Company Quick10K Filing
Quick10K
Flex
Closing Price ($) Shares Out (MM) Market Cap ($MM)
$10.40 521 $5,420
10-K 2019-03-31 Annual: 2019-03-31
10-Q 2018-12-31 Quarter: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-09-28 Quarter: 2018-09-28
10-Q 2018-06-29 Quarter: 2018-06-29
10-K 2018-03-31 Annual: 2018-03-31
10-Q 2017-12-31 Quarter: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-09-29 Quarter: 2017-09-29
10-Q 2017-06-30 Quarter: 2017-06-30
10-K 2017-03-31 Annual: 2017-03-31
10-Q 2016-12-31 Quarter: 2016-12-31
10-Q 2016-09-30 Quarter: 2016-09-30
10-Q 2016-07-01 Quarter: 2016-07-01
10-K 2016-03-31 Annual: 2016-03-31
10-Q 2015-12-31 Quarter: 2015-12-31
10-Q 2015-09-25 Quarter: 2015-09-25
10-Q 2015-06-26 Quarter: 2015-06-26
10-K 2015-03-31 Annual: 2015-03-31
10-Q 2014-12-31 Quarter: 2014-12-31
10-Q 2014-09-26 Quarter: 2014-09-26
10-Q 2014-06-27 Quarter: 2014-06-27
10-K 2014-03-31 Annual: 2014-03-31
10-Q 2013-12-31 Quarter: 2013-12-31
8-K 2019-04-30 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-02-11 Officers, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-02-05 Officers
8-K 2019-01-30 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-01-17 Officers
8-K 2018-12-24
8-K 2018-12-07 Officers
8-K 2018-11-14 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2018-10-25 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-10-22 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-16 Shareholder Vote, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-07-26 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-07-02 Other Events
8-K 2018-06-25 Officers
8-K 2018-03-26 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-01-25 Earnings, Exit Costs, Exhibits
8-K 2018-01-08 Officers, Exhibits
REG Regency Centers 10,950
ATH Athene Holding 8,800
CFFN Capitol Federal Financial 1,970
FATE Fate Therapeutics 1,080
IHC Independence Holding 523
FDUS Fidus Investment 396
CLSK Cleanspark 0
CASM CAS Medical Systems 0
SNWV Sanuwave Health 0
LCTC Lifeloc Technologies 0
FLEX 2019-03-31
Part I
Item 1. Business
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 2. Properties
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Part II
Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Shareholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6. Selected Financial Data
Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures
Item 9B. Other Information
Part III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11. Executive Compensation
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Shareholder Matters
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services
Part IV
Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
Item 16. Form 10-K Summary
EX-4.10 flex-exx41033119.htm
EX-10.17 flex-exx101733119.htm
EX-10.23 flex-exx102333119.htm
EX-10.27 flex-exx102733119.htm
EX-10.29 flex-exx102933119.htm
EX-21.01 flex-exx210133119.htm
EX-23.01 flex-exx230133119.htm
EX-31.01 flex-exx310133119.htm
EX-31.02 flex-exx310233119.htm
EX-32.01 flex-exx320133119.htm

Flex Earnings 2019-03-31

FLEX 10K Annual Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

10-K 1 flex331201910-k.htm 10-K Document
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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
____________________________________________________________________________
Form 10-K
(Mark One)
 
 
ý
 
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2019
Or
o
 
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
Commission file number 000-23354
FLEX LTD.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Singapore
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
Not Applicable
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
2 Changi South Lane,
Singapore
(Address of registrant's principal executive offices)
 
486123
(Zip Code)
Registrant's telephone number, including area code
(65) 6876-9899
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
Trading Symbol(s)
Name of each exchange on which registered
Ordinary Shares, No Par Value
FLEX
The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act—NONE
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ý    No o
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act. Yes o    No ý
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ý    No o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes ý    No o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer", "smaller reporting company" and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer ý
 
Accelerated filer o
 
Non-accelerated filer o
 
Smaller reporting company o
Emerging growth company o
 
 
 
 
 
 
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o    No ý
As of September 28, 2018, the aggregate market value of the Company's ordinary shares held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $6.9 billion based upon the closing sale price as reported on the Nasdaq Global Select Market.
Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant's classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date.
Class
 
Outstanding at May 13, 2019
Ordinary Shares, No Par Value
 
514,029,702
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Document
 
Parts into Which Incorporated
Proxy Statement to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the Registrant's 2019 Annual General Meeting of Shareholders
 
Part III




TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
Page
 

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PART I

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
Unless otherwise specifically stated, references in this report to "Flex," "the Company," "we," "us," "our" and similar terms mean Flex Ltd. and its subsidiaries.
Except for historical information contained herein, certain matters included in this annual report on Form 10-K are, or may be deemed to be forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933. The words "will," "may," "designed to," "believe," "should," "anticipate," "plan," "expect," "intend," "estimate" and similar expressions identify forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this annual report. These forward-looking statements are contained principally under Item 1, "Business," and under Item 7, "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations." Because these forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties, actual results could differ materially from the expectations expressed in the forward-looking statements. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements include those described in Item 1A, "Risk Factors" and Item 7, "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations." In addition, new risks emerge from time to time and it is not possible for management to predict all such risk factors or to assess the impact of such risk factors on our business. Given these risks and uncertainties, the reader should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. We undertake no obligation to update or revise these forward-looking statements to reflect subsequent events or circumstances.
ITEM 1.    BUSINESS
OVERVIEW
We are a globally-recognized, provider of Sketch-to-Scale® services - innovative design, engineering, manufacturing, and supply chain services and solutions - from conceptual sketch to full-scale production. We design, build, ship and manage complete packaged consumer and enterprise products, from medical devices and connected automotive systems to sustainable lighting and cloud and data center solutions, for companies of all sizes in various industries and end-markets, through our activities in the following segments:
High Reliability Solutions ("HRS"), which is comprised of our health solutions business, including surgical equipment, drug delivery, diagnostics, telemedicine, disposable devices, imaging and monitoring, patient mobility and ophthalmology; and our automotive business, including vehicle electrification, connectivity, autonomous, and smart technologies;

Industrial and Emerging Industries ("IEI"), which is comprised of energy including advanced metering infrastructure, energy storage, smart lighting, smart solar energy; and industrial, including semiconductor and capital equipment, office solutions, household industrial and lifestyle, industrial automation and kiosks;

Communications & Enterprise Compute ("CEC"), which includes our telecom business of radio access base stations, remote radio heads and small cells for wireless infrastructure; our networking business, which includes optical, routing, and switching products for data and video networks; our server and storage platforms for both enterprise and cloud-based deployments; next generation storage and security appliance products; and rack-level solutions, converged infrastructure and software-defined product solutions; and

Consumer Technologies Group ("CTG"), which includes our consumer-related businesses in IoT enabled devices, audio and consumer power electronics, mobile devices; and various supply chain solutions for consumer, computing and printing devices.
These segments represent components of the Company for which separate financial information is available that is utilized on a regular basis by the Chief Operating Decision Maker (“CODM”). Our segments are determined based on several factors, including the nature of products and services, the nature of production processes, customer base, delivery channels and similar economic characteristics. Refer to note 19 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" for additional information on our operating segments.
We provide design, manufacturing and supply chain services through a network of over 100 locations in approximately 35 countries across five continents. We have established global scale through an extensive network of innovation labs, design centers, manufacturing and services sites in the world's major consumer and enterprise products markets (Asia, the Americas,

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and Europe) in order to serve the supply chain needs of both multinational and regional companies. Our services provide customers with a competitive advantage by delivering improved product quality, increased flexibility, leading-edge manufacturability, improved performance, faster time-to-market, and value. Our customers leverage our services to meet their requirements throughout their products' entire life cycles. For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2019, we had revenue of $26.2 billion and net income of $93 million.
Over the past several years, we have evolved beyond a traditional Electronics Manufacturing Services ("EMS") company, and now consider ourselves to be a provider of a full range of Sketch-to-Scale® services – beyond electronics manufacturing services – including strategic product development planning and design-phase innovation, supported by teams of talented design engineers. Our innovation strategy is focused on three levels: products, systems, and manufacturing technologies and processes.
We believe that the combination of our extensive innovative solutions, design and engineering services, advanced supply chain management solutions and services, significant global scale and regional presence, and manufacturing sites in key geographies provide us with a competitive advantage and strong differentiation in the market for designing, building, and servicing consumer and enterprise products for leading multinational and regional companies. Through these services, centers and sites, we offer our customers improved product design, increased flexibility and responsiveness. We also enable faster time to market, product safety and regulatory compliance and supply chain predictability with real-time visibility, all of which accelerate product launches, access to new markets, and mitigate of risks.
We recognized research and development costs primarily related to our product design and innovations service offerings of $66 million, $78 million, and $66 million for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively.
INDUSTRY OVERVIEW
Our expertise is Sketch-to-Scale® services: design, manufacture, and supply chain services for a broad range of products, from medical devices, connected automotive systems and smart home appliances to sustainable lighting and cloud data center infrastructures. Although Flex has evolved beyond traditional EMS, the majority of our customers are electronics original equipment manufacturers ("OEMs"); as such, the closest broad definition of our industry remains the outsourced EMS industry.
EMS has experienced significant change and growth as an increasing number of companies elect to outsource some or all of their design, manufacturing, and after-market services requirements. In recent years we have seen an increased level of diversification by many companies, in the technology, automotive and healthcare industries along with the convergence of many industries being transformed by technology advancements. Companies that have historically identified themselves as software providers, internet service providers, or e-commerce retailers are entering the highly competitive and rapidly evolving hardware markets, with products that include mobile devices, home entertainment products, and wearable devices. This trend has resulted in significant changes to the hardware manufacturing and supply chain solutions requirements of such companies. Increasingly complex products require highly customized supply chain solutions, in turn resulting in significant changes to the overall manufacturing and supply chain landscape. The growth of the overall industry for calendar year 2018 is estimated to have been around 4%.
We believe the total available market for the EMS industry is poised for continued growth, with current penetration rates estimated to be about 31%. The intensely competitive nature of the electronics industry, the increasing complexity and sophistication of electronics products, and pressure on OEMs to reduce product costs and shorten product life cycles are all factors that encourage OEMs to utilize supply chain service providers as part of their business and manufacturing strategies. Utilizing global manufacturing and service providers allows OEMs to take advantage of the global design, manufacturing and supply chain management expertise of such providers, and enables OEMs to concentrate on product research, development, marketing, and sales. We believe that OEMs realize a number of important benefits through their strategic relationships with EMS providers, including:
Improved inventory management and purchasing power;

Access to worldwide design, engineering, manufacturing, and after-market service capabilities;

Ability to focus on core branding and R&D initiatives;

Accelerated time-to-market and time-to-volume production;

Improved efficiency and optimized production costs;

Improved product quality through advanced design and production at scale; and

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Reduced capital investment requirements and fixed costs;
We believe that growth in the EMS industry will be largely driven by the need for OEMs to respond to rapidly changing industries, markets and technologies, the increasing complexity of supply chains and the continued pressure to be innovative and cost competitive. Additionally, we believe that there are significant opportunities for global EMS providers to win additional business from OEMs in markets or industry segments that have yet to substantially utilize such providers.
SERVICE OFFERINGS
We offer a broad range of customizable services to our customers. We believe that Flex has the broadest worldwide product development lifecycle capabilities in the industry, from concept design to manufacturing to aftermarket services. We believe a key competitive advantage is our people, processes and capabilities for making products, systems and solutions for our customers:
Speed:  Our sophisticated supply chain management tools and expertise allow us to provide customers with access to real-time information that increases visibility throughout the entire product lifecycle, reducing risk while accelerating execution.

Scope:  Our full range of services, from Sketch-to-Scale®, include innovation and design, engineering, manufacturing, forward and reverse logistics, and circular economy supply chain management. Our deep industry and cross-industry knowledge and multi-domain expertise accelerate the production of increasingly complex products for increasingly interconnected industries.

Scale:  Our physical infrastructure includes over 100 facilities in approximately 35 countries, staffed by approximately 200,000 employees, providing our customers with truly global scale and strategic geographic distribution capabilities.
We offer global economies of scale in advanced materials and technology sourcing, manufacturing and after-market services, as well as market-focused expertise and capabilities in design and engineering. As a result of our extensive experience in specific markets, we have developed deep understanding of complex market dynamics, giving us the ability to anticipate trends that impact our customers' businesses. Our expertise can help improve our customers' market positioning by effectively adjusting product plans and roadmaps to efficiently and cost-effectively deliver high quality products that meet their time-to-market requirements.
Our services include all processes necessary to design, build, ship, and service a wide range of products for our customers. These services include:
Innovation Services.    We provide a comprehensive set of services that enable companies to successfully ideate, create new products and solutions, and gain access to new markets. These services span the entire product introduction and solution lifecycle by providing access to new cross-industry and technology platforms and building block technologies, accelerating innovation and product development from early concepts to final production-ready design, and providing advanced manufacturing and testing for new product introduction and market access to grow our customers' offerings. This area of our business has seen increased investment and focus over the past few years.
Beyond our flagship Customer Engagement Center in Silicon Valley, we have established a global network of Design and Engagement Centers. Our innovation and design services include:
Innovation and Design Centers. Our Innovation and Design Centers specialize in supporting customer design and product development. Customers gain access to our design and engineering facilities, technical subject matter expertise, and rapid prototyping resources such as metal and plastic 3D printers and soft tooling capabilities.

Cross-industry Technologies. Along with our portfolio of building block technologies in electrical/electronics, electromechanical, and software, we also have deep technical expertise in cross-industry technologies. Our Cross-industry technologies are a combination of building block technologies expertly applied to products and solutions for use within numerous industries. These technologies include: Human Machine Interface (HMI), Audio and Video, System in Package (SIP), Miniaturization, IoT Platforms and Asset Tracking.

Centers of Excellence/Competence. Our Centers of Excellence/Competence provide strategic technology capabilities developed by Flex in critical solutions areas which leverage our expertise across multiple

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industries, for integration into our customers' products and next generation industry requirements. Centers of Excellence/Competence have specialized capabilities in connectivity, sensors and actuators, power, battery, interconnects and PMATX, smart software, optical, and "soft" Systems.

Systems Integration Services. Through systems integration, we design and integrate advanced data center servers, storage and networking equipment and data center appliances, providing engineering and design services with an emphasis on multivendor integration and open technologies that promote interoperability at a lower cost. Our CloudLabs provide a staging lab for customers to deploy the latest technologies, allowing for performance testing of workloads and enabling faster diffusion of technologies in a controlled environment.
Design and Engineering Services.   We offer a comprehensive range of value-added design and engineering services, tailored to specific industries and markets, and the needs of our customers. These services can be delivered using one of two primary business models:
Design Services, where customers purchase engineering and development services on a time and materials basis; or

Joint Design and Manufacturing Services, where our engineering and development teams work jointly with our customers' teams to ensure product development integrity, seamless manufacturing handoffs, and faster time to market.
Our design and engineering services are provided by our global market-based engineering teams and cover a broad range of technical competencies:
System Architecture, User Interface and Industrial Design. We help our customers design and develop innovative and cost-effective products that address the needs of the user and the market. These services include product definition, analysis and optimization of performance and functional requirements, 2-D sketch level drawings, 3-D mock-ups and CAD drawings, proofs of concept, product prototypes, interaction and interface models, detailed hard models, and product packaging.

Hardware Design. We offer design for printed-circuit board assemblies (PCBA); identification and selection of key components, Subsystem design and full-product design including electrical and mechanical design. We provide complete electrical and hardware design for products ranging from small handheld consumer devices to large, high-speed, carrier-grade, telecommunications equipment, incorporating embedded microprocessors, memory, digital signal processing, high-speed digital interfaces, analog circuit design, power management solutions, wired and wireless communication protocols, display imaging, audio/video, and radio frequency systems and antenna design. In addition, we offer detailed mechanical, structural, and thermal design solutions for enclosures that utilize a wide range of plastic, metal and other material technologies. These capabilities and technologies are increasingly important to our customers' product differentiation goals.

Software Design. We offer cloud integration design services which include developing and embedding a cloud agent onto a device, firmware and applications services including developing and embedding software of functionality and user-specific tasks and features.

Design for Excellence. We provide comprehensive design for manufacturing, testing, and reliability services leveraging robust, internally-developed tools and databases. These services leverage our core manufacturing competencies to help our customers achieve their time-to-revenue goals.
We are exposed to different or greater potential liabilities from our various design services than those we typically face in our core assembly and manufacturing services. See "Risk Factors—The success of certain of our activities depends on our ability to protect our intellectual property rights; claims of infringement or misuse of intellectual property and/or breach of license agreement provisions against our customers or us could harm our business."
Systems Assembly and Manufacturing.    Our assembly and manufacturing operations, which generate the majority of our revenues, include printed circuit board assembly and assembly of systems and subsystems that incorporate printed circuit boards and complex electromechanical components. We assemble electronics products with custom electronic enclosures on either a build-to-order or configure-to-order basis. In these operations, we employ just-in-time, ship-to-stock and ship-to-line programs, continuous flow manufacturing, demand flow processes, and statistical process controls. As our customers seek to provide greater functionality in physically smaller products, they increasingly require more sophisticated manufacturing technologies and processes. Our investment in advanced manufacturing equipment and our expertise in innovative miniaturization, packaging and interconnect technologies, enables us to offer a variety of leading-edge manufacturing solutions.

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We support a wide range of product demand profiles, from low-volume, high-complexity programs, to high-volume production. A continuous focus on Lean manufacturing, and a systematic approach to identifying and eliminating waste (non-value-added activities) through continuous improvement based on customer demand allows us to increase our efficiency and flexibility to meet dynamic customer requirements. Our systems assembly and manufacturing expertise includes the following:
Enclosures. We offer a comprehensive set of custom electronics enclosures and related products and services. Our services include the design, manufacture, integration and deployment of electronics packaging systems, including custom enclosure systems, power and thermal subsystems, interconnect subsystems, cabling, and cases. In addition to standard sheet metal and plastic fabrication services, we assist in the design of electronics packaging systems that protect sensitive electronics and enhance functionality. Our enclosure design services focus on functionality, manufacturability, and testing. These services are integrated with our other assembly and manufacturing services to provide our customers with improved overall supply chain management.

Testing Services. We offer computer-aided testing services for assembled printed circuit boards, systems, and subsystems. These services significantly improve our ability to deliver high-quality products on a consistent basis. Our test services include management defect analysis, in-circuit testing and functional testing; as well as environmental stress tests of board and system assemblies. We also offer design for test, manufacturing, and environmental services to jointly improve customer product design and manufacturing.

Materials Procurement and Inventory Management. Our manufacturing and assembly operations capitalize on our materials inventory management expertise and volume procurement capabilities. As a result, we believe that we are able to achieve highly competitive cost reductions and shorten total manufacturing cycle times our OEM customers. Materials procurement and management consists of the planning, purchasing, expediting, and warehousing of components and materials used in the manufacturing process. In addition, our strategy includes having third-party suppliers of custom components located in our industrial parks to reduce material and transportation costs, simplify logistics, and facilitate inventory management. We also use a sophisticated automated manufacturing resource planning system and enhanced electronic data interchange capabilities to ensure inventory control and optimization. Through our manufacturing resources planning system, we have real-time visibility of material availability and are able to track work in process. We utilize electronic data interchange with our customers and suppliers to implement a variety of supply chain management programs. Electronic data interchange allows customers to share demand and product forecasts, deliver purchase orders and assists suppliers with satisfying just-in-time delivery and supplier-managed inventory requirements. This also enables us to implement vendor-managed inventory solutions to increase flexibility and reduce overall capital allocation in the supply chain. We procure a wide assortment of materials, including electronic components, plastics and metals. There are a number of sources for these materials, including customers for whom we are providing systems assembly and manufacturing services. On some occasions, there have been shortages of certain electronic components, most recently this has been connectors, capacitors, LCD panels and memory (both DRAM and Flash). However, such shortages have not had a material impact on our operating results for any periods presented. See "Risk Factors—We may be adversely affected by supply chain issues, including shortages of required electronic components."
Components Business.    We offer a full-service power supply business that provides a range of solutions from custom to highly scalable system solutions. Flex has expertise in high efficiency and high-density switching power supplies ranging from 1 to 3,000 watts. Our product portfolio includes chargers for smartphones and tablets, adapters for notebooks and gaming systems, and power supplies for the server, storage, and networking markets. Our Power Modules business designs and manufactures a wide range of isolated DC/DC converters and non-isolated Point of Load (PoL) converters intended primarily, although not exclusively, for the Information and Communications Technology market, including Servers and High-Performance Computing applications. We also offer specialized power module solutions suitable for other markets. We pride ourselves on our ability to service the needs of industry leaders in these markets through valuable technology, design expertise, collaborative development, and efficient execution. Our products are fully compliant with the environmental and Energy Star requirements that drive efficiency specifications in our industry. Customers who engage with Flex gain access to compelling innovations and design expertise in digital control and smart power.
Logistics.    Our Flex Global Services business is a provider of services including after-market and forward supply chain logistics services. Our comprehensive suite of services is tailored to customers operating in the computing, consumer digital, infrastructure, industrial, mobile, automotive and medical industries. Our expansive global infrastructure includes 27 sites and approximately 11,000 employees strategically located throughout the Americas, Europe, and Asia. By leveraging our operational infrastructure, supply chain network, and IT systems, we are able to offer our customers globally consistent logistics solutions. By linking the flow of information from these supply chains, we create supply chain insight for our

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customers. We provide multiple logistics solutions including supplier-managed inventory, inbound freight management, product postponement, build/configure to order, order fulfillment and distribution, asset tracking, and supply chain network design.
Reverse Logistics and Repair Services.    We offer a suite of integrated reverse logistics and repair solutions that use globally consistent processes, which help increase our customers' brand loyalty by improving turnaround times and raising end-customer satisfaction levels. Our objective is to maximize asset value retention for our customers' products throughout their product life cycle while simultaneously minimizing non-value added repair inventory levels and handling in the supply chain. With our suite of end-to-end solutions, we can effectively manage our customers' reverse logistics requirements, while providing critical feedback to their supply chain constituents, delivering continuous improvement and efficiencies for both existing and next generation products. Our reverse logistics and repair solutions include returns management, exchange programs, complex repair, asset recovery, recycling and e-waste management. We provide repair expertise to multiple product lines such as consumer and midrange products, printers, smart phones, consumer medical devices, notebook personal computers, set-top boxes, game consoles and highly complex infrastructure products. With our service parts logistics business, we manage all of the logistics and restocking processes essential to the efficient operation of repair and refurbishment services.
STRATEGY
We help our customers responsibly build products for a connected world. We do this by providing our customers with product development lifecycle services, from innovation, design, and engineering, to manufacturing, logistics, and supply chain solutions. Our strategy is to enable and scale innovation for our customers, maintain our leadership in our capabilities, and build extended offerings in high-growth industries and markets.
Talent.    To maintain our competitiveness and world-class capabilities, we focus on hiring and retaining the world's best talent. We empower talented employees to develop innovative solutions that transform industries and companies. We have taken steps to attract the best engineering, functional and operational leaders and have accelerated efforts to develop the future leaders of the company.
Customer Focus.    We believe that serving leaders in dynamic industries fosters the development of our core skills and results in superior growth and profitability. Our customers come first, and we have a relentless focus on delivering distinctive products and services in a cost-effective manner with fast time-to-market.
Market Focus.    We aim to apply a rigorous approach to managing our portfolio of opportunities by focusing on companies that are leaders in their industry and value our superior capabilities in design, manufacturing, and supply chain services. We focus our energy and efforts on high-growth industries and markets where we have distinctive competence and compelling value propositions. Examples include our investments in specific technologies and industries including healthcare, automotive, industrial markets, and energy. Our market-focused approach to managing our business increases our customers' competitiveness by leveraging our deep vertical industry and cross-industry expertise, as well as global scale, regional presence and agility to respond to changes in market dynamics.
Global Operations Capabilities.    We continue to invest in maintaining the leadership of our world-class manufacturing and services capabilities including automation, new product introduction and large-scale manufacturing. We constantly push the state of the art in manufacturing technology, process development and operations management. We continue to capitalize on our industrial park concept, where we co-locate our design, manufacturing, and service resources globally in lower-cost regions, to provide a competitive advantage by minimizing logistics, manufacturing costs, and cycle times while increasing flexibility and responsiveness. We believe our global scale, breadth of services, IP, and assets contribute to our significant competitive advantage.
Extended Value Propositions.    We continue to extend our distinctiveness in manufacturing into new value propositions that leverage our core capabilities. We opportunistically invest in new technologies, capabilities and services to provide our customers with a broader value-added suite of innovative services and solutions to meet their product and market requirements.
COMPETITIVE STRENGTHS
We continue to enhance our business through the development and expansion of our product and service offerings. We strive to maintain the efficiency and flexibility of our organization, with repeatable execution that adapts to macro-economic changes to provide clear value to our customers, while increasing their competitiveness. We have a focused strategy on delivering scale, scope and speed to our customers through world-class innovation and design services, operations, supply chain solutions, and industry and market expertise. We provide active tracking and real-time data analytics (Flex Pulse®) that enable improved supply chain visibility, allowing customers to better monitor and mitigate risks. We believe the following capabilities further differentiate us from our competitors and better serve our customers' requirements:

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Significant Scope and Global Scale.    We believe that scale is a significant competitive advantage, as our customers' solutions increasingly require capabilities and competitive solutions that can only be achieved through capabilities scope and global scale.
We have established an extensive, integrated network of design, manufacturing and logistics facilities in the world's major consumer electronics and industrial markets to serve the outsourcing needs of both multinational and regional companies. Our extensive global network of over 100 facilities in approximately 35 countries with approximately 200,000 employees, helps increase our customers' competitiveness by simplifying their global product development processes while delivering improved product quality with improved performance and accelerated time to market.
Additionally, we are a leader in global procurement, purchasing approximately $27 billion of electrical and mechanical materials during our fiscal year ended March 31, 2019. This scale provides us with an ability to use our worldwide supplier relationships to achieve leading-edge technologies, access, supply chain flexibility and advantageous pricing for our customers.
Digitized Supply Chain Solutions.    We offer a comprehensive range of worldwide supply chain services that simplify and improve global product development processes, providing meaningful time and cost savings to our customers. Our broad-based, full cycle services enable us to cost effectively design, build, ship and service a complete packaged product. We believe that our capabilities help our customers improve product quality, manufacturability and performance, while optimizing costs. We have expanded and enhanced our service offerings by adding capabilities in innovation and design centers, modern manufacturing including additive manufacturing, automation, robotics, real-time supply chain software, end-to-end supply chain modeling and simulation, precision plastics, and machining.
Long-Standing Customer Relationships.    We believe that maintaining our long-term relationships with key customers is a critical requirement for maintaining our market position, growth and profitability. We believe that our ability to maintain and grow these customer relationships results from our history and reputation of creating value for our customers while increasing their own competitiveness. We achieve this through our market-focused approach, our broad range of service offerings and solutions, and our deep vertical industry and cross-industry expertise, which allow us to provide innovative solutions to all of the manufacturing and related service needs of our customers. We continue to receive numerous service and quality awards that further validate the strength of our customer relationships.
Extensive Design and Engineering Capabilities.    We have an industry-leading global design service offering, with extensive product design engineering resources, that provides design services, product developments, and solutions to satisfy a wide array of customer requirements across all of our key industries and markets. We combine our design and manufacturing services to provide Sketch-to-Scale® customized solutions that include services from design concept, through product industrialization and development, including the manufacture of components and complete products across the industries and market that we serve, which are then sold by our customers under their brand names.
Geographic, Customer and End Market Diversification.    We believe we have created a well-diversified and balanced company. Our business spans multiple end markets, significantly expanding our total available market. The world is experiencing rapid changes, and macro-economic disruptions have led to demand shifts and realignments. We believe that we are well-positioned through our market diversification to grow faster than the industry average and successfully navigate through difficult economic times. Our broad geographic footprint and experiences with multiple product types and complexity levels create a significant competitive advantage. We continually look for new ways to diversify our offering within each market segment.
Customer and Product Innovation Hubs.    We have established state-of-the art innovation hubs in the Americas, Asia and Europe, with differentiated offerings and specialized services and focus. With subject matter expertise in connectivity, sensors and actuators, batteries, power, interconnects, human machine interfaces, smart textiles, optical technologies, software & security and advanced manufacturing, our technology leaders collaborate with customers to co-develop their next generation of products.  We offer concepting and quick-turn prototyping utilizing the most advanced 3D plastic printing, 3D metal printing, surface mount technology (SMT), AI, Machine Learning and advanced collaborative software to support major industries in bringing innovative products to market rapidly. We are dedicated to providing quality and reliable solutions to meet the customers’ requirements. We ensure confidentiality offering dedicated customer-confidential work spaces that provide increased security and restricted access to protect our customers' intellectual property and the confidentiality of new products being launched into the marketplace. These innovation hubs offer our customers a geographically-focused version of our Sketch-to-Scale® services, taking their product from concept to volume production and go-to-market in a rapid, cost effective and low risk manner.
Industrial Parks; Cost-Efficient Manufacturing Services.    We have developed self-contained campuses that co-locate our manufacturing and logistics operations with our suppliers in various cost-efficient locations. These sites enhance our supply chain management efficiency, while providing multi-technology solution value for our customers. This approach increases the

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competitiveness of our customers by reducing logistical barriers and costs, improving communications, increasing flexibility, lowering transportation costs and reducing turnaround times. We have strategically established our industrial parks in Brazil, China, India, and Mexico.
We have selected manufacturing operations situated in regions around the world to provide our customers with a wide array of manufacturing solutions where our customers and/or their customers are located. As of March 31, 2019, approximately 80% of our manufacturing capacity was located in emerging markets, including Brazil, China, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, Poland, Romania, and the Ukraine.
Sustainability. We believe in the power of technology to connect people, products and services to create a smarter, more sustainable future. It’s not just good business, but it’s good for the environment, for people and the communities in which we live and work. This belief forms the cornerstone of our sustainability commitments and actions.
CUSTOMERS
Our customers include many of the world's leading technology companies. We have focused on establishing long-term relationships with our customers and have been successful in expanding our relationships to incorporate additional product lines and services.
As our business spans multiple end markets, we believe that we are well-positioned through our market diversification to grow faster than the industry average and successfully navigate through difficult economic times. As an example, we serve the following key customers across our diverse business groups: health solutions customers Abbott and Johnson & Johnson and auto customers Ford and Nexteer in our HRS segment; Teradyne, Applied Materials and Xerox in our IEI segment; Cisco, Nokia Solutions and Ericsson in our CEC segment; and Lenovo/Motorola, HP and Bose in our CTG segment.
In fiscal year 2019, our ten largest customers accounted for approximately 43% of net sales. No customer accounted for greater than 10% of the Company's net sales in fiscal year 2019.
BACKLOG
Although we obtain firm purchase orders from our customers, OEM customers typically do not place firm orders for delivery of products more than 30 to 90 days in advance. In addition, OEM customers may reschedule or cancel firm orders depending on contractual arrangements. Therefore, we do not believe that the backlog of expected product sales covered by firm purchase orders is a meaningful measure of future sales.
COMPETITION
Our market is extremely competitive and includes many companies, several of which have achieved substantial market share. We compete against numerous domestic and foreign manufacturing service providers, as well as our current and prospective customers, who evaluate our capabilities in light of their own capabilities and cost structures. We face particular competition from Asian-based competitors, including Taiwanese Original Design Manufacturing ("ODM") suppliers who compete in a variety of our end markets and have a substantial share of global information technology hardware production.
We compete with different companies depending on the type of service we are providing or the geographic area in which an activity takes place. We believe that the principal competitive factors in the manufacturing services market are: quality and range of services; design and technological capabilities; cost; location of sites; and responsiveness and flexibility. We believe we are extremely competitive with regard to all of these factors.
CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPSONSIBLITY
Sustainability remains central to who we are and how we operate. Our sustainability governance principles are a core part of our business operations. Through innovation and smart technologies, our sustainable solutions positively impact people and the environment.
Since February 2018, we have been participants of the United Nations Global Compact ("UNGC"), the world's largest corporate sustainability initiative, to showcase our commitment to integrate sustainability throughout our company and across our entire supply chain. Our commitment aims to help customers, partners and other businesses increase their own efforts to build a more sustainable future.
Our strategy and global efforts, through our sustainability programs and multi-year "Flex 20 by 2020 goals," are aligned with the principles set forth in the UNGC, and the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals ("SDGs"). While our global efforts

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contribute to most of the SDGs, we have prioritized them and focus on decent work, quality education, clean energy and responsible consumption and production.
We achieve social and environmental compliance through a robust integrated management system that consolidates several management systems into one. Our Corporate Social and Environmental Responsibility management system has several elements, including environmental, health and safety compliance, labor and human rights and ethics. The Flex Social and Environmental framework is based upon the principles, policies, and standards prescribed by the Responsible Business Alliance (“RBA”), a worldwide association of electronics companies committed to promoting an industry code of conduct for global electronics supply chains to improve working and environmental, health and safety conditions, as well as other relevant international standards (e.g., ISO 14001, United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights). Flex is a founding member of the RBA. Social responsibility is also an area of increasing concern, with specific regulations such as the California Transparency in Supply Chains Act, the U.S. Federal Acquisition Regulation on Human Trafficking and the U.K. Modern Slavery Act of 2015, all creating new compliance and disclosure obligations for the Company and for our customers. We operate a number of programs, including compliance audits, data collection, training and leadership programs that focus upon driving continuous improvement in social, ethical, and environmental performance throughout all of our global operating units, all in accordance with our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics ("CoBCE"). We also go beyond compliance by offering a wide range of programs and initiatives to engage both our internal and external stakeholders.
We are committed to providing decent work for Flex employees, respecting their dignity and striving to advance human rights around the world. Our philosophy, strategies, and policies in human rights, health and safety, diversity and inclusion, support the inclusion of all people in our working environment. Some of the cornerstone specific goals through which we measure our performance include increasing employee development, social and environmental management system audits, human rights policy training completion, RBA compliance for rest day requirements and decreasing incident rates.
We work with nonprofits, community leaders and governments to promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all. We help protect the environment, support resource conservation and provide disaster relief. We accomplish this through grants from the Flex Foundation, corporate and employee donations and volunteerism. Our multi-year goals in this area cover increasing volunteer hours and the percentage of sites with community activities as well as implementing the worker empowerment training program and Flex Foundation community grants.
We take necessary measures to protect the environment, conserve energy and natural resources, and prevent pollution by applying appropriate management practices and technology. We take actions to protect the environment, including but not limited to strict compliance with material requirements, reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, waste, water and energy consumption, and circular economy implementation, among others. Our multi-year goals for environment cover increasing our use of renewable energy, water recycling, waste diversion rate and number of powered homes equivalents and decreasing water consumption, CO2 emissions, and cost of electricity to the grid vs. fossil fuels.
Our corporate compliance program integrates our obligations and commitment to integrity into our day-to-day business practices. We expect our employees and business partners to follow the highest ethical standards. The CoBCE serves as the foundation of our Ethics and Compliance program. We conduct regular internal audits, and we maintain metrics around compliance to continuously benchmark and improve. Implementing in-person training on CoBCE for direct labor employees and increasing CoBCE training for annual completion for indirect labor employees are our integrity multi-year goals targeted for 2020.
We are committed to continuously monitoring and complying with social and environmental requirements across the supply chain. We require our suppliers to have a management system in place to ensure compliance and mitigate potential risks. We also have sustainability supply chain programs in place like on-site sustainability training for suppliers, working hours improvement and labor agent programs which help us to develop our supplier’s competencies for them to comply with the applicable requirements. We measure our progress through two goals, namely increasing out sustainability supplier training and supplier screening on social and environmental criteria.
All of these activities are the subject of our annual sustainability reporting, done in accordance with the Global Reporting Initiative’s (“GRI”) standards, and further information can be found in our annual sustainability executive and GRI reports, as well as the Flex 20 by 2020 bi-annual report posted on our website.
The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”), Section 1502, introduced reporting requirements related to the verification of whether we are directly (or indirectly through suppliers of materials) purchasing the following minerals (“Conflict Minerals”): columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); or their derivatives, which are limited to tantalum, tin and tungsten; or any other mineral or its derivatives as determined by the U.S. Secretary of State to be associated with financing conflicts in the Democratic Republic of

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the Congo or an adjoining country. We work directly with suppliers, industry groups, and customers to comply with the reporting requirements necessary to comply with this law. See "Risk Factors - Compliance with government regulations regarding the use of ‘Conflict Minerals’ may result in increased costs and risks to us." We have filed the required reports on Form SD with the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") in accordance with the Dodd-Frank Act.
In addition, we are a founding member and active participant in the RBA’s Responsible Minerals Initiative ("RMI"). RMI promotes the goal of understanding and mitigating social and environmental impacts of extraction and processing of raw materials in supply chains. As an active member of RMI, we leverage direct and indirect partnerships and use international standards, e.g.. Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development ("OECD") Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises, and the United Nations (UN) Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, as our guides. We are committed to responsibly sourcing minerals, in accordance with our Responsible Sourcing Policy, and follow the RMI’s Conflict Minerals data reporting format.
ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION
Our operations are regulated under various federal, state, local and international laws governing the environment, including laws governing the discharge of pollutants into the air and water, the management and disposal of hazardous substances and wastes and the cleanup of contaminated sites. We have implemented processes and procedures to ensure that our operations are in compliance with all applicable environmental regulations. We do not believe that costs of compliance with these laws and regulations will have a material adverse effect on our capital expenditures, operating results, or competitive position. In addition, we are responsible for cleanup of contamination at some of our current and former manufacturing facilities and at some third-party sites. We engage environmental consulting firms to assist us in the evaluation of environmental liabilities associated with our ongoing operations, historical disposal activities and closed sites in order to establish appropriate accruals in our financial statements. We determine the amount of our accruals for environmental matters by analyzing and estimating the probability of occurrence and the reasonable possibility of incurring costs in light of information currently available.
The imposition of more stringent standards or requirements under environmental laws or regulations, the results of future testing and analysis undertaken by us at our operating facilities, or a determination that we are potentially responsible for the release of hazardous substances at other sites could result in expenditures in excess of amounts currently estimated to be required for such matters. Additionally, we could be required to alter our operations in order to comply with any new standards or requirements under environmental laws or regulations. There can be no assurance that additional environmental matters will not arise in the future or that costs will not be incurred with respect to sites as to which no issue is currently known.
We are also required to comply with an increasing number of product environmental compliance regulations focused upon the restriction of certain hazardous substances. The electronics industry is subject to various regulations based on region or country. For example:
Restrictions on Hazardous Substances ("RoHS") 2011/65/EU

Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment ("WEEE") 2012/19/EU directives

The regulation EC 1907/2006 EU Directive REACH ("Registration, Evaluation, Authorization, and Restriction of Chemicals")

China RoHS entitled, Management Methods for Controlling Pollution for Electronic Information Products ("EIPs").
Similar legislation has been or may be enacted in other jurisdictions, including the United States. Our business requires close collaboration with our customers and suppliers to mitigate risks of non-compliance. We have developed rigorous compliance programs designed to meet the needs and specifications of our customers as well as the regulations. These programs vary from collecting compliance or material data from our Flex controlled or managed suppliers to full laboratory testing, and we include compliance requirements in our standard supplier contracts. Non-compliance could result in significant costs and/or penalties.
RoHS and other similar legislation ban or restrict the use of lead, mercury and certain other specified substances in electronics products and WEEE requires EU importers and/or producers to assume responsibility for the collection, recycling and management of waste electronic products and components. In the case of WEEE, although the compliance responsibility rests primarily with the EU importers and/or producers rather than with EMS companies, OEMs may turn to EMS companies for assistance in meeting their WEEE obligations. Flex continues to monitor developments related to product environmental

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compliance and is working with our customers and other technical organizations to anticipate and minimize any impacts to our operations.
EMPLOYEES
Our policies, philosophy and strategies support the inclusion of all people in our working environment. We’re committed to respecting the human rights of our employees and improving their quality of life. We encourage our people to engage in lifelong learning and growth. And we give them opportunities to perform to the best of their abilities.
As of March 31, 2019, our global workforce totaled approximately 200,000 employees including our contractor workforce. In certain international locations, our employees are represented by labor unions and by work councils. We have never experienced a significant work stoppage or strike, and we believe that our employee relations are good.
Our success depends to a large extent upon the continued services of key managerial and technical employees. The loss of such personnel could seriously harm our business, results of operations and business prospects. To date, we have not experienced significant difficulties in attracting or retaining such personnel.
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY
We own or license various United States and foreign patents relating to a variety of technologies. For certain of our proprietary processes, inventions, and works of authorship, we rely on trade secret or copyright protection. We also maintain trademark rights (including registrations) for our corporate name and several other trademarks and service marks that we use in our business in the United States and other countries throughout the world. We have implemented appropriate policies and procedures (including both technological means and training programs for our employees) to identify and protect our intellectual property, as well as that of our customers and suppliers. As of March 31, 2019 and 2018, the carrying value of our intellectual property was not material.
Although we believe that our intellectual property assets and licenses are sufficient for the operation of our business as we currently conduct it, from time to time third parties assert patent infringement claims against us or our customers. In addition, we provide design and engineering services to our customers and also design and make our own products. As a consequence of these activities, our customers are sometimes requiring us to take responsibility for intellectual property to a greater extent than in our manufacturing and assembly businesses. If and when third parties make assertions regarding the ownership or right to use intellectual property, we could be required to either enter into licensing arrangements or to resolve the issue through litigation. Such license rights might not be available to us on commercially acceptable terms, if at all, and any such litigation might not be resolved in our favor. Additionally, litigation could be lengthy and costly and could materially harm our financial condition regardless of the outcome. We also could be required to incur substantial costs to redesign a product or re-perform design services.
From time to time, we enter into intellectual property licenses (e.g., patent licenses and software licenses) with third parties which obligate us to report covered behavior to the licensor and pay license fees to the licensor for certain activities or products, or that enable our use of third-party technologies. We may also decline to enter into licenses for intellectual property that we do not think is useful for or used in our operations, or for which our customers or suppliers have licenses or have assumed responsibility. Given the diverse and varied nature of our business and the location of our business around the world, certain activities we perform, such as providing assembly services in China and India, may fall outside the scope of those licenses or may not be subject to the applicable intellectual property rights. Our licensors may disagree and claim royalties are owed for such activities. In addition, the basis (e.g. base price) for any royalty amounts owed are audited by licensors and may be challenged. Some of these disagreements may lead to claims and litigation that might not be resolved in our favor. Additionally, litigation could be lengthy and costly and could materially harm our financial condition regardless of the outcome.
FINANCIAL INFORMATION ABOUT SEGMENTS AND GEOGRAPHIC AREAS
Refer to note 19 to our consolidated financial statements included under Item 8 for financial information about our business segments and geographic areas.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Our Internet address is https://www.flex.com. We make available through our Internet website the Company's annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or

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furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the Securities and Exchange Commission.
We were incorporated in the Republic of Singapore in May 1990. Our principal corporate office is located at 2 Changi South Lane, Singapore 486123. Our U.S. corporate headquarters is located at 6201 America Center Drive, San Jose, CA 95002.
ITEM 1A.    RISK FACTORS
We depend on industries that continually produce technologically advanced products with short product life cycles and our business would be adversely affected if our customers' products are not successful or if our customers lose market share.
We derive our revenues from customers in the following business groups:
HRS, which is comprised of our health solutions business, including surgical equipment, drug delivery, diagnostics, telemedicine, disposable devices, imaging and monitoring, patient mobility and ophthalmology; and our automotive business, including vehicle electrification, connectivity, autonomous, and smart technologies;

IEI, which is comprised of energy including advanced metering infrastructure, energy storage, smart lighting, smart solar energy; and industrial, including semiconductor and capital equipment, office solutions, household industrial and lifestyle, industrial automation and kiosks;

CEC, which includes our telecom business of radio access base stations, remote radio heads and small cells for wireless infrastructure; our networking business, which includes optical, routing, and switching products for data and video networks; our server and storage platforms for both enterprise and cloud-based deployments; next generation storage and security appliance products; and rack-level solutions, converged infrastructure and software-defined product solutions; and

CTG, which includes our consumer-related businesses in IoT enabled devices, audio and consumer power electronics, mobile devices; and various supply chain solutions for consumer, computing and printing devices.
Factors affecting any of these industries in general or our customers in particular, could adversely impact us. These factors include:
rapid changes in technology, evolving industry standards, and requirements for continuous improvement in products and services that result in short product life cycles;

demand for our customers' products may be seasonal;

our customers may fail to successfully market their products, and our customers' products may fail to gain widespread commercial acceptance;

our customers' products may have supply chain issues;

our customers may experience dramatic market share shifts in demand which may cause them to lose market share or exit businesses; and

there may be recessionary periods in our customers' markets.
Our customers may cancel their orders, change production quantities or locations, or delay production, and our current and potential customers may decide to manufacture some or all of their products internally, which could harm our business.
Cancellations, reductions, or delays by a significant customer or by a group of customers have harmed, and may in the future harm, our results of operations by reducing the volumes of products we manufacture and deliver for those customers, by causing a delay in the repayment of our expenditures for inventory in preparation for customer orders and for an impairment loss for inventory, and by lowering our asset utilization and overhead absorption resulting in lower gross margins and earnings. Additionally, current and prospective customers continuously evaluate our capabilities against other providers as well as against the merits of manufacturing products themselves. Our business would be adversely affected if customers decide to perform these functions internally or transfer their business to another provider. In addition, we face competition from the manufacturing operations of some of our current and potential customers, who are continually evaluating the merits of

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manufacturing products internally against the advantages of outsourcing. In the past, some of our customers moved a portion of their manufacturing from us in order to more fully utilize their excess internal manufacturing capacity. Any of these developments could cause a decline in our sales, loss of market acceptance of our products or services, decreases of our profits or loss of our market share.
As a provider of design and manufacturing services and components for electronics, we must provide increasingly rapid product turnaround times for our customers. We generally do not obtain firm, long-term purchase commitments from our customers, and we often experience reduced lead times in customer orders which may be less than the lead time we require to procure necessary components and materials.
The short-term nature of our customers' commitments and the rapid changes in demand for their products reduces our ability to accurately estimate the future requirements of our customers. This makes it difficult to schedule production and maximize utilization of our manufacturing capacity. In that regard, we must make significant decisions, including determining the levels of business that we will seek and accept, setting production schedules, making component procurement commitments, and allocating personnel and other resources based on our estimates of our customers' requirements.
On occasion, customers require rapid increases in production or require that manufacturing of their products be transitioned from one facility to another to reduce costs or achieve other objectives. These demands stress our resources, can cause supply chain management issues, and reduce our margins. We may not have sufficient capacity at any given time to meet our customers' demands, and transfers from one facility to another can result in inefficiencies and costs due to excess capacity in one facility and corresponding capacity constraints at another. Many of our costs and operating expenses are relatively fixed, and thus customer order fluctuations, deferrals, and transfers of demand from one facility to another, as described above, have had a material adverse effect on our operating results in the past and we may experience such effects in the future.
Our industry is extremely competitive; if we are not able to continue to provide competitive services, we may lose business.
We compete with a number of different companies, depending on the type of service we provide or the location of our operations. For example, we compete with major global EMS providers, other smaller EMS companies that have a regional or product-specific focus and ODMs with respect to some of the services that we provide. We also compete with our current and prospective customers, who evaluate our capabilities in light of their own capabilities and cost structures. Our industry is extremely competitive, many of our competitors have achieved substantial market share, and some may have lower cost structures or greater design, manufacturing, financial or other resources than we do. We face particular competition from Asian-based competitors, including Taiwanese ODM suppliers who compete in a variety of our end markets and have a substantial share of global information technology hardware production. If we are unable to provide comparable manufacturing services and improved products at lower cost than the other companies in our market, our net sales could decline.
A significant percentage of our sales come from a small number of customers and a decline in sales to any of these customers could adversely affect our business.
Sales to our ten largest customers represent a significant percentage of our net sales. Our ten largest customers accounted for approximately 43%, 41% and 43% of net sales in fiscal years 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively. No customer accounted for more than 10% of net sales in fiscal year 2019, 2018 and 2017. Our principal customers have varied from year to year. These customers may experience dramatic declines in their market shares or competitive position, due to economic or other forces, that may cause them to reduce their purchases from us or, in some cases, result in the termination of their relationship with us. Significant reductions in sales to any of these customers, or the loss of major customers, would materially harm our business. If we are not able to timely replace expired, canceled or reduced contracts with new business, our revenues and profitability could be harmed. Additionally, mergers, acquisitions, consolidations or other significant transactions involving our key customers generally entail risks to our business. If a significant transaction involving any of our key customers results in the loss of or reduction in purchases by any of our largest customers, it could have a materially adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects.
Our components business is dependent on our ability to quickly launch world-class component products, and our investment in the development of our component capabilities, together with the start-up and integration costs necessary to achieve quick launches of world-class component products, may adversely affect our margins and profitability.
Our components business, which include power supply manufacturing, is part of our strategy to improve our competitive position and to grow our future margins, profitability and shareholder returns by expanding our capabilities. The success of our components business is dependent on our ability to design and introduce world- class components that have performance characteristics which are suitable for a broad market and that offer significant price and/or performance advantages over competitive products.

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To create these world class components offerings, we must continue to make substantial investments in the development of our components capabilities, in resources such as research and development, technology licensing, test and tooling equipment, facility expansions, and personnel requirements. We may not be able to achieve or maintain market acceptance for any of our components offerings in any of our current or target markets. The success of our components business will also depend upon the level of market acceptance of our customers' end products, which incorporate our components, and over which we have no control.
Our exposure to financially troubled customers or suppliers may adversely affect our financial results.
We provide manufacturing services to companies and industries that have in the past, and may in the future, experience financial difficulty. If some of our customers experience financial difficulty, we could have difficulty recovering amounts owed to us from these customers, or demand for our products from these customers could decline. Additionally, if our suppliers experience financial difficulty we could have difficulty sourcing supplies necessary to fulfill production requirements and meet scheduled shipments. If one or more of our customers were to become insolvent or otherwise were unable to pay for the services provided by us on a timely basis, or at all, our operating results and financial condition could be adversely affected. Such adverse effects could include one or more of the following: an increase in our provision for doubtful accounts, a charge for inventory write-offs, a reduction in revenue, and an increase in our working capital requirements due to higher inventory levels and increases in days our accounts receivables are outstanding.
On April 21, 2016, SunEdison, Inc. and certain of its subsidiaries (“SunEdison”) filed for protection under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2016, we recognized a bad debt reserve charge of $61.0 million associated with our outstanding SunEdison receivables and accepted return of previously shipped inventory of approximately $90 million. During the second quarter of fiscal year 2017, prices for solar panel modules declined significantly. We determined that certain solar panel inventory previously designated for SunEdison on hand at the end of the second quarter of fiscal year 2017 was not fully recoverable and recorded a charge of $60.0 million to reduce the carrying costs to market during fiscal year 2017. In addition, we recognized a $16.0 million impairment charge for solar module equipment and incurred $16.9 million of incremental costs primarily related to negative margin sales and other associated solar panel direct costs. The estimates underlying our recorded provisions, as well as consideration of other potential customer bankruptcy-related contingencies associated with the SunEdison bankruptcy proceedings, are based on the facts currently known to us; no preference claims have been asserted against the Company. SunEdison stated in schedules filed with the Bankruptcy Court that, within the 90 days preceding SunEdison's bankruptcy filing, the Company received approximately $98.6 million of inventory and cash transfers of $69.2 million, which in aggregate represents the Company's estimate of the maximum reasonably possible contingent loss. On April 15, 2018, a subsidiary of the Company together with its subsidiaries and affiliates, entered into a tolling agreement with the trustee of the SunEdison Litigation Trust to toll any applicable statute of limitations or other time-related defense that might exist in regards to any potential claims that either party might be able to assert against the other for a period that will end at the earlier to occur of: (a) 60 days after a party provides written notice of termination; (b) six years from the effective date of April 15, 2018; or (c) such other date as the parties may agree in writing. We believe that we continue to have a number of affirmative and direct defenses to any potential claims for recovery and intend to vigorously defend any such claim, if asserted. An unfavorable resolution of this matter could be material to our results of operations, financial condition, or cash flows.
We may be adversely affected by supply chain issues, including shortages of required electronic components.
From time to time, we have experienced shortages of some of the electronic components that we use. These shortages can result from strong demand for those components or from problems experienced by suppliers, such as shortages of raw materials. These unanticipated component shortages could result in curtailed production or delays in production, which may prevent us from making scheduled shipments to customers. Our inability to make scheduled shipments could cause us to experience a reduction in sales, increase in inventory levels and costs, and could adversely affect relationships with existing and prospective customers. Component shortages may also increase our cost of goods sold because we may be required to pay higher prices for components in short supply and redesign or reconfigure products to accommodate substitute components. As a result, component shortages could adversely affect our operating results. Our performance depends, in part, on our ability to incorporate changes in component costs into the selling prices for our products.
Our supply chain may also be impacted by other events outside our control, including macro-economic events, trade restrictions, political crises, or natural or environmental occurrences.
Our margins and profitability may be adversely affected due to substantial investments, start-up and production ramp costs in our design services.
As part of our strategy to enhance our end-to-end service offerings, we continue to expand our design and engineering capabilities. Providing these services can expose us to different or greater potential risks than those we face when providing our manufacturing services.

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Although we enter into contracts with our design services customers, we may design and develop products for these customers prior to receiving a purchase order or other firm commitment from them. We are required to make substantial investments in the resources necessary to design and develop these products, and no revenue may be generated from these efforts if our customers do not approve the designs in a timely manner or at all. In addition, we may make investments in designing products and not be able to design viable manufacturable products, in which cases we may not be able to recover our investments. Even if we are successful in designing manufacturable products and our customers accept our designs, if our customers do not then purchase anticipated levels of products, we may not realize any profits. Our design activities often require that we purchase inventory for initial production runs before we have a purchase commitment from a customer. Even after we have a contract with a customer with respect to a product, these contracts may allow the customer to delay or cancel deliveries and may not obligate the customer to any particular volume of purchases. These contracts can generally be terminated on short notice. In addition, some of the products we design and develop must satisfy safety and regulatory standards and some must receive government certifications. If we fail to obtain these approvals or certifications on a timely basis, we would be unable to sell these products, which would harm our sales, profitability and reputation.
Our design services offerings require significant investments in research and development, technology licensing, test and tooling equipment, patent applications, facility building and expansion and recruitment. We may not be able to achieve a high enough level of sales for this business to be profitable. The initial costs of investing in the resources necessary to expand our design and engineering capabilities, and in particular to support our design services offerings, have historically adversely affected our profitability, and may continue to do so as we continue to make investments to grow these capabilities.
In addition, we often agree to certain product price limitations and cost reduction targets in connection with these services. Inflationary and other increases in the costs of the raw materials and labor required to produce the products have occurred and may recur from time to time. Also, the production ramps for these programs are typically significant and negatively impact our margin in early stages as the manufacturing volumes are lower and result in inefficiencies and unabsorbed manufacturing overhead costs. We may not be able to reduce costs, incorporate changes in costs into the selling prices of our products, or increase operating efficiencies as we ramp production of our products, which would adversely affect our margins and our results of operations.
We conduct operations in a number of countries and are subject to the risks inherent in international operations.
The geographic distances between the Americas, Asia and Europe create a number of logistical and communications challenges for us. These challenges include managing operations across multiple time zones, directing the manufacture and delivery of products across distances, coordinating procurement of components and raw materials and their delivery to multiple locations, and coordinating the activities and decisions of the core management team, which is based in a number of different countries.
Facilities in several different locations may be involved at different stages of the production process of a single product, leading to additional logistical difficulties.
Because our manufacturing operations are located in a number of countries throughout the Americas, Asia and Europe, we are subject to risks of changes in economic and political conditions in those countries, including:
fluctuations in the value of local currencies;

labor unrest, difficulties in staffing and geographic labor shortages;

longer payment cycles;

cultural differences;

increases in duties, tariffs, and taxation levied on our products including anti-dumping and countervailing duties;

trade restrictions including limitations on imports or exports of components or assembled products, unilaterally or bilaterally;

trade sanctions and related regulatory enforcement actions and other proceedings;

potential trade wars;


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increased scrutiny by the media and other third parties of labor practices within our industry (including but not limited to working conditions) which may result in allegations of violations, more stringent and burdensome labor laws and regulations and inconsistency in the enforcement and interpretation of such laws and regulations, higher labor costs, and/or loss of revenues if our customers become dissatisfied with our labor practices and diminish or terminate their relationship with us;

imposition of restrictions on currency conversion or the transfer of funds;

expropriation of private enterprises;

ineffective legal protection of our intellectual property rights in certain countries;

natural disasters;

exposure to infectious disease and epidemics;

inability of international customers and suppliers to obtain financing resulting from tightening of credit in international financial markets;

political unrest; and

a potential reversal of current favorable policies encouraging foreign investment or foreign trade by our host countries.
The attractiveness of our services to customers and our ability to conduct business with certain customers can be affected by changes in U.S. and other countries' trade policies. In 2018, the U.S. imposed tariffs on a large variety of products of Chinese origin. The U.S. government has also indicated a readiness to further expand the scope of the tariffs on Chinese goods if negotiations are not successful, and most recently, effective May 10, 2019, increased tariffs on $200 billion of Chinese goods to 25%. Further, on May 15, 2019, President Trump issued an executive order designed to secure the information and communications technology and services supply chain, which would restrict the acquisition or use in the United States of information and communications technology or services designed, developed, manufactured, or supplied by persons owned by, controlled by, or subject to the jurisdiction or direction of foreign adversaries. The executive order is subject to implementation by the Secretary of Commerce and applies to contracts entered into prior to the effective date of the order. In addition, the U.S. Commerce Department has implemented additional restrictions and may implement further restrictions that would affect conducting business with certain Chinese companies. Depending upon their duration and implementation, as well as our ability to mitigate their impact, these tariffs, the executive order and its implementation and other regulatory actions could materially affect our business, including in the form of increased cost of goods sold, decreased margins, increased pricing for customers, and reduced sales.
In addition, some countries in which we operate, such as Brazil, Hungary, India, Mexico, Malaysia and Poland, have experienced periods of slow or negative growth, high inflation, significant currency devaluations or limited availability of foreign exchange. Furthermore, in countries such as China, Brazil, India and Mexico, governmental authorities exercise significant influence over many aspects of the economy, and their actions could have a significant effect on us. We could be seriously harmed by inadequate infrastructure, including lack of adequate power and water supplies, transportation, raw materials and parts in countries in which we operate. In addition, we may encounter labor disruptions and rising labor costs, in particular within the lower-cost regions in which we operate. Any increase in labor costs that we are unable to recover in our pricing to our customers could adversely impact our operating results.
Operations in foreign countries also present risks associated with currency exchange and convertibility, inflation and repatriation of earnings. In some countries, economic and monetary conditions and other factors could affect our ability to convert our cash distributions to U.S. dollars or other freely convertible currencies, or to move funds from our accounts in these countries. Furthermore, the central bank of any of these countries may have the authority to suspend, restrict or otherwise impose conditions on foreign exchange transactions or to approve distributions to foreign investors.
The success of certain of our activities depends on our ability to protect our intellectual property rights; claims of infringement or misuse of intellectual property and/or breach of license agreement provisions against our customers or us could harm our business.

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We retain certain intellectual property rights to some of the technologies that we develop as part of our engineering, design and manufacturing services and components offerings. The measures we have taken to prevent unauthorized use of our technology may not be successful. If we are unable to protect our intellectual property rights, this could reduce or eliminate the competitive advantages of our proprietary technology, which would harm our business.
Our engineering, design and manufacturing services and components offerings involve the creation and use of intellectual property rights, which subject us to the risk of claims of infringement or misuse of intellectual property from third parties and/or breach of our agreements with third parties, as well as claims arising from the allocation of intellectual property risk among us and our customers. From time to time, we enter into intellectual property licenses (e.g., patent licenses and software licenses) with third parties which obligate us to report covered behavior to the licensor and pay license fees to the licensor for certain activities or products, or that enable our use of third party technologies. We may also decline to enter into licenses for intellectual property that we do not think is useful for or used in our operations, or for which our customers or suppliers have licenses or have assumed responsibility. Given the diverse and varied nature of our business and the location of our business around the world, certain activities we perform, such as providing assembly services in China and India, may fall outside the scope of those licenses or may not be subject to the applicable intellectual property rights. Our licensors may disagree and claim royalties are owed for such activities. In addition, the basis (e.g. base price) for any royalty amounts owed are audited by licensors and may be challenged. Our customers are increasingly requiring us to indemnify them against the risk of intellectual property-related claims and licensors are claiming that activities we perform are covered by licenses to which we are a party. In March 2018, we received an inquiry from a licensor referencing a patent license agreement, and requesting information relating royalties for products that we assemble for a customer in China. If any of these inquiries result in a claim, the Company intends to contest any such claim vigorously. If a claim is asserted and we are unsuccessful in its defense, a material loss is reasonably possible. We cannot predict or estimate an amount or reasonable range of outcomes with respect to the matter.
If any claims of infringement or misuse of intellectual property from third parties and/or breach of our agreements with third parties, as well as claims arising from the allocation of intellectual property risk among us and our customers, are brought against us or our customers, whether or not these have merit, we could be required to expend significant resources in defense of such claims. In the event of such a claim, we may be required to spend a significant amount of money to develop alternatives or obtain licenses or to resolve the issue through litigation. We may not be successful in developing such alternatives or obtaining such licenses on reasonable terms or at all, and any such litigation might not be resolved in our favor, in which cases we may be required to curtail certain of our services and offerings. Additionally, litigation could be lengthy and costly, and could materially harm our financial condition regardless of outcome.
We are subject to risks relating to litigation and regulatory investigations and proceedings, which may have a material adverse effect on our business.
From time to time, we are involved in various claims, suits, investigations and legal proceedings. Additional legal claims or regulatory matters may arise in the future and could involve matters relating to commercial disputes, government regulatory and compliance, intellectual property, antitrust, tax, employment or shareholder issues, product liability claims and other issues on a global basis. If we receive an adverse judgment in any such matter, we could be required to pay substantial damages and cease certain practices or activities. Regardless of the merits of the claims, litigation and other proceedings may be both time- consuming and disruptive to our business. The defense and ultimate outcome of any lawsuits or other legal proceedings may result in higher operating expenses and a decrease in operating margin, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations.
On May 8, 2018, a putative class action was filed in the Northern District of California against the Company and certain officers alleging violations of Sections 10(b) and 20(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and Rule 10b-5, promulgated thereunder, alleging misstatements and/or omissions in certain of the Company’s financial results, press releases and SEC filings made during the putative class period of January 26, 2017 through April 26, 2018. On October 1, 2018, the Court appointed lead plaintiff and lead plaintiff’s counsel in the case. On November 28, 2018, lead plaintiff filed an amended complaint alleging misstatements and/or omissions in certain of the Company’s SEC filings, press releases, earnings calls, and analyst and investor conferences and expanding the putative class period through October 25, 2018. On April 3, 2019, the Court vacated its prior order appointing lead plaintiff and lead plaintiff’s counsel and reopened the lead plaintiff appointment process. Motions for appointment as lead plaintiff are due June 4, 2019. Defendants’ deadline to move to dismiss is vacated until after the lead plaintiff appointment process is complete and an operative complaint is designated. In addition, the Court has set a case management conference for July 17, 2019. Any existing or future lawsuits could be time-consuming, result in significant expense and divert the attention and resources of our management and other key employees, as well as harm our reputation, business, financial condition or results of operations.
On February 14, 2019, we submitted an initial notification of voluntary disclosure to the U.S. Department of the Treasury, Office of Foreign Assets Control ("OFAC") regarding possible noncompliance with U.S. economic sanctions requirements among certain non-U.S. Flex-affiliated operations.  We have initiated an internal investigation regarding this matter.  The matter

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is at a very preliminary stage and we cannot predict the total costs to be incurred in response to any steps taken by OFAC, the potential impact on our personnel or to what extent we could be subject to penalties, which could be material. Nor can we predict how long it will take to complete our investigation and for a disposition by OFAC.
If we do not effectively manage changes in our operations, our business may be harmed; we have taken substantial restructuring charges in the past and we may need to take material restructuring charges in the future.
The expansion of our business, as well as business contractions and other changes in our customers' requirements, have in the past, and may in the future, require that we adjust our business and cost structures by incurring restructuring charges. Restructuring activities involve reductions in our workforce at some locations and closure of certain facilities. All of these changes have in the past placed, and may in the future place, considerable strain on our financial and management control systems and resources, including decision support, accounting management, information systems and facilities. If we do not properly manage our financial and management controls, reporting systems and procedures to manage our employees, our business could be harmed.
In recent years, including fiscal years 2019, 2018 and 2017, we initiated targeted restructuring activities focused on optimizing our portfolio, in particular customers and products in our CTG business, optimizing our cost structure in lower growth areas and, more importantly, streamlining certain corporate and segment functions as well as exited our NIKE operations in Mexico. Restructuring charges are recorded based upon employee termination dates, site closure and consolidation plans generally in conjunction with an overall corporate initiative to drive cost reduction and realign the Company's global footprint.
We may be required to take additional charges in the future to align our operations and cost structures with global economic conditions, market demands, cost competitiveness, and our geographic footprint as it relates to our customers' production requirements. We may consolidate certain manufacturing facilities or transfer certain of our operations to lower cost geographies. If we are required to take additional restructuring charges in the future, our operating results, financial condition, and cash flows could be adversely impacted. Additionally, there are other potential risks associated with our restructurings that could adversely affect us, such as delays encountered with the finalization and implementation of the restructuring activities, work stoppages, and the failure to achieve targeted cost savings.
A breach of our IT or physical security systems, or violation of data privacy laws, may cause us to incur significant legal and financial exposure.
We rely on our information systems to process, transmit and store electronic information (including sensitive data such as confidential business information and personally identifiable data relating to employees, customers, and other business partners), and to manage or support a variety of critical business processes and activities. We regularly face attempts by others to gain unauthorized access through the Internet or to introduce malicious software to our information systems. We are also a target of malicious attackers who attempt to gain access to our network or data centers or those of our customers or end users; steal proprietary information related to our business, products, employees, and customers; or interrupt our systems and services or those of our customers or others. We believe such attempts are increasing in number and in technical sophistication. In some instances, we, our customers, and the users of our products and services might be unaware of an incident or its magnitude and effects. We have implemented security systems with the intent of maintaining the physical security of our facilities and inventory and protecting our customers’ and our suppliers’ confidential information. In addition, while we seek to detect and investigate all unauthorized attempts and attacks against our network, products, and services, and to prevent their recurrence where practicable through changes to our internal processes and tools, we are subject to, and at times have suffered from, breach of these security systems which have in the past and may in the future result in unauthorized access to our facilities and/or unauthorized use or theft of the inventory or information we are trying to protect. If unauthorized parties gain physical access to our inventory or if they gain electronic access to our information systems or if such information or inventory is used in an unauthorized manner, misdirected, or lost or stolen during transmission or transport, any theft or misuse of such information or inventory could result in, among other things, unfavorable publicity, governmental inquiry and oversight, difficulty in marketing our services, allegations by our customers that we have not performed our contractual obligations, litigation by affected parties including our customers and possible financial obligations for damages related to the theft or misuse of such information or inventory, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our profitability and cash flow. In addition, new data privacy laws and regulations, including the new European Union General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) effective May 2018, pose increasingly complex compliance challenges, which may increase compliance costs, and any failure to comply with data privacy laws and regulations could result in significant penalties. Additionally, California recently enacted legislation, the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”), which will become effective January 1, 2020. The CCPA will, among other requirements, require covered companies to provide new disclosures to California consumers, and allow such consumers new abilities to opt-out of certain sales of personal information. The effects of the CCPA may be significant, and may require us to modify our data processing practices and policies and to incur substantial costs and expenses in an effort to comply.

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Our strategic relationships with major customers create risks.
In the past, we have completed numerous strategic transactions with customers. Under these arrangements, we generally acquire inventory, equipment and other assets from the customers, and lease or acquire their manufacturing facilities, while simultaneously entering into multi-year manufacturing and supply agreements for the production of their products. We may pursue these customer divestiture transactions in the future. These arrangements entered into with divesting customers typically involve many risks, including the following:
we may need to pay a purchase price to the divesting customers that exceeds the value we ultimately may realize from the future business of the customer;

the integration of the acquired assets and facilities into our business may be time-consuming and costly, including the incurrence of restructuring charges;

we, rather than the divesting customer, bear the risk of excess capacity at the facility;

we may not achieve anticipated cost reductions and efficiencies at the facility;

we may be unable to meet the expectations of the customer as to volume, product quality, timeliness and cost reductions;

our supply agreements with the customers generally do not require any minimum volumes of purchase by the customers, and the actual volume of purchases may be less than anticipated; and

if demand for the customers' products declines, the customer may reduce its volume of purchases, and we may not be able to sufficiently reduce the expenses of operating the facility or use the facility to provide services to other customers.
As a result of these and other risks, we have been, and in the future may be, unable to achieve anticipated levels of profitability under these arrangements. In addition, these strategic arrangements have not, and in the future may not, result in any material revenues or contribute positively to our earnings per share.
If our compliance policies are breached, we may incur significant legal and financial exposure.
We have implemented local and global compliance policies to ensure compliance with our legal obligations across our operations. A significant legal risk resulting from our international operations is compliance with the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act or similar local laws of the countries in which we do business, including the UK Anti-Bribery Act, which prohibits covered companies from making payments to foreign government officials to assist in obtaining or retaining business. Our Code of Business Conduct prohibits corrupt payments on a global basis and precludes us from offering or giving anything of value to a government official for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business, to win a business advantage or to improperly influence a decision regarding Flex. Nevertheless, there can be no assurance that all of our employees and agents will refrain from taking actions in violation of this and our related anti-corruption policies and procedures. Any such violation could have a material adverse effect on our business.
We are subject to the risk of increased income taxes.
We are subject to taxes in numerous jurisdictions. Our future effective tax rates could be affected by changes in the mix of earnings in countries with differing statutory rates and changes in tax laws or their interpretation including changes related to tax holidays or tax incentives. The international tax environment continues to change as a result of both coordinated efforts by governments and unilateral measures designed by individual countries, both intended to tackle concerns over perceived international tax avoidance techniques, which could ultimately have an adverse effect on the taxation of international businesses. In addition, legislative changes may result from the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development’s Base Erosion and Profit Shifting Project. Any such changes, if adopted, could adversely impact our effective tax rate.
Our taxes could also increase if certain tax holidays or incentives are not renewed upon expiration, or if tax rates applicable to us in such jurisdictions are otherwise increased. Our continued ability to qualify for specific tax holiday extensions will depend on, among other things, our anticipated investment and expansion in these countries and the manner in which the local governments interpret the requirements for modifications, extensions or new incentives.
In addition, the Company and its subsidiaries are regularly subject to tax return audits and examinations by various taxing jurisdictions around the world. In determining the adequacy of our provision for income taxes, we regularly assess the likelihood of adverse outcomes resulting from tax examinations. While it is often difficult to predict the final outcome or the

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timing of the resolution of a tax examination, we believe that our reserves for uncertain tax benefits reflect the outcome of tax positions that are more likely than not to occur. However, we cannot assure you that the final determination of any tax examinations will not be materially different than that which is reflected in our income tax provisions and accruals. Should additional taxes be assessed as a result of a current or future examination, there could be a material adverse effect on our tax provision, operating results, financial position and cash flows in the period or periods for which that determination is made.
Changes in financial accounting standards or policies have affected, and in the future may affect, our reported financial condition or results of operations.
We prepare our financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP. These principles are subject to interpretation by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB), the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA), the SEC and various bodies formed to interpret and create accounting policies. For example, significant changes to revenue recognition rules have been enacted and applied to us in fiscal year 2019 per Accounting Standard Update ("ASU") 2014-09 "Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606)". Changes to accounting rules or challenges to our interpretation or application of the rules by regulators may have a material adverse effect on our reported financial results or on the way we conduct business. Refer to "Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements" within note 2 of Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.
We may encounter difficulties with acquisitions and divestitures, which could harm our business.
We have completed numerous acquisitions of businesses and we may acquire additional businesses in the future. Any future acquisitions may require additional equity financing, which could be dilutive to our existing shareholders, or additional debt financing, which could increase our leverage and potentially affect our credit ratings. Any downgrades in our credit ratings associated with an acquisition could adversely affect our ability to borrow by resulting in more restrictive borrowing terms. As a result of the foregoing, we also may not be able to complete acquisitions or strategic customer transactions in the future to the same extent as in the past, or at all.
To integrate acquired businesses, we must implement our management information systems, operating systems and internal controls, and assimilate and manage the personnel of the acquired operations. The difficulties of this integration may be further complicated by geographic distances. The integration of acquired businesses may not be successful and could result in disruption to other parts of our business. In addition, the integration of acquired businesses may require that we incur significant restructuring charges.
In addition, acquisitions involve numerous risks and challenges, including:
diversion of management's attention from the normal operation of our business;

potential loss of key employees and customers of the acquired companies;

difficulties managing and integrating operations in geographically dispersed locations;

the potential for deficiencies in internal controls at acquired companies;

increases in our expenses and working capital requirements, which reduce our return on invested capital;

lack of experience operating in the geographic market or industry sector of the acquired business;

cybersecurity and compliance related issues;

initial dependence on unfamiliar supply chain or relatively small supply chain partners; and

exposure to unanticipated liabilities of acquired companies.
In addition, divestitures involve significant risks, including without limitation, difficulty finding financially sufficient buyers or selling on acceptable terms in a timely manner, and the agreed-upon terms could be renegotiated due to changes in business or market conditions. Divestitures could adversely affect our profitability and, under certain circumstances, require us to record impairment charges or a loss as a result of the transaction. In addition, completing divestitures requires expenses and management attention and could leave us with certain continuing liabilities.
These and other factors have harmed, and in the future could harm, our ability to achieve anticipated levels of profitability at acquired operations or realize other anticipated benefits of an acquisition or divestiture, and could adversely affect our business and operating results.

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We may not meet regulatory quality standards applicable to our manufacturing and quality processes for medical devices, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.
As a medical device manufacturer, we have additional compliance requirements. We are required to register with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") and are subject to periodic inspection by the FDA for compliance with the FDA's Quality System Regulation ("QSR") requirements, which require manufacturers of medical devices to adhere to certain regulations, including testing, quality control and documentation procedures. Compliance with applicable regulatory requirements is subject to continual review and is rigorously monitored through periodic inspections and product field monitoring by the FDA. If any FDA inspection reveals noncompliance with QSR or other FDA regulations, and the Company does not address the observation adequately to the satisfaction of the FDA, the FDA may take action against us. FDA actions may include issuing a letter of inspectional observations, issuing a warning letter, imposing fines, bringing an action against the Company and its officers, requiring a recall of the products we manufactured for our customers, refusing requests for clearance or approval of new products or withdrawal of clearance or approval previously granted, issuing an import detention on products entering the U.S. from an offshore facility, or shutting down a manufacturing facility. If any of these actions were to occur, it would harm our reputation and cause our business to suffer.
In the European Union ("EU"), we are required to maintain certain standardized certifications in order to sell our products and must undergo periodic inspections to obtain and maintain these certifications. Continued noncompliance to the EU regulations could stop the flow of products into the EU from us or from our customers. In China, the Safe Food and Drug Administration controls and regulates the manufacture and commerce of healthcare products. We must comply with the regulatory laws applicable to medical device manufactures or our ability to manufacture products in China could be impacted. In Japan, the Pharmaceutical Affairs Laws regulate the manufacture and commerce of healthcare products. These regulations also require that subcontractors manufacturing products intended for sale in Japan register with authorities and submit to regulatory audits. Other Asian countries and Latin America where we operate have similar laws regarding the regulation of medical device manufacturing.
If our products or components contain defects, demand for our services may decline and we may be exposed to product liability and product warranty liability.
Defects in the products we manufacture or design, whether caused by a design, engineering, manufacturing or component failure or deficiencies in our manufacturing processes, could result in product or component failures, which may damage our business reputation and expose us to product liability or product warranty claims.
Product liability claims may include liability for personal injury or property damage. Product warranty claims may include liability to pay for the recall, repair or replacement of a product or component. Although we generally allocate liability for these claims in our contracts with our customers, increasingly we are unsuccessful in allocating such liability, and even where we have allocated liability to our customers, our customers may not have the resources to satisfy claims for costs or liabilities arising from a defective product or component for which they have assumed responsibility.
If we design, engineer or manufacture a product or component that is found to cause any personal injury or property damage or is otherwise found to be defective, we could spend a significant amount of money to resolve the claim. In addition, product liability and product recall insurance coverage are expensive and may not be available for some or all of our services offerings on acceptable terms, in sufficient amounts, or at all. A successful product liability or product warranty claim in excess of our insurance coverage or any material claim for which insurance coverage is denied, limited or is not available could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
Fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates could increase our operating costs.
We have manufacturing operations and industrial parks that are located in various part of the world, including Asia, Eastern Europe, Mexico and Brazil. A portion of our purchases and our sale transactions are denominated in currencies other than the United States dollar. As a result, we are exposed to fluctuations in these currencies impacting our fixed cost overhead or our supply base relative to the currencies in which we conduct transactions.
Currency exchange rates fluctuate on a daily basis as a result of a number of factors, including changes in a country's political and economic policies. Volatility in the functional and non-functional currencies of our entities and the United States dollar could seriously harm our business, operating results and financial condition. The primary impact of currency exchange fluctuations is on the cash, receivables, payables and expenses of our operating entities. As part of our currency hedging strategy, we use financial instruments such as forward exchange, swap contracts, and options to hedge our foreign currency exposure in order to reduce the short-term impact of foreign currency rate fluctuations on our operating results. If our hedging activities are not successful or if we change or reduce these hedging activities in the future, we may experience significant unexpected fluctuations in our operating results as a result of changes in exchange rates.

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We are also exposed to risks related to the valuation of the Chinese currency relative to the U.S. dollar. The Chinese currency is the renminbi ("RMB"). A significant increase in the value of the RMB could adversely affect our financial results and cash flows by increasing both our manufacturing costs and the costs of our local supply base.
Our operating results may fluctuate significantly due to seasonal demand.
Two of our significant end markets are the mobile devices market and the consumer devices market. These markets exhibit particular strength generally in the two quarters leading up to the end of the calendar year in connection with the holiday season. As a result, we have historically experienced stronger revenues in our second and third fiscal quarters as compared to our other fiscal quarters. Economic or other factors leading to diminished orders in the end of the calendar year could harm our business.
We depend on our executive officers and skilled management personnel.
Our success depends to a large extent upon the continued services of our executive officers and other key employees. Generally, our employees are not bound by employment or non-competition agreements, and we cannot assure you that we will retain our executive officers and other key employees. We could be seriously harmed by the loss of any of our executive officers or other key employees. We will need to recruit and retain skilled management personnel, and if we are not able to do so, our business could be harmed. In addition, in connection with expanding our design services offerings, we must attract and retain experienced design engineers. There is substantial competition in our industry for highly skilled employees. Our failure to recruit and retain experienced design engineers could limit the growth of our design services offerings, which could adversely affect our business.
Our failure to comply with environmental laws could adversely affect our business.
We are subject to various federal, state, local and foreign environmental laws and regulations, including regulations governing the use, storage, discharge and disposal of hazardous substances used in our manufacturing processes. We are also subject to laws and regulations governing the recyclability of products, the materials that may be included in products, and our obligations to dispose of these products after end users have finished with them. Additionally, we may be exposed to liability to our customers relating to the materials that may be included in the components that we procure for our customers' products. Any violation or alleged violation by us of environmental laws could subject us to significant costs, fines or other penalties.
We are also required to comply with an increasing number of global and local product environmental compliance regulations focused on the restriction of certain hazardous substances. We are subject to the EU directives, including the Restrictions on RoHS, the WEEE as well as the EU's REACH regulation. In addition, new technical classifications of e-Waste being discussed in the Basel Convention technical working group could affect both our customers' abilities and obligations in electronics repair and refurbishment. Also of note is China's Management Methods for Controlling Pollution Caused by EIPs regulation, commonly referred to as "China RoHS", which restricts the importation into and production within China of electrical equipment containing certain hazardous materials. Similar legislation has been or may be enacted in other jurisdictions, including in the United States. RoHS and other similar legislation bans or restricts the use of lead, mercury and certain other specified substances in electronics products and WEEE requires EU importers and/or producers to assume responsibility for the collection, recycling and management of waste electronic products and components. We have developed rigorous risk mitigating compliance programs designed to meet the needs of our customers as well as applicable regulations. These programs may include collecting compliance data from our suppliers, full laboratory testing and public reporting of other environmental metrics such as carbon emissions, electronic waste and water, and we also require our supply chain to comply. Non-compliance could potentially result in significant costs and/or penalties. In the case of WEEE, the compliance responsibility rests primarily with the EU importers and/or producers rather than with EMS companies. However, customers may turn to EMS companies for assistance in meeting their obligations under WEEE.
In addition, we are responsible for the cleanup of contamination at some of our current and former manufacturing facilities and at some third party sites. If more stringent compliance or cleanup standards under environmental laws or regulations are imposed, or the results of future testing and analyses at our current or former operating facilities indicate that we are responsible for the release of hazardous substances into the air, ground and/or water, we may be subject to additional liability. Additional environmental matters may arise in the future at sites where no problem is currently known or at sites that we may acquire in the future. Additionally, we could be required to alter our manufacturing and operations and incur substantial expense in order to comply with environmental regulations. Our failure to comply with environmental laws and regulations or adequately address contaminated sites could limit our ability to expand our facilities or could require us to incur significant expenses, which would harm our business.
Failure to comply with domestic or international employment and related laws could result in the payment of significant damages, which would reduce our net income.

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We are subject to a variety of domestic and foreign employment laws, including those related to safety, wages and overtime, discrimination, whistle-blowing, classification of employees and severance payments. Enforcement activity relating to these laws, particularly outside of the United States, can increase as a result of increased media attention due to violations by other companies, changes in law, political and other factors. There can be no assurance that we won't be found to have violated such laws in the future, due to a more aggressive enforcement posture by governmental authorities or for any other reason. Any such violations could lead to the assessment of fines against us by federal, state or foreign regulatory authorities or damages payable to employees, which fines could be substantial and which would reduce our net income.
We are subject to risks associated with investments.
We invest in private funds and companies for strategic reasons and may not realize a return on our investments. We make investments in private funds and companies to further our strategic objectives, support key business initiatives, and develop business relationships with related portfolio companies. Many of the instruments in which we invest are non-marketable at the time of our initial investment. During the last half of fiscal year 2019, we reassessed our strategy with respect to our investment portfolio. We focused on streamlining our investment portfolio and disposed of some of our investments and recognized certain charges. If any of the funds or companies in which we invest fail, we could lose all or part of our investment. From time-to-time we have identified observable price changes, or impairments in investments, and we have written down certain investments fair values and recognized a loss.
Our business could be impacted as a result of actions by activist shareholders or others.
We may be subject, from time to time, to legal and business challenges in the operation of our company due to actions instituted by activist shareholders or others. Responding to such actions could be costly and time-consuming, may not align with our business strategies and could divert the attention of our Board of Directors and senior management from the pursuit of our business strategies. Perceived uncertainties as to our future direction as a result of shareholder activism may lead to the perception of a change in the direction of the business or other instability and may make it more difficult to attract and retain qualified personnel and business partners and may affect our relationships with vendors, customers and other third parties.
Our debt level may create limitations.
As of March 31, 2019, our total debt was approximately $3.1 billion. This level of indebtedness could limit our flexibility as a result of debt service requirements and restrictive covenants, and may limit our ability to access additional capital or execute our business strategy.
Changes in our credit rating may make it more expensive for us to raise additional capital or to borrow additional funds. We may also be exposed to interest rate fluctuations on our outstanding borrowings and investments.
Our credit is rated by credit rating agencies. Our 4.625% Notes, our 5.000% Notes and our 4.750% Notes are currently rated BBB- by Standard and Poor's ("S&P") which is considered to be “investment grade” by S&P, rated Baa3 by Moody’s which is considered to be “investment grade” by Moody's, and rated BBB- by Fitch which is considered to be "investment grade" by Fitch. Any decline in our credit rating may make it more expensive for us to raise additional capital in the future on terms that are acceptable to us, if at all, negatively impact the price of our ordinary shares, increase our interest payments under some of our existing debt agreements, and have other negative implications on our business, many of which are beyond our control. In addition, the interest rate payable on some of our credit facilities is subject to adjustment from time to time if our credit ratings change. Thus, any potential future negative change in our credit rating may increase the interest rate payable on these credit facilities.
In addition, we are exposed to interest rate risk under our variable rate terms loans, bilateral facilities and revolving credit facility for indebtedness we have incurred or may incur under such borrowings. The interest rates under these borrowings are based on either (i) a margin over LIBOR or (ii) the base rate (the greatest of the agent's prime rate, the federal funds rate plus 0.50% and LIBOR for a one-month interest period plus 1.00%) plus an applicable margin, in each case depending on our credit rating. Refer to the discussion in note 7, "Bank Borrowings and Long-Term Debt" to the consolidated financial statements for further details of our debt obligations. We are also exposed to interest rate risk on our invested cash balances, our securitization facilities and our factoring activities.
In addition, the U. K.’s Financial Conduct Authority, which regulates LIBOR, announced that it intends to phase out LIBOR by the end of 2021. The U.S. Federal Reserve has begun publishing a Secured Overnight Funding Rate (“SOFR”), which is intended to replace U.S. dollar LIBOR. Plans for alternative reference rates for other currencies have also been announced. At this time, we cannot predict how markets will respond to these proposed alternative rates or the effect of any changes to LIBOR or the discontinuation of LIBOR. If LIBOR is no longer available or if our lenders have increased costs due to changes in LIBOR, we may experience potential increases in interest rates on our variable rate debt, which could adversely impact our interest expense, results of operations and cash flows.

25


Weak global economic conditions, geopolitical uncertainty and instability in financial markets may adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition, and access to capital markets.
Our revenue and gross margin depend significantly on general economic conditions and the demand for products in the markets in which our customers compete. Adverse worldwide economic conditions and geopolitical uncertainty may create challenging conditions in the electronics industry. For example, these conditions may be adversely impacted by the pending withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the EU, which is scheduled to take place on October 31, 2019, following its referendum on EU membership and the actions that the U.S. has taken or may take with respect to certain treaty and trade relationships with other countries. These conditions may result in reduced consumer and business confidence and spending in many countries, a tightening in the credit markets, a reduced level of liquidity in many financial markets, high volatility in credit, fixed income and equity markets, currency exchange rate fluctuations, and global economic uncertainty. In addition, longer term disruptions in the capital and credit markets could adversely affect our access to liquidity needed for our business. If financial institutions that have extended credit commitments to us are adversely affected by the conditions of the U.S. and international capital markets, they may become unable to fund borrowings under their credit commitments to us, which could have an adverse impact on our financial condition and our ability to borrow additional funds, if needed, for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions, research and development and other corporate purposes.
Catastrophic events could have a material adverse effect on our operations and financial results.
Our operations or systems could be disrupted by natural disasters, terrorist activity, public health issues, cyber security incidents, interruptions of service from utilities, transportation or telecommunications providers, or other catastrophic events. Such events could make it difficult or impossible to manufacture or deliver products to our customers, receive production materials from our suppliers, or perform critical functions, which could adversely affect our revenue and require significant recovery time and expenditures to resume operations. While we maintain business recovery plans that are intended to allow us to recover from natural disasters or other events that can be disruptive to our business, some of our systems are not fully redundant and we cannot be sure that our plans will fully protect us from all such disruptions.
We maintain a program of insurance coverage for a variety of property, casualty, and other risks. We place our insurance coverage with multiple carriers in numerous jurisdictions. However, one or more of our insurance providers may be unable or unwilling to pay a claim. The types and amounts of insurance we obtain vary depending on availability, cost, and decisions with respect to risk retention. The policies have deductibles and exclusions that result in us retaining a level of self-insurance. Losses not covered by insurance may be large, which could harm our results of operations and financial condition.
Our business could be adversely affected by any delays, or increased costs, resulting from issues that our common carriers are dealing with in transporting our materials, our products, or both.
We rely on a variety of common carriers to transport our materials from our suppliers to us, and to transport our products from us to our customers. Problems suffered by any of these common carriers, whether due to a natural disaster, labor problem, increased energy prices, criminal activity or some other issue, could result in shipping delays, increased costs, or other supply chain disruptions, and could therefore have a material adverse effect on our operations.
Our business and operations could be adversely impacted by climate change initiatives.
Concern over climate change has led to international legislative and regulatory initiatives directed at limiting carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas emissions. Proposed and existing efforts to address climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions could directly or indirectly affect our costs of energy, materials, manufacturing, distribution, packaging and other operating costs, which could impact our business and financial results.
Our goodwill and identifiable intangible assets could become impaired, which could reduce the value of our assets and reduce our net income in the year in which the write-off occurs.
Goodwill represents the excess of the cost of an acquisition over the fair value of the net assets acquired. We also ascribe value to certain identifiable intangible assets, which consist primarily of customer relationships, developed technology and trade names, among others, as a result of acquisitions. We may incur impairment charges on goodwill or identifiable intangible assets if we determine that the fair values of goodwill or identifiable intangible assets are less than their current carrying values. We evaluate, on a regular basis, whether events or circumstances have occurred that indicate all, or a portion, of the carrying amount of goodwill may no longer be recoverable, in which case an impairment charge to earnings would become necessary.
Refer to note 2 to the consolidated financial statements and 'critical accounting policies' in "management's discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations" for further discussion of the impairment testing of goodwill and identifiable intangible assets.

26


A decline in general economic conditions or global equity valuations could impact the judgments and assumptions about the fair value of our businesses and we could be required to record impairment charges on our goodwill or other identifiable intangible assets in the future, which could impact our consolidated balance sheet, as well as our consolidated statement of operations. If we are required to recognize an impairment charge in the future, the charge would not impact our consolidated cash flows, liquidity, capital resources, and covenants under our existing credit facilities, asset securitization program, and other outstanding borrowings.
The market price of our ordinary shares is volatile.
The stock market in recent years has experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that have affected the market prices of companies, including technology companies. These fluctuations have often been unrelated to or disproportionately impacted by the operating performance of these companies. The market for our ordinary shares has been and may in the future be subject to similar volatility. Factors such as fluctuations in our operating results, announcements of technological innovations or events affecting other companies in the electronics industry, currency fluctuations, general market fluctuations, and macro-economic conditions may cause the market price of our ordinary shares to decline.
Compliance with government regulations regarding the use of "Conflict Minerals" may result in increased costs and risks to us.
As part of the Dodd-Frank Act, the SEC has promulgated disclosure requirements regarding the use of certain minerals ("Minerals") that may have originated in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or adjoining countries. In our most recent report on Form SD, we reported that, based on our diligence review, we were unable to determine whether Minerals contained in our products originated in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or adjoining countries or whether the mining or trade of such Minerals directly or indirectly financed or otherwise benefited armed groups in those countries. We expect to undertake further reviews of our supply chain as necessary to comply with the SEC’s requirements. Additionally, customers rely on us to provide critical data regarding the products they purchase and request information on such Minerals. Our materials sourcing is broad-based and multi-tiered, and we may not be able to easily verify the origins of the Minerals used in the products we sell. We have many suppliers and each may provide the required information in a different manner, if at all. Accordingly, because the supply chain is complex, our reputation may suffer if we are unable to sufficiently verify the origins of the Minerals, if any, used in our products. Additionally, customers may demand that the products they purchase be free of any Minerals originating in the specified countries. The implementation of this requirement could affect the sourcing and availability of products we purchase from our suppliers. This may reduce the number of suppliers that may be able to provide products and may affect our ability to obtain products in sufficient quantities to meet customer demand or at competitive prices.
ITEM 1B.    UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
None.
ITEM 2.    PROPERTIES
Our facilities consist of a global network of industrial parks, regional manufacturing operations, and design, engineering and product introduction centers, providing approximately 27 million square feet of productive capacity as of March 31, 2019. We do not identify or allocate assets by operating segment, as they are interchangeable in nature and used by multiple operating segments.
The composition of the square footage of our facilities, by region, is as follows:
 
Leased
(Manufacturing)
 
Owned
(Manufacturing)
 
Total
(Manufacturing)
 
Non-manufacturing
 
Total
 
(in million square feet)
Americas
3.4

 
5.4

 
8.8

 
8.9

 
17.7

Asia
7.8

 
5.9

 
13.7

 
7.6

 
21.3

Europe
1.9

 
2.6

 
4.5

 
5.1

 
9.6

Total
13.1

 
13.9

 
27.0

 
21.6

 
48.6

Our facilities include large industrial parks, ranging in size from approximately 100,000 to 5.7 million square feet in Brazil, China, India, and Mexico. We also have regional manufacturing operations, generally ranging in size from under 100,000 to approximately 2.7 million square feet in Austria, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, The Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Singapore, Spain, Switzerland, the Ukraine

27


and the United States. We also have smaller design and engineering centers, innovation centers and product introduction centers at a number of locations in the world's major industrial and electronics markets.
Our facilities are well maintained and suitable for the operations conducted. The productive capacity of our plants is adequate for current needs.
ITEM 3.    LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
For a description of our material legal proceedings, see note 12 "Commitments and Contingencies" to the consolidated financial statements included under Item 8, which is incorporated herein by reference.
ITEM 4.    MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
Not applicable

28


PART II
ITEM 5.    MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED SHAREHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
MARKET AND SHAREHOLDER INFORMATION
Our ordinary shares are quoted on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbol "FLEX."
As of May 13, 2019 there were 3,053 holders of record of our ordinary shares. This does not include persons whose stock is in nominee or "street name" accounts through brokers.
DIVIDENDS
Since inception, we have not declared or paid any cash dividends on our ordinary shares. We currently do not have plans to pay any dividends in fiscal year 2020.
STOCK PRICE PERFORMANCE GRAPH
The following stock price performance graph and accompanying information is not deemed to be "soliciting material" or to be "filed" with the SEC or subject to Regulation 14A under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 or to the liabilities of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and will not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into any filing under the Securities Act of 1933 or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, regardless of any general incorporation language in any such filing.
The graph below compares the cumulative total shareholder return on our ordinary shares, the Standard & Poor's 500 Stock Index and a peer group comprised of Benchmark Electronics, Inc., Celestica Inc., Jabil Inc., and Sanmina Corporation.
The graph below assumes that $100 was invested in our ordinary shares, in the Standard & Poor's 500 Stock Index and in the peer group described above on March 31, 2014 and reflects the annual return through March 31, 2019, assuming dividend reinvestment.
The comparisons in the graph below are based on historical data and are not indicative of, or intended to forecast, the possible future performances of our ordinary shares.


29


COMPARISON OF 5 YEAR CUMULATIVE TOTAL RETURN
Flex, the S&P 500 Index, and Peer Group
chart-c4f1b043d381540b82a.jpg
 
3/14
 
3/15
 
3/16
 
3/17
 
3/18
 
3/19
Flex Ltd.
100.00

 
137.23

 
130.52

 
181.82

 
176.73

 
108.23

S&P 500 Index
100.00

 
112.73

 
114.74

 
134.45

 
153.26

 
167.81

Peer Group
100.00

 
123.37

 
111.90

 
169.45

 
144.64

 
136.56

Prepared by Zacks Investment Research, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved. Copyright 1980-2019
Index Data: Copyright Standard and Poor's, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved.
Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
The following table provides information regarding purchases of our ordinary shares made by us for the period from January 1, 2019 through March 31, 2019.
Period (2)
Total Number
of Shares
Purchased (1)
 
Average Price
Paid per Share
 
Total Number of Shares
Purchased as Part of
Publicly Announced
Plans or Programs
 
Approximate Dollar Value
of Shares that May Yet
Be Purchased Under the
Plans or Programs
January 1 - January 25, 2019
1,058,740

 
$
8.03

 
1,058,740

 
$
381,021,766

January 26 - March 1, 2019
2,245,925

 
10.24

 
2,245,925

 
358,017,848

March 2 - March 31, 2019
3,270,091

 
10.24

 
3,270,091

 
324,522,119

Total
6,574,756

 
 

 
6,574,756

 
 


(1)
During the period from January 1, 2019 through March 31, 2019 all purchases were made pursuant to the program discussed below in open market transactions. All purchases were made in accordance with Rule 10b-18 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.



30


(2)
On August 16, 2018, our Board of Directors authorized repurchases of our outstanding ordinary shares for up to $500 million. This is in accordance with the share purchase mandate whereby our shareholders approved a repurchase limit of 20% of our issued ordinary shares outstanding at the Annual General Meeting held on the same date as the Board authorization. As of March 31, 2019, shares in the aggregate amount of $324,522,119 were available to be repurchased under the current plan.
RECENT SALES OF UNREGISTERED SECURITIES
None.
INCOME TAXATION UNDER SINGAPORE LAW
Dividends.    Singapore does not impose a withholding tax on dividends. All dividends are tax exempt to shareholders.
Gains on Disposal.    Under current Singapore tax law there is no tax on capital gains, and thus any profits from the disposal of shares are not taxable in Singapore unless the gains arising from the disposal of shares are income in nature and subject to tax, especially if they arise from activities which the Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore regards as the carrying on of a trade or business in Singapore (in which case, the profits on the sale would be taxable as trade profits rather than capital gains).
Shareholders who apply, or who are required to apply, the Singapore Financial Reporting Standard 39 Financial Instruments—Recognition and Measurement ("FRS 39") for the purposes of Singapore income tax may be required to recognize gains or losses (not being gains or losses in the nature of capital) in accordance with the provisions of FRS 39 (as modified by the applicable provisions of Singapore income tax law) even though no sale or disposal of shares is made.
Stamp Duty.    There is no stamp duty payable for holding shares, and no duty is payable on the issue of new shares. When existing shares are acquired in Singapore, a stamp duty of 0.2% is payable on the instrument of transfer of the shares at market value. The stamp duty is borne by the purchaser unless there is an agreement to the contrary. If the instrument of transfer is executed outside of Singapore, the stamp duty must be paid only if the instrument of transfer is received in Singapore.
Estate Taxation.    The estate duty was abolished for deaths occurring on or after February 15, 2008. For deaths prior to February 15, 2008 the following rules apply:
If an individual who is not domiciled in Singapore dies on or after January 1, 2002, no estate tax is payable in Singapore on any of our shares held by the individual.
If property passing upon the death of an individual domiciled in Singapore includes our shares, Singapore estate duty is payable to the extent that the value of the shares aggregated with any other assets subject to Singapore estate duty exceeds S$600,000. Unless other exemptions apply to the other assets, for example, the separate exemption limit for residential properties, any excess beyond S$600,000 will be taxed at 5% on the first S$12,000,000 of the individual's chargeable assets and thereafter at 10%.
An individual shareholder who is a U.S. citizen or resident (for U.S. estate tax purposes) will have the value of the shares included in the individual's gross estate for U.S. estate tax purposes. An individual shareholder generally will be entitled to a tax credit against the shareholder's U.S. estate tax to the extent the individual shareholder actually pays Singapore estate tax on the value of the shares; however, such tax credit is generally limited to the percentage of the U.S. estate tax attributable to the inclusion of the value of the shares included in the shareholder's gross estate for U.S. estate tax purposes, adjusted further by a pro rata apportionment of available exemptions. Individuals who are domiciled in Singapore should consult their own tax advisors regarding the Singapore estate tax consequences of their investment.
Tax Treaties Regarding Withholding.    There is no reciprocal income tax treaty between the U.S. and Singapore regarding withholding taxes on dividends and capital gains.

31


ITEM 6.    SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
These historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected in the future. The following selected consolidated financial data set forth below was derived from our historical audited consolidated financial statements and is qualified by reference to, and should be read in conjunction with, Item 7, "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data." On April 1, 2018, we adopted the new revenue standard and as a result we recognized the cumulative effect of initially applying the new revenue standard as an adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings, as further described in note 2 to the consolidated financial statements included under Item 8. The comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under the accounting standards in effect at the time.
 
Fiscal Year Ended March 31,
 
2019
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
(In millions, except per share amounts)
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS DATA:
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Net sales
$
26,211

 
$
25,441

 
$
23,863

 
$
24,419

 
$
26,148

Cost of sales
24,594

 
23,778

 
22,303

 
22,811

 
24,603

Restructuring charges (3)
99

 
67

 
39

 

 

Gross profit
1,518

 
1,596

 
1,521

 
1,608

 
1,545

Selling, general and administrative expenses
953

 
1,019

 
937

 
955

 
844

Intangible amortization
74

 
79

 
81

 
66

 
32

Restructuring charges (3)
14

 
24

 
11

 

 

Interest and other, net
183

 
123

 
100

 
84

 
51

Other charges (income), net (1)
110

 
(170
)
 
21

 
48

 
(53
)
Income before income taxes
182

 
521

 
371

 
455

 
671

Provision for income taxes
89

 
92

 
51

 
11

 
70

Net income
$
93

 
$
429

 
$
320

 
$
444

 
$
601

Diluted earnings per share:
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Total
$
0.18

 
$
0.80

 
$
0.59

 
$
0.79

 
$
1.02




 
As of March 31,
 
2019
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
(In millions)
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET DATA:
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Working capital (2)
$
1,506

 
$
1,902

 
$
1,883

 
$
1,743

 
$
1,986

Total assets
13,499

 
13,716

 
12,593

 
12,385

 
11,653

Total long-term debt, excluding current portion
2,422

 
2,898

 
2,891

 
2,709

 
2,026

Shareholders' equity
2,972

 
3,019

 
2,678

 
2,606

 
2,396


(1)
For fiscal years 2019, 2018 and 2017, refer to note 15 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" for further discussion.

During fiscal year 2016, the Company incurred non-cash losses of $47.7 million primarily due to a $26.8 million loss on the disposition of a non-strategic Western European manufacturing facility, which included a non-cash foreign currency translation loss of $25.3 million, and a $21.8 million loss from the impairment of a non-core investment offset by immaterial currency translation gains.


32


During fiscal year 2015, an amendment to a customer contract to reimburse a customer for certain performance provisions was executed which included the derecognition of a $55 million contractual obligation previously recognized during fiscal year 2014. Accordingly, the Company reversed this charge with a corresponding credit to other charges (income), net in the consolidated statement of operations. Additionally, during fiscal year 2015, the Company recognized a loss of $11 million in connection with the disposition of a manufacturing facility in Western Europe.

(2)
Working capital is defined as current assets, less current liabilities.

(3)
The Company initiated restructuring plans during fiscal years 2019, 2018 and 2017, refer to note 14 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" for further discussion.

ITEM 7.    MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
This report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended. The words "expects," "anticipates," "believes," "intends," "plans" and similar expressions identify forward-looking statements. In addition, any statements which refer to expectations, projections or other characterizations of future events or circumstances are forward-looking statements. We undertake no obligation to publicly disclose any revisions to these forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances occurring subsequent to filing this Form 10-K with the Securities and Exchange Commission. These forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties, including, without limitation, those discussed in this section and in Item 1A, "Risk Factors." In addition, new risks emerge from time to time and it is not possible for management to predict all such risk factors or to assess the impact of such risk factors on our business. Accordingly, our future results may differ materially from historical results or from those discussed or implied by these forward-looking statements. Given these risks and uncertainties, the reader should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements.
OVERVIEW
We are a globally-recognized, provider of Sketch-to-Scale® services - innovative design, engineering, manufacturing, and supply chain services and solutions - from conceptual sketch to full-scale production. We design, build, deliver and manage complete packaged consumer and enterprise products, from medical devices and connected automotive systems to sustainable lighting and cloud data center infrastructures, for companies of all sizes in various industries and end-markets, through our activities in the following segments:
High Reliability Solutions ("HRS"), which is comprised of our health solutions business, including surgical equipment, drug delivery, diagnostics, telemedicine, disposable devices, imaging and monitoring, patient mobility and ophthalmology; and our automotive business, including vehicle electrification, connectivity, autonomous, and smart technologies;
Industrial and Emerging Industries ("IEI"), which is comprised of energy including advanced metering infrastructure, energy storage, smart lighting, smart solar energy; and industrial, including semiconductor and capital equipment, office solutions, household industrial and lifestyle, industrial automation and kiosks;
Communications & Enterprise Compute ("CEC"), which includes our telecom business of radio access base stations, remote radio heads and small cells for wireless infrastructure; our networking business, which includes optical, routing, and switching products for data and video networks; our server and storage platforms for both enterprise and cloud-based deployments; next generation storage and security appliance products; and rack-level solutions, converged infrastructure and software-defined product solutions; and
Consumer Technologies Group ("CTG"), which includes our consumer-related businesses in IoT enabled devices, audio and consumer power electronics, mobile devices; and various supply chain solutions for consumer, computing and printing devices.
These segments represent components of the Company for which separate financial information is available that is utilized on a regular basis by the Chief Operating Decision Maker (“CODM”). Our segments are determined based on several factors, including the nature of products and services, the nature of production processes, customer base, delivery channels and similar economic characteristics.
During the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2019, we announced that Revathi Advaithi was appointed CEO of the Company effective February 11, 2019. As part of her new role and responsibilities, the CEO along with certain direct reports that oversee operations of the business, are now considered the CODM. There is a possibility that the CODM will request changes in the

33


information that is regularly reviewed in determining how to allocate resources and in assessing performance, which could eventually result in changes to our reportable segments.
Refer to note 19 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" for additional information on our operating segments.
Our strategy is to provide customers with a full range of cost competitive, vertically-integrated global supply chain solutions through which we can design, build, ship and service a complete packaged product for our customers. This enables our customers to leverage our supply chain solutions to meet their product requirements throughout the entire product life cycle.
Over the past few years, we have seen an increased level of diversification by many companies, primarily in the technology sector. Some companies that have historically identified themselves as software providers, Internet service providers or e-commerce retailers have entered the highly competitive and rapidly evolving technology hardware markets, such as mobile devices, home entertainment and wearable devices. This trend has resulted in a significant change in the manufacturing and supply chain solutions requirements of such companies. While the products have become more complex, the supply chain solutions required by such companies have become more customized and demanding, and it has changed the manufacturing and supply chain landscape significantly.
We use a portfolio approach to manage our extensive service offerings. As our customers change the way they go to market, we have the capability to reorganize and rebalance our business portfolio in order to align with our customers' needs and requirements in an effort to optimize operating results. The objective of our business model is to allow us to be flexible and redeploy and reposition our assets and resources as necessary to meet specific customer's supply chain solutions needs across all the markets we serve and earn a return on our invested capital above the weighted average cost of that capital.
During the past several years, we have evolved our long-term portfolio towards a mix of businesses which possess longer product life cycles and higher segment operating margins such as reflected in our IEI and HRS businesses. We have expanded our design and engineering relationships through our product innovation centers and global design centers.
During fiscal year 2019, we took action to revise our go-to-market strategy within our CTG business, where we are actively managing under-performing accounts and are focused on partnering with well-funded, leading multi-national brands that control multiple categories of products and have regional demand requirements. We expect this transition to continue in fiscal year 2020 which will continue to put downward pressure on the segment operating margins until fully transitioned. During the fiscal year 2019, we also completed the wind down of our NIKE operations in Mexico and concurrently streamlined our third-party investments. In addition, we developed a measured and sustainable operating plan for India and as of March 31, 2019, we have completed the majority of our regional build-out. We continue to invest in the capital expenditures necessary to support underlying higher margin, long-term programs in our IEI and HRS businesses.
We believe that our continued business transformation is strategically positioning us to take advantage of the long-term, future growth prospects for outsourcing of advanced manufacturing capabilities, design and engineering services and after-market services.
We are one of the world's largest providers of global supply chain solutions, with revenues of $26.2 billion in fiscal year 2019. We have established an extensive network of manufacturing facilities in the world's major consumer and enterprise markets (Asia, the Americas, and Europe) to serve the growing outsourcing needs of both multinational and regional customers. We design, build, ship, and service consumer and enterprise products for our customers through a network of over 100 facilities in approximately 35 countries across four continents. As of March 31, 2019, our total manufacturing capacity was approximately 27 million square feet. In fiscal year 2019, our net sales in Asia, the Americas and Europe represented approximately 44%, 38% and 18%, respectively, of our total net sales, based on the location of the manufacturing site. On April 1, 2018, we adopted a new revenue standard and as a result we recognized a cumulative effect of adoption as an adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings, as further described in note 2 to the consolidated financial statements included under Item 8. The comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under the accounting standards in effect at the time. The following tables set forth the relative percentages and dollar amounts of net sales and net property and equipment, by country, based on the location of our manufacturing sites:

34


 
Fiscal Year Ended March 31,
Net sales:
2019
 
2018
 
2017
 
(In millions)
China
$
6,649

 
25
%
 
$
7,450

 
29
%
 
$
7,214

 
30
%
Mexico
4,539

 
17
%
 
4,362

 
17
%
 
4,076

 
17
%
U.S.
3,106

 
12
%
 
2,860

 
11
%
 
2,560

 
11
%
Brazil
2,181

 
8
%
 
2,578

 
10
%
 
1,908

 
8
%
Malaysia
1,996

 
8
%
 
2,005

 
8
%
 
2,267

 
10
%
India
1,805

 
7
%
 
609

 
2
%
 
511

 
2
%
Other
5,935

 
23
%
 
5,577

 
23
%
 
5,327

 
22
%
 
$
26,211

 
 
 
$
25,441

 
 

 
$
23,863

 
 


Amounts may not sum due to rounding.
 
Fiscal Year Ended March 31,
Property and equipment, net:
2019
 
2018
 
(In millions)
Mexico
$
537

 
23
%
 
$
587

 
26
%
China
523

 
22
%
 
492

 
22
%
U.S.
361

 
15
%
 
305

 
14
%
India
219

 
9
%
 
78

 
3
%
Hungary
103

 
4
%
 
150

 
7
%
Malaysia
138

 
6
%
 
153

 
7
%
Other
454

 
21
%
 
475

 
21
%
 
$
2,336

 
 
 
$
2,240

 
 

Amounts may not sum due to rounding.
We believe that the combination of our extensive open innovation platform solutions, design and engineering services, advanced supply chain management solutions and services, significant scale and global presence, and manufacturing campuses in low-cost geographic areas provide us with a competitive advantage and strong differentiation in the market for designing, manufacturing and servicing consumer and enterprise products for leading multinational and regional customers. Specifically, we have launched multiple product innovation centers ("PIC") focused exclusively on offering our customers the ability to simplify their global product development, manufacturing process, and after sales services, and enable them to meaningfully accelerate their time to market and cost savings.
Our operating results are affected by a number of factors, including the following:
changes in the macro-economic environment and related changes in consumer demand;

the mix of the manufacturing services we are providing, the number, size, and complexity of new manufacturing programs, the degree to which we utilize our manufacturing capacity, seasonal demand, shortages of components and other factors;

the effects on our business when our customers are not successful in marketing their products, or when their products do not gain widespread commercial acceptance;

our ability to achieve commercially viable production yields and to manufacture components in commercial quantities to the performance specifications demanded by our customers;

the effects on our business due to certain customers' products having short product life cycles;

our customers' ability to cancel or delay orders or change production quantities;


35


our customers' decisions to choose internal manufacturing instead of outsourcing for their product requirements;

our exposure to financially troubled customers;

integration of acquired businesses and facilities;

increased labor costs due to adverse labor conditions in the markets we operate;

the impacts on our business due to component shortages or other supply chain related constraints;

changes in tax legislation; and

changes in trade regulations and treaties.
The attractiveness of our services to customers and our ability to conduct business with certain customers can be affected by changes in U.S. and other countries' trade policies. In 2018, the U.S. imposed tariffs on a large variety of products of Chinese origin. The U.S. government has also indicated a readiness to further expand the scope of the tariffs on Chinese goods if negotiations are not successful, and most recently, effective May 10, 2019, increased tariffs on $200 billion of Chinese goods to 25%. Further, on May 15, 2019, President Trump issued an executive order designed to secure the information and communications technology and services supply chain, which would restrict the acquisition or use in the United States of information and communications technology or services designed, developed, manufactured, or supplied by persons owned by, controlled by, or subject to the jurisdiction or direction of foreign adversaries. The executive order is subject to implementation by the Secretary of Commerce and applies to contracts entered into prior to the effective date of the order. In addition, the U.S. Commerce Department has implemented additional restrictions and may implement further restrictions that would affect conducting business with certain Chinese companies. Depending upon their duration and implementation, as well as our ability to mitigate their impact, these tariffs, the executive order and its implementation and other regulatory actions could materially affect our business, including in the form of increased cost of goods sold, decreased margins, increased pricing for customers, and reduced sales.
We also are subject to other risks as outlined in Item 1A, "Risk Factors".
Net sales for fiscal year 2019 increased 3% or $0.8 billion to $26.2 billion from the prior year. The increase was primarily due to a $0.6 billion increase in our CEC segment and a $0.2 billion increase in our IEI segment. Our fiscal year 2019 gross profit totaled $1.5 billion, representing a decrease of $78 million, or 5%, from the prior year, which is primarily driven by an incremental increase of $32 million of restructuring charges, coupled with approximately $47 million of additional charges related to distressed customers that were included in cost of sales in fiscal year 2019. These incremental charges were part of our targeted actions to optimize our business portfolio, most notably within CTG, as we eliminated certain non-core activities and repositioned ourselves to align with go-forward strategies. The decline in gross margin is also due to the mix of revenues included in our portfolio most notably a decline in revenues from our automotive products and services within HRS which carry higher gross profit margins. Increased revenues from our ramping businesses in India further impacted the decline in gross profit margin from the prior year as the new programs were pressured below our average margins during the ramp. Our net income totaled $93 million, representing a decrease of $335 million, or 78%, compared to fiscal year 2018. The decrease in net income during fiscal year 2019 is primarily due to the same factors explained above in addition to the recognition of $193 million of charges primarily for the impairment of certain of our investments, including our investment in Elementum SCM (Cayman) Ltd ("Elementum"), offset by an $87 million gain from the deconsolidation of Bright Machines (formerly known as AutoLab AI). We also recognized a $152 million gain from the deconsolidation of Elementum in fiscal year 2018, which contributed further to the decrease in net income from fiscal year 2018 to 2019. Refer to note 2 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" for details of the investment impairments and the deconsolidation of Bright Machines, respectively.
Cash used in operations decreased by approximately $0.9 billion to $3.0 billion for fiscal year 2019 compared with $3.9 billion for fiscal year 2018 primarily due to a lower level of cash collections on deferred purchase price being reclassed to investing activities offset by elevated levels of investment required to support the business growth and operating through a more constrained inventory marketplace in fiscal year 2019. Our net working capital, defined as accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts, adding back the reduction in accounts receivable resulting from non-cash accounts receivable sales, plus inventories, less accounts payable, was redefined upon the adoption of ASC 606 (as further described in note 2 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data"), to include contract assets on a going forward basis. Our net working capital as a percentage of annualized sales for fiscal year 2019 increased by 0.3% to 6.7% from the prior year. Upon adoption of Accounting Standard Update (ASU) 2016-15 during the first quarter of fiscal year

36


2019, cash collections on deferred purchase price from our ABS programs that were previously classified as operating cash inflows are now classified as cash flows from investing activities. Refer to note 2 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" for further description on the ASU.
As a result, we redefined our free cash flow as cash from operating activities, plus cash collections of deferred purchase price, less net purchases of property and equipment in order to present free cash flows on a consistent basis for investor transparency. We also excluded the reduction to operating cash flows related to certain vendor programs from the free cash flow calculation. Free cash flow was $3 million for fiscal year 2019 compared to $236 million for fiscal year 2018. The decrease in free cash flow is primarily due to increased capital expenditures in fiscal year 2019 as we built out our regional capacity in India and continued to expand our capacity and capability in support of our expanding IEI and HRS businesses, as well as increased inventory levels due to a more constrained inventory marketplace and higher business levels. Refer to the Liquidity and Capital Resources section for the free cash flows reconciliation to our most directly comparable GAAP financial measure of cash flows from operations. Cash provided by investing activities decreased by approximately $458 million to $3.3 billion for fiscal year 2019, compared with $3.7 billion for fiscal year 2018, primarily due lower cash collection on deferred purchase price and higher capital expenditures as described above. Cash used in financing activities totaled $30 million during fiscal year 2019, which decreased by approximately $158 million from $188 million in the prior year, primarily due to higher net proceeds from bank borrowings and long-term debt in fiscal year 2019.
CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America ("U.S. GAAP" or "GAAP") requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results may differ from those estimates and assumptions.
We believe the following critical accounting policies affect our more significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements. For further discussion of our significant accounting policies, refer to note 2 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data."
Revenue Recognition
In determining the appropriate amount of revenue to recognize, we apply the following steps: (i) identify the contracts with the customers; (ii) identify performance obligations in the contracts; (iii) determine the transaction price; (iv) allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations per the contracts; and (v) recognize revenue when (or as) we satisfy a performance obligation. Further, we assess whether control of the product or services promised under the contract is transferred to the customer at a point in time (PIT) or over time (OT). We are first required to evaluate whether our contracts meet the criteria for OT recognition. We have determined that for a portion of our contracts, we are manufacturing products for which there is no alternative use (due to the unique nature of the customer-specific product and IP restrictions) and we have an enforceable right to payment including a reasonable profit for work-in-progress inventory with respect to these contracts. As a result, revenue is recognized under these contracts OT based on the cost-to-cost method as it best depicts the transfer of control to the customer measured based on the ratio of costs incurred to date as compared to the total estimated costs at completion of the performance obligation. For all other contracts that do not meet these criteria, we recognize revenue when we have transferred control of the related manufactured products which generally occurs upon delivery and passage of title to the customer. Refer to notes 2 and 3 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" for further details.
Customer Contracts and Related Obligations
Certain of our customer agreements include potential price adjustments which may result in variable consideration. These price adjustments include, but are not limited to, sharing of cost savings, committed price reductions, material margins earned over the period that are contractually required to be paid to the customers, rebates, refunds tied to performance metrics such as on-time delivery, and other periodic pricing resets that may be refundable to customers. We estimate the variable consideration related to these price adjustments as part of the total transaction price and recognize revenue in accordance with the pattern applicable to the performance obligation, subject to a constraint. We constrain the amount of revenues recognized for these contractual provisions based on our best estimate of the amount which will not result in a significant reversal of revenue in a future period. We determine the amounts to be recognized based on the amount of potential refunds required by the contract, historical experience and other surrounding facts and circumstances. Refer to note 2 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" for further details.
Customer Credit Risk

37


We have an established customer credit policy through which we manage customer credit exposures through credit evaluations, credit limit setting, monitoring, and enforcement of credit limits for new and existing customers. We perform ongoing credit evaluations of our customers' financial condition and make provisions for doubtful accounts based on the outcome of those credit evaluations. We evaluate the collectability of accounts receivable based on specific customer circumstances, current economic trends, historical experience with collections and the age of past due receivables. To the extent we identify exposures as a result of customer credit issues, we also review other customer related exposures, including but not limited to inventory and related contractual obligations.
Restructuring Charges
We recognize restructuring charges related to our plans to close or consolidate excess manufacturing facilities and rationalize administrative functions and to realign our corporate cost structure. In connection with these activities, we recognize restructuring charges for employee termination costs, long-lived asset impairment and other exit-related costs.
The recognition of these restructuring charges requires that we make certain judgments and estimates regarding the nature, timing and amount of costs associated with the planned restructuring activity. To the extent our actual results differ from our estimates and assumptions, we may be required to revise the estimates of future liabilities, requiring the recognition of additional restructuring charges or the reduction of liabilities already recognized. Such changes to previously estimated amounts may be material to the consolidated financial statements. At the end of each reporting period, we evaluate the remaining accrued balances to ensure that no excess accruals are retained, and the utilization of the provisions are for their intended purpose in accordance with developed exit plans.
Refer to note 14 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" for further discussion of our restructuring activities.
Inventory Valuation
Our inventories are stated at the lower of cost (on a first-in, first-out basis) or net realizable value. Our industry is characterized by rapid technological change, short-term customer commitments and rapid changes in demand. We purchase our inventory based on forecasted demand, and we estimate write downs for excess and obsolete inventory based on our regular reviews of inventory quantities on hand, and the latest forecasts of product demand and production requirements from our customers. If actual market conditions or our customers' product demands are less favorable than those projected, additional write downs may be required. In addition, unanticipated changes in the liquidity or financial position of our customers and/or changes in economic conditions may require additional write downs for inventories due to our customers' inability to fulfill their contractual obligations with regards to inventory procured to fulfill customer demand.
Valuation of Private Company Investments
We assess our investments for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the assets may be impaired. The factors we consider in our evaluation of potential impairment of our investments, include, but are not limited to a significant deterioration in the earnings performance or business prospects of the investee, or factors that raise significant concerns about the investee’s ability to continue as a going concern, such as negative cash flows from operation or working capital deficiencies. The carrying value of certain of our investments are individually material, thus there is the potential for material charges in future periods if we determine that those investments are impaired.
During the last half of fiscal year 2019, the Company reassessed its strategy with respect to its investment portfolio. As a result of the change in the Company's strategy and due to market valuation changes, the Company recognized an aggregate net charge related to investment impairments and dispositions of approximately $193 million for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2019, which is recorded in other charges (income), net on the consolidated statement of operations. The aggregate charge was primarily driven by write-downs of the Company's investment positions in a non-core cost method investment and Elementum as well as other investment impairments that were individually immaterial.
Carrying Value of Long-Lived Assets
We review property and equipment and acquired amortizable intangible assets for impairment at least annually and whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset may not be recoverable. An impairment loss is recognized when the carrying amount of these long-lived assets exceeds their fair value. Recoverability of property and equipment and acquired amortizable intangible assets are measured by comparing their carrying amount to the projected cash flows the assets are expected to generate. If such assets are determined to be impaired, the impairment loss recognized, if any, is the amount by which the carrying amount of the property and equipment and acquired amortizable intangible assets exceeds fair value. Our judgments regarding projected cash flows for an extended period of time and the fair value of assets may be impacted by changes in market conditions, general business environment and other factors. To the extent

38


our estimates relating to cash flows and fair value of assets change adversely we may have to recognize additional impairment charges in the future.
Goodwill is tested for impairment on an annual basis and whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of goodwill may not be recoverable. Recoverability of goodwill is measured at the reporting unit level by comparing the reporting unit's carrying amount, including goodwill, to the fair value of the reporting unit, which is measured based upon, among other factors, market multiples for comparable companies as well as a discounted cash flow analysis. These approaches use significant unobservable inputs, or Level 3 inputs, as defined by the fair value hierarchy and require us to make various judgmental assumptions about sales, operating margins, growth rates and discount rates which consider our budgets, business plans and economic projections, and are believed to reflect market participant views. Some of the inherent estimates and assumptions used in determining fair value of the reporting units are outside the control of management, including interest rates, cost of capital, tax rates, market EBITDA comparables and credit ratings. While we believe we have made reasonable estimates and assumptions to calculate the fair value of the reporting units, it is possible a material change could occur. If our actual results are not consistent with our estimates and assumptions used to calculate fair value, it could result in material impairments of our goodwill. During fiscal year 2019, we adopted ASU 2017-04 "Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment", which simplifies the subsequent measurement of goodwill by eliminating step 2 from the goodwill impairment test. The ASU did not have a material impact to Flex's financial position during the period (Refer to note 2 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" for further detail).
We performed our goodwill impairment assessment on January 1, 2019 and determined that no impairment existed as of the date of the impairment test because the fair value of each one of our reporting units exceeded its respective carrying value. As of the date of the impairment test, all reporting units' fair values were 25% or more, over their respective carrying values, with the exception of the CTG reporting unit which was 22% in excess of its carrying value. The estimated future results for CTG used in the impairment analysis reflect our revised strategy including the wind down of our NIKE operations in Mexico, further restrictions on capital expenditures related to our expansion into India and our focus on partnering with well-funded, leading multi-national brands that control multiple categories of products and have regional demand requirements. If we are not successful in driving improved results in our CTG segment it is reasonably possible that material goodwill impairment charges could be recorded in future periods.
Contingent Liabilities
We may be exposed to certain liabilities relating to our business operations, acquisitions of businesses and assets and other activities. We make provisions for such liabilities when it is probable that the settlement of the liability will result in an outflow of economic resources or the impairment of an asset. We make these assessments based on facts and circumstances that may change in the future resulting in additional expenses.
Refer to note 12 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" for further discussion of our contingent liabilities.
Income Taxes
Our deferred income tax assets represent temporary differences between the carrying amount and the tax basis of existing assets and liabilities, which will result in deductible amounts in future years, including net operating loss carry forwards. Based on estimates, the carrying value of our net deferred tax assets assumes that it is more likely than not that we will be able to generate sufficient future taxable income in certain tax jurisdictions to realize these deferred income tax assets. Our judgments regarding future profitability may change due to future market conditions, changes in U.S. or international tax laws and other factors. If these estimates and related assumptions change in the future, we may be required to increase or decrease our valuation allowance against deferred tax assets previously recognized, resulting in additional or lesser income tax expense.
We are regularly subject to tax return audits and examinations by various taxing jurisdictions and around the world, and there can be no assurance that the final determination of any tax examinations will not be materially different than that which is reflected in our income tax provisions and accruals. Should additional taxes be assessed as a result of a current or future examination, there could be a material adverse effect on our tax position, operating results, financial position and cash flows. Refer to note 13 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" for further discussion of our tax position.

39


RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, certain statements of operations data expressed as a percentage of net sales. The financial information and the discussion below should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data." The data below, and discussion that follows, represents our results from operations. On April 1, 2018, we adopted the new revenue standard and as a result we recognized the cumulative effect of initially applying the new revenue standard as an adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings, as further described in note 2 to the consolidated financial statements included under Item 8. The comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under the accounting standards in effect at the time.
 
Fiscal Year Ended
March 31,
 
2019
 
2018
 
2017
Net sales
100.0
%
 
100.0
 %
 
100.0
%
Cost of sales
93.8

 
93.5

 
93.5

Restructuring charges
0.4

 
0.3

 
0.2

Gross profit
5.8

 
6.2

 
6.3

Selling, general and administrative expenses
3.6

 
4.0

 
3.9

Intangible amortization
0.3

 
0.3

 
0.3

Restructuring charges
0.1

 
0.1

 

Interest and other, net
0.7

 
0.5

 
0.4

Other charges (income), net
0.4

 
(0.7
)
 
0.1

Income before income taxes
0.7

 
2.0

 
1.6

Provision for income taxes
0.3

 
0.4

 
0.2

Net Income
0.4
%
 
1.6
 %
 
1.4
%

Net sales
Net sales during fiscal year 2019 totaled $26.2 billion, representing an increase of $0.8 billion, or 3%, from $25.4 billion during fiscal year 2018. The overall increase in sales was driven by increases in three of our segments offset by a decline in sales in our CTG segment. Net sales was higher across all our regions during fiscal year 2019, with increases of $0.5 billion in Europe, $0.3 billion in Asia, and to a lesser extent, $12 million in the Americas.
Net sales during fiscal year 2018 totaled $25.4 billion, representing an increase of $1.5 billion, or 7%, from $23.9 billion during fiscal year 2017. During fiscal year 2018, the increase in net sales was primarily driven by an increase of $1.3 billion in the Americas and to a lesser extent, $0.2 billion in Asia with Europe remaining relatively consistent from the prior year.
The following table sets forth net sales by segments and their relative percentages. Historical information has been recast to reflect realignment of customers and/or products between segments:
 
Fiscal Year Ended March 31,
Segments:
2019
 
2018
 
2017
 
(In millions)
High Reliability Solutions
$
4,829

 
18
%
 
$
4,770

 
19
%
 
$
4,149

 
17
%
Industrial & Emerging Industries
6,183

 
24
%
 
5,972

 
24
%
 
4,968

 
21
%
Communications & Enterprise Compute
8,336

 
32
%
 
7,729

 
30
%
 
8,384

 
35
%
Consumer Technologies Group
6,863

 
26
%
 
6,970

 
27
%
 
6,362

 
27
%
 
$
26,211

 
 

 
$
25,441

 
 

 
$
23,863

 
 


Net sales during fiscal year 2019 increased $0.6 billion or 8% in our CEC segment driven by momentum from our cloud and data center business as well as the expansion of network infrastructure programs to support 4G and 5G technology, offset by declines in our data networking business due to weakness with some legacy product lines. Our IEI segment increased $0.2 billion or 4%, which was mainly driven by new programs and customer launches within our industrial, home and lifestyle

40


businesses, offset by declines in our capital equipment and energy businesses. Our HRS segment increased $59 million or 1% from higher sales in our health solutions business as we benefited from prior year investments in design, engineering and automation that have strengthened and improved our capabilities and competitive positioning that more than offset year over year declines from our automotive customers primarily in Asia. These segment increases were partially offset by a decrease of $107 million or 1.5% in our CTG segment, primarily within the legacy consumer sectors of the segment and as a result of actively repositioning the portfolio of customers and rationalizing underperforming customers and eliminating certain product categories.
Net sales during fiscal year 2018 increased $1.0 billion or 20% in our IEI segment, which was mainly driven by our industrial, home and lifestyle businesses in addition to growth in our solar energy business. Our CTG segment increased $0.6 billion or 10% largely attributable to stronger sales in our connected living and mobile devices businesses, offset by a decrease in gaming. Our HRS segment increased $0.6 billion or 15% from higher sales in our automotive business. These increases were partially offset by a decrease of $0.7 billion or 8% in our CEC segment, largely attributable to lower sales within our telecom and networking businesses, offset by increased sales in our cloud and data center business.
Our ten largest customers during fiscal years 2019, 2018 and 2017 accounted for approximately 43%, 41% and 43% of net sales, respectively. We have made substantial efforts to diversify of our portfolio which allows us to operate at scale in many different industries, and, as a result, no customer accounted for greater than 10% of net sales in fiscal year 2019, 2018 or 2017.
Gross profit
Gross profit is affected by a number of factors, including the number and size of new manufacturing programs, product mix, component costs and availability, product life cycles, unit volumes, pricing, competition, new product introductions, capacity utilization and the expansion or consolidation of manufacturing facilities including specific restructuring activities from time to time. The flexible design of our manufacturing processes allows us to manufacture a broad range of products in our facilities and better utilize our manufacturing capacity across our diverse geographic footprint and service customers from all segments. In the cases of new programs, profitability normally lags revenue growth due to product start-up costs, lower manufacturing program volumes in the start-up phase, operational inefficiencies, and under-absorbed overhead. Gross margin for these programs often improves over time as manufacturing volumes increase, as our utilization rates and overhead absorption improve, and as we increase the level of manufacturing services content. As a result of these various factors, our gross margin varies from period to period.
Gross profit decreased $0.1 billion to $1.5 billion from $1.6 billion from fiscal year 2018 to fiscal year 2019. Gross margin decreased 40 basis points, to 5.8% of net sales in fiscal year 2019, from 6.2% of net sales in fiscal year 2018. The decrease is primarily due to an additional $32 million, or 10 basis points, of restructuring charges coupled with approximately $47 million of additional charges related to distressed customers incurred during fiscal year 2019 versus fiscal year 2018. As noted above, during the year we completed the wind down of our NIKE Mexico operations and incurred a total of $66 million of charges primarily for non-cash asset impairments in the second and third quarters of fiscal year 2019. Additional gross profit and gross margin declines were due to revenue reductions in some of our higher margin businesses, such as automotive and semi-cap equipment and further due to the Multek China divestiture. Also negatively pressuring the gross profit margin was the significant revenues from ramping new programs in India which had pressured margins below our average margins during the ramp in fiscal year 2019.
Gross profit during fiscal year 2018 increased $75 million to $1.6 billion from $1.5 billion during fiscal year 2017, primarily as a result of the increase in revenue offset by $67 million, or 30 basis points, of restructuring charges incurred during fiscal year 2018. Gross margin decreased 10 basis points, to 6.2% of net sales in fiscal year 2018, from 6.3% of net sales in fiscal year 2017, mainly attributable to the same factors previously described, coupled with elevated levels of investments in ramping new operations for our strategic footwear customer.
Segment income
An operating segment's performance is evaluated based on its pre-tax operating contribution, or segment income. Segment income is defined as net sales, less cost of sales and segment selling, general and administrative expenses, and does not include amortization of intangibles, stock-based compensation, customer related asset impairments, restructuring charges, the new revenue standard adoption impact, contingencies and other, interest and other, net and other charges (income), net. A portion of depreciation is allocated to the respective segment together with other general corporate research and development and administrative expenses.
The following table sets forth segment income and margins. Historical information has been recast to reflect realignment of customers and/or products between segments:

41


 
Fiscal Year Ended March 31,
 
2019
 
2018
 
2017
 
(In millions)
Segment income & margin:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
High Reliability Solutions
$
371

 
7.7
%
 
$
381

 
8.0
%
 
$
334

 
8.1
%
Industrial & Emerging Industries
269

 
4.4
%
 
235

 
3.9
%
 
180

 
3.6
%
Communications & Enterprise Compute
215

 
2.6
%
 
186

 
2.4
%
 
229

 
2.7
%
Consumer Technologies Group
121

 
1.8
%
 
112

 
1.6
%
 
180

 
2.8
%
Corporate and Other
(104
)
 
 
 
(128
)
 
 
 
(108
)
 
 
   Total segment income
872

 
3.3
%
 
786

 
3.1
%
 
815

 
3.4
%
Reconciling items:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Intangible amortization
74

 
 
 
79

 
 
 
81

 
 
Stock-based compensation
76

 
 
 
85

 
 
 
82

 
 
Customer related asset impairments (1)
87

 
 
 
6

 
 
 
93

 
 
Restructuring charges (Note 14)
113

 
 
 
91

 
 
 
49

 
 
New revenue standard adoption impact (Note 2 & Note 3)
9

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
Contingencies and other (2)
35

 
 
 
52

 
 
 
18

 
 
Interest and other, net
183

 
 
 
123

 
 
 
100

 
 
Other charges (income), net (Note 15)
110

 
 
 
(170
)
 
 
 
21

 
 
Income before income taxes
$
182

 
 
 
$
521

 
 
 
$
371

 
 
Amounts may not sum due to rounding.
(1)
Customer related asset impairments for fiscal year 2019, relate to provision for doubtful accounts receivable, inventory and impairment of other assets for certain customers experiencing significant financial difficulties and/or the Company is disengaging from.
During fiscal year 2017, prices for solar panel modules declined significantly. We determined that certain solar panel inventory on hand at the end of the fiscal year 2017 was not fully recoverable and recorded a charge of $60 million to reduce the carrying costs to market in fiscal year 2017. We also recognized a $16 million impairment charge for solar module equipment and $17 million primarily related to negative margin sales and other associated direct costs. The total charge of $93 million is included in cost of sales for fiscal year 2017 but is excluded from segment results above.

(2)
Contingencies and other during fiscal year 2019, primarily consists of costs incurred relating to the independent investigation undertaken by the Audit Committee of the Company’s Board of Directors which was completed in June 2018. In addition, Contingencies and other also includes certain charges of the China based Multek operations that was divested in the second quarter of fiscal year 2019.

During fiscal year 2018, we incurred charges in connection with certain legal matters, for loss contingencies where it believed that losses were probable and estimable. Additionally, we incurred various other charges predominately related to damages incurred from a typhoon that impacted a China facility as well as certain assets impairments during fiscal year 2018.
Corporate and other primarily includes corporate services costs that are not included in the CODM's assessment of the performance of each of the identified reporting segments.
HRS segment margin decreased 30 basis point to 7.7% for fiscal year 2019, from 8.0% during fiscal year 2018, primarily due to reduced revenues from our automotive products and services, which carry higher gross margins partially offset by greater contribution from our growing health solutions business. HRS segment margin decreased 10 basis points to 8.0% for fiscal year 2018, from 8.1% during fiscal year 2017. The slight decrease reflects investments in expanding the segment's design and engineering capabilities, coupled with ramping up new customers and programs.
IEI segment margin increased 50 basis points to 4.4% for fiscal year 2019, from 3.9% during fiscal year 2018, as a result of improved overhead absorption benefits from the increased revenues and greater levels of design led programs which have higher gross margins, offset by reduced demand in capital equipment and energy. IEI segment margin increased 30 basis points to 3.9% for fiscal year 2018, from 3.6% during fiscal year 2017. This is primarily driven by strong revenue expansion led by

42


several new customer programs and improving overall demand across its diverse market that has provided to overhead absorption benefits.
CEC segment margin increased 20 basis points to 2.6% for fiscal year 2019, from 2.4% during fiscal year 2018. The increase was driven by operational efficiencies and improved absorption of overhead as a result of the 8% increase in revenues. CEC segment margin decreased 30 basis points to 2.4% for fiscal year 2018, from 2.7% during fiscal year 2017. The decrease was driven by lower revenues which negatively impacted profitability with under-absorbed overhead and higher investment costs.
CTG segment margin increased 20 basis points to 1.8% for fiscal year 2019, from 1.6% during fiscal year 2018, as a result of lower losses from our NIKE operations in Mexico, which we exited in the third quarter of fiscal year 2019, partially offset by under-performance of certain accounts. CTG segment margin decreased 120 basis points to 1.6% for fiscal year 2018, from 2.8% during fiscal year 2017, primarily driven by negatively impacted profits due to a lower contribution, and continued losses from our NIKE operations in Mexico.
Restructuring charges
During fiscal year 2019, we took targeted actions to optimize our portfolio, most notably within CTG. We recognized restructuring charges of approximately $113 million during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2019, of which $73.2 million were non-cash charges primarily for asset impairments. A significant component of our charges were associated with the wind down of our NIKE operations in Mexico in the third quarter of fiscal year 2019 where we recognized charges of $66 million primarily for non-cash asset impairments. In addition, we executed targeted head-count reductions at existing operating and design sites and corporate functions and exited certain immaterial businesses. Of these total charges, approximately $99 million was recognized as a component of cost of sales during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2019.
During fiscal year 2018, we initiated targeted restructuring activities, focused on optimizing our cost structure in lower growth areas and, more importantly, streamlining certain corporate and segment functions. The objective of the plan is to make Flex a faster, more responsive and agile company, better positioned to react to marketplace opportunities. We recognized $79 million of pre-tax cash charges, predominantly related to employee severance costs, and $12 million of pre-tax non-cash charges for asset impairment and other exit charges. We classified $67 million of these charges as a component of cost of sales and $24 million as a component of selling, general and administrative expenses during fiscal year 2018.
During fiscal year 2017, we initiated a restructuring plan to accelerate our ability to support more Sketch-to-Scale® efforts across the Company and reposition away from historical legacy programs and structures through rationalizing our current footprint at existing sites including certain corporate SG&A functions. We recognized $49 million of pre-tax restructuring charges predominantly for employee termination costs. We classified $39 million of these charges as a component of cost of sales and $10 million as a component of selling, general and administrative expenses.
Refer to note 14 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" for further discussion of our restructuring activities.
Selling, general and administrative expenses
Selling, general and administrative expenses ("SG&A") totaled $953 million or 3.6% of net sales, during fiscal year 2019, compared to $1.0 billion, or 4.0% of net sales, during fiscal year 2018, decreasing by $66 million or 7%, due to strong cost discipline focused on driving further productivity improvements and a refined cost structure benefiting from prior restructuring initiatives.
SG&A totaled $1.0 billion or 4.0% of net sales, during fiscal year 2018, compared to $937 million, or 3.9% of net sales, during fiscal year 2017, increasing by $82 million or 9%. This increase in SG&A was due to incremental costs associated with our continued expansion of our design and engineering resources and innovation system but also, due to the recognition of certain contingencies that are probable and estimable of payout. We also incurred incremental costs from our acquisitions in fiscal year 2018.
Intangible amortization
Amortization of intangible assets in fiscal year 2019 decreased by $5 million to $74 million from $79 million in fiscal year 2018, primarily as a result of certain intangible assets being fully amortized during fiscal year 2019.
Amortization of intangible assets in fiscal year 2018 decreased by $2 million to $79 million from $81 million in fiscal year 2017, primarily as a result of certain intangible assets being fully amortized during fiscal year 2018.
Other charges (income), net

43


During the last half of fiscal year 2019, we reassessed our strategy with respect to our entire investment portfolio. As a result, we recognized an aggregate net charge related to investment impairments and dispositions of approximately $193 million for the year ended March 31, 2019. The aggregate charge was primarily driven by write-downs of our investment positions in a non-core cost method investment and Elementum that were recognized in the third and fourth quarters of fiscal 2019, respectively. We also incurred other investment impairments that were individually immaterial as a result of our strategy shift and due to market valuation changes. Offsetting these charges was an $87 million non-cash gain from the deconsolidation of Bright Machines (formally known as AutoLab AI). Refer to note 2 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" for details on the investment impairments and the deconsolidation of Bright Machines.
During fiscal year 2018, we recognized $152 million of gain from the deconsolidation of Elementum, and $39 million of gain from the sale of Wink. We also recorded $22 million related to the impairment of certain non-core investments during fiscal year 2018. No other components of other charges and income, net incurred during fiscal year 2018 were material.
The fiscal year ended March 31, 2017 includes a $7 million loss attributable to a non-strategic facility sold during the second quarter of fiscal year 2017. No other components of other charges and income, net incurred during fiscal year 2017 were material.
Interest and other, net
Interest and other, net was $183 million during fiscal year 2019, compared to $123 million during fiscal year 2018, increasing $60 million due to a $23 million increase of interest expense primarily from higher weighted average interest rates and a higher average borrowing level, as well as a $21 million increase in interest expense from our accounts receivable sales program, coupled with a $14 million decrease in foreign exchange gains as compared to the prior year.
Interest and other, net was $123 million during fiscal year 2018, compared to $100 million during fiscal year 2017. The increase in interest and other, net of $23 million was primarily due to a $15 million increase of interest expense from higher weighted average interest rates and a higher borrowing level.
Income taxes
We work to ensure that we accrue and pay the appropriate amount of income taxes according to the laws and regulations of each jurisdiction in which we operate. Certain of our subsidiaries have, at various times, been granted tax relief in their respective countries, resulting in lower income taxes than would otherwise be the case under ordinary tax rates. The consolidated effective tax rates were 48.7%, 17.7% and 13.8% for the fiscal years 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively. The effective rate varies from the Singapore statutory rate of 17.0% in each year as a result of the following items:
 
Fiscal Year Ended March 31,
 
2019
 
2018
 
2017
Income taxes based on domestic statutory rates
17.0
 %
 
17.0
 %
 
17.0
 %
Effect of tax rate differential
(74.1
)
 
(46.9
)
 
(23.0
)
Change in liability for uncertain tax positions
(8.4
)
 
4.3

 
0.2

Change in valuation allowance
105.4

 
57.1

 
21.2

Recognition of prior year taxes recoverable
3.0

 
(10.3
)
 

Expiration of tax attributes
2.3

 

 

Other
3.5

 
(3.5
)
 
(1.6
)
Provision for income taxes
48.7
 %
 
17.7
 %
 
13.8
 %

The variation in our effective tax rate each year is primarily a result of recognition of earnings in foreign jurisdictions which are taxed at rates lower than the Singapore statutory rate including the effect of tax holidays and tax incentives we received primarily for our subsidiaries in China, Malaysia, Costa Rica, India, Netherlands and Israel of $24 million, $22 million and $16 million in fiscal years 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Additionally, our effective tax rate is impacted by changes in our liabilities for uncertain tax positions of ($15) million, $22 million, and $1 million and changes in our valuation allowances on deferred tax assets of $192 million, $279 million and $79 million in fiscal years 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively. We generate most of our revenues and profits from operations outside of Singapore.
We are regularly subject to tax return audits and examinations by various taxing jurisdictions and around the world, and there can be no assurance that the final determination of any tax examinations will not be materially different than that which is

44


reflected in our income tax provisions and accruals. Should additional taxes be assessed as a result of a current or future examinations, there could be a material adverse effect on our tax position, operating results, financial position and cash flows.
We provide a valuation allowance against deferred tax assets that in our estimation are not more likely than not to be realized. During fiscal year 2019, we released valuation allowance of $3 million related to our operations in Poland as this amount was deemed to be more likely than not to be realized due to the sustained profitability during the past three fiscal years as well as continued forecasted profitability of this subsidiary. Various other valuation allowance positions were also reduced due to varying factors such as recognition of uncertain tax positions impacting deferred tax assets, one-time income recognition in loss entities, and foreign exchange impacts on deferred tax balances. Lastly, these valuation allowance reductions and eliminations were offset by current period valuation allowance additions due to increased deferred tax assets as a result of current period losses in legal entities with existing full valuation allowance positions.
LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES
As of March 31, 2019, we had cash and cash equivalents of $1.7 billion and bank and other borrowings of $3.1 billion. We have a $1.75 billion revolving credit facility that is due to mature in June 2022, under which we had no borrowings outstanding as of March 31, 2019. We have also entered into two credit facilities in India during fiscal year 2019, (i) a $200 million term loan facility entered in July 2018, under which there were $79 million in borrowings outstanding as of the end of fiscal year 2019, and (ii) a $100 million uncommitted credit import advance facility in India, under which there were $91 million in advances outstanding as of March 31, 2019, which we anticipate repaying in fiscal year 2020. Refer to note 7 to the consolidated financial statement in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" for additional details. As of March 31, 2019, we were in compliance with the covenants under all of our credit facilities and indentures. In April 2019, we entered into an additional $300 million term loan facility as further explained below.
Our cash balances are held in numerous locations throughout the world. As of March 31, 2019, over half of our cash and cash equivalents were held by foreign subsidiaries outside of Singapore. Although substantially all of the amounts held outside of Singapore could be repatriated, under current laws, a significant amount could be subject to income tax withholdings. We provide for tax liabilities on these amounts for financial statement purposes, except for certain of our foreign earnings that are considered indefinitely reinvested outside of Singapore (approximately $1.6 billion as of March 31, 2019). Repatriation could result in an additional income tax payment; however, our intent is to permanently reinvest these funds outside of Singapore and our current plans do not demonstrate a need to repatriate them to fund our operations in jurisdictions outside of where they are held. Where local restrictions prevent an efficient intercompany transfer of funds, our intent is that cash balances would remain outside of Singapore and we would meet our liquidity needs through ongoing cash flows, external borrowings, or both.
Fiscal Year 2019
Cash used in operating activities was $3.0 billion during fiscal year 2019. As further discussed below, cash collections on the deferred purchase price from our ABS sales program of $3.6 billion are now included in cash from investing activities instead of cash from operating activities in accordance with new accounting guidance. The total cash used in operating activities resulted primarily from $93 million of net income for the period plus $804 million of non-cash charges such as depreciation, amortization, restructuring and impairment charges, provision for doubtful accounts, and stock-based compensation, net of a gain of $87 million from the deconsolidation of Bright Machines which are included in the determination of net income. Depreciation expense was $433 million and relatively consistent with prior years. These additions were more than offset by a net change in our operating assets and liabilities of $3.9 billion. In accordance with the new accounting guidance adopted in fiscal 2019 (and further described in note 2 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”), cash collections on deferred purchase price from our ABS programs are now classified as cash flows from investing activities and no longer included in cash receipts related to accounts receivable. As a result, while accounts receivable only increased by approximately $95 million from fiscal year 2018 to fiscal year 2019, the impact to operating cash flows is an outflow of $3.6 billion further described below. Year over year increases in inventory and contract assets also added to the net change in our operating assets and liabilities reflected on our cash flow from operations.
We believe net working capital ("NWC"), and net working capital as a percentage of annualized sales are key metrics that measure our liquidity. NWC was previously calculated as current quarter accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts, adding back the reduction in accounts receivable resulting from non-cash accounts receivable sales, plus inventories, less accounts payable. As part of the adoption of ASC 606, we expanded NWC, to include contract assets. We also included certain other current liabilities related to vendor financing programs, which are immaterial for the fiscal year, in the NWC calculation. NWC increased by $32 million to $1.7 billion as of March 31, 2019, from $1.6 billion as of March 31, 2018. This increase is primarily driven by (i) an increase of $216 million in contract assets upon adoption of ASC 606, (ii) a $58 million decrease in accounts receivable adding back reductions from non-cash accounts receivable sales, and (iii) a $77 million decrease in our inventory levels from March 31, 2018, offset by an approximately $25 million increase in accounts

45


payable. Our net working capital as a percentage of annualized net sales as of March 31, 2019 increased slightly to 6.7% as compared to 6.4% of annualized net sales as of March 31, 2018.
Cash provided by investing activities totaled $3.3 billion during fiscal year 2019. This was primarily driven by the impact of our adoption of ASU 2016-15 during the current fiscal year referred to above, which requires us to classify cash collections on deferred purchase price from our ABS programs that were previously classified as operating cash inflows as cash flows from investing activities. Refer to note 2 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data", for further description of the ASU. In addition, we received $267 million of proceeds, net of cash held, in connection with the divestitures of our China-based Multek operations as further described in note 17 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data". We also invested $631 million of net capital expenditures for property and equipment to expand capabilities and capacity in support of our expanding IEI and HRS businesses as well as building out capacity in India.
Cash used in financing activities was $30 million during fiscal year 2019. This was primarily the result of repurchases of ordinary shares in the amount of $189 million, offset by $170 million received from the drawdown of India Facilities as further described in note 7 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data".
Fiscal Year 2018
Cash provided by operating activities was $0.8 billion during fiscal year 2018. This resulted primarily from $429 million of net income for the period plus $478 million of non-cash charges such as depreciation, amortization and stock-based compensation, net of a gain from the deconsolidation of Elementum that are included in the determination of net income. Depreciation expense was $434 million of those non-cash charges. These were partially offset by a net change in our operating assets and liabilities of $153 million, driven primarily by a $354 million increase in inventories, an $88 million increase in other current and noncurrent assets, and a $347 million increase in accounts receivable, including the change in sales of accounts receivable, offset by a $623 million increase in accounts payable.
Cash used in investing activities totaled $0.9 billion during fiscal year 2018. This resulted primarily from $214 million paid for the acquisition of AGM Automotive ("AGM") for our HRS segment, net of cash acquired, and $55 million paid for a power module business for our CEC segment, net of cash acquired. Further, we invested $517 million of net capital expenditures for property and equipment to expand capabilities and capacity in support of our automotive, medical, footwear and IEI businesses. In addition, other investing activities includes $73 million of cash derecognized as of the date of the Elementum deconsolidation, and $46 million of payments for non-core investments, net of cash received.
Cash used in financing activities was $188 million during fiscal year 2018. This was primarily the result of repurchases of ordinary shares in the amount of $180 million, and the repayment of $55 million of debt, partially offset by $65 million received from third party investors in fiscal year 2018 in exchange for an additional noncontrolling equity interest in Elementum prior to the deconsolidation described above.
Fiscal Year 2017
Cash provided by operating activities was $1.1 billion during fiscal year 2017. This resulted primarily from $320 million of net income for the period plus $674 million of non-cash charges such as depreciation, amortization, other impairment charges, provision for doubtful accounts and stock-based compensation expense that are included in the determination of net income. Depreciation expense was $432 million of those non-cash charges. We generated $157 million in cash as a result of changes in our operating assets and liabilities, driven primarily by a $268 million increase in accounts payable, offset by a $184 million increase in accounts receivable, including the change in sales of accounts receivable.
Cash used in investing activities was $0.7 billion during fiscal year 2017. This resulted primarily from $490 million of net capital expenditures for property and equipment to expand capability and capacity in support of our automotive and medical businesses and further investments in both automation and expanding technologies to support our innovation services. We also paid $189 million for the acquisition of four businesses, net of cash acquired, including $162 million, net of $18 million of cash acquired related to the acquisition of manufacturing facilities from Bose. Further, $60 million was paid for a non-controlling interest in a joint venture with RIB Software AG as our partner. Offsetting this were proceeds from various other investing activities of $64 million, most notably the receipt of $38 million for the sale of two non-strategic businesses.
Cash used in financing activities was $242 million during fiscal year 2017. This was primarily the result of repurchases of ordinary shares in the amount $350 million, and $31 million of cash paid to a third-party banking institution for certain assets that were financed by the third-party banking institution on behalf of a customer, which is included in other financing activities. These cash outflows were partially offset by $171 million of net proceeds from bank borrowings and long-term debt, of which $130 million is the incremental amount borrowed extending the maturity date of one of our loan agreements from

46


August 30, 2018 to November 30, 2021, and $107 million is the amount of proceeds from the €100 million term loan, discussed further in note 7 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data".
Free Cash Flow
We believe free cash flow is an important liquidity metric because it measures, during a given period, the amount of cash generated that is available to repurchase company shares, fund acquisitions, make investments, repay debt obligations, and for certain other activities. Upon adoption of ASU 2016-15 effective for fiscal year 2019, our free cash flow was redefined as cash from operations, plus cash collections of deferred purchase price, less net purchases of property and equipment to present cash flows on a consistent basis for investor transparency. We also exclude the reduction to operating cash flows related to certain vendor programs that is required for US GAAP presentation. Our free cash flow was $3 million, $236 million and $660 million for fiscal years 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Free cash flow is not a measure of liquidity under generally accepted accounting principles in the United States, and may not be defined and calculated by other companies in the same manner. Free cash flow should not be considered in isolation or as an alternative to net cash provided by operating activities. Free cash flows reconcile to the most directly comparable GAAP financial measure of cash flows from operations as follows:
 
Fiscal Year Ended March 31,
 
2019
 
2018
 
2017
 
(In millions)
Net cash used in operating activities
$
(2,971
)
 
$
(3,866
)
 
$
(3,822
)
Cash collection of deferred purchase price and other
3,605

 
4,620

 
4,971

Purchases of property and equipment
(725
)
 
(562
)
 
(525
)
Proceeds from the disposition of property and equipment
94

 
44

 
36

Free cash flow
$
3

 
$
236

 
$
660


Liquidity is affected by many factors, some of which are based on normal ongoing operations of the business and some of which arise from fluctuations related to global economics and markets. Cash balances are generated and held in many locations throughout the world. Local government regulations may restrict our ability to move cash balances to meet cash needs under certain circumstances; however, any current restrictions are not material. We do not currently expect such regulations and restrictions to impact our ability to pay vendors and conduct operations throughout the global organization. We believe that our existing cash balances, together with anticipated cash flows from operations and borrowings available under our credit facilities, will be sufficient to fund our operations through at least the next twelve months.
Future liquidity needs will depend on fluctuations in levels of inventory, accounts receivable and accounts payable, the timing of capital expenditures for new equipment, the extent to which we utilize operating leases for new facilities and equipment, and the levels of shipments and changes in the volumes of customer orders.
We maintain global paying services agreements with several financial institutions. Under these agreements, the financial institutions act as our paying agents with respect to accounts payable due to our suppliers who elect to participate in the program. The agreements allow our suppliers to sell their receivables to one of the participating financial institutions at the discretion of both parties on terms that are negotiated between the supplier and the respective financial institution. Our obligations to our suppliers, including the amounts due and scheduled payment dates, are not impacted by our suppliers’ decisions to sell their receivables under this program. At March 31, 2019 and 2018, the cumulative payments due to suppliers participating to the programs amounted to approximately $0.5 billion and $0.3 billion, respectively. Pursuant to their agreement with one of the financial institutions, certain suppliers may elect to be paid early at their discretion. We are not always notified when our suppliers sell receivables under these programs. The available capacity under these programs can vary based on the number of investors and/or financial institutions participating in these programs at any point in time.
Historically, we have funded operations from cash and cash equivalents generated from operations, proceeds from public offerings of equity and debt securities, bank debt and lease financings. We also sell a designated pool of trade receivables under asset-backed securitization ("ABS") programs and sell certain trade receivables, which are in addition to the trade receivables sold in connection with these securitization agreements.
During fiscal years 2019, 2018 and 2017, we received approximately $6.8 billion, $8.0 billion and $7.6 billion, respectively from transfers of receivables under our ABS programs, and $2.7 billion, $1.5 billion and $1.3 billion, respectively from other sales of receivables. As of March 31, 2019, and 2018, the outstanding balance on receivables sold for cash was $1.3 billion, for both years, respectively, under all our accounts receivable sales programs, which are removed from accounts receivable balances in our consolidated balance sheets.

47


We anticipate that we will enter into debt and equity financings, sales of accounts receivable and lease transactions to fund acquisitions and anticipated growth.
The sale or issuance of equity or convertible debt securities could result in dilution to current shareholders. Further, we may issue debt securities that have rights and privileges senior to those of holders of ordinary shares, and the terms of this debt could impose restrictions on operations and could increase debt service obligations. This increased indebtedness could limit our flexibility as a result of debt service requirements and restrictive covenants, potentially affect our credit ratings, and may limit our ability to access additional capital or execute our business strategy. Any downgrades in credit ratings could adversely affect our ability to borrow as a result of more restrictive borrowing terms. We continue to assess our capital structure and evaluate the merits of redeploying available cash to reduce existing debt or repurchase ordinary shares.
Historically we have been successful in refinancing and extending the maturity dates on our term loans and credit facilities. In June 2017, we entered into a five-year credit facility consisting of a $1.75 billion revolving credit facility and a $503 million term loan, which is due to mature on June 30, 2022 (the "2022 Credit Facility"). This 2022 Credit Facility replaced our $2.1 billion credit facility, which was due to mature in March 2019. The outstanding principal of the term loan portion of the 2022 Credit Facility is repayable in quarterly installments of approximately $6 million from September 30, 2017 through June 30, 2020 and approximately $13 million from September 30, 2020 through March 31, 2022 with the remainder due upon maturity. As of March 31, 2019, one of our $500 million Notes due February 2020 has been included in current liabilities on the consolidated balance sheet.
In April 2019, we entered into a JPY 33.5 billion term loan agreement (approximately $300 million) due April 2024, which was then swapped to U.S. dollars. The term loan will be used to fund general operations and refinance certain other outstanding debt. Borrowings under this term loan bear interest, at LIBOR plus the applicable margin of 1.21%
Under our current share repurchase program, our Board of Directors authorized repurchases of our outstanding ordinary shares for up to $500 million in accordance with the share purchase mandate approved by our shareholders at the date of the most recent Annual General Meeting which was held on August 16, 2018. During fiscal year 2019, we paid $189 million to repurchase shares (under the current and prior repurchase plans) at an average price of $10.66 per share. As of March 31, 2019, shares in the aggregate amount of $325 million were available to be repurchased under the current plan.
CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS AND COMMITMENTS
Bank borrowings and long-term debt are as follows:
 
As of March 31,
 
2019
 
2018
 
(In millions)
4.625% Notes due February 2020
$
500

 
$
500

Term Loan, including current portion, due in installments through November 2021
672

 
688

Term Loan, including current portion, due in installments through June 2022
459

 
484

5.000% Notes due February 2023
500

 
500

4.750% Notes due June 2025
597

 
596

India Facilities (1)
170

 

Other
168

 
187

Debt issuance costs
(11
)
 
(14
)
 
3,055

 
2,941

Current portion, net of debt issuance costs
(633
)
 
(43
)
Non-current portion
$
2,422

 
$
2,898


(1)
India Facilities as of March 31, 2019 include an approximately $91.4 million drawdown of short-term bank borrowings under a facility entered in February 2019 and a $78.8 million drawdown from the $200 million term loan facility entered in July 2018.
Refer to the discussion in note 7 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" for further details of our debt obligations.

48


We have purchase obligations that arise in the normal course of business, primarily consisting of binding purchase orders for inventory related items and capital expenditures. Additionally, we have leased certain of our property and equipment under capital lease commitments, and certain of our facilities and equipment under operating lease commitments.
Future payments due under our purchase obligations, debt including capital leases and related interest obligations and operating leases are as follows:
 
Total
 
Less Than
1 Year
 
1 - 3 Years
 
4 - 5 Years
 
Greater Than
5 Years
 
(In millions)
Contractual Obligations:
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Purchase obligations
$
3,299

 
$
3,299

 
$

 
$

 
$

Long-term debt and capital lease obligations:
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Long-term debt
3,065

 
634

 
913

 
918

 
600

Capital leases
45

 
19

 
19

 
7

 

Interest on long-term debt obligations
512

 
140

 
253

 
83

 
36

Operating leases, net of subleases
683

 
155

 
207

 
149

 
172

Restructuring costs
32

 
32

 

 

 

Total contractual obligations
$
7,636

 
$
4,279

 
$
1,392

 
$
1,157

 
$
808


We have excluded $252 million of liabilities for unrecognized tax benefits from the contractual obligations table as we cannot make a reasonably reliable estimate of the periodic settlements with the respective taxing authorities. See note 13, "Income Taxes" to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" for further details.
Our purchase obligations can fluctuate significantly from period to period and can materially impact our future operating asset and liability balances, and our future working capital requirements. We intend to use our existing cash balances, together with anticipated cash flows from operations to fund our existing and future contractual obligations.
OFF-BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS
We sell designated pools of trade receivables to unaffiliated financial institutions under our ABS programs, and in addition to cash, we receive a deferred purchase price receivable for each pool of the receivables sold. Each of these deferred purchase price receivables serves as additional credit support to the financial institutions and is recorded at its estimated fair value. As of March 31, 2019 and 2018, the fair value of our deferred purchase price receivable was approximately $293 million and $445 million, respectively. As of March 31, 2019 and 2018, the outstanding balance on receivables sold for cash was $1.3 billion for both periods, respectively, under all our accounts receivable sales programs, which were removed from accounts receivable balances in our consolidated balance sheets. For further information, see note 10 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data".
RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS
Refer to note 2 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" for recent accounting pronouncements.

49


ITEM 7A.    QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
INTEREST RATE RISK
A portion of our exposure to market risk for changes in interest rates relates to our highly liquid investment portfolio, with maturities of three months or less from original dates of purchase and are classified as cash equivalents on our consolidated balance sheet. We do not use derivative financial instruments in our highly liquid investment portfolio. We place cash and cash equivalents with various major financial institutions and highly rated money market accounts. Our investment policy has strict guidelines focusing on preservation of capital. The portfolio is comprised of various instruments including term deposits with banks, marketable securities and money market accounts. Our cash is principally invested in the U.S. dollar and China RMB serving as a natural hedge of our RMB denominated costs. As of March 31, 2019, the outstanding amount in the highly liquid investment portfolio was $0.5 billion, the largest components of which were Brazilian real, China renminbi and Indian rupee denominated money market accounts with an average return of 2.18%. A hypothetical 10% change in interest rates would not be expected to have a material effect on our financial position, results of operations and cash flows over the next fiscal year.
We had variable rate debt outstanding of approximately $1.5 billion as of March 31, 2019. Variable rate debt obligations consisted of borrowings under our term loans. Interest on these obligations is discussed in note 7 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data".
Our variable rate debt instruments create exposures for us related to interest rate risk. Primarily due to the current low interest rates, a hypothetical 10% change in interest rates would not be expected to have a material effect on our financial position, results of operations and cash flows over the next fiscal year.
As of March 31, 2019, the approximate average fair value of our debt outstanding under our term loan facilities that mature in November 2021 and June 2022, and Notes due February 2020, February 2023 and June 2025 was 99.9% of the face value of the debt obligations based on broker trading prices.
FOREIGN CURRENCY EXCHANGE RISK
We transact business in various foreign countries and are, therefore, subject to risk of foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations. We have established a foreign currency risk management policy to manage this risk. To the extent possible, we manage our foreign currency exposure by evaluating and using non-financial techniques, such as currency of invoice, leading and lagging payments and receivables management. In addition, we may borrow in various foreign currencies and enter into short-term foreign currency derivative contracts, including forward, swap, and option contracts to hedge only those currency exposures associated with certain assets and liabilities, mainly accounts receivable and accounts payable, and cash flows denominated in non-functional currencies.
We endeavor to maintain a partial or fully hedged position for certain transaction exposures. These exposures are primarily, but not limited to, revenues, customer and vendor payments and inter-company balances in currencies other than the functional currency unit of the operating entity. The credit risk of our foreign currency derivative contracts is minimized since all contracts are with large financial institutions and accordingly, fair value adjustments related to the credit risk of the counter-party financial institution were not material. The gains and losses on foreign currency derivative contracts generally offset the losses and gains on the assets, liabilities and transactions hedged. The fair value of currency derivative contracts is reported on the balance sheet. The aggregate notional amount of outstanding contracts as of March 31, 2019 amounted to $7.8 billion and the recorded fair values of the associated assets and liabilities were not material. The majority of these foreign exchange contracts expire in less than three months and all expire within one year. They will settle primarily in the Brazilian real, British pound, China renminbi, Euro, Hungarian forint, Indian rupee, Malaysian ringgit, Mexican peso, Singapore dollar, and U.S. dollar.
Based on our overall currency rate exposures as of March 31, 2019, including the derivative financial instruments intended to hedge the nonfunctional currency-denominated monetary assets, liabilities and cash flows, and other factors a 10% appreciation or depreciation of the U.S. dollar from its cross-functional rates would not be expected, in the aggregate, to have a material effect on our financial position, results of operations and cash flows in the near-term.

50


ITEM 8.    FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of Flex Ltd., Singapore
Opinion on the Financial Statements
We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Flex Ltd. and subsidiaries (the "Company") as of March 31, 2019 and 2018, and the related consolidated statements of operations, comprehensive income, shareholders' equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended March 31, 2019 and the related notes. In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Flex Ltd. and subsidiaries as of March 31, 2019 and 2018, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended March 31, 2019, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.
We have also audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the Company's internal control over financial reporting as of March 31, 2019, based on the criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission and our report dated May 20, 2019, expressed an unqualified opinion on the Company's internal control over financial reporting.
Change in Accounting Principles
As discussed in Note 2 to the financial statements, the Company changed its method of accounting for revenue from contracts with customers in fiscal year 2019 due to the adoption of Accounting Standards Update No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, using the modified retrospective approach. As also discussed in Note 2 to the financial statements, the Company changed its method of accounting for cash receipts on the deferred purchase price from asset-backed securitization programs in fiscal year 2019 due to the adoption of ASU 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments using the retrospective approach.
Basis of Opinion
These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the PCAOB and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedure included examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

/s/ DELOITTE & TOUCHE LLP
San Jose, California
May 20, 2019
We have served as the Company’s auditors since 2002.

51


FLEX LTD.
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 
As of March 31,
 
2019
 
2018
 
(In thousands, except
share amounts)
ASSETS
 

 
 

Current assets:
 

 
 

Cash and cash equivalents
$
1,696,625

 
$
1,472,424

Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts (Note 2)
2,612,961

 
2,517,695

Contract assets
216,202

 

Inventories
3,722,854

 
3,799,829

Other current assets
854,790

 
1,380,466

Total current assets
9,103,432

 
9,170,414

Property and equipment, net
2,336,213

 
2,239,506

Goodwill
1,073,055

 
1,121,170

Other intangible assets, net
330,995

 
424,433

Other assets
655,672

 
760,332

Total assets
$
13,499,367

 
$
13,715,855

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
 

 
 

Current liabilities:
 

 
 

Bank borrowings and current portion of long-term debt
$
632,611

 
$
43,011

Accounts payable
5,147,236

 
5,122,303

Accrued payroll
391,591

 
383,332

Other current liabilities
1,426,075

 
1,719,418

Total current liabilities
7,597,513

 
7,268,064

Long-term debt, net of current portion
2,421,904

 
2,897,631

Other liabilities
507,590

 
531,587

Commitments and contingencies (Note 12)


 


Shareholders' equity
 

 
 

Flex Ltd. Shareholders' equity
 

 
 

Ordinary shares, no par value; 566,787,620 and 578,317,848 issued, and 516,548,265 and 528,078,493 outstanding as of March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively
6,523,750

 
6,636,747

Treasury stock, at cost; 50,239,355 shares as of March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively
(388,215
)
 
(388,215
)
Accumulated deficit
(3,012,012
)
 
(3,144,114
)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss
(151,163
)
 
(85,845
)
Total shareholders' equity
2,972,360

 
3,018,573

Total liabilities and shareholders' equity
$
13,499,367

 
$
13,715,855

   
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.


52


FLEX LTD.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

 
Fiscal Year Ended March 31,
 
2019
 
2018
 
2017
 
(In thousands, except per share amounts)
Net sales
$
26,210,511

 
$
25,441,131

 
$
23,862,934

Cost of sales
24,593,731

 
23,778,404

 
22,303,231

Restructuring charges
99,005

 
66,845

 
38,758

Gross profit
1,517,775

 
1,595,882

 
1,520,945

Selling, general and administrative expenses
953,077

 
1,019,399

 
937,339

Intangible amortization
74,396

 
78,640

 
81,396

Restructuring charges
14,308

 
23,846

 
10,637

Interest and other, net
183,454

 
122,823

 
99,532

Other charges (income), net
110,414

 
(169,719
)
 
21,193

Income before income taxes
182,126

 
520,893

 
370,848

Provision for income taxes
88,727

 
92,359

 
51,284

Net income
$
93,399

 
$
428,534

 
$
319,564


 

 
 

 
 

Earnings per share:
 

 
 

 
 

Basic
$
0.18

 
$
0.81

 
$
0.59

Diluted
$
0.18

 
$
0.80

 
$
0.59

Weighted-average shares used in computing per share amounts:
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
526,519

 
529,782

 
540,503

Diluted
530,070

 
536,598

 
546,220

   
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

53


FLEX LTD.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

 
Fiscal Year Ended March 31,
 
2019
 
2018
 
2017
 
(In thousands)
Net income
$
93,399

 
$
428,534

 
$
319,564

Other comprehensive income (loss):
 

 
 

 
 

Foreign currency translation adjustments, net of zero tax
(59,508
)
 
45,618

 
(1,324
)
Unrealized gain (loss) on derivative instruments and other, net of zero tax          
(5,810
)
 
(3,320
)
 
9,096

Comprehensive income
$
28,081

 
$
470,832

 
$
327,336

   
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

54


FLEX LTD.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY

55


 
Ordinary Shares
 
 
 
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss
 
 
 
 
 
Total
 
Shares
Outstanding
 
Amount
 
Accumulated
Deficit
 
Unrealized
Gain (Loss) on
Derivative
Instruments
And Other
 
Foreign
Currency
Translation
Adjustments
 
Total
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Loss
 
Total Flex Ltd.
Shareholders'
Equity
 
Noncontrolling
Interests