Company Quick10K Filing
Quick10K
First Citizens Bancshares
10-K 2018-12-31 Annual: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-09-30 Quarter: 2018-09-30
10-Q 2018-06-30 Quarter: 2018-06-30
10-Q 2018-03-31 Quarter: 2018-03-31
10-K 2017-12-31 Annual: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-09-30 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-Q 2017-06-30 Quarter: 2017-06-30
10-Q 2017-03-31 Quarter: 2017-03-31
10-K 2016-12-31 Annual: 2016-12-31
10-Q 2016-09-30 Quarter: 2016-09-30
10-Q 2016-06-30 Quarter: 2016-06-30
10-Q 2016-03-31 Quarter: 2016-03-31
10-K 2015-12-31 Annual: 2015-12-31
10-Q 2015-09-30 Quarter: 2015-09-30
10-Q 2015-06-30 Quarter: 2015-06-30
10-Q 2015-03-31 Quarter: 2015-03-31
10-K 2014-12-31 Annual: 2014-12-31
10-Q 2014-09-30 Quarter: 2014-09-30
10-Q 2014-06-30 Quarter: 2014-06-30
10-Q 2014-03-31 Quarter: 2014-03-31
10-K 2013-12-31 Annual: 2013-12-31
8-K 2019-01-30 Earnings, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-01-18 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2019-01-11 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-11-15 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-11-01 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-10-29 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-10-24 Earnings, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-10-23 Officers
8-K 2018-10-01 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-09-06 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-29 Other Events
8-K 2018-07-26 Earnings, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-07-25 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-06-27 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-04-25 Earnings, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-04-24 Shareholder Vote
8-K 2018-03-27 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-01-31 Earnings, Regulation FD, Exhibits
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SMDM Singing Machine 0
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FCNCA 2018-12-31
Part I
Item 1. Business
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 2. Properties
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
Part II
Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6. Selected Financial Data
Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosure About Market Risk
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures
EX-21 fcnca_exhibit21x12312018.htm
EX-24 fcnca_exhibit24x12312018.htm
EX-31.1 fcnca_exhibit311x12312018.htm
EX-31.2 fcnca_exhibit312x12312018.htm
EX-32.1 fcnca_exhibit321x12312018.htm
EX-32.2 fcnca_exhibit322x12312018.htm

First Citizens Bancshares Earnings 2018-12-31

FCNCA 10K Annual Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

10-K 1 fcnca_10kx12312018.htm 10-K Document



UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018
Commission File Number: 001-16715
____________________________________________________
FIRST CITIZENS BANCSHARES, INC.
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)
____________________________________________________
Delaware
 
56-1528994
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification Number)
 
 
 
 
4300 Six Forks Road
 
 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27609
 
 
(Address of principal executive offices, ZIP code)
 
 
 
 
 
(919) 716-7000
 
 
(Registrant's telephone number, including area code)
 
____________________________________________________
Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934:
Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Class A Common Stock, Par Value $1
 
NASDAQ Global Select Market

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
Class B Common Stock, Par Value $1
(Title of class)
  _________________________________________________________________
Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes x    No ¨
Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ¨    No x
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding twelve months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past ninety days. Yes x    No ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to submit such files). Yes x    No ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or emerging growth company. See definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “non-accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer x
 
Accelerated filer ¨
 
Non-accelerated filer ¨
 
Smaller reporting company ¨
 
Emerging growth company ¨
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ¨    No x

The aggregate market value of the Registrant’s common equity held by nonaffiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was last sold as of the last business day of the Registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter was $3,012,571,741.

On February 19, 2019, there were 10,524,720 outstanding shares of the Registrant's Class A Common Stock and 1,005,185 outstanding shares of the Registrant's Class B Common Stock.
Portions of the Registrant's definitive Proxy Statement for the 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders are incorporated in Part III of this report.





 
 
 
Page
 
 
CROSS REFERENCE INDEX
 
 
 
 
 
PART I
Item 1
 
Item 1A
 
Item 1B
Unresolved Staff Comments
None
 
Item 2
 
Item 3
 
Item 4
Mine Safety Disclosures
N/A
PART II
Item 5
 
Item 6
 
Item 7
 
Item 7A
 
Item 8
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 9
Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
None
 
Item 9A
 
Item 9B
Other Information
None
PART III
Item 10
Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
*
 
Item 11
Executive Compensation
*
 
Item 12
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
*
 
Item 13
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence
*
 
Item 14
Principal Accounting Fees and Services
*
PART IV
Item 15
Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules
 
 
(1)
Financial Statements (see Item 8 for reference)
 
 
(2)
All Financial Statement Schedules normally required for Form 10-K are omitted since they are not applicable, except as referred to in Item 8.
 
 
(3)

* Information required by Item 10 is incorporated herein by reference to the information that appears under the headings or captions ‘Proposal 1: Election of Directors,’ ‘Corporate Governance —Service on other Public Company Boards,’ ‘Code of Ethics,’ ‘Committees of our Board—General’ and ‘—Audit Committee,’ ‘Executive Officers’ and ‘Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance’ from the Registrant’s Proxy Statement for the 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (2019 Proxy Statement).
Information required by Item 11 is incorporated herein by reference to the information that appears under the headings or captions ‘Compensation, Nominations and Governance Committee Report,’ ‘Compensation Discussion and Analysis,’ ‘Executive Compensation,’ and ‘Director Compensation,’ of the 2019 Proxy Statement.
Information required by Item 12 is incorporated herein by reference to the information that appears under the captions ‘Beneficial Ownership of Our Common Stock—Directors and Executive Officers,’ '—Existing Pledge Arrangements,’ and '—Principal Shareholders' of the 2019 Proxy Statement.
Information required by Item 13 is incorporated herein by reference to the information that appears under the headings or captions ‘Corporate Governance—Director Independence’ and ‘Transactions with Related Persons’ of the 2019 Proxy Statement.
Information required by Item 14 is incorporated by reference to the information that appears under the caption ‘Proposal 4: Ratification of Appointment of Independent Accounts – Services and Fees During 2018 and 2017’ of the 2019 Proxy Statement.

2




Part I
Item 1. Business
 
General
First Citizens BancShares, Inc. (“we,” “us,” “our,” “BancShares,”) was incorporated under the laws of Delaware on August 7, 1986, to become the holding company of First-Citizens Bank & Trust Company ("FCB," or "the Bank"), its banking subsidiary. FCB opened in 1898 as the Bank of Smithfield in Smithfield, North Carolina, and later changed its name to First-Citizens Bank & Trust Company. BancShares has expanded through de novo branching and acquisitions and now operates in 19 states, providing a broad range of financial services to individuals, businesses and professionals. At December 31, 2018, BancShares had total assets of $35.41 billion.

Throughout its history, the operations of BancShares have been significantly influenced by descendants of Robert P. Holding, who came to control FCB during the 1920s. Robert P. Holding’s children and grandchildren have served as members of the Board of Directors, as chief executive officers and in other executive management positions and, since BancShares' formation in 1986, have remained shareholders controlling a large percentage of its common stock.

The Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Frank B. Holding, Jr., is the grandson of Robert P. Holding. Hope Holding Bryant, Vice Chairman of BancShares, is Robert P. Holding’s granddaughter. Peter M. Bristow, President and Corporate Sales Executive of BancShares, is the brother-in-law of Frank B. Holding, Jr. and Hope Holding Bryant.

BancShares seeks to meet the financial needs of both individuals and commercial entities in its market areas through a wide range of retail and commercial banking services. Loan services include various types of commercial, business and consumer lending. Deposit services include checking, savings, money market and time deposit accounts. BancShares' subsidiaries also provide mortgage lending, a full-service trust department, wealth management services for businesses and individuals, and other activities incidental to commercial banking. FCB’s wholly owned subsidiaries, First Citizens Investor Services, Inc. (FCIS) and First Citizens Asset Management, Inc. (FCAM), provide various investment products and services: as a registered broker/dealer, FCIS provides a full range of investment products, including annuities, discount brokerage services and third-party mutual funds; as registered investment advisors, FCIS and FCAM provide investment management services and advice.

BancShares' subsidiaries deliver products and services to its customers through an extensive branch network as well as digital banking, telephone banking and various ATM networks. Services offered at most offices include the taking of deposits, the cashing of checks and providing for individual and commercial cash needs. Business customers may conduct banking transactions through the use of remote image technology.

The financial services industry is highly competitive. BancShares' subsidiaries compete with national, regional and local financial services providers. In recent years, the ability of non-bank financial entities to provide services has intensified competition. Non-bank financial service providers are not subject to the same significant regulatory restrictions as traditional commercial banks. More than ever, customers have the ability to select from a variety of traditional and nontraditional alternatives.

FCB’s primary deposit markets are North Carolina and South Carolina, which represent approximately 50.7 percent and 25.0 percent, respectively, of total FCB deposits. FCB’s deposit market share in North Carolina was 4.2 percent as of June 30, 2018, based on the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) Deposit Market Share Report, which makes FCB the fourth largest bank in North Carolina. The three banks larger than FCB based on deposits in North Carolina as of June 30, 2018, controlled 75.7 percent of North Carolina deposits. In South Carolina, FCB was the fourth largest bank in terms of deposit market share with 8.7 percent at June 30, 2018. The three larger banks represent 44.0 percent of total deposits in South Carolina as of June 30, 2018.

Statistical information regarding our business activities is found in Management’s Discussion and Analysis.

Geographic Locations and Employees
As of December 31, 2018, BancShares operated 551 branches in Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Maryland, Missouri, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia and Wisconsin. BancShares and its subsidiaries employ approximately 6,301 full-time staff and approximately 382 part-time staff for a total of 6,683 employees.


3




Business Combinations
BancShares pursues growth through strategic acquisitions that enhance organizational value, strengthen its presence in existing markets as well as expand its footprint in new markets. Additional information relating to business combinations is set forth in Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, subsection "Business Combinations" and Item 8. Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, Note B.

Regulatory Considerations

Various laws and regulations administered by regulatory agencies affect BancShares' and its subsidiaries' business and corporate practices. These include the payment of dividends, the incurrence of debt, and the acquisition of financial institutions and other companies; they also affect business practices, such as the payment of interest on deposits, the charging of interest on loans, the types of business conducted, and the location of offices.

Numerous statutes and regulations apply to and restrict the activities of BancShares and its subsidiaries, including limitations on the ability to pay dividends, capital requirements, reserve requirements, deposit insurance requirements and restrictions on transactions with related persons and entities controlled by related persons. The impact of these statutes and regulations is discussed below and in the accompanying consolidated financial statements.

Dodd-Frank Act. The Dodd-Frank Act, enacted in 2010, significantly restructured the financial services regulatory environment and imposed significant regulatory and compliance changes; increased capital, leverage and liquidity requirements; and expanded the scope of oversight responsibility of certain federal agencies through the creation of new oversight bodies. For example, the Dodd-Frank Act established the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) with broad powers to supervise and enforce consumer protection laws.

Effective during 2018, the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act (the "EGRRCPA"), while largely preserving the fundamental elements of the post-Dodd-Frank Act regulatory framework, modified certain requirements of the Dodd-Frank Act as they applied to regional and community banking organizations. Implementation of certain of those changes was effective immediately, while other changes remain subject to the promulgation of regulations by the various banking regulators. The regulators have announced positions they will take in the interim between the passage of the EGRRCPA and the finalization of their implementing regulations. Certain of the significant requirements of the Dodd-Frank Act are listed below with information regarding how they apply to BancShares following the enactment of the EGRRCPA.

Capital Planning and Stress Testing. The Dodd-Frank Act mandated that stress tests be developed and performed to ensure that financial institutions have sufficient capital to absorb losses and support operations during multiple economic and bank scenarios. The EGRRCPA gave immediate relief from stress testing for applicable bank holding companies and therefore, BancShares is no longer required to submit company-run annual stress tests. Notwithstanding these amendments to the stress testing requirements, the federal banking agencies indicated through inter-agency guidance that the capital planning and risk management practices of institutions with total assets less than $100 billion would continue to be reviewed through the regular supervisory process. Although BancShares will continue to monitor its capital consistent with the safety and soundness expectations of the federal regulators, BancShares will no longer conduct company-run stress testing as a result of the legislative and regulatory amendments. BancShares will continue to use customized stress testing to support the business and its capital planning process, as well as prudent risk mitigation.

The Volcker Rule. The Volcker Rule was promulgated to implement provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act. It prohibits banks and their affiliates from engaging in proprietary trading and investing in and sponsoring hedge funds and private equity funds. The EGRRCPA exempted many financial institutions with total consolidated assets of less than $10 billion from the Volcker Rule, but it continues to apply to BancShares and its subsidiaries. However, the Volcker Rule does not significantly impact our operations as we do not have any significant engagement in the businesses it prohibits.

Ability-to-Repay and Qualified Mortgage Rule. Creditors are required to comply with mortgage reform provisions prohibiting the origination of any residential mortgages that do not meet rigorous Qualified Mortgage standards or Ability-to-Repay standards. All mortgage loans originated by FCB meet Ability-to-Repay standards and a substantial majority also meets Qualified Mortgage standards. The EGRRCPA impact on the original Ability-to-Repay and Qualified Mortgage standards is only applicable to banks with less than $10 billion in total consolidated assets.




4




BancShares
General. As a financial holding company registered under the Bank Holding Company Act (BHCA) of 1956, as amended, BancShares is subject to supervision, regulation and examination by the Federal Reserve. BancShares is also registered under the bank holding company laws of North Carolina and is subject to supervision, regulation and examination by the North Carolina Commissioner of Banks (NCCOB).

Permitted Activities. A bank holding company is limited to managing or controlling banks, furnishing services to or performing services for its subsidiaries, and engaging in other activities that the Federal Reserve determines by regulation or order to be so closely related to banking or managing or controlling banks as to be a proper incident thereto. In addition, bank holding companies that qualify and elect to be financial holding companies, such as BancShares, may engage in any activity, or acquire and retain the shares of a company engaged in any activity, that is either (i) financial in nature or incidental to such financial activity (as determined by the Federal Reserve in consultation with the Secretary of the Treasury) or (ii) complementary to a financial activity and does not pose a substantial risk to the safety and soundness of depository institutions or the financial system generally (as solely determined by the Federal Reserve), without prior approval of the Federal Reserve. Activities that are financial in nature include securities underwriting and dealing, serving as an insurance agent and underwriter and engaging in merchant banking.

Acquisitions. A bank holding company (BHC) must obtain approval from the Federal Reserve Board (Federal Reserve) prior to directly or indirectly acquiring ownership or control of 5% of the voting shares or substantially all of the assets of another BHC or bank or prior to merging or consolidating with another BHC.

Status Requirements. To maintain financial holding company status, a financial holding company and all of its depository institution subsidiaries must be well-capitalized and well-managed. A depository institution subsidiary is considered to be well-capitalized if it satisfies the requirements for this status under applicable Federal Reserve capital requirements. A depository institution subsidiary is considered well managed if it received a composite rating and management rating of at least “satisfactory” in its most recent examination. If a financial holding company ceases to meet these capital and management requirements, the Federal Reserve may impose limitations or conditions on the conduct of its activities.

Capital Requirements. The Federal Reserve imposes certain capital requirements on bank holding companies under the BHCA, including a minimum leverage ratio and a minimum ratio of “qualifying” capital to risk-weighted assets. These requirements are described below under “The Subsidiary Bank - FCB - Current Capital Requirements (Basel III).” As of December 31, 2018, the risk-based Tier 1, common equity Tier 1, total capital and leverage capital ratios of BancShares were 12.67 percent, 12.67 percent, 13.99 percent and 9.77 percent, respectively, and each capital ratio listed above exceeded the applicable minimum requirements as well as the well-capitalized standards. Subject to its capital requirements and certain other restrictions, BancShares is able to borrow money to make capital contributions to FCB and such loans may be repaid from dividends paid by FCB to BancShares.

Source of Strength. Under the Dodd-Frank Act, bank holding companies are required to act as a source of financial and managerial strength to their subsidiary banks. Under this requirement, BancShares is expected to commit resources to support FCB, including times when BancShares may not be in a financial position to provide such resources. Any capital loans made by a bank holding company to any of its subsidiary banks are subordinate in right of payment to depositors and to certain other indebtedness of such subsidiary banks. In the event of a bank holding company’s bankruptcy, any commitment by the bank holding company to a federal bank regulatory agency to maintain the capital of a subsidiary bank will be assumed by the bankruptcy trustee and entitled to priority of payment.

Safety and Soundness. The federal bank regulatory agencies have adopted guidelines prescribing safety and soundness standards. These guidelines establish general standards relating to internal controls and information systems, internal audit systems, loan documentation, credit underwriting, interest rate exposure, asset growth and compensation, fees and benefits. In general, the guidelines require, among other things, appropriate systems and practices to identify and manage the risk and exposures specified in the guidelines. There are a number of obligations and restrictions imposed on bank holding companies and their subsidiary banks by law and regulatory policy that are designed to minimize potential loss to the depositors of such depository institutions and to the FDIC insurance fund in the event of a depository institution default.

Limits on Dividends and Other Payments. BancShares is a legal entity, separate and distinct from its subsidiaries. Revenues of BancShares primarily result from dividends received from FCB. There are various legal limitations applicable to the payment of dividends by FCB to BancShares and to the payment of dividends by BancShares to its shareholders. The payment of dividends by FCB or BancShares may be limited by certain factors, such as requirements to maintain capital above regulatory guidelines. Bank regulatory agencies have the authority to prohibit FCB or BancShares from engaging in an unsafe or unsound practice in conducting their business. The payment of dividends, depending on the financial condition of FCB or BancShares, could be deemed to constitute such an unsafe or unsound practice.

5




Under the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (FDIA), insured depository institutions, such as FCB, are prohibited from making capital distributions, including the payment of dividends, if, after making such distributions, the institution would become “undercapitalized” (as such term is used in the statute). Additionally, under Basel III capital requirements, banking institutions with a ratio of common equity Tier 1 to risk-weighted assets above the minimum but below the conservation buffer will face constraints on dividends, equity repurchases and compensation based on the amount of the shortfall. Based on FCB’s current financial condition, BancShares currently does not expect these provisions to have any material impact on its ability to receive dividends from FCB. BancShares' non-bank subsidiaries pay dividends to BancShares periodically on a non-regulated basis.

Subsidiary Bank - FCB
General. FCB is a state-chartered bank, subject to supervision and examination by, and the regulations and reporting requirements of, the FDIC and the North Carolina Commissioner of Banks (NCCOB). Deposit obligations are insured by the FDIC to the maximum legal limits.

Capital Requirements (Basel III). Bank regulatory agencies approved Basel III regulatory capital guidelines aimed at strengthening existing capital requirements through a combination of higher minimum capital requirements, new capital conservation buffers and more conservative definitions of capital and balance sheet exposure. BancShares and FCB implemented the requirements of Basel III effective January 1, 2015, subject to a transition period for several aspects of the rule. The table below describes the minimum and well-capitalized requirements in 2018 and the fully-phased-in requirements that became effective in 2019.
 
Basel III minimum requirement
2018
 
Basel III well-capitalized
2018
 
Basel III minimum requirement
2019
 
Basel III well-capitalized
2019
Leverage ratio
4.00%
 
5.00%
 
4.00%
 
5.00%
Common equity Tier 1
4.50%
 
6.50%
 
4.50%
 
6.50%
Tier 1 capital ratio
6.00%
 
8.00%
 
6.00%
 
8.00%
Total capital ratio
8.00%
 
10.00%
 
8.00%
 
10.00%

The transitional period began in 2016 and the capital conservation buffer requirement was phased in beginning January 1, 2016, at 0.625 percent of risk-weighted assets, increasing each year until fully implemented at 2.5 percent on January 1, 2019. The capital conservation buffer is designed to absorb losses during periods of economic stress. Banking institutions with a ratio of common equity Tier 1 to risk-weighted assets above the minimum, but below the conservation buffer, will face constraints on dividends, equity repurchases and compensation based on the amount of the shortfall.

Failure to meet minimum capital requirements may result in certain actions by regulators that could have a direct material effect on FCB's consolidated financial statements. As of December 31, 2018, FCB exceeded the applicable minimum requirements as well as the well-capitalized standards.

Although FCB is unable to control the external factors that influence its business, by maintaining high levels of balance sheet liquidity, prudently managing interest rate exposures, ensuring capital positions remain strong and actively monitoring asset quality, FCB seeks to minimize the potentially adverse risks of unforeseen and unfavorable economic trends and to take advantage of favorable economic conditions and opportunities when appropriate.

Transactions with Affiliates. Pursuant to Sections 23A and 23B of the Federal Reserve Act, Regulation W and Regulation O, the authority of FCB to engage in transactions with related parties or “affiliates” or to make loans to insiders is limited. Loan transactions with an affiliate generally must be collateralized and certain transactions between FCB and its affiliates, including the sale of assets, the payment of money or the provision of services, must be on terms and conditions that are substantially the same, or at least as favorable to FCB, as those prevailing for comparable nonaffiliated transactions. In addition, FCB generally may not purchase securities issued or underwritten by affiliates.

FCB receives management fees from its subsidiaries and BancShares for expenses incurred for performing various functions on their behalf. These fees are charged to each company based upon the estimated cost for usage of services by that company. The fees are eliminated from the consolidated financial statements.


6




Community Reinvestment Act. FCB is subject to the requirements of the Community Reinvestment Act of 1977 (CRA). The CRA imposes on financial institutions an affirmative and ongoing obligation to meet the credit needs of the local communities, including low-and-moderate-income neighborhoods. If FCB receives a rating from the Federal Reserve of less than “satisfactory” under the CRA, restrictions would be imposed on our operating activities. In addition, in order for a financial holding company, like BancShares, to commence any new activity permitted by the BHCA or to acquire any company engaged in any new activity permitted by the BHCA, each insured depository institution subsidiary of the financial holding company must have received a rating of at least “satisfactory” in its most recent examination under the CRA. FCB currently has a “satisfactory” CRA rating.

Anti-Money Laundering and the United States Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Asset Control (OFAC) Regulation. Governmental policy in recent years has been aimed at combating money laundering and terrorist financing. The Bank Secrecy Act of 1970 (BSA) and subsequent laws and regulations require financial institutions to take steps to prevent the use of their systems to facilitate the flow of illegal or illicit money or terrorist funds. The USA Patriot Act of 2001 (Patriot Act) significantly expanded anti-money laundering (AML) and financial transparency laws and regulations by imposing new compliance and due diligence obligations, including standards for verifying customer identification at account opening and maintaining expanded records, as well as rules promoting cooperation among financial institutions, regulators and law enforcement entities in identifying persons who may be involved in terrorism or money laundering. These rules were expanded to require new customer due diligence and beneficial ownership requirements in 2018. An institution subject to the BSA, such as FCB, must additionally provide AML training to employees, designate an AML compliance officer and annually audit the AML program to assess its effectiveness. The United States has imposed economic sanctions on transactions with certain designated foreign countries, nationals and others. As these rules are administrated by OFAC, these are generally known as the OFAC rules. Failure of a financial institution to maintain and implement adequate BSA, AML and OFAC programs, or to comply with all the relevant laws and regulations, could have serious legal and reputational consequences, including material fines and sanctions. FCB has implemented a program designed to facilitate compliance with the full extent of the applicable BSA and OFAC related laws, regulations and related sanctions.

Consumer Laws and Regulations. FCB is also subject to certain laws and regulations designed to protect consumers in transactions with banks. These laws include the Truth in Lending Act, the Truth in Savings Act, the Electronic Funds Transfer Act, the Expedited Funds Availability Act, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, Home Mortgage Disclosure Act, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, the Fair Housing Act and the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. The laws and related regulations mandate certain disclosures and regulate the manner in which financial institutions transact business with certain customers. FCB must comply with these consumer protection laws and regulations in its relevant lines of business.
Available Information

BancShares does not have its own separate Internet website. However, FCB’s website (www.firstcitizens.com) includes a hyperlink to the Security and Exchange Commission's (SEC) website where the public may obtain copies of BancShares’ annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports, free of charge, as soon as reasonably practicable after they are electronically filed with or furnished to the SEC. Interested parties may also directly access the SEC’s website (www.sec.gov), which contains reports and other information electronically filed by BancShares.

Item 1A. Risk Factors
We are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties that could have a material impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations and cash flows. As a financial services organization, certain elements of risk are inherent in our transactions and operations and are present in the business decisions we make. We encounter risk as part of the normal course of our business, and we design risk management processes to help manage these risks. Our success is dependent on our ability to identify, understand and manage the risks presented by our business activities. We categorize risk into the following areas:

Operational Risk: The risk of loss resulting from inadequate or failed processes, people and systems or from external events.
Credit Risk: The risk that arises from a borrower's or counterparty's inability to perform on an obligation.
Market Risk: The risk to BancShares' financial condition resulting from adverse movements in market rates or prices, including, but not limited to, interest rates or equity prices.

7




Liquidity Risk: The risk that BancShares will be unable to meet its obligations as they come due because of an inability to (i) liquidate assets or obtain adequate funding (referred to as "Funding Liquidity Risk"), or (ii) unwind or offset specific exposures without significantly lowering market prices because of inadequate market depth or market disruptions ("Market Liquidity Risk").
Capital Adequacy Risk: The risk that capital levels are inadequate to preserve the safety and soundness of BancShares, support ongoing business operations and strategies and provide support against unexpected or sudden changes in the business/economic environment.
Compliance Risk: The risk of loss or reputational harm resulting from regulatory sanctions, fines, penalties or losses due to the failure to comply with laws, rules, regulations or other supervisory requirements applicable to a financial institution.
Strategic Risk: The risk to earnings or capital arising from business decisions or improper implementation of those decisions.
The risks and uncertainties that management believes are material are described below. The risks listed are not the only risks that BancShares faces. Additional risks and uncertainties that are not currently known or that management does not currently deem material could also have a material adverse impact on our financial condition and/or the results of our operations or our business. If such risks and uncertainties were to materialize or the likelihoods of the risks were to increase, the market price of our common stock could significantly decline.
Operational Risks
We face significant operational risks in our businesses.
Safely conducting and growing our business requires that we create and maintain an appropriate operational and organizational control infrastructure. Operational risk can arise in numerous ways, including employee fraud, customer fraud and control lapses in bank operations and information technology. Our dependence on our employees and internal and third party automated systems to record and process transactions may further increase the risk that technical failures or system-tampering will result in losses that are difficult to detect. We may be subject to disruptions of our operating systems arising from events that are wholly or partially beyond our control. Failure to maintain appropriate operational infrastructure and oversight can lead to loss of service to customers, legal actions and noncompliance with various laws and regulations. We have implemented internal controls that are designed to safeguard and maintain our operational and organizational infrastructure and information. However, all internal control systems, no matter how well designed, have inherent limitations. Therefore, even those systems determined to be effective can provide only reasonable assurance with respect to financial statement preparation and presentation.
A cyber attack, information or security breach, or a technology failure of ours or of a third party could adversely affect our ability to conduct our business, manage our exposure to risk, result in the disclosure or misuse of confidential or proprietary information, increase our costs to maintain and update our operational and security systems and infrastructure, and adversely impact our results of operations, liquidity and financial condition, as well as cause legal or reputational harm.
Our businesses are highly dependent on the security and efficacy of our infrastructure, computer and data management systems, as well as those of third parties with whom we interact or on whom we rely. Our businesses rely on the secure processing, transmission, storage and retrieval of confidential, proprietary and other information in our computer and data management systems and networks, and in the computer and data management systems and networks of third parties. In addition, to access our network, products and services, our customers and other third parties may use personal mobile devices or computing devices that are outside of our network environment and are subject to their own cybersecurity risks.
We, our customers, regulators and other third parties have been subject to, and are likely to continue to be the target of, cyber attacks. These cyber attacks include computer viruses, malicious or destructive code, phishing attacks, denial of service or information or other security breaches that could result in the unauthorized release, gathering, monitoring, misuse, loss or destruction of confidential, proprietary and other information of ours, our employees, our customers or of third parties, damages to systems, or otherwise material disruption to our or our customers’ or other third parties’ network access or business operations. As cyber threats continue to evolve, we may be required to expend significant additional resources to continue to modify or enhance our protective measures or to investigate and remediate any information security vulnerabilities or incidents. Despite efforts to protect the integrity of our systems and implement controls, processes, policies and other protective measures, we may not be able to anticipate all security breaches, nor may we be able to implement guaranteed preventive measures against such security breaches.

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Cybersecurity risks for banking organizations have significantly increased in recent years in part because of the proliferation of new technologies, and the use of the Internet and telecommunications technologies to conduct financial transactions. For example, cybersecurity risks may increase in the future as we continue to increase our mobile-payment and other internet-based product offerings and expand our internal usage of web-based products and applications. In addition, cybersecurity risks have significantly increased in recent years in part due to the increased sophistication and activities of organized crime groups, hackers, terrorist organizations, hostile foreign governments, disgruntled employees or vendors, activists and other external parties, including those involved in corporate espionage. Even the most advanced internal control environment may be vulnerable to compromise. Additionally, the existence of cyber attacks or security breaches at third parties with access to our data, such as vendors, may not be disclosed to us in a timely manner.
Although to date we have not experienced any material losses or other material consequences relating to technology failure, cyber attacks or other information or security breaches, whether directed at us or third parties, there can be no assurance that we will not suffer such losses or other consequences in the future. As a result, cybersecurity and the continued development and enhancement of our controls, processes and practices designed to protect our systems, computers, software, data and networks from attack, damage or unauthorized access remain a priority.
We also face indirect technology, cybersecurity and operational risks relating to the customers, clients and other third parties with whom we do business or upon whom we rely to facilitate or enable our business activities, including financial counterparties; financial intermediaries such as clearing agents, exchanges and clearing houses; vendors; regulators; providers of critical infrastructure such as internet access and electrical power. As a result of increasing consolidation, interdependence and complexity of financial entities and technology systems, a technology failure, cyber attack or other information or security breach that significantly degrades, deletes or compromises the systems or data of one or more financial entities could have a material impact on counterparties or other market participants, including us. This consolidation interconnectivity and complexity increases the risk of operational failure, on both individual and industry-wide bases, as disparate systems need to be integrated, often on an accelerated basis. Any third-party technology failure, cyber attack or other information or security breach, termination or constraint could, among other things, adversely affect our ability to effect transactions, service our clients, manage our exposure to risk or expand our businesses.
Cyber attacks or other information or security breaches, whether directed at us or third parties, may result in a material loss or have material consequences. Furthermore, the public perception that a cyber attack on our systems has been successful, whether or not this perception is correct, may damage our reputation with customers and third parties with whom we do business. A successful penetration or circumvention of system security could cause us negative consequences, including loss of customers and business opportunities, disruption to our operations and business, misappropriation or destruction of our confidential information and/or that of our customers, or damage to our customers’ and/or third parties’ computers or systems, and could result in a violation of applicable privacy laws and other laws, litigation exposure, regulatory fines, penalties or intervention, loss of confidence in our security measures, reputational damage, reimbursement or other compensatory costs, additional compliance costs, and could adversely impact our results of operations, liquidity and financial condition.
We are exposed to losses related to credit and debit card fraud.
As technology continues to evolve, criminals are using increasingly more sophisticated techniques to commit and hide fraudulent activity. Fraudulent activity can come in many forms, including debit card/credit card fraud, check fraud, electronic scanning devices attached to ATM machines, social engineering and phishing attacks to obtain personal information and fraudulent impersonation of our clients through the use of falsified or stolen credentials. To counter the increased sophistication of these fraudulent activities, we have increased our investment in systems, technologies and controls to detect and prevent such fraud. Combating fraudulent activities as they evolve will result in continued ongoing investments in the future.
New technologies, and our ability to efficiently and effectively develop, market and deliver new products and services to our customers present competitive risks.
The rapid growth of new digital technologies, including internet services, smart phones and other mobile devices, requires us to continuously evaluate our product and service offerings to ensure they remain competitive. Our success depends in part on our ability to adapt and deliver our products and services in a manner responsive to evolving industry standards and consumer preferences. New technologies by banks and non-bank service providers may create risks if our products and services are no longer competitive with then-current standards, and could negatively affect our ability to attract or maintain a loyal customer base. These risks may affect our ability to grow and could reduce our revenue streams from certain products and services, while increasing expenses associated with developing more competitive solutions. Our results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected.

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We depend on key personnel for our success.
Our success depends to a great extent on our ability to attract and retain key personnel. We have an experienced management team that our Board of Directors believes is capable of managing and growing our business. Losses of, or changes in, our current executive officers or other key personnel and their responsibilities may disrupt our business and could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and liquidity. There can be no assurance that we will be successful in retaining our current executive officers or other key personnel, or hiring additional key personnel to assist in executing our growth, expansion and acquisition strategies.
We are subject to litigation risks, and our expenses related to litigation may adversely affect our results.
We are subject to litigation risks in the ordinary course of our business. Claims and legal actions, including supervisory actions by our regulators, that may be initiated against us from time to time could involve large monetary sums and significant defense costs. During the last credit crisis, we saw the number of cases and our expenses related to those cases increase. The outcomes of such cases are always uncertain until finally adjudicated or resolved.
We establish reserves for legal claims when payments associated with the claims become probable and our liability can be reasonably estimated. We may still incur legal costs for a matter even if we have not established a reserve. In addition, the actual amount paid in resolution of a legal claim may be substantially higher than any amounts reserved for the matter. The ultimate resolution of a legal proceeding, depending on the remedy sought and any relief granted, could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
Substantial legal claims or significant regulatory action against us could have material adverse financial effects or cause significant reputational harm to us, which in turn could seriously harm our business prospects. We may be exposed to substantial uninsured legal liabilities and/or regulatory actions which could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition. For additional information, see Note T, “Commitments and Contingencies,” to the Consolidated Financial Statements in this Form 10-K.
Our business and financial performance could be impacted by natural disasters, acts of war or terrorist activities.
Natural disasters (including but not limited to earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, fires, explosions), acts of war and terrorist activities could hurt our performance (i) directly through damage to our facilities or other impacts to our ability to conduct business in the ordinary course, and (ii) indirectly through such damage or impacts to our customers, suppliers or other counterparties. In particular, a significant amount of our business is concentrated in North Carolina and South Carolina, including coastal areas where our retail and commercial customers have been and in the future could be impacted by hurricanes. We could also suffer adverse results to the extent that disasters, wars or terrorist activities affect the broader markets or economy. Our ability to minimize the consequences of such events is in significant measure reliant on the quality of our disaster recovery planning and our ability, if any, to forecast the events.
We rely on third parties.
Third party vendors provide key components of our business infrastructure, including certain data processing and information services. Their services could be difficult to quickly replace in the event of failure or other interruption in service. Failures of certain vendors to provide services could adversely affect our ability to deliver products and services to our customers. External vendors also present information security risks. We monitor significant vendor risks, including the financial stability of critical vendors. The failure of a critical external vendor could disrupt our business and cause us to incur significant expense.
Our business is highly quantitative and requires widespread use of financial models for day-to-day operations; these models may produce inaccurate predictions that significantly vary from actual results.
We rely on quantitative models to measure risks and to estimate certain financial values. Such models may be used in many processes including, but not limited to, the pricing of various products and services, classifications of loans, setting interest rates on loans and deposits, quantifying interest rate and other market risks, forecasting losses, measuring capital adequacy and calculating economic and regulatory capital levels. Models may also be used to estimate the value of financial instruments and balance sheet items. Inaccurate or erroneous models present the risk that business decisions relying on the models will prove inefficient or ineffective. Additionally, information we provide to our investors and regulators may be negatively impacted by inaccurately designed or implemented models. For further information on models, see the Risk Management section included in Item 7 of this Form 10-K.

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Failure to maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition and disclosures.
We must have effective internal controls over financial reporting in order to provide reliable financial reports, to effectively prevent fraud and to operate successfully as a public company. If we were unable to provide reliable financial reports or prevent fraud, our reputation and operating results would be harmed. As part of our ongoing monitoring of our internal controls over financial reporting, we may discover material weaknesses or significant deficiencies requiring remediation. A “material weakness” is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal controls over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of a company’s annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.
We continually work to improve our internal controls; however, we cannot be certain that these measures will ensure appropriate and adequate controls over our future financial processes and reporting. Any failure to maintain effective controls or to implement any necessary improvement of our internal controls in a timely manner could, among other things, result in losses from fraud or error, harm our reputation or cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, each of which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition and the market value of our common stock.
The quality of our data could deteriorate and cause financial or reputational harm to the Bank.
Incomplete, inconsistent, or inaccurate data could lead to non-compliance with regulatory statutes and result in fines. Additionally, customer impact could result in reputational harm and customer attrition.
Malicious action by an employee could result in harm to our customers or the Bank.
Several high-profile cases of misconduct have occurred at other financial institutions. Such an event may lead to large regulatory fines, as well as an erosion in customer confidence, which could impact our financial position.
Credit Risks
If we fail to effectively manage credit risk, our business and financial condition will suffer.
We must effectively manage credit risk. There are risks inherent in making any loan, including risks of repayment, risks with respect to the period of time over which the loan may be repaid, risks relating to proper loan underwriting and guidelines, risks resulting from changes in economic and industry conditions, risks inherent in dealing with individual borrowers and risks resulting from uncertainties as to the future value of collateral. There is no assurance that our loan approval procedures and our credit risk monitoring are or will be adequate to or will reduce the inherent risks associated with lending. Our credit administration personnel, policies and procedures may not adequately adapt to changes in economic or other conditions affecting customers and the quality of our loan portfolio. Any failure to manage such credit risks may materially adversely affect our business, and our consolidated results of operations and financial condition.
Our concentration of loans to borrowers within the medical and dental industries could impair our earnings if those industries experience economic difficulties.
Statutory or regulatory changes, or economic conditions in the market generally, could negatively impact borrowers' businesses and their ability to repay their loans with us, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. Additionally, smaller practices such as those in the dental industry generally have fewer financial resources in terms of capital or borrowing capacity than larger entities, and generally have a heightened vulnerability to negative economic conditions. Consequently, we could be required to increase our allowance for loan losses through additional provisions on our income statement, which would reduce reported net income. See Note D for additional discussion.
Economic conditions in real estate markets and our reliance on junior liens may adversely impact our business and our results of operations.
Real property collateral values may be impacted by economic conditions in the real estate market and may result in losses on loans that, while adequately collateralized at the time of origination, become inadequately collateralized. Our reliance on junior liens is concentrated in our non-commercial revolving mortgage loan portfolio. Approximately two-thirds of the non-commercial revolving mortgage portfolio is secured by junior lien positions, and lower real estate values for collateral underlying these loans may cause the outstanding balance of the senior lien to exceed the value of the collateral, resulting in a junior lien loan that is effectively unsecured. Inadequate collateral values, rising interest rates and unfavorable economic conditions could result in greater delinquencies, write-downs or charge-offs in future periods, which could have a material adverse impact on our results of operations and capital adequacy.

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Our allowance for loan losses may prove to be insufficient to absorb losses in our loan portfolio.
We maintain an allowance for loan losses that is designed to cover losses on loans that borrowers may not repay in their entirety. We believe that we maintain an allowance for loan losses at a level adequate to absorb probable losses inherent in the loan portfolio as of the corresponding balance sheet date, and in compliance with applicable accounting and regulatory guidance. However, the allowance may not be sufficient to cover actual loan losses, and future provisions for loan losses could materially and adversely affect our operating results. Accounting measurements related to impairment and the allowance require significant estimates that are subject to uncertainty and revisions driven by new information and changing circumstances. The significant uncertainties surrounding our borrowers' abilities to conduct their businesses successfully through changing economic environments, competitive challenges and other factors complicate our estimates of the risk and/or amount of loss on any loan. Due to the degree of uncertainty and the susceptibility to change, the actual losses may vary from current estimates. We also expect fluctuations in the allowance due to economic changes nationally as well as locally within the states we conduct business.
As an integral part of their examination process, our banking regulators periodically review the allowance and may require us to increase it for loan losses by recognizing additional provisions for loan losses charged to expense or to decrease the allowance by recognizing loan charge-offs, net of recoveries. Any such required additional loan loss provisions or charge-offs could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.
Our financial condition could be adversely affected by the soundness of other financial institutions.
Financial services institutions are interrelated as a result of trading, clearing, counterparty and/or other relationships. We have exposure to numerous financial services providers, including banks, securities brokers and dealers and other financial services providers. Although we monitor the financial conditions of financial institutions with which we have credit exposure, transactions with those institutions expose us to credit risk through the possibility of counterparty default.
Market Risks
Unfavorable economic conditions could adversely affect our business.
Our business is subject to periodic fluctuations based on national, regional and local economic conditions. These fluctuations are not predictable, cannot be controlled and may have a material adverse impact on our operations and financial condition. Our banking operations are located within several states but are locally oriented and community based. Our retail and commercial banking activities are primarily concentrated within the same geographic footprint. Our markets include the Southeast, Mid-Atlantic, Midwest and Western United States, with our greatest presence in North Carolina and South Carolina. Worsening economic conditions within our markets, particularly within North Carolina and South Carolina, could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. Accordingly, we expect to continue to be dependent upon local business conditions as well as conditions in the local residential and commercial real estate markets we serve. Unfavorable changes in unemployment, real estate values, interest rates and other factors could weaken the economies of the communities we serve. Economic growth and business activity have remained relatively stable across a wide range of industries and geographic locations, but there can be no assurance that current economic conditions will continue or that these conditions will not worsen.
In addition, the political environment, the level of United States (U.S.) debt and global economic conditions can have a destabilizing effect on financial markets. Weakness in any of our market areas could have an adverse impact on our earnings, and consequently, our financial condition and capital adequacy.
Accounting for acquired assets may result in earnings volatility.
Fair value discounts that are recorded at the time an asset is acquired are accreted into interest income based on accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (GAAP). The rate at which those discounts are accreted is unpredictable and the result of various factors including prepayments and changes in credit quality. Post-acquisition deterioration in excess of remaining discounts results in the recognition of provision expense. Additionally, the income statement impact of adjustments to the indemnification asset recorded in certain FDIC-assisted transactions may occur over a shorter period of time than the adjustments to the covered assets.
Fair value discount accretion, post-acquisition impairment and adjustments to the indemnification asset may result in significant volatility in our earnings. Volatility in earnings could unfavorably influence investor interest in our common stock, thereby depressing the market value of our stock and the market capitalization of our company.

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The performance of equity securities and corporate bonds in the investment portfolio could be adversely impacted by the soundness and fluctuations in the market values of other financial institutions.
Our investment securities portfolio contains certain equity securities and corporate bonds of other financial institutions. As a result, a portion of our investment securities portfolio is subject to fluctuation due to changes in the financial stability and market value of other financial institutions, as well as interest rate sensitivity to economic and market conditions. Such fluctuations could have an adverse effect on our results of operations.
Failure to effectively manage our interest rate risk could adversely affect us.
Our results of operations and cash flows are highly dependent upon net interest income. Interest rates are sensitive to economic and market conditions that are beyond our control, including the actions of the Federal Reserve Board’s Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC). Changes in monetary policy could influence interest income, interest expense, and the fair value of our financial assets and liabilities. If changes in interest rates on our interest-earning assets are not equal to the changes in interest rates on our interest-bearing liabilities, our net interest income and, therefore, our net income, could be adversely impacted.
As interest rates rise, our interest expense will increase and our net interest margins may decrease, negatively impacting our performance and, potentially, our financial condition. To the extent banks and other financial services providers compete for interest-bearing deposit accounts through higher interest rates, our deposit base could be reduced if we are unwilling to pay those higher rates. If we decide to compete with those higher interest rates, our cost of funds could increase and our net interest margins could be reduced. Additionally, higher interest rates will impact our ability to originate new loans. Increases in interest rates could adversely affect the ability of our borrowers to meet higher payment obligations. If this occurred, it could cause an increase in nonperforming assets and net charge-offs, which could adversely affect our business and financial condition.
Although we maintain an interest rate risk monitoring system, the forecasts of future net interest income are estimates and may be inaccurate. Actual interest rate movements may differ from our forecasts, and unexpected actions by the FOMC may have a direct impact on market interest rates.
We May Be Adversely Impacted By The Transition From LIBOR as a reference rate
In 2017, the United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority announced that after 2021 it would no longer compel banks to submit the rates required to calculate the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”). This announcement indicates that the continuation of LIBOR on the current basis cannot and will not be guaranteed after 2021. Consequently, at this time, it is not possible to predict whether and to what extent banks will continue to provide submissions for the calculation of LIBOR. Similarly, it is not possible to predict whether LIBOR will continue to be viewed as an acceptable market benchmark, what rate or rates may become accepted alternatives to LIBOR, or what the effect of any such changes in views or alternatives may be on the markets for LIBOR-indexed financial instruments.
We have loans, borrowings and other financial instruments with attributes that are either directly or indirectly dependent on LIBOR. The transition from LIBOR could create additional costs and risks. Since proposed alternative rates are calculated differently, payments under contracts referencing new rates will differ from those referencing LIBOR. The transition will change our market risk profiles, requiring changes to risk and pricing models, valuation tools, and product design. Furthermore, failure to adequately manage this transition process with our customers could adversely impact our reputation. Although we are currently unable to assess what the ultimate impact of the transition from LIBOR will be, failure to adequately manage the transition could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Liquidity Risks
If our current level of balance sheet liquidity were to experience pressure, it could affect our ability to pay deposits and fund our operations.
Our deposit base represents our primary source of core funding and balance sheet liquidity. We normally have the ability to stimulate core deposit growth through reasonable and effective pricing strategies. However, in circumstances where our ability to generate needed liquidity is impaired, we need access to noncore funding such as borrowings from the Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) and the Federal Reserve, Federal Funds purchased lines and brokered deposits. While we maintain access to these noncore funding sources, some sources are dependent on the availability of collateral as well as the counterparty’s willingness and ability to lend.

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Capital Adequacy Risks
Our ability to grow is contingent on access to capital.
Our primary capital sources have been retained earnings and debt issued through both private and public markets. Rating agencies regularly evaluate our creditworthiness and assign credit ratings to BancShares and FCB. The ratings of the agencies are based on a number of factors, some of which are outside our control. In addition to factors specific to our financial strength and performance, the rating agencies also consider conditions generally affecting the financial services industry. There can be no assurance that we will maintain our current credit ratings. Rating reductions could adversely affect our access to funding sources and the cost of obtaining funding.
Based on existing capital levels, BancShares and FCB are well-capitalized under current leverage and risk-based capital standards. Our ability to grow is contingent on our ability to generate sufficient capital to remain well-capitalized under current and future capital adequacy guidelines.
We are subject to capital adequacy and liquidity guidelines and, if we fail to meet these guidelines, our financial condition would be adversely affected.
Under regulatory capital adequacy guidelines and other regulatory requirements, BancShares, together with FCB, must meet certain capital and liquidity guidelines, subject to qualitative judgments by regulators about components, risk weightings and other factors.
The Federal Reserve Bank (FRB) issued capital rules that established a new comprehensive capital framework for U.S. banking institutions and established a more conservative definition of capital. These requirements, known as Basel III, became effective January 1, 2015, and, as a result, we became subject to enhanced minimum capital and leverage ratios. These requirements could adversely affect our ability to pay dividends, restrict certain business activities or compel us to raise capital, each of which may adversely affect our results of operations or financial condition. In addition, the costs associated with complying with more stringent capital requirements, such as the requirement to formulate and submit capital plans based on pre-defined stress scenarios on an annual basis, could have an adverse effect on us. See the Supervision and Regulation section included in Item 7 of this Form 10-K for additional information regarding the capital requirements under the Dodd-Frank Act and Basel III.
Compliance Risks
We operate in a highly regulated industry; the laws and regulations that govern our operations, taxes, corporate governance, executive compensation and financial accounting and reporting, including changes in them or our failure to comply with them, may adversely affect us.
We are subject to extensive regulation and supervision that govern almost all aspects of our operations. In addition to a multitude of regulations designed to protect customers, depositors and consumers, we must comply with other regulations that protect the deposit insurance fund and the stability of the U.S. financial system, including laws and regulations that, among other matters, prescribe minimum capital requirements; impose limitations on our business activities and investments; limit the dividends or distributions that we can pay; restrict the ability of our bank subsidiaries to guarantee our debt; and impose certain specific accounting requirements that may be more restrictive and may result in greater or earlier charges to earnings or reductions in our capital than GAAP. Compliance with laws and regulations can be difficult and costly, and changes in laws and regulations often impose additional compliance costs.
The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and the related rules and regulations issued by the SEC and Nasdaq, as well as numerous other recently enacted statutes and regulations, including the Dodd-Frank Act, EGRRCPA, and regulations promulgated thereunder, have increased the scope, complexity and cost of corporate governance and reporting and disclosure practices, including the costs of completing our external audit and maintaining our internal controls. Such additional regulation and supervision may limit our ability to pursue business opportunities.
The failure to comply with these various rules and regulations could subject us to restrictions on our business activities, including mergers and acquisitions, fines and other penalties, any of which could adversely affect our results of operations, capital base and the price of our common stock.
We may be adversely affected by changes in U.S. tax laws and other laws and regulations.
Corporate tax rates affect our profitability and capital levels. The U.S. corporate tax code may be further reformed by the U.S. Congress and additional guidance may be issued by the U.S. Department of the Treasury relevant to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (Tax Act) enacted during 2017. Additional adverse amendments to the Tax Act or other related legislation could have an adverse impact on our financial condition and results of operations.

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Strategic Risks
We encounter significant competition that may reduce our market share and profitability.
We compete with other banks and specialized financial services providers in our market areas. Our primary competitors include local, regional and national banks; credit unions; commercial finance companies; various wealth management providers; independent and captive insurance agencies; mortgage companies; and non-bank providers of financial services. Some of our larger competitors, including certain banks with a significant presence in our market areas, have the capacity to offer products and services we do not offer. Some of our non-bank competitors operate in less stringent regulatory environments, and certain competitors are not subject to federal and/or state income taxes. The fierce competitive pressures that we face adversely affect pricing for many of our products and services.
Certain provisions in our Certificate of Incorporation and Bylaws may prevent a change in management or a takeover attempt that you might consider to be in your best interests.
Certain provisions contained in our Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation and Amended and Restated Bylaws could delay or prevent the removal of directors and other management. The provisions could also delay or make more difficult a tender offer, merger or proxy contest that you might consider to be in your best interests. For example, our Certificate of Incorporation and/or Bylaws:
allow our Board of Directors to issue and set the terms of preferred shares without further shareholder approval;
limit who can call a special meeting of shareholders; and
establish advance notice requirements for nominations for election to the Board of Directors and proposals of other business to be considered at annual meetings of shareholders.
These provisions, as well as provisions of the BHCA and other relevant statutes and regulations that require advance notice and/or applications for regulatory approval of changes in control of banks and bank holding companies, may discourage bids for our common stock at a premium over market price, adversely affecting its market price. Additionally, the fact that the Holding family holds or controls shares representing a majority of the voting power of our common stock may discourage potential takeover attempts and/or bids for our common stock at a premium over market price.
The market price of our stock may be volatile.
Although publicly traded, our common stock has less liquidity and public float than many other large, publicly traded financial services companies. Low liquidity increases the price volatility of our stock and could make it difficult for our shareholders to sell or buy our common stock at specific prices.
Excluding the impact of liquidity, the market price of our common stock can fluctuate widely in response to other factors, including expectations of financial and operating results, actual operating results, actions of institutional shareholders, speculation in the press or the investment community, market perception of acquisitions, rating agency upgrades or downgrades, stock prices of other companies that are similar to us, general market expectations related to the financial services industry and the potential impact of government actions affecting the financial services industry.
We rely on dividends from FCB.
As a financial holding company, we are a separate legal entity from FCB. We derive most of our revenue and cash flow from dividends paid by FCB. These dividends are the primary source from which we pay dividends on our common stock and interest and principal on our debt obligations. State and federal laws impose restrictions on the dividends that FCB may pay to us. In the event FCB is unable to pay dividends to us for an extended period of time, we may not be able to service our debt obligations or pay dividends on our common stock.
Our financial performance depends upon our ability to attract and retain clients for our products and services, which ability may be adversely impacted by weakened consumer and/or business confidence, and by any inability on our part to predict and satisfy customers’ needs and demands.
Our financial performance is subject to risks associated with the loss of client confidence and demand. A fragile or weakening economy, or ambiguity surrounding the economic future, may lessen the demand for our products and services. Our performance may also be negatively impacted if we fail to attract and retain customers because we are not able to successfully anticipate, develop and market products and services that satisfy market demands. Such events could impact our performance through fewer loans, reduced fee income and fewer deposits, each of which could result in reduced net income.

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The value of our goodwill may decline in the future.
At December 31, 2018, we had $236.3 million of goodwill recorded as an asset on our balance sheet. We test goodwill for impairment at least annually, comparing the estimated fair value of a reporting unit with its net book value. We also test goodwill for impairment when certain events occur, such as a significant decline in our expected future cash flows, a significant adverse change in the business climate or a sustained decline in the price of our common stock. These tests may result in a write-off of goodwill deemed to be impaired, which could have a significant impact on our financial results; however, any such write-off would not impact our regulatory capital ratios, given that regulatory capital ratios are calculated using tangible capital amounts.
We may be adversely affected by risks associated with completed, pending or any potential future acquisitions.
We plan to continue to grow our business organically. However, we have pursued and expect to continue to pursue acquisition opportunities that we believe support our business strategies and may enhance our profitability. We must generally satisfy a number of material conditions prior to consummating any acquisition including, in many cases, federal and state regulatory approval. We may fail to complete strategic and competitively significant business opportunities as a result of our inability to obtain required regulatory approvals in a timely manner or at all.
Acquisitions of financial institutions or assets of financial institutions involve operational risks and uncertainties, and acquired companies or assets may have unknown or contingent liabilities, exposure to unexpected asset quality problems that require write downs or write-offs, difficulty retaining key employees and customers and other issues that could negatively affect our results of operations and financial condition.
We may not be able to realize projected cost savings, synergies or other benefits associated with any such acquisition. Failure to efficiently integrate any acquired entities or assets into our existing operations could significantly increase our operating costs and have material adverse effects on our financial condition and results of operations. There can be no assurance that we will be successful in identifying, consummating, or integrating any potential acquisitions.
Accounting standards may change and increase our operating costs and/or otherwise adversely affect our results.
The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and the SEC periodically modify the standards that govern the preparation of our financial statements. The nature of these changes is not predictable and could impact how we record transactions in our financial statements, which could lead to material changes in assets, liabilities, shareholders’ equity, revenues, expenses and net income. In some cases, we could be required to apply new or revised standards retroactively, resulting in changes to previously reported financial results or a cumulative adjustment to retained earnings. Application of new accounting rules or standards could require us to implement costly technology changes.
Item 2. Properties
BancShares' and FCB's headquarters facility, a nine-story building with approximately 163,000 square feet, is located in Raleigh, North Carolina. In addition, FCB occupies separate facilities in Raleigh and in Columbia, South Carolina, that serve as data and operations centers. As of December 31, 2018, FCB operated 551 branch offices throughout the Southeast, Mid-Atlantic, Midwest and Western United States. FCB owns many of the buildings and leases other facilities from third parties.
Additional information relating to premises, equipment and lease commitments is set forth in Note F of BancShares’ Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
BancShares and various subsidiaries have been named as defendants in various legal actions arising from our normal business activities in which damages in various amounts are claimed. Although the amount of any ultimate liability with respect to those matters cannot be determined, in the opinion of management, no legal actions currently exist that are expected to have a material effect on BancShares’ consolidated financial statements. Additional information related to legal proceedings is set forth in Note T of BancShares’ Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

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Part II

Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
BancShares has two classes of common stock—Class A common and Class B common. Shares of Class A common have one vote per share, while shares of Class B common have 16 votes per share. BancShares’ Class A common stock is listed on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol FCNCA. The Class B common stock is traded on the over-the-counter market and quoted on the Over-The-Counter (OTC) Bulletin Board under the symbol FCNCB. As of December 31, 2018, there were 1,264 holders of record of the Class A common stock and 193 holders of record of the Class B common stock. The market volume for Class B common stock is extremely limited. On many days there is no trading and, to the extent there is trading, it is generally low volume. Over-the-counter bid prices for BancShares Class B common stock represent inter-dealer prices without retail markup, markdown or commissions, and may not represent actual transaction prices.

The average monthly trading volume for the Class A common stock was 679,451 shares for the fourth quarter of 2018 and 787,238 shares for the year ended December 31, 2018. The Class B common stock monthly trading volume averaged 4,703 shares in the fourth quarter of 2018 and 2,218 shares for the year ended December 31, 2018.

During 2018, our Board authorized the purchase of up to 800,000 shares of Class A common stock. The shares may be purchased from time to time at management's discretion from November 1, 2018 through October 31, 2019. That authorization does not obligate BancShares to purchase any particular amount of shares, and purchases may be suspended or discontinued at any time. The Board's action replaced existing authority to purchase up to 800,000 shares in effect during the twelve months preceding November 1, 2018. BancShares purchased 200,000 shares under the previous authority that expired on October 31, 2018, and 182,000 shares have been purchased under the newly approved authority, which began November 1, 2018. During the third quarter of 2018, BancShares purchased 100,000 shares of its outstanding Class A common stock at a price of $465 per share from a related party. An additional 106,500 shares have been purchased subsequent to December 31, 2018.

Shares of Class A common stock purchased by BancShares during the year ended December 31, 2018.
Class A common stock
Total Number of Class A Shares Purchased
 
Average Price Paid per Share
 
Total Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plans or Programs
 
Maximum Number of Shares that May Yet be Purchased Under the Plans or Programs
Purchases from July 1, 2018 to July 31, 2018

 
$

 

 
800,000

Purchases from August 1, 2018 to August 31, 2018
100,000

 
465.00

 
100,000

 
700,000

Purchases from September 1, 2018 to September 30, 2018
25,000

 
463.39

 
25,000

 
675,000

Purchases from October 1, 2018 to October 31, 2018
75,000

 
438.26

 
75,000

 
600,000

Purchases from November 1, 2018 to November 30, 2018
82,400

 
433.02

 
82,400

 
717,600

Purchases from December 1, 2018 to December 31, 2018
99,600

 
388.43

 
99,600

 
618,000

Total
382,000

 
$
432.78

 
382,000

 
618,000



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The following graph compares the cumulative total shareholder return (CTSR) of our Class A common stock during the previous five years with the CTSR over the same measurement period of the NASDAQ – Banks Index and the NASDAQ – U.S. Index. Each trend line assumes that $100 was invested on December 31, 2013, and that dividends were reinvested for additional shares.

chart-47fd7bbaba44559cbb8a19.jpg

18




Item 6. Selected Financial Data
Table 1
FINANCIAL SUMMARY AND SELECTED AVERAGE BALANCES AND RATIOS
(Dollars in thousands, except share data)
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest income
$
1,245,757

 
$
1,103,690

 
$
987,757

 
$
969,209

 
$
760,448

Interest expense
36,857

 
43,794

 
43,082

 
44,304

 
50,351

Net interest income
1,208,900

 
1,059,896

 
944,675

 
924,905

 
710,097

Provision (credit) for loan and lease losses
28,468

 
25,692

 
32,941

 
20,664

 
640

Net interest income after provision for loan and lease losses
1,180,432

 
1,034,204

 
911,734

 
904,241

 
709,457

Gain on acquisitions

 
134,745

 
5,831

 
42,930

 

Noninterest income excluding gain on acquisitions
400,149

 
387,218

 
371,268

 
424,158

 
343,213

Noninterest expense
1,076,971

 
1,012,469

 
937,766

 
1,038,915

 
849,076

Income before income taxes
503,610

 
543,698

 
351,067

 
332,414

 
203,594

Income taxes
103,297

 
219,946

 
125,585

 
122,028

 
65,032

Net income
$
400,313

 
$
323,752

 
$
225,482

 
$
210,386

 
$
138,562

Net interest income, taxable equivalent (1)
$
1,212,280

 
$
1,064,415

 
$
949,768

 
$
931,231

 
$
714,085

PER SHARE DATA
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
$
33.53

 
$
26.96

 
$
18.77

 
$
17.52

 
$
13.56

Cash dividends
1.45

 
1.25

 
1.20

 
1.20

 
1.20

Market price at period end (Class A)
377.05

 
403.00

 
355.00

 
258.17

 
252.79

Book value at period end
300.04

 
277.60

 
250.82

 
239.14

 
223.77

SELECTED PERIOD AVERAGE BALANCES
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total assets
$
34,879,912

 
$
34,302,867

 
$
32,439,492

 
$
31,072,235

 
$
24,104,404

Investment securities
7,074,929

 
7,036,564

 
6,616,355

 
7,011,767

 
5,994,080

Loans and leases (2)
24,483,719

 
22,725,665

 
20,897,395

 
19,528,153

 
14,820,126

Interest-earning assets
32,847,661

 
32,213,646

 
30,267,788

 
28,893,157

 
22,232,051

Deposits
30,165,249

 
29,119,344

 
27,515,161

 
26,485,245

 
20,368,275

Interest-bearing liabilities
18,995,727

 
19,576,353

 
19,158,317

 
18,986,755

 
15,273,619

Long-term obligations
304,318

 
842,863

 
811,755

 
547,378

 
403,925

Shareholders' equity
$
3,422,941

 
$
3,206,250

 
$
3,001,269

 
$
2,797,300

 
$
2,256,292

Shares outstanding
11,938,439

 
12,010,405

 
12,010,405

 
12,010,405

 
10,221,721

SELECTED PERIOD-END BALANCES
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total assets
$
35,408,629

 
$
34,527,512

 
$
32,990,836

 
$
31,475,934

 
$
30,075,113

Investment securities
6,741,763

 
7,180,256

 
7,006,678

 
6,861,548

 
7,172,435

Loans and leases:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Purchased Credit Impaired (PCI)
606,576

 
762,998

 
809,169

 
950,516

 
1,186,498

Non-Purchased Credit Impaired (Non-PCI)
24,916,700

 
22,833,827

 
20,928,709

 
19,289,474

 
17,582,967

Interest-earning assets
33,200,549

 
32,216,187

 
30,691,551

 
29,224,436

 
27,730,515

Deposits
30,672,460

 
29,266,275

 
28,161,343

 
26,930,755

 
25,678,577

Interest-bearing liabilities
19,681,944

 
19,592,947

 
19,467,223

 
18,955,173

 
1,893,297

Long-term obligations
319,867

 
870,240

 
832,942

 
704,155

 
351,320

Shareholders' equity
$
3,488,954

 
$
3,334,064

 
$
3,012,427

 
$
2,872,109

 
$
2,687,594

Shares outstanding
11,628,405

 
12,010,405

 
12,010,405

 
12,010,405

 
12,010,405

SELECTED RATIOS AND OTHER DATA
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rate of return on average assets
1.15
%
 
0.94
%
 
0.70
%
 
0.68
%
 
0.57
%
Rate of return on average shareholders' equity
11.69

 
10.10

 
7.51

 
7.52

 
6.14

Average equity to average assets ratio
9.81

 
9.35

 
9.25

 
9.00

 
9.36

Net yield on interest-earning assets (taxable equivalent)
3.69

 
3.30

 
3.14

 
3.22

 
3.21

Allowance for loan and lease losses to total loans and leases:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PCI
1.51

 
1.31

 
1.70

 
1.72

 
1.82

Non-PCI
0.86

 
0.93

 
0.98

 
0.98

 
1.04

Total
0.88

 
0.94

 
1.01

 
1.02

 
1.09

Ratio of total nonperforming assets to total loans, leases and other real estate owned
0.52

 
0.61

 
0.67

 
0.83

 
0.91

Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio
12.67

 
12.88

 
12.42

 
12.65

 
13.61

Common equity Tier 1 ratio
12.67

 
12.88

 
12.42

 
12.51

 
N/A

Total risk-based capital ratio
13.99

 
14.21

 
13.85

 
14.03

 
14.69

Leverage capital ratio
9.77

 
9.47

 
9.05

 
8.96

 
8.91

Dividend payout ratio
4.32

 
4.64

 
6.39

 
6.85

 
8.85

Average loans and leases to average deposits
81.17

 
78.04

 
75.95

 
73.73

 
72.76

(1) The taxable-equivalent adjustment was $3,380, $4,519, $5,093, $6,326 and $3,988 for the years 2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, and 2014, respectively.
(2) Average loan and lease balances include PCI loans, non-PCI loans and leases, loans held for sale and nonaccrual loans and leases.

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Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Management’s discussion and analysis (MD&A) of earnings and related financial data are presented to assist in understanding the financial condition and results of operations of First Citizens BancShares, Inc. (BancShares) and its banking subsidiary, First-Citizens Bank & Trust Company (FCB). This discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and related notes presented within this report. Intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated. See Note A in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Part II, Item 8, of this report for more detail. Although certain amounts for prior years have been reclassified to conform to statement presentations for 2018, the reclassifications had no effect on shareholders’ equity or net income as previously reported. Unless otherwise noted, the terms "we," "us," “our,” and "BancShares" refer to the consolidated financial position and consolidated results of operations for BancShares.
FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
Statements in this report and exhibits relating to plans, strategies, economic performance and trends, projections of results of specific activities or investments, expectations or beliefs about future events or results and other statements that are not descriptions of historical facts may be forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

Forward-looking information is inherently subject to risks and uncertainties, and actual results could differ materially from those currently anticipated due to a number of factors that include, but are not limited to, factors discussed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K and in other documents filed by us from time to time with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Forward-looking statements may be identified by terms such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “could,” “expects,” “plans,” “intends,” “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “forecasts,” “projects,” “potential” or “continue,” or similar terms or the negative of these terms, or other statements concerning opinions or judgments of BancShares’ management about future events.

Factors that could influence the accuracy of those forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, the financial success or changing strategies of our customers, customer acceptance of our services, products and fee structure, the competitive nature of the financial services industry, our ability to compete effectively against other financial institutions in our banking markets, actions of government regulators, the level of market interest rates and our ability to manage our interest rate risk, changes in general economic conditions that affect our loan and lease portfolio, the abilities of our borrowers to repay their loans and leases, the values of real estate and other collateral, the impact of the FDIC-assisted transactions and/or the risks discussed in Item 1A. Risk Factors above and other developments or changes in our business that we do not expect.

Actual results may differ materially from those expressed in or implied by any forward-looking statements. Except to the extent required by applicable law or regulation, BancShares undertakes no obligation to revise or update publicly any forward-looking statements for any reason.

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING ESTIMATES
 
The accounting and reporting policies of BancShares are in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (GAAP) and are described in Note A of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires us to exercise judgment in determining many of the estimates and assumptions utilized to arrive at the carrying value of assets and liabilities and amounts reported for revenues and expenses. Our financial position and results of operations could be materially affected by changes to these estimates and assumptions.

The following is a summary of some of the more significant areas in which we apply critical assumptions and estimates:

Allowance for loan and lease losses. The allowance for loan and lease losses (ALLL) represents the best estimate of inherent credit losses within the loan and lease portfolio as of the balance sheet date. Estimating credit losses requires judgment in determining the amount and timing of expected cash flows, the value of the underlying collateral and loan specific attributes that impact the borrower's ability to repay contractual obligations. Other factors such as economic conditions, historical loan losses, migration of loans through delinquency stages and changes in the size, composition and risks within the loan portfolio are also considered. Loan balances considered uncollectible are charged off against the ALLL. If it is probable that a borrower will be unable to pay all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement and a loss is probable, a specific valuation allowance is determined. Recoveries of amounts previously charged-off are generally credited to the ALLL.

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Purchased credit impaired (PCI) loans are initially recorded at fair value and are generally pooled based upon common risk characteristics. At each balance sheet date, we evaluate whether the estimated cash flows have decreased and if so, recognizes an additional allowance. Subsequent improvements in expected cash flows results first in the recovery of any allowance established and then in the recognition of additional interest income over the remaining lives of the loans.
The ALLL for Non-purchased credit impaired (Non-PCI) loans is assessed at each balance sheet date and adjustments are recorded in provision for loan and lease losses. General reserves for collective impairment are based on historical loss rates for each loan class by credit quality indicator and may be adjusted through a qualitative assessment to reflect current economic conditions and portfolio trends. Non-PCI loans classified as impaired as of the balance sheet date are assessed for individual impairment based on the loan's characteristics and either a specific valuation allowance is established or partial charge-off is recorded.
Management considers the established ALLL adequate to absorb incurred losses for loans and leases outstanding at December 31, 2018. Changes in circumstances could result in changes in estimates and assumptions, which may result in adjustments to the allowance for loan and lease losses or, in the case of acquired loans, changes in interest income recognized in future periods. See Note E in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for additional disclosures.
Financial Measurements. Fair value is the price that could be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants as of the measurement date. Certain assets and liabilities are measured at fair value on a recurring basis. Examples of recurring uses of fair value include marketable equity securities, available for sale securities and loans held for sale. There were no liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis at December 31, 2018. We also measure certain assets at fair value on a non-recurring basis. Examples include impaired loans, other real estate owned (OREO), goodwill and intangible assets. Assets acquired and liabilities assumed in a business combination are recognized at fair value as of the acquisition date.

Fair value is determined using different inputs and assumptions based upon the instrument that is being valued. Where observable market prices from transactions for identical assets or liabilities are not available, we identify market prices for similar assets or liabilities. If observable market prices are unavailable or impracticable to obtain for any such similar assets or liabilities, we look to other modeling techniques, which often incorporate unobservable inputs that are inherently subjective and require significant judgment. Fair value estimates requiring significant judgments are determined using various inputs developed by management with the appropriate skills, understanding and knowledge of the underlying asset or liability to ensure the development of fair value estimates is reasonable. Typical pricing sources used in estimating fair values include, but are not limited to, active markets with high trading volume, third-party pricing services, external appraisals, valuation models and commercial and residential evaluation reports. In certain cases, our assessments with respect to assumptions that market participants would make may be inherently difficult to determine, and the use of different assumptions could result in material changes to these fair value measurements. See Note M in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for additional disclosures regarding fair value.

FDIC shared-loss payable. Certain shared-loss agreements include clawback provisions that require payments to the FDIC if actual losses and expenses do not exceed a calculated amount. Our estimate of the clawback payments based on current loss and expense projections are recorded as a payable to the FDIC. Projected cash flows are discounted to reflect the estimated timing of the payments to the FDIC. See Note H in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for additional disclosures.
 
Defined benefit pension plan assumptions. BancShares has a noncontributory qualified defined benefit pension plan that covers qualifying employees (BancShares plan), and certain legacy Bancorporation employees are covered by a noncontributory qualified defined benefit pension plan (Bancorporation plan). The calculation of the benefit obligations, the future value of plan assets, funded status and related pension expense under the pension plans require the use of actuarial valuation methods and assumptions. The valuations and assumptions used to determine the future value of plan assets and liabilities are subject to management judgment and may differ significantly depending upon the assumptions used. The discount rate used to estimate the present value of the benefits to be paid under the pension plans reflects the interest rate that could be obtained for a suitable investment used to fund the benefit obligations, which was 4.38 percent for both the BancShares and Bancorporation plans during 2018, compared to 3.76 percent during 2017. For the calculation of pension expense, the assumed discount rate was 3.76 percent for both the BancShares and Bancorporation plans during 2018, compared to 4.30 percent during 2017.
 
We also estimate a long-term rate of return on pension plan assets that is used to estimate the future value of plan assets. We consider such factors as the actual return earned on plan assets, historical returns on the various asset classes in the plans and projections of future returns on various asset classes. The calculation of pension expense was based on an assumed expected long-term return on plan assets of 7.50 percent for both of the BancShares and Bancorporation plans during 2018 and 2017.
 

21




The assumed rate of future compensation increases is reviewed annually based on actual experience and future salary expectations. We used an assumed rate of compensation increase of 4.00 percent for both the BancShares and Bancorporation plans to calculate pension expense during 2018 and 2017. Assuming other variables remain unchanged, an increase in future compensation typically results in higher pension expense for periods subsequent to the increase. See Note N in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for additional disclosures.

Income taxes. Management estimates income tax expense using the asset and liability method. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for future tax consequences attributable to differences between the amount of assets and liabilities reported in the consolidated financial statements and their respective tax bases. In estimating the liabilities and corresponding expense related to income taxes, management assesses the relative merits and risks of various tax positions considering statutory, judicial and regulatory guidance. Because of the complexity of tax laws and regulations, interpretation is difficult and subject to differing judgments. Accrued income taxes payable represents an estimate of the net amounts due to or from taxing jurisdictions based upon various estimates, interpretations and judgments.
 
We evaluate our effective tax rate on a quarterly basis based upon the current estimate of net income, the favorable impact of various credits, statutory tax rates expected for the year and the amount of tax liability in each jurisdiction in which we operate. Annually, we file tax returns with each jurisdiction where we have tax nexus and settle our return liabilities.
 
Changes in estimated income tax liabilities occur periodically due to changes in actual or estimated future tax rates and projections of taxable income, interpretations of tax laws, the complexities of multi-state income tax reporting, the status of examinations conducted by various taxing authorities and the impact of newly enacted legislation or guidance as well as income tax accounting pronouncements. See Note P in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for additional disclosures.

CURRENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS
Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements
Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2018-02, Income Statement - Reporting Comprehensive Income (Topic 220): Reclassification of Certain Tax Effects from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income
This ASU requires a reclassification from accumulated other comprehensive income (AOCI) to retained earnings for stranded tax effects resulting from the newly enacted federal corporate income tax rate in the Tax Act, which was enacted on December 22, 2017. The Tax Act included a reduction to the corporate income tax rate from 35 percent to 21 percent effective January 1, 2018. The amount of the reclassification is the difference between the historical corporate income tax rate and the newly enacted 21 percent corporate income tax rate.
The amendments in this ASU are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted. We adopted the guidance effective in the first quarter of 2018. The change in accounting principle was accounted for as a cumulative-effect adjustment to the balance sheet resulting in a $31.3 million increase to retained earnings and a corresponding decrease to AOCI on January 1, 2018.
FASB ASU 2017-07, Compensation - Retirement Benefits (Topic 715): Improving the Presentation of Net Periodic Pension Cost and Net Periodic Postretirement Benefit Cost
This ASU requires employers to present the service cost component of the net periodic benefit cost in the same income statement line item as other employee compensation costs arising from services rendered during the period. Employers will present the other components separately from the line item that includes the service cost. In addition, only the service cost component of net benefit cost is eligible for capitalization.
The amendments in this ASU are effective for public business entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. We adopted the guidance effective in the first quarter of 2018. The adoption did not have a material impact on our consolidated financial position or consolidated results of operations.

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FASB ASU 2016-01, Financial Instruments-Overall (Subtopic 825-10): Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities
This ASU addresses certain aspects of recognition, measurement, presentation and disclosure of certain financial instruments. The amendments in this ASU (i) require most equity investments to be measured at fair value with changes in fair value recognized in net income; (ii) simplify the impairment assessment of equity investments without a readily determinable fair value; (iii) eliminate the requirement to disclose the method(s) and significant assumptions used to estimate the fair value for financial instruments measured at amortized cost on the balance sheet; (iv) require public business entities to use exit price notion, rather than entry prices, when measuring fair value of financial instruments for disclosure purposes; (v) require separate presentation of financial assets and financial liabilities by measurement category and form of financial assets on the balance sheet or the accompanying notes to the financial statements; (vi) require separate presentation in other comprehensive income of the portion of the total change in the fair value of a liability resulting from a change in the instrument-specific credit risk when the organization has elected to measure the liability at fair value in accordance with the fair value option for financial instruments; and (vii) state that a valuation allowance on deferred tax assets related to available-for-sale securities should be evaluated in combination with other deferred tax assets.
The amendments in this ASU are effective for public business entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. We adopted the guidance effective in the first quarter of 2018. The change in accounting principle was accounted for as a cumulative-effect adjustment to the balance sheet resulting in an $18.7 million increase to retained earnings and a decrease to AOCI on January 1, 2018. With the adoption of this ASU, equity securities can no longer be classified as available for sale; as such, marketable equity securities are disclosed as a separate line item on the balance sheet with changes in the fair value of equity securities reflected in net income.
For equity investments without a readily determinable fair value, BancShares has elected to measure the equity investments using the measurement alternative that requires BancShares to make a qualitative assessment of whether the investment is impaired at each reporting period. Under the measurement alternative, these investments will be measured at cost, less any impairment, plus or minus changes resulting from observable price changes in orderly transactions for an identical or similar investment of the same issuer. If a qualitative assessment indicates that the investment is impaired, BancShares will estimate the investment's fair value in accordance with the Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) 820 and, if the fair value is less than the investment's carrying value, recognize an impairment loss in net income equal to the difference between carrying value and fair value. Equity investments without a readily determinable fair value are recorded within other assets in the consolidated balance sheets.
FASB ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606)
In May 2014, the FASB issued a standard on the recognition of revenue from contracts with customers with the core principle being for a company to recognize revenue to depict the transfer of goods or services to customers in amounts that reflect the consideration to which the company expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. The new standard, which provides a five step model to determine when and how revenue is recognized, also results in enhanced disclosures about revenue, provides guidance for transactions that were not previously addressed comprehensively and improves guidance for multiple-element arrangements.
Per ASU 2015-14, Deferral of the Effective Date, this guidance was deferred and is effective for fiscal periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim reporting periods within that reporting period. We adopted the guidance effective in the first quarter of 2018. Our revenue is comprised primarily of net interest income on financial assets and liabilities, which is explicitly excluded from the scope of the new guidance, and noninterest income. The contracts that are in the scope of the guidance are primarily related to cardholder and merchant services income, service charges on deposit accounts, wealth management services income, other service charges and fees, insurance commissions, ATM income, sales of other real estate and other. Based on our overall assessment of revenue streams and review of related contracts affected by the ASU, the adoption of this guidance did not change the method in which we currently recognize revenue.

23




We also completed an evaluation of the costs related to these revenue streams to determine whether such costs should be presented as expenses or contra-revenue (i.e., gross vs. net). Based on this evaluation, we determined that the classification of cardholder and merchant processing costs as well as expenses for cardholder reward programs should be netted against cardholder and merchant services income. We used the full retrospective method of adoption and restated the prior financial statements to net the cardholder and merchant processing costs against the related cardholder and merchant services income. These classification changes resulted in changes to both noninterest income and noninterest expense; however, there was no change to previously reported net income. Merchant processing expenses of $81.3 million and $69.2 million had been reclassified and reported as a component of merchant services income for the years ended December 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively. For the twelve months ended December 31, 2017, cardholder processing expenses of $27.8 million and cardholder reward programs expense of $10.0 million were reclassified and reported as a component of cardholder services income. For the twelve months ended December 31, 2016, cardholder processing expenses of $20.8 million and cardholder reward programs expense of $10.6 million were reclassified and reported as a component of cardholder services income.
Revenue Recognition
The standard requires disclosure of qualitative and quantitative information surrounding the amount, nature, timing and uncertainty of revenues and cash flows arising from contracts with customers. Descriptions of our noninterest revenue-generating activities that are within the scope of the new revenue ASU are broadly segregated as follows:
Cardholder and Merchant Services - These represent interchange fees from customer debit and credit card transactions that are earned at the time a cardholder engages in a transaction with a merchant as well as fees charged to merchants for providing them the ability to accept and process the debit and credit card transaction. Revenue is recognized when the performance obligation has been satisfied, which is upon completion of the card transaction. Additionally, ASU 2014-09 requires costs associated with cardholder and merchant services transactions to be netted against the fee income from such transactions when an entity is acting as an agent in providing services to a customer.
Service Charges on Deposit Accounts - These deposit account-related fees represent monthly account maintenance and transaction-based service fees such as overdraft fees, stop payment fees and charges for issuing cashier's checks and money orders. For account maintenance services, revenue is recognized at the end of the statement period when our performance obligation has been satisfied. All other revenues from transaction-based services are recognized at a point in time when the performance obligation has been completed.
Wealth Management Services - These primarily represent annuity fees, sales commissions, management fees, insurance sales, and trust and asset management fees. The performance obligation for wealth management services is the provision of services to place annuity products issued by the counterparty to investors, and the provision of services to manage the client’s assets, including brokerage custodial and other management services. Revenue from wealth management services is recognized over the period in which services are performed, and is based on a percentage of the value of the assets under management/administration. This revenue is either fixed or variable based on account type, or transaction-based.
Other Service Charges and Fees - These include, but are not limited to, check cashing fees, international banking fees, internet banking fees, wire transfer fees and safe deposit fees. The performance obligation is fulfilled, and revenue is recognized, at the point in time the requested service is provided to the customer.
Insurance Commissions - These represent commissions earned on the issuance of insurance products and services. The performance obligation is generally satisfied upon the issuance of the insurance policy and revenue is recognized when the commission payment is remitted by the insurance carrier or policy holder depending on whether the billing is performed by Bancshares or the carrier.
ATM Income - These represent fees imposed on customers and non-customers for engaging in an ATM transaction. Revenue is recognized at the time of the transaction as the performance obligation of rendering the ATM service has been met.
Sales of Other Real Estate (ORE) - ORE property consists of foreclosed real estate used as collateral for loans, closed branches, land acquired and no longer intended for future use by First Citizens Bank (FCB), and other real estate purchased for resale as ORE. Revenue is generally recognized on the date of sale where the performance obligation of providing access and transferring control of the specified ORE property to the buyer in good faith and good title is satisfied. This is recorded as a component of other noninterest income.
Other - This consists of several forms of recurring revenue such as external rental income, parking income, Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) dividends and income earned on changes in the cash surrender value of bank-owned life insurance, all of which are outside the scope of ASU 2014-09. The remaining miscellaneous income is the result of immaterial transactions where revenue is recognized when, or as, the performance obligation is satisfied.

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Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements
FASB ASU 2018-15 - Intangibles - Goodwill and Other - Internal Use Software (Subtopic 350-40): Customer’s Accounting for Implementation Costs Incurred in a Cloud Computing Arrangement That is a Service Contract
This ASU aligns the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred in a hosting arrangement that is a service contract with the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred to develop or obtain internal-use software (and hosting arrangements that include internal-use software license). This ASU requires entities to use the guidance in FASB ASC 350-40, Intangibles - Goodwill and Other - Internal Use Software, to determine whether to capitalize or expense implementation costs related to the service contract. This ASU also requires entities to (i) expense capitalized implementation costs of a hosting arrangement that is a service contract over the term of the hosting arrangement; (ii) present the expense related to the capitalized implementation costs in the same line item on the income statement as fees associated with the hosting element of the arrangement; (iii) classify payments for capitalized implementation costs in the statement of cash flows in the same manner as payments made for fees associated with the hosting element; and (iv) present the capitalized implementation costs in the same balance sheet line item that a prepayment for the fees associated with the hosting arrangement would be presented.
The amendments in this ASU are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019 and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted. BancShares will adopt the amendments in this ASU during the first quarter of 2020. BancShares is currently evaluating the impact this new standard will have on its consolidated financial statements and the magnitude of the impact has not yet been determined.
FASB ASU 2018-14 - Compensation - Retirement Benefits - Defined Benefit Plans - General (Subtopic 715-20): Disclosure Framework - Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Defined Benefit Plans
This ASU modifies the disclosure requirements for employers that sponsor defined benefit pension or other postretirement plans by eliminating the requirement to disclose the amounts in accumulated other comprehensive income expected to be recognized as components of net periodic benefit cost over the next fiscal year and adding a requirement to disclose an explanation of the reasons for significant gains and losses related to changes in the benefit obligation for the period.
The amendments in this ASU are effective for public entities for fiscal years ending after December 15, 2020. Early adoption is permitted for all entities. BancShares will adopt all applicable amendments and update the disclosures as appropriate during the first quarter of 2021.
FASB ASU 2018-13 - Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Disclosure Framework - Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement
This ASU modifies the disclosure requirements on fair value measurements by eliminating the requirements to disclose (i) the amount of and reasons for transfers between Level 1 and Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy; (ii) the policy for timing of transfers between levels; and (iii) the valuation processes for Level 3 fair value measurements. This ASU also added specific disclosure requirements for fair value measurements for public entities including the requirement to disclose the changes in unrealized gains and losses for the period included in other comprehensive income for recurring Level 3 fair value measurements and the range and weighted average of significant unobservable inputs used to develop Level 3 fair value measurements.
The amendments in this ASU are effective for all entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and all interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted upon issuance of the ASU. Entities are permitted to early adopt amendments that remove or modify disclosures and delay the adoption of the additional disclosures until their effective date. BancShares will adopt all applicable amendments and update the disclosures as appropriate during the first quarter of 2020.
FASB ASU 2017-04, Intangibles - Goodwill and Other (Topic 350): Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment
This ASU eliminates Step 2 from the goodwill impairment test. Under Step 2, an entity had to perform procedures to determine the fair value at the impairment testing date of its assets and liabilities (including unrecognized assets and liabilities) following the procedure that would be required in determining the fair value of assets acquired and liabilities assumed in a business combination. Instead, under the amendments in this ASU, an entity should perform its annual, or interim, goodwill impairment test by comparing the fair value of a reporting unit with its carrying amount. An entity should recognize an impairment charge for the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds the reporting unit’s fair value; however, the loss recognized should not exceed the total amount of goodwill allocated to that reporting unit. Additionally, an entity should consider income tax effects from any tax deductible goodwill on the carrying amount of the reporting unit when measuring the goodwill impairment loss, if applicable. An entity still has the option to perform the qualitative assessment for a reporting unit to determine if the quantitative impairment test is necessary. This ASU eliminates the requirements for any reporting unit with a zero or negative carrying amount to perform a qualitative test.

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This ASU will be effective for BancShares' annual or interim goodwill impairment tests for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted for interim or annual goodwill impairment tests performed on testing dates after January 1, 2017. We expect to adopt the guidance for our annual impairment test in fiscal year 2020. BancShares does not anticipate any impact to our consolidated financial position or consolidated results of operations as a result of the adoption.
FASB ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments-Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments
This ASU eliminates the delayed recognition of the full amount of credit losses until the loss was probable of occurring and instead will reflect an entity's current estimate of all expected credit losses. The amendments in this ASU broaden the information that an entity must consider in developing its expected credit loss estimate for assets measured either collectively or individually. The ASU does not specify a method for measuring expected credit losses and allows an entity to apply methods that reasonably reflect its expectations of the credit loss estimate based on the entity's size, complexity and risk profile. In addition, the disclosures of credit quality indicators in relation to the amortized cost of financing receivables, a current disclosure requirement, are further disaggregated by year of origination.
The amendments in this ASU are effective for public business entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018. BancShares will adopt the guidance by the first quarter of 2020 with a cumulative-effect adjustment to retained earnings as of the beginning of the year of adoption. For BancShares, the standard will apply to loans, unfunded loan commitments and debt securities. A cross-functional team co-led by Corporate Finance and Risk Management is in place to implement the new standard. The team continues to work on critical activities such as building models, documenting accounting policies, reviewing data quality and implementing a reporting and disclosure solution. BancShares continues to evaluate the impact the new standard will have on its consolidated financial statements but the magnitude of this impact has not been determined. The final impact will be dependent, among other items, on loan portfolio composition and credit quality at the adoption date, as well as economic conditions, financial models used and forecasts at that time.
FASB ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842)
This ASU increases transparency and comparability among organizations by recognizing lease assets and lease liabilities on the balance sheet and disclosing key information about leasing arrangements. The key difference between existing standards and this ASU is the requirement for lessees to recognize all lease contracts on their balance sheet. This ASU requires lessees to classify leases as either operating or finance leases, which are substantially similar to the current operating and capital leases classifications. The distinction between these two classifications under the new standard does not relate to balance sheet treatment, but relates to treatment in the statements of income and cash flows. Lessor guidance remains largely unchanged with the exception of how a lessor determines the appropriate lease classification for each lease to better align the lessor guidance with revised lessee classification guidance.
The amendments in this ASU are effective for public business entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years. We will adopt during the first quarter of 2019. We expect an increase to the Consolidated Balance Sheets for right-of-use assets and associated lease liabilities, as well as resulting depreciation expense of the right-of-use assets and interest expense of the lease liabilities in the Consolidated Statements of Income, for arrangements previously accounted for as operating leases. Additionally, adding these assets to our balance sheet will impact our total risk-weighted assets used to determine our regulatory capital levels. Our impact analysis estimates an increase to the Consolidated Balance Sheets ranging between $70.0 million and $80.0 million, as the initial gross up of both assets and liabilities. Capital is expected to be adversely impacted by an estimated three to four basis points. These are preliminary estimates subject to change and will continue to be refined closer to adoption.
EXECUTIVE OVERVIEW

BancShares conducts its banking operations through its wholly owned subsidiary FCB, a state-chartered bank organized under the laws of the state of North Carolina.

BancShares’ earnings and cash flows are primarily derived from our commercial and retail banking activities. We gather deposits from retail and commercial customers and also secure funding through various non-deposit sources. We invest the liquidity generated from these funding sources in interest-earning assets, including loans, investment securities and overnight investments. We also invest in bank premises, hardware, software, furniture and equipment used to conduct our commercial and retail banking business. We provide treasury services products, cardholder and merchant services, wealth management services and various other products and services typically offered by commercial banks. The fees generated from these products and services are a primary source of noninterest income and an essential component of our total revenue.
 

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Our strong financial position enables us to pursue growth through strategic acquisitions that enhance organizational value by providing us the opportunity to grow capital and increase earnings. These transactions allow us to strengthen our presence in existing markets as well as expand our footprint into new markets.
Interest rates have presented significant challenges to commercial banks’ efforts to generate earnings and shareholder value. Our strategy continues to focus on maintaining an interest rate risk profile that will benefit net interest income in a rising rate environment.  Management drives to this goal by focusing on core customer deposits and loans in the targeted interest rate risk profile. Additionally, our initiatives focus on growth of noninterest income sources, control of noninterest expenses, optimization of our branch network and further enhancements to our technology and delivery channels.

In lending, we continue to focus our activities within our core competencies of retail, small business, medical, commercial and commercial real estate lending to build a diversified portfolio. Our low to moderate risk appetite continues to govern all lending activities.

Our initiatives also pursue additional noninterest fee income through enhanced credit card offerings and expanded wealth management and merchant services. We have redesigned our credit card programs to offer more competitive products, intended to both increase the number of accounts and frequency of card usage. Enhancements include more comprehensive reward programs and improved card benefits. In wealth management, we have broadened our products and services to better align with the specialized needs and desires of those customers.

Our goals are to increase efficiencies and control costs while effectively executing an operating model that best serves our customers’ needs. We seek the appropriate footprint and staffing levels to take efficient advantage of the revenue opportunities in each of our markets. Management is pursuing opportunities to improve our operational efficiency and increase profitability through expense reductions, while continuing enterprise sustainability projects to stabilize the operating environment. Such initiatives include the automation of certain manual processes, elimination of duplicated and outdated systems, enhancements to existing technology and implementation of new digital technologies, reduction of discretionary spending and actively managing personnel expenses. We review vendor agreements and larger third party contracts for cost savings. We also seek to increase profitability through optimizing our branch network.

Recent Economic and Industry Developments
Various external factors influence the focus of our business efforts and the results of our operations can change significantly based on those external factors. Based on the latest real gross domestic product (GDP) information available, the Bureau of Economic Analysis’ revised estimate of third quarter 2018 GDP growth was 3.4 percent, down from 4.2 percent GDP growth in the second quarter 2018. The estimated real GDP decline in the third quarter primarily reflected a downturn in exports and decelerations in nonresidential fixed investments and in personal consumption expenditures. Imports increased in the third quarter after decreasing in the second. These movements were partly offset by an upturn in private inventory investments.
The U.S. unemployment rate dropped from 4.1 percent in December 2017 to 3.9 percent in December 2018. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, nonfarm payroll employment growth in 2018 was 2.7 million, compared to 2.2 million in 2017.
The Federal Reserve’s Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) indicated in the fourth quarter that the U.S. labor market continued to strengthen and economic activity has been rising at a strong rate. In view of realized and expected labor market conditions and inflation, the FOMC decided to raise the federal funds rate target range by another 25 basis points to 2.25 to 2.50 percent. In determining the timing and size of future adjustments to the target range for the federal funds rate, the FOMC will assess realized and expected economic conditions relative to its objectives of maximum employment and 2.0 percent inflation.
The U.S. Census Bureau and the Department of Housing and Urban Development's latest estimate for sales of new single-family homes in November 2018 was at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 657,000, down 7.7 percent from the November 2017 estimate of 712,000. Purchases of existing homes in 2018 are also down 10.3 percent from a year ago.
Despite the mixed economic data, the trends in the banking industry are very strong as shown in the latest national banking results from the third quarter of 2018. FDIC-insured institutions reported a 29.3 percent increase in net income compared to the third quarter of 2017 as a result of growth in net interest income, higher noninterest income and a lower effective tax rate due to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (Tax Act). Using the higher effective tax rate before the enactment of the Tax Act, estimated net income for the third quarter of 2018 would have increased 13.9 percent compared to the same period in 2017. Loan-loss provisions declined by 12.6 percent while noninterest expense rose by 4.0 percent from a year earlier. Banking industry average net interest margin was 3.45 percent in the third quarter of 2018, up from 3.30 percent in the same quarter a year ago as average asset yields outpaced average funding costs. Total loans increased by 4.0 percent over the past twelve months primarily due to growth in commercial and industrial loans as well as consumer loans, which includes credit card balances.

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FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE SUMMARY
For the year ended December 31, 2018, net income was $400.3 million, or $33.53 per share, compared to $323.8 million, or $26.96 per share, during 2017. The return on average assets was 1.15 percent during 2018, compared to 0.94 percent during 2017. The return on average shareholders' equity was 11.69 percent and 10.10 percent for the respective periods. The $76.6 million, or 23.6 percent increase in net income was primarily the result of the following:
Income Statement Highlights
Net interest income for the year ended 2018 increased $149.0 million, or by 14.1 percent, compared to the year ended 2017. The taxable-equivalent net interest margin was 3.69 percent for the year ended 2018, an increase of 39 basis points from the year ended 2017. These increases were driven by loan growth, increases in both loan and investment yields, and lower debt balances.
BancShares recorded net provision expense for loan and lease losses of $28.5 million in 2018, compared to $25.7 million in 2017. The net provision expense on non-PCI loans was $29.2 million for 2018, compared to $29.1 million net provision expense in 2017. Provision expense remained relatively stable due to strong credit quality, offset by loan growth. The net charge-off to average Non-PCI loans was 0.11% for the year, up 1 basis point from 2017.
Noninterest income for the year ended 2018 totaled $400.1 million, a decrease of $121.8 million, or 23.34%, from the prior year. The decrease was primarily due to acquisition gains of $134.7 million recognized in 2017 that did not occur in 2018. Noninterest income generated from our fee-income producing lines of business increased by $19.8 million, led by wealth services and bankcard lines which increased $11.2 million and $7.9 million, respectively.
Noninterest expense was $1.08 billion for the year ended December 31, 2018, compared to $1.01 billion for the same period in 2017. The increase was primarily attributable to personnel, net occupancy and furniture and equipment expense.
Income tax expense was $103.3 million and $219.9 million for the years ended 2018 and 2017, respectively. The decrease in 2018 was primarily due to the decrease in the federal corporate tax rate from 35 percent to 21 percent and a $15.7 million tax benefit recorded in 2018, both as a result of the Tax Act. Income tax expense for 2017 also included additional provisional tax expense of $25.8 million primarily to re-measure the deferred tax assets at the lower federal corporate tax rate.
Balance Sheet Highlights
Loan growth was strong during 2018, as loans increased by $1.93 billion, or by 8.2 percent to $25.52 billion, primarily driven by originated portfolio growth and net loans acquired from HomeBancorp, Capital Commerce and Palmetto Heritage. Excluding current year acquired loans of $798.7 million, total loans increased by $1.13 billion, or 4.8 percent.
The allowance for loan and lease losses as a percentage of total loans was 0.88 percent at December 31, 2018, compared to 0.94 percent at December 31, 2017. At December 31, 2018, BancShares’ nonperforming assets, including nonaccrual loans and OREO, decreased $10.4 million to $133.9 million from $144.3 million at December 31, 2017.
Deposit growth continued in 2018, up $1.41 billion, or by 4.8 percent to $30.67 billion, primarily due to organic growth of $675.7 million and the addition of deposit balances from the HomeBancorp, Capital Commerce and Palmetto Heritage acquisitions of $730.5 million.
Capital Highlights
For the full year 2018, we returned $182.6 million of capital to shareholders through repurchases of 382,000 shares of class A common stock for $165.3 million and cash dividends of $17.2 million.
Common shareholders' equity increased to $3.49 billion on December 31, 2018, compared to$3.33 billion on December 31, 2017.
BancShares remained well-capitalized at December 31, 2018, under Basel III capital requirements with a total risk-based capital ratio of 13.99 percent, Tier 1 risk based capital ratio and common Tier 1 ratio of 12.67 percent and leverage capital ratio of 9.77 percent.

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BUSINESS COMBINATIONS

FCB has evaluated the financial statement significance for all business combinations that were completed during 2018 and 2017. FCB has concluded that the completed business combinations noted below are not material to Bancshares' financial statements, individually or in aggregate, and therefore, pro forma financial data has not been not included.

First South Bancorp, Inc.

On January 10, 2019, FCB and First South Bancorp, Inc. (First South Bancorp) entered into a definitive merger agreement for the acquisition by FCB of Spartanburg, South Carolina-based First South Bancorp and its bank subsidiary, First South Bank. Under the terms of the agreement, cash consideration of $1.15 per share will be paid to the shareholders of First South Bancorp for each share of common stock, totaling approximately $37.5 million. The total consideration assumes the conversion of all Series A preferred shares into common stock. The transaction is anticipated to close during the second quarter of 2019, subject to the receipt of regulatory approvals and the approval of First South Bancorp's shareholders, and will be accounted for under the acquisition method of accounting. The merger will allow FCB to expand its presence and enhance banking efforts in South Carolina. As of December 31, 2018, First South Bancorp reported $238.5 million in consolidated assets, $180.9 million in loans and $204.1 million in deposits.

Biscayne Bancshares, Inc.

On November 15, 2018, FCB and Biscayne Bancshares, Inc. (Biscayne Bancshares) entered into a definitive merger agreement for the acquisition by FCB of Coconut Grove, Florida-based Biscayne Bancshares and its bank subsidiary, Biscayne Bank. Under the terms of the agreement, cash consideration of $25.05 per share will be paid to the shareholders of Biscayne Bancshares for each share of common stock, totaling approximately $118.7 million. The transaction is expected to close during the second quarter of 2019, subject to the receipt of regulatory approvals, and will be accounted for under the acquisition method of accounting. The merger will allow FCB to expand its presence and enhance banking efforts in South Florida. As of December 31, 2018, Biscayne Bancshares reported $1.01 billion in consolidated assets, $850.3 million in loans and $746.4 million in deposits.

Palmetto Heritage Bancshares, Inc.

On November 1, 2018, FCB completed the merger of Pawleys Island, South Carolina-based Palmetto Heritage Bancshares, Inc. (Palmetto Heritage) and its subsidiary, Palmetto Heritage Bank & Trust, into FCB. Under the terms of the agreement, cash consideration of $135.00 per share was paid to the shareholders of Palmetto Heritage for each share of Palmetto Heritage's common stock, with total consideration paid of $30.4 million. The merger allowed FCB to expand its presence and enhance banking efforts in the South Carolina coastal markets.

The Palmetto Heritage transaction was accounted for under the acquisition method of accounting and, accordingly, assets acquired and liabilities assumed were recorded at their estimated fair values on the acquisition date. Fair values are preliminary and subject to refinement for up to one year after the closing date of the acquisition as additional information regarding closing date fair values becomes available. As of December 31, 2018, there have been no refinements to the fair value of these assets acquired and liabilities assumed.

The fair value of the assets acquired was $162.2 million, including $131.3 million in Non-Purchased Credit Impaired (Non-PCI) loans, $3.9 million in Purchased Credit Impaired (PCI) Loans and $1.7 million in a core deposit intangible. Liabilities assumed were $149.3 million, of which $124.9 million were deposits. As a result of the transaction, FCB recorded $17.5 million of goodwill. The amount of goodwill represents the excess purchase price over the estimated fair value of the net assets acquired. The premium paid reflects the increased market share and related synergies that are expected to result from the acquisition. None of the goodwill is deductible for income tax purposes as the merger is accounted for as a qualified stock purchase.

Based on such credit factors as past due status, nonaccrual status, life-to-date charge-offs and other quantitative and qualitative considerations, the acquired loans were separated into loans with evidence of credit deterioration, which are accounted for under ASC 310-30 (PCI loans), and loans that do not meet this criteria, which are accounted for under ASC 310-20 (non-PCI loans).


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Table 2 provides the purchase price as of the acquisition date and the identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed at their estimated fair values.

Table 2
PALMETTO HERITAGE PURCHASE PRICE, NET ASSETS ACQUIRED AND NET LIABILITIES ASSUMED
(Dollars in thousands)
 
As recorded by FCB
Purchase Price
 
 
 
$
30,426

Assets
 
 
 
 
Cash and due from banks
 
$
6,418

 
 
Investment securities
 
4,549

 
 
Loans
 
135,146

 
 
Premises and equipment
 
5,369

 
 
Other real estate owned
 
2,319

 
 
Income earned not collected
 
531

 
 
Intangible assets
 
1,706

 
 
Other assets
 
6,210

 
 
Fair value of assets acquired
 
162,248

 
 
Liabilities
 
 
 
 
Deposits
 
124,892

 
 
Accrued interest payable
 
177

 
 
Borrowings
 
24,000

 
 
Other liabilities
 
203

 
 
Fair value of liabilities assumed
 
$
149,272

 
 
Fair value of net assets assumed
 
 
 
12,976

Goodwill recorded for Palmetto Heritage
 
 
 
$
17,450


Merger-related expenses of $546 thousand from the Palmetto Heritage transaction were recorded in the Consolidated Statements of Income for the year ended December 31, 2018. Loan-related interest income generated from Palmetto Heritage was approximately $1.2 million since the acquisition date.

Capital Commerce Bancorp, Inc.

On October 2, 2018, FCB completed the merger of Milwaukee, Wisconsin-based Capital Commerce Bancorp, Inc. (Capital Commerce) and its subsidiary, Securant Bank & Trust, into FCB. Under the terms of the merger agreement, cash consideration of $4.75 per share was paid to the shareholders of Capital Commerce for each share of Capital Commerce's common stock, with total consideration paid of $28.1 million. The merger allowed FCB to expand its presence and enhance banking efforts in the Milwaukee market.

The Capital Commerce transaction was accounted for under the acquisition method of accounting and, accordingly, assets acquired and liabilities assumed were recorded at their estimated fair values on the acquisition date. Fair values are preliminary and subject to refinement for up to one year after the closing date of the acquisition as additional information regarding closing date fair values becomes available. As of December 31, 2018, there have been no refinements to the fair value of these assets acquired and liabilities assumed.

The fair value of the assets acquired was $221.9 million, including $173.4 million in non-PCI loans, $10.8 million in PCI loans and $2.7 million in a core deposit intangible. Liabilities assumed were $204.5 million, of which $172.4 million were deposits. As a result of the transaction, FCB recorded $10.7 million of goodwill. The amount of goodwill represents the excess purchase price over the estimated fair value of the net assets acquired. The premium paid reflects the increased market share and related synergies that are expected to result from the acquisition. None of the goodwill is deductible for income tax purposes as the merger is accounted for as a qualified stock purchase.


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Based on such credit factors as past due status, nonaccrual status, life-to-date charge-offs and other quantitative and qualitative considerations, the acquired loans were separated into loans with evidence of credit deterioration, which are accounted for under ASC 310-30 (PCI loans), and loans that do not meet this criteria, which are accounted for under ASC 310-20 (non-PCI loans).

Table 3 provides the purchase price as of the acquisition date and the identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed at their estimated fair values.

Table 3
CAPITAL COMMERCE PURCHASE PRICE, NET ASSETS ACQUIRED AND NET LIABILITIES ASSUMED
(Dollars in thousands)
 
As recorded by FCB
Purchase Price
 
 
 
$
28,063

Assets
 
 
 
 
Cash and due from banks
 
$
3,244

 
 
Overnight investments
 
1,065

 
 
Investment securities
 
17,865

 
 
Loans
 
184,126

 
 
Premises and equipment
 
3,773

 
 
Income earned not collected
 
621

 
 
Intangible assets
 
2,680

 
 
Other assets
 
8,513

 
 
Fair value of assets acquired
 
221,887

 
 
Liabilities
 
 
 
 
Deposits
 
172,387

 
 
Accrued interest payable
 
263

 
 
Borrowings
 
30,624

 
 
Other liabilities
 
1,230

 
 
Fair value of liabilities assumed
 
$
204,504

 
 
Fair value of net assets assumed
 
 
 
17,383

Goodwill recorded for Capital Commerce
 
 
 
$
10,680


Merger-related expenses of $1.2 million from the Capital Commerce transaction were recorded in the Consolidated Statements of Income for the year ended December 31, 2018. Loan-related interest income generated from Capital Commerce was approximately $3.2 million since the acquisition date.

HomeBancorp, Inc.

On May 1, 2018, FCB completed the merger of Tampa, Florida-based HomeBancorp, Inc. (HomeBancorp) and its subsidiary, HomeBanc, into FCB. Under the terms of the merger agreement, cash consideration of $15.03 per share was paid to the shareholders of HomeBancorp for each share of HomeBancorp's common stock, with total consideration paid of $112.7 million. The merger allowed FCB to expand its footprint in Florida by entering into the Tampa and Orlando markets.

The HomeBancorp transaction was accounted for under the acquisition method of accounting and, accordingly, assets acquired and liabilities assumed were recorded at their estimated fair values on the acquisition date. Fair values are preliminary and subject to refinement for up to one year after the closing date of the acquisition as additional information regarding closing date fair values becomes available. As of December 31, 2018, there have been no refinements to the fair value of these assets acquired and liabilities assumed.

The fair value of the assets acquired was $842.7 million, including $550.6 million in non-PCI loans, $15.6 million in PCI loans and $9.9 million in a core deposit intangible. Liabilities assumed were $787.7 million, of which $619.6 million were deposits. As a result of the transaction, FCB recorded $57.6 million of goodwill. The amount of goodwill represents the excess purchase price over the estimated fair value of the net assets acquired. The premium paid reflects the increased market share and related synergies that are expected to result from the acquisition. None of the goodwill is deductible for income tax purposes as the merger is accounted for as a qualified stock purchase.

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Based on such credit factors as past due status, nonaccrual status, loan-to-value, credit scores and other quantitative and qualitative considerations, the acquired loans were separated into loans with evidence of credit deterioration, which are accounted for under ASC 310-30 (PCI loans), and loans that do not meet this criteria, which are accounted for under ASC 310-20 (non-PCI loans).

Table 4 provides the purchase price as of the acquisition date and the identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed at their estimated fair values.

Table 4
HOMEBANCORP PURCHASE PRICE, NET ASSETS ACQUIRED AND NET LIABILITIES ASSUMED
(Dollars in thousands)
 
As recorded by FCB
Purchase Price
 
 
 
$
112,657

Assets
 
 
 
 
Cash and due from banks
 
$
6,359

 
 
Overnight investments
 
10,393

 
 
Investment securities
 
200,918

 
 
Loans held for sale
 
791

 
 
Loans
 
566,173

 
 
Premises and equipment
 
6,542

 
 
Other real estate owned
 
2,135

 
 
Income earned not collected
 
2,717

 
 
Intangible assets
 
13,206

 
 
Other assets
 
33,459

 
 
Fair value of assets acquired
 
842,693

 
 
Liabilities
 
 
 
 
Deposits
 
619,589

 
 
Accrued interest payable
 
1,020

 
 
Borrowings
 
161,917

 
 
Other liabilities
 
5,126

 
 
Fair value of liabilities assumed
 
$
787,652

 
 
Fair value of net assets assumed
 
 
 
55,041

Goodwill recorded for HomeBancorp
 
 
 
$
57,616


Merger-related expenses of $2.3 million from the HomeBancorp transaction were recorded in the Consolidated Statements of Income for the year ended December 31, 2018. Loan-related interest income generated from HomeBancorp was approximately $17.4 million since the acquisition date.

Guaranty Bank
On May 5, 2017, FCB entered into an agreement with the FDIC, as Receiver, to purchase certain assets and assume certain liabilities of Guaranty Bank (Guaranty) of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The Guaranty transaction was accounted for under the acquisition method of accounting and, accordingly, assets acquired and liabilities assumed were recorded at their estimated fair values on the acquisition date. These fair values were subject to refinement for up to one year after the closing date of the acquisition. The measurement period ended on May 4, 2018, with no material changes to the original calculated fair values.

The fair value of the assets acquired was $875.1 million, including $574.6 million in non-PCI loans, $114.5 million in PCI loans and $9.9 million in a core deposit intangible. Liabilities assumed were $982.7 million, of which $982.3 million were deposits. The total gain on the transaction was $122.7 million which is included in noninterest income in the Consolidated Statements of Income.

Merger-related expenses of $2.3 million and $7.4 million were recorded in the Consolidated Statements of Income for the years ended December 31, 2018, and December 31, 2017, respectively. Loan-related interest income generated from Guaranty was approximately $17.3 million and $20.5 million for the years ended December 31, 2018, and December 31, 2017, respectively. While the acquisition gain of $122.7 million was significant for 2017, the ongoing contribution of this transaction to BancShares' financial statements is not considered material, and therefore pro forma financial data is not included.


32




Based on such credit factors as past due status, nonaccrual status, loan-to-value, credit scores, and other quantitative and qualitative considerations, the acquired loans were separated into loans with evidence of credit deterioration, which are accounted for under ASC 310-30 (PCI loans), and loans that do not meet this criteria, which are accounted for under ASC 310-20 (non-PCI loans).

Harvest Community Bank
On January 13, 2017, FCB entered into an agreement with the FDIC, as Receiver, to purchase certain assets and assume certain liabilities of Harvest Community Bank (HCB) of Pennsville, New Jersey. The HCB transaction was accounted for under the acquisition method of accounting and, accordingly, assets acquired and liabilities assumed were recorded at their estimated fair values on the acquisition date. These fair values were subject to refinement for up to one year after the closing date of the acquisition. The measurement period ended on January 12, 2018, with no material changes to the original calculated fair values.

The fair value of the assets acquired was $111.6 million, including $85.1 million in PCI loans and $850 thousand in a core deposit intangible. Liabilities assumed were $121.8 million, of which the majority were deposits. The total gain on the transaction was $12.0 million, which is included in noninterest income in the Consolidated Statements of Income.

There were no merger-related expenses recorded for the year ended December 31, 2018, and $1.2 million were recorded in the Consolidated Statements of Income for the year ended December 31, 2017. Loan-related interest income generated from HCB was approximately $3.7 million and $3.8 million for the years ended December 31, 2018, and December 31, 2017, respectively.

All loans resulting from the HCB transaction were recorded at the acquisition date with a discount attributable, at least in part, to credit quality deterioration, and are therefore accounted for as PCI under ASC 310-30.

FDIC-ASSISTED TRANSACTIONS

As at December 31, 2018 and 2017, BancShares completed fourteen FDIC-assisted transactions since 2009. The carrying value of FDIC-assisted acquired loans at December 31, 2018 was approximately $781.4 million. Nine of the fourteen FDIC-assisted transactions included shared-loss agreements that, for their terms, protect us from a substantial portion of the credit and asset quality risk we would otherwise incur.

At December 31, 2018, shared-loss protection remains for single family residential loans acquired in the amount of $55.6 million. Cumulative losses incurred through December 31, 2018, totaled $1.20 billion. Cumulative amounts reimbursed by the FDIC through December 31, 2018, totaled $674.8 million. The shared-loss agreements for two FDIC-assisted transactions include provisions related to payments that may be owed to the FDIC at the termination of the agreements (clawback liability). The clawback liability represents a payment by BancShares to the FDIC if actual cumulative losses on acquired covered assets are lower than the cumulative losses originally estimated by the FDIC at the time of acquisition. As of December 31, 2018, and December 31, 2017, the estimated clawback liability was $105.6 million and $101.3 million, respectively. The clawback liability dates are March 2020 and March 2021.

Table 5 provides changes in the FDIC shared-loss payable (clawback liability) for the years ended December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017.

Table 5
FDIC CLAWBACK LIABILITY
(Dollars in thousands)
2018
 
2017
Beginning balance
$
101,342

 
$
97,008

Accretion
4,023

 
3,851

Adjustments related to changes in assumptions
253

 
483

Ending balance
$
105,618

 
$
101,342



33




Table 6
AVERAGE BALANCE SHEETS
 
2018
 
2017
 
(Dollars in thousands, taxable equivalent)
Average
Balance
 
Interest
Income/
Expense
 
Yield/
Rate
 
Average
Balance
 
Interest
Income/
Expense
 
Yield/
Rate
 
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Loans and leases(1)
$
24,483,719

 
$
1,075,682

 
4.39

%
$
22,725,665

 
$
959,785

 
4.22

%
Investment securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
U.S. Treasury
1,514,598

 
28,277

 
1.87

 
1,628,088

 
18,015

 
1.11

 
Government agency
106,067

 
2,697

 
2.54

 
38,948

 
647

 
1.66

 
Mortgage-backed securities
5,241,865

 
113,698

 
2.17

 
5,206,897

 
98,341

 
1.89

 
Corporate bonds and other
104,796

 
5,727

 
5.46

 
60,950

 
3,877

 
6.36

 
State, county and municipal
210

 
11

 
5.29

 

 

 

 
Marketable equity securities(2)
107,393

 
1,048

 
0.98

 
101,681

 
698

 
0.69

 
Total investment securities
7,074,929

 
151,458

 
2.14

 
7,036,564

 
121,578

 
1.73

 
Overnight investments
1,289,013

 
21,997

 
1.71

 
2,451,417

 
26,846

 
1.10

 
Total interest-earning assets
32,847,661

 
$
1,249,137

 
3.80

%
32,213,646

 
$
1,108,209

 
3.44

%
Cash and due from banks
281,510

 
 
 
 
 
417,229

 
 
 
 
 
Premises and equipment
1,164,542

 
 
 
 
 
1,133,255

 
 
 
 
 
Allowance for loan and lease losses
(223,300
)
 
 
 
 
 
(226,465
)
 
 
 
 
 
Other real estate owned
47,053

 
 
 
 
 
56,478

 
 
 
 
 
Other assets
762,446

 
 
 
 
 
708,724

 
 
 
 
 
 Total assets
$
34,879,912

 
 
 
 
 
$
34,302,867

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest-bearing deposits:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Checking with interest
$
5,188,542

 
$
1,257

 
0.02

%
$
4,956,498

 
$
1,021

 
0.02

%
Savings
2,466,734

 
789

 
0.03

 
2,278,895

 
717

 
0.03

 
Money market accounts
7,993,943

 
10,664

 
0.13

 
8,136,731

 
6,969

 
0.09

 
Time deposits
2,427,949

 
9,773

 
0.40

 
2,634,434

 
7,489

 
0.28

 
Total interest-bearing deposits
18,077,168

 
22,483

 
0.12

 
18,006,558

 
16,196

 
0.09

 
Repurchase obligations
555,555

 
1,738

 
0.31

 
649,252

 
2,179

 
0.34

 
Other short-term borrowings
58,686

 
1,919

 
3.27

 
77,680

 
2,659

 
3.39

 
Long-term obligations
304,318

 
10,717

 
3.48

 
842,863

 
22,760

 
2.67

 
Total interest-bearing liabilities
18,995,727

 
36,857

 
0.19

 
19,576,353

 
43,794

 
0.22

 
Demand deposits
12,088,081

 
 
 
 
 
11,112,786

 
 
 
 
 
Other liabilities
373,163

 
 
 
 
 
407,478

 
 
 
 
 
Shareholders' equity
3,422,941

 
 
 
 
 
3,206,250

 
 
 
 
 
 Total liabilities and shareholders' equity
$
34,879,912

 
 
 
 
 
$
34,302,867

 
 
 
 
 
Interest rate spread
 
 
 
 
3.61

%
 
 
 
 
3.22

%
Net interest income and net yield
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
on interest-earning assets
 
 
$
1,212,280

 
3.69

%
 
 
$
1,064,415

 
3.30

%
(1) Loans and leases include PCI and non-PCI loans, nonaccrual loans and loans held for sale. Interest income on loans and leases includes accretion income and loan fees. Loan fees were $8.8 million, $9.7 million, $9.9 million, $14.8 million and $16.5 million for the years ended 2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, and 2014, respectively. Yields related to loans, leases and securities exempt from both federal and state income taxes, federal income taxes only, or state income taxes only are stated on a taxable-equivalent basis assuming statutory federal income tax rates of 21.0 percent for 2018, and 35.0 percent for all other years presented, as well as state income tax rates of 3.4 percent, 3.1 percent, 3.1 percent, 5.5 percent, and 6.2 percent for the years ended 2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, and 2014, respectively. The taxable-equivalent adjustment was $3,380, $4,519, $5,093, $6,326 and $3,988 for the years ended 2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, and 2014, respectively.
(2) Marketable equity securities income represents dividends.


34




Table 6
AVERAGE BALANCE SHEETS (continued)
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
Average
Balance
 
Interest
Income/
Expense
 
Yield/
Rate
 
Average
Balance
 
Interest
Income/
Expense
 
Yield/
Rate
 
Average
Balance
 
Interest
Income/
Expense
 
Yield/
Rate
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
$
20,897,395

 
$
881,266

 
4.22
%
$
19,528,153

 
$
880,381

 
4.51
%
$
14,820,126

 
$
703,716

 
4.75
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1,548,895

 
12,078

 
0.78
 
2,065,750

 
15,918

 
0.77
 
1,690,186

 
12,139

 
0.72
 
332,107

 
2,941

 
0.89
 
801,408

 
7,095

 
0.89
 
1,509,868

 
7,717

 
0.51
 
4,631,927

 
79,336

 
1.71
 
4,141,703

 
65,815

 
1.59
 
2,769,255

 
36,492

 
1.32
 
30,347

 
1,783

 
5.88
 
1,042

 
178

 
17.08
 
4,779

 
254

 
5.31
 
49

 
1

 
2.69
 
903

 
53

 
5.85
 
295

 
21

 
7.12
 
73,030

 
911

 
1.25
 
961

 
28

 
2.93
 
19,697

 
385

 
1.95
 
6,616,355

 
97,050

 
1.47
 
7,011,767

 
89,087

 
1.27
 
5,994,080

 
57,008

 
0.95
 
2,754,038

 
14,534

 
0.53
 
2,353,237

 
6,067

 
0.26
 
1,417,845

 
3,712

 
0.26
 
30,267,788

 
$
992,850

 
3.28
%
28,893,157

 
$
975,535

 
3.38
%
22,232,051

 
$
764,436

 
3.44
%
467,315

 
 
 
 
 
469,270

 
 
 
 
 
493,947

 
 
 
 
 
1,128,870

 
 
 
 
 
1,125,159

 
 
 
 
 
943,270

 
 
 
 
 
(209,232
)
 
 
 
 
 
(206,342
)
 
 
 
 
 
(210,937
)
 
 
 
 
 
66,294

 
 
 
 
 
76,845

 
 
 
 
 
87,944

 
 
 
 
 
718,457

 
 
 
 
 
714,146

 
 
 
 
 
558,129

 
 
 
 
 
$
32,439,492

 
 
 
 
 
$
31,072,235

 
 
 
 
 
$
24,104,404

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
$
4,484,557

 
$
910

 
0.02
%
$
4,170,598

 
$
856

 
0.02
%
$
2,988,287

 
$
779

 
0.03
%
2,024,656

 
615

 
0.03
 
1,838,531

 
479

 
0.03
 
1,196,096

 
624

 
0.05
 
8,148,123

 
6,472

 
0.08
 
8,236,160

 
7,051

 
0.09
 
6,733,959

 
6,527

 
0.10
 
2,959,757

 
10,172

 
0.34
 
3,359,794

 
12,844

 
0.38
 
3,159,510

 
16,856

 
0.53
 
17,617,093

 
18,169

 
0.10
 
17,605,083

 
21,230

 
0.12
 
14,077,852

 
24,786

 
0.18
 
721,933

 
1,861

 
0.26
 
606,357

 
1,481

 
0.24
 
159,696

 
350

 
0.22
 
7,536

 
104

 
1.38
 
227,937

 
3,179

 
1.39
 
632,146

 
8,827

 
1.40
 
811,755

 
22,948

 
2.83
 
547,378

 
18,414

 
3.36
 
403,925

 
16,388

 
4.06
 
19,158,317

 
43,082

 
0.22
 
18,986,755

 
44,304

 
0.23
 
15,273,619

 
50,351

 
0.33
 
9,898,068

 
 
 
 
 
8,880,162

 
 
 
 
 
6,290,423

 
 
 
 
 
381,838

 
 
 
 
 
408,018

 
 
 
 
 
284,070

 
 
 
 
 
3,001,269

 
 
 
 
 
2,797,300

 
 
 
 
 
2,256,292

 
 
 
 
 
$
32,439,492

 
 
 
 
 
$
31,072,235

 
 
 
 
 
$
24,104,404

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3.06
%
 
 
 
 
3.15
%
 
 
 
 
3.11
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
$
949,768

 
3.14
%
 
 
$
931,231

 
3.22
%
 
 
$
714,085

 
3.21
%

















35




Table 7
CHANGES IN CONSOLIDATED TAXABLE EQUIVALENT NET INTEREST INCOME
 
2018
 
2017
 
Change from previous year due to:
 
Change from previous year due to:
 
 
 
Yield/
 
Total
 
 
 
Yield/
 
Total
(Dollars in thousands)
Volume
 
Rate
 
Change
 
Volume
 
Rate
 
Change
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Loans and leases(1)
$
65,709

 
$
50,188

 
$
115,897

 
$
77,836

 
$
683

 
$
78,519

Investment securities: