Company Quick10K Filing
1847 Holdings
Price-0.00 EPS-1
Shares3 P/E0
MCap-0 P/FCF0
Net Debt3 EBIT-2
TEV3 TEV/EBIT-1
TTM 2019-09-30, in MM, except price, ratios
10-Q 2020-03-31 Filed 2020-05-15
S-1 2020-01-23 Public Filing
10-K 2019-12-31 Filed 2020-03-30
10-Q 2019-09-30 Filed 2019-11-19
10-Q 2019-06-30 Filed 2019-08-19
10-Q 2019-03-31 Filed 2019-05-15
10-K 2018-12-31 Filed 2019-04-15
10-Q 2018-09-30 Filed 2018-11-19
10-Q 2018-06-30 Filed 2018-08-17
10-Q 2018-03-31 Filed 2018-05-21
10-K 2017-12-31 Filed 2018-04-17
10-Q 2017-09-30 Filed 2017-11-14
10-Q 2017-06-30 Filed 2017-08-21
10-Q 2017-03-31 Filed 2017-05-22
10-K 2016-12-31 Filed 2017-04-17
10-Q 2016-09-30 Filed 2016-11-21
10-Q 2016-06-30 Filed 2016-08-22
10-Q 2016-03-31 Filed 2016-05-16
10-K 2015-12-31 Filed 2016-04-14
10-Q 2015-09-30 Filed 2015-11-23
10-Q 2015-06-30 Filed 2015-08-19
10-Q 2015-03-31 Filed 2015-05-15
10-K 2014-12-31 Filed 2015-04-15
10-Q 2014-09-30 Filed 2014-11-14
10-Q 2014-06-30 Filed 2014-08-19
10-Q 2014-03-31 Filed 2014-06-23
8-K 2020-07-17 Enter Agreement, Off-BS Arrangement, Exhibits
8-K 2020-05-28
8-K 2020-05-11
8-K 2020-03-27
8-K 2019-09-24
8-K 2019-07-12
8-K 2019-07-10
8-K 2019-05-31
8-K 2019-04-05
8-K 2019-03-13
8-K 2019-01-18
8-K 2018-11-12
8-K 2018-06-13
8-K 2018-05-10
8-K 2018-04-18
8-K 2018-01-19
8-K 2018-01-03

EFSH 10Q Quarterly Report

Part I
Item 1.Financial Statements.
Note 1&Mdash;Organization and Nature of Business
Note 2&Mdash;Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Note 3&Mdash;Business Segments
Note 4&Mdash;Receivables
Note 5&Mdash;Inventories
Note 6&Mdash;Deposits with Vendors
Note 7&Mdash;Property and Equipment
Note 8&Mdash;Intangible Assets
Note 9&Mdash;Acquisition
Note 10&Mdash;Lines of Credit
Note 11&Mdash;Notes Payable
Note 12&Mdash;Floor Plan Loans Payable
Note 13&Mdash;Convertible Promissory Note
Note 14&Mdash;Financing Lease
Note 15&Mdash;Operating Leases
Note 16&Mdash;Related Parties
Note 17&Mdash;Shareholders' Deficit
Note 18&Mdash;Commitments and Contingencies
Note 19&Mdash;Subsequent Events
Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.
Item 4. Controls and Procedures.
Part II
Item 1. Legal Proceedings.
Item 1A. Risk Factors.
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities.
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.
Item 5. Other Information.
Item 6. Exhibits.
EX-10.1 f10q0320ex10-1_1847holdings.htm
EX-31.1 f10q0320ex31-1_1847holdings.htm
EX-32.1 f10q0320ex32-1_1847holdings.htm

1847 Holdings Earnings 2020-03-31

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow
20151050-42014201620182020
Assets, Equity
1511851-12014201620182020
Rev, G Profit, Net Income
0.90.50.2-0.2-0.5-0.92014201620182020
Ops, Inv, Fin

10-Q 1 f10q0320_1847holdingsllc.htm QUARTERLY REPORT

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10−Q

 

(Mark One)

☒  QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended: March 31, 2020

 

or

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from ____________ to _____________

 

Commission File Number: 333-193821

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware   38-3922937
(State or other jurisdiction
of incorporation)
  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

 

590 Madison Avenue, 21st Floor, New York, NY   10022
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

 

(212) 521-4052
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

N/A
(Former name or former address, if changed since last report)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: None

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer ☐ Accelerated filer ☐
Non-accelerated filer ☒ Smaller reporting company ☒
  Emerging growth company ☐

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for comply with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐  No ☒

 

As of May 14, 2020, there were 3,265,625 common shares of the registrant issued and outstanding. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

 

Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q

 Period Ended March 31, 2020

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

i

 

 

PART I

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS.

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

 

1

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

   March 31, 2020   December 31,
2019
 
ASSETS  (unaudited)     
Current Assets        
Cash  $302,417   $238,760 
Accounts receivable, net   1,603,734    2,453,455 
Vendor deposits   294,960    294,960 
Inventories, net   1,399,672    1,615,432 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets   955,509    1,123,486 
TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS   4,556,292    5,726,093 
Property and equipment, net   3,066,532    3,367,427 
Operating lease right of use assets   2,447,280    2,565,835 
Goodwill   5,119,918    4,998,182 
Intangible assets, net   1,810,994    1,893,577 
Deferred tax asset   1,133,303    635,503 
Other assets   45,375    45,375 
TOTAL ASSETS  $18,179,694   $19,231,992 
           
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT          
CURRENT LIABILITIES          
Accounts payable and accrued expenses  $4,743,487   $4,017,630 
Floor plan payable   10,587    10,581 
Current portion of operating lease liability   440,228    485,773 
Advances, related party   183,118    181,333 
Lines of credit   579,355    1,250,930 
Note payable – related party   119,400    119,400 
Notes payable – current portion   5,202,330    5,367,539 
Warrant liability   122,344    122,344 
Convertible promissory note – current portion   710,288    584,943 
Customer deposits   5,434,785    4,164,296 
Current portion of financing lease liability   373,012    358,584 
TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES   17,918,934    16,663,353 
           
Operating lease liability – long term, net of current portion   2,007,052    2,080,062 
Notes payable – long term, net of current portion   3,109,567    3,256,469 
Contingent note payable   49,248    49,248 
Accrued expenses – long term, related party   1,019,333    905,780 
Financing lease liability, net of current portion   184,836    275,874 
TOTAL LIABILITIES  $24,288,970   $23,230,786 
SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT          
Allocation shares, 1,000 shares issued and outstanding   1,000    1,000 
Common Shares, 500,000,000 shares authorized, 3,165,625 shares issued and outstanding as of March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019   3,165    3,165 
Additional paid-in capital   442,014    442,014 
Accumulated deficit   (5,774,340)   (4,402,043)
TOTAL SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT   (5,328,161)   (3,955,864)
NONCONTROLLING INTERESTS   (781,115)   (42,930)
TOTAL SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT   (6,109,276)   (3,998,794)
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT  $18,179,694   $19,231,992 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements

 

2

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(UNAUDITED)

 

   Three Months Ended March 31, 
   2020   2019 
REVENUES        
Services  $446,099   $575,397 
Sales of parts and equipment   288,071    236,974 
Furniture and appliances   9,677,178    - 
TOTAL REVENUE   10,411,348    812,371 
OPERATING EXPENSES          
Cost of sales   8,366,438    213,750 
Personnel costs   1,764,450    457,197 
Depreciation and amortization   403,236    338,822 
Fuel   103,764    188,377 
General and administrative   1,847,789    375,735 
TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES   12,485,677    1,573,881 
LOSS FROM OPERATIONS   (2,074,329)   (761,510)
OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE)          
Financing costs and loss on early extinguishment of debt   (202,782)   (8,100)
Interest expense   (333,554)   (144,292)
Other income (expense)   2,383    - 
Gain (loss) on sale of property and equipment   -    24,224 
TOTAL OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE)   (533,953)   (128,168)
NET LOSS BEFORE INCOME TAXES   (2,608,282)   (889,678)
INCOME TAX BENEFIT   497,800    254,419 
NET LOSS BEFORE NON-CONTROLLING INTERESTS   (2,110,482)   (635,259)
LESS NET LOSS ATTRIBUTABLE TO NON-CONTROLLING INTERESTS   (738,185)   (266,680)
NET LOSS ATTRIBUTABLE TO 1847 HOLDINGS SHAREHOLDERS  $(1,372,297)  $(368,579)
           
Net Loss Per Common Share: Basic and diluted  $(0.43)  $(0.12)
Weighted-average number of common shares outstanding: Basic and diluted   3,165,625    3,115,625 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements

 

3

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT

(UNAUDITED)

 

For the Three Months Ended March 31, 2020

 

   Allocation   Common Shares   Additional Paid-In   Accumulated  

Non-

Controlling

   Shareholders’ 
   Shares   Shares   Amount   Capital   Deficit   Interest   Deficit 
BALANCE – January 1, 2020  $1,000    3,165,625   $3,165   $442,014   $(4,402,043)  $(42,930)  $(3,998,794)
Net loss   -    -    -    -    (1,372,297)   (738,185)   (2,110,482)
BALANCE – March 31, 2020  $1,000    3,165,625   $3,165   $442,014   $(5,774,340)  $(781,115)  $(6,109,276)

 

For the Three Months Ended March 31, 2019

 

   Allocation   Common Shares   Additional Paid-In   Accumulated   Non-
Controlling
   Shareholders’ 
   Shares   Shares   Amount   Capital   Deficit   Interest   Deficit 
BALANCE – January 1, 2019  $1,000    3,115,625   $3,115   $11,891   $(2,155,084)  $112,011   $(2,027,067)
Net loss   -    -    -    -    (368,579)   (266,680)   (635,259)
BALANCE – March 31, 2019  $1,000    3,115,625   $3,115   $11,891   $(2,523,663)  $(154,669)  $(2,662,326)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements

 

4

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(UNAUDITED)

 

   Three Months Ended March 31, 
   2020   2019 
OPERATING ACTIVITIES          
Net loss  $(2,110,482)  $(635,259)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash provided by operating activities:          
Gain (loss) on sale of property and equipment   -      (24,224)
Depreciation and amortization   403,236    337,122 
Amortization of financing costs   202,782    9,800 
Amortization of original interest discount   14,451    -   
Amortization of operating lease right-of-use assets   118,555    19,107 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:          
Accounts receivable   727,985    331,332 
Inventory   215,760    (48,004)
Prepaid expenses and other assets   167,977    92,149 
Accounts payable and accrued expenses   727,041    181,150 
Operating lease liability   (118,555)   (14,769)
Customer deposits   1,270,489    -   
Deferred taxes and uncertain tax position   (497,800)   (254,400)
Due to related parties   1,785    1,963 
Accrued expense long-term   113,553    -   
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities   1,236,777    (4,033)
           
INVESTING ACTIVITIES          
Proceeds from the sale of property and equipment   -      39,750 
Purchase of equipment   (19,758)   (10,296)
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities   (19,758)   29,454 
           
FINANCING ACTIVITIES          
Repayments of notes payable   (392,337)   (236,832)
Proceeds from note payable – related party   -      28,393 
Net borrowings from lines of credit   (681,401)   -   
Repayment of financing lease   (79,624)   (54,638)
Net cash used in financing activities   (1,153,362)   (263,077)
           
NET CHANGE IN CASH   63,657    (237,656)
           
CASH          
Beginning of period   238,760    333,880 
End of period  $302,417   $96,224 
           
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF CASH FLOW INFORMATION          
     Interest paid  $159,004   $160,763 
     Income taxes paid  $-     $-   
           
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF NON-CASH INFORMATION          
Adjustment to fair value of goodwill based on final purchase price allocation  $121,736   $-   

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements

 

5

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

NOTE 1—ORGANIZATION AND NATURE OF BUSINESS

 

1847 Holdings LLC (the “Company”) was formed under the laws of the State of Delaware on January 22, 2013. The Company is in the business of acquiring small businesses in a variety of different industries.

 

On March 3, 2017, the Company’s wholly-owned subsidiary 1847 Neese Inc., a Delaware corporation (“1847 Neese”), entered into a stock purchase agreement with Neese, Inc., an Iowa corporation (“Neese”), and Alan Neese and Katherine Neese, pursuant to which 1847 Neese acquired all of the issued and outstanding capital stock of Neese. As a result of this transaction, the Company owns 55% of 1847 Neese, with the remaining 45% held by the sellers.

 

On January 10, 2019, the Company established 1847 Goedeker Inc. (“Goedeker”) as a wholly owned subsidiary in the State of Delaware in connection with the proposed acquisition of assets from Goedeker Television Co., Inc., a Missouri corporation (“Goedeker Television”), described below. On March 20, 2019, the Company established 1847 Goedeker Holdco Inc. (“1847 Goedeker”) as a wholly owned subsidiary in the State of Delaware and subsequently transferred all of its shares in Goedeker to 1847 Goedeker, such that Goedeker became a wholly-owned subsidiary of 1847 Goedeker.

 

On January 18, 2019, Goedeker entered into an asset purchase agreement with Goedeker Television and Steve Goedeker and Mike Goedeker, pursuant to which, on April 5, 2019, Goedeker acquired substantially all of the assets of Goedeker Television used in its retail appliance and furniture business (see Note 9). As a result of this transaction, the Company owns 70% of 1847 Goedeker, with the remaining 30% held by third parties. (See Note 9).

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its consolidated subsidiaries, 1847 Neese, Neese, 1847 Goedeker and Goedeker. All significant intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

NOTE 2—SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The financial statements of the Company have been prepared without audit in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America (“GAAP”) and are presented in US dollars.

 

In the opinion of management, all adjustments (consisting of normal recurring accruals) considered necessary for a fair presentation have been included. Operating results for the three months March 31, 2020 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ending December 31, 2020.

 

These unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto contained in the Company’s annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

Accounting Basis

 

The Company uses the accrual basis of accounting and GAAP. The Company has adopted a calendar year end.

 

6

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

Segment Reporting

 

The Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standard Codification (“ASC”) Topic 280, Segment Reporting, requires that an enterprise report selected information about reportable segments in its financial reports issued to its stockholders. Beginning with the second quarter of 2019, the Company changed its operating and reportable segments from one segment to two segments: the Retail and Appliances Segment, which is operated by Goedeker, and the Land Management Segment, which is operated by Neese.

 

The Retail and Appliances Segment is comprised of a retail store and an e-commerce destination for home furnishings, including appliances, furniture, home goods and related products, based in St. Louis, Missouri.

 

The Land Management Services Segment is comprised of professional services for waste disposal and a variety of agricultural services, wholesaling of agricultural equipment and parts, local trucking services, various shop services, and sales of other products and services, based in Grand Junction, Iowa.

 

The Company provides general corporate services to its segments; however, these services are not considered when making operating decisions and assessing segment performance. These services are reported under “Holding Company” below and these include costs associated with executive management, financing activities and public company compliance.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with the original maturities of three months or less to be cash equivalents.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Reclassifications

 

Certain Statements of Operations reclassifications have been made in the presentation of the Company’s prior financial statements and accompanying notes to conform to the presentation as of and for the three months ended March 31, 2020. The Company reclassified certain operating expense accounts in the Consolidated Statement of Operations. The reclassification had no impact on financial position, net income, or shareholder’s equity.

 

Revenue Recognition and Cost of Revenue 

 

On January 1, 2018, the Company adopted Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), which supersedes the revenue recognition requirements in ASC Topic 605, Revenue Recognition. This ASU is based on the principle that revenue is recognized to depict the transfer of goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. This ASU also requires additional disclosure about the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from customer purchase orders, including significant judgments. The Company’s adoption of this ASU resulted in no change to the Company’s results of operations or balance sheet.

 

7

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

Retail and Appliances Segment

 

Goedeker collects the full sales price from the customer at the time the order is placed. Goedeker does not incur incremental costs obtaining purchase orders from customers, however, if Goedeker did, because all Goedeker’s contracts are less than a year in duration, any contract costs incurred would be expensed rather than capitalized.

 

The revenue that Goedeker recognizes arises from orders it receives from customers. Goedeker’s performance obligations under the customer orders correspond to each sale of merchandise that it makes to customers under the purchase orders; as a result, each purchase order generally contains only one performance obligation based on the merchandise sale to be completed. Control of the delivery transfers to customers when the customer can direct the use of, and obtain substantially all the benefits from, Goedeker’s products, which generally occurs when the customer assumes the risk of loss. The transfer of control generally occurs at the point of shipment. Once this occurs, Goedeker has satisfied its performance obligation and Goedeker recognizes revenue. Revenue from the sale of long-term service warranties are recognized net of costs to sell the contracts to the third-party warranty service company.

 

Transaction Price ‒ Goedeker agrees with customers on the selling price of each transaction. This transaction price is generally based on the agreed upon sales price. In Goedeker’s contracts with customers, it allocates the entire transaction price to the sales price, which is the basis for the determination of the relative standalone selling price allocated to each performance obligation. Any sales tax, value added tax, and other tax Goedeker collects concurrently with revenue-producing activities are excluded from revenue.

 

If Goedeker continued to apply legacy revenue recognition guidance for the three months ended March 31, 2020, revenues, gross margin, and net loss would not have changed.

 

Cost of revenue includes the cost of purchased merchandise plus the cost of delivering merchandise and where applicable installation, net of promotional rebates and other incentives received from vendors.

 

Substantially all Goedeker’s sales are to individual retail consumers.

 

Disaggregated Revenue ‒ Goedeker disaggregates revenue from contracts with customers by contract type, as it believes it best depicts how the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows are affected by economic factors.

 

Goedeker’s revenue by sales type is as follows:

 

   Three Months Ended March 31, 
   2020   2019 
Appliance sales  $8,128,777   $     - 
Furniture sales   1,382,365    - 
Other sales   166,036    - 
Total revenue  $9,677,178   $- 

 

Performance Obligations – Goedeker’s performance obligations include delivery of products and, in some instances, performance of services such as installation. Revenue for the sale of merchandise is recognized upon shipment to the customer; or in some instances, upon delivery and installation of the product which typically occur simultaneously.

 

8

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

Land Management Segment

 

Neese’s payment terms are due on demand from acceptance of delivery. Neese does not incur incremental costs obtaining purchase orders from customers, however, if Neese did, because all of Neese’s contracts are less than a year in duration, any contract costs incurred would be expensed rather than capitalized. 

 

The revenue that Neese recognizes arises from orders it receives from customers. Neese’s performance obligations under the customer orders correspond to each service delivery or sale of equipment that Neese makes to customers under the purchase orders; as a result, each purchase order generally contains only one performance obligation based on the service or equipment sale to be completed. Control of the delivery transfers to customers when the customer is able to direct the use of, and obtain substantially all of the benefits from, Neese’s products, which generally occurs at the later of when the customer obtains title to the equipment or when the customer assumes risk of loss. The transfer of control generally occurs at a point of delivery. Once this occurs, Neese has satisfied its performance obligation and Neese recognizes revenue.

 

Neese also sells equipment by posting it on auction sites specializing in farm equipment. Neese posts the equipment for sale on a “magazine” site for several weeks before the auction. When Neese decides to sell, it moves the equipment to the auction site. The auctions are one day. If Neese accepts a bid, the customer pays the bid price and arranges for pick-up of the equipment.

 

Transaction Price ‒ Neese agrees with customers on the selling price of each transaction. This transaction price is generally based on the agreed upon service fee. In Neese’s contracts with customers, it allocates the entire transaction price to the service fee to the customer, which is the basis for the determination of the relative standalone selling price allocated to each performance obligation. Any sales tax, value added tax, and other tax Neese collects concurrently with revenue-producing activities are excluded from revenue.

 

If Neese continued to apply legacy revenue recognition guidance for the three months ended March 31, 2020, revenues, gross margin, and net loss would not have changed.

 

Substantially all of Neese’s sales are to businesses, including farmers or municipalities and very little to individuals.

 

Disaggregated Revenue ‒ Neese disaggregates revenue from contracts with customers by contract type, as it believes it best depicts how the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows are affected by economic factors.

 

Neese’s revenue by contract type is as follows:

   Three Months Ended March 31, 
   2020   2019 
Revenues        
Services        
Trucking  $240,763   $372,472 
Waste hauling   117,130    104,329 
Repairs   60,684    52,928 
Other   27,522    45,668 
Total services   446,099    575,397 
Sales of parts and equipment   288,071    236,974 
Total revenue  $734,170   $812,371 

 

9

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

Performance Obligations ‒ Performance obligations for the different types of services are discussed below:

 

Trucking ‒ Revenues for time and material contracts are recognized when the merchandise or commodity is delivered to the destination specified in the agreement with the customer.

 

Waste Hauling and pumping ‒ Revenues for waste hauling and pumping is recognized when the hauling, pumping, and spreading are complete.

 

Repairs ‒ Revenues for repairs are recognized upon completion of equipment serviced.

 

Sales of parts and equipment ‒ Revenues for the sale of parts and equipment are recognized upon the transfer and acceptance by the customer.

 

Accounts Receivable, Net ‒ Accounts receivable, net, are amounts due from customers where there is an unconditional right to consideration. Unbilled receivables of $0 and $121,989 are included in this balance at March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively. The payment of consideration related to these unbilled receivables is subject only to the passage of time.

 

Neese reviews accounts receivable on a periodic basis to determine if any receivables will potentially be uncollectible. Estimates are used to determine the amount of the allowance for doubtful accounts necessary to reduce accounts receivable to its estimated net realizable value. The estimates are based on an analysis of past due receivables, historical bad debt trends, current economic conditions, and customer specific information. After Neese has exhausted all collection efforts, the outstanding receivable balance relating to services provided is written off against the allowance. Additions to the provision for bad debt are charged to expense.

 

Neese determined that an allowance for loss of $14,614 and $29,001 was required at March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively.

 

Receivables

 

Receivables consist of credit card transactions in the process of settlement. Vendor rebates receivable represent amounts due from manufactures from whom the Company purchases products. Rebates receivable are stated at the amount that management expects to collect from manufacturers, net of accounts payable amounts due the vendor. Rebates are calculated on product and model sales programs from specific vendors. The rebates are paid at intermittent periods either in cash or through issuance of vendor credit memos, which can be applied against vendor accounts payable. Based on the Company’s assessment of the credit history with its manufacturers, it has concluded that there should be no allowance for uncollectible accounts. The Company historically collects substantially all of its outstanding rebates receivables. Uncollectible balances are expensed in the period it is determined to be uncollectible.

 

Allowance for Credit Losses

 

Provisions for credit losses are charged to income as losses are estimated to have occurred and in amounts sufficient to maintain an allowance for credit losses at an adequate level to provide for future losses on the Company’s accounts receivable. The Company charges credit losses against the allowance and credits subsequent recoveries, if any, to the allowance. Historical loss experience and contractual delinquency of accounts receivables, and management’s judgment are factors used in assessing the overall adequacy of the allowance and the resulting provision for credit losses. While management uses the best information available to make its evaluation, future adjustments to the allowance may be necessary if there are significant changes in economic conditions or portfolio performance. This evaluation is inherently subjective as it requires estimates that are susceptible to significant revisions as more information becomes available.

 

The allowance for credit losses consists of general and specific components. The general component of the allowance estimates credit losses for groups of accounts receivable on a collective basis and relates to probable incurred losses of unimpaired accounts receivables. The Company records a general allowance for credit losses that includes forecasted future credit losses.

 

10

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

Inventory

 

Inventory consists of finished products acquired for resale and is valued at the lower-of-cost-or-market with cost determined on a specific item basis for the Neese and of finished products acquired for resale and is valued at the low-of-cost-or-market with cost determined on an average item basis for Goedeker. The Company periodically evaluates the value of items in inventory and provides write-downs to inventory based on its estimate of market conditions. The Company estimated an obsolescence allowance of $451,546 at March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment is stated at cost. Depreciation of furniture, vehicles and equipment is calculated using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives as follows:

 

   Useful Life (Years) 
Building and Improvements   4 
Machinery and Equipment   3-7 
Tractors   3-7 
Trucks and Vehicles   3-6 

 

Goodwill and Intangible Assets

 

In applying the acquisition method of accounting, amounts assigned to identifiable assets and liabilities acquired were based on estimated fair values as of the date of acquisition, with the remainder recorded as goodwill. Identifiable intangible assets are initially valued at fair value using generally accepted valuation methods appropriate for the type of intangible asset. Identifiable intangible assets with definite lives are amortized over their estimated useful lives and are reviewed for impairment if indicators of impairment arise. Intangible assets with indefinite lives are tested for impairment within one year of acquisitions or annually as of December 1, and whenever indicators of impairment exist. The fair value of intangible assets are compared with their carrying values, and an impairment loss would be recognized for the amount by which a carrying amount exceeds its fair value.

 

Acquired identifiable intangible assets are amortized over the following periods:

 

 

Acquired intangible Asset

  Amortization Basis 

Expected Life

(years)

 
Customer-Related  Straight-line basis   5-15 
Marketing-Related  Straight-line basis   5 

 

Long-Lived Assets 

 

The Company reviews its property and equipment and any identifiable intangibles for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. The test for impairment is required to be performed by management at least annually. Recoverability of assets to be held and used is measured by a comparison of the carrying amount of an asset to the future undiscounted operating cash flow expected to be generated by the asset. If such assets are considered to be impaired, the impairment to be recognized is measured by the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds the fair value of the asset. Long-lived assets to be disposed of are reported at the lower of carrying amount or fair value less costs to sell.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The Company’s financial instruments consist of cash and cash equivalents and amounts due to shareholders. The carrying amount of these financial instruments approximates fair value due either to length of maturity or interest rates that approximate prevailing market rates unless otherwise disclosed in these financial statements.

 

11

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

Derivative Instrument Liability

 

The Company accounts for derivative instruments in accordance with ASC 815, Derivatives and Hedging, which establishes accounting and reporting standards for derivative instruments and hedging activities, including certain derivative instruments embedded in other financial instruments or contracts, and requires recognition of all derivatives on the balance sheet at fair value, regardless of hedging relationship designation. Accounting for changes in fair value of the derivative instruments depends on whether the derivatives qualify as hedge relationships and the types of relationships designated are based on the exposures hedged. At March 31, 2020, the Company classified a warrant issued in conjunction with a term loan as a derivative instrument (see Note 11).

 

Income Taxes

 

Income taxes are computed using the asset and liability method. Under the asset and liability method, deferred income tax assets and liabilities are determined based on the differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities and are measured using the currently enacted tax rates and laws. A valuation allowance is provided for the amount of deferred tax assets that, based on available evidence, are not expected to be realized.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

Stock-based compensation is accounted for at fair value in accordance with ASC Topic 718. To date, the Company has not adopted a stock option plan and has not granted any stock options.

 

Basic Income (Loss) Per Share

 

Basic income (loss) per share is calculated by dividing the net loss applicable to common shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares during the period. Diluted earnings per share is calculated by dividing the net income available to common shareholders by the diluted weighted average number of shares outstanding during the year. The diluted weighted average number of shares outstanding is the basic weighted number of shares adjusted for any potentially dilutive debt or equity. As the Company had a net loss for the three months ended March 31, 2020, the following 895,565 potentially dilutive securities were excluded from diluted loss per share: 200,000 for outstanding warrants and 695,565 related to the convertible note payable and accrued interest. There are no such common share equivalents outstanding as of March 31, 2019.

 

Going Concern Assessment

 

Management assesses going concern uncertainty in the Company’s consolidated financial statements to determine whether there is sufficient cash on hand and working capital, including available borrowings on loans, to operate for a period of at least one year from the date the consolidated financial statements are issued or available to be issued, which is referred to as the “look-forward period”, as defined in GAAP. As part of this assessment, based on conditions that are known and reasonably knowable to management, management will consider various scenarios, forecasts, projections, estimates and will make certain key assumptions, including the timing and nature of projected cash expenditures or programs, its ability to delay or curtail expenditures or programs and its ability to raise additional capital, if necessary, among other factors. Based on this assessment, as necessary or applicable, management makes certain assumptions around implementing curtailments or delays in the nature and timing of programs and expenditures to the extent it deems probable those implementations can be achieved and management has the proper authority to execute them within the look-forward period.

 

The Company has generated losses since its inception and has relied on cash on hand, external bank lines of credit, issuance of third party and related party debt and the sale of a note to support cashflow from operations. As of and for the three months ended March 31, 2020, the Company had a net loss attributable to 1847 Holdings’ shareholders of $2,110,482 and net cash provided by operations of $1,236,777. 

 

12

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2020, the Company incurred operating losses of $2,110,482 (before deducting losses attributable to non-controlling interests) and incurred cash flows from operations of $1,236,777 and negative working capital of $13,362,642. Management believes the Company is owed $809,000 related to a working capital adjustment, which is disputed by Goedeker Television. This matter is being pursued through a legal process (See Note 9). In addition to the estimates of funds available from operations, the Company has unpledged assets that it believes could provide for $478,000 of additional borrowings.

 

Management has prepared estimates of operations for fiscal year 2020 and believes that sufficient funds will be generated from operations to fund its operations, and to service its debt obligations for one year from the date of the filing of the consolidated financial statements in the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, indicate improved operations and the Company’s ability to continue operations as a going concern.

 

The impact of COVID-19 on the Company’s business has been considered in these assumptions; however, it is too early to know the full impact of COVID-19 or its timing on a return to more normal operations. Further, the recently enacted stimulus bill provides for economic assistance loans through the United States Small Business Administration. The Company is actively pursuing the possibility of obtaining such loans.

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis under which the Company is expected to be able to realize its assets and satisfy its liabilities in the normal course of business.

 

Management believes that based on relevant conditions and events that are known and reasonably knowable that its forecasts, for one year from the date of the filing of the financial statements in this registration statement, indicate improved operations and the Company’s ability to continue operations as a going concern. The Company has contingency plans to reduce or defer expenses and cash outlays should operations not improve in the look forward period.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

Not Yet Adopted

 

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-04, Intangibles - Goodwill and Other: Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment. To simplify the subsequent measurement of goodwill, the update requires only a single-step quantitative test to identify and measure impairment based on the excess of a reporting unit's carrying amount over its fair value. A qualitative assessment may still be completed first for an entity to determine if a quantitative impairment test is necessary. The update is effective for fiscal year 2021 and is to be adopted on a prospective basis. Early adoption is permitted for interim or annual goodwill impairment tests performed on testing dates after January 1, 2017. The Company will test goodwill for impairment within one year of the acquisition or annually as of December 1, and whenever indicators of impairment exist.

 

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13 Financial Instruments-Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments which requires the measurement and recognition of expected credit losses for financial assets held at amortized cost. ASU 2016-13 replaces the existing incurred loss impairment model with an expected loss methodology, which will result in more timely recognition of credit losses. ASU 2016-13 is effective for annual reporting periods, and interim periods within those years beginning after December 15, 2019. This pronouncement was amended under ASU 2019-10 to allow an extension on the adoption date for entities that qualify as a small reporting company. The Company has elected this extension and the effective date for the Company to adopt this standard will be for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022. The Company has not completed its assessment of the standard, but does not expect the adoption to have a material impact on the Company's consolidated financial position, results of operations, or cash flows.

 

13

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

  

NOTE 3—BUSINESS SEGMENTS

 

Summarized financial information concerning the Company’s reportable segments is presented below:

 

   For the Three Months March 31, 2020   For the Three Months Ended March 31, 2019 
   Land Management Services   Retail & Appliances   Corporate Services   Total   Land Management Services   Retail & Appliances   Corporate Services   Total 
Revenue                                
Services  $446,099   $-   $-   $446,099   $575,397   $       -   $-   $575,397 
Sales of parts and equipment   288,071    -    -    288,071    236,974    -    -    236,974 
Furniture and appliances revenue   -    9,677,178    -    9,677,178    -    -    -    - 
Total Revenue   734,170    9,677,178    -    10,411,348    812,371    -    -    812,371 
Total cost of sales   255,268    8,111,170    -    8,366,438    213,750    -    -    213,750 
Total operating expenses   1,198,815    2,881,140    39,284    4,119,239    1,319,836    -    40,295    1,360,131 
Loss from operations  $(719,913)  $(1,315,132)  $(39,284)  $(2,074,329)  $(721,215)  $    $(40,295)  $(761,510)

 

NOTE 4—RECEIVABLES

 

At March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, receivables consisted of the following:

 

   March 31,
2020
   December 31,
2019
 
Credit card payments in process of settlement  $312,678   $406,838 
Vendor rebates receivable   1,085,287    1,380,369 
Trade receivables from customers   220,383    695,249 
Total receivables   1,618,348    2,482,456 
Allowance for doubtful accounts   (14,615)   (29,001)
Accounts receivable, net  $1,603,734   $2,453,455 

 

14

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

NOTE 5—INVENTORIES

 

At March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the inventory balances are composed of:

 

   March 31,
2020
   December 31,
2019
 
Machinery and Equipment  $206,923   $119,444 
Parts   149,836    142,443 
Appliances   1,282,636    1,562,359 
Furniture   161,111    189,376 
Other   50,712    53,356 
Subtotal   1,851,218    2,066,978 
Allowance for inventory obsolescence   (451,546)   (451,546)
Inventories, net  $1,399,672   $1,615,432 

 

Inventory and accounts receivable are pledged to secure a loan from Burnley, SBCC and Home State Bank described and defined in the notes below.

 

NOTE 6—DEPOSITS WITH VENDORS

 

Deposits with vendors represent cash on deposit with one vendor arising from accumulated rebates paid by the vendor. The deposits are used by the vendor to seek to secure the Company’s purchases. The deposit can be withdrawn at any time up to the amount of the Company’s credit line with the vendor. Alternatively, the Company could secure their credit line with a floor plan line from a lender and withdraw all its deposits. The Company has elected to leave the deposits with the vendor on which it earns interest income. As of March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, deposits with vendors totaled $294,960.

 

NOTE 7—PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

 

Property and equipment consist of the following at March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019:

 

 

Classification

  March 31,
2020
   December 31,
2019
 
Buildings and improvements  $5,338   $5,338 
Equipment and machinery   3,120,498    3,120,498 
Tractors   2,714,645    2,694,888 
Trucks and other vehicles   1,138,304    1,138,304 
Leasehold improvements   117,626    117,626 
Total   7,096,411    7,076,654 
Less: Accumulated depreciation   (4,029,879)   (3,709,227)
Property and equipment, net  $3,066,532   $3,367,427 

 

Depreciation expense for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019 was $320,653 and $337,122, respectively.

 

All property and equipment are pledged to secure loans from Burnley, SBCC and Home State Bank as described and defined in the notes below.

 

15

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

NOTE 8—INTANGIBLE ASSETS

 

The following provides a breakdown of identifiable intangible assets as of March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019:

 

   March 31,
2020
   December 31,
2019
 
Customer Relationships        
Identifiable intangible assets, gross  $783,000   $783,000 
Accumulated amortization   (70,206)   (56,023)
Customer relationship identifiable intangible assets, net   712,794    726,977 
Marketing Related          
Identifiable intangible assets, gross   1,368,000    1,368,000 
Accumulated amortization   (269,800)   (201,400)
Marketing related identifiable intangible assets, net   1,098,200    1,166,600 
Total Identifiable intangible assets, net  $1,810,994   $1,893,577 

 

In connection with the acquisitions of Goedeker and Neese, the Company identified intangible assets of $2,151,000 and $34,000, respectively, representing trade names and customer relationships. These assets are being amortized on a straight-line basis over their weighted average estimated useful life of 7.9 years and amortization expense amounted to $82,583 and $1,700 for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

 

As of March 31, 2020, the estimated annual amortization expense for each of the next five fiscal years is as follows:

 

2020 (remainder)  $247,749 
2021   330,332 
2022   324,665 
2023   323,532 
2024   122,132 
Thereafter   462,584 
Total  $1,810,994 

 

NOTE 9—ACQUISITION

 

On January 18, 2019, Goedeker entered into an asset purchase agreement with Goedeker Television and Steve Goedeker and Mike Goedeker (the “Stockholders”), pursuant to which Goedeker agreed to acquire substantially all of the assets of Goedeker Television used in its retail appliance and furniture business (the “Goedeker Business”).

 

On April 5, 2019, Goedeker, 1847 Goedeker, and the Stockholders entered into an amendment to the asset purchase agreement and closing of the acquisition of substantially all of the assets of Goedeker Television used in the Goedeker Business was completed (the “Acquisition”). The acquisition provided an addition to the Company’s objective of a diversified portfolio of acquisitions.

 

The aggregate purchase price was $6,200,000 consisting of: (i) $1,500,000 in cash, subject to adjustment; (ii) the issuance of a promissory note in the principal amount of $4,100,000; and (iii) up to $600,000 in earn out payments (as described below). As additional consideration, 1847 Goedeker agreed to issue to each of the Stockholders a number of shares of its common stock equal to a 11.25% non-dilutable interest (22.5% total) in all of the issued and outstanding stock of 1847 Goedeker as of the closing date.

 

16

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

The asset purchase agreement provided for an adjustment to the purchase price based on the difference between actual working capital at closing and Goedeker Television’s preliminary estimate of closing date working capital.  In accordance with the asset purchase agreement, an independent CPA firm was retained by Goedeker and Goedeker Television to resolve differences in the working capital amounts.  The report issued by that CPA firm determined that Goedeker Television owed Goedeker $809,000, which Goedeker Television has not paid.  On or about March 23, 2020, Goedeker submitted a claim for arbitration to the American Arbitration Association relating to Goedeker Television’s failure to pay the amount owed. The claim alleges, inter alia, breach of contract, fraud, indemnification and the breach of the covenant of good faith and fair dealing. Goedeker is alleging damages in the amount of $809,000, plus attorneys’ fees and costs. The $809,000 is included in other assets in the accompanying balance sheet as of March 31, 2020.

 

Goedeker Television is also entitled to receive the following earn out payments to the extent the Goedeker Business achieves the applicable EBITDA (as defined in the asset purchase agreement) targets:

 

1.An earn out payment of $200,000 if the EBITDA of the Goedeker Business for the trailing twelve (12) month period from the closing date is $2,500,000 or greater;

 

2.An earn out payment of $200,000 if the EBITDA of the Goedeker Business for the trailing twelve (12) month period from the first anniversary of closing date is $2,500,000 or greater; and

 

3.An earn out payment of $200,000 if the EBITDA of the Goedeker Business for the trailing twelve (12) month period from the second anniversary of the closing date is $2,500,000 or greater.

 

To the extent the EBITDA of the Goedeker Business for any applicable period is less than $2,500,000 but greater than $1,500,000, Goedeker must pay a partial earn out payment to Goedeker Television in an amount equal to the product determined by multiplying (i) the EBITDA Achievement Percentage by (ii) the applicable earn out payment for such period, where the “Achievement Percentage” is the percentage determined by dividing (A) the amount of (i) the EBITDA of the Goedeker Business for the applicable period less (ii) $1,500,000, by (B) $1,000,000. For avoidance of doubt, no partial earn out payments shall be earned or paid to the extent the EBITDA of the Goedeker Business for any applicable period is equal or less than $1,500,000.

 

To the extent Goedeker Television is entitled to all or a portion of an earn out payment, the applicable earn out payment(s) (or portion thereof) shall be paid on the date that is three (3) years from the closing date, and shall accrue interest from the date on which it is determined Goedeker Television is entitled to such earn out payment (or portion thereof) at a rate equal to five percent (5%) per annum, computed on the basis of a 360 day year for the actual number of days elapsed.

 

The rights of Goedeker Television to receive any earn out payment are subordinate to the rights of Burnley and SBCC under separate subordination agreements that Goedeker Television entered into with them on April 5, 2019 in connection with the Acquisition (see Notes 9 and 11). The Company determined the fair value of the earnout on the date of acquisition was $81,494. Such amount was recorded as a contingent consideration liability within the accounts payable and accrued expense line item on the consolidated balance sheet and is revalued to fair value each reporting period until settled. The year 1 contingent liability of $32,246 was written-off in the year ended December 31, 2019 as the target was not met and the balance of the liability at March 31, 2020 is $49,248.

 

The provisional fair value of the purchase consideration issued to Goedeker Television was allocated to the net tangible assets acquired. The Company accounted for the Acquisition as the purchase of a business under GAAP under the acquisition method of accounting, and the assets and liabilities acquired were recorded as of the acquisition date, at their respective fair values and consolidated with those of the Company. The fair value of the net liabilities assumed was approximately $492,601. The excess of the aggregate fair value of the net tangible assets has been allocated to goodwill.

 

The Company is currently in the process of completing the preliminary purchase price allocation as an acquisition of certain assets. The final purchase price allocation for Goedeker will be included in the Company’s financial statements in future periods. The table below shows preliminary analysis for the Goedeker asset purchase:

 

17

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

Purchase consideration at final fair value:

    
Note payable, net of $462,102 debt discount and $215,500 of capitalized financing costs  $3,422,398 
Contingent note payable   81,494 
Non-controlling interest   979,523 
Amount of consideration  $4,483,415 
      
Assets acquired and liabilities assumed at fair value     
Accounts receivable  $334,446 
Inventories   1,851,251 
Working capital adjustment receivable and other assets   1,104,863 
Property and equipment   216,286 
Customer related intangibles   749,000 
Marketing related intangibles   1,368,000 
Accounts payable and accrued expenses   (3,929,876)
Customer deposits   (2,308,307)
Net tangible assets acquired (liabilities assumed)  $(614,337)
      
Total net assets acquired (liabilities assumed)  $(614,337)
Consideration paid   4,483,415 
Goodwill  $5,097,752 

 

The following presents the pro-forma combined results of operations of the Company as if the Acquisition was completed on January 1, 2019 (before non-controlling interest).

 

  

For the Three Months Ended

March 31,
2019

 
Revenues, net  $12,829,584 
Net income (loss) allocable to common shareholders  $(940,911)
Net loss per share  $(0.30)
Weighted average number of shares outstanding   3,165,625 

 

The unaudited pro forma results of operations are presented for information purposes only. The unaudited pro-forma results of operations are not intended to present actual results that would have been attained had the Acquisition been completed as of January 1, 2019 or to project potential operating results as of any future date or for any future periods.

 

The estimated useful life remaining on the property and equipment acquired is 4 to 5 years.

 

18

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

NOTE 10—LINES OF CREDIT

 

Northpoint Commercial Finance LLC

 

On June 24, 2019, Goedeker, as borrower, entered into a loan and security agreement with Northpoint Commercial Finance LLC (“Northpoint”), which was amended on August 2, 2019, for revolving loans up to an aggregate maximum loan amount of $1,000,000 for the acquisition, financing or refinancing by Goedeker of inventory at an interest rate of LIBOR plus 7.99%. The balance of the line of credit amounts to $169,712 as of March 31, 2020.

 

Pursuant to the loan and security agreement, Goedeker shall pay the following fees to Northpoint: (i) an audit fee for each audit conducted as determined by Northpoint, equal to the out-of-pocket expense incurred by Northpoint plus any minimum audit fee established by Northpoint; (ii) a fee for any returned payments equal to the lesser of the maximum amount permitted by law or $50; (iii) a late fee for each payment not received by the 25th day of a calendar month, and each month thereafter until such payment is paid, equal to the greater of 5% of the amount past due or $25; (iv) a billing fee equal to $250 for any month for which Goedeker requests a paper billing statement; (v) a live check fee equal to $50 for each check that Goedeker sends to Northpoint for payment of obligations under the loan and security agreement; (vi) processing fees to be determined by Northpoint; and (vii) any additional fees that Northpoint may implement from time to time.

 

The loan and security agreement contains customary events of default, including in the event of (i) non-payment, (ii) a breach by Goedeker of any of its representations, warranties or covenants under the loan and security agreement or any other agreement entered into with Northpoint, or (iii) the bankruptcy or insolvency of Goedeker.  The loan and security agreement contains customary representations, warranties and affirmative and negative financial and other covenants for a loan of this type.

 

The loans are secured by a security interest in all of the inventory of Goedeker that is manufactured or sold by vendors identified in the loan and security agreement. In connection with the loan and security agreement, on June 24, 2019, 1847 Goedeker entered into a guaranty in favor of Northpoint, to guaranty the obligations of Goedeker under the loan and security agreement.

 

Burnley Capital LLC

 

On April 5, 2019, Goedeker, as borrower, and 1847 Goedeker entered into a loan and security agreement with Burnley Capital LLC (“Burnley”) for revolving loans in an aggregate principal amount that will not exceed the lesser of (i) the borrowing base or (ii) $1,500,000 (provided that such amount may be increased to $3,000,000 in Burnley’s sole discretion) minus reserves established Burnley at any time in accordance with the loan and security agreement. The “borrowing base” means an amount equal to the sum of the following: (i) the product of 85% multiplied by the liquidation value of Goedeker’s inventory (net of all liquidation costs) identified in the most recent inventory appraisal by an appraiser acceptable to Burnley (ii) multiplied by Goedeker’s eligible inventory (as defined in the loan and security agreement), valued at the lower of cost or market value, determined on a first-in-first-out basis. In connection with the closing of the Acquisition on April 5, 2019, Goedeker borrowed $744,000 under the loan and security agreement and issued a revolving note to Burnley in the principal amount of up to $1,500,000. There is no available borrowing base and the balance of the line of credit amounts to $409,642 as of March 31, 2020, comprised of principal of $488,309 and net of unamortized debt discount of $78,667.

 

The revolving note matures on April 5, 2022, provided that at Burnley’s sole and absolute discretion, it may agree to extend the maturity date for two successive terms of one year each. The revolving note bears interest at a per annum rate equal to the greater of (i) the LIBOR Rate (as defined in the loan and security agreement) plus 6.00% or (ii) 8.50%; provided that upon an event of default (as defined below) all loans, all past due interest and all fees shall bear interest at a per annum rate equal to the foregoing rate plus 3.00%. Goedeker shall pay interest accrued on the revolving note in arrears on the last day of each month commencing on April 30, 2019.

 

19

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

Goedeker may at any time and from time to time prepay the revolving note in whole or in part. If at any time the outstanding principal balance on the revolving note exceeds the lesser of (i) the difference of the total loan amount minus any reserves and (ii) the borrowing base, then Goedeker shall immediately prepay the revolving note in an aggregate amount equal to such excess. In addition, in the event and on each occasion that any net proceeds (as defined in the loan and security agreement) are received by or on behalf of Goedeker or 1847 Goedeker in respect of any prepayment event following the occurrence and during the continuance of an event of default, Goedeker shall, immediately after such net proceeds are received, prepay the revolving note in an aggregate amount equal to 100% of such net proceeds. A “prepayment event” means (i) any sale, transfer, merger, liquidation or other disposition (including pursuant to a sale and leaseback transaction) of any property of Goedeker or 1847 Goedeker; (ii) a change of control (as defined in the loan and security agreement); (iii) any casualty or other insured damage to, or any taking under power of eminent domain or by condemnation or similar proceeding of, any property of Goedeker or 1847 Goedeker with a fair value immediately prior to such event equal to or greater than $25,000; (iv) the issuance by Goedeker of any capital stock or the receipt by Goedeker of any capital contribution; or (v) the incurrence by Goedeker or 1847 Goedeker of any indebtedness (as defined in the loan and security agreement), other than indebtedness permitted under the loan and security agreement.

 

Under the loan and security agreement, Goedeker is required to pay a number of fees to Burnley, including the following:

 

a commitment fee during the period from closing to the earlier of the maturity date or termination of Burnley’s commitment to make loans under the loan and security agreement, which shall accrue at the rate of 0.50% per annum on the average daily difference of the total loan amount then in effect minus the sum of the outstanding principal balance of the revolving note, which such accrued commitment fees are due and payable in arrears on the first day of each calendar month and on the date on which Burnley’s commitment to make loans under the loan and security agreement terminates, commencing on the first such date to occur after the closing date;

 

an annual loan facility fee equal to 0.75% of the revolving commitment (i.e., the maximum amount that Goedeker may borrow under the revolving loan), which is fully earned on the closing date for the term of the loan (including any extension) but shall be due and payable on each anniversary of the closing date;

 

a monthly collateral management fee for monitoring and servicing the revolving loan equal to $1,700 per month for the term of revolving note, which is fully earned and non-refundable as of the date of the loan and security agreement, but shall be payable monthly in arrears on the first day of each calendar month; provided that payment of the collateral management fee may be made, at the discretion of Burnley, by application of advances under the revolving loan or directly by Goedeker; and

 

if the revolving loan is terminated for any reason, including by Burnley following an event of default, then Goedeker shall pay, as liquidated damages and compensation for the costs of being prepared to make funds available, an amount equal to the applicable percentage multiplied by the revolving commitment (i.e., the maximum amount that Goedeker may borrow under the revolving loan), wherein the term applicable percentage means (i) 3%, in the case of a termination on or prior to the first anniversary of the closing date, (ii) 2%, in the case of a termination after the first anniversary of the closing date but on or prior to the second anniversary thereof, and (iii) 0.5%, in the case of a termination after the second anniversary of the closing date but on or prior to the maturity date.

 

20

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

The loan and security agreement contains customary events of default, including, among others: (i) for failure to pay principal and interest on the revolving note when due, or to pay any fees due under the loan and security agreement; (ii) if any representation, warranty or certification in the loan and security agreement or any document delivered in connection therewith is incorrect in any material respect; (iii) for failure to perform any covenant or agreement contained in the loan and security agreement or any document delivered in connection therewith; (iv) for the occurrence of any default in respect of any other indebtedness of more than $100,000; (v) for any voluntary or involuntary bankruptcy, insolvency or dissolution; (vi) for the occurrence of one or more judgments, non-interlocutory orders, decrees or arbitration awards involving in the aggregate a liability of $25,000 or more; (vii) if Goedeker or 1847 Goedeker, or officer thereof, is charged by a governmental authority, criminally indicted or convicted of a felony under any law that would reasonably be expected to lead to forfeiture of any material portion of collateral, or such entity is subject to an injunction restraining it from conducting its business; (viii) if Burnley determines that a material adverse effect (as defined in the loan and security agreement) has occurred; (ix) if a change of control (as defined in the loan and security agreement) occurs; (x) if there is any material damage to, loss, theft or destruction of property which causes, for more than thirty consecutive days beyond the coverage period of any applicable business interruption insurance, the cessation or substantial curtailment of revenue producing activities; (xi) if there is a loss, suspension or revocation of, or failure to renew any permit if it could reasonably be expected to have a material adverse effect; and (xii) for the occurrence of any default or event of default under the term loan with SBCC (as defined below), the 9% subordinated promissory note issued to Goedeker Television, the secured convertible promissory note issued to Leonite (as defined below) or any other debt that is subordinated to the revolving loan.

 

The loan and security agreement contains customary representations, warranties and affirmative and negative financial and other covenants for a loan of this type. The revolving note is secured by a first priority security interest in all of the assets of Goedeker and 1847 Goedeker. In connection with such security interest, on April 5, 2019, (i) 1847 Goedeker entered into a pledge agreement with Burnley, pursuant to which 1847 Goedeker pledged the shares of Goedeker held by it to Burnley, and (ii) Goedeker entered into a deposit account control agreement with Burnley, SBCC and Montgomery Bank relating to the security interest in Goedeker’s bank accounts.

 

In addition, on April 5, 2019, the Company entered into a guaranty with Burnley to guaranty the obligations under the loan and security agreement upon the occurrence of certain prohibited acts described in the guaranty.

 

The rights of Burnley to receive payments under the revolving note are subordinate to the rights of Northpoint under a subordination agreement that Burnley entered into with Northpoint.

 

At March 31, 2020, Goedeker did not meet certain loan covenants under the loan and security agreement. The agreement requires compliance with the following ratios as a percentage of earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization for the twelve-month period ended March 31, 2019. The table below shows the required ratio and actual ratio for such period.

 

Covenant  Actual Ratio  Required Ratio
Total debt ratio  (2.6)x  4.0x
Senior debt ratio  (0.7)x  1.5x
Interest coverage ratio  (0.9)x  1.0x

 

In addition, Goedeker was not in compliance with a requirement with respect to the liquidity ratio, which is the ratio of cash and available borrowings to customer deposits. At March 31, 2020, the actual ratio was 0.10x compared to a requirement of 0.35x.

 

The loan and security agreement with SBCC described below contains the same covenants and a cross default provision, whereby a default under the Burnley loan and security agreement triggers a default under the SBCC loan and security agreement. Accordingly, the Company is in technical, not payment default, on these loan and security agreements and has classified such debt as a current liability. The Company has developed plans that will return it to full compliance including a recently received proposal from a new asset-based lender.

 

21

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

NOTE 11—NOTES PAYABLE

 

Small Business Community Capital II, L.P.

 

On April 5, 2019, Goedeker, as borrower, and 1847 Goedeker entered into a loan and security agreement with Small Business Community Capital II, L.P. (“SBCC”) for a term loan in the principal amount of $1,500,000, pursuant to which Goedeker issued to SBCC a term note in the principal amount of up to $1,500,000 and a ten-year warrant to purchase shares of the most senior capital stock of Goedeker equal to 5.0% of the outstanding equity securities of Goedeker on a fully-diluted basis for an aggregate price equal to $100. The Company classified the warrant as a derivative liability on the balance sheet of $122,344 and subject to remeasurement on every reporting period. The balance of the note amounts to $940,124 as of March 31, 2020, comprised of principal of $1,218,750, capitalized PIK interest of $27,473, and net of unamortized debt discount of $133,500 and unamortized warrant feature of $172,599.

 

The term note matures on April 5, 2023 and bears interest at the sum of the cash interest rate (defined as 11% per annum) plus the Paid-in-Kind (“PIK”) interest rate (defined as 2% per annum); provided that upon an event of default all principal, past due interest and all fees shall bear interest at a per annum rate equal to the cash interest rate and the PIK interest rate, in each case plus 3.00%. Interest accrued at the cash interest rate shall be due and payable in arrears on the last day of each month commencing May 31, 2019. Interest accrued at the PIK interest rate shall be automatically capitalized, compounded and added to the principal amount of the term note on each last day of each quarter unless paid in cash on or prior to the last day of each quarter; provided that (i) interest accrued pursuant to an event of default shall be payable on demand, and (ii) in the event of any repayment or prepayment, accrued interest on the principal amount repaid or prepaid (including interest accrued at the PIK interest rate and not yet added to the principal amount of term note) shall be payable on the date of such repayment or prepayment. Notwithstanding the foregoing, all interest on term note, whether accrued at the cash interest rate or the PIK interest rate, shall be due and payable in cash on the maturity date unless payment is sooner required by the loan and security agreement.

 

Goedeker must repay to SBCC on the last business day of each March, June, September and December, commencing with the last business day of June 2019, an aggregate principal amount of the term note equal to $93,750, regardless of any prepayments made, and must pay the unpaid principal on the maturity date unless payment is sooner required by the loan and security agreement.

 

Goedeker may prepay the term note in whole or in part from time to time; provided that if such prepayment occurs (i) prior to the first anniversary of the closing date, Goedeker shall pay SBCC an amount equal to 5.0% of such prepayment, (ii) prior to the second anniversary of the closing date and on or after the first anniversary of the closing date, Goedeker shall pay SBCC an amount equal to 3.0% of such prepayment, or (iii) prior to the third anniversary of the closing date and on or after the second anniversary of the closing date, Goedeker shall pay SBCC an amount equal to 1.0% of such prepayment, in each case as liquidated damages for damages for loss of bargain to SBCC. In addition, in the event and on each occasion that any net proceeds (as defined in the loan and security agreement) are received by or on behalf of Goedeker or 1847 Goedeker in respect of any prepayment event following the occurrence and during the continuance of an event of default, Goedeker shall, immediately after such net proceeds are received, prepay the term note in an aggregate amount equal to 100% of such net proceeds. A “prepayment event” means (i) any sale, transfer, merger, liquidation or other disposition (including pursuant to a sale and leaseback transaction) of any property of Goedeker or 1847 Goedeker; (ii) a change of control (as defined in the loan and security agreement); (iii) any casualty or other insured damage to, or any taking under power of eminent domain or by condemnation or similar proceeding of, any property of Goedeker or 1847 Goedeker with a fair value immediately prior to such event equal to or greater than $25,000; (iv) the issuance by Goedeker of any capital stock or the receipt by Goedeker of any capital contribution; or (v) the incurrence by Goedeker or 1847 Goedeker of any indebtedness (as defined in the loan and security agreement), other than indebtedness permitted under the loan and security agreement.

 

The loan and security agreement with SBCC contains the same events of default as the loan and security agreement with Burnley, provided that the reference to the term loan in the cross-default provision refers instead to the revolving loan.

 

22

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

The loan and security agreement contains customary representations, warranties and affirmative and negative financial and other covenants for a loan of this type. The term note is secured by a second priority security interest (subordinate to the revolving loan) in all of the assets of Goedeker and 1847 Goedeker. In connection with such security interest, on April 5, 2019, (i) 1847 Goedeker entered into a pledge agreement with SBCC, pursuant to which 1847 Goedeker pledged the shares of Goedeker held by it to SBCC, and (ii) Goedeker entered deposit account control agreement with Burnley, SBCC and Montgomery Bank relating to the security interest in Goedeker’s bank accounts.

 

In addition, on April 5, 2019, the Company entered into a guaranty with SBCC to guaranty the obligations under the loan and security agreement upon the occurrence of certain prohibited acts described in the guaranty.

 

The rights of SBCC to receive payments under the term note are subordinate to the rights of Northpoint and Burnley under separate subordination agreements that SBCC entered into with them.

 

As noted above, the Company is in technical, not payment default, on this loan and security agreement and has classified such debt as a current liability.

 

Home State Bank

 

On June 13, 2018, Neese entered into a term loan agreement with Home State Bank, pursuant to which Neese issued a promissory note to Home State Bank in the principal amount of $3,654,074 with an annual interest rate of 6.85% with covenants to maintain a minimum debt coverage ratio of 1.00 to 1.25 measured at December 31, 2019. Neese did not comply with this covenant for the year ended December 31, 2019. Accordingly, because of the violation of this covenant and because the loan matures July 20, 2020, the loan is classified as a current liability in the balance sheet. Pursuant to the terms of the note, Neese will make semi-annual payments of $302,270 beginning on January 20, 2019 and continuing every six months thereafter until July 20, 2020, the maturity date; provided however, that Neese will pay the note in full immediately upon demand by Home State Bank. The balance of the note amounts to $3,000,779 as of March 31, 2020, comprised of principal of $3,005,867 and net of unamortized debt discount of $5,088.

 

The loan agreement contains customary representations and warranties. Pursuant to the terms of the loan agreement and the note, an “event of default” includes: (i) if Neese fails to make any payment when due under the note; (ii) if Neese fails to comply with or to perform any other term, obligation, covenant or condition contained in the note or in any of the related documents or to comply with or to perform any term, obligation, covenant or condition contained in any other agreement between Home State Bank and Neese; (iii) if Neese defaults under any loan, extension of credit, security agreement, purchase or sales agreement, or any other agreement, in favor of any other creditor or person that may materially affect any of Home State Bank’s property or Neese’s ability to repay the note or perform Neese’s obligations under the note or any of the related documents; (iv) if any warranty, representation or statement made or furnished to Home State Bank by Neese or on Neese’s behalf under the note or the related documents is false or misleading in any material respect; (v) upon the dissolution or termination of Neese’s existence as a going business, the insolvency of Neese, the appointment of a receiver for any part of Neese’s property, any assignment for the benefit of creditors, any type of creditor workout, or the commencement of any proceeding under any bankruptcy or insolvency laws by or against Neese, (vi) upon commencement of foreclosure or forfeiture proceedings by any creditor of Neese or by any governmental agency against any collateral securing the loan; and (vii) if a material adverse change occurs in Neese’s financial condition, or Home State Bank believes the prospect of payment or performance of the note is impaired. If any event of default occurs, all commitments and obligations of Home State Bank immediately will terminate and, at Home State Bank’s option, all indebtedness immediately will become due and payable, all without notice of any kind to Neese. Additionally, upon an event of default, the interest rate on the note will be increased by 3 percentage points. However, in no event will the interest rate exceed the maximum interest rate limitations under applicable law.

 

The loan is secured by inventory, accounts receivable, and certain fixed assets of Neese. The loan agreement limited the payment of interest on certain promissory notes to $40,000 annually. The Company continues to accrue interest at the contractual amounts. Such accruals (in excess of $40,000 in interest on the promissory notes) are shown as long-term accrued expenses in the accompanying balance sheet as of March 31, 2020.

 

23

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

If the Company sells property, plant, and equipment securing the loan, it must remit the appraised value of the equipment to Home State Bank. During the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, $159,607 and $21,500, respectively, was remitted to Home State Bank pursuant to this requirement.

 

The Company adopted ASU 2015-03 by deducting debt issuance costs from the long-term portion of the loan. Amortization of debt issuance costs totaled $5,085 for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019.

 

9% Subordinated Promissory Note

 

As noted above, a portion of the purchase price for the Acquisition was paid by the issuance by Goedeker to Steve Goedeker, as representative of Goedeker Television, of a 9% subordinated promissory note in the principal amount of $4,100,000. The note will accrue interest at 9% per annum, amortized on a five-year straight-line basis and payable quarterly in accordance with the amortization schedule attached thereto, and mature on April 5, 2023. The remaining balance of the note at March 31, 2020 is $3,395,243, comprised of principal of $3,930,283 and net of unamortized debt discount of $535,050.

 

Goedeker has the right to redeem all or any portion of the note at any time prior to the maturity date without premium or penalty of any kind. The note contains customary events of default, including in the event of (i) non-payment, (ii) a default by Goedeker of any of its covenants under the asset purchase agreement or any other agreement entered into in connection with the asset purchase agreement, or a breach of any of representations or warranties under such documents, or (iii) the bankruptcy of Goedeker. The note also contains a cross default provision which provides that if there occurs with respect to the revolving loan with Burnley or the term loan with SBCC (A) a default with respect to any payment obligation thereunder that entitles the holder thereof to declare such indebtedness to be due and payable prior to its stated maturity or (B) any other default thereunder that entitles, and has caused, the holder thereof to declare such indebtedness to be due and payable prior to maturity. Since the defaults under the loans with Burnley and SBCC are not payment defaults, they fall under clause (B) above and would require Burnley or SBCC to accelerate the payment of indebtedness under their notes (which they have not done) before the cross default provisions would result in a default under this note.

 

The rights of the holder to receive payments under the note are subordinate to the rights of Northpoint, Burnley and SBCC under separate subordination agreements that the holder entered into with them.

 

10% Promissory Note

 

A portion of the purchase price for the acquisition of Neese was paid by the issuance of a promissory note in the principal amount of $1,025,000 by 1847 Neese and Neese to the sellers of Neese. The promissory note bears interest on the outstanding principal amount at the rate of ten percent (10%) per annum and was due and payable in full on March 3, 2018; provided, however, that the unpaid principal, and all accrued, but unpaid, interest thereon shall be prepaid if at any time, and from time to time, the cash on hand of 1847 Neese and Neese exceeds $250,000 and, then, the prepayment shall be equal to the amount of cash in excess of $200,000 until the unpaid principal and accrued, but unpaid, interest thereon is fully prepaid. The promissory note contains the same events of default as the vesting promissory note. The promissory note has not been repaid; thus, the Company is in default under this note. Under terms of the term loan with Home State Bank described above, this note may not be paid until the term loan is paid in full. The payees on the note agreed to the modification of its terms by signing the loan agreement for the Home State Bank term loan. Accordingly, the loan is shown as a long-term liability as of March 31, 2020. Additionally, the term loan lender limits the payment of interest on this note to $40,000 annually. The Company continues to accrue interest at the contract rate; however, given the limitations of the term loan, all accrued interest in excess of $40,000 is included in long-term accrued expenses.

 

NOTE 12—FLOOR PLAN LOANS PAYABLE

 

At March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, $10,587 and $10,581, respectively, of machinery and equipment inventory was pledged to secure a floor plan loan from a commercial lender. The Company must remit proceeds from the sale of the secured inventory to the floor plan lender and pays a finance charge that can vary monthly at the option of the lender. The balance of the floor plan payable as of March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019 amounted to $10,587 and $10,581, respectively.

 

24

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

NOTE 13—CONVERTIBLE PROMISSORY NOTE

 

On April 5, 2019, the Company, 1847 Goedeker and Goedeker (collectively, “1847”) entered into a securities purchase agreement with Leonite Capital LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (“Leonite”), pursuant to which 1847 issued to Leonite a secured convertible promissory note in the aggregate principal amount of $714,286. As additional consideration for the purchase of the note, (i) the Company issued to Leonite 50,000 common shares, (ii) the Company issued to Leonite a five-year warrant to purchase 200,000 common shares at an exercise price of $1.25 per share (subject to adjustment), which may be exercised on a cashless basis, and (iii) 1847 Goedeker issued to Leonite shares of common stock equal to a 7.5% non-dilutable interest in 1847 Goedeker.

 

The note carries an original issue discount of $64,286 to cover Leonite’s legal fees, accounting fees, due diligence fees and/or other transactional costs incurred in connection with the purchase of the note. Therefore, the purchase price of the note was $650,000. Furthermore, the Company issued 50,000 shares of common stock valued at $137,500 and a debt-discount related to the warrants valued at $292,673. The Company amortized $110,894 of financing costs related to the shares and warrants in the three months ended March 31, 2020. The remaining net balance of the note at March 31, 2020 is $710,286, comprised of principal of $714,288 and unamortized debt discount warrant feature of $3,998.

 

The note bears interest at the rate of the greater of (i) 12% per annum and (ii) the prime rate as set forth in the Wall Street Journal on April 5, 2019 plus 6.5% guaranteed over the holding period on the unconverted principal amount, on the terms set forth in the note (the “Stated Rate”). Any amount of principal or interest on the note which is not paid by the maturity date shall bear interest at the rate at the lesser of 24% per annum or the maximum legal amount permitted by law (the “Default Interest”).

 

Beginning on May 5, 2019 and on the same day of each and every calendar month thereafter throughout the term of the note, 1847 shall make monthly payments of interest only due under the note to Leonite at the Stated Rate as set forth above. 1847 shall pay to Leonite on an accelerated basis any outstanding principal amount of the note, along with accrued, but unpaid interest, from: (i) net proceeds of any future financings by the Company, but not its subsidiaries, whether debt or equity, or any other financing proceeds, except any transaction having a specific use of proceeds requirement that such proceeds are to be used exclusively to purchase the assets or equity of an unaffiliated business and the proceeds are used accordingly; (ii) net proceeds from any sale of assets of 1847 or any of its subsidiaries other than sales of assets in the ordinary course of business or receipt by 1847 or any of its subsidiaries of any tax credits, subject to rights of Goedeker, or other financing sources of 1847 (including its subsidiaries) existing prior to the date of the note; and (iii) net proceeds from the sale of any assets outside of the ordinary course of business or securities in any subsidiary.

 

The note will mature 12 months from the issue date, or April 5, 2020, at which time the principal amount and all accrued and unpaid interest, if any, and other fees relating to the note, will be due and payable. Unless an event of default as set forth in the note has occurred, 1847 has the right to prepay principal amount of, and any accrued and unpaid interest on, the note at any time prior to the maturity date at 115% of the principal amount (the “Premium”), provided, however, that if the prepayment is the result of any of the occurrence of any of the transactions described in subparagraphs (i), (ii) or (iii) above then such prepayment shall be the unpaid principal amount, plus accrued and unpaid interest and other amounts due but without the Premium.

 

The note contains customary events of default, including in the event of (i) non-payment, (ii) a breach by 1847 of its covenants under the securities purchase agreement or any other agreement entered into in connection with the securities purchase agreement, or a breach of any of representations or warranties under the note, or (iii) the bankruptcy of 1847. The note also contains a cross default provision, whereby a default by 1847 of any covenant or other term or condition contained in any of the other financial instrument issued by of 1847 to Leonite or any other third party after the passage all applicable notice and cure or grace periods that results in a material adverse effect shall, at Leonite’s option, be considered a default under the note, in which event Leonite shall be entitled to apply all rights and remedies under the terms of the note.

 

25

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

Under the note, Leonite has the right at any time at its option to convert all or any part of the outstanding and unpaid principal amount and accrued and unpaid interest of the note into fully paid and non-assessable common shares or any shares of capital stock or other securities of the Company into which such common shares may be changed or reclassified. The number of common shares to be issued upon each conversion of the note shall be determined by dividing the conversion amount by the applicable conversion price then in effect. The conversion amount is the sum of: (i) the principal amount of the note to be converted plus (ii) at Leonite’s option, accrued and unpaid interest, plus (iii) at Leonite’s option, Default Interest, if any, plus (iv) Leonite’s expenses relating to a conversion, plus (v) at Leonite’s option, any amounts owed to Leonite. The conversion price shall be $1.00 per share (subject to adjustment as further described in the note for common share distributions and splits, certain fundamental transactions, and anti-dilution adjustments), provided that at any time after any event of default under the note, the conversion price shall immediately be equal to the lesser of (i) such conversion price less 40%; and (ii) the lowest weighted average price of the common shares during the 21 consecutive trading day period immediately preceding the trading day that 1847 receives a notice of conversion or (iii) the discount to market based on subsequent financings with other investors.

 

Notwithstanding the foregoing, in no event shall Leonite be entitled to convert any portion of the note in excess of that portion of the note upon conversion of which the sum of (1) the number of common shares beneficially owned by Leonite and its affiliates (other than common shares which may be deemed beneficially owned through the ownership of the unconverted portion of the note or the unexercised or unconverted portion of any other security of the Company subject to a limitation on conversion or exercise analogous to the limitations contained in the note, and, if applicable, net of any shares that may be deemed to be owned by any person not affiliated with Leonite who has purchased a portion of the note from Leonite) and (2) the number of common shares issuable upon the conversion of the portion of the note with respect to which the determination of this proviso is being made, would result in beneficial ownership by Leonite and its affiliates of more than 4.99% of the outstanding common shares of the Company. Such limitations on conversion may be waived (up to a maximum of 9.99%) by Leonite upon, at its election, not less than 61 days’ prior notice to the Company, and the provisions of the conversion limitation shall continue to apply until such 61st day (or such later date, as determined by Leonite, as may be specified in such notice of waiver).

 

Concurrently with 1847 and Leonite entering into the securities purchase agreement and as security for 1847’s obligations thereunder, on April 5, 2019, the Company, 1847 Goedeker and Goedeker entered into a security and pledge agreement with Leonite, pursuant to which, in order to secure 1847’s timely payment of the note and related obligations and the timely performance of each and all of its covenants and obligations under the securities purchase agreement and related documents, 1847 unconditionally and irrevocably granted, pledged and hypothecated to Leonite a continuing security interest in and to, a lien upon, assignment of, and right of set-off against, all presently existing and hereafter acquired or arising assets. Such security interest is a first priority security interest with respect to the securities that the Company owns in 1847 Goedeker and in 1847 Neese, and a third priority security interest with respect to all other assets.

 

The rights of Leonite to receive payments under the note are subordinate to the rights of Northpoint, Burnley and SBCC under separate subordination agreements that Leonite entered into with them.

 

26

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

NOTE 14—FINANCING LEASE

 

The cash portion of the purchase price for the acquisition of Neese was financed under a capital lease transaction for Neese’s equipment with Utica Leaseco, LLC (“Utica”), pursuant to a master lease agreement, dated March 3, 2017, between Utica, as lessor, and 1847 Neese and Neese, as co-lessees (collectively, the “Lessee”), which was amended on June 14, 2017. Under the master lease agreement, as amended, Utica loaned an aggregate of $3,240,000 for certain of Neese’s equipment listed therein, which it leases to the Lessee. A portion of the proceeds from the term loan from Home State Bank (see Note 11) were applied to reduce the balance of this lease to $475,000. The lease is payable in 46 payments of $12,882 beginning July 3, 2018 and an end-of-term buyout of $38,000.

 

On October 31, 2017, the parties entered into a second equipment schedule to the master lease agreement, pursuant to which Utica loaned an aggregate of $980,000 for certain of Neese’s equipment listed therein. The term of the second equipment schedule is 51 months and agreed monthly payments are $25,807.

 

If any rent is not received by Utica within five (5) calendar days of the due date, the Lessee shall pay a late charge equal to ten (10%) percent of the amount. In addition, in the event that any payment is not processed or is returned on the basis of insufficient funds, upon demand, the Lessee shall pay Utica a charge equal to five percent (5%) of the amount of such payment. The Lessee is also required to pay an annual administration fee of $5,000. Upon the expiration of the term of the master lease agreement, the Lessee is required to pay, together with all other amounts then due and payable under the master lease agreement, in cash, an end of term buyout price equal to the lesser of: (a) $162,000 (five percent (5%) of the total invoice cost (as defined in the master lease agreement)); or (b) the fair market value of the equipment, as determined by Utica. Upon the expiration of the master lease agreement, the Lessee is required to pay, together with all other amounts then due and payable under the master lease agreement, in cash, an end of term buyout price equal to the lesser of: (a) $49,000 (five percent (5%) of the total invoice cost); or (b) the fair market value of the equipment, as determined by Utica.

 

Provided that no default under the master lease agreement has occurred and is continuing beyond any applicable grace or cure period, the Lessee has an early buy-out option with respect to all but not less than all of the equipment, upon the payment of any outstanding rental payments or other fees then due, plus an additional amount set forth in the master lease agreement, which represents the anticipated fair market value of the equipment as of the anticipated end date of the master lease agreement. In addition, the Lessee shall pay to Utica an administrative charge to be determined by Utica to cover its time and expenses incurred in connection with the exercise of the option to purchase, including, but not limited to, reasonable attorney fees and costs. Furthermore, upon the exercise by the Lessee of this option to purchase the equipment, the Lessee shall pay all sales and transfer taxes and all fees payable to any governmental authority as a result of the transfer of title of the equipment to Lessee. The early buy-out option was not available on the second equipment schedule to the master lease agreement until after December 31, 2018.

 

In connection with the master lease agreement, the Lessee granted a security interest on all of its right, title and interest in and to: (i) the equipment, together with all related software (embedded therein or otherwise) and general intangibles, all additions, attachments, accessories and accessions thereto whether or not furnished by the supplier; (ii) all accounts, chattel paper, deposit accounts, documents, other equipment, general intangibles, instruments, inventory, investment property, letter of credit rights and any supporting obligations related to any of the foregoing; (iii) all books and records pertaining to the foregoing; (iv) all property of such Lessee held by Utica, including all property of every description, in the custody of or in transit to Utica for any purpose, including safekeeping, collection or pledge, for the account of such Lessee or as to which such Lessee may have any right or power, including but not limited to cash; and (v) to the extent not otherwise included, all insurance, substitutions, replacements, exchanges, accessions, proceeds and products of the foregoing.

 

If the Company sells equipment or inventory, it must remit to Utica the amount loaned against the equipment. Such payments are accumulated and applied to the balance at the end of the lease term. During the three months ended March 31, 2020, there were no sales of equipment or inventory required to be remitted to Utica.

 

The assets and liabilities under the master lease agreement are recorded at the fair value of the assets at the time of acquisition. 

 

27

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

The Company adopted ASU 2015-03 by deducting $22,040 of net debt issuance costs from the long-term portion of the financing lease. Amortization of debt issuance costs totaled $3,015 for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019.

 

At March 31, 2020, annual minimum future lease payments under this Master Lease Agreement are as follows:

 

   Amount 
2020 (remainder of year)  $490,077 
2021   412,655 
2022   12,882 
Total minimum lease payments   915,614 
Less amount representing interest   164,548 
Present value of minimum lease payments   751,066 
Less current portion of minimum lease   (373,012)
Less debt issuance costs, net   (22,040)
Less payments to Utica for release of lien   (249,784)
Less lease deposits   (38,807)
End of lease buyout payments   117,413 
Long-term present value of minimum lease payment  $184,836 

  

The interest rate on the capitalized lease is approximately 15.5%.

 

NOTE 15—OPERATING LEASES

 

On March 3, 2017, Neese entered into an agreement of lease with K&A Holdings, LLC, a limited liability company that is wholly owned by officers of Neese. The agreement of lease is for a term of ten (10) years and provides for a base rent of $8,333 per month. In the event of late payment, interest shall accrue on the unpaid amount at the rate of eighteen percent (18%) per annum. The agreement of lease contains customary events of default, including if Neese shall fail to pay rent within five (5) days after the due date, or if Neese shall fail to perform any other terms, covenants or conditions under the agreement of lease, and other customary representations, warranties and covenants. Under terms of the term loan agreement with Home State Bank (Note 11), the Company may not pay salary or rent to such officers of Neese in excess of $100,000 per year beginning on the date of the term loan agreement, June 13, 2018. The Company is accruing monthly rent, but because of the limitation in the term loan, $225,000 of accrued rent is classified as a long-term accrued liability.

 

The amount accrued for amounts included in the measurement of operating lease liabilities was $25,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2020.

 

Supplemental balance sheet information related to leases was as follows:

 

   March 31,
2020
 
Operating lease right-of-use lease asset  $624,157 
Accumulated amortization   74,487 
Net balance  $549,670 
      
Lease liability, current portion   64,343 
Lease liability, long term   485,327 
Total operating lease liabilities  $549,670 
      
Weighted Average Remaining Lease Term - operating leases   83 months 
      
Weighted Average Discount Rate - operating leases   6.85%

 

28

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

Maturities of the lease liability are as follows:

 

   For the Years Ended 
2020 (reminder of year)  $75,000 
2021   100,000 
2022   100,000 
2023   100,000 
2024   100,000 
Thereafter   216,667 
Total lease payments   691,667 
Less imputed interest   (141,997)
Maturities of lease liabilities  $549,670 

 

Neese leased a piece of equipment on an operating lease. The lease originated in May 2014 for a five-year term with annual payments of $11,830 with a final payment in July 2019.

 

On April 5, 2019, Goedeker entered into a lease agreement with S.H.J., L.L.C., a Missouri limited liability company and affiliate of Goedeker Television. The lease is for a term five (5) years and provides for a base rent of $45,000 per month. In addition, Goedeker is responsible for all taxes and insurance premiums during the lease term. In the event of late payment, interest shall accrue on the unpaid amount at the rate of eighteen percent (18%) per annum. The lease contains customary events of default, including if: (i) Goedeker shall fail to pay rent within five (5) days after the due date; (ii) any insurance required to be maintained by Goedeker pursuant to the lease shall be canceled, terminated, expire, reduced, or materially changed; (iii) Goedeker shall fail to comply with any term, provision, or covenant of the lease and shall not begin and pursue with reasonable diligence the cure of such failure within fifteen (15) days after written notice thereof to Goedeker; (iv) Goedeker shall become insolvent, make an assignment for the benefit of creditors, or file a petition under any section or chapter of the Bankruptcy Code, or under any similar law or statute of the United States of America or any State thereof; or (v) a receiver or trustee shall be appointed for the leased premises or for all or substantially all of the assets of Goedeker.

 

Supplemental balance sheet information related to leases was as follows:

 

   March 31,
2020
 
Operating lease right-of-use lease asset  $2,300,000 
Accumulated amortization   (402,390)
Net balance  $1,897,610 
      
Lease liability, current portion   375,885 
Lease liability, long term   1,521,725 
Total operating lease liabilities  $1,897,610 
      
Weighted Average Remaining Lease Term - operating leases   48 
      
Weighted Average Discount Rate - operating leases   6.5%

 

 

29

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

Maturities of the lease liability are as follows:

 

   For the Years Ended 
2020 (remainder of year)  $405,000 
2021   540,000 
2022   540,000 
2023   540,000 
2024   135,000 
Total lease payments   2,160,000 
Less imputed interest   (262,390)
Maturities of lease liabilities  $1,897,610 

 

NOTE 16—RELATED PARTIES

 

Management Services Agreement

 

On April 15, 2013, the Company and 1847 Partners LLC (the “Manager”) entered into a management services agreement, pursuant to which the Company is required to pay the Manager a quarterly management fee equal to 0.5% of its adjusted net assets for services performed (the “Parent Management Fee”). The amount of the Parent Management Fee with respect to any fiscal quarter is (i) reduced by the aggregate amount of any management fees received by the Manager under any offsetting management services agreements with respect to such fiscal quarter, (ii) reduced (or increased) by the amount of any over-paid (or under-paid) Parent Management Fees received by (or owed to) the Manager as of the end of such fiscal quarter, and (iii) increased by the amount of any outstanding accrued and unpaid Parent Management Fees. The Company expensed $0 and $0 in Parent Management Fees for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

 

Offsetting Management Services Agreements

 

1847 Neese entered into an offsetting management services agreement with the Manager on March 3, 2017 and Goedeker entered into an offsetting management services agreement with the Manager on April 5, 2019. Pursuant to the offsetting management services agreements, 1847 Neese appointed the Manager to provide certain services to it for a quarterly management fee equal to $62,500 and Goedeker appointed the Manager to provide certain services to it for a quarterly management fee equal to the greater of $62,500 or 2% of adjusted net assets (as defined in the management services agreement); provided, however, in each case that (i) pro rated payments shall be made in the first quarter and the last quarter of the term, (ii) if the aggregate amount of management fees paid or to be paid by 1847 Neese or Goedeker, together with all other management fees paid or to be paid by all other subsidiaries of the Company to the Manager, in each case, with respect to any fiscal year exceeds, or is expected to exceed, 9.5% of the Company’s gross income with respect to such fiscal year, then the management fee to be paid by 1847 Neese or Goedeker for any remaining fiscal quarters in such fiscal year shall be reduced, on a pro rata basis determined by reference to the management fees to be paid to the Manager by all of the subsidiaries of the Company, until the aggregate amount of the management fee paid or to be paid by 1847 Neese or Goedeker, together with all other management fees paid or to be paid by all other subsidiaries of the Company to the Manager, in each case, with respect to such fiscal year, does not exceed 9.5% of the Company’s gross income with respect to such fiscal year, and (iii) if the aggregate amount the management fee paid or to be paid by 1847 Neese or Goedeker, together with all other management fees paid or to be paid by all other subsidiaries of the Company to the Manager, in each case, with respect to any fiscal quarter exceeds, or is expected to exceed, the Parent Management Fee with respect to such fiscal quarter, then the management fee to be paid by 1847 Neese or Goedeker for such fiscal quarter shall be reduced, on a pro rata basis, until the aggregate amount of the management fee paid or to be paid by 1847 Neese or Goedeker, together with all other management fees paid or to be paid by all other subsidiaries of the Company to the Manager, in each case, with respect to such fiscal quarter, does not exceed the Parent Management Fee calculated and payable with respect to such fiscal quarter.

 

Each of 1847 Neese and Goedeker shall also reimburse the Manager for all of its costs and expenses which are specifically approved by its board of directors, including all out-of-pocket costs and expenses, which are actually incurred by the Manager or its affiliates on behalf of 1847 Neese or Goedeker in connection with performing services under the offsetting management services agreements.

 

30

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

1847 Neese expensed $62,500 in management fees for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019. Under terms of the term loan from Home State Bank (see Note 11), no fees may be paid to the Manager without permission of the bank, which the Manager does not expect to be granted within the forthcoming year. Accordingly, $513,308 due from 1847 Neese to the Manager is classified as a long-term accrued liability as of March 31, 2020.

 

Goedeker expensed $62,500 in management fees for the three months ended March 31, 2020. Payment of the management fee is subordinated to the payment of interest on the 9% subordinated promissory note (see Note 11), such that no payment of the management fee may be made if Goedeker is in default under the note with regard to interest payments and, for the avoidance of doubt, such payment of the management fee will be contingent on Goedeker being in good standing on all associated loan covenants. In addition, during the period that that any amounts are owed under the 9% subordinated promissory note or the earn out payments, the annual management fee shall be capped at $250,000. The rights of the Manager to receive payments under the offsetting management services agreement with Goedeker are also subordinate to the rights of Burnley and SBCC under separate subordination agreements that the Manager entered into with Burnley and SBCC on April 5, 2019. Accordingly, $126,153 due from Goedeker to the Manager is classified as an accrued liability as of March 31, 2020.

 

Advances

 

From time to time, the Company has received advances from its chief executive officer to meet short-term working capital needs. As of March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, a total of $118,834 in advances from related parties are outstanding. These advances are unsecured, bear no interest, and do not have formal repayment terms or arrangements.

 

As of March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the Manager has funded the Company $64,284 and $62,499 in related party advances, respectively. These advances are unsecured, bear no interest, and do not have formal repayment terms or arrangements.

 

Grid Promissory Note

 

On January 3, 2018, the Company issued a grid promissory note to the Manager in the initial principal amount of $50,000. The note provides that the Company may from time to time request additional advances from the Manager up to an aggregate additional amount of $100,000, which will be added to the note if the Manager, in its sole discretion, so provides. Interest shall accrue on the unpaid portion of the principal amount and the unpaid portion of all advances outstanding at a fixed rate of 8% per annum, and along with the outstanding portion of the principal amount and the outstanding portion of all advances, shall be payable in one lump sum due on the maturity date, January 3, 2021. If all or a portion of the principal amount or any advance under the note, or any interest payable thereon is not paid when due (whether at the stated maturity, by acceleration or otherwise), such overdue amount shall bear interest at a rate of 12% per annum. In the event the Company completes a financing involving at least $500,000, the Company must, contemporaneously with the closing of such financing transaction, repay the entire outstanding principal and accrued and unpaid interest on the note. The note is unsecured and contains customary events of default. As of March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the Manager has advanced $119,400 and $119,400 of the promissory note and the Company has accrued interest of $19,530 and $17,115, respectively.

 

Building Lease

 

On March 3, 2017, Neese entered into an agreement of lease with K&A Holdings, LLC, a limited liability company that is wholly owned by officers of Neese. See Note 15 for details regarding this lease.

 

31

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

NOTE 17—SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT

 

Allocation Shares

 

As of March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the Company had authorized and outstanding 1,000 allocation shares. These allocation shares do not entitle the holder thereof to vote on any matter relating to the Company other than in connection with amendments to the Company’s operating agreement and in connection with certain other corporate transactions as specified in the operating agreement.

 

The Manager owns 100% of the allocation shares of the Company, which are a separate class of limited liability company interests that, together with the common shares, will comprise all of the classes of equity interests of the Company. The Manager received the allocation shares with its initial capitalization of the Company. The allocation shares generally will entitle the Manager to receive a twenty percent (20%) profit allocation as a form of incentive designed to align the interests of the Manager with those of the Company’s shareholders. Profit allocation has two components: an equity-based component and a distribution-based component. The equity-based component will be paid when the market for the Company’s shares appreciates, subject to certain conditions and adjustments. The distribution-based component will be paid when the distributions the Company pays to shareholders exceed an annual hurdle rate of eight percent (8.0%), subject to certain conditions and adjustments. While the equity-based component and distribution-based component are interrelated in certain respects, each component may independently result in a payment of profit allocation if the relevant conditions to payment are satisfied.

 

The 1,000 allocation shares are issued and outstanding and held by the Manager, which is controlled by Mr. Roberts, the Company’s chief executive officer and controlling shareholder.

 

Common Shares

 

The Company is authorized to issue 500,000,000 common shares as of March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019. As of March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the Company had 3,165,625 common shares issued and outstanding. The common shares entitle the holder thereof to one vote per share on all matters coming before the shareholders of the Company for a vote.

 

The Company did not issue any equity securities in the three months ended March 31, 2020.

 

Warrants

 

On April 5, 2019, the Company issued a warrant to purchase 200,000 common shares to Leonite pursuant to the securities purchase agreement (see Note 13). The warrant has a term of five years, an exercise price of $1.25 per share (subject to adjustment), and may be exercised on a cashless basis.

 

Accordingly, a portion of the proceeds was allocated to the warrant based on its relative fair value using the Black Scholes option-pricing model. The assumptions used in the Black-Scholes model are as follows: (i) dividend yield of 0%; (ii) expected volatility of 140.3%, (iii) weighted average risk-free interest rate of 2.31%, (iv) expected life of five years, and (v) estimated fair value of the common shares of $2.75 per share in the amount of $292,673. The Company amortized $72,769 of debt discount in the three months ended March 31, 2020.

 

The warrant also contains an ownership limitation. The Company shall not effect any exercise of the warrant, and Leonite shall not have the right to exercise any portion of the warrant, to the extent that after giving effect to issuance of common shares upon exercise the warrant, Leonite, together with its affiliates, and any other persons acting as a group together with Leonite or any of its affiliates, would beneficially own in excess of 4.99% of the number of common shares outstanding immediately after giving effect to the issuance of common shares issuable upon exercise of the warrant.  Upon no fewer than 61 days’ prior notice to the Company, Leonite may increase or decrease such beneficial ownership limitation provisions and any such increase or decrease will not be effective until the 61st day after such notice is delivered to the Company. 

 

32

 

 

1847 HOLDINGS LLC

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

 

Noncontrolling Interests

 

The Company owns 55.0% of 1847 Neese and 70% of 1847 Goedeker.  For financial interests in which the Company owns a controlling financial interest, the Company applies the provisions of ASC 810, which are applicable to reporting the equity and net income or loss attributable to noncontrolling interests. The results of 1847 Neese and 1847 Goedeker are included in the consolidated statement of income. The net loss attributable to the 45% non-controlling interest of 1847 Neese amount to $352,649 and $266,680 for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The net loss attributable to the 30% non-controlling interest of 1847 Goedeker amounted to $385,536 for the three months ended March 31, 2020.

 

NOTE 18—COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

An office space has been leased on a month-by-month basis.

 

The officers and directors are involved in other business activities and most likely will become involved in other business activities in the future.

On March 27, 2020, the Company and the Company’s newly-formed wholly-owned subsidiary 1847 Asien Inc. (“1847 Asien”) entered into a Stock Purchase Agreement (the “Purchase Agreement”) with Asien’s Appliance, Inc. (“Asien’s Appliance”) and Joerg Christian Wilhelmsen and Susan Kay Wilhelmsen, as trustees of the Wilhelmsen Family Trust, U/D/T Dated May 1, 1992, pursuant to which 1847 Asien agreed to acquire all of the issued and outstanding capital stock of Asien’s Appliance for an aggregate purchase price of $2.5 million, subject to adjustment, consisting of (i) $1,670,000 in cash and (ii) 415,000 common shares of the Company, having a mutually agreed upon value of $830,000. Closing of the Purchase Agreement is subject to due diligence other customary closing conditions and is expected to occur during the second quarter of 2020.

NOTE 19—SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

In accordance with ASC 855-10, the Company has analyzed its operations subsequent to March 31, 2020 to the date these financial statements were issued, and has determined that, except as set forth below, it does not have any material subsequent events to disclose in these financial statements. 

PPP Loans

 

On April 9, 2020 and April 10, 2020, Goedeker and Neese received a $642,600 and $383,600, respectively, in Payroll Protection Program (“PPP”) loans from the United States Small Business Administration (“SBA”) under provisions of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”).  The PPP loans have two-year terms and bear interest at a rate of 1.0% per annum.  Monthly principal and interest payments are deferred for six months after the date of disbursement.  The PPP loans may be prepaid at any time prior to maturity with no prepayment penalties.  The PPP loans contain events of default and other provisions customary for loans of this type.  The PPP provides that the PPP loans may be partially or wholly forgiven if the funds are used for certain qualifying expenses as described in the CARES Act.  Goedeker and Neese intend to use the proceeds from the PPP loans for qualifying expenses and to apply for forgiveness of the PPP loans in accordance with the terms of the CARES Act.  The Company has classified the PPP loans as current liabilities pending SBA clarification of the final loan terms.

 

Option Grants

 

On May 11, 2020, the Company granted options to Paul A. Froning and Robert D. Barry to purchase 60,000 and 30,000 common shares, respectively, each at an exercise price of $2.50 per share.  The options vested immediately on the date of grant and terminate on May 11, 2025. 

Leonite Conversion and Amendments

 

On May 4, 2020, Leonite converted $100,000 of the outstanding balance of the secured convertible promissory note (see Note 13) into 100,000 common shares.

 

On May 11, 2020, 1847 and Leonite entered into a first amendment to secured convertible promissory note, pursuant to which the parties agreed (i) to extend the maturity date of the note to October 5, 2020, (ii) that 1847’s failure to repay the note on the original maturity date of April 5, 2020 shall not constitute and event of default under the note and (iii) to increase the principal amount of the note by $207,145, as a forbearance fee. Notwithstanding the foregoing, in the event that 1847 completes an offering of debt, equity, or closes on an asset sale (other than in the ordinary course of business), then 1847 agreed to promptly use the net proceeds of such offering to repay Leonite; provided that, in no event shall this requirement cause 1847 to default on any of its agreements and obligations that were outstanding at the time of the amendment.

 

Pursuant to the amendment, 1847 also agreed that, upon closing of its planned acquisition of Asien’s Appliance described above, Leonite shall be granted a 5% equity interest in such acquisition. In the event that 1847 does not consummate the acquisition, 1847 and Leonite agreed to negotiate in good faith to exchange such interest with another asset or other term of that would approximate the economic benefit that would have been derived by Leonite.

In connection with the amendment, the Company issued to Leonite a five-year warrant to purchase 200,000 common shares at an exercise price of $1.25 per share (subject to adjustment), which may be exercised on a cashless basis. This warrant has the same terms as the warrant previously issued to Leonite (see Note 17).

 

33

 

 

ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.

 

The following management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations provides information that management believes is relevant to an assessment and understanding of our plans and financial condition. The following financial information is derived from our financial statements and should be read in conjunction with such financial statements and notes thereto set forth elsewhere herein.

 

Use of Terms

 

Except as otherwise indicated by the context and for the purposes of this report only, references in this report to “we,” “us,” “our” and the “Company” refer to 1847 Holdings LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, and its consolidated subsidiaries. References to the “Manager” refer to 1847 Partners LLC, a Delaware limited liability company.

 

Special Note Regarding Forward Looking Statements

 

Certain information contained in this report includes forward-looking statements. The statements herein which are not historical reflect our current expectations and projections about our future results, performance, liquidity, financial condition, prospects and opportunities and are based upon information currently available to our management and our interpretation of what is believed to be significant factors affecting our businesses, including many assumptions regarding future events. The following factors, among others, may affect our forward-looking statements:

 

  our ability to successfully identify and acquire additional businesses, and to operate such businesses that we may acquire in the future and to effectively integrate and improve such businesses;
     

  our organizational structure, which may limit our ability to meet our dividend and distribution policy;
     

  our ability to service and comply with the terms of our indebtedness;
     

  our cash flow available for distribution and our ability to make distributions in the future to our common shareholders;
     

  our ability to pay the management fee, profit allocation and put price to the Manager when due;
     

  labor disputes, strikes or other employee disputes or grievances;
     

  our ability to implement our acquisition and management strategies;
     

  the regulatory environment in which our businesses operate under;
     

  trends in the industries in which our businesses operate;
     

  the competitive environment in which our businesses operate;
     

  changes in general economic or business conditions or economic or demographic trends in the United States including changes in interest rates and inflation;
     

  our ability to retain or replace qualified employees of our businesses;
     

  casualties, condemnation or catastrophic failures with respect to any of our businesses’ facilities;
     

  costs and effects of legal and administrative proceedings, settlements, investigations and claims; and
     

  extraordinary or force majeure events affecting our business or operations.

 

Forward-looking statements, which involve assumptions and describe our future plans, strategies, and expectations, are generally identifiable by use of the words “may,” “should,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “believe,” “intend,” or “project” or the negative of these words or other variations on these words or comparable terminology. Actual results, performance, liquidity, financial condition, prospects and opportunities could differ materially from those expressed in, or implied by, these forward-looking statements as a result of various risks, uncertainties and other factors. Actual events or results may differ materially from those discussed in forward-looking statements as a result of various factors, including, without limitation, the risks outlined under Item 1A “Risk Factors” included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2019 and matters described in this report generally. In light of these risks and uncertainties, there can be no assurance that the forward-looking statements contained in this report will in fact occur.

 

Potential investors should not place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements. Except as expressly required by the federal securities laws, there is no undertaking to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events, changed circumstances or any other reason.

 

34

 

 

Overview

 

We are an acquisition holding company focused on acquiring and managing a group of small businesses, which we characterize as those that have an enterprise value of less than $50 million, in a variety of different industries headquartered in North America. To date, we have completed two acquisitions.

 

In April 2019, our subsidiary 1847 Goedeker Inc. (“Goedeker”) acquired substantially all of the assets of Goedeker Television Co. (“Goedeker Television”). As a result of this transaction, Goedeker acquired the former business of Goedeker Television, which was established in 1951, and continues to operate this business. Headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri, Goedeker is a one-stop e-commerce destination for home furnishings, including appliances, furniture, home goods and related products. Goedeker has evolved from a local brick and mortar operation serving the St. Louis metro area to a large nationwide omnichannel retailer that offers one-stop shopping for the leading brands.

 

In March 2017, our subsidiary 1847 Neese Inc. (“1847 Neese”) acquired Neese, Inc. (“Neese”). Headquartered in Grand Junction, Iowa and founded in 1991, Neese is an established business specializing in providing a wide range of land application services and selling equipment and parts, primarily to the agricultural industry, but also to the construction and lawn and garden industries. Neese’s revenue mix is composed of waste disposal and a variety of agricultural services, wholesaling of agricultural equipment and parts, local trucking services, various shop services, and other products and services. Services to the local agricultural and farming communities include manure spreading, land rolling, bin whipping, cleaning of bulk storage bins and silos, equipment rental, trucking, vacuuming, building erection, and others.

 

Through our structure, we offer investors an opportunity to participate in the ownership and growth of a portfolio of businesses that traditionally have been owned and managed by private equity firms, private individuals or families, financial institutions or large conglomerates. We believe that our management and acquisition strategies will allow us to achieve our goals to begin making and growing regular distributions to our common shareholders and increasing common shareholder value over time.

 

We seek to acquire controlling interests in small businesses that we believe operate in industries with long-term macroeconomic growth opportunities, and that have positive and stable earnings and cash flows, face minimal threats of technological or competitive obsolescence and have strong management teams largely in place. We believe that private company operators and corporate parents looking to sell their businesses will consider us to be an attractive purchaser of their businesses. We intend to make these future businesses our majority-owned subsidiaries and intend to actively manage and grow such businesses. We expect to improve our businesses over the long term through organic growth opportunities, add-on acquisitions and operational improvements.

 

Recent Developments

 

Impact of Coronavirus Pandemic

 

In December 2019, a novel strain of coronavirus was reported to have surfaced in Wuhan, China. The virus has since spread to over 150 countries and every state in the United States. On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak a pandemic, and on March 13, 2020, the United States declared a national emergency. Most states and cities have reacted by instituting quarantines, restrictions on travel, “stay at home” rules and restrictions on the types of businesses that may continue to operate, as well as guidance in response to the pandemic and the need to contain it.

 

Effective April 6, 2020, the Governor of Missouri announced a stay at home order that was in effect until May 3, 2020. Pursuant to this order, non-essential businesses, such as Goedeker’s showroom, were forced to close. However, Goedeker’s call center and warehouse continued to operate. According to Missouri’s re-opening plan, retail stores, such as Goedeker’s showroom, may re-open effective May 4, 2020 but with limitations on the number of individuals allowed in the showroom. Goedeker has not yet determined when it may re-open. Since over 90% of Goedeker’s sales are completed online and its call center and warehouse and distribution operations continued to operate, the restrictions put in place have not yet had a negative impact on Goedeker’s operations.

 

In Iowa, where Neese is located, non-essential businesses in certain counties, include where Neese’s principal office is located, began re-opening on May 1, 2020, but non-essential businesses in other counties in Iowa remain closed and the pandemic has had a negative effect on business activity throughout Iowa.

 

We have taken steps to take care of our employees, including providing the ability for employees to work remotely and implementing strategies to support appropriate social distancing techniques for those employees who are not able to work remotely. We have also taken precautions with regard to employee, facility and office hygiene as well as implementing significant travel restrictions. We are also assessing our business continuity plans for all business units in the context of the pandemic. This is a rapidly evolving situation, and we will continue to monitor and mitigate developments affecting our workforce, our suppliers, our customers, and the public at large to the extent we are able to do so. We have and will continue to carefully review all rules, regulations, and orders and responding accordingly.

 

35

 

 

Goedeker is dependent upon suppliers to provide it with all of the products that it sells. The pandemic has impacted and may continue to impact suppliers and manufacturers of certain of its products. As a result, Goedeker has faced and may continue to face delays or difficulty sourcing certain products, which could negatively affect Goedeker’s business and financial results. Even if Goedeker is able to find alternate sources for such products, they may cost more, which could adversely impact Goedeker’s profitability and financial condition.

 

Neese is also dependent upon suppliers to provide it with all of the equipment and parts that it sells, and several have notified it of disruptions to their production and/or supply chain related to the pandemic. Any business disruption or failure of these suppliers to meet delivery requirements and commitments may cause delays in future shipments and potential lost or delayed revenue.

 

If the current pace of the pandemic cannot be slowed and the spread of the virus is not contained, our business operations could be further delayed or interrupted. We expect that government and health authorities may announce new or extend existing restrictions, which could require us to make further adjustments to our operations in order to comply with any such restrictions. We may also experience limitations in employee resources. In addition, our operations could be disrupted if any of our employees were suspected of having the virus, which could require quarantine of some or all such employees or closure of our facilities for disinfection. The duration of any business disruption cannot be reasonably estimated at this time but may materially affect our ability to operate our business and result in additional costs.

 

The extent to which the pandemic may impact our results will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted as of the date of this report, including new information that may emerge concerning the severity of the pandemic and steps taken to contain the pandemic or treat its impact, among others. Nevertheless, the pandemic and the current financial, economic and capital markets environment, and future developments in the global supply chain and other areas present material uncertainty and risk with respect to our performance, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

PPP Loans

 

On April 9, 2020 and April 10, 2020, Goedeker and Neese received a $642,600 and $383,600, respectively, in Payroll Protection Program (“PPP”) loans from the United States Small Business Administration (“SBA”) under provisions of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”).  The PPP loans have two-year terms and bear interest at a rate of 1.0% per annum.  Monthly principal and interest payments are deferred for six months after the date of disbursement.  The PPP loans may be prepaid at any time prior to maturity with no prepayment penalties.  The PPP loans contain events of default and other provisions customary for loans of this type.  The PPP provides that the PPP loans may be partially or wholly forgiven if the funds are used for certain qualifying expenses as described in the CARES Act.  Goedeker and Neese intend to use the proceeds from the PPP loans for qualifying expenses and to apply for forgiveness of the PPP loans in accordance with the terms of the CARES Act.  The Company has classified the PPP loans as current liabilities pending SBA clarification of the final loan terms.

 

Leonite Conversion and Amendments

 

On May 4, 2020, Leonite (as defined below), converted $100,000 of the outstanding balance of the secured convertible promissory note described below into 100,000 common shares.

 

On May 11, 2020, 1847 (as defined below) and Leonite entered into a first amendment to secured convertible promissory note, pursuant to which the parties agreed (i) to extend the maturity date of the note to October 5, 2020, (ii) that 1847’s failure to repay the note on the original maturity date of April 5, 2020 shall not constitute and event of default under the note and (iii) to increase the principal amount of the note by $207,145, as a forbearance fee. Notwithstanding the foregoing, in the event that 1847 completes an offering of debt, equity, or closes on an asset sale (other than in the ordinary course of business), then 1847 agreed to promptly use the net proceeds of such offering to repay Leonite; provided that, in no event shall this requirement cause 1847 to default on any of its agreements and obligations that were outstanding at the time of the amendment.

 

Pursuant to the amendment, 1847 also agreed that, upon closing of its planned acquisition of Asien’s Appliance, Inc., Leonite shall be granted a 5% equity interest in such acquisition. In the event that 1847 does not consummate the acquisition, 1847 and Leonite agreed to negotiate in good faith to exchange such interest with another asset or other term of that would approximate the economic benefit that would have been derived by Leonite.

 

36

 

 

In connection with the amendment, the Company issued to Leonite a five-year warrant to purchase 200,000 common shares at an exercise price of $1.25 per share (subject to adjustment), which may be exercised on a cashless basis.

 

Management Fees

 

On April 15, 2013, the Company and the Manager entered into a management services agreement, pursuant to which the Company is required to pay the Manager a quarterly management fee equal to 0.5% of its adjusted net assets for services performed (the “Parent Management Fee”). The amount of the Parent Management Fee with respect to any fiscal quarter is (i) reduced by the aggregate amount of any management fees received by the Manager under any offsetting management services agreements with respect to such fiscal quarter, (ii) reduced (or increased) by the amount of any over-paid (or under-paid) Parent Management Fees received by (or owed to) the Manager as of the end of such fiscal quarter, and (iii) increased by the amount of any outstanding accrued and unpaid Parent Management Fees. The Company expensed $0 and $0 in Parent Management Fees for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

 

1847 Neese entered into an offsetting management services agreement with the Manager on March 3, 2017 and Goedeker entered into an offsetting management services agreement with the Manager on April 5, 2019. Pursuant to the offsetting management services agreements, 1847 Neese appointed the Manager to provide certain services to it for a quarterly management fee equal to $62,500 and Goedeker appointed the Manager to provide certain services to it for a quarterly management fee equal to the greater of $62,500 or 2% of adjusted net assets (as defined in the management services agreement); provided, however, in each case that (i) pro rated payments shall be made in the first quarter and the last quarter of the term, (ii) if the aggregate amount of management fees paid or to be paid by 1847 Neese or Goedeker, together with all other management fees paid or to be paid by all other subsidiaries of the Company to the Manager, in each case, with respect to any fiscal year exceeds, or is expected to exceed, 9.5% of the Company’s gross income with respect to such fiscal year, then the management fee to be paid by 1847 Neese or Goedeker for any remaining fiscal quarters in such fiscal year shall be reduced, on a pro rata basis determined by reference to the management fees to be paid to the Manager by all of the subsidiaries of the Company, until the aggregate amount of the management fee paid or to be paid by 1847 Neese or Goedeker, together with all other management fees paid or to be paid by all other subsidiaries of the Company to the Manager, in each case, with respect to such fiscal year, does not exceed 9.5% of the Company’s gross income with respect to such fiscal year, and (iii) if the aggregate amount the management fee paid or to be paid by 1847 Neese or Goedeker, together with all other management fees paid or to be paid by all other subsidiaries of the Company to the Manager, in each case, with respect to any fiscal quarter exceeds, or is expected to exceed, the Parent Management Fee with respect to such fiscal quarter, then the management fee to be paid by 1847 Neese or Goedeker for such fiscal quarter shall be reduced, on a pro rata basis, until the aggregate amount of the management fee paid or to be paid by 1847 Neese or Goedeker, together with all other management fees paid or to be paid by all other subsidiaries of the Company to the Manager, in each case, with respect to such fiscal quarter, does not exceed the Parent Management Fee calculated and payable with respect to such fiscal quarter.

 

Each of 1847 Neese and Goedeker shall also reimburse the Manager for all of its costs and expenses which are specifically approved by its board of directors, including all out-of-pocket costs and expenses, which are actually incurred by the Manager or its affiliates on behalf of 1847 Neese or Goedeker in connection with performing services under the offsetting management services agreements.

 

Goedeker expensed $62,500 in management fees for the three months ended March 31, 2020. Payment of the management fee is subordinated to the payment of interest on the 9% subordinated promissory note described below, such that no payment of the management fee may be made if Goedeker is in default under the note with regard to interest payments and, for the avoidance of doubt, such payment of the management fee will be contingent on Goedeker being in good standing on all associated loan covenants. In addition, during the period that that any amounts are owed under the 9% subordinated promissory note or the earn out payments, the annual management fee shall be capped at $250,000. The rights of the Manager to receive payments under the offsetting management services agreement with Goedeker are also subordinate to the rights of Burnley and SBCC (each as defined below) under separate subordination agreements that the Manager entered into with Burnley and SBCC on April 5, 2019. Accordingly, $126,153 due from Goedeker to the Manager is classified as an accrued liability as of March 31, 2020.

 

1847 Neese expensed $62,500 in management fees for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019. Under terms of the term loan from Home State Bank described below, no fees may be paid to the Manager without permission of the bank, which the Manager does not expect to be granted within the forthcoming year. Accordingly, $513,308 due from 1847 Neese to the Manager is classified as a long-term accrued liability as of March 31, 2020.

 

On a consolidated basis, we expensed total management fees of $125,000 and $62,500 for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively, and $639,461 due to the Manager is classified as an accrued liability as of March 31, 2020.

 

37

 

 

Segments

 

We have two reportable segments: the retail and appliances segment and the land management services segment. Additionally, unallocated shared-service costs, which include various corporate level expenses and other governance functions, are presented as corporate services.

 

The retail and appliances segment, operated by Goedeker, is comprised of a retail store and an e-commerce destination for home furnishings, including appliances, furniture, home goods and related products.

 

The land management services segment, operated by Neese, is comprised of professional services for waste disposal and a variety of agricultural services, wholesaling of agricultural equipment and parts, local trucking services, various shop services, and sales of other products and services.

 

Results of Operations

 

Comparison of Three Months Ended March 31, 2020 and 2019

 

The following table sets forth key components of our results of operations during the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, both in dollars and as a percentage of our revenue.

 

   March 31, 2020   March 31, 2019 
   Amount  

% of

Revenues

   Amount  

% of

Revenues

 
Revenues                
Services  $446,099    4.3%  $575,397    70.8%
Sales of parts and equipment   288,071    2.8%   236,974    29.2%
Furniture and appliances   9,677,178    92.9%   -    - 
Total revenues   10,411,348    100.0%   812,371    100.0%
Operating expenses                    
Cost of sales   8,366,438    80.4%   213,750    26.3%
Personnel costs   1,764,450    16.9%   457,197    56.3%
Depreciation and amortization   403,236    3.9%   338,822    41.7%
Fuel   103,764    1.0%   188,377    23.2%
General and administrative   1,847,789    17.7%   375,735    46.3%
Total operating expenses   12,485,677    119.9%   1,573,881    193.7%
Net loss from operations   (2,074,329)   (19.9)%   (761,510)   (93.7)%
Other income (expense)                    
Financing costs and loss on early extinguishment of debt   (202,782)   (1.9)%   (8,100)   (1.0)%
Interest expense   (333,554)   (3.2)%   (144,292)   (17.8)%
Other income (expense)   2,383    -    -    - 
Gain (loss) on sale of property and equipment   -    -    24,224    3.0%
Total other income (expense)   (533,953)   (5.1)%   (128,168)   (15.8)%
Net loss before income taxes   (2,608,282)   (25.1)%   (889,678)   (109.5)%
Income tax benefit   497,800    4.8%   254,419    31.3%
Net loss before non-controlling interests   (2,110,482)   (20.3)%   (635,259)   (78.2)%
Less net loss attributable to non-controlling interests   (738,185)   (3.7)%   (266,680)   (32.8)%
Net loss attributable to company shareholders  $(1,372,297)   (13.2)%  $(368,579)   (45.4)%

 

Total revenues. Our total revenues were $10,411,348 for the three months ended March 31, 2020, including $9,677,178 from our new retail and appliances segment, as compared to $812,371 for the three months ended March 31, 2019.

 

38

 

 

The retail and appliances segment generates revenue through the sales of home furnishings, including appliances, furniture, home goods and related products. The following table summarizes our revenues by sales type for the three months ended March 31, 2020:

 

   Three Months Ended March 31,
2020
 
Appliance sales  $8,128,777 
Furniture sales   1,382,365 
Other sales   166,036 
Total revenues  $9,677,178 

 

The land management services segment generates revenue through the provision of waste disposal and a variety of land application services, wholesaling of agricultural equipment and parts, local trucking services, various shop services, and sales of other products and services. Revenues from the land management segment decreased by $78,201, or 9.6%, to $734,170 for the three months ended March 31, 2020 from $812,371 for the three months ended March 31, 2019. Such decrease resulted from a $129,298 decrease in services revenue, offset by a $51,097 increase in sales of parts and equipment. The decrease in services revenue was primarily due to a $131,709 decline in trucking revenue primarily attributable to decline in revenue from one customer in 2020 compared to 2019. The following table summarizes our revenues by type for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019:

 

   Three Months Ended  March 31, 
   2020   2019 
Services        
Trucking  $240,763   $372,472 
Waste hauling   117,130    104,329 
Repairs   60,684    52,928 
Other   27,522    45,668 
Total services   446,099    575,397 
Sales of parts and equipment   288,071    236,974 
Total revenues  $734,170   $812,371 

 

Cost of sales. Cost of sales for the retail and appliances segment consist of the cost of purchased merchandise plus the cost of delivering merchandise and where applicable installation, net of promotional rebates and other incentives received from vendors. Cost of sales for the land management services segment consist of the direct costs of our equipment and parts. Our total cost of sales was $8,366,438 for the three months ended March 31, 2020, including $8,111,170 from our new retail and appliances segment, as compared to $213,750 for the three months ended March 31, 2019.

 

Cost of sales for the land management services segment increased by $41,518, or 19.4%, to $255,268 for the three months ended March 31, 2020 from $213,750 for the three months ended March 31, 2019. As a percentage of land management services revenues, cost of sales was 34.8% and 26.3% for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. Such increase was due to the change in revenue mix, with sales of parts and equipment, which have higher associated costs, accounting for a larger portion of revenues during the 2019 period.

 

Personnel costs. Personnel costs include employee salaries and bonuses plus related payroll taxes. It also includes health insurance premiums, 401(k) contributions, and training costs. Our personnel costs were $1,764,450 for the three months ended March 31, 2020, including $1,311,483 from our new retail and appliances segment, as compared to $457,197 for the three months ended March 31, 2019.

 

Personnel costs for the land management services segment decreased by $4,230, or 0.9%, to $452,967 for the three months ended March 31, 2020 from $457,197 for the three months ended March 31, 2019.

 

Fuel costs. Fuel costs, which are attributable to our land management services segment, include fuel for our on-road trucking and off-road manure spreading services. Our fuel costs decreased by $84,613, or 44.9%, to $103,764 for the three months ended March 31, 2020 from $188,377 for the three months ended March 31, 2019. The decrease in fuel costs is the result of a decline in market prices for fuel purchases and the decline in trucking and waste hauling revenue.

 

General and administrative expenses. Our general and administrative expenses consist primarily of professional advisor fees, bad debts reserve, rent expense, advertising, bank fees, and other expenses incurred in connection with general operations. Our total general and administrative expenses increased by $1,472,054, or 391.8%, to $1,847,789 for the three months ended March 31, 2020, including $1,477,815 from our new retail and appliances segment, from $375,735 for the three months ended March 31, 2019.

 

39

 

 

General and administrative expenses for the land management services segment decreased by $4,751, or 1.4%, to $330,689 for the three months ended March 31, 2020 from $335,440 for the three months ended March 31, 2019. The decrease primarily resulted from a decrease in equipment repairs of $4,818. As a percentage of land management services revenue, general and administrative expenses for the land management services segment amounted to 45.0% and 41.3% for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

 

General and administrative expenses for our holding company decreased by $1,010, or 2.5%, to $39,285 for the three months ended March 31, 2020, from $40,295 for the three months ended March 31, 2019. The decrease was due to a decrease in professional fees compared to the prior year.

 

Total other income (expense). We had $533,953 in total other expense, net, for the three months ended March 31, 2020, as compared to other expense, net, of $128,168 for the three months ended March 31, 2019. Other expense in the three months ended March 31, 2020 consisted primarily of interest expense of $333,554 and amortization of financing costs of $202,782, while other expense for the three months ended March 31, 2019 consisted of interest expense of $144,292 and financing costs and loss on early extinguishment of debt $8,100, offset by a gain on sale of property and equipment of $24,224.

 

Net loss attributable to company shareholders. As a result of the cumulative effect of the factors described above, our net loss attributable to our shareholders increased by $1,003,718, or 272.3%, to $1,372,297 for the three months ended March 31, 2020 from $368,579 for the three months ended March 31, 2019.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

As of March 31, 2020, we had cash and cash equivalents of $302,417. To date, we have financed our operations primarily through cash proceeds from financing activities, borrowings and equity contributions by our shareholders.

 

Although we do not believe that we will require additional cash to continue our operations over the next twelve months (i.e., we do not believe that there is a going concern issue), we do believe additional funds are required to execute our business plan and our strategy of acquiring additional businesses. The funds required to execute our business plan will depend on the size, capital structure and purchase price consideration that the seller of a target business deems acceptable in a given transaction. The amount of funds needed to execute our business plan also depends on what portion of the purchase price of a target business the seller of that business is willing to take in the form of seller notes or our equity or in one of our subsidiaries. Given these factors, we believe that the amount of outside additional capital necessary to execute our business plan on the low end (assuming target company sellers accept a significant portion of the purchase price in the form of seller notes or our equity or in one of our subsidiaries) ranges between $100,000 to $250,000. If, and to the extent, that sellers are unwilling to accept a significant portion of the purchase price in seller notes and equity, then the cash required to execute our business plan could be as much as $5,000,000. We will seek growth as funds become available from cash flow, borrowings, additional capital raised privately or publicly, or seller retained financing.

 

Our primary use of funds will be for future acquisitions, public company expenses including regular distributions to our shareholders, investments in future acquisitions, payments to the Manager pursuant to the management services agreement, potential payment of profit allocation to the Manager and potential put price to the Manager in respect of the allocation shares it owns. The management fee, expenses, potential profit allocation and potential put price are paid before distributions to shareholders and may be significant and exceed the funds we hold, which may require us to dispose of assets or incur debt to fund such expenditures. See Item 1. “Business—Our Manager” included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2019 for more information concerning the management fee, the profit allocation and put price.

 

At March 31, 2020, Goedeker did not meet certain loan covenants under the loan and security agreements with Burnley Capital LLC and Small Business Community Capital II, L.P. The agreements require compliance with the following ratios as a percentage of earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization for the twelve-month period ended March 31, 2020. The table below shows the required ratio and actual ratio for such period.

 

Covenant  Actual Ratio  Required Ratio
Total debt ratio  (2.6)x  4.0x
Senior debt ratio  (0.7)x  1.5x
Interest coverage ratio  (0.9)x  1.0x

 

In addition, Goedeker was not in compliance with a requirement with respect to the liquidity ratio, which is the ratio of cash and available borrowings to customer deposits. At March 31, 2020, the actual ratio was 0.10x compared to a requirement of 0.35x.

 

40

 

 

Accordingly, Goedeker is in technical, not payment default, on these loan and security agreements and we have classified such debt as a current liability. We have developed plans that will return us to full compliance, including a proposed underwritten public offering of Goedeker’s common stock, the proceeds of which would be used to repay these two loans. Goedeker filed a registration statement on Form S-1 relating to this offering on April 22, 2020. In addition, we have taken the following two steps that we believe will positively impact our retail and appliance business:

 

  we hired an appliance industry veteran as chief executive officer of our retail and appliance business to drive growth and increase profitability; and

 

  we have engaged outside consultants to increase traffic to the website of our retail and appliance business and improve our on-line shopping experience.

 

We believe these efforts and others will increase revenue and allow us to regain compliance with our debt covenants.

 

There are no cross-default provisions that would require any other long-term liabilities to be classified as current. Although the 9% subordinated promissory note described below contains a cross default provision that is triggered by the acceleration of the senior debt, such cross default provision would only be triggered for a technical default like the one that occurred if the senior lender accelerated the senior debt, which has not happened.

 

The amount of management fee paid to the Manager by us is reduced by the aggregate amount of any offsetting management fees, if any, received by the Manager from any of our businesses. As a result, the management fee paid to the Manager may fluctuate from quarter to quarter. The amount of management fee paid to the Manager may represent a significant cash obligation. In this respect, the payment of the management fee will reduce the amount of cash available for distribution to shareholders.

 

The Manager, as holder of 100% of our allocation shares, is entitled to receive a twenty percent (20%) profit allocation as a form of preferred equity distribution, subject to an annual hurdle rate of eight percent (8%), as follows. Upon the sale of a company subsidiary, the Manager will be paid a profit allocation if the sum of (i) the excess of the gain on the sale of such subsidiary over a high water mark plus (ii) the subsidiary’s net income since its acquisition by the Company exceeds the 8% hurdle rate. The 8% hurdle rate is the product of (i) a 2% rate per quarter, multiplied by (ii) the number of quarters such subsidiary was held by the Company, multiplied by (iii) the subsidiary’s average share (determined based on gross assets, generally) of our consolidated net equity (determined according to GAAP with certain adjustments). In certain circumstances, after a subsidiary has been held for at least 5 years, the Manager may also trigger a profit allocation with respect to such subsidiary (determined based solely on the subsidiary’s net income since its acquisition). The amount of profit allocation may represent a significant cash payment and is senior in right to payments of distributions to our shareholders. Therefore, the amount of profit allocation paid, when paid, will reduce the amount of cash available to us for our operating and investing activities, including future acquisitions. See Item 1. “Business—Our Manager—Our Manager as an Equity Holder—Manager’s Profit Allocation” included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2019 for more information on the calculation of the profit allocation.

 

Our operating agreement also contains a supplemental put provision, which gives the Manager the right, subject to certain conditions, to cause us to purchase the allocation shares then owned by the Manager upon termination of the management services agreement. The amount of put price under the supplemental put provision is determined by assuming all of our subsidiaries are sold at that time for their fair market value and then calculating the amount of profit allocation would be payable in such a case. If the management services agreement is terminated for any reason other than the Manager’s resignation, the payment to the Manager could be as much as twice the amount of such hypothetical profit allocation. As is the case with profit allocation, the calculation of the put price is complex and based on many factors that cannot be predicted with any certainty at this time. See Item 1. “Business—Our Manager—Our Manager as an Equity Holder—Supplemental Put Provision” included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2019 for more information on the calculation of the put price. The put price obligation, if the Manager exercises its put right, will represent a significant cash payment and is senior in right to payments of distributions to our shareholders. Therefore, the amount of put price will reduce the amount of cash available to us for our operating and investing activities, including future acquisitions.

 

41

 

 

Summary of Cash Flow

 

The following table provides detailed information about our net cash flow for the period indicated:

 

Cash Flow

 

   Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
   2020   2019 
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities  $1,236,777   $(4,033)
Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities   (19,758)   29,454 
Net cash used in financing activities   (1,153,362)   (263,077)
Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents   63,657    (237,656)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period   238,760    333,880 
Cash and cash equivalent at end of period  $302,417   $96,224 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities was $1,236,777 for the three months ended March 31, 2020, as compared to net cash used in operating activities of $4,033 for the three months ended March 31, 2019. For the three months ended March 31, 2020, the net loss of $2,110,482 and deferred taxes and uncertain tax position of $497,800, offset by depreciation and amortization of $403,236, amortization of financing costs of $202,782, a decrease in accounts receivable of $727,985, a decrease in inventory of $215,760, a decrease in prepaids and other assets of $167,977, an increase in accounts payable and accrued expenses of $727,041, an increase in customer deposits of $1,270,489, were the primary drivers of the net cash used in operating activities. For the three months ended March 31, 2019, the net loss of $635,259 and deferred taxes and uncertain tax position of $254,400, offset by depreciation and amortization of $338,822, an increase in accounts receivable of $331,332, an increase in accounts payable and accrued expenses of $181,150 and an increase in prepaid expenses and other assets of $92,149, were the primary drivers of the net cash used in operating activities.

 

Net cash used in investing activities was $19,758 for the three months ended March 31, 2020, as compared to net cash provided by investing activities of $29,454 for the three months ended March 31, 2019. For the three months ended March 31, 2020, net cash used in investing activities consisted of the purchase of equipment of $19,758, while net cash provided by investing activities for the three months ended March 31, 2019 consisted of proceeds from the sale of property and equipment of $39,750, offset by the purchase of equipment of $10,296. 

Net cash used in financing activities was $1,153,362 for the three months ended March 31, 2020, as compared to $263,077 for the three months ended March 31, 2019. For the three months ended March 31, 2020, net cash used in financing activities consisted of repayment of notes payable of $392,337, net repayments of the lines of credit of $681,401 and repayment of the financing lease of $79,624, while net cash used in financing activities for the three months ended March 31, 2019 consisted of repayments of notes payable of $263,832 and repayment of financing lease of $54,638, offset by proceeds from related note payable of $28,393.

Grid Promissory Note

 

On January 3, 2018, the Company issued a grid promissory note to the Manager in the initial principal amount of $50,000. The note provides that the Company may from time to time request additional advances from the Manager up to an aggregate additional amount of $100,000, which will be added to the note if the Manager, in its sole discretion, so provides. Interest shall accrue on the unpaid portion of the principal amount and the unpaid portion of all advances outstanding at a fixed rate of 8% per annum, and along with the outstanding portion of the principal amount and the outstanding portion of all advances, shall be payable in one lump sum due on the maturity date, January 3, 2021. If all or a portion of the principal amount or any advance under the note, or any interest payable thereon is not paid when due (whether at the stated maturity, by acceleration or otherwise), such overdue amount shall bear interest at a rate of 12% per annum. In the event the Company completes a financing involving at least $500,000, the Company must, contemporaneously with the closing of such financing transaction, repay the entire outstanding principal and accrued and unpaid interest on the note. The note is unsecured and contains customary events of default. As of March 31, 2020, the Manager has advanced $119,400 of the promissory note and the Company has accrued interest of $19,530.

 

Revolving Loan – Northpoint

 

On June 24, 2019, Goedeker, as borrower, entered into a loan and security agreement with Northpoint Commercial Finance LLC (“Northpoint”), which was amended on August 2, 2019, for revolving loans up to an aggregate maximum loan amount of $1,000,000 for the acquisition, financing or refinancing by Goedeker of inventory at an interest rate of LIBOR plus 7.99%. The balance of the line of credit amounts to $169,712 as of March 31, 2020.

 

The loan and security agreement contains customary events of default, representations, warranties and affirmative and negative financial and other covenants for a loan of this type. The loans are secured by a security interest in all of the inventory of Goedeker that is manufactured or sold by vendors identified in the loan and security agreement and are guaranteed by 1847 Goedeker.

 

42

 

 

Revolving Loan - Burnley

 

On April 5, 2019, Goedeker, as borrower, and 1847 Goedeker entered into a loan and security agreement with Burnley Capital LLC (“Burnley”) for revolving loans in an aggregate principal amount that will not exceed the lesser of (i) the borrowing base or (ii) $1,500,000 (provided that such amount may be increased to $3,000,000 in Burnley’s sole discretion) minus reserves established Burnley at any time in accordance with the loan and security agreement. The “borrowing base” means an amount equal to the sum of the following: (i) the product of 85% multiplied by the liquidation value of Goedeker’s inventory (net of all liquidation costs) identified in the most recent inventory appraisal by an appraiser acceptable to Burnley (ii) multiplied by Goedeker’s eligible inventory (as defined in the loan and security agreement), valued at the lower of cost or market value, determined on a first-in-first-out basis. In connection with the closing of the acquisition of Goedeker Television’s business on April 5, 2019, Goedeker borrowed $744,000 under the loan and security agreement and issued a revolving note to Burnley in the principal amount of up to $1,500,000. There is no available borrowing base and the balance of the line of credit amounts to $409,642 as of March 31, 2020, comprised of principal of $488,309 and net of unamortized debt discount of $78,667.

 

The revolving note matures on April 5, 2022, provided that at Burnley’s sole and absolute discretion, it may agree to extend the maturity date for two successive terms of one year each. The revolving note bears interest at a per annum rate equal to the greater of (i) the LIBOR Rate (as defined in the loan and security agreement) plus 6.00% or (ii) 8.50%; provided that upon an event of default all loans, all past due interest and all fees shall bear interest at a per annum rate equal to the foregoing rate plus 3.00%.

 

The loan and security agreement contains customary events of default, representations, warranties and affirmative and negative financial and other covenants for a loan of this type. The revolving note is secured by a first priority security interest in all of the assets of Goedeker and 1847 Goedeker and is guaranteed by the Company. The rights of Burnley to receive payments under the revolving note are subordinate to the rights of Northpoint under a subordination agreement that Burnley entered into with Northpoint.

 

As noted above, Goedeker is in technical, not payment default, on this loan and security agreement and has classified such debt as a current liability.

 

Term Loan - SBCC

 

On April 5, 2019, Goedeker, as borrower, and 1847 Goedeker entered into a loan and security agreement with Small Business Community Capital II, L.P. (“SBCC”) for a term loan in the principal amount of $1,500,000, pursuant to which Goedeker issued to SBCC a term note in the principal amount of up to $1,500,000 and a ten-year warrant to purchase shares of the most senior capital stock of Goedeker equal to 5.0% of the outstanding equity securities of Goedeker on a fully-diluted basis for an aggregate price equal to $100. The Company classified the warrant as a derivative liability on the balance sheet of $122,344 and subject to remeasurement on every reporting period. The balance of the note amounts to $940,124 as of March 31, 2020, comprised of principal of $1,218,750, capitalized PIK interest of $27,473, and net of unamortized debt discount of $133,500 and unamortized warrant feature of $172,599.

 

The term note matures on April 5, 2023 and bears interest at the sum of the cash interest rate (defined as 11% per annum) plus the Paid-in-Kind interest rate (defined as 2% per annum); provided that upon an event of default all principal, past due interest and all fees shall bear interest at a per annum rate equal to the cash interest rate and the Paid-in-Kind interest rate, in each case plus 3.00%.

 

The loan and security agreement contains customary events of default, representations, warranties and affirmative and negative financial and other covenants for a loan of this type. The term note is secured by a second priority security interest (subordinate to the revolving loan) in all of the assets of Goedeker and 1847 Goedeker and is guaranteed by the Company. The rights of SBCC to receive payments under the term note are subordinate to the rights of Northpoint and Burnley under separate subordination agreements that SBCC entered into with them.

 

As noted above, Goedeker is in technical, not payment default, on this loan and security agreement and has classified such debt as a current liability.

 

43

 

 

Term Loan - Home State Bank

 

On June 13, 2018, Neese entered into a term loan agreement with Home State Bank, pursuant to which Neese issued a promissory note to Home State Bank in the principal amount of $3,654,074 with an annual interest rate of 6.85% with covenants to maintain a minimum debt coverage ratio of 1.00 to 1.25 measured at December 31, 2019. Neese did not comply with this covenant for the year ended December 31, 2019. Accordingly, because of the violation of this covenant and because the loan matures July 20, 2020, the loan is classified as a current liability in the balance sheet. Pursuant to the terms of the note, Neese will make semi-annual payments of $302,270 beginning on January 20, 2019 and continuing every six months thereafter until July 20, 2020, the maturity date; provided however, that Neese will pay the note in full immediately upon demand by Home State Bank. The balance of the note amounts to $3,000,779 as of March 31, 2020, comprised of principal of $3,005,867 and net of unamortized debt discount of $5,088.

 

The loan agreement contains customary events of default, representations and warranties and covenants. Upon an event of default, the interest rate on the note will be increased by 3 percentage points. However, in no event will the interest rate exceed the maximum interest rate limitations under applicable law.

 

The loan is secured by inventory, accounts receivable, and certain fixed assets of Neese. If the Company sells property, plant, and equipment securing the loan, it must remit the appraised value of the equipment to Home State Bank. During the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, $159,607 and $21,500, respectively, was remitted to Home State Bank pursuant to this requirement.

 

Secured Convertible Promissory Note

 

On April 5, 2019, the Company, 1847 Goedeker and Goedeker (collectively, “1847”) entered into a securities purchase agreement with Leonite Capital LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (“Leonite”), pursuant to which 1847 issued to Leonite a secured convertible promissory note in the aggregate principal amount of $714,286. As additional consideration for the purchase of the note, (i) the Company issued to Leonite 50,000 common shares, (ii) the Company issued to Leonite a five-year warrant to purchase 200,000 common shares at an exercise price of $1.25 per share (subject to adjustment), which may be exercised on a cashless basis, and (iii) 1847 Goedeker issued to Leonite shares of common stock equal to a 7.5% non-dilutable interest in 1847 Goedeker.

 

The note carries an original issue discount of $64,286 to cover Leonite’s legal fees, accounting fees, due diligence fees and/or other transactional costs incurred in connection with the purchase of the note. Therefore, the purchase price of the note was $650,000. Furthermore, the Company issued 50,000 shares of common stock valued at $137,500 and a debt-discount related to the warrants valued at $292,673. The Company amortized $110,894 of financing costs related to the shares and warrants in the three months ended March 31, 2020. The remaining net balance of the note at March 31, 2020 is $710,286, comprised of principal of $714,288 and unamortized debt discount warrant feature of $3,998.

 

The note bears interest at the rate of the greater of (i) 12% per annum and (ii) the prime rate as set forth in the Wall Street Journal on April 5, 2019 plus 6.5% guaranteed over the holding period on the unconverted principal amount, on the terms set forth in the note. Any amount of principal or interest on the note which is not paid by the maturity date shall bear interest at the rate at the lesser of 24% per annum or the maximum legal amount permitted by law.

 

The note contains customary events of default, is convertible into our common shares and is secured first priority security interest with respect to the securities that we own in 1847 Goedeker and in 1847 Neese, and a third priority security interest with respect to all other assets. The rights of Leonite to receive payments under the note are subordinate to the rights of Northpoint, Burnley and SBCC under separate subordination agreements that Leonite entered into with them.

 

9% Subordinated Promissory Note

 

A portion of the purchase price for the acquisition of assets of Goedeker Television was paid by the issuance by Goedeker to Steve Goedeker, as representative of Goedeker Television, of a 9% subordinated promissory note in the principal amount of $4,100,000. The note will accrue interest at 9% per annum, amortized on a five-year straight-line basis and payable quarterly in accordance with the amortization schedule attached thereto, and mature on April 5, 2023. The remaining balance of the note at March 31, 2020 is $3,395,243, comprised of principal of $3,930,283 and the contingent note payable of $49,248, net of unamortized debt discount of $535,050.

 

The note is unsecured and contains customary events of default. The rights of the holder to receive payments under the note are subordinate to the rights of Northpoint, Burnley and SBCC under separate subordination agreements that the holder entered into with them.

 

44

 

 

10% Promissory Note

 

A portion of the purchase price for the acquisition of Neese was paid by the issuance of a promissory note in the principal amount of $1,025,000 by 1847 Neese and Neese to the sellers of Neese. The promissory note bears interest on the outstanding principal amount at the rate of ten percent (10%) per annum and was due and payable in full on March 3, 2018; provided, however, that the unpaid principal, and all accrued, but unpaid, interest thereon shall be prepaid if at any time, and from time to time, the cash on hand of 1847 Neese and Neese exceeds $250,000 and, then, the prepayment shall be equal to the amount of cash in excess of $200,000 until the unpaid principal and accrued, but unpaid, interest thereon is fully prepaid. The promissory note is unsecured and contains customary events of default.

 

The promissory note has not been repaid; thus, the Company is in default under this note. Under terms of the term loan with Home State Bank described above, this note may not be paid until the term loan is paid in full. The payees on the note agreed to the modification of its terms by signing the loan agreement for the Home State Bank term loan. Accordingly, the loan is shown as a long-term liability as of March 31, 2020. Additionally, the term loan lender limits the payment of interest on this note to $40,000 annually. The Company continues to accrue interest at the contract rate; however, given the limitations of the term loan, all accrued interest in excess of $40,000 is included in long-term accrued expenses.

 

Floor Plan Loans Payable

 

At March 31, 2020, $10,587 of machinery and equipment inventory was pledged to secure a floor plan loan from a commercial lender. The Company must remit proceeds from the sale of the secured inventory to the floor plan lender and pays a finance charge that can vary monthly at the option of the lender. The balance of the floor plan payable as of March 31, 2020 amounted to $10,587.

 

Master Lease Agreement

 

The cash portion of the purchase price for the acquisition of Neese was financed under a capital lease transaction for Neese’s equipment with Utica Leaseco, LLC (“Utica”), pursuant to a master lease agreement, dated March 3, 2017, between Utica, as lessor, and 1847 Neese and Neese, as co-lessees (collectively, the “Lessee”), which was amended on June 14, 2017. Under the master lease agreement, as amended, Utica loaned an aggregate of $3,240,000 for certain of Neese’s equipment listed therein, which it leases to the Lessee. A portion of the proceeds from the term loan from Home State Bank described above were applied to reduce the balance of this lease to $475,000. The lease is payable in 46 payments of $12,882 beginning July 3, 2018 and an end-of-term buyout of $38,000.

 

On October 31, 2017, the parties entered into a second equipment schedule to the master lease agreement, pursuant to which Utica loaned an aggregate of $980,000 for certain of Neese’s equipment listed therein. The term of the second equipment schedule is 51 months and agreed monthly payments are $25,807.

 

The remaining balance of the lease amounts to $557,848 as of March 31, 2020, comprised of principal of 751,066 and net of unamortized debt discount of $22,040, accrued payments on lien release of $249,784 and lease deposits of $38,807, offset by end of lease buyout payments of $117,413.

 

Total Debt

 

The following table shows aggregate figures for the total debt described above that is coming due in the short and long term as of March 31, 2020. See the above disclosures for more details regarding these loans.

 

   Short-Term   Long-Term   Total Debt 
Grid Promissory Note  $119,400   $-   $119,400 
Revolving Loan – Northpoint   169,712    -    169,712 
Revolving Loan – Burnley   409,642    -    409,642 
Term Loan - SBCC   1,062,467(1)   -    1,062,467 
Term Loan - Home State Bank   3,000,779    -    3,000,779 
Secured Convertible Promissory Note – Leonite   710,288    -    710,288 
9% Subordinated Promissory Note – Goedeker   1,261,428    2,133,815(2)   3,395,243 
10% Promissory Note – Neese   1,025,000    -    1,025,000 
Floor Plan Loans Payable – Wells Fargo Commercial Distribution Finance   10,587    -    10,587 
Master Lease Agreement – Utica   373,012    184,836    557,848 
Total  $8,142,315   $2,318,651   $10,460,966 

 

(1)Includes warrant liability of $122,344

 

(2)Includes contingent note payable of $49,248

 

45

 

 

Contractual Obligations

 

We have engaged the Manager to manage our day-to-day operations and affairs. Our relationship with the Manager will be governed principally by the following agreements:

 

  the management services agreement and offsetting management services agreements relating to the management services the Manager will perform for us and the businesses we own and the management fee to be paid to the Manager in respect thereof; and

 

  our company’s operating agreement setting forth the Manager’s rights with respect to the allocation shares it owns, including the right to receive profit allocations from us, and the supplemental put provision relating to the Manager’s right to cause us to purchase the allocation shares it owns.

 

Pursuant to the asset purchase agreement with Goedeker Television, dated April 5, 2019, Goedeker Television is also entitled to receive the following earn out payments to the extent the Goedeker business achieves the applicable EBITDA (as defined in the asset purchase agreement) targets:

 

  1. An earn out payment of $200,000 if the EBITDA of the Goedeker business for the trailing twelve (12) month period from the closing date is $2,500,000 or greater;

 

  2. An earn out payment of $200,000 if the EBITDA of the Goedeker business for the trailing twelve (12) month period from the first anniversary of closing date is $2,500,000 or greater; and

 

  3. An earn out payment of $200,000 if the EBITDA of the Goedeker business for the trailing twelve (12) month period from the second anniversary of the closing date is $2,500,000 or greater.

 

To the extent the EBITDA of the Goedeker business for any applicable period is less than $2,500,000 but greater than $1,500,000, Goedeker must pay a partial earn out payment to Goedeker Television in an amount equal to the product determined by multiplying (i) the EBITDA Achievement Percentage by (ii) the applicable earn out payment for such period, where the “Achievement Percentage” is the percentage determined by dividing (A) the amount of (i) the EBITDA of the Goedeker business for the applicable period less (ii) $1,500,000, by (B) $1,000,000. For avoidance of doubt, no partial earn out payments shall be earned or paid to the extent the EBITDA of the Goedeker business for any applicable period is equal or less than $1,500,000.

 

To the extent Goedeker Television is entitled to all or a portion of an earn out payment, the applicable earn out payment(s) (or portion thereof) shall be paid on the date that is three (3) years from the closing date, and shall accrue interest from the date on which it is determined Goedeker Television is entitled to such earn out payment (or portion thereof) at a rate equal to five percent (5%) per annum, computed on the basis of a 360 day year for the actual number of days elapsed.

 

The rights of Goedeker Television to receive any earn out payment are subordinate to the rights of Burnley and SBCC under separate subordination agreements that Goedeker Television entered into with them on April 5, 2019.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We have no off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

The following discussion relates to critical accounting policies for our consolidated company. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires our management to make assumptions, estimates and judgments that affect the amounts reported, including the notes thereto, and related disclosures of commitments and contingencies, if any. We have identified certain accounting policies that are significant to the preparation of our financial statements. These accounting policies are important for an understanding of our financial condition and results of operation. Critical accounting policies are those that are most important to the portrayal of our financial condition and results of operations and require management’s difficult, subjective, or complex judgment, often as a result of the need to make estimates about the effect of matters that are inherently uncertain and may change in subsequent periods. Certain accounting estimates are particularly sensitive because of their significance to financial statements and because of the possibility that future events affecting the estimate may differ significantly from management’s current judgments. We believe the following critical accounting policies involve the most significant estimates and judgments used in the preparation of our financial statements:

 

46

 

 

Revenue Recognition and Cost of Revenue 

 

On January 1, 2018, the Company adopted Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), which supersedes the revenue recognition requirements in ASC Topic 605, Revenue Recognition. This ASU is based on the principle that revenue is recognized to depict the transfer of goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. This ASU also requires additional disclosure about the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from customer purchase orders, including significant judgments. The Company’s adoption of this ASU resulted in no change to the Company’s results of operations or balance sheet.

 

Retail and Appliances Segment

 

Goedeker collects the full sales price from the customer at the time the order is placed. Goedeker does not incur incremental costs obtaining purchase orders from customers, however, if Goedeker did, because all Goedeker’s contracts are less than a year in duration, any contract costs incurred would be expensed rather than capitalized.

 

The revenue that Goedeker recognizes arises from orders it receives from customers. Goedeker’s performance obligations under the customer orders correspond to each sale of merchandise that it makes to customers under the purchase orders; as a result, each purchase order generally contains only one performance obligation based on the merchandise sale to be completed. Control of the delivery transfers to customers when the customer can direct the use of, and obtain substantially all the benefits from, Goedeker’s products, which generally occurs when the customer assumes the risk of loss. The transfer of control generally occurs at the point of shipment. Once this occurs, Goedeker has satisfied its performance obligation and Goedeker recognizes revenue. Revenue from the sale of long-term service warranties are recognized net of costs to sell the contracts to the third-party warranty service company.

 

Transaction Price ‒ Goedeker agrees with customers on the selling price of each transaction. This transaction price is generally based on the agreed upon sales price. In Goedeker’s contracts with customers, it allocates the entire transaction price to the sales price, which is the basis for the determination of the relative standalone selling price allocated to each performance obligation. Any sales tax, value added tax, and other tax Goedeker collects concurrently with revenue-producing activities are excluded from revenue.

 

Cost of revenue includes the cost of purchased merchandise plus the cost of delivering merchandise and where applicable installation, net of promotional rebates and other incentives received from vendors.

 

Substantially all Goedeker’s sales are to individual retail consumers.

 

Disaggregated Revenue ‒ Goedeker disaggregates revenue from contracts with customers by contract type, as it believes it best depicts how the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows are affected by economic factors.

 

Performance Obligations – Goedeker’s performance obligations include delivery of products and, in some instances, performance of services such as installation. Revenue for the sale of merchandise is recognized upon shipment to the customer; or in some instances, upon delivery and installation of the product which typically occur simultaneously.

 

Land Management Segment

 

Neese’s payment terms are due on demand from acceptance of delivery. Neese does not incur incremental costs obtaining purchase orders from customers, however, if Neese did, because all of Neese’s contracts are less than a year in duration, any contract costs incurred would be expensed rather than capitalized. 

 

The revenue that Neese recognizes arises from orders it receives from customers. Neese’s performance obligations under the customer orders correspond to each service delivery or sale of equipment that Neese makes to customers under the purchase orders; as a result, each purchase order generally contains only one performance obligation based on the service or equipment sale to be completed. Control of the delivery transfers to customers when the customer is able to direct the use of, and obtain substantially all of the benefits from, Neese’s products, which generally occurs at the later of when the customer obtains title to the equipment or when the customer assumes risk of loss. The transfer of control generally occurs at a point of delivery. Once this occurs, Neese has satisfied its performance obligation and Neese recognizes revenue.

 

47

 

 

Neese also sells equipment by posting it on auction sites specializing in farm equipment. Neese posts the equipment for sale on a “magazine” site for several weeks before the auction. When Neese decides to sell, it moves the equipment to the auction site. The auctions are one day. If Neese accepts a bid, the customer pays the bid price and arranges for pick-up of the equipment.

 

Transaction Price ‒ Neese agrees with customers on the selling price of each transaction. This transaction price is generally based on the agreed upon service fee. In Neese’s contracts with customers, it allocates the entire transaction price to the service fee to the customer, which is the basis for the determination of the relative standalone selling price allocated to each performance obligation. Any sales tax, value added tax, and other tax Neese collects concurrently with revenue-producing activities are excluded from revenue.

 

Substantially all of Neese’s sales are to businesses, including farmers or municipalities and very little to individuals.

 

Disaggregated Revenue ‒ Neese disaggregates revenue from contracts with customers by contract type, as it believes it best depicts how the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows are affected by economic factors.

 

Performance Obligations ‒ Performance obligations for the different types of services are discussed below:

 

  Trucking ‒ Revenues for time and material contracts are recognized when the merchandise or commodity is delivered to the destination specified in the agreement with the customer.

 

  Waste Hauling and pumping ‒ Revenues for waste hauling and pumping is recognized when the hauling, pumping, and spreading are complete.

 

  Repairs ‒ Revenues for repairs are recognized upon completion of equipment serviced.

 

  Sales of parts and equipment ‒ Revenues for the sale of parts and equipment are recognized upon the transfer and acceptance by the customer.

 

Receivables

 

Receivables consist of credit card transactions in the process of settlement. Vendor rebates receivable represent amounts due from manufactures from whom the Company purchases products. Rebates receivable are stated at the amount that management expects to collect from manufacturers, net of accounts payable amounts due the vendor. Rebates are calculated on product and model sales programs from specific vendors. The rebates are paid at intermittent periods either in cash or through issuance of vendor credit memos, which can be applied against vendor accounts payable. Based on the Company’s assessment of the credit history with its manufacturers, it has concluded that there should be no allowance for uncollectible accounts. The Company historically collects substantially all of its outstanding rebates receivables. Uncollectible balances are expensed in the period it is determined to be uncollectible.

 

Allowance for Credit Losses

 

Provisions for credit losses are charged to income as losses are estimated to have occurred and in amounts sufficient to maintain an allowance for credit losses at an adequate level to provide for future losses on the Company’s accounts receivable. The Company charges credit losses against the allowance and credits subsequent recoveries, if any, to the allowance. Historical loss experience and contractual delinquency of accounts receivables, and management’s judgment are factors used in assessing the overall adequacy of the allowance and the resulting provision for credit losses. While management uses the best information available to make its evaluation, future adjustments to the allowance may be necessary if there are significant changes in economic conditions or portfolio performance. This evaluation is inherently subjective as it requires estimates that are susceptible to significant revisions as more information becomes available.

 

The allowance for credit losses consists of general and specific components. The general component of the allowance estimates credit losses for groups of accounts receivable on a collective basis and relates to probable incurred losses of unimpaired accounts receivables. The Company records a general allowance for credit losses that includes forecasted future credit losses.

 

48

 

 

Inventory

 

Inventory consists of finished products acquired for resale and is valued at the lower-of-cost-or-market with cost determined on a specific item basis for the Neese and of finished products acquired for resale and is valued at the low-of-cost-or-market with cost determined on an average item basis for Goedeker. The Company periodically evaluates the value of items in inventory and provides write-downs to inventory based on its estimate of market conditions. The Company estimated an obsolescence allowance of $425,000 at March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment is stated at cost. Depreciation of furniture, vehicles and equipment is calculated using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives as follows:

 

   Useful Life (Years)
Building and Improvements  4
Machinery and Equipment  3-7
Tractors  3-7
Trucks and Vehicles  3-6

 

Goodwill and Intangible Assets

 

In applying the acquisition method of accounting, amounts assigned to identifiable assets and liabilities acquired were based on estimated fair values as of the date of acquisition, with the remainder recorded as goodwill. Identifiable intangible assets are initially valued at fair value using generally accepted valuation methods appropriate for the type of intangible asset. Identifiable intangible assets with definite lives are amortized over their estimated useful lives and are reviewed for impairment if indicators of impairment arise. Intangible assets with indefinite lives are tested for impairment within one year of acquisitions or annually as of December 1, and whenever indicators of impairment exist. The fair value of intangible assets are compared with their carrying values, and an impairment loss would be recognized for the amount by which a carrying amount exceeds its fair value.

 

Acquired identifiable intangible assets are amortized over the following periods:

 

Acquired intangible Asset  Amortization Basis 

Expected Life

(years)

Customer-Related  Straight-line basis  5-15
Marketing-Related  Straight-line basis  5

 

Long-Lived Assets 

 

The Company reviews its property and equipment and any identifiable intangibles for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. The test for impairment is required to be performed by management at least annually. Recoverability of assets to be held and used is measured by a comparison of the carrying amount of an asset to the future undiscounted operating cash flow expected to be generated by the asset. If such assets are considered to be impaired, the impairment to be recognized is measured by the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds the fair value of the asset. Long-lived assets to be disposed of are reported at the lower of carrying amount or fair value less costs to sell.

 

Derivative Instrument Liability

 

The Company accounts for derivative instruments in accordance with ASC 815, Derivatives and Hedging, which establishes accounting and reporting standards for derivative instruments and hedging activities, including certain derivative instruments embedded in other financial instruments or contracts, and requires recognition of all derivatives on the balance sheet at fair value, regardless of hedging relationship designation. Accounting for changes in fair value of the derivative instruments depends on whether the derivatives qualify as hedge relationships and the types of relationships designated are based on the exposures hedged. At March 31, 2020, the Company classified a warrant issued in conjunction with a term loan as a derivative instrument.

 

49

 

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-04, Intangibles - Goodwill and Other: Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment. To simplify the subsequent measurement of goodwill, the update requires only a single-step quantitative test to identify and measure impairment based on the excess of a reporting unit's carrying amount over its fair value. A qualitative assessment may still be completed first for an entity to determine if a quantitative impairment test is necessary. The update is effective for fiscal year 2021 and is to be adopted on a prospective basis. Early adoption is permitted for interim or annual goodwill impairment tests performed on testing dates after January 1, 2017. The Company will test goodwill for impairment within one year of the acquisition or annually as of December 1, and whenever indicators of impairment exist.

 

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13 Financial Instruments-Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments which requires the measurement and recognition of expected credit losses for financial assets held at amortized cost. ASU 2016-13 replaces the existing incurred loss impairment model with an expected loss methodology, which will result in more timely recognition of credit losses. ASU 2016-13 is effective for annual reporting periods, and interim periods within those years beginning after December 15, 2019. This pronouncement was amended under ASU 2019-10 to allow an extension on the adoption date for entities that qualify as a small reporting company. We have elected this extension and the effective date for us to adopt this standard will be for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022. We have not completed our assessment of the standard, but we do not expect the adoption to have a material impact on the Company's consolidated financial position, results of operations, or cash flows.

  

ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK.

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES.

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

We maintain disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”)). Disclosure controls and procedures refer to controls and other procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in the reports we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the rules and forms of the Securities and Exchange Commission and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

As required by Rule 13a-15(e) of the Exchange Act, our management has carried out an evaluation, with the participation and under the supervision of our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures, as of March 31, 2020. Based upon, and as of the date of this evaluation, our chief executive officer and chief financial officer determined that, because of the material weaknesses described in Item 9A “Controls and Procedures” of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019, which we are still in the process of remediating as of March 31, 2020, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective. Investors are directed to Item 9A of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019 for the description of these weaknesses.

 

50

 

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

We regularly review our system of internal control over financial reporting and make changes to our processes and systems to improve controls and increase efficiency, while ensuring that we maintain an effective internal control environment. Changes may include such activities as implementing new, more efficient systems, consolidating activities, and migrating processes.

 

During its evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of March 31, 2020, our management identified the following material weaknesses:

 

  We did not have appropriate policies and procedures in place to evaluate the proper accounting and disclosures of key documents and agreements.

 

  We do not have adequate segregation of duties with our limited accounting personnel and rely upon outsourced accounting services.

 

As disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019, our management has identified the steps necessary to address the material weaknesses, and in the first quarter of 2020, we continued to implement the following remedial procedures:

 

 

Once we raise additional funds, Robert D. Barry, CPA intends to resign as a director of our company and will become our Chief Financial Officer. Mr. Barry has more than 15 years of experience acting as chief financial officer of various companies and has significant GAAP and SEC reporting experience.

 

  We plan to make necessary changes by providing training to our financial team and our other relevant personnel on the GAAP accounting guidelines applicable to financial reporting requirements.

 

  We have plan to hire a financial controller for Neese. Mr. Barry is acting as interim controller for Neese until a permanent controller is hired.

 

  We have engaged the outsourced accounting and financial reporting services of Carrollton Partners, LLC and will continue to use its services after Robert D. Barry assumes the role of Chief Financial Officer.

 

We intend to complete the remediation of the material weaknesses discussed above as soon as practicable but we can give no assurance that we will be able to do so. Designing and implementing an effective disclosure controls and procedures is a continuous effort that requires us to anticipate and react to changes in our business and the economic and regulatory environments and to devote significant resources to maintain a financial reporting system that adequately satisfies our reporting obligations. The remedial measures that we have taken and intend to take may not fully address the material weaknesses that we have identified, and material weaknesses in our disclosure controls and procedures may be identified in the future. Should we discover such conditions, we intend to remediate them as soon as practicable. We are committed to taking appropriate steps for remediation, as needed.

 

Other than in connection with the implementation of the remedial measures described above, there were no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting during the first quarter of 2020 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

51

 

 

PART II

OTHER INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.

 

From time to time, we may become involved in various lawsuits and legal proceedings, which arise, in the ordinary course of business. However, litigation is subject to inherent uncertainties, and an adverse result in these, or other matters, may arise from time to time that may harm our business. We are currently not aware of any such legal proceedings or claims that we believe will have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or operating results.

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS.

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 2. UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS.

 

We have not sold any equity securities during three months ended March 31, 2020 that were not previously disclosed in a current report on Form 8-K that was filed during the quarter.

 

We did not repurchase any of our common shares during the three months ended March 31, 2020.

 

ITEM 3. DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES.

 

None.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES.

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 5. OTHER INFORMATION.

 

We have no information to disclose that was required to be in a report on Form 8-K during the first quarter of fiscal 2020 but was not reported. There have been no material changes to the procedures by which security holders may recommend nominees to our board of directors.

 

52

 

 

ITEM 6. EXHIBITS.

 

Exhibit No.   Description of Exhibit
3.1   Certificate of Formation of 1847 Holdings LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed on February 7, 2014)
3.2   Second Amended and Restated Operating Agreement of 1847 Holdings LLC, dated January 19, 2018 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K filed on January 22, 2018)
10.1*   Stock Purchase Agreement, dated March 27, 2020, among 1847 Asien Inc., Asien’s Appliance, Inc., Joerg Christian Wilhelmsen and Susan Kay Wilhelmsen, as Trustees of the Wilhelmsen Family Trust, U/D/T dated May 1, 1992, and 1847 Holdings LLC
31.1*   Certifications of Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer filed pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
32.1*   Certifications of Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer furnished pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
101.INS*   XBRL Instance Document
101.SCH*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
101.CAL*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
101.DEF*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
101.LAB*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
101.PRE*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

 

 

*Filed herewith

 

53

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

Date: May 15, 2020 1847 HOLDINGS LLC
   
  /s/ Ellery W. Roberts
  Name: Ellery W. Roberts
 

Title: Chief Executive Officer and

Chief Financial Officer

 

(Principal Executive Officer and

Principal Financial and Accounting Officer)

 

 

54