merger Agreement, the “Merger Agreements”), by and among Platinum Eagle, Topaz Holdings LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (the “Holdco Acquiror”), Arrow Bidco, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (“Arrow Bidco”) Algeco Investments B.V., a Netherlands besloten vennootschap (the “Algeco Seller”) and Target Parent (as defined below). Pursuant to the Merger Agreements, Platinum Eagle, through its wholly-owned subsidiary, the Holdco Acquiror, acquired all of the issued and outstanding equity interests of Arrow Parent Corp., a Delaware corporation (“Signor Parent”) and owner of Arrow Bidco, the owner of Signor, from the Arrow Seller, and all of the issued and outstanding equity interests of Algeco US Holdings LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (“Target Parent”) and owner of Target, from the Algeco Seller. The transactions contemplated by the Merger Agreements are herein after referred to as the “Business Combination.”

 

On the effective date of the Domestication, our then issued and outstanding Class A ordinary shares and Class B ordinary shares automatically converted by operation of law, on a one-for-one basis, into shares of our Class A common stock (“Class A common stock”) and Class B common stock (“Class B common stock”), respectively, and our outstanding Warrants automatically became warrants to acquire the corresponding number of shares of Class A common stock. On the closing date of the Business Combination (the “Closing Date”), each of our then currently issued and outstanding shares of Class B common stock automatically converted, on a one-for-one basis, into shares of Class A common stock, in accordance with the terms of our Delaware certificate of incorporation (the “Interim Domestication Charter”). Immediately thereafter, each of our issued and outstanding shares of Class A common stock automatically converted by operation of law, on a one-for-one basis, into shares of Target Hospitality Corp.’s Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per share (the “Common Stock”). Similarly, all of our outstanding Warrants to acquire shares of Class A common stock became warrants to acquire the corresponding number of shares of Common Stock and no other changes were made to the terms of any outstanding Warrants.

 

Upon completion of the Business Combination, the Nasdaq trading symbols of our Common Stock and our Warrants were changed to “TH” and “THWWW,” respectively.

Business Model

 

Our DDBOOM model allows our customers to focus their efforts and resources on their core businesses. This makes us an integral part of the planning and execution phases for all customers.

We provide a safe, comfortable, and healthy environment to our guests, employees and workers across the U.S. and anywhere our customers need our facilities and services. Under our “Target 12” service model, we provide benefits to our customers, delivering high quality food, rest, connection, wellness, community, and hospitality, which optimizes our customers’ workforce engagement, performance, safety, loyalty, and productivity during work hours.

This facility and service model is provided directly by our employees, who deliver the essential services 24 hours per day for 365 days a year. We provide all of the hospitality services at our sites, and as a result, we believe we deliver more consistent and high-quality hospitality services at each community compared to our peers. Our company and employees are driven by our primary objective of helping our customers’ workforce reach their full potential every day. Our professionally trained hospitality staff has the unique opportunity to live with our customers as most of our employees live on location at the communities where our customers’ workforce reside. This allows our employees to develop powerful customer empathy, so we are better able to deliver consistent service quality and care through the Target 12 platform each day. Our employees are focused on “the other 12 hours”—the time our customers and their employees are not working—making sure we deliver a well fed, well rested, happier, loyal, safer and more productive employee every day. What we provide our customers’ workforce “off the clock” optimizes their performance when they are “on the clock.” The investment our customers make in their employees “the other 12 hours” is an essential part of their strategy and overall business and operations execution plan.

Using our expansive community network, DDBOOM and Target 12 models, we provide specialty rental and hospitality services that span the lifecycle of our oil and gas customers’ projects. Our services cover the entire value chain of oil and gas projects, from the initial stages of exploration, resource delineation and drilling to the long-term production,

5

 

 

pipeline transportation and final processing. Customers typically require accommodations and hospitality services at the onset of their projects as they assess the resource potential and determine how they will develop the resource. Our temporary accommodation assets are well-suited to support this exploratory stage where customers begin to execute their development and construction plans. As the resource development begins, we can serve customers’ needs with our specialty rental accommodation assets, and we are able to scale our facility size to meet customers’ growing needs. By providing infrastructure early in the project lifecycle, we are well-positioned to continue serving our customers throughout the full cycle of their projects, which can typically last for several decades.

Our integrated model provides value to our customers by reducing project timing and counterparty risks associated with projects. More broadly, our accommodations networks, combined with our integrated value-added hospitality and facilities services creates value for our customers by optimizing our customers’ engagement, performance, safety, loyalty, productivity, preparedness and profitability.

Summary of Value Added Services

We take great pride in the premium customer experience we offer across our range of community and hospitality services offerings. All of Target’s communities include in-house culinary and hospitality services. Our well-trained culinary and catering professionals serve more than 13,000,000 meals each year with fresh ingredients and many of our meals are made from scratch. We self-manage most culinary and hospitality services, which provides us with greater control over service quality as well as incremental revenue and profit potential. Our communities are designed to promote rest and quality of life for our customers’ workforces and include amenities such as:

Summary of Amenities:

 

 

 

 

 

● New Innovative Modular Design

 

● Media Lounges and WIFI Throughout

 

 

● Single Occupancy Design

 

● Individual Xbox/PSII Pods

 

 

● Swimming Pool, Volleyball, Basketball

 

● Flat-Screen TVs in Each Room

 

 

● Commercial Kitchen

 

● 40+ Premium TV Channel Line-up

 

 

● Fast Food Lounges

 

● Personal Laundry Service

 

 

● Full & Self Service Dining Areas

 

● Individually Controlled HVAC System

 

 

● TV Sport/Entertainment Lounges

 

● Hotel Access Unity Lock Systems

 

 

● Training/conference Rooms

 

● 24 Hour No-Limit Dining

 

 

● Core Passive Recreation Areas

 

● Free DVD Rentals

 

 

● Active Fitness Centers

 

● Self Dispensing Free Laundry

 

 

● Lodge Recreation Areas

 

● Commercial Laundry

 

 

● Locker/Storage/Boot-up Areas

 

● Transportation to Project Site

 

 

● Parking Areas

 

● 24 Hour Gated Security

 

 

● Waste Water Treatment Facility

 

● Daily Cleaning & Custodial Service

 

 

● On-site Commissary

 

● Professional Uniformed Staff

 

 

 

Our hospitality services and programming are designed to promote safety, security and rest, which in turn promote greater on-the-job productivity for our customers’ workforces. All of our communities strictly adhere to our community code of conduct, which prohibits alcohol, drugs, firearms, co-habitation and guests. We work closely with our customers to ensure that our communities are an extension of the safe environment and culture they aim to provide to their employees while they are on a project location. Our customer code of conduct is adopted by each corporate customer and enforced in conjunction with our customers through their documented health, safety and environmental policies, standards and customer management. We recognize that safety and security extends beyond the customers’ jobsite hours and is a 24-hour responsibility which requires 24-hour services by Target Hospitality and close collaboration with our customer partners.

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History and Development

 

Target Hospitality’s legacy businesses of Signor and Target have grown and developed since they were created. The chart below sets out certain key milestones for each business.

 

 

 

1978-2000

 

2010-Present

● 1978: Target Logistics was founded

 

● 2011: Target expanded capacity in Williston, Stanley and Tioga with long-term customers Halliburton, Hess, ONEOK, Schlumberger, Superior Well Service, Key Energy Services and others

● 1990: Signor Farm and Ranch Real Estate was founded

 

● 2011: Signor Lodge opened in Midland, TX (84 rooms)

●  Target awarded contracts for logistics services for Olympics in 1984 (Sarajevo), 1992 (Barcelona), 1996 (Atlanta), 2000 (Sydney), 2002 (Salt Lake City), 2004 (Athens), 2006 (Turin) and 2010 (Vancouver)

 

● 2011: Signor Barnhart Lodge opened in Barnhart, TX (160 beds)

● The Vancouver project consisted of a 1,600 bed facility, a portion of which was subsequently transferred to North Dakota and remains in use today

 

●  2012: Target developed additional North Dakota facilities in Dunn County (Q1), Judson Lodge(Q3), Williams County (Q3) and Watford City (Q4)

● 2005: Target operated 1,100-bed cruise ship anchored in the Gulf of Mexico to support relief efforts during aftermath of Hurricane Katrina

 

● 2012: Target expanded service into Texas with the opening of Pecos Lodge (90 beds) (Permian basin) in Q4

● In addition, built and managed 700-person modular camp in New Orleans with running water, electricity and on-site kitchen services

 

● 2013: Target awarded TCPL Keystone KXL pipeline project to house and feed over 6,000 workers

● 2007: Target hired by Freeport-McMoRan to build and operate 425-bed facility in Morenci, AZ in support of copper mining operations (re-opening 10/2012)

 

● 2014: Target awarded lodge contract for new 200-bed community in the Permian

●  2008: Target provided catering/food services for 600 personnel in support of relief operations in aftermath of Hurricane Ike

 

● 2014: Target awarded contract and built 2,400-bed STRFC for U.S. federal government

● 2009: Target provided housing and logistics services for 1,500 workers during a refurbishment of a refinery in St. Croix

 

● 2015: Opened new community in Mentone, TX (Permian basin) in Q4 for Anadarko Petroleum Company

● 2009: Signor Lodging was formed

 

● 2016: Signor expanded Midland Lodge several phased expansions 1,000 beds

●  2010: Target opened Williston Lodge, Muddy River, Tioga and Stanley Cabins in western North Dakota

 

● 2016: Signor Kermit Lodge opens with 84 rooms

 

 

● 2017: Signor opened Oria Lodge with 208 rooms

 

 

●  2017: Target expanded Permian network with the expansion of both Wolf Lodge and Pecos Lodge (Permian basin) in Q2

 

 

● 2017: Target expanded presence in New Mexico (Permian basin) and West Texas with the acquisition of 1,000-room Iron Horse Ranch
in Q3

 

 

● 2017: Signor opened El Reno Lodge with 345 rooms

 

 

● 2017: Target expanded Permian presence with 280-room Blackgold Lodge in Q3

 

 

● 2018: Target Logistics rebranded as Target Lodging in March 2018

 

 

● 2018: Target opened new 600-room community in Mentone-Permian basin

 

 

● 2018: Target added approximately 1,600 rooms across Permian basin network

 

 

● 2018: Target expanded community network in Permian and Anadarko basins through acquisition of Signor, adding 7 locations and approximately 4,500 beds to the network

 

 

● 2019: Target announced new 400-bed community in the Permian basin

 

 

● 2019: Target expanded its community network in the Permian Basin through the acquisitions of Superior and ProPetro, adding 4 locations and approximately 758 beds to the network.

 

 

● 2019: El Capitan 200 beds

 

 

● 2019: El Capitan expansion 100 beds

 

 

● 2019: Seven Rivers expansion 200 beds

 

Industry Overview

We are one of the few vertically integrated specialty rental and hospitality services providers that service the entire value chain from site identification to long-term community development and facilities management. Our industry divides specialty rental accommodations into three primary types: communities, temporary worker lodges and mobile

7

 

 

assets. We are principally focused on communities across several end markets, including oil and gas, energy infrastructure and U.S. government.

Communities typically contain a larger number of rooms and require more time and capital to develop. These facilities typically have commercial kitchens, dining areas, conference rooms, medical and dental services, recreational facilities, media lounges and landscaped grounds where climate permits. A substantial portion of our communities are built and underpinned by multi-year committed contracts which often include exclusivity provisions. These facilities are designed to serve the long-term needs of customers regardless of the end markets they serve. All of our communities provide fully-integrated and value-added hospitality services, including but not limited to: catering and food services, housekeeping, health and recreation facilities, laundry services and overall workforce community management, as well as water and wastewater treatment, power generation, communications and personnel logistics where required. In contrast, temporary lodges are usually smaller in number of rooms and generally do not include hospitality, catering, facilities services or other value-added on-site services and typically serve customers on a spot or short-term basis without long-term committed contracts. These temporary facilities are “open” for any customer who needs lodging services. Finally, mobile assets, or rig housing, are designed to follow customers’ activities and are generally used for drilling rig operators. They are often used to support conventional drilling crews and are contracted on a project-by-project, well-by-well or short-term basis.

Our specialty rental modular assets and hospitality services deliver the essential services and accommodations when and where there is a lack of sufficient accessible or cost-effective housing, infrastructure or local labor. Many of the geographic areas near the southern U.S. border lack sufficient temporary housing and infrastructure for asylum-seeking immigrants or may require additional infrastructure in the future. In the U.S. oil and gas sector, many of the largest unconventional and hydrocarbon reservoirs are in remote and expansive geographic locations, like the Permian and Bakken where limited infrastructure exists. Our industry supports the development of these natural resources by providing lodging, catering and food services, housekeeping, recreation facilities, laundry services and facilities management, as well as water and wastewater treatment, power generation, communications and personnel logistics where required. Our communities and integrated hospitality services allow our customers to outsource their accommodations needs to a single provider, optimizing employee morale, productivity, safety, and loyalty while focusing their investment on their core businesses and long term planning.

With our focus on large-scale community networks, large-scale stand-alone communities and hospitality services, our business model is a balanced combination of specialty rental assets and facilities services and is most similar to specialty rental companies like William Scotsman and Mobile Mini, and facilities services companies such as Aramark, Sodexo or Compass Group, and developers of lodging properties who are also owners or operators, such as Hyatt Hotels Corporation or Marriott International, Inc.

The U.S. specialty rental accommodations industry is segmented into competitors that serve components of the overall value chain, with very few integrated providers.

The family residential center we own, operate, or manage, as well as those facilities we own but are managed by other operators, are subject to competition for residents from other private operators. We compete primarily on siting, cost, the quality and range of services offered, our experience in the design, construction, and management of facilities, and our reputation. We compete with government agencies that are responsible for correctional, detention and residential facilities. Government sector demand for facilities is affected by a number of factors, including the demand for beds, general economic conditions and the size of the immigration-seeking population.

In the U.S. oil and gas sector, Target Hospitality represents 42.7% of the overall rental accommodations market, of which, the total integrated market is approximately 70%.  There are only three other integrated accommodations and facilities services providers and they make up approximately 28% of the total U.S. integrated rental accommodations market, while private companies primarily provide lodging only or offer optional catering services through a third-party

8

 

 

catering company and also make up approximately 10% of the market. Two public manufacturing and/or leasing firms also participate in the U.S. market. Those companies primarily own and lease the units to customers, facility service companies or integrated providers. Facility service companies, manage third-party facilities, but do not invest in, or own, the accommodations assets.

Demand for accommodations and related services within our oil and gas end market is influenced by four primary factors: (i) available infrastructure, (ii) competition, (iii) workforce requirements, and (iv) capital spending.  Anticipated capital spending, and our customers’ expectations for future capital spending as well as larger infrastructure requirements, influence customers’ development on current productive assets, maintenance on current assets, expansion of existing assets and development of greenfield, brownfield or new assets. In addition to capital requirements, different types of customer activity require varying workforce sizes, influencing the demand for accommodations. Also, competing locations and services influence demand for our assets and services.

Demand within our government end market is primarily influenced by immigration, including the ongoing need to accommodate asylum seekers as well as federal governmental policy and budgets. Continued increases in asylum seeking activity may influence government spending on infrastructure in immigration-impacted regions and consequentially demand for accommodations and related services.

Another factor that influences demand for our rooms and services is the type of customer we are supporting. Generally, oil producer customers require larger workforces during construction and expansionary periods and therefore have a higher demand for accommodations. Due to the contiguous nature of their land positions, a “hub and spoke” model is utilized for producers. Oilfield service companies also require larger and more mobile workforces which, in many cases, consist of employees sourced from outside of the work areas. These employees, described as rotational workers, permanently reside in another region or state and commute to the Permian or Bakken on a rotational basis (often, two weeks on and one week off). Rotational workers are also sometimes described as a fly-in-fly-out (“FIFO”) or drive-in-drive-out (“DIDO”) commuter work force.

In addition, proximity to customer activities influences occupancy and demand. We have built, own and operate the two largest specialty rental and hospitality services networks available to oil and gas customers operating in the Permian and Bakken. These networks allow our customers to utilize one provider across a large and expansive geographic area. Our broad network often results in us having communities that are the closest to our customers’ job sites, which reduces commute times and costs, and improves the overall safety of our customers’ workforce.

Generally, if a community is within a one hour drive of a customer’s work location, our contractual exclusivity provisions with our customers require the customers to have their crews lodge at one of our communities. Our communities provide customers with cost efficiencies, as they are able to jointly use our communities and related infrastructure (power, water, sewer and IT) services alongside other customers operating in the same vicinity.

Demand for our services is dependent upon activity levels, particularly our customers’ capital spending on exploration for, development, production and transportation of oil and natural gas and government immigration housing programs. Our customers’ spending plans generally are based on their view of commodity supply and demand dynamics, as well as the outlook for near-term and long-term commodity prices and annual government appropriations. Our current oil and gas footprint is strategically concentrated in the Permian, the largest basin in the world with approximately 140 billion barrels of oil equivalent (“bboe”) of recoverable oil while producing approximately 4.5 million barrels of oil equivalent (“mboe”) per day. The Permian stretches across the southeast corner of New Mexico and through a large swath of land in western Texas, encompassing hundreds of thousands of square miles and dozens of counties.

The Permian has experienced elevated drilling activity as the result of improved technologies that have driven down the cost of production. Additionally, the Permian is the lowest cost basin within the U.S., with a breakeven price below $40/bbl and multi-year drilling inventory economic at sub-$35 per barrel WTI prices in many areas, allowing operators

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focused in the Permian to continue drilling economic wells even at low commodity price levels. Technological improvements in recent years and the extensive oil and gas reserves support sustained activity in the Permian for the foreseeable future.

Business Strengths & Strategies

Strengths

 

·

Market Leader in Strategically Located Geographies. We are the nation’s largest provider of turnkey specialty rental units with premium catering and hospitality services including 25 strategically located communities with approximately 13,800 beds primarily in the highest demand regions of the Permian and Bakken. Utilizing our large network of communities with the most bed capacity, particularly within the Permian and Bakken, we believe we are the only provider with the scale and regional density to serve all of our customers’ needs in these key basins. Additionally, our network and relocatable facility assets allow us to transfer the rental fleet to locations that meet our customer service needs. We leverage our scale and experience to deliver a comprehensive service offering of vertically integrated accommodations and hospitality services. Our complete end-to-end accommodations solution, including our premium amenities and experience, provides our customers with a compelling economic value proposition.

Picture 4

 

 

 

 

 

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·

Long-Standing Relationships with Diversified Large Integrated Customers. We have long standing relationships with our diversified base of approximately 300 customers, which includes some of the largest blue-chip, investment grade oil and gas and integrated energy infrastructure companies in the U.S. We serve the full energy value chain, with customers spanning across the upstream, midstream, downstream and service sectors. We believe we have also established strong relationships in our U.S. government end market with our contract partner and the federal agency we serve. We initially won our large government contract in 2014 based upon our differentiated ability to develop and open the large facility on an accelerated timeline. This contract was renewed and extended in 2016, demonstrating our successful execution and customer satisfaction. The relationships we have established over the past decade have been built on trust and credibility given our track record of performance and delivering value to our customers by providing a broad range of hospitality service offerings within a community atmosphere. Target’s customers’ desire and willingness to enter into multi- year committed contracts, and to renew them at a historical rate of approximately 90%, demonstrates the strength of these long-standing relationships.

 

·

Multi-year Contracts and Exclusivity Produce Highly Visible, Recurring Revenue.  The vast majority of our revenues are generated under multi-year contracts. Of those long-term contracts, 82% are committed and 63% represent contracts to which our revenue generation is guaranteed regardless of occupancy levels.  Further, 46% (by revenue) of our total committed contracts contain exclusivity provisions under which our customers agree to exclusively use our communities for all of their needs within the geographies we serve.  Of our contracts that are not committed, approximately 80% have exclusivity.  The weighted average term of our contracts is approximately 39 months and Target has maintained a client renewal rate of at least 90% over the last 5 years.  Our committed customers secure minimum capacity commitments with us to ensure that sufficient accommodations and hospitality services are in place to properly care for their large workforces.  Our multi-year committed customer agreements provide us with contracted recurring revenue and high visibility to future financial performance.

 

·

Proven Performance and Resiliency Through the Cycle.  Our business model is well insulated from economic and commodity cycles, as evidenced by our ability to increase revenue and EBITDA despite a significant and prolonged decline in oil and related commodity prices in recent years. For example, in the fourth quarter of 2019, we secured contract renewals and extensions with four large oil and gas customers who represent approximately 20% of Target Hospitality’s 2019 revenue attributable to the energy end market, despite a greater than 25% decline in the U.S. oil rig count during the period. Our multi-year, committed, exclusive contracts with large integrated customers support stable performance through commodity and economic cycles. Further, we are able to efficiently optimize our modular assets and redeploy them, as warranted by customer demand. Our prior planning and strategic focus on the Permian Basin further supports consistent performance as the region’s oil production continues to grow. The Permian Basin is one of the largest basins in the world with high levels of sustained production expected to continue, further supported by the structural decline in breakeven prices in the region.

 

·

Long-lived Assets Requiring Minimal Maintenance Capital Expenditures. Our long-lived specialty rental assets support robust cash flow generation. Our rental assets have an average life in excess of 20 years, and we typically recover our initial investment within the first few years of initial capital deployment. We estimate our maintenance capital to be approximately 1% of annual revenue and maintain low maintenance capital expenditures, as cleaning and routine maintenance costs are included in day-to-day operating costs and recovered through the average daily rates that we charge our customers. This continual care of our assets supports extended asset lives and the ongoing ability to operate with only nominal maintenance capital expenditures. The investment profile of our rental assets underpins our industry leading unit economics. Our contract discipline underpins our investment decision making and spending on any new growth investments. Generally, we do not invest capital

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unless we expect to meet our internal returns thresholds. Due to the high revenue visibility from long-term contracts, we are poised to generate robust and stable cash flows driven by historical strategic growth investments and minimal future maintenance capital expenditure requirements.

 

Strategies

We believe that we can further develop our business by, among other things:

·

Maintaining and Expanding Existing Customer Relationships.  Growing and maintaining key customer relationships is a strategic priority. We fill existing bed capacity within our communities, while optimizing our inventory for existing customer expansion or for new customers. Keeping this balance provides us with flexibility and a competitive advantage when pursuing new contract opportunities. We optimize our capacity, inventory and customers’ usage through data analytics, customer collaboration and forecasting demand. With the scale of our accommodations network, a significant number of our key customers are commercially exclusive to Target Hospitality as their primary and preferred provider of accommodations and hospitality services throughout the U.S. or for a designated geographic area.

 

·

Enhancing Contract Scope and Services.  One of our strategic focus areas is to enhance the scope and terms of our customer contracts. We intend to continue our historical track record of renewing and extending these contracts at favorable commercial and economic terms, while also providing additional value added services to our customers. For example, following the Signor acquisition we added our vertically integrated suite of services, including catering, to the many legacy Signor contracts that included only accommodations. Replacing legacy third party providers allows us greater control over service quality and delivery and offers substantial incremental revenue potential. Additionally, we believe we have capacity to increase revenue within our existing communities without new growth capital expenditures through increased utilization rates or modest price increases over time.

 

·

Disciplined Growth Capital Expenditures to Increase Capacity. We selectively pursue opportunities to expand existing communities and develop new communities to satisfy customer demand. We employ rigorous discipline to our capital expenditures to grow our business. Our investment strategy is to only deploy new capital with visibility—typically a contract—to revenue and returns to meet our internal return hurdles. We target payback on initial investment within a few years. Due to the lower cost per bed, returns on investment are higher for the expansion of existing facilities.

 

·

Growing and Pursuing New Customer/Contract Opportunities. We continually seek additional opportunities to lease our facilities to government, energy and natural resources, manufacturing, and other third-party owners or operators in need of specialty rental and hospitality services. We have a proven track record of success in executing our specialty rental and facilities management model across several end markets for ongoing needs as well as major projects that have finite project life cycle durations. While special projects do not constitute a large portion of our business, it is typical for us to secure some special projects that can last anywhere from 1-5 years (or more). We have designated sales-related resources that focus on special finite life cycle projects and maintain a dynamic business pipeline which includes but is not limited to special projects across end markets.

 

·

Expansion Through Acquisitions and diversify our service offerings. We selectively pursue acquisitions and business combinations related to specialty rental and hospitality services in the markets we currently serve as well as adjacent markets that offer existing complimentary services to ours. Leveraging our core competencies related to facilities management, culinary services, catering and site services, we can further scale this segment of our business and replicate it in other geographies and end markets. We continue to assess targeted acquisitions and business combinations that would be accretive to us while also expanding our end markets.

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Sales and Marketing

Target has a tenured in-house sales and marketing team that is responsible for acquiring new customers and managing the relationships of our existing customers across the U.S. Our sales approach is based on a consultative empathy based value creation model. Our professionally trained sales organization is relentlessly focused on providing solutions to our customers’ challenges which has resulted in higher customer satisfaction and loyalty.

Business Operations

Target Hospitality provides specialty rental and hospitality services, temporary specialty rental and hospitality services solutions and facilities management services across the U.S. The company’s primary customers are investment grade oil, gas and energy companies, other workforce accommodation providers operating in the Permian and Bakken regions, and government contractors. The company’s specialty rental and hospitality services and management services are highly customizable and are tailored to each customer’s needs and requirements. Target Hospitality is also an approved general services administration (“GSA”) contract holder and offers a comprehensive range of housing, deployment, operations and management services through its GSA professional services schedule agreement. The GSA contract allows U.S. federal agencies to acquire our products and services directly from Target Hospitality which expedites the commercial procurement process often required by government agencies.

Target Hospitality operates its business in three key end markets: (i) government (“Government”), which includes the facilities, services and operations of its family residential center and the related support communities in Dilley, Texas (the “South Texas Family Residential Center”) provided under its lease and services agreement with CoreCivic; (ii) the Permian basin (the “Permian Basin”), which includes the facilities and operations in the Permian region and the 19 communities located across Texas, New Mexico and (iii) the Bakken basin (the “Bakken Basin”), which includes facilities and operations in the Bakken basin region and four communities in North Dakota

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The map below shows the company’s primary community locations in the Permian Basin and the Bakken Basin (including the Company’s one location in the Anadarko).

A picture containing text, map

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The table below presents the Company’s lodges in the oil and gas end market.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Location

    

Lodge Name

    

Location

    

Status

    

Number of Beds

Bakken

 

Williams County Lodge

 

Williston, North Dakota

 

Own/Operate

 

300

Bakken

 

Judson Executive Lodge

 

Williston, North Dakota

 

Own/Operate

 

100

Bakken

 

Stanley Hotel

 

Stanley, North Dakota

 

Own/Operate

 

345

Bakken

 

Watford City Lodge

 

Watford City, North Dakota

 

Own/Operate

 

334

Permian

 

Dilley (STFRC)

 

Dilley, Texas

 

Own/Operate

 

2,556

Permian

 

Pecos North Lodge

 

Pecos, Texas

 

Own/Operate

 

982

Permian

 

Pecos South Lodge

 

Pecos, Texas

 

Own/Operate

 

786

Permian

 

Mentone Wolf Camp

 

Mentone, Texas

 

Own/Operate

 

530

Permian

 

Skillman Station Lodge

 

Mentone, Texas

 

Own/Operate

 

706

Permian

 

Orla North Lodge

 

Orla, Texas

 

Own/Operate

 

170

Permian

 

Orla South Lodge

 

Orla, Texas

 

Own/Operate

 

240

Permian

 

Delaware Orla Lodge

 

Orla, Texas

 

Own/Operate

 

465

Permian

 

El Capitan Lodge

 

Orla, Texas

 

Own/Operate

 

429

Permian

 

Odessa West Lodge

 

Odessa, Texas

 

Own/Operate

 

805

Permian

 

Odessa East Lodge

 

Odessa, Texas

 

Own/Operate

 

280

Permian

 

Odessa FTSI Lodge

 

Odessa, Texas

 

Own/Operate

 

217

Permian

 

Midland Lodge

 

Midland, Texas

 

Own/Operate

 

1,567

Permian

 

Midland East Lodge

 

Midland, Texas

 

Own/Operate

 

168

Permian

 

Kermit Lodge

 

Kermit, Texas

 

Own/Operate

 

232

Permian

 

Kermit North Lodge

 

Kermit, Texas

 

Own/Operate

 

180

Permian

 

Barnhart Lodge

 

Barnhart, Texas

 

Own/Operate

 

192

Permian

 

Carlsbad Lodge

 

Carlsbad, New Mexico

 

Own/Operate

 

606

Permian

 

Carlsbad Seven Rivers Lodge

 

Carlsbad, New Mexico

 

Own/Operate

 

640

Permian

 

Jal Lodge

 

Jal, New Mexico

 

Own/Operate

 

626

Anadarko

 

El Reno Lodge

 

El Reno, Oklahoma

 

Own/Operate

 

345

Total Number of Beds

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13,801

 

Government

Historically, the Government segment has included, but is not limited to, two primary end markets which make up approximately 20.9% of our revenue for the year ended December 31, 2019:

·

Residential Facilities. Residential facilities, including the South Texas Family Residential Center (discussed below), provide space and residential services in an open and safe environment to adult females with children who are seeking asylum and are awaiting the outcome of immigration hearings or the return to their countries of origin. Residential facilities offer services including, but not limited to, educational programs, medical care, recreational activities, counseling, and access to religious and legal services.

 

·

Community Corrections. Community corrections/residential reentry facilities offer housing and programs to offenders who are serving the last portion of their sentence or who have been assigned to the facility in lieu of a jail or prison sentence, with a key focus on employment, job readiness, and life skills.

 

Target Hospitality built and currently leases and operates the South Texas Family Residential Center through a sub-lease and services agreement with CoreCivic, a government solutions company which provides correctional and detention management services. Target Hospitality owns and operates the facility by providing on-site services including catering, culinary, management, janitorial and light maintenance. The South Texas Family Residential Center includes 524,000 square feet of building space including residential housing units with 2,400 beds, as well as classrooms, a library, chapels, an infirmary with full medical, dental, pharmaceutical and x-ray capabilities, a dining hall, offices and an industrial laundry center.

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We look forward to expanding the products and services of our Government segment through our GSA designations, specifically our designation to maintain the professional services schedule (“PSS”) for logistics service solutions, which are designed to assist federal agencies in procuring comprehensive logistics solutions, including planning, consulting, management, and operational support when deploying supplies, equipment, materials and associated personnel. GSA’s PSS is a multiple award schedule (“MAS”) contract for innovative solutions, offered to federal, state and local governments, for their professional service’s needs. Having a PSS signifies that we have been vetted as a responsible supplier, our pricing has been determined to be fair and reasonable and we are in compliance with all applicable laws and regulations. PSS is one of the GSA’s schedule contracts, which are indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity (“IDIQ”), long-term contracts under the GSA MAS program. GSA schedule contracts were developed to assist federal employees in purchasing products and services and they contain pre-negotiated prices, delivery terms, warranties, and other terms and conditions which streamline the buying process.

The Government segment generated 20.9% or $67.0 million of the company’s revenue for the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

Permian Basin

The Permian Basin is one of the oldest producing basins in the world, with production dating back to the early 1900s. It stretches across the southeast corner of New Mexico and a large swath of western Texas, encompassing hundreds of thousands of square miles and dozens of counties. The growth story comes from both unconventional and conventional drilling techniques into stacked reservoirs including the Wolfcamp, Bone Springs, Trend Area (Spraberry area) and Spraberry reservoirs. The basin consists of multiple sub-basins; the most targeted are the Delaware and Midlands Basins. Until the oil price decline in 2014, over 200 vertical rigs (most of all vertical rigs in the U.S.) were operating in the Permian using traditional drilling methods to vertically target and frac into multiple stacked pay zones, primarily in the Midland Basin’s Trend Area and Spraberry reservoirs. Horizontal production from the Delaware basin began in earnest in 2014, primarily in New Mexico. Horizontal drilling in the Texas portion of the Permian Basin followed shortly thereafter with horizontal drilling in the Spraberry and Trend Area reservoirs, which were traditionally vertical targets.

The Permian Basin market is the most prolific shale basin in the U.S. with an estimated 140 billion barrels of oil equivalent (bboe) of recoverable oil while producing approximately 4.5 one million barrels of oil equivalent (mboe) per day. This century-old oil basin has attracted investment from large and small companies for many decades. However, it took years of vertical drilling and multi-stage fracking of vertical wells (and simultaneous development of horizontal drilling and fracking outside of the Permian Basin) to learn enough about the stacked pay potential in order to drill it horizontally. The high proportion of vertical wells before 2014 evidences the recent realization of the Permian Basin’s potential—due in large part to its scale and geologic complexity.

While understanding the significant potential in the Permian Basin, Target entered the market in 2012, ahead of many of our competitors. We started in the Permian Basin with an 80-bed community in Pecos, TX.

As of December 31, 2019, Target Hospitality has two locations and over 1,700 beds in the Pecos area of the Permian Basin alone, which is located in the Delaware basin area. With 19 communities and approximately 9,821 beds across the Permian Basin, we offer the largest network of turnkey specialty rental accommodations and hospitality services in the basin, with the next largest provider having 5,000 beds or less and only six locations.

The Permian Basin segment generated 66.8% or $214.5 million of the company’s revenue for the year ended December 31, 2019. The map below shows the company’s primary community locations in the Permian Basin (including the Company’s one location in the Anadarko).

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Picture 7

Bakken Basin

The Bakken Basin was the first of the unconventional oil regions to develop in the U.S. The Bakken Basin is one of the most prolific U.S. shale oil production formations to date. The basin spans territory in North Dakota, eastern Montana, and a small portion of northern South Dakota (in addition to portions in Saskatchewan and Manitoba in Canada). It is home to the Bakken Basin and Three Forks reservoirs and is often referred to simply as the Bakken Basin formation. North Dakota is home to most of the Bakken Basin production and has been the strongest growth area for many U.S. independent oil companies.

It was an older, conventional oil play that had endured several cycles, but had never really taken off in earnest. It followed on the tails of the shale gas boom and the advent of unconventional technology, particularly horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Experimental horizontal drilling, without fracking, was being done in the Bakken Basin in the 1990s.

The Bakken Basin drew attention and capital investment because operators were looking to find shale oil the same way they found shale gas, cracking open tight rocks and extracting oil.

The geology in the Bakken Basin was well known to geologists and was known for its vast reserves. It is a promising, clean and relatively simple geology in its structure. It is a large continuous oil accumulation with a simple Oreo cookie-like structure, with a layer of shale, sandstone, and then another layer of shale.

In 2009, Target entered the Bakken Basin market and built its first community in Williston, North Dakota for a large oilfield services company. The community was the first of its kind in the region and provided specialty rental and hospitality services for more than 150 remote rotational workers. As of December 31, 2019, Target Hospitality had four community locations and 1,079 rentable rooms serving the Bakken Basin. We are the largest specialty rental and

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hospitality services provider in the region with approximately 50% of the market share with the next closest direct competitor having less than 15% of the market share.

The Bakken Basin segment generated 6.4% or $20.6 million of the company’s revenue for the year ended December 31, 2019. The map below shows the company’s primary community locations in the Bakken Basin.

A close up of a map

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Other

In addition to the three segments above, the company: (i) has facilities and operations for one community in the Anadarko Basin of Oklahoma; (ii) provides catering and other services to communities and other workforce accommodation facilities for the oil, gas and mining industries not owned by Target Hospitality (“Facilities Management”); and (iii) provides ongoing preparatory work and plans for facilities and services to be provided in connection with the TransCanada pipeline project.

The company provides specialty rental and hospitality services including concierge, culinary, catering, maintenance, security, janitorial and related services at facilities owned by other companies. We currently provide Facilities Management, culinary and catering services and site services for two facilities located in the Permian for which we do not own the specialty rental accommodation assets.

Future Pipeline Services Plans

 

We are contracted with TransCanada Pipelines (“TCPL”) to construct, deliver, cater and manage all accommodations and hospitality services in conjunction with the planned construction of the Keystone XL pipeline project. Our contract with TCPL was executed in 2013 and is currently pending full contract release, subject to TCPL’s final investment decision and formal notice to proceed. Our contract with TCPL is terminable at will by TCPL with ten days prior written notice and, in the event of such termination we are entitled to certain cancellation and termination fees for work performed prior to cancellation. In October 2018, we received partial release for certain pre-work related to the project and have commenced a limited scope of work based on work orders issued by TCPL.

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The project is still pending a final investment decision by TCPL and, as a result, we cannot be certain that this project will commence in full on the expected timeline or at all.

This project continues to face legal challenges from various opposition groups.  As a result, any adverse ruling or injunction from any current or future legal proceeding could adversely affect the timing and scope of work to be performed by the Company for TCPL in support of the Keystone XL project.

Segment information for December 31, 2018 and 2017

 

For additional information on our segments, including Government, Permian, Bakken, and Other, related to December 31, 2018 and 2017, refer to Note 25 of our audited consolidated financial statements located in Part II, Item 8 within this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Customers and Competitors

Target Hospitality’s principal customers include investment grade oil and gas companies, energy infrastructure companies, and U.S. government and government contractors. For the year ended December 31, 2019, our largest customers were CoreCivic of Tennessee LLC and Halliburton, who accounted for approximately 20.8% and 12.5% of our revenues, respectively.    

 

For the year ended December 31, 2019, our top five customers accounted for approximately 52% of our revenue.

For the year ended December 31, 2018, our largest customer was CoreCivic of Tennessee LLC, who accounted for approximately 27.7% of our revenues.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2017, our largest customers were CoreCivic of Tennessee LLC and Anadarko Petroleum Corporation who accounted for 50.5% and 11.8% of revenues, respectively.

 

Our primary competitors in the U.S. for our oil and gas segments are Cotton Logistics, Permian Lodging, Aries, and Civeo for temporary accommodations in the U.S. shale basins. For hospitality services and facilities management, our three primary competitors are: Sodexo, Aramark and Compass.

Our primary competitors in the Government segment are The GEO group and Management and Training Corporation (“MTC”).

The Company’s Community and Services Contracts

For the year ended December 31, 2019, revenue related to the Permian and Bakken regions represented 66.8% and 6.4% of our revenue, respectively, revenue related to our Government segment represented 20.9% of our revenue, and all other revenue represented less than 6% of our revenue.

Lease and Services Agreements

 

The company’s operations in the Permian and Bakken regions are primarily conducted through committed contractual arrangements with its customers. For certain of the company’s largest customers, it uses network lease and services agreements (“NLSAs”) which cover the customer’s full enterprise and are exclusive agreements with set terms and rates for all geographic regions in which the company operates. The NLSAs obligate the customers to use the company’s facilities and services across the U.S. The company’s NLSAs have an average set term of two to three years.

Certain other customers are subject to lease and services agreements (“LSAs”) which are more limited in geographic scope and cover only specified areas with the same structural commercial terms as the NLSAs. The LSAs have terms that range from six to thirty six months and generally do not have termination provisions in favor of the customer.

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The company also has master services agreements (“MSAs”) with certain customers which are typically exclusive arrangements without the committed component of the NLSAs and LSAs and no minimum contractual liability for the customer.

CoreCivic

The company operates the South Texas Family Residential Center pursuant to a contractual arrangement with CoreCivic (the “CoreCivic Contract”). The CoreCivic Contract provides for the company’s sublease and ongoing operation of the South Texas Family Residential Center through September 2021. This facility, located in Dilley, Texas, is the largest family residential center in the U.S. and was built by the company in 2015. This facility has approximately 524,000 square feet of facilities on an 85-acre site. Target Hospitality leases the facilities to CoreCivic and provides onsite managed services including catering, culinary, facilities management, maintenance, and janitorial services of the common area facilities only.

The CoreCivic Contract depends on the U.S. government and its funding. Any impasse or delay in reaching a federal budget agreement, debt ceiling or government shut downs, and the subsequent lack of funding to the applicable government entity, could result in material payment delays, payment reductions or contract terminations. The government may terminate the contract with CoreCivic for convenience on 90 days’ notice; in the event this should occur, CoreCivic may terminate its agreement with Target upon 60 days’ notice.

Regulatory and  Environmental Compliance

Our business and the businesses of the company’s customers can be affected significantly by federal, state, municipal and local laws and regulations relating to the oil, natural gas and mining industries, food safety and environmental protection. Changes in these laws, including more stringent regulations and increased levels of enforcement of these laws and regulations, and the development of new laws and regulations could impact the company’s business and result in increased compliance or operating costs associated with its or its customers’ operations.

To the extent that these laws and regulations impose more stringent requirements or increased costs or delays upon the company’s customers in the performance of their operations, the resulting demand for the company’s services by those customers may be adversely affected. Moreover, climate change laws or regulations could increase the cost of consuming, and thereby reduce demand for, oil and natural gas, which could reduce the company’s customers’ demand for its services. The company cannot predict changes in the level of enforcement of existing laws and regulations, how these laws and regulations may be interpreted or the effect changes in these laws and regulations may have on the company or its customers or on our future operations or earnings. The company also cannot predict the extent to which new laws and regulations will be adopted or whether such new laws and regulations may impose more stringent or costly restrictions on its customers or its operations.

Employees

As of December 31, 2019, Target Hospitality had approximately 826 employees. None of the Company’s employees are unionized or members of collective bargaining arrangements.

Intellectual Property

Target Hospitality owns a number of trademarks important to the business. Its material trademarks are registered or pending registration in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The business operates primarily under the Target Hospitality brand.

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Properties

Corporate  Headquarters

Target Hospitality’s headquarters are located in The Woodlands, Texas. Its executive, financial, accounting, legal, administrative, management information systems and human resources functions operate from this single, leased office.

For a list of real property owned material to the operations of Target Hospitality, refer to Part I Item 2 within this Form 10-K.

Communities/Owned and Leased Real Estate

Target Hospitality operates 26 communities, of which it owns the underlying real property of 38%, leases the underlying real property of 31%, and both owns and leases the underlying real property of 4%. The remaining 12% are customer sites.

Legal  Proceedings and Insurance

Target Hospitality is involved in various lawsuits, claims and legal proceedings, the majority of which arise out of the ordinary course of business. The nature of the company’s business is such that disputes occasionally arise with vendors including suppliers and subcontractors, and customers over contract specifications and contract interpretations among other things. The Company assesses these matters on a case-by-case basis as they arise. Reserves are established, as required, based on its assessment of exposure. Target Hospitality has insurance policies to cover general liability and workers’ compensation related claims. In the opinion of management, the ultimate amount of liability not covered by insurance, if any, under such pending lawsuits, claims and legal proceedings will not have a material adverse effect on its financial condition or results of operations. See the audited consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto of Target Hospitality Corp. located in Part II, Item 8 within this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information.

Available Information

Our website address is www.targethospitality.com. We make available, free of charge through our website, our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”) as soon as reasonably practicable after such documents are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). The SEC maintains an internet website at www.sec.gov that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding Target Hospitality Corp.

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Item 1A. Risk Factors

 

Operational Risks

 

Our operations are and will be exposed to operational, economic, political and regulatory risks.

 

Our operations could be affected by economic, political and regulatory risks. These risks include:

 

                  multiple regulatory requirements that are subject to change and that could restrict our ability to build and operate our communities and other sites;

 

                  inflation, recession, fluctuations in interest rates;

 

                  compliance with applicable export control laws and economic sanctions laws and regulations;

 

                 trade protection measures, including increased duties and taxes, and import or export licensing requirements;

  

                  ownership regulations;

 

                  compliance with applicable antitrust and other regulatory rules and regulations relating to potential future acquisitions;

 

                  different local product preferences and product requirements;

 

                  pressures on management time and attention due to the complexities of overseeing diverse operations;

 

                  challenges in maintaining, staffing and managing national operations;

 

                  different labor regulations;

 

                  potentially adverse consequences from changes in or interpretations of tax laws;

 

                  political and economic instability;

 

                  enforcement of remedies in various jurisdictions;

 

                  the risk that the business partners upon whom we depend for technical assistance or management and acquisition expertise will not perform as expected;

  

                  differences in business practices that may result in violation of our policies including but not limited to bribery and collusive practices.

 

These and other risks could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

We face significant competition as a provider of specialty rental and hospitality services in the specialty rental sector. If we are unable to compete successfully, we could lose customers and our revenue and profitability could decline.

 

Although our competition varies significantly by market, the specialty rental and hospitality services industry, in general, is highly competitive. We compete on the basis of a number of factors, including equipment availability, quality, price, service, reliability, appearance, functionality and delivery terms. We may experience pricing pressures in our operations in the future as some of our competitors seek to obtain market share by reducing prices. We may also face reduced demand for our products and services if our competitors are able to provide new or innovative products or services that better appeal to our potential customers. In each of our current markets, we face competition from national, regional and local

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companies who have an established market position in the specific service area. We expect to encounter similar competition in any new markets that we may enter. Some of our competitors may have greater market share, less indebtedness, greater pricing flexibility, more attractive product or service offerings, or superior marketing and financial resources. Increased competition could result in lower profit margins, substantial pricing pressure, and reduced market share. Price competition, together with other forms of competition, may materially adversely affect our business, results of operations, and financial condition.

 

We depend on several significant customers. The loss of one or more such customers or the inability of one or more such customers to meet their obligations could adversely affect our results of operations.

 

We depend on several significant customers. The majority of our customers operate in the energy industry. For a more detailed explanation of our customers, see the section of this Annual Report on Form 10-K entitled “Business.” The loss of any one of our largest customers in any of our business segments or a sustained decrease in demand by any of such customers could result in a substantial loss of revenues and could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations. In addition, the concentration of customers in the industries in which we operate may impact our overall exposure to credit risk, either positively or negatively, in that customers may be similarly affected by changes in economic and industry conditions.

 

As a result of our customer concentration, risks of nonpayment and nonperformance by our counterparties are a concern in our business. We are subject to risks of loss resulting from nonpayment or nonperformance by our customers. Many of its customers finance their activities through cash flow from operations, the incurrence of debt, or the issuance of equity. Additionally, many of our customers’ equity values have declined and could decline further. The combination of lower cash flow due to commodity prices, a reduction in borrowing bases under reserve-based credit facilities, and the lack of available debt or equity financing may continue to result in a significant reduction in our customers’ liquidity and could impair their ability to pay or otherwise perform on their obligations. Furthermore, some of our customers may be highly leveraged and subject to their own operating and regulatory risks, which increases the risk that they may default on their obligations to us. The inability or failure of our significant customers to meet their obligations to us or their insolvency or liquidation may adversely affect our financial results.

 

Our business depends on the quality and reputation of the Company and its communities, and any deterioration in such quality or reputation could adversely impact its market share, business, financial condition or results of operations.

 

Many factors can influence our reputation and the value of our communities, including quality of services, food quality and safety, availability and management of scarce natural resources, supply chain management, diversity, human rights and support for local communities. In addition, events that may be beyond our control could affect the reputation of one or more of its communities or more generally impact the reputation of the Company, including protests directed at government immigration policies, violent incidents at one or more communities or other sites or criminal activity. Reputational value is also based on perceptions, and broad access to social media makes it easy for anyone to provide public feedback that can influence perceptions of Target Hospitality and its communities, and it may be difficult to control or effectively manage negative publicity, regardless of whether it is accurate. While reputations may take decades to build, negative incidents can quickly erode trust and confidence, particularly if they result in adverse mainstream and social media publicity, governmental investigations or penalties, or litigation. Negative incidents could lead to tangible adverse effects on our business, including customer boycotts, loss of customers, loss of development opportunities or employee retention and recruiting difficulties. A decline in the reputation or perceived quality of our communities or corporate image could negatively affect its market share, reputation, business, financial condition or results of operations. (See “Risk Factors—Public resistance and potential legal challenges to, and increasing scrutiny of, the use of family residential facilities like our South Texas Residential Center could affect our ability to obtain new contracts or result in the loss of existing contracts and negatively impact our brand or reputation, each of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations)

 

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We derive a substantial portion of our revenue from the operation of the South Texas Family Residential Center for the U.S. government through a subcontract with a government contractor. The loss of, or a significant decrease in revenues from, this customer could seriously harm our financial condition and results of operations.

 

We derive a significant portion of our revenues from our subcontract with a government contractor for the operation of the South Texas Family Residential Center for the U.S. government. These revenues depend on the U.S. government and its contractors receiving sufficient funding and providing it with timely payment under the terms of our contract. If the applicable government entity does not receive sufficient appropriations to cover its contractual obligations, it may delay or reduce payment to its contractors and, as a result, our government contractor customer may delay or reduce payments to or terminate its contract with us. Any future impasse or struggle impacting the federal government’s ability to reach agreement on the federal budget, debt ceiling or any future federal government shut downs could result in material payment delays, payment reductions or contract terminations. Additionally, our current and potential future government contractor customers may request in the future that we reduce our contract rates or forego increases to those rates as a way for those contractors to control costs and help their government customers to control their spending and address their budgetary shortfalls. For additional information regarding our operation of the South Texas Family Residential Center, see “Business—Business Operations—Government Services” elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

The U.S. government and, by extension, our U.S. government contractor customer, may also from time to time adopt, implement or modify certain policies or directives that may adversely affect our business. For example, while the U.S. government is currently using private immigration detention sites like the South Texas Family Residential Center, federal, state or local governmental partners may in the future choose to undertake a review of their utilization of privately operated facilities, or may cancel or decide not to renew existing contracts with their government contractors, who may, in turn, cancel or decide not to renew their contracts with us. Changes in government policy, the election of a new administration or other changes in the political landscape relating to immigration policies may similarly result in a decline in our revenues in the Government Services segment. In addition, lawsuits, to which we are not a party, have challenged the U.S. government’s policy of detaining migrant families, and government policies with respect to family immigration may impact the demand for the South Texas Family Residential Center and any facilities that we may operate in the future. Any court decision or government action that impacts our existing contract for the South Texas Family Residential Center or any future contracts for similar facilities could materially affect our cash flows, financial condition and results of operations. Our current agreement with this government contractor is scheduled to expire on September 22, 2021. We may not be able to renew our agreement with the government contractor or enter new agreements with this contractor. Further, any renewal or new agreement we may enter with this contractor may be on terms that are materially less favorable to us than those in our current agreement.

 

Public resistance and potential legal challenges to, and increasing scrutiny of, the use of family residential facilities like our South Texas Residential Center could affect our ability to obtain new contracts or result in the loss of existing contracts and negatively impact our brand or reputation, each of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. 

   

The management and operation of facilities like our South Texas Residential Center through the government’s use of private contractors and subcontractors has not achieved complete acceptance by either government agencies or the public. Some governmental agencies have limitations on their ability to delegate their traditional management responsibilities for such facilities to private companies or they may be instructed by a governmental agency or authority overseeing them to reduce their utilization or scope of private companies or undertake additional reviews of their public-private relationships. Additional legislative or policy changes or prohibitions could occur that further increase these limitations or instructions. In addition, the movement toward using private companies to manage and operate these facilities has encountered resistance from groups which believe that these facilities should only be operated by governmental agencies. For example, JP Morgan Chase, Wells Fargo and Bank of America recently announced that they will not be renewing existing agreements or entering into new agreements with companies that operate such facilities. Bank of America, N.A. serves as the administrative and collateral agent for our New ABL Facility and is a lender thereunder. Upon expiration of the New ABL Facility, Bank of America or other banks that currently provide us with financing could decide not to provide financing, which could adversely affect our ability to refinance the New ABL Facility on acceptable terms or at all. 

   

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Increased public resistance, including negative media attention and public opinion, to the use of private companies for the management and operation of facilities like our South Texas Residential Center, and to the Trump administration’s immigration policies overall, may negatively impact our brand and the public perception of our company. Maintaining and promoting our brand will depend largely on our ability to differentiate ourselves from the direct participants in the ongoing conflict around immigration policy. If we continue to be portrayed negatively in the press, or associated with the ongoing social and political debates around immigration policy, our public image and reputation could be irreparably tarnished and our brand could be harmed. If we are unable to counter such negative media attention effectively, investors may lose confidence in our business, which could result in a decline in the trading price of our common stock, and our business could be materially adversely affected.

   

Furthermore, providing family residential services at the South Texas Residential Center subjects us and our government contractor customers to unique risks such as unanticipated increased costs and litigation that could materially adversely affect our or their business, financial condition, or results of operations. For example, the contractual arrangements between the U.S. government and the government’s private contractors, with whom we subcontract, mandate resident-to-staff ratios that are higher than the typical contract, require services unique to the contract (e.g. child care and primary education services), and limit the use of security protocols and techniques typically utilized in correctional and detention settings. These operational risks and others associated with privately managing this type of residential facility could result in higher costs associated with staffing and lead to increased litigation. Numerous lawsuits, to which we are not a party, have challenged the government's policy of detaining migrant families, and government policies with respect to family immigration may impact the demand for the South Texas Family Residential Center.  Any court decision or government action that impacts our customer’s existing contract with the government for the South Texas Family Residential Center could impact our subcontract for the facility and result in a reduction in demand for our services or reputational damage to us, and require use to devote a significant amount of time and expense to the defense of our operations and reputation, which could materially affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

Our oil and gas customers are exposed to a number of unique operating risks and challenges which could also adversely affect us.

 

We could be impacted by disruptions to our customers’ operations caused by, among other things, any one of or all of the following singularly or in combination:

 

                  U.S. and international pricing and demand for the natural resources being produced at a given project (or proposed project);

 

                  unexpected problems, higher costs and delays during the development, construction, and project start-up which may delay the commencement of production;

 

                  unforeseen and adverse geological, geotechnical, and seismic conditions;

 

                  lack of availability of sufficient water or power to maintain their operations;

 

                  lack of availability or failure of the required infrastructure necessary to maintain or to expand their operations;

 

                  the breakdown or shortage of equipment and labor necessary to maintain their operations;

 

                  risks associated with the natural resource industry being subject to various regulatory approvals. Such risks may include a government agency failing to grant an approval or failing to renew an existing approval, or the approval or renewal not being provided by the government agency in a timely manner or the government agency granting or renewing an approval subject to materially onerous conditions. For example, the Keystone XL project requires various permits from state and federal authorities that have been delayed as a result of various legal and regulatory challenges;

 

                  risks to land titles and use thereof as a result of native title claims;

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                  interruptions to the operations of our customers caused by industrial accidents or disputes; and

 

                  delays in or failure to commission new infrastructure in timeframes so as not to disrupt customer operations.

 

We may face opposition to our communities and planned communities along the Keystone XL pipeline route from various groups, including the indigenous people in these areas. 

   

We may face opposition to the construction and operation of our facilities along the Keystone XL pipeline from environmental groups, landowners, tribal groups, local groups and other advocates. Such opposition could take many forms, including organized protests, attempts to block or sabotage our operations, intervention in regulatory or administrative proceedings involving our facilities, or lawsuits or other actions designed to prevent, disrupt or delay the operation of our facilities. For example, acts of sabotage or other disruptions at or around our communities could cause significant damage or injury to people, property or the environment or lead to extended interruptions of our operations. Any such event that interrupts the revenues generated by our operations, or which causes us to have to make significant expenditures not covered by insurance, could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

A component of our business strategy is based on developing and maintaining positive relationships with the indigenous people and communities in the areas where we operate. These relationships are important to our operations and customers who desire to work on traditional Native American lands. The inability to develop and maintain relationships and to be in compliance with local requirements could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.

 

We may be adversely affected if customers reduce their specialty rental and hospitality services outsourcing.

 

Our business and growth strategies depend in large part on customers outsourcing some or all of the services that we provide. We cannot be certain that these customer preferences for outsourcing will continue or that customers that have outsourced accommodations will not decide to perform these functions themselves or only outsource accommodations during the development or construction phases of their projects. In addition, labor unions representing customer employees and contractors may oppose outsourcing accommodations to the extent that the unions believe that third-party accommodations negatively impact union membership and recruiting. The reversal or reduction in customer outsourcing of accommodations could negatively impact our financial results and growth prospects.

 

Our failure to retain our current customers, renew existing customer contracts, and obtain new customer contracts, or the termination of existing contracts, could adversely affect our business.

 

Our success depends on our ability to retain our current customers, renew or replace our existing customer contracts, and obtain new business. Our ability to do so generally depends on a variety of factors, including overall customer expenditure levels and the quality, price and responsiveness of our services, as well as its ability to market these services effectively and differentiate itself from its competitors. We cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain new business, renew existing customer contracts at the same or higher levels of pricing, or at all, or that our current customers will not turn to competitors, cease operations, elect to self-operate, or terminate contracts with us. In the context of a potential depressed commodity price environment, our customers may not renew contracts on terms favorable to it or, in some cases, at all, and we may have difficulty obtaining new business. Additionally, several contracts have clauses that allow termination upon the payment of a termination fee. As a result, our customers may choose to terminate their contracts. The likelihood that a customer may seek to terminate a contract is increased during periods of market weakness. Further, certain of our customers may not reach positive final investment decisions on projects with respect to which we have been awarded contracts to provide related accommodation, which may cause those customers to terminate the contracts. Customer contract cancellations, the failure to renew a significant number of our existing contracts, or the failure to obtain new business would have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

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If we do not effectively manage our credit risk or collect on our accounts receivable, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

Failure to manage our credit risk and receive timely payments on our customer accounts receivable may result in the write-off of customer receivables. If we are not able to manage credit risk, or if a large number of customers should have financial difficulties at the same time, our credit and equipment losses would increase above historical levels. If this should occur, our business, financial condition, and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.

 

Our operations could be subject to natural disasters and other business disruptions, which could materially adversely affect our future revenue and financial condition and increase its costs and expenses.

 

Our operations could be subject to natural disasters and other business disruptions such as fires, floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, outbreaks of epidemic or pandemic disease (such as the novel coronavirus outbreak) and terrorism, which could adversely affect its future revenue and financial condition and increase its costs and expenses. For example, extreme weather, particularly periods of high rainfall, hail, tornadoes, or extreme cold, in any of the areas in which we operate may cause delays in our community construction activities or result in the cessation of customer operations at one or more communities for an extended period of time. See “Risk Factors—We are exposed to various possible claims relating to our business and our insurance may not fully protect us.” See “[Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Factors Affecting Results of Operations—Natural Disasters or Other Significant Disruption.]” In addition, the occurrence and threat of terrorist attacks may directly or indirectly affect economic conditions, which could in turn adversely affect demand for our communities and services. In the event of a major natural or man-made disaster, we could experience loss of life of our employees, destruction of our communities or other sites, or business interruptions, any of which may materially adversely affect our business. If any of our communities were to experience a catastrophic loss, it could disrupt our operations, delay services, staffing and revenue recognition, and result in expenses to repair or replace the damaged facility not covered by asset, liability, business continuity or other insurance contracts. Also, we could face significant increases in premiums or losses of coverage due to the loss experienced during and associated with these and potential future natural or man-made disasters that may materially adversely affect our business. In addition, attacks or armed conflicts that directly impact one or more of our properties or facilities could significantly affect our ability to operate those properties or communities and thereby impair our results of operations.

 

More generally, any of these events could cause consumer confidence and spending to decrease or result in increased volatility in the global economy and worldwide financial markets. Any of these occurrences could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Construction risks exist which may adversely affect our results of operations.

 

There are a number of general risks that might impinge on companies involved in the development, construction and installation of facilities as a prerequisite to the management of those assets in an operational sense. We are exposed to the following risks in connection with our construction activities:

 

                  the construction activities of our accommodations are partially dependent on the supply of appropriate construction and development opportunities;

 

                  development approvals, slow decision making by counterparties, complex construction specifications, changes to design briefs, legal issues, and other documentation changes may give rise to delays in completion, loss of revenue, and cost over-runs which may, in turn, result in termination of accommodation supply contracts;

 

                  other time delays that may arise in relation to construction and development include supply of labor, scarcity of construction materials, lower than expected productivity levels, inclement weather conditions, land contamination, cultural heritage claims, difficult site access, or industrial relations issues;

 

                  objections to our activities or those of our customers aired by aboriginal or community interests, environment and/or neighborhood groups which may cause delays in the granting or approvals and/or the overall progress

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of a project (See “Risk Factors—We may face opposition to our communities and planned communities along the Keystone XL pipeline route from various groups);

 

                  where we assume design responsibility, there is a risk that design problems or defects may result in rectification and/or costs or liabilities which we cannot readily recover; and

 

                  there is a risk that we may fail to fulfill our statutory and contractual obligations in relation to the quality of our materials and workmanship, including warranties and defect liability obligations.

 

Due to the nature of the natural resources industry, our business may be adversely affected by periods of low oil, or natural gas prices or unsuccessful exploration results may decrease customers’ spending and therefore our results.

 

Commodity prices have been and are expected to remain volatile. This volatility causes oil and gas companies to change their strategies and expenditure levels. Prices of oil and natural gas can be influenced by many factors, including reduced demand due to lower global economic growth, surplus inventory, improved technology such as the hydraulic fracturing of horizontally drilled wells in shale discoveries, access to potential productive regions, and availability of required infrastructure to deliver production to the marketplace. For example, when there is a significant drop in the price of oil as a result of reduced demand in global markets and oversupply, our oil and gas customers are likely to reduce expenditures, reduce rig counts, and cut costs which in turn, may result in lower occupancy in our facilities.

 

The carrying value of our communities could be reduced by extended periods of limited or no activity by its customers, which would require us to record impairment charges equal to the excess of the carrying value of the communities over fair value. We may incur asset impairment charges in the future, which charges may affect negatively our results of operations and financial condition.

 

Demand for our products and services is sensitive to changes in demand within a number of key industry end-markets and geographic regions.

 

Our financial performance is dependent on the level of demand for our facilities and services, which is sensitive to the level of demand within various sectors, in particular, the energy and natural resources and government end-markets. Each of these sectors is influenced not only by the state of the general global economy but by a number of more specific factors as well. For example, demand for workforce accommodations within the energy and resources sector may be materially adversely affected by a decline in global energy prices. Demand for our facilities and services may also vary among different localities or regions. The levels of activity in these sectors and geographic regions may also be cyclical, and we may not be able to predict the timing, extent or duration of the activity cycles in the markets in which we or our key customers operate. A decline or slowed growth in any of these sectors or geographic regions could result in reduced demand for our products and services, which may materially adversely affect our business, results of operations, and financial condition.

 

Decreased customer expenditure levels could adversely affect our results of operations.

 

Demand for our services is sensitive to the level of exploration, development and production activity of, and the corresponding capital spending by, oil and gas companies. The oil and gas industries’ willingness to explore, develop, and produce depends largely upon the availability of attractive resource prospects and the prevailing view of future commodity prices. Prices for oil and gas are subject to large fluctuations in response to changes in the supply of and demand for these commodities, market uncertainty, and a variety of other factors that are beyond our control. Accordingly, a sudden or long-term decline in commodity pricing would have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Additionally, the potential imposition of new regulatory requirements, including climate change legislation, could have an impact on the demand for and the cost of producing oil and natural gas in the regions where we operate. Many factors affect the supply of and demand for oil, natural gas and other resources and, therefore, influence product prices, including:

 

                  the level of activity in US shale development;

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                  the availability of economically attractive oil and natural gas field prospects, which may be affected by governmental actions or environmental activists which may restrict development;

 

                  the availability of transportation infrastructure for oil and natural gas, refining capacity and shifts in end-customer preferences toward fuel efficiency and the use of natural gas;

 

                  global weather conditions and natural disasters;

 

                  worldwide economic activity including growth in developing countries, such as China and India;

 

                  national government political requirements, including the ability of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Companies (“OPEC”) to set and maintain production levels and prices for oil and government policies which could nationalize or expropriate oil and natural gas exploration, production, refining or transportation assets;

 

                  the level of oil and gas production by non-OPEC countries;

 

                  rapid technological change and the timing and extent of energy resource development, including liquid natural gas or other alternative fuels;

 

                  environmental regulation; and

 

                  U.S. and foreign tax policies.

 

Our business is contract intensive and may lead to customer disputes or delays in receipt of payments.

 

Our business is contract intensive and we are party to many contracts with customers. We periodically review our compliance with contract terms and provisions. If customers were to dispute our contract determinations, the resolution of such disputes in a manner adverse to our interests could negatively affect sales and operating results. In the past, our customers have withheld payment due to contract or other disputes, which has delayed our receipt of payments. While we do not believe any reviews, audits, delayed payments, or other such matters should result in material adjustments, if a large number of our customer arrangements were modified or payments withheld in response to any such matter, the effect could be materially averse to our business or results of operations.

 

Certain of our major communities are located on land subject to leases. If we are unable to renew a lease, we could be materially and adversely affected.

 

Certain of our major communities are located on land subject to leases. Accordingly, while we own the accommodations assets, we only own a leasehold interest in those properties. If we are found to be in breach of a lease, we could lose the right to use the property. In addition, unless we can extend the terms of these leases before their expiration, as to which no assurance can be given, we will lose our right to operate our facilities located on these properties upon expiration of the leases. In that event, we would be required to remove our accommodations assets and remediate the site. [Generally, our leases have an average term of three years and generally contain unilateral renewal provisions for up to seven additional years.] We can provide no assurances that we will be able to renew our leases upon expiration on similar terms, or at all. If we are unable to renew leases on similar terms, it may have an adverse effect on our business.

 

Third parties may fail to provide necessary services and materials for our communities and other sites.

 

We are often dependent on third parties to supply services and materials for our communities and other sites. We typically do not enter into long-term contracts with third-party suppliers. We may experience supply problems as a result of financial or operating difficulties or the failure or consolidation of our suppliers. We may also experience supply problems as a result of shortages and discontinuations resulting from product obsolescence or other shortages or allocations by suppliers. Unfavorable economic conditions may also adversely affect our suppliers or the terms on which we purchase products. In the future, we may not be able to negotiate arrangements with third parties to secure products and services that we require

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in sufficient quantities or on reasonable terms. If we cannot negotiate arrangements with third parties to produce our products or if the third parties fail to produce our products to our specifications or in a timely manner, our business, results of operations, and financial condition may be materially adversely affected.

 

It may become difficult for us to find and retain qualified employees, and failure to do so could impede our ability to execute our business plan and growth strategy.

 

One of the most important factors in our ability to provide reliable and quality services and profitably execute our business plan is our ability to attract, develop and retain qualified personnel. The competition for qualified personnel in the industries in which we operate is intense and there can be no assurance that we will be able to continue to attract and retain all personnel necessary for the development and operation of our business. In periods of higher activity, it may become more difficult to find and retain qualified employees which could limit growth, increase operating costs, or have other material adverse effects on our operations.

 

Many of our key executives, managers, and employees have knowledge and an understanding of our business and our industry that cannot be readily duplicated and they are the key individuals that interface with customers. In addition, the ability to attract and retain qualified personnel is dependent on the availability of qualified personnel, the impact on the labor supply due to general economic conditions, and the ability to provide a competitive compensation package.

 

In addition, labor shortages, the inability to hire or retain qualified employees nationally, regionally or locally or increased labor costs could have a material adverse effect on our ability to control expenses and efficiently conduct operations. We may not be able to continue to hire and retain the sufficiently skilled labor force necessary to operate efficiently and to support our operating strategies. Labor expenses could also increase as a result of continuing shortages in the supply of personnel. Failure to retain key personnel or hire qualified employees may materially adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Significant increases in raw material and labor costs could increase our operating costs significantly and harm our profitability.

 

We incur labor costs and purchase raw materials, including steel, lumber, siding and roofing, fuel and other products to construct and perform periodic repairs, modifications and refurbishments to maintain physical conditions of our facilities as well as the construction of our communities and other sites. The volume, timing, and mix of such work may vary quarter-to-quarter and year-to-year. Generally, increases in labor and raw material costs will increase the acquisition costs of new facilities and also increase the construction, repair, and maintenance costs of our facilities. During periods of rising prices for labor or raw materials, and in particular, when the prices increase rapidly or to levels significantly higher than normal, we may incur significant increases in our costs for new facilities and incur higher operating costs that we may not be able to recoup from customers through changes in pricing, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

If we determine that our goodwill and intangible assets have become impaired, we may incur impairment charges, which would negatively impact our operating results.

 

We have goodwill, which represents the excess of the total purchase price of our acquisitions over the fair value of the assets acquired, and other intangible assets. As of December 31, 2019, we had approximately $41.0 million and $117.9 million of goodwill and other intangible assets, net, respectively, in our statement of financial position, which would represent approximately 6.9% and 19.7% of total assets, respectively. We are required to review goodwill and intangible assets at least annually for impairment. In the event impairment is identified, a charge to earnings would be recorded. Impairment may result from significant changes in the manner of use of the acquired asset, negative industry or economic trends and significant underperformance relative to historic or projected operating results. Any impairment charges could adversely affect our business, results of operations, and financial condition.

 

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Increased operating costs and obstacles to cost recovery due to the pricing and cancellation terms of our specialty rental and hospitality services contracts may constrain its ability to make a profit.

 

Our profitability can be adversely affected to the extent we are faced with cost increases for food, wages and other labor related expenses, insurance, fuel and utilities, especially to the extent we are unable to recover such increased costs through increases in the prices for our services, due to one or more of general economic conditions, competitive conditions or contractual provisions in our customer contracts. Substantial increases in the cost of fuel and utilities have historically resulted in cost increases in our communities. From time to time we have experienced increases in our food costs. While we believe a portion of these increases were attributable to fuel prices, we believe the increases also resulted from rising global food demand. In addition, food prices can fluctuate as a result of foreign exchange rates and temporary changes in supply, including as a result of incidences of severe weather such as droughts, heavy rains, and late freezes. We may be unable to fully recover costs, and such increases would negatively impact its profitability on contracts that do not contain such inflation protections.

  

Our future operating results may fluctuate, fail to match past performance, or fail to meet expectations.

 

Our operating results may fluctuate, fail to match past performance, or fail to meet the expectations of analysts and investors. Our financial results may fluctuate as a result of a number of factors, some of which are beyond our control, including but not limited to:

 

                  general economic conditions in the geographies and industries where we own or operate communities;

 

·

legislative policies where we provide our services;

 

                  the budgetary constraints of our customers;

 

                  the success of our strategic growth initiatives;

 

                  the costs associated with the launching or integrating new or acquired businesses;

 

                  the cost, type, and timing of customer orders;

 

                  the nature and duration of the needs of our customers;

 

                  the raw material or labor costs of servicing our facilities;

 

                  the timing of new product or service introductions by us, our suppliers, and our competitors;

 

                  changes in end-user demand requirements;

 

                  the mix, by state and region, of our revenue, personnel, and assets;

 

                  movements in interest rates, or tax rates;

 

                  changes in, and application of, accounting rules;

 

                  changes in the regulations applicable to us;

 

                  litigation matters;

 

                  the success of large scale capital intensive projects;

 

                  liquidity, including the impact of our debt service costs; and

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                  attrition and retention risk.

 

As a result of these factors, our historical financial results are not necessarily indicative of our future results.

 

We are exposed to various possible claims relating to our business, and our insurance may not fully protect us.

 

We are exposed to various possible claims relating to our business, and our operations are subject to many hazards. In the ordinary course of business, we may become the subject of various claims, lawsuits, and administrative proceedings seeking damages or other remedies concerning our commercial operations, products, employees, and other matters, including occasional claims by individuals alleging exposure to hazardous materials as a result of our products or operations. Some of these claims relate to the activities of businesses that we have acquired, even though these activities may have occurred prior to our acquisition of such businesses.

 

Our insurance policies have deductibles or self-insured retentions which would require us to expand amounts prior to taking advantage of coverage limits. We believe that we have adequate insurance coverage for the protection of our assets and operations. However, our insurance may not fully protect us for certain types of claims such as dishonest, fraudulent, criminal or malicious acts; terrorism, war, hostile or warlike action during a time of peace; automobile physical damage; natural disasters; and cyber-crime. A judgment could be rendered against us in cases in which we could be uninsured and beyond the amounts that we currently have reserved or anticipate incurring for such matters. Even a partially uninsured or underinsured claim, if successful and of significant size, could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations or consolidated financial position. The specifications and insured limits under those policies, however, may be insufficient for such claims. We also face the following other risks related to our insurance coverage:

 

·

we may not be able to continue to obtain insurance on commercially reasonable terms;

 

·

the counterparties to our insurance contracts may pose credit risks; and

 

·

we may incur losses from interruption of our business that exceed our insurance coverage each of which, individually or in the aggregate, could materially and adversely impact our business

 

Further, due to rising insurance costs and changes in the insurance markets, we cannot provide any assurance that our insurance coverage will continue to be available at all or at rates or on terms similar to those presently available.

  

Social, Political, and Regulatory Risks

 

A failure to maintain food safety or comply with government regulations related to food and beverages may subject us to liability.

 

Claims of illness or injury relating to food quality or food handling are common in the food service industry, and a number of these claims may exist at any given time. Because food safety issues could be experienced at the source or by food suppliers or distributors, food safety could, in part, be out of our control. Regardless of the source or cause, any report of food-borne illness or other food safety issues such as food tampering or contamination at one of our locations could adversely impact our reputation, hindering our ability to renew contracts on favorable terms or to obtain new business, and have a negative impact on our sales. Future food product recalls and health concerns associated with food contamination may also increase our raw materials costs and, from time to time, disrupt its business.

 

A variety of regulations at various governmental levels relating to the handling, preparation, and serving of food (including, in some cases, requirements relating to the temperature of food), and the cleanliness of food production facilities and the hygiene of food-handling personnel are enforced primarily at the local public health department level. We cannot assure you that we are in full compliance with all applicable laws and regulations at all times or that we will be able to comply with any future laws and regulations. Furthermore, legislation and regulatory attention to food safety is very high. Additional or amended regulations in this area may significantly increase the cost of compliance or expose us to liabilities.

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If we are unable to maintain food safety or comply with government regulations related to food and beverages, the effect could be materially averse to our business or results of operations.

 

Unanticipated changes in our tax obligations, the adoption of a new tax legislation, or exposure to additional income tax liabilities could affect profitability.

 

We are subject to income taxes in the United States. Our tax liabilities are affected by the amounts charged for inventory, services, funding, and other intercompany transactions. Tax authorities may disagree with our intercompany charges, cross-jurisdictional transfer pricing or other tax positions and assess additional taxes. We regularly assess the likely outcomes of examinations in order to determine the appropriateness of its tax provision. However, there can be no assurance that we will accurately predict the outcomes of potential examinations, and the amounts ultimately paid upon resolution of examinations could be materially different from the amounts previously included in our income tax provision and, therefore, could have a material impact on its results of operations and cash flows. In addition, our future effective tax rate could be adversely affected by changes to its operating structure, changes in the mix of earnings in countries and/or states with differing statutory tax rates, changes in the valuation of deferred tax assets and liabilities, changes in tax laws, and the discovery of new information in the course of our tax return preparation process.

 

Our ability to use our net operating loss carryforwards and other tax attributes may be limited.

 

As of December 31, 2019, we had U.S. net operating loss (“NOL”) carryforwards of approximately $71.6 million for U.S. federal and state income tax purposes, available to offset future taxable income, prior to consideration of annual limitations that may be imposed under Section 382 (“Section 382”) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”). Approximately $1.3 million of these tax loss carryovers expire in 2038. The remaining $70.3 million of tax loss carryovers do not expire.

 

Our NOL is limited and could expire unused and be unavailable to offset future income tax liabilities. Under Section 382 and corresponding provisions of U.S. state law, if a corporation undergoes an “ownership change,” generally defined as a greater than 50% change, by value, in its equity ownership over a three-year period, the corporation’s ability to use its pre-change NOLs and other applicable pre-change tax attributes, such as research and development tax credits, to offset its post-change income may be limited. We have not completed a Section 382 analysis and therefore cannot forecast or otherwise determine our ability to derive any benefit from our various federal or state tax attribute carryforwards at this time. As a result, if we earn net taxable income, our ability to use our pre-change NOL carryforwards to offset U.S. federal taxable income may be subject to limitations, which could potentially result in increased future tax liability to us. In addition, at the state level, there may be periods during which the use of NOLs is suspended or otherwise limited, which could accelerate or permanently increase state taxes owed.

 

Lastly, we may experience ownership changes in the future as a result of subsequent shifts in our share ownership, some of which may be outside of our control. If we determine that an ownership change has occurred and our ability to use our historical NOL is materially limited, it may result in increased future tax obligations.

 

We may be unable to recognize deferred tax assets and, as a result, lose future tax savings, which could have a negative impact on our liquidity and financial position.

 

We recognize deferred tax assets primarily related to deductible temporary differences based on our assessment that the item will be utilized against future taxable income and the benefit will be sustained upon ultimate settlement with the applicable taxing authority. Such deductible temporary differences primarily relate to tax loss carryforwards and deferred tax depreciation and deferred revenue. Tax loss carryforwards arising in a given tax jurisdiction may be carried forward to offset taxable income in future years from such tax jurisdiction and reduce or eliminate income taxes otherwise payable on such taxable income, subject to certain limitations. We may have to write down, via a valuation allowance, the carrying amount of certain of the deferred tax assets to the extent we determine it is not probable such deferred tax assets will continue to be recognized

 

In the event that we do not have sufficient taxable income in future years to use the tax benefits before they expire, the benefit may be permanently lost. In addition, the taxing authorities could challenge our calculation of the amount of our

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tax attributes, which could reduce certain of our recognized tax benefits. In addition, tax laws in certain jurisdictions may limit the ability to use carryforwards upon a change in control.

 

We are subject to various laws and regulations including those governing our contractual relationships with the U.S. government and U.S. government contractors and the health and safety of our workforce and our customers. Obligations and liabilities under these laws and regulations may materially harm our business.

 

Our customers include U.S. government contractors, which means that we may, indirectly, be subject to various statutes and regulations applicable to doing business with the U.S. government. These types of contracts customarily contain provisions that give the U.S. government substantial rights and remedies, many of which are not typically found in commercial contracts and which are unfavorable to contractors, including provisions that allow the government to unilaterally terminate or modify our customers’ federal government contracts, in whole or in part, at the government’s convenience. Under general principles of U.S. government contracting law, if the government terminates a contract for convenience, the terminated party may generally recover only its incurred or committed costs and settlement expenses and profit on work completed prior to the termination. If the government terminates a contract for default, the defaulting party may be liable for any extra costs incurred by the government in procuring undelivered items from another source. In addition, our or our customers’ failure to comply with these laws and regulations might result in administrative penalties or the suspension of our customers’ government contracts or debarment and, as a result, the loss of the related revenue which would harm our business, results of operations and financial condition. We are not aware of any action contemplated by any regulatory authority related to any possible non-compliance by or in connection with our operations.

 

Our operations are subject to an array of governmental regulations in each of the jurisdictions in which we operate. Our activities are subject to regulation by several federal and state government agencies, including the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) and by federal and state laws. Our operations and activities in other jurisdictions are subject to similar governmental regulations. Similar to conventionally constructed buildings, the workforce housing industry is also subject to regulations by multiple governmental agencies in each jurisdiction relating to, among others, environmental, zoning and building standards, and health, safety and transportation matters. Noncompliance with applicable regulations, implementation of new regulations or modifications to existing regulations may increase costs of compliance, require a termination of certain activities or otherwise have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, and financial condition.

 

In addition, U.S. government contracts and grants normally contain additional requirements that may increase our costs of doing business, reduce our profits, and expose us to liability for failure to comply with these terms and conditions. These requirements include, for example:

 

·

specialized disclosure and accounting requirements unique to U.S. government contracts;

 

·

financial and compliance audits that may result in potential liability for price adjustments, recoupment of government funds after such funds have been spent, civil and criminal penalties, or administrative sanctions such as suspension or debarment from doing business with the U.S. government;

 

·

public disclosures of certain contract and company information; and

 

·

mandatory socioeconomic compliance requirements, including labor requirements, non-discrimination and affirmative action programs and environmental compliance requirements.

 

If we fail to maintain compliance with these requirements, our contracts may be subject to termination, and we may be subject to financial and/or other liability under its contracts or under the Federal Civil False Claims Act (the “False Claims Act”). The False Claims Act’s “whistleblower” provisions allow private individuals, including present and former employees, to sue on behalf of the U.S. government. The False Claims Act statute provides for treble damages and other penalties and, if our operations are found to be in violation of the False Claims Act, we could face other adverse action, including suspension or prohibition from doing business with the United States government. Any penalties, fines, suspension or damages could adversely affect our financial results as well as our ability to operate our business.

 

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We are subject to various anti-corruption laws and we may be subject to other liabilities which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

We are subject to various anti-corruption laws that prohibit improper payments or offers of payments to foreign governments and their officials by a U.S. person for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. Our activities create the risk of unauthorized payments or offers of payments by one of our employees or agents that could be in violation of various laws, including the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (the “FCPA”). We have implemented safeguards and policies to discourage these practices by our employees and agents. However, existing safeguards and any future improvements may prove to be ineffective and employees or agents may engage in conduct for which we might be held responsible.

 

If employees violate our policies or we fail to maintain adequate record-keeping and internal accounting practices to accurately record its transactions, we may be subject to regulatory sanctions. Violations of the FCPA or other anti-corruption laws may result in severe criminal or civil sanctions and penalties, including suspension or debarment from U.S. government contracting, and we may be subject to other liabilities which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. We are also subject to similar anti-corruption laws in other jurisdictions.

  

We may be subject to environmental laws and regulations that may require us to take actions that will adversely affect our results of operations.

 

All of our and our customers’ operations may be affected by federal, state and local laws and regulations governing the discharge of substances into the environment or otherwise relating to environmental protection. Among other things, these laws and regulations impose limitations and prohibitions on the discharge and emission of, and establish standards for the use, disposal and management of, regulated materials and waste, and impose liabilities for the costs of investigating and cleaning up, and damages resulting from, present and past spills, disposals or other releases of hazardous substances or materials. In the ordinary course of business, we use and generate substances that are regulated or may be hazardous under environmental laws. We have an inherent risk of liability under environmental laws and regulations, both with respect to ongoing operations and with respect to contamination that may have occurred in the past on our properties or as a result of our operations. From time to time, our operations or conditions on properties that we have acquired have resulted in liabilities under these environmental laws. We may in the future incur material costs to comply with environmental laws or sustain material liabilities from claims concerning noncompliance or contamination. We have no reserves for any such liabilities. Environmental laws and regulations are subject to change in the future, possibly resulting in more stringent requirements. Our or any of our customers’ failure to comply with applicable environment laws and regulations may result in any of the following:

 

                  issuance of administrative, civil and criminal penalties;

 

                  denial or revocation of permits or other authorizations;

 

                  reduction or cessation of operations; and

 

                  performance of site investigatory, remedial or other corrective actions

 

While it is not possible at this time to predict how environmental legislation may change or how new regulations that may be adopted would impact our business, any such future laws and regulations could result in increased compliance costs or additional operating restrictions for us or our oil and gas and natural resource company customers and could have a material adverse effect on our business or demand for our services.

   

We may be subject to litigation, judgments, orders or regulatory proceedings that could materially harm our business.

 

We are subject to claims arising from disputes with customers, employees, vendors and other third parties in the normal course of business. The risks associated with any such disputes may be difficult to assess or quantify and their existence and magnitude may remain unknown for substantial periods of time. If the plaintiffs in any suits against us were to

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successfully prosecute their claims, or if we were to settle such suits by making significant payments to the plaintiffs, our business, results of operations and financial condition would be harmed. Even if the outcome of a claim proves favorable to us, litigation can be time consuming and costly and may divert management resources. To the extent that our senior executives are named in such lawsuits, our indemnification obligations could magnify the costs.

 

We may be exposed to certain regulatory and financial risks related to climate change.

 

Climate change is receiving increasing attention from scientists and legislators alike. The debate is ongoing as to the extent to which the climate is changing, the potential causes of any change and its potential impacts. Some attribute global warming to increased levels of greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide, which has led to significant legislative and regulatory efforts to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Significant focus is being made on companies that are active producers of depleting natural resources.

 

There are a number of legislative and regulatory proposals to address greenhouse gas emissions, which are in various phases of discussion or implementation. The outcome of U.S. federal, regional, provincial, and state actions to address global climate change could result in a variety of regulatory programs including potential new regulations, additional charges to fund energy efficiency activities, or other regulatory actions. These actions could:

 

                  result in increased costs associated with our operations and our customers’ operations;

 

                  increase other costs to our business;

 

                  reduce the demand for carbon-based fuels; and

 

                  reduce the demand for our services.

 

Any adoption of these or similar proposals by U.S. federal, regional, provincial, or state governments mandating a substantial reduction in greenhouse gas emissions could have far-reaching and significant impacts on the energy industry. Although it is not possible at this time to predict how legislation or new regulations that may be adopted to address greenhouse gas emissions would impact our business, any such future laws and regulations could result in increased compliance costs or additional operating restrictions, and could have a material adverse effect on our business or demand for our services. See “[Business—Regulatory and Environmental Compliance]” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for a more detailed description of our climate-change related risks.

 

Growth, Development and Financing Risks

 

We may not be able to successfully acquire and integrate new operations, which could cause our business to suffer.

 

We may not be able to successfully complete potential strategic acquisitions for various reasons. We anticipate that we will consider acquisitions in the future that meet our strategic growth plans. We cannot predict whether or when acquisitions will be completed, and we may face significant competition for certain acquisition targets. Acquisitions that are completed involve numerous risks, including the following:

 

                  difficulties in integrating the operations, technologies, products and personnel of the acquired companies;

 

                  diversion of management’s attention from normal daily operations of the business;

 

                  difficulties in entering markets in which we have no or limited direct prior experience and where our competitors in such markets have stronger market positions;

 

                  difficulties in complying with regulations, such as environmental regulations, and managing risks related to an acquired business;

 

                  an inability to timely complete necessary financing and required amendments, if any, to existing agreements;

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                  an inability to implement uniform standards, controls, procedures and policies;

 

                  undiscovered and unknown problems, defects, liabilities or other issues related to any acquisition that become known to us only after the acquisition, particularly relating to rental equipment on lease that are unavailable for inspection during the diligence process; and

 

                  potential loss of key customers or employees.

 

In connection with acquisitions we may assume liabilities or acquire damaged assets, some of which may be unknown at the time of such acquisitions; record goodwill and non-amortizable intangible assets that will be subject to future impairment testing and potential periodic impairment charges; or incur amortization expenses related to certain intangible assets.

 

The condition and regulatory certification of any facilities or operations acquired is assessed as part of the acquisition due diligence. In some cases, facility condition or regulatory certification may be difficult to determine due to that facility being on lease at the time of acquisition and/or inadequate certification records. Facility acquisitions may therefore result in a rectification cost which may not have been factored into the acquisition price, impacting deployability and ultimate profitability of the facility acquired.

 

Acquisitions are inherently risky, and no assurance can be given that our future acquisitions will be successful or will not materially adversely affect our business, results of operations, and financial condition. If we do not manage new markets effectively, some of our new communities and acquisitions may lose money or fail, and we may have to close unprofitable communities. Closing a community in such circumstances would likely result in additional expenses that would cause our operating results to suffer. To successfully manage growth, we will need to continue to identify additional qualified managers and employees to integrate acquisitions within our established operating, financial and other internal procedures and controls. We will also need to effectively motivate, train and manage our employees. Failure to successfully integrate recent and future acquisitions and new communities into existing operations could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

 

Global or local economic movements could have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

We operate in the United States, but our business may be negatively impacted by economic movements or downturns in that market or in global markets generally, including those that could be caused by policy changes by the U.S. administration in areas such as trade and immigration. These adverse economic conditions may reduce commercial activity, cause disruption and volatility in global financial markets, and increase rates of default and bankruptcy. Reduced commercial activity has historically resulted in reduced demand for our products and services. For example, reduced commercial activity in the energy and natural resource sectors in certain markets in which we operate may negatively impact our business. U.S. federal spending cuts or further limitations that may result from presidential or congressional action or inaction may also negatively impact our arrangements with government contractor customers. Disruptions in financial markets could negatively impact the ability of our customers to pay their obligations to us in a timely manner and increase our counterparty risk. If economic conditions worsen, we may face reduced demand and an increase, relative to historical levels, in the time it takes to receive customer payments. If we are not able to adjust our business in a timely and effective manner to changing economic conditions, our business, results of operations and financial condition may be materially adversely affected.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Prior to the completion of the Business Combination in March 2019, Target Parent was owned by the Algeco Seller, and Signor Parent was owned by the Arrow Seller and did not operate together as Target Hospitality, though they were under common control. Target Parent’s and Signor Parent’s historical financial information for periods prior to the closing of the Business Combination is not representative of the results we would have achieved as a separate, publicly-traded company during these periods and may not be a reliable indicator of our future results.

 

The historical information of Signor Parent and Target Parent refers to their respective businesses prior to the Business Combination. Accordingly, the historical financial information does not necessarily reflect the financial condition, results of operations or cash flows that we would have achieved as a separate, publicly-traded company during the periods presented or those that we will achieve in the future primarily as a result of the factors described below:

 

                  prior to the completion of the Business Combination, Signor Parent’s and Target Parent’s businesses were owned by the Arrow Seller and the Algeco Seller, respectively, as part of broader corporate organizations, rather than as an independent company. As such, these broader organizations performed various corporate functions for each entity such as legal, treasury, accounting, auditing, human resources, corporate affairs and finance. Target Parent’s and Signor Parent’s historical financial results reflect allocations of corporate expenses from such functions and are likely to be less than the expenses Target Hospitality would have incurred had it operated as a separate publicly-traded company. Following the Business Combination, we are responsible for the cost related to such functions previously performed by each entity’s previous corporate group;

 

                  prior to the completion of the Business Combination, decisions regarding capital raising and major capital expenditures for Signor Parent or Target Parent were done through the Arrow Seller or the Algeco Seller, respectively;

 

                  following the Business Combination, we may need to obtain additional financing from banks, through public offerings or private placements of debt or equity securities, strategic relationships or other arrangements; and

 

                  Signor Parent’s and Target Parent’s historical financial information prior to the Business Combination does not reflect the debt or the associated expenses that Target Hospitality incurred as part of the Business Combination.

 

We incurred and expect to continue to incur significantly increased costs as a result of operating as a public company, and our management is required to devote substantial time to compliance efforts.

 

We incurred and expect to continue to incur significant legal, accounting, insurance, and other expenses as a result of becoming a public company, and we expect to continue to incur such expenses. The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010, as amended (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended (“SOX”), as well as related rules implemented by the SEC, have required changes in corporate governance practices of public companies. In addition, rules that the SEC is implementing or is required to implement pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act are expected to require additional change. Compliance with these and other similar laws, rules and regulations, including compliance with Section 404 of SOX, will substantially increase our expenses, including legal and accounting costs, and make some activities more time-consuming and costly. It is possible that these expenses will exceed the increases projected by management. These laws, rules, and regulations may also make it more expensive to obtain director and officer liability insurance, and we may be required to accept reduced policy limits and coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain the same or similar coverage, which may make it more difficult to attract and retain qualified persons to serve on its board of directors or as officers. Although the JOBS Act may, for a limited period of time, somewhat lessen the cost of complying with these additional regulatory and other requirements, we nonetheless expect a substantial increase in legal, accounting, insurance, and certain other expenses in the future, which will negatively impact its results of operations and financial condition.

 

 

 

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We are an “emerging growth company” and as a result of the reduced disclosure and governance requirements applicable to emerging growth companies, our common stock may be less attractive to investors.

 

We are an “emerging growth company” as defined in the JOBS Act, and we intend to utilize some of the exemptions from reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies, including not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports and proxy statements, and adopting new accounting standards using private company effective dates. We cannot predict if investors will find our common stock less attractive because we will rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our common stock less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our common stock and our stock price may be more volatile. We may take advantage of these reporting exemptions until we are no longer an emerging growth company. We will remain an emerging growth company until the earlier of (1) the last day of the fiscal year (a) following the fifth anniversary of the completion of our initial public offering, (b) in which we have total annual gross revenue of at least $1.0 billion, or (c) in which we are deemed to be a large accelerated filer, which means the market value of our common stock that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the prior June 30th, and (2) the date on which we have issued more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt during the prior three-year period.

 

As a result of being a public company, we are subject to additional reporting and corporate governance requirements that require additional management time, resources and expense.

 

As a public company, we are obligated to file with the SEC annual and quarterly information and other reports that are specified in the Exchange Act. We are also subject to other reporting and corporate governance requirements under SOX, and the rules and regulations promulgated thereunder, all of which impose significant compliance and reporting obligations upon us and require us to incur additional expense in order to fulfill such obligations.

 

Information Technology and Privacy Risks

 

Any failure of our management information systems could disrupt our business and result in decreased revenue and increased overhead costs.

 

We depend on our management information systems to actively manage our facilities and provide facility information, and availability of our services. These functions enhance our ability to optimize facility utilization, occupancy, costs of goods sold, and average daily rate. The failure of our management information systems to perform as anticipated could damage our reputation with our customers, disrupt our business or result in, among other things, decreased revenue and increased overhead costs. For example, an inaccurate utilization rate could cause us to fail to have sufficient inventory to meet consumer demand, resulting in decreased sales. Any such failure could harm our business, results of operations and financial condition. In addition, the delay or failure to implement information system upgrades and new systems effectively could disrupt our business, distract management’s focus and attention from business operations and growth initiatives, and increase our implementation and operating costs, any of which could materially adversely affect our operations and operating results.

 

Like other companies, our information systems may be vulnerable to a variety of interruptions due to events beyond our control, including, but not limited to, telecommunications failures, computer viruses, security breaches (including cyber-attacks), and other security issues. In addition, because our systems contain information about individuals and businesses, the failure to maintain the security of the data we hold, whether the result of our own error or the malfeasance or errors of others, could harm our reputation or give rise to legal liabilities leading to lower revenue, increased costs, regulatory sanctions, and other potential material adverse effects on our business, results of operations, and financial condition.

 

Our business could be negatively impacted by security threats, including cyber-security threats and other disruptions.

 

We face various security threats, including cyber-security threats to gain unauthorized access to sensitive information or to render data or systems unusable; threats to the safety of our employees; threats to the security of our facilities and infrastructure or third-party facilities and infrastructure; and threats from terrorist acts. Although we utilize various procedures and controls to monitor these threats and mitigate our exposure to such threats, there can be no assurance that

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these procedures and controls will be sufficient in preventing security threats from materializing. If any of these events were to materialize, they could lead to losses of sensitive information, critical infrastructure, personnel or capabilities essential to our operations and could have a material adverse effect on our reputation, financial position, results of operations or cash flows. Cyber-security attacks in particular are evolving and include, but are not limited to, malicious software, attempts to gain unauthorized access to data and other electronic security breaches that could lead to disruptions in critical systems, unauthorized release of confidential or otherwise protected information, and corruption of data. See “Risk Factors—Information Technology and Privacy Risks—Cyber-attacks could have a disruptive effect on our business.”

 

Cyber-attacks could have a disruptive effect on our business

 

From time to time we may experience cyber-attacks, attempted and actual breaches of our information technology systems and networks or similar events, which could result in a loss of sensitive business or customer information, systems interruption or the disruption of our operations. The techniques that are used to obtain unauthorized access, disable or degrade service or sabotage systems change frequently and are difficult to detect for long periods of time, and we are accordingly unable to anticipate and prevent all data security incidents.

 

Even if we are fully compliant with legal standards and contractual or other requirements, we still may not be able to prevent security breaches involving sensitive data. The sophistication of efforts by hackers to gain unauthorized access to information systems has continued to increase in recent years. Breaches, thefts, losses or fraudulent uses of customer, employee or company data could cause consumers to lose confidence in the security of our website, point of sale systems and other information technology systems and choose not to stay in our communities or contract with us in the future. Such security breaches also could expose us to risks of data loss, business disruption, litigation and other costs or liabilities, any of which could adversely affect our business.

 

Failure to keep pace with developments in technology could adversely affect our operations or competitive position.

 

The specialty rental and hospitality services industry demands the use of sophisticated technology and systems for community management, procurement, operation of services across communities and other facilities, distribution of community resources to current and future customers and amenities. These technologies may require refinements and upgrades. The development and maintenance of these technologies may require significant investment by us. As various systems and technologies become outdated or new technology is required, we may not be able to replace or introduce them as quickly as needed or in a cost-effective and timely manner. As a result, we may not achieve the benefits we may have been anticipating from any new technology or system.

 

Risks Relating to Our Indebtedness

 

Our leverage may make it difficult for us to service our debt and operate our business.

 

As of December 31, 2019, we, through our wholly-owned indirect subsidiary, Arrow Bidco, had $420 million of total indebtedness consisting of $80 million of borrowings under the New ABL Facility and $340 million of Notes.

 

Our leverage could have important consequences, including:

 

                  making it more difficult to satisfy our obligations with respect to our various debt (including the Notes) and liabilities;

 

                  requiring us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to debt payments, thus reducing the availability of cash flow to fund internal growth through working capital and capital expenditures on our existing communities or new communities and for other general corporate purposes;

 

                  increasing our vulnerability to a downturn in our business or adverse economic or industry conditions;

 

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                  placing us at a competitive disadvantage compared to our competitors that have less debt in relation to cash flow and that, therefore, may be able to take advantage of opportunities that our leverage would prevent us from pursuing;

 

                  limiting our flexibility in planning for or reacting to changes in our business and industry;

 

                  restricting us from pursuing strategic acquisitions or exploiting certain business opportunities or causing us to make non-strategic divestitures; and

 

                  limiting, among other things, our ability to borrow additional funds or raise equity capital in the future and increasing the costs of such additional financings.

 

Our ability to meet our debt service obligations, including those under the New ABL Facility and the Notes, or to refinance our debt depends on our future operating and financial performance, which will be affected by our ability to successfully implement our business strategy as well as general economic, financial, competitive, regulatory and other factors beyond our control. If our business does not generate sufficient cash flow from operations, or if future borrowings are not available to us in an amount sufficient to enable us to pay our indebtedness or to fund our other liquidity needs, we may need to refinance all or a portion of our indebtedness on or before the maturity thereof, sell assets, reduce or delay capital investments or seek to raise additional capital, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our operations. In addition, we may not be able to affect any of these actions, if necessary, on commercially reasonable terms or at all. Any refinancing of our debt could be at higher interest rates and may require us to comply with more onerous covenants, which could further restrict our business operations. The terms of our existing or future debt instruments may limit or prevent us from taking any of these actions. If we default on the payments required under the terms of certain of our indebtedness, that indebtedness, together with debt incurred pursuant to other debt agreements or instruments that contain cross-default or cross-acceleration provisions, may become payable on demand, and we may not have sufficient funds to repay all of our debts. As a result, our inability to generate sufficient cash flow to satisfy our debt service obligations, or to refinance or restructure our obligations on commercially reasonable terms or at all, would have an adverse effect, which could be material, on our business, financial condition and results of operations, as well as on our ability to satisfy our debt obligations.

 

We and our subsidiaries may be able to incur substantial additional indebtedness (including additional secured obligations) in the future. Although the Indenture and the New ABL Facility contain restrictions on the incurrence of additional indebtedness, these restrictions are subject to a number of significant qualifications and exceptions, and under certain circumstances, the amount of indebtedness that could be incurred in compliance with these restrictions could be substantial. If new debt, including future additional secured obligations, is added to our and our subsidiaries’ existing debt levels, the related risks that we now face would increase.

 

Global capital and credit markets conditions could materially adversely affect our ability to access the capital and credit markets or the ability of key counterparties to perform their obligations to it.

 

Although we believe the banks participating in the New ABL Facility have adequate capital and resources, we can provide no assurance that all of those banks will continue to operate as a going concern in the future. If any of the banks in our lending group were to fail, it is possible that the borrowing capacity under the New ABL Facility would be reduced. Further, practical, legal, and tax limitations may also limit our ability to access the cash available to certain businesses within our group to service the working capital needs of other businesses within our group. In the event that the availability under the New ABL Facility were reduced significantly, we could be required to obtain capital from alternate sources in order to finance our capital needs. The options for addressing such capital constraints would include, but would not be limited to, obtaining commitments from the remaining banks in the lending group or from new banks to fund increased amounts under the terms of the New ABL Facility, and accessing the public capital markets. In addition, we may delay certain capital expenditures to ensure that we maintain appropriate levels of liquidity. If it becomes necessary to access additional capital, any such alternatives could have terms less favorable than those terms under the New ABL Facility, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition, and cash flows.

 

41

 

 

In addition, in the future we may need to raise additional funds to, among other things, refinance existing indebtedness, fund existing operations, improve or expand our operations, respond to competitive pressures or make acquisitions. If adequate funds are not available on acceptable terms, we may be unable to achieve our business or strategic objectives or compete effectively. Our ability to pursue certain future opportunities may depend in part on our ongoing access to debt and equity capital markets. We cannot assure Noteholders that any such financing will be available on terms satisfactory to us or at all. If we are unable to obtain financing on acceptable terms, we may have to curtail our growth.

 

Economic disruptions affecting key counterparties could also have a material adverse effect on our business. We monitor the financial strength of our larger customers, derivative counterparties, lenders, and insurance carriers on a periodic basis using publicly-available information in order to evaluate its exposure to those who have or who it believes may likely experience significant threats to their ability to adequately perform their obligations to it. The information available will differ from counterparty to counterparty and may be insufficient for us to adequately interpret or evaluate our exposure and/or determine appropriate or timely responses.

 

We are, and may in the future become, subject to covenants that limit our operating and financial flexibility and, if we default under our debt covenants, we may not be able to meet our payment obligations.

 

The New ABL Facility and the Indenture, as well as any instruments that will govern any future debt obligations, contain covenants that impose significant restrictions on the way the Arrow Bidco and its subsidiaries can operate, including restrictions on the ability to:

 

                  incur or guarantee additional debt and issue certain types of stock;

 

                  create or incur certain liens;

 

                  make certain payments, including dividends or other distributions, with respect to our equity securities;

 

                  prepay or redeem junior debt;

 

                  make certain investments or acquisitions, including participating in joint ventures;

 

                  engage in certain transactions with affiliates;

 

                  create unrestricted subsidiaries;

 

                  create encumbrances or restrictions on the payment of dividends or other distributions, loans or advances to, and on the transfer of, assets to the issuer or any restricted subsidiary;

 

                  sell assets, consolidate or merge with or into other companies;

 

                  sell or transfer all or substantially all our assets or those of our subsidiaries on a consolidated basis; and

 

                  issue or sell share capital of certain subsidiaries.

 

Although these limitations will be subject to significant exceptions and qualifications, these covenants could limit our ability to finance future operations and capital needs and our ability to pursue acquisitions and other business activities that may be in our interest. Arrow Bidco’s ability to comply with these covenants and restrictions may be affected by events beyond our control. These include prevailing economic, financial and industry conditions. If Arrow Bidco defaults on their obligations under the New ABL Facility and the Indenture, then the relevant lenders or holders could elect to declare the debt, together with accrued and unpaid interest and other fees, if any, immediately due and payable and proceed against any collateral securing that debt. If the debt under the New ABL Facility, the Indenture or any other material financing arrangement that we enter into were to be accelerated, our assets may be insufficient to repay in full the New ABL Facility, the Notes and our other debt.

 

42

 

 

The New ABL Facility will also require our subsidiaries to satisfy specified financial maintenance tests in the event that certain excess liquidity requirements are not satisfied. The ability to meet these tests could be affected by deterioration in our operating results, as well as by events beyond our control, including increases in raw materials prices and unfavorable economic conditions, and we cannot assure Noteholders that these tests will be met. If an event of default occurs under the New ABL Facility, the lenders thereunder could terminate their commitments and declare all amounts borrowed, together with accrued and unpaid interest and other fees, to be immediately due and payable. Borrowings under other debt instruments that contain cross-acceleration or cross-default provisions also may be accelerated or become payable on demand. In these circumstances, Target Hospitality’s assets may not be sufficient to repay in full that indebtedness and its other indebtedness then outstanding.

 

The amount of borrowings permitted at any time under the New ABL Facility will be subject to compliance with limits based on a periodic borrowing base valuation of the borrowing base assets thereunder. As a result, our access to credit under the New ABL Facility will potentially be subject to significant fluctuations depending on the value of the borrowing base of eligible assets as of any measurement date, as well as certain discretionary rights of the agent in respect of the calculation of such borrowing base value. As a result of any change in valuation, the availability under the New ABL Facility may be reduced, or we may be required to make a repayment of the New ABL Facility, which may be significant. The inability to borrow under the New ABL Facility or the use of available cash to repay the New ABL Facility as a result of a valuation change may adversely affect our liquidity, results of operations and financial position.

 

Restrictions in Arrow Bidco’s existing and future debt agreements could limit our growth and our ability to respond to changing conditions.

 

The New ABL Facility contains a number of significant covenants including covenants restricting the incurrence of additional debt. The credit agreement governing the New ABL Facility requires Arrow Bidco, among other things, to maintain certain financial ratios or reduce our debt. These restrictions also limit our ability to obtain future financings to withstand a future downturn in its business or the economy in general, or to otherwise conduct necessary corporate activities. We may also be prevented from taking advantage of business opportunities that arise because of the limitations that the restrictive covenants under the New ABL Facility and the indenture governing the Notes impose on it. In addition, complying with these covenants may also cause us to take actions that are not favorable to our securityholders and may make it more difficult for us to successfully execute our business strategy and compete against companies that are not subject to such restrictions.

 

Credit rating downgrades could adversely affect our businesses, cash flows, financial condition and operating results.

 

Arrow Bidco’s credit ratings will impact the cost and availability of future borrowings, and, as a result, cost of capital. Arrow Bidco’s ratings reflect each rating agency’s opinion of our financial strength, operating performance and ability to meet our debt obligations. Each rating agency will review these ratings periodically and there can be no assurance that such ratings will be maintained in the future. A downgrade in Arrow Bidco’s rating could adversely affect our businesses, cash flows, financial condition and operating results.

 

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

 

None

 

Item 2. Properties

 

Our corporate headquarters are located in Woodlands, Texas. Our executive, financial, accounting, legal, administrative, management information systems and human resources functions operate from this single, leased office.  We operate over 25 branch locations across the US.  Subject to certain exceptions, substantially all of our owned personal property and material real property in the US and Canada is encumbered under our New ABL Facility and the 2024 Senior Secured

43

 

 

Notes. We do not believe that the encumbrances will materially detract from the value of our properties, nor will they materially interfere with their use in the operation of our business.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Location

 

Description

Bakken

 

 

 

 

Williston, North Dakota

 

Williams County Lodge

 

Williston, North Dakota

 

Judson Executive Lodge

 

Stanley, North Dakota

 

Stanley Hotel

 

Watford City, North Dakota

 

Watford City Lodge

 

 

 

 

Government

 

 

 

 

Dilley, Texas

 

Dilley (STFRC)

 

 

 

 

Permian

 

 

 

 

Pecos, Texas

 

Pecos North Lodge

 

Pecos, Texas

 

Pecos South Lodge

 

Mentone, Texas

 

Mentone Wolf Camp

 

Mentone, Texas

 

Skillman Station Lodge

 

Orla, Texas

 

Orla North Lodge

 

Orla, Texas

 

Orla South Lodge

 

Orla, Texas

 

Delaware Orla Lodge

 

Orla, Texas

 

El Capitan Lodge

 

Odessa, Texas

 

Odessa West Lodge

 

Odessa, Texas

 

Odessa East Lodge

 

Odessa, Texas

 

Odessa FTSI Lodge

 

Midland, Texas

 

Midland Lodge

 

Midland, Texas

 

Midland East Lodge

 

Kermit, Texas

 

Kermit Lodge

 

Kermit, Texas

 

Kermit North Lodge

 

Barnhart, Texas

 

Barnhart Lodge

 

Carlsbad, New Mexico

 

Carlsbad Lodge

 

Carlsbad, New Mexico

 

Carlsbad Seven Rivers Lodge

 

Jal, New Mexico

 

Jal Lodge

 

 

 

 

Other

 

 

 

 

El Reno, Oklahoma

 

El Reno Lodge

 

 

 

44

 

 

Item 3.  Legal Proceedings

We are involved in various lawsuits, claims and legal proceedings, the majority of which arise out of the ordinary course of business. The nature of the Company’s business is such that disputes occasionally arise with vendors including suppliers and subcontractors, and customers over contract specifications and contract interpretations among other things. The company assesses these matters on a case-by-case basis as they arise. Reserves are established, as required, based on its assessment of exposure. We have insurance policies to cover general liability and workers’ compensation related claims. In the opinion of management, the ultimate amount of liability not covered by insurance, if any, under such pending lawsuits, claims and legal proceedings will not have a material adverse effect on its financial condition or results of operations. Because litigation is subject to inherent uncertainties including unfavorable rulings or developments, it is possible that the ultimate resolution of our legal proceedings could involve amounts that are different from our currently recorded accruals, and that such differences could be material.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

Not applicable

45

 

 

 

Part II

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Shareholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Our Common Stock is listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market under the symbol “TH.” Through March 15, 2019, our common stock,  warrants and units were quoted under the symbols “EAGL,” “EAGLW” and “EAGLU,” respectively. Upon consummation of the Business Combination,  (i) our public units automatically separated into their component securities and, as a result, no longer trade as a separate security and were delisted; (ii) our Common Stock (into which Platinum Eagle’s ordinary shares were converted) continued to trade on Nasdaq under the ticker symbol “TH”; and (iii) the 2019 Warrants continued to trade on Nasdaq under the ticker symbol “THWWW”.

The following table includes the high and low closing prices for shares of our common stock and warrants for the periods presented. Share prices for 2019 represent prices for shares of Common Stock which came into existence on March 15, 2019 as part of the Business Combination. Share prices for all other periods presented represent prices for Class A ordinary shares of Platinum Eagle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Stock

 

Warrants

 

 

    

High

    

Low

    

High

    

Low

2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Quarter

 

$

12.11

 

$

9.26

 

$

1.65

 

$

1.20

Second Quarter

 

$

11.70

 

$

8.92

 

$

3.30

 

$

1.41

Third Quarter

 

$

9.93

 

$

5.65

 

$

2.00

 

$

0.84

Fourth Quarter

 

$

7.15

 

$

3.80

 

$

1.05

 

$

0.22

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Quarter

 

$

9.85

 

$

9.85

 

$

1.50

 

$

0.51

Second Quarter

 

$

11.82

 

$

9.60

 

$

2.13

 

$

1.15

Third Quarter

 

$

9.85

 

$

9.72

 

$

1.50

 

$

1.05

Fourth Quarter

 

$

10.16

 

$

9.70

 

$

1.75

 

$

1.20

 

Holders

As of December 31, 2019, there were 20 holders of record of our Common Stock and 1 holder of record of our Warrants. 

Dividend Information 

We do not currently pay any cash dividends on our Common Stock. The declaration and amount of all dividends will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend upon many factors, including our financial condition, results of operations, cash flows, prospects, industry conditions, capital requirements of our business, covenants associated with certain debt obligations, legal requirements, regulatory constraints, industry practice and other factors the board of directors deems relevant. We can give no assurances that we will pay a dividend in the future.

2018 Warrants

Platinum Eagle issued warrants to purchase its common stock as components of units sold in its initial public offering (the “Public Warrants”). Platinum Eagle also issued warrants to purchase its common stock in a private placement concurrently with its initial public offering (the “Private Warrants,” and together with the Public Warrants, the "2018 Warrants").  

As of December 31, 2019, there were 16,166,650 2018 Warrants outstanding. Each 2018 Warrant entitles its holder to purchase Common Stock in accordance with its terms. See Note 21 of the audited consolidated financial statements included in Part II, Item 8 within this Annual Report on Form 10-k for additional information.

46

 

 

Performance Graph

The following stock price performance graph should not be deemed incorporated by reference by any general statement incorporating by reference this Annual Report on Form 10-K into any filing under the Exchange Act or the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), except to the extent that we specifically incorporate this information by reference, and shall not otherwise be deemed filed under such acts.

The graph below compares the cumulative total return of our common stock from January 12, 2018, through December 31, 2019, with the comparable cumulative return of two indices, the Russell Broadbased Total Returns and the Nasdaq US Benchmark TR Index. The graph plots the change in value of an initial investment in each of our Common Stock, the Russell 2000 Index, and the Nasdaq US Benchmark Index over the indicated time periods. We have not paid any cash dividends and, therefore, the cumulative total return calculation for us is based solely upon the change in share price. The share price performance shown on the graph is not necessarily indicative of future price performance.

Picture 1

 

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities

 

None.

 

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

On August 15, 2019, the Company's board of directors approved the 2019 Share Repurchase Program (“2019 Plan”), authorizing the repurchase of up to $75.0 million of our common shares from August 30, 2019 to August 15, 2020. During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company repurchased 4,414,767 common shares for approximately $23.6 million. As of December 31, 2019, the 2019 Plan had a remaining capacity of approximately $51.5 million. 

 

47

 

 

The following table summarizes all of the share repurchases during the year ended December 31, 2019:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Period

    

Total number
of shares

    

 

Average price paid
per share

    

Total number of
shares  purchased
as part of publicly
announced plans or
programs

    

Maximum
number of
shares yet to be
purchased
under the
plans (1)

August 1, 2019 through August 31, 2019

 

23,300

 

$

6.03

 

23,300

 

12,272,034

September 1, 2019 through September 30, 2019

 

805,300

 

$

6.74

 

805,300

 

10,195,888

October 1, 2019 through October 30, 2019

 

962,800

 

$

6.14

 

962,800

 

11,465,803

November 1, 2019 through November 30, 2019

 

1,357,100

 

$

4.91

 

1,357,100

 

12,019,738

December 1, 2019 through December 31, 2019

 

1,266,267

 

$

4.20

 

1,266,267

 

10,307,008

Total

 

4,414,767

 

 

 

 

4,414,767

 

 


(1)

The maximum number of shares that may be repurchased under the 2019 Share Repurchase Program is calculated by dividing the total dollar amount available to repurchase shares by the closing price of our common shares on the last business day of the respective month.

Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

On March 6, 2019, our shareholders approved a new long-term incentive award plan (the "Plan") in connection with the Business Combination. The Plan is administered by the Compensation Committee. Under the Plan, the Compensation Committee may grant an aggregate of 4,000,000 shares of common stock in the form of stock options, stock appreciation rights, restricted stock, restricted stock units, stock bonus awards, and performance compensation awards.

As of December 31, 2019, 981,167 securities had been granted under the Plan.

Information on our equity compensation plans can be found in the table below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity Compensation Plan Information

Plan Category

 

 

Common shares to be
issued upon Exercise of
Outstanding Options and
Restricted Stock Units

 

 

Weighted Average
Exercise Price of
Outstanding Options and
Restricted Stock Units

 

 

Common Shares
Remaining Available for
Future Issuance under
Equity Compensation
Plans (Excluding Shares
Reflected in the first
column in this table)

Equity compensation plan approved by Target Hospitality stockholders(1)

 

 

981,167

 

$

9.39

 

 

3,018,833

Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

Total

 

 

981,167

 

$

9.39

 

 

3,018,833


(1)

The number of common shares reported in Column (a) excludes grants that were forfeited on or before December 31, 2019, as forfeited grants are available for reissuance under the Plan. The amounts and values in Columns (a) and (b) comprise 401,797 RSUs at a weighted average grant price of $9.31, and 579,370 stock options at a weighted average exercise price of $9.48. For additional information on the awards outstanding under the Plan, see Note 22 in the audited consolidated financial statements included in Part II, Item 8 within this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

 

 

 

 

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Item 6. Selected Financial Data

On March 15, 2019, our company, formerly known as Platinum Eagle, indirectly acquired Target Parent and Signor Parent through the Business Combination. The Business Combination was accounted for as a reverse acquisition in which Target Parent and Signor Parent was the accounting acquirer. Except as otherwise provided herein, our financial statement presentation includes (i) the results of Target Parent and Signor Parent and its subsidiaries as our accounting predecessor for periods prior to the completion of the Business Combination, and (ii) the results of Target Hospitality (including the consolidation of its subsidiaries) for periods after the completion of the Business Combination. The operating statistics and data contained herein represents the operating information of the Company’s business.

 

The following selected historical financial information should be read together with the audited consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes (located in Part II, Item 8 within this Annual Report on Form 10-K) and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” located in Part II, Item 7 within this Annual Report on Form 10-K.  The selected historical financial information in this section is not intended to replace the Company’s consolidated financial statements and related notes.  The Company’s historical results are not necessarily indicative of the Company’s future results, and the Company’s results as of the year ended December 31, 2019 are not necessarily indicative of future results.

49

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As of and for the Years Ended December 31,

 

 

    

2019

    

2018

    

2017

    

2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Services income

 

$

242,817

 

$

163,656

 

$

73,498

 

$

69,510

 

Specialty rental income

 

 

59,826

 

 

53,735

 

 

58,813

 

 

79,957

 

Construction fee income

 

 

18,453

 

 

23,209

 

 

1,924

 

 

 -

Total revenues:

 

 

 

321,096

 

 

240,600

 

 

134,235

 

 

149,467

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Costs:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Services

 

 

120,712

 

 

93,064

 

 

46,630

 

 

42,245

 

Specialty rental

 

 

9,950

 

 

10,372

 

 

10,095

 

 

9,785

 

Depreciation of specialty rental assets

 

 

43,421

 

 

31,610

 

 

24,464

 

 

36,300

 

Loss on impairment (1)

 

 

 -

 

 

15,320

 

 

 -