Company Quick10K Filing
Quick10K
Encision
10-Q 2019-06-30 Quarter: 2019-06-30
10-K 2019-03-31 Annual: 2019-03-31
10-Q 2018-12-31 Quarter: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-09-30 Quarter: 2018-09-30
10-Q 2018-06-30 Quarter: 2018-06-30
10-K 2018-03-31 Annual: 2018-03-31
10-Q 2017-12-31 Quarter: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-09-30 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-Q 2017-06-30 Quarter: 2017-06-30
10-K 2017-03-31 Annual: 2017-03-31
10-Q 2016-12-31 Quarter: 2016-12-31
10-Q 2016-09-30 Quarter: 2016-09-30
10-Q 2016-06-30 Quarter: 2016-06-30
10-K 2016-03-31 Annual: 2016-03-31
10-Q 2015-12-31 Quarter: 2015-12-31
10-Q 2015-09-30 Quarter: 2015-09-30
10-Q 2015-06-30 Quarter: 2015-06-30
10-K 2015-03-31 Annual: 2015-03-31
10-Q 2014-12-31 Quarter: 2014-12-31
10-Q 2014-09-30 Quarter: 2014-09-30
10-Q 2014-06-30 Quarter: 2014-06-30
10-K 2014-03-31 Annual: 2014-03-31
10-Q 2013-12-31 Quarter: 2013-12-31
8-K 2019-08-14 Shareholder Vote
8-K 2019-08-12 Exhibits
8-K 2019-02-07 Exhibits
8-K 2019-01-03 Enter Agreement, Sale of Shares, Exhibits
8-K 2019-01-03 Enter Agreement, Sale of Shares, Exhibits
8-K 2019-01-02 Exhibits
8-K 2018-11-06 Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-07 Enter Agreement, Off-BS Arrangement
8-K 2018-08-02 Exhibits
8-K 2018-05-07 Exhibits
8-K 2018-02-05 Exhibits
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SNNY Sunnyside Bancorp 13
ICTV ICTV Brands 6
EVTN Enviro Technologies 2
IMKT Ingles Markets 0
TCE TraqIQ 0
ILCC International Leaders Capital 0
HYAS Huale Acoustics 0
ECIA 2019-06-30
Part I	Financial Information
Item 1	-	Condensed Interim Financial Statements
Note 1.	Organization and Nature of Business
Note 2.	Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Note 3.	Basic and Diluted Income and Loss per Common Share
Note 4.	Commitments and Contingencies
Note 5.	Share-Based Compensation
Note 6.	Related Party Transaction
Note 7.	Subsequent Events
Item 2	-	Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 4- Controls and Procedures
Part II.	Other Information
Item 6. 	Exhibits
EX-10.1 ex101.htm
EX-31.1 ex31x1.htm
EX-31.2 ex31x2.htm
EX-32.1 ex32x1.htm

Encision Earnings 2019-06-30

ECIA 10Q Quarterly Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

10-Q 1 encision_10q-063019.htm FORM 10-Q

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

Form 10-Q

 

[X]       QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2019

OR

[_]       TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from __________ to________

 

Commission file number: 001-11789

 

ENCISION INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Colorado   84-1162056
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)   (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

6797 Winchester Circle

Boulder, Colorado 80301

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(303) 444-2600

(Registrant’s telephone number)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes x No o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit). Yes x No o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.  

 

Large accelerated filer [_] Accelerated filer [_]
Non-accelerated filer [_] Smaller reporting company [X]
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company) Emerging growth company [_]

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  [_]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

Yes o No x

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934:

Title of each class Trading Symbol(s) Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, no par value ECIA OTC Bulletin Board

 

Securities registered under Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common equity, as of the latest practicable date:

 

Common Stock, no par value 11,558,355 Shares
(Class)  (outstanding at August 31, 2019)

 

      

 
 

 

ENCISION INC.

 

FORM 10-Q

 

For the Three Months Ended June 30, 2019

 

 

INDEX

 

 

Page

Number

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION  
ITEM 1 - Condensed Interim Financial Statements:  
-       Condensed Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2019 and March 31, 2019 3
-       Condensed Statements of Operations for the Three Months Ended June 30, 2019 and 2018 4
-       Condensed Statements of Cash Flows for the Three Months Ended June 30, 2019 and 2018 5
-       Notes to Condensed Interim Financial Statements 6
   
ITEM 2 - Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 13
ITEM 4 - Controls and Procedures 21
PART II. OTHER INFORMATION 22
ITEM 6 - Exhibits 22
SIGNATURE 22

 

 

 

2 
 

 

 

PART I FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1 - Condensed Interim Financial Statements

 

Encision Inc.

Condensed Balance Sheets

(Unaudited)

  

June 30,

2019

 

March 31,

2019

ASSETS          
Current assets:          
Cash and cash equivalents  $135,569   $273,348 
Restricted cash   —      25,000 
Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $20,000 at June 30, 2019 and $26,000 at March 31, 2019   1,021,341    1,009,106 
Inventories, net of reserve for obsolescence of $40,000 at June 30, 2019 and $50,000 at March 31, 2019   1,377,719    1,472,543 
Prepaid expenses   132,583    130,016 
Total current assets   2,667,212    2,910,013 
Equipment, at cost:          
Furniture, fixtures and equipment   3,082,315    3,061,329 
Accumulated depreciation   (2,848,095)   (2,811,761)
Equipment, net   234,220    249,568 
Right of use asset   1,181,590    —   
Patents, net of accumulated amortization of $272,526 at June 30, 2019 and $266,028 at March 31, 2019   242,886    248,579 
Other assets   19,548    19,548 
TOTAL ASSETS  $4,345,456   $3,427,708 
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY          
Current liabilities:          
Accounts payable  $437,918   $578,956 
Accrued compensation   208,946    295,875 
Other accrued liabilities   138,007    126,434 
Line of credit   150,000    —   
Accrued lease liability   158,721    —   
Total current liabilities   1,093,592    1,001,265 
Long-term liability:          
Accrued lease liability   1,074,434    —   
Deferred rent   —      74,821 
Total liabilities   2,168,026    1,076,086 
Commitments and contingencies (Note 4)          
Shareholders’ equity:          
Preferred stock, no par value: 10,000,000 shares authorized; none issued and outstanding   —      —   
Common stock and additional paid-in capital, no par value: 100,000,000 shares authorized; 11,558,355 shares issued and outstanding at June 30, 2019 and March 31, 2019   24,209,471    24,201,769 
Accumulated (deficit)   (22,032,041)   (21,850,147)
Total shareholders’ equity   2,177,430    2,351,622 
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY  $4,345,456   $3,427,708 

 

The accompanying notes to financial statements are an integral part of these condensed statements.

 

3 
 

 

Encision Inc.

Condensed Statements of Operations

(Unaudited)

 

   Three Months Ended
   June 30, 2019  June 30, 2018
NET REVENUE  $1,928,575   $2,404,292 
COST OF REVENUE   995,604    1,103,177 
GROSS PROFIT   932,971    1,301,115 
OPERATING EXPENSES:          
Sales and marketing   530,505    775,785 
General and administrative   345,600    320,260 
Research and development   236,144    166,672 
Total operating expenses   1,112,249    1,262,717 
OPERATING INCOME (LOSS)   (179,278)   38,398 
Interest expense, net   (2,783)   (18,450)
Other income (expense), net   167    (1,365)
Interest expense and other income (expense), net   (2,616)   (19,815)
INCOME (LOSS) BEFORE PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES   (181,894)   18,583 
Provision for income taxes   —      —   
NET INCOME (LOSS)  $(181,894)  $18,583 
Net income (loss) per share—basic and diluted  $(0.02)  $0.00 
Weighted average shares—basic   11,558,355    10,683,355 
Weighted average shares—diluted   11,558,355    10,704,655 

 

 

The accompanying notes to financial statements are an integral part of these condensed statements.

 

 

4 
 

 

 

Encision Inc.

Condensed Statements of Cash Flows

(Unaudited)

 

   Three Months Ended
   June 30, 2019  June 30, 2018
Operating activities:          
Net income (loss)  $(181,894)  $18,583 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash used in operating activities:          
Depreciation and amortization   42,832    47,587 
Share-based compensation expense   7,702    12,093 
(Recovery from) doubtful accounts, net   (6,000)   (3,000)
(Recovery from) inventory obsolescence, net   (10,000)   —   
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:          
Right of use asset, net   (23,256)   —   
Accounts receivable   (6,235)   (284,959)
Inventories   104,824    201,506 
Prepaid expenses and other assets   (2,567)   (44,033)
Accounts payable   (141,038)   (16,870)
Accrued compensation and other accrued liabilities   (75,356)   (72,953)
Net cash (used in) operating activities   (290,988)   (142,046)
Investing activities:          
Acquisition of property and equipment   (20,986)   (5,288)
Patent costs   (805)   (1,171)
Net cash (used in) investing activities   (21,791)   (6,459)
Financing activities:          
Borrowings from credit facility, net change   150,000    87,110 
Net cash generated by financing activities   150,000    87,110 
Net (decrease) in cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash   (162,779)   (61,395)
Cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash beginning of period   298,348    139,538 
Cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash end of period  $135,569   $78,143 
           
Supplemental disclosure:         
Right of use asset  $1,214,983    —   
Accrued lease liability   $1,279,675    —   

 

 

The accompanying notes to financial statements are an integral part of these condensed statements.

 

 

 

5 
 

 

ENCISION INC.

 

NOTES TO CONDENSED INTERIM FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

JUNE 30, 2019

(Unaudited)

 

Note 1. ORGANIZATION AND NATURE OF BUSINESS

 

Encision Inc. is a medical device company that designs, develops, manufactures and markets patented surgical instruments that provide greater safety to, and saves lives of, patients undergoing minimally-invasive surgery. We believe that our patented AEM® (Active Electrode Monitoring) surgical instrument technology is changing the marketplace for electrosurgical devices and instruments by providing a solution to a patient safety risk in laparoscopic surgery. Our sales to date have been made principally in the United States.

 

We have an accumulated deficit of $22,032,041 at June 30, 2019. A significant portion of our operating funds have been provided by issuances of our common stock and warrants, a line of credit, and the exercise of stock options to purchase our common stock. Shareholders’ equity decreased by $174,192 as a result of our loss of $181,894, and increased as a result of share-based compensation of $7,702. Should our liquidity be diminished in the future because of operating losses, we may be required to seek additional capital.

 

Our strategic marketing and sales plan is designed to expand the use of our products in surgically active hospitals and surgery centers in the United States.

 

Note 2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of Presentation. The condensed interim financial statements included herein have been prepared by us, without audit, pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles accepted in the United States (“GAAP”) have been condensed or omitted pursuant to such rules and regulations, although we believe that the disclosures made are adequate to make the information presented not misleading. The condensed interim financial statements and notes thereto should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and the notes thereto included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2019, filed on June 14, 2019.

 

The accompanying condensed interim financial statements have been prepared, in all material respects, in conformity with the standards of accounting measurements and reflect, in the opinion of management, all adjustments necessary to summarize fairly the financial position and results of operations for such periods in accordance with GAAP. All adjustments are of a normal recurring nature. The results of operations for the most recent interim period are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year.

 

We had a net loss of $181,894 for the fiscal quarter ended June 30, 2019. At June 30, 2019, we had cash of $135,569, borrowings of $150,000 and $850,000 available under our line of credit. Working capital was $1,573,620, a decrease of $335,128 from March 31, 2019. We used $290,988 of cash in the fiscal quarter ended June 30, 2019, primarily as a result of our loss and reduction of accounts payable. The principal reason for our loss for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2019 was higher material costs as a result of the U.S. governmental tariffs. These facts and circumstances were initial indicators that created uncertainty about our ability to continue as a going concern. To address this uncertainty, management has developed plans to ensure that we have the working capital necessary to fund operations. In July 2019, we reduced personnel and departmental costs by more than $1 million annualized. We expect that the $1 million annualized cost reductions will return us, starting in the near-term, to profitability. We have a new line of credit (see Note 7), for up to $1 million, restricted by eligible receivables. Management concludes that it is probable that our cash resources and line of credit will be sufficient to meet our cash requirements for twelve months from the issuance of the consolidated financial statements. In the event that the governmental tariffs are reduced or eliminated then we expect that the higher material costs that we experienced will be reduced. We are increasing our pricing on products to mitigate somewhat our higher material costs. Therefore, the accompanying condensed financial statements have been prepared assuming that we will continue as a going concern.

 

 

6 
 

 

 

Use of Estimates in the Preparation of Financial Statements. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions. Such estimates and assumptions affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities as well as disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of sales and expense during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents. For purposes of reporting cash flows, we consider all cash and highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents. Restricted cash is cash that was deposited to obtain a letter of credit for our importing and exporting activities.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments. Our financial instruments consist of cash, cash equivalents, restricted cash, short-term trade receivables, payables and a line of credit. The carrying values of cash, cash equivalents, restricted cash short-term trade receivables, payables and line of credit approximate their fair value due to their short maturities.

 

Concentration of Credit Risk. Financial instruments, which potentially subject us to concentrations of credit risk, consist of cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable and a line of credit. From time to time, the amount of cash on deposit with financial institutions may exceed the $250,000 federally insured limit at June 30, 2019. We believe that cash on deposit that exceeds $250,000 with financial institutions is financially sound and the risk of loss is minimal.

 

We have no significant off-balance sheet concentrations of credit risk such as foreign exchange contracts, options contracts or other foreign hedging arrangements. We maintain the majority of our cash balances with one financial institution in the form of demand deposits.

 

Accounts receivable are typically unsecured and are derived from transactions with and from entities in the healthcare industry primarily located in the United States. Accordingly, we may be exposed to credit risk generally associated with the healthcare industry. We maintain allowances for doubtful accounts for estimated losses resulting from the inability of our customers to make required payments. The net accounts receivable balance at June 30, 2019 of $1,021,341 and at March 31, 2019 of $1,009,106 included no more than 8% from any one customer.

 

Inventories. Inventories are stated at the lower of cost (first-in, first-out basis) or net realizable value. We reduce inventory for estimated obsolete or unmarketable inventory equal to the difference between the cost of inventory and the net realizable value based upon assumptions about future demand and market conditions. If actual market conditions are less favorable than those projected by management, additional inventory write-downs may be required. At June 30, 2019 and March 31, 2019, inventory consisted of the following:

 

   June 30, 2019  March 31, 2019
Raw materials  $1,148,006   $1,063,780 
Finished goods   269,713    458,763 
Total gross inventories   1,417,719    1,522,543 
Less reserve for obsolescence   (40,000)   (50,000)
Total net inventories  $1,377,719   $1,472,543 

 

 

7 
 

 

 

Property and Equipment. Property and equipment are stated at cost, with depreciation computed over the estimated useful lives of the assets, generally five to seven years. We use the straight-line method of depreciation for property and equipment. Leasehold improvements are depreciated over the shorter of the remaining lease term or the estimated useful life of the asset. Maintenance and repairs are expensed as incurred and major additions, replacements and improvements are capitalized.

 

Long-Lived Assets. Long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. A long-lived asset is considered impaired when estimated future cash flows related to the asset, undiscounted and without interest, are insufficient to recover the carrying amount of the asset. If deemed impaired, the long-lived asset is reduced to its estimated fair value. Long-lived assets to be disposed of are reported at the lower of their carrying amount or estimated fair value less cost to sell.

 

Patents. The costs of applying for patents are capitalized and amortized on a straight-line basis over the lesser of the patent’s economic or legal life (20 years from the date of application in the United States). Capitalized costs are expensed if patents are not issued. We review the carrying value of our patents periodically to determine whether the patents have continuing value and such reviews could result in the conclusion that the recorded amounts have been impaired.

 

Income Taxes. We account for income taxes under the provisions of FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 740, “Accounting for Income Taxes” (“ASC 740”). ASC 740 requires recognition of deferred income tax assets and liabilities for the expected future income tax consequences, based on enacted tax laws, of temporary differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities. ASC 740 also requires recognition of deferred tax assets for the expected future tax effects of all deductible temporary differences, loss carryforwards and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets are then reduced, if deemed necessary, by a valuation allowance for the amount of any tax benefits, which, more likely than not based on current circumstances, are not expected to be realized. As a result, no provision for income tax is reflected in the accompanying statements of operations. Should we achieve sufficient, sustained income in the future, we may conclude that some or all of the valuation allowance should be reversed. We are required to make many subjective assumptions and judgments regarding our income tax exposures. At June 30, 2019, we had no unrecognized tax benefits, which would affect the effective tax rate if recognized and had no accrued interest, or penalties related to uncertain tax positions.

 

Revenue Recognition. We record revenue at a single point in time, when control is transferred to the customer, which is consistent with past practice. We will continue to apply our current business processes, policies, systems and controls to support recognition and disclosure. Our shipping policy is FOB Shipping Point. We recognize revenue from sales to stocking distributors when there is no right of return, other than for normal warranty claims. We have no ongoing obligations related to product sales, except for normal warranty obligations. We evaluated the requirement to disaggregate revenue, and concluded that substantially all of its revenue comes from multiple products within a line of medical devices.

 

Research and Development Expenses. We expense research and development costs for products and processes as incurred.

 

Stock-Based Compensation. Stock-based compensation is presented in accordance with the guidance of ASC Topic 718, “Compensation – Stock Compensation” (“ASC 718”). Under the provisions of ASC 718, companies are required to estimate the fair value of share-based payment awards on the date of grant using an option-pricing model. The value of the portion of the award that is ultimately expected to vest is recognized as expense over the requisite service periods in our statements of operations.

 

8 
 

 

 

Stock-based compensation expense recognized under ASC 718 for the three months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018 was $7,702 and $12,093, respectively, which consisted of stock-based compensation expense related to grants of employee stock options and restricted stock units (“RSUs”).

 

Segment Reporting. We have concluded that we have one operating segment.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements. We have reviewed all recently issued accounting pronouncements.

 

ASU No. 2014-09 (ASC 606), Revenue from Contracts with Customers became effective for us beginning April 1, 2018, and adopted the new accounting standard using the modified retrospective transition approach. We record revenue under ASC 606 at a single point in time, when control is transferred to the customer, which is consistent with past practice. We will continue to apply our current business processes, policies, systems and controls to support recognition and disclosure under the new standard. Based on the results of the evaluation, we have determined that the adoption of the new standard presents no material impact on our financial statements.

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842) ("ASU 2016-02"), which modified lease accounting for both lessees and lessors to increase transparency and comparability by recognizing lease assets and lease liabilities by lessees for those leases classified as operating leases under previous accounting standards and disclosing key information about leasing arrangements. Within the opening balances for the fiscal year beginning April 1, 2019, we recognized leased assets and corresponding liabilities in other long-term assets of $1,214,983.

 

Note 3. Basic and Diluted Income and Loss per Common Share

 

We report both basic and diluted net income (loss) per share. Basic net income or loss per common share is computed by dividing net income or loss for the period by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted net income or loss per common share is computed by dividing the net income or loss for the period by the weighted average number of common and potential common shares outstanding during the period if the effect of the potential common shares is dilutive. The shares used in the calculation of dilutive potential common shares exclude options and RSUs to purchase shares where the exercise price was greater than the average market price of common shares for the period.

 

The following table presents the calculation of basic and diluted net loss per share:

 

   Three Months Ended
   June 30, 2019  June 30, 2018
Net income (loss)  $(181,894)  $18,583 
Weighted-average shares — basic   11,558,355    10,683,355 
Effect of dilutive potential common shares   —      21,300 
Weighted-average shares — diluted   11,558,355    10,704,655 
Net income (loss) per share — basic  $(0.02)  $0.00 
Net income (loss) per share — diluted  $(0.02)  $0.00 
Antidilutive employee stock options and RSUs   980,286    986,236 
           

 

 

9 
 

 


Note 4. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

Effective November 9, 2018, we extended our noncancelable lease agreement through July 31, 2024 for our facilities at 6797 Winchester Circle, Boulder, Colorado. The lease includes base rent abatement for the first two months, or $55,583, and $145,000 of leasehold improvements granted by the landlord.

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842) ("ASU 2016-02"), which modified lease accounting for both lessees and lessors to increase transparency and comparability by recognizing lease assets and lease liabilities by lessees for those leases classified as either finance or operating leases under previous accounting standards and disclosing key information about leasing arrangements. We adopted Topic 842 on April 1, 2019, using the alternative modified transition method, which requires a cumulative effect adjustment, if any, to the opening balance of retained earnings to be recognized on the date of adoption with prior periods not restated. There was no cumulative effect adjustment recorded on April 1, 2019. Within the opening balances for the fiscal year beginning April 1, 2019, we will recognize leased assets and corresponding liabilities in other long-term assets of $1,214,983. This includes two months of rent abatements. The primary impact for us was the balance sheet recognition of right-of-use (“ROU”) assets and lease liabilities for operating leases as a lessee.

 

We determine if an arrangement contains a lease at inception. We currently do not have any finance leases. Operating lease ROU assets and operating lease liabilities are recognized based on the present value of the future minimum lease payments over the lease term at commencement date. ROU assets also include any initial direct costs incurred and any lease payments made at or before the lease commencement date, less lease incentives received. We use our incremental borrowing rate based on the information available at the commencement date in determining the lease liabilities as our leases do not provide an implicit rate. Lease expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

 

The minimum future lease payment, by fiscal year, as of June 30, 2019 is as follows:

 

Fiscal Year  Amount
 2020 (9 months remaining)   $199,913 
 2021    343,167 
 2022    357,667 
 2023    372,167 
 2024    386,667 
 2025    130,500 
 Total   $1,790,081 

 

On July 31, 2018, we signed a new line of credit agreement with Bank of America Merrill Lynch. The facility provides for up to $1 million revolving line of credit. The interest rate is a rate per year equal to the LIBOR Daily Floating Rate plus 2.75 percentage points. There is a minimum quarterly EBITDA covenant and a minimum Collateral Coverage ratio of 2. Minimum Collateral Coverage is the ratio of gross accounts receivable plus inventory to the line of credit commitment. As of June 30, 2019, we had $150,000 of borrowings from the credit facility and had an additional $850,000 available to borrow. For the quarter ended June 30, 2019, we were not in compliance with the minimum quarterly EBITDA covenant. This line was extended to August 31, 2019 and was replaced by a loan and security agreement with Crestmark Bank, see below.

 

On August 9, 2019, we entered into a loan and security agreement with Crestmark Bank, which replaced the Bank of America Merrill Lynch credit agreement. The loan is due on demand and has no financial covenants. Under the agreement, we were provided with a line of credit that is not to exceed the lesser of $1,000,000 or 85% of eligible accounts receivable. The interest rate is prime rate plus 1.5%, with a floor of 6.75%, plus a monthly maintenance fee of 0.4%, based on the average monthly loan balance. Interest is charged on a minimum loan balance of $500,000, a loan fee of 1% annually, and an exit fee of 3%, 2% and 1% during years one, two and three, respectively.

 

10 
 

 

 

 

Aside from the operating lease, we do not have any material contractual commitments requiring settlement in the future.

 

We are subject to regulation by the United States Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”). The FDA provides regulations governing the manufacture and sale of our products and regularly inspects us and other manufacturers to determine compliance with these regulations. We believe that we were in substantial compliance with all known regulations at June 30, 2019. FDA inspections are conducted periodically at the discretion of the FDA. Our latest inspection by the FDA occurred in October 2016.

 

Note 5. SHARE-BASED COMPENSATION

 

The provisions of ASC 718-10-55 requires the measurement and recognition of compensation expense for all share-based payment awards made to our employees and directors, including employee stock options and RSUs, based on estimated fair values. The following table summarizes stock-based compensation expense related to employee stock options, RSUs and employee stock purchases for the three months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, which was allocated as follows:

 

   Three Months Ended
   June 30, 2019  June 30, 2018
Cost of sales  $681   $601 
Sales and marketing   790    1,296 
General and administrative   5,622    9,592 
Research and development   609    604 
Stock-based compensation expense  $7,702   $12,093 

 

Share-based compensation cost for stock options is measured at the grant date, based on the fair value as calculated by the Black-Scholes-Merton ("BSM") option-pricing model. The BSM option-pricing model requires the use of actual employee exercise behavior data and the application of a number of assumptions, including expected volatility, risk-free interest rate and expected dividends. There were 40,000 stock options granted and 50,000 stock options forfeited during the three months ended June 30, 2019. Share-based compensation cost for RSUs is measured based on the closing fair market value of the Company's common stock on the date of grant.

 

As of June 30, 2019, $131,000 of total unrecognized compensation costs related to nonvested stock options is expected to be recognized over a period of five years.

 

Note 6. RELATED PARTY TRANSACTION

 

We paid consulting fees of $20,094 and $20,069 to an entity owned by one of our directors during the three months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

 

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Note 7. SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

We evaluated all of our activity as of the date the condensed interim financial statements were issued and concluded that, except for the item that follows, no subsequent events have occurred that would require recognition in our financial statements or disclosed in the notes to our condensed interim financial statements. On August 9, 2019, we entered into a loan and security agreement with Crestmark Bank, which replaced the Bank of America Merrill Lynch credit agreement. The loan is due on demand and has no financial covenants. Under the agreement, we were provided with a line of credit that is not to exceed the lesser of $1,000,000 or 85% of eligible accounts receivable. The interest rate is prime rate plus 1.5%, with a floor of 6.75%, plus a monthly maintenance fee of 0.4%, based on the average monthly loan balance. Interest is charged on a minimum loan balance of $500,000, a loan fee of 1% annually, and an exit fee of 3%, 2% and 1% during years one, two and three, respectively.

 

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ITEM 2 - MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Certain statements contained in this section on Management’s Discussion and Analysis are not historical facts, including statements about our strategies and expectations with respect to new and existing products, market demand, acceptance of new and existing products, marketing efforts, technologies and opportunities, market and industry segment growth, and return on investments in products and markets. These statements are forward looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and involve substantial risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from those indicated by the forward looking statements. All forward looking statements in this section on Management’s Discussion and Analysis are based on information available to us on the date of this document, and we assume no obligation to update such forward looking statements. Readers of this Form 10-Q are strongly encouraged to review the section entitled “Risk Factors” in our Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2019.

 

General

 

Encision Inc., a medical device company based in Boulder, Colorado, has developed and markets innovative technology that provides unprecedented outcomes and patient safety in minimally-invasive surgery. We believe that our patented Active Electrode Monitoring (“AEM®”) AEM EndoShield™ Burn Protection System is changing the marketplace for electrosurgical devices and laparoscopic instruments by providing a solution to a well-documented hazard unique to laparoscopic surgery. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”) recently published its Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program effective October 1, 2015. At that time, the program began to levy as much as a 1% penalty on Medicare reimbursements to hospitals in the lower quadrant of performance for selected quality indicators, including accidental puncture and laceration (“APL”). Examples of APL include the use of a cautery device (electrosurgery) or scissors to dissect a tissue plane that errantly causes an injury to underlying bowels. During the quarter, a Safety Communication was released by the FDA on May 29, 2018. It is on the FDA's website at: https://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/Safety/AlertsandNotices/ucm608637.htm. The Safety Communication states that, "In addition to serving as an ignition source, monopolar energy use can directly result in unintended patient burns from capacitive coupling and intra-operative insulation failure. If a monopolar electrosurgical units (ESU) is used: Do not activate when near or in contact with other instruments.”

 

We address market opportunities created by the increase in minimally-invasive surgery (“MIS”) and surgeons’ use of electrosurgery devices in these procedures. The product opportunity exists in that monopolar electrosurgery instruments used in laparoscopic procedures provide excellent clinical results, but are also susceptible to causing inadvertent collateral tissue damage outside the surgeon’s field of view due to insulation failure and capacitive coupling. The risk of unintended electrosurgical burn injury to the patient in laparoscopic surgery has been well documented. This risk poses a threat to patient safety, including the risk of death, and creates liability exposure for surgeons and hospitals, as well as increased and preventable readmissions.

 

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Our patented AEM technology provides surgeons with the desired tissue effects, while capturing stray electrosurgical energy that can cause unintended and unseen tissue injury that may result in death. AEM Surgical Instruments are equivalent to conventional instruments in size, shape, ergonomics, functionality and competitive pricing, but they incorporate “Active Electrode Monitoring” technology to dynamically and continuously monitor the flow of electrosurgical current, thereby helping to prevent patient injury. With our “shielded and monitored” instruments, surgeons are able to perform electrosurgical procedures more safely, effectively and economically than is possible using conventional instruments or alternative energy sources.

 

AEM technology has been recommended and endorsed by many groups involved in MIS. Surgeons, nurses, biomedical engineers, the medicolegal community, malpractice insurance carriers and electrosurgical device manufacturers advocate the use of AEM technology. We have focused our marketing strategies to date on expanding the market awareness of the AEM technology and our broad independent endorsements and have continued efforts to improve and expand the AEM technology penetration.

 

When a hospital or surgery center changes to AEM technology, we receive recurring revenue from sales of replacement instruments. We believe that there is no directly competing technology to supplant AEM products. The replacement market of reusable and disposable AEM products in hospitals and surgery centers that use our AEM technology represented over 90% of our product revenue during the three months ended June 30, 2019. This revenue stream is expected to grow as the base of accounts using AEM technology expands. In addition, we intend to further develop disposable versions of more of our AEM products in order to meet market demands and expand our sales opportunities.

 

We have an accumulated deficit of $22,032,041 at June 30, 2019. A significant portion of our operating funds have been provided by issuances of our common stock and warrants, a line of credit, and the exercise of stock options to purchase our common stock. Should our liquidity be diminished in the future because of operating losses, we may be required to seek additional capital.

 

During the three months ended June 30, 2019, we used $290,988 of cash in our operating activities and used $20,986 for investments in property and equipment. As of June 30, 2019, we had $135,569 in cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash available to fund future operations, a decrease of $162,779 from March 31, 2019. Our working capital was $1,573,620 at June 30, 2019 compared to $1,908,748 at March 31, 2019.

 

Historical Perspective

 

We were organized in 1991 and spent several years developing the AEM monitoring system and protective sheaths to adapt to conventional electrosurgical instruments. We have invested heavily in an effort to protect our valuable technology, and, as a result of this effort, we have been issued 16 unexpired relevant patents that together form a significant intellectual property position. Our patents relate to the basic shielding and monitoring technologies that we incorporate into our AEM products.

 

Our AEM Surgical Instruments have been engineered to provide a seamless transition for surgeons switching from conventional laparoscopic instruments. AEM technology has been integrated into instruments that have the same look, feel and functionality as conventional instruments that surgeons have been using for years. The AEM product line encompasses the full range of instrument sizes, types and styles favored by surgeons. Additionally, we continue to improve quality and add to the product line. These additions include more disposable versions, the introduction of hand-activated instruments, our enhanced scissors, our e∙Edge™ scissors, our EM3 AEM Monitor and our AEM EndoShield Burn Protection System. Hospitals can make a complete and smooth conversion to our product line, thereby advancing patient safety in MIS with optimal convenience.

 

 

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Outlook

 

Installed Base of AEM Monitoring Equipment: We believe that sales of our installed base of AEM products will increase as the inherent risks associated with monopolar laparoscopic electrosurgery become more widely acknowledged and as we focus on increasing our sales efficiency and continue to enhance our product line. We expect that the replacement sales of electrosurgical instruments and accessories will also increase as additional facilities adopt AEM technology. We anticipate that the efforts to improve the productivity of sales representatives carrying the AEM product line, along with the introduction of next generation products, may provide the basis for increased sales and profitable operations. However, these measures, or any others that we may adopt, may not result in either increased sales or profitable operations.

 

We believe that the unique performance of the AEM technology and our breadth of independent endorsements provide an opportunity for continued market share growth. In our view, market awareness and awareness of the clinical credibility of the AEM technology, as well as awareness of our endorsements, are improving, and we expect this awareness to benefit our sales efforts for the remainder of fiscal year 2020. Our objectives for the remainder of fiscal year 2020 are to optimize sales execution, to expand market awareness of the AEM technology and to maximize the number of additional hospital and surgery center accounts switching to AEM instruments while retaining existing customers. In addition, acceptance of AEM products depends on surgeons’ preference for our instruments, which depends on factors such as ergonomics, quality and ease of use in addition to the technological and safety advantages of AEM products. If surgeons prefer other instruments to our instruments, our business results will suffer.

 

Possibility of Operating Losses: We have an accumulated deficit of $22,032,041 at June 30, 2019. A significant portion of our operating funds have been provided by issuances of our common stock and warrants, a line of credit, and the exercise of stock options to purchase our common stock. Should our liquidity be diminished in the future because of operating losses, we may be required to seek additional capital. We have made strides toward improving our operating results but due to the ongoing need to develop, optimize and train our direct sales managers and the independent sales representative network, the need to support the development of refinements to our product line, and the need to increase sustained sales to a level adequate to cover fixed and variable operating costs, we may operate at a net loss. Sustained losses, or our inability to generate sufficient cash flow from operations to fund our obligations, may result in a need to raise additional capital.

 

Revenue Growth: We expect to generate increased product revenue in the U.S. from sales to new customers and from expanded sales to existing customers as the medical device industry stabilizes and our network of direct and independent sales representatives becomes more efficient. We believe that the visibility and credibility of the independent clinical endorsements for AEM technology will contribute to new accounts and increased product revenue in fiscal year 2020. We also expect to increase market share through promotional programs of placing our AEM monitors at no charge into hospitals that commit to standardize with AEM instruments. However, all of these efforts to increase market share and grow product revenue will depend in part on our ability to expand the efficiency and effective coverage range of our direct and independent sales representatives, as well as maintain and in some cases, improve the quality of our product offerings. Service revenue represents design, development and product supply revenue from our agreements with strategic partners.

 

We also have longer-term initiatives in place to improve our prospects. We expect that development of next generation versions of our AEM products will better position our products in the marketplace and improve our retention rate at hospitals and surgery centers that have changed to AEM technology, enabling us to grow our sales. We are exploring overseas markets to assess opportunities for sales growth internationally. Finally, we intend to explore opportunities to capitalize on our proven AEM technology via licensing arrangements and strategic alliances. These efforts to generate additional sales and further the market penetration of our products are longer term in nature and may not materialize. Even if we are able to successfully develop next generation products or identify potential international markets or strategic partners, we may not be able to capitalize on these opportunities.

 

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Gross Profit and Gross Margins: Gross profit and gross margins can be expected to fluctuate from quarter to quarter as a result of product sales mix, sales volume and service revenue. Gross margins on products manufactured or assembled by us are expected to improve at higher levels of production and sales.

 

Sales and Marketing Expenses: We continue to refine our domestic and international distribution capability, and we believe that sales and marketing expenses will decrease as a percentage of net sales with increasing sales volume.

 

Research and Development Expenses: Research and development expenses are expected to increase to support quality improvement efforts and development of refinements to our AEM product line and new products, which will further expand options for surgeons and hospitals.

 

Results of Operations

 

For the quarter ended June 30, 2019 compared to the quarter ended June 30, 2018.

 

Net revenue. Net revenue for the quarter ended June 30, 2019 was $1,928,575 compared to $2,404,292 for the quarter ended June 30, 2018, a decrease of 20%. The decrease of AEM product net revenue is attributable to business lost from hospitals that used AEM technology during the quarter. In addition, fewer capital monitor units were sold in the current quarter than were sold in the quarter a year ago.

Gross profit. Gross profit for the quarter ended June 30, 2019 of $932,971 represented a decrease of 28% from gross profit of $1,301,115 for the quarter ended June 30, 2018. Gross profit as a percentage of sales (gross margins) decreased from 54% for the quarter ended June 30, 2018 to 48% for the quarter ended June 30, 2019. Gross margins were lower in the quarter ended June 30, 2019 compared to last year’s quarter primarily as a result of higher material costs as a result of the U.S. tariffs and higher labor and overhead costs, per unit of inventory, as a result of lower revenue.

Sales and marketing expenses. Sales and marketing expenses of $530,505 for the quarter ended June 30, 2019 represented a decrease of 32% from sales and marketing expenses of $775,785 for the quarter ended June 30, 2018. The decrease was the result of lower compensation on a decrease to the direct salesforce, lower commissions on reduced revenue, reduced sales samples’ cost and reduced travel. The reduction was partially offset by higher commissions to general purchasing organizations.

 

General and administrative expenses. General and administrative expenses of $345,600 for the quarter ended June 30, 2019 represented an increase of 8% from general and administrative expenses of $320,260 for the quarter ended June 30, 2018. The increase was the result of an increase to outside accountants’ fee accrual, outside services and regulatory fees.

 

Research and development expenses. Research and development expenses of $236,144 for the quarter ended June 30, 2019 represented an increase of 42% compared to $166,672 for the quarter ended June 30, 2018. The increase was the result of increased compensation.

 

Net loss. Net loss was $181,894 for the quarter ended June 30, 2019 compared to net income of $18,583 for the quarter ended June 30, 2018. The net loss increase was principally a result of lower net revenue and lower gross profit that was partially offset by lower total operating expenses, as explained above.

 

The results of operations for the three months ended June 30, 2019 are not indicative of the results of operations for all or any part of the balance of the fiscal year.

 

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Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

To date, a significant portion of our operating funds have been provided by issuances of our common stock and warrants, a line of credit, and the exercise of stock options to purchase our common stock. Common stock and additional paid in capital totaled $24,209,471 from inception through June 30, 2019.

 

On July 31, 2018, we signed a new line of credit agreement with Bank of America Merrill Lynch. The facility provides for up to $1 million revolving line of credit. The interest rate is a rate per year equal to the LIBOR Daily Floating Rate plus 2.75 percentage points. There is a minimum quarterly EBITDA covenant and a minimum Collateral Coverage ratio of 2. Minimum Collateral Coverage is the ratio of gross accounts receivable plus inventory to the line of credit commitment. As of June 30, 2019, we had no borrowings from the credit facility and had an additional $1 million available to borrow. For the quarter ended June 30, 2019, we were not in compliance with the minimum quarterly EBITDA covenant. This line was extended to August 31, 2019 and was replaced by a loan and security agreement with Crestmark Bank, see below.

 

On August 9, 2019, we entered into a loan and security agreement with Crestmark Bank, which replaced the Bank of America Merrill Lynch credit agreement. The loan is due on demand and has no financial covenants. Under the agreement, we were provided with a line of credit that is not to exceed the lesser of $1,000,000 or 85% of eligible accounts receivable. The interest rate is prime rate plus 1.5%, with a floor of 6.75%, plus a monthly maintenance fee of 0.4%, based on the average monthly loan balance. Interest is charged on a minimum loan balance of $500,000, a loan fee of 1% annually, and an exit fee of 3%, 2% and 1% during years one, two and three, respectively.

 

Our operations used $290,988 of cash during the three months ended June 30, 2019 on net revenue of $1,928,575. Cash was principally used by the net loss, accounts payable, accrued compensation and other accrued liabilities and increased by inventories. The amounts of cash used by operations for the three months ended June 30, 2019 are not indicative of the expected amounts of cash to be generated from or used in operations in fiscal year 2019. To reduce our costs and cash usage, w we have implemented a reduction of personnel and departmental spending in excess of $1 million annualized. e have implemented a reduction of personnel and departmental spending in excess of $1 million annualized. At June 30, 2019, we had $135,569 in cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash available to fund future operations. Our working capital was $1,573,620 at June 30, 2019 compared to $1,908,748 at March 31, 2019. The decrease of working capital at June 30, 2019 was the result of our loss and a decrease to inventories. Current liabilities were $1,093,592 at June 30, 2019 compared to $1,001,265 at March 31, 2019.

 

Effective November 9, 2018, we extended our noncancelable lease agreement through July 31, 2024 for our facilities at 6797 Winchester Circle, Boulder, Colorado. The lease includes base rent abatement for the first two months, or $55,583, and $145,000 of leasehold improvements granted by the landlord.

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842) (“ASU 2016-02”), which modified lease accounting for both lessees and lessors to increase transparency and comparability by recognizing lease assets and lease liabilities by lessees for those leases classified as operating leases under previous accounting standards and disclosing key information about leasing arrangements. Within the opening balances for the fiscal year beginning April 1, 2019, we will recognize leased assets and corresponding liabilities in other long-term assets of $1,214,983. The primary impact for us was the balance sheet recognition of right-of-use (“ROU”) assets and lease liabilities for operating leases as a lessee.

 

Operating lease ROU assets and operating lease liabilities are recognized based on the present value of the future minimum lease payments over the lease term at commencement date. ROU assets also include any initial direct costs incurred and any lease payments made at or before the lease commencement date, less lease incentives received. We use our incremental borrowing rate based on the information available at the commencement date in determining the lease liabilities as our leases do not provide an implicit rate. Lease expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

 

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The minimum future lease payment, by fiscal year, as of June 30, 2019 is as follows:

 

Fiscal Year  Amount
 2020 (9 months remaining)   $199,913 
 2021    343,167 
 2022    357,667 
 2023    372,167 
 2024    386,667 
 2025    130,500 
 Total   $1,790,081 

 

Aside from the operating lease, we do not have any material contractual commitments requiring settlement in the future.

 

As of June 30, 2019, the following table shows our contractual obligations for the periods presented:

 

   Payment due by period
Contractual obligations  Totals 

Less than

1 year

  1-3 years  3-5 years 

More than

5 years

Operating lease obligations  $1,790,081   $285,705   $708,084   $698,417   $97,875 
Line of credit   150,000    150,000    —      —      —   
Totals  $1,940,081   $435,705   $708,084   $698,417   $97,875 

 

Our fiscal year 2020 operating plan is focused on increasing new accounts, retaining existing customers, growing revenue, increasing gross profits and conserving cash. We are investing in research and development efforts to develop next generation versions of the AEM product line. We have invested in manufacturing property and equipment to manufacture disposable scissors inserts internally and to reduce our cost of product revenue. We cannot predict with certainty the expected revenue, gross profit, net income or loss and usage of cash, cash equivalents or restricted cash for fiscal year 2020. If we are unable to manage our business operations in line with budget expectations, it could have a material adverse effect on our business viability, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

 

Income Taxes

 

As of March 31, 2019, net operating loss carryforwards totaling approximately $10 million are available to reduce taxable income in the future. The net operating loss carryforwards expire, if not previously utilized, at various dates beginning in the fiscal year ending March 31, 2020. We have not paid income taxes since our inception. The Tax Reform Act of 1986 and other income tax regulations contain provisions which may limit the net operating loss carryforwards available to be used in any given year if certain events occur, including changes in ownership interests. We have established a valuation allowance for the entire amount of our deferred tax asset since inception due to our history of losses. Should we achieve sufficient, sustained income in the future, we may conclude that some or all of the valuation allowance should be reversed. If some or all of the valuation allowance were reversed, then, to the extent of the reversal, a tax benefit would be recognized which would result in an increase to net income.

 

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Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

Our discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, sales and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. On an on-going basis, we evaluate our estimates, including those related to bad debts, inventories, sales returns, contingencies and litigation. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions. We believe the following critical accounting policies affect the more significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of our financial statements.

 

We record revenue at a single point in time, when control is transferred to the customer, which is consistent with past practice. We will continue to apply our current business processes, policies, systems and controls to support recognition and disclosure. Our shipping policy is FOB Shipping Point. We recognize revenue from sales to stocking distributors when there is no right of return, other than for normal warranty claims. We have no ongoing obligations related to product sales, except for normal warranty obligations. We evaluated the requirement to disaggregate revenue, and concluded that substantially all of its revenue comes from multiple products within a line of medical devices.

 

We maintain allowances for doubtful accounts for estimated losses resulting from the inability of our customers to make required payments. If the financial condition of our customers were to deteriorate, resulting in an impairment of their ability to make payments, additional allowances would be required, which would increase our expenses during the periods in which any such allowances were made. The amount recorded as a provision for bad debts in each period is based upon our assessment of the likelihood that we will be paid on our outstanding receivables, based on customer-specific as well as general considerations. To the extent that our estimates prove to be too high, and we ultimately collect a receivable previously determined to be impaired, we may record a reversal of the provision in the period of such determination.

 

We provide for the estimated cost of product warranties at the time sales are recognized. While we engage in extensive product quality programs and processes, including actively monitoring and evaluating the quality of our component suppliers, we have experienced some costs related to warranties. The warranty accrual is based on historical experience and is adjusted based on current experience. Should actual warranty experience differ from our estimates, revisions to the estimated warranty liability would be required.

 

We reduce inventory for estimated obsolete or unmarketable inventory equal to the difference between the cost of inventory and the estimated realizable value based on assumptions about future demand and market conditions. If actual market conditions are less favorable than those projected by management, additional inventory write-downs may be required. Any write-downs of inventory would reduce our reported net income during the period in which such write-downs were applied. To the extent that our estimates prove to be too high, and we ultimately utilize or sell inventory previously determined to be impaired, we may record a reversal of the provision in the period of such determination.

 

We recognize deferred income tax assets and liabilities for the expected future income tax consequences, based on enacted tax laws, of temporary differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities. Deferred tax assets are then reduced, if deemed necessary, by a valuation allowance for the amount of any tax benefits, which, more likely than not based on current circumstances, are not expected to be realized. Should we maintain sufficient, sustained income in the future, we may conclude that all or some of the valuation allowance should be reversed.

 

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Property and equipment are stated at cost, with depreciation computed over the estimated useful lives of the assets, generally five to seven years. We use the straight-line method of depreciation for property and equipment. Leasehold improvements are depreciated over the shorter of the remaining lease term or the estimated useful life of the asset. Maintenance and repairs are expensed as incurred and major additions, replacements and improvements are capitalized.

 

We amortize our patent costs over their estimated useful lives, which is typically the remaining statutory life. From time to time, we may be required to adjust these useful lives of our patents based on advances in technology, competitor actions, and the like. We review the recorded amounts of patents at each period end to determine if their carrying amount is still recoverable based on our expectations regarding sales of related products. Such an assessment, in the future, may result in a conclusion that the assets are impaired, with a corresponding charge against earnings.

 

We currently estimate forfeitures for stock-based compensation expense related to employee stock options and RSUs at 40% and evaluate the forfeiture rate quarterly. Other assumptions that are used in calculating stock-based compensation expense include risk-free interest rate, expected life, expected volatility and expected dividend.

 

 

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ITEM 4- Controls and procedures

 

(a) We have carried out an evaluation under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our President and CEO and Principal Accounting and Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934 (the "Exchange Act")). Based upon that evaluation, the President and CEO and the Principal Accounting and Financial Officer concluded that, as of June 30, 2019, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective.

 

(b) During the quarter ended June 30, 2019, there were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

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PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

 

 

ITEM 6. Exhibits

 

The following exhibits are filed with this report on Form 10-Q or are incorporated by reference:

 

10.1Loan and Security Agreement between Encision Inc. and Crestmark Bank received August 9, 2019 (filed herewith).

 

31.1Certification of President and CEO under Rule 13a-14(a) of the Exchange Act (filed herewith).

 

31.2Certification of Principal Financial and Accounting Officer under Rule 13a-14(a) of the Exchange Act (filed herewith).

 

32.1Certifications of President and CEO and Principal Financial and Accounting Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (filed herewith).

 

101The following materials from Encision Inc.’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2019, formatted in XBRL (Extensible Business Reporting Language): (i) the unaudited Condensed Balance Sheets, (ii) the unaudited Condensed Statements of Income, (iii) the unaudited Condensed Statements of Cash Flows, and (iv) Notes to Condensed Financial Statements, tagged at Level I.

 

 

 

 

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SIGNATURE

 

 

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

  ENCISION INC.
Dated: August 14, 2019  
  By: /s/ Mala Ray
   

Mala Ray
Controller

Principal Accounting Officer & Principal Financial Officer

 

 

 

 

 

 

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