Company Quick10K Filing
frontdoor
Closing Price ($) Shares Out (MM) Market Cap ($MM)
$0.00 85 $3,675
10-K 2020-02-28 Annual: 2019-12-31
10-Q 2019-11-06 Quarter: 2019-09-30
10-Q 2019-08-08 Quarter: 2019-06-30
10-Q 2019-05-09 Quarter: 2019-03-31
S-1 2019-03-01 Public Filing
10-K 2019-02-28 Annual: 2018-12-31
8-K 2020-02-26 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-11-05 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-08-07 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-05-08 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-04-29 Officers, Shareholder Vote, Exhibits
8-K 2019-03-20 Other Events
8-K 2019-02-27 Earnings, Exhibits
FTDR 2019-12-31
Part I
Item 1. Business
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 2. Properties
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Part II
Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6. Selected Financial Data
Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Note 1. Basis of Presentation
Note 2. Significant Accounting Policies
Note 3. Revenue
Note 4. Goodwill and Intangible Assets
Note 5. Leases
Note 6. Income Taxes
Note 7. Acquisitions
Note 8. Restructuring Charges
Note 9. Spin-Off Charges
Note 10. Commitments and Contingencies
Note 11. Related Party Transactions
Note 12. Stock-Based Compensation
Note 13. Employee Benefit Plans
Note 14. Long-Term Debt
Note 15. Supplemental Cash Flow Information
Note 16. Cash and Marketable Securities
Note 17. Comprehensive Income (Loss)
Note 18. Derivative Financial Instruments
Note 19. Fair Value Measurements
Note 20. Capital Stock
Note 21. Earnings per Share
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures
Item 9B. Other Information
Part III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11. Executive Compensation
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services
Part IV
Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
Item 16. Form 10-K Summary
Note 1. Basis of Presentation
Note 2. Long-Term Debt
Note 3. Acquisitions
EX-4.3 ftdr-20191231xex4_3.htm
EX-21 ftdr-20191231xex21.htm
EX-23 ftdr-20191231xex23.htm
EX-31.1 ftdr-20191231xex31_1.htm
EX-31.2 ftdr-20191231xex31_2.htm
EX-32.1 ftdr-20191231xex32_1.htm
EX-32.2 ftdr-20191231xex32_2.htm

frontdoor Earnings 2019-12-31

FTDR 10K Annual Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

Comparables ($MM TTM)
Ticker M Cap Assets Liab Rev G Profit Net Inc EBITDA EV G Margin EV/EBITDA ROA
AER 5,761 43,209 34,328 0 0 0 0 33,853 0%
ADT 4,517 16,977 13,087 4,861 0 -556 1,388 14,284 0% 10.3 -3%
AL 4,457 20,484 15,184 1,838 0 551 1,637 17,166 0% 10.5 3%
AAN 4,201 3,180 1,331 3,926 445 204 280 4,101 11% 14.6 6%
JOBS 3,731 12,238 4,420 0 0 0 0 1,757 0%
FTDR 3,675 1,179 1,457 1,315 633 139 260 4,237 48% 16.3 12%
ABM 2,432 3,744 2,240 6,499 719 89 253 3,296 11% 13.0 2%
TRTN 2,426 9,996 7,659 93 20 346 1,291 9,471 22% 7.3 3%
KFY 2,163 2,407 1,142 1,992 0 187 295 1,962 0% 6.7 8%
AYR 1,543 8,634 6,613 921 0 206 818 6,535 0% 8.0 2%

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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

________________________________________________

FORM 10-K

________________________________________________

x

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019

or

o

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from    to

Commission file number 001-38617

________________________________________________

Picture 1

frontdoor, inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware

82-3871179

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

(IRS Employer Identification No.)

150 Peabody Place, Memphis, Tennessee 38103

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

901-701-5002

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12 (b) of the Act:

Title of Each Class

Trading Symbol

Name of Each Exchange on which Registered

Common stock, par value $0.01 per share

FTDR

The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12 (g) of the Act:

None

(Title of class)

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes x   No o

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes o   No x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes x   No o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes x   No o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer 

Accelerated filer 

Non-accelerated filer 

Smaller reporting company 



 

Emerging growth company 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.    Yes o   No o

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).    Yes o   No x

As of June 28, 2019, the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second quarter, the aggregate market value of the common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant, computed by reference to the closing price, was approximately $3.7 billion.

As of February 21, 2020, there were 85,338,911 shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock, par value $0.01 per share.

Documents incorporated by reference:

Portions of the registrant’s proxy statement to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission in connection with the registrant’s 2020 annual meeting of stockholders (the “Proxy Statement”) are incorporated by reference into Part III hereof. Such Proxy Statement will be filed within 120 days of the registrant’s fiscal year ended December 31, 2019. 


 

frontdoor, inc.

Annual Report on Form 10-K

GLOSSARY OF TERMS AND SELECTED ABBREVIATIONS

In order to aid the reader, we have included certain terms and abbreviations used throughout this Annual Report on Form 10-K below:

Term/Abbreviation

Definition

2019 Form 10-K

frontdoor, inc. Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2019

2026 Notes

6.750% senior notes in the aggregate principal amount of $350 million

AOCI

Accumulated other comprehensive income or loss

ASC

FASB Accounting Standards Codification

ASC 606

ASC Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers

ASC 740

ASC Topic 740, Income Taxes

ASC 842

ASC Topic 842, Leases

ASU

FASB Accounting Standards Update

ASU 2016-02

ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842)

ASU 2016-13

ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments–Credit Losses (Topic 326)

ASU 2018-15

ASU 2018-15, Intangibles—Goodwill and Other—Internal-Use Software (Subtopic 350-40): Customer’s Accounting for Implementation Costs Incurred in a Cloud Computing Arrangement That Is a Service Contract

Code

Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended

Credit Agreement

The agreements governing the Term Loan Facility and the Revolving Credit Facility

Credit Facilities

The Term Loan Facility together with the Revolving Credit Facility

ESPP

frontdoor, inc. 2019 Employee Stock Purchase Plan

Exchange Act

Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended

FASB

U.S. Financial Accounting Standards Board

HVAC

Heating, ventilation and air conditioning

Indenture

The indenture and supplemental indenture between Frontdoor and Wilmington Trust, National Association as trustee, that governs the 2026 notes

IRS

Internal Revenue Service

NASDAQ

Nasdaq Global Select Market

Omnibus Plan

frontdoor, inc. 2018 Omnibus Incentive Plan

Parent or ServiceMaster

ServiceMaster Global Holdings, Inc.

Registration Statement

Registration Statement on Form 10 (File No. 001-38617), filed with the SEC, for frontdoor, inc., as amended, on August 1, 2018

Revolving Credit Facility

$250 million revolving credit facility

SEC

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission

Securities Act

Securities Act of 1933, as amended

SVM

The ServiceMaster Company, LLC

Term Loan Facility

$650 million senior secured term loan facility

U.S.

United States of America

U.S. GAAP

Accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America

U.S. Tax Reform

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act enacted on December 22, 2017, which includes significant changes to the U.S. corporate tax system

The following terms in this Annual Report on Form 10-K are our trademarks: frontdoor, American Home Shield®, HSATM, OneGuard®, Landmark Home Warranty®, CanduTM, Streem® and the frontdoor logo.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PART I

 

 

 

Item 1.

 

Business

6

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

13

Item 1B.

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

30

Item 2.

 

Properties

30

Item 3.

 

Legal Proceedings

30

Item 4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

30

PART II

 

 

 

Item 5.

 

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

31

Item 6.

 

Selected Financial Data

32

Item 7.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

36

Item 7A.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

50

Item 8.

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

51

Item 9.

 

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

82

Item 9A.

 

Controls and Procedures

82

Item 9B.

 

Other Information

82

PART III

 

 

 

Item 10.

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

82

Item 11.

 

Executive Compensation

83

Item 12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

83

Item 13.

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

83

Item 14.

 

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

83

PART IV

 

 

 

Item 15.

 

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

84

Item 16.

Form 10-K Summary

84

Exhibit Index

85

Signatures

87

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CAUTIONARY STATEMENT CONCERNING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act and Section 21E of the Exchange Act, regarding business strategies, market potential, future financial performance and other matters. The words “believe,” “expect,” “estimate,” “could,” “should,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “seek,” “anticipate,” “project,” “will,” “shall,” “would,” “aim,” and similar expressions, among others, generally identify “forward-looking statements,” which speak only as of the date the statements were made. The matters discussed in these forward-looking statements are subject to risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected, anticipated or implied in the forward-looking statements. Where, in any forward-looking statement, an expectation or belief as to future results or events is expressed, such expectation or belief is based on the current plans and expectations of our management and expressed in good faith and believed to have a reasonable basis, but there can be no assurance that the expectation or belief will result or be achieved or accomplished. Whether any such forward-looking statements are in fact achieved will depend on future events, some of which are beyond our control. Except as may be required by law, we undertake no obligation to modify or revise any forward-looking statements to reflect new information, events or circumstances occurring after the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Factors, risks, trends and uncertainties that could cause actual results or events to differ materially from those anticipated include the matters described under “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” in addition to the following other factors, risks, trends and uncertainties:

changes in the source and intensity of competition in our market;

weakening general economic conditions, especially as they may affect existing home sales, unemployment and consumer confidence or spending levels;

our ability to successfully implement our business strategies;

our ability to attract, retain and maintain positive relations with third-party contractors and vendors;

adverse credit and financial markets impeding access and leading to increased financing costs;

adverse weather conditions and Acts of God;

our ability to attract and retain key personnel;

our dependence on labor availability, third-party vendors, including business process outsourcers, and third-party component suppliers;

compliance with, or violation of, laws and regulations, including consumer protection laws, increasing our legal and regulatory expenses;

adverse outcomes in litigation or other legal proceedings;

increases in tariffs or changes to import/export regulations;

cybersecurity breaches, disruptions or failures in our technology systems and our failure to protect the security of personal information about our customers;

increases in appliance, parts and system prices, and other operating costs;

our ability to protect our intellectual property and other material proprietary rights;

negative reputational and financial impacts resulting from acquisitions or strategic transactions;

requirement to recognize and record impairment charges;

failure to maintain our strategic relationships with the real estate brokerages and agents that comprise our real estate customer acquisition channel;

failure of our marketing efforts to be successful or cost-effective;

third-party use of our trademarks as search engine keywords to direct our potential customers to their own websites;

inappropriate use of social media by us or other parties to harm our reputation;

special risks applicable to operations outside the United States by us or our business process outsource providers;

our limited history of operating as an independent company;

inability to achieve some or all of the benefits that we expected to achieve from the Spin-off;

tax liabilities and potential indemnification of ServiceMaster for material taxes if the distribution fails to qualify as tax-free;

the effects of our substantial indebtedness and the limitations contained in the agreements governing such indebtedness;

increases in interest rates increasing the cost of servicing our substantial indebtedness;

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increased borrowing costs due to lowering or withdrawal of the ratings, outlook or watch assigned to us, our debt securities or our Credit Facilities; 

our ability to generate the significant amount of cash needed to fund our operations and service our debt obligations; and

other factors described in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and from time to time in documents that we file with the SEC.

You should read this Annual Report on Form 10-K completely and with the understanding that actual future results may be materially different from expectations. All forward-looking statements made in this Annual Report on Form 10-K are qualified by these cautionary statements. These forward-looking statements are made only as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and we do not undertake any obligation, other than as may be required by law, to update or revise any forward-looking or cautionary statements to reflect changes in assumptions, the occurrence of events, unanticipated or otherwise, and changes in future operating results over time or otherwise. For a discussion of other important factors that could cause our results to differ materially from those expressed in, or implied by, the forward-looking statements included in this report, you should refer to the risks and uncertainties detailed from time to time in our periodic reports filed with the SEC as well as the disclosure contained under the heading “Risk Factors” included in Item 1A of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

References in this Annual Report on Form 10-K to “Frontdoor,” the “Company,” “we,” “our,” or “us” refer to frontdoor, inc. and all of its subsidiaries. Certain amounts presented in tables are subject to rounding adjustments and, as a result, the totals in such tables may not sum.

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PART I

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

Overview

Frontdoor is the largest provider of home service plans in the United States, as measured by revenue, and operates under the American Home Shield, HSA, OneGuard and Landmark brands. Our home service plans help our customers maintain their homes and protect against costly and unexpected breakdowns of essential home systems and appliances. We maintain close and frequent contact with our customers as we respond to over four million homeowner service requests annually utilizing our nationwide network of approximately 17,000 pre-qualified professional contractor firms. Our value proposition to our professional contractor network is providing them access to our significant work volume, increasing their business activity while enhancing their ability to manage their financial and human capital resources. We realize significant economies of scale as a result of our volume of service requests, and we intend to leverage our advanced customer and contractor-centric technology platform, expanding independent contractor network, existing customer base, purchasing power for replacement parts, appliances and home systems and extensive history and deep understanding of the home services market to generate sustained growth of our core home service plan business as well as to develop our new on-demand home services business, which we launched in 2019 under the brand name Candu. In 2019, we also acquired Streem, Inc. (“Streem”), a technology startup that uses augmented reality, computer vision and machine learning to help home service professionals more quickly and accurately diagnose breakdowns and complete repairs.

We serve over two million customers annually across all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Our home service plan customers subscribe to a yearly service plan agreement that covers the repair or replacement of major components of up to 21 home systems and appliances, including electrical, plumbing, central HVAC systems, water heaters, refrigerators, dishwashers and ranges/ovens/cooktops, as well as electronics, pools and spas and pumps. Product failures can pose significant emotional and financial challenges for our customers as these items tend to be the most critical and complicated items in a home. Given the potentially high cost of a major appliance or home system breakdown, the cumbersome process of vetting and hiring a qualified repair professional and, typically, the lack of a formal guarantee for services performed, our customers place high value on the peace of mind, convenience, repair expertise and service guarantee our home service plans deliver. As homes become increasingly complex and connected, our ability to innovate, both through upgraded product offerings and through channel diversification, has allowed us to grow the home service plan category as well as our share of that category.

Our service plans appeal to the growing category of U.S. homeowners who seek financial protection against unexpected and expensive home repairs and/or the convenience of having a single home service provider that delivers pre-qualified, experienced professionals and service guarantees. Our multi-faceted value proposition resonates with a broad customer demographic, regardless of home price, income level, geographic location or age. We acquire our customers through our partner real estate brokers and directly by advertising and marketing through our direct-to-consumer (“DTC”) channel. As a result of our strong customer value proposition, 68 percent of our revenue in 2019 was recurring, in line with historical averages, driving consistency and predictability in our revenues. In addition, a significant majority of our home service plan customers automatically renew on an annual basis.

From 2014 to 2019, our network of high-quality, pre-qualified professional contractor firms has grown from approximately 11,000 to 17,000, all of which have performed a service order for us in the past 12 months. We are highly selective with onboarding new contractor firms into our service network and continuously monitor service quality through a set of rigorous performance measures, relying heavily on direct customer feedback. We are more than four times larger than the next largest provider of home service plans in the United States, as measured by revenue. We believe our scale affords us significant competitive advantages, as it would require substantial time and monetary investment to develop a comparable contractor base with national reach, experience and service excellence. We classify a subset of our independent contractor network as “preferred,” representing firms that meet our highest quality standards and are often long-tenured providers with us. Approximately 80 percent of work orders are completed by our preferred contractor network, driving higher customer satisfaction and retention rates. We intend to leverage our leading contractor base to expand into home improvement and maintenance services through both our home service plans and future on-demand services.

Also in 2019, we expanded our business through the launch of our on-demand home services business Candu and the acquisition of Streem. As part of its free home services membership, Candu offers access to appliance repair services from vetted and highly-rated appliance service professionals. Candu commenced operating in select Atlanta-area neighborhoods in December 2019. We expect to expand to additional geographic areas and skilled trades throughout 2020. Candu is unique in serving as a guide and advisor for projects, offering do-it-yourself videos and content, an upfront flat-fee pricing option, next-day repairs on weekdays, and a “Candu Will Do Guarantee”—a six-month guarantee of the work performed under flat-fee pricing.

Streem uses augmented reality, computer vision and machine learning to help home service professionals more quickly and accurately diagnose breakdowns and complete repairs. The technology enables homeowners to use their smartphone cameras to instantly connect with a service professional who can remotely see the item that needs attention and capture a variety of important details about the item, potentially helping to reduce the time required for completing repairs and even eliminating the need for a technician to visit the home by offering a simple do-it-yourself solution. We expect to use Streem’s services in our core home service plan business and in Candu’s on-demand business to deliver a superior service experience and reduce our costs.

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For the year ended December 31, 2019, we generated revenue, net income and Adjusted EBITDA of $1,365 million, $153 million and $303 million, respectively. For a reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA to net income, see "Item 6. Selected Financial Data".

Our Opportunity

Frontdoor operates within the $400 billion U.S. home services market, of which the U.S. home service plan category currently represents $2.5 billion. We view increased penetration of the U.S. home service plan category as a long-term growth opportunity. This category is currently characterized by low household penetration with approximately five million of 124 million U.S. households (owner-occupied homes and rentals), or approximately four percent, covered by a home service plan. In addition, we believe that increasingly complex home systems and appliances, as well as consumer preference for budget protection and convenience, will emphasize the value proposition of pre-qualified professional repair services and, accordingly, the coverage benefits offered by a home service plan.

We also believe that we are well-positioned to capitalize on our leading position in the home service plan category to provide services to consumers in the broader home services segment. As consumer demand shifts toward more convenient, outsourced services, we believe we have an opportunity as a reliable, scaled service provider with a national, licensed independent contractor network to expand further into on-demand services through our Candu brand.

Our marketplace-based approach to home service delivery requires us to continue to grow our supply side, and we remain committed to attracting high-quality independent contractors to our network of professional service providers. As we continue to scale our contractor network, we in turn expand our breadth of potential services and enhance our ability to further execute our on-demand service delivery model.

Our Competitive Strengths

We believe the following competitive strengths have been instrumental to our success and position us for future growth:

Leader in Large, Fragmented and Growing Category. We are the leader in the U.S. home service plan category. We are more than four times larger than the next largest provider of home service plans in the United States, as measured by revenue. Over the past four decades, we have developed a marketplace reputation built on the strength of our brands, our customer and contractor value proposition and our service quality. As a result, we enjoy industry-leading brand awareness and a reputation for high-quality customer service, both of which are key drivers of the success of our customer acquisition and retention efforts. Our size and scale provide us with a competitive advantage in contractor selection and purchasing power for replacement parts, appliances and home systems, as well as the ability to extract marketing and operating efficiencies compared to smaller local and regional competitors.

High-Value Service Offerings. We provide our customers with a compelling value proposition by offering financial protection against unexpected and expensive home repairs, coupled with the convenience of having repairs completed quickly and by experienced professionals. In contrast with insurance products that have low frequency of use, we pay claims on behalf of our home service plan customers more than once per year, on average. We believe this high level of engagement reinforces our customer value proposition and leads to higher renewal rates. We believe our annual customer retention rate is further evidence of the value our customers place on our service and the quality of execution that we provide.

Technology-Enabled Platform Drives Efficiency and Quality of Service. We are focused on constantly improving the customer and contractor experience. We continuously develop and refine our advanced customer- and contractor-centric technology platform to enhance the experience for our customers, our contractors and our partner real estate brokers and agents. Our platform allows customers to purchase and utilize a home service plan, electronically chat with a representative, pay bills and track the progress of their service requests, all from their mobile device or personal computer. Our contractors use this platform to interact with us and to more efficiently and effectively serve our customers. In addition, real estate brokers utilize our platform to facilitate the purchase of home service plans. We believe our technology-enabled platform provides a foundation for operational and customer service excellence, ultimately driving customer retention and contractor growth.

Multi-Channel Sales and Marketing Approach Supported by Sophisticated Customer Analytics. Our multi-channel sales and marketing approach is designed to understand the key decision points that our customers face during the purchase of home services to generate revenue and build brand value.

In the real estate channel, we leverage marketing service agreements and a team of field-based account managers to train, educate and market our plans through real estate brokers and agents at both a local and national level. We have strategic relationships with each of the top ten real estate brokers in the United States, and we view these strategic relationships as a key competitive advantage.

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In the DTC channel, lead generation has benefited from increased and more efficient marketing spending as well as improved digital marketing. Our internal testing demonstrates that a customer’s intent to purchase a home service plan increases by approximately two times after being presented with a basic description of how our home service plans work. We increasingly utilize sophisticated consumer analytics models that allow us to more effectively segment our prospective customers and deliver tailored marketing campaigns. In addition, we have deployed more sophisticated marketing tools to attract customers, including content marketing, online reputation management and social media channels. The effectiveness of our marketing efforts is demonstrated by our ability to generate quality leads and online sales on a cost-effective basis.

Diverse, Recurring and Stable Revenue Streams. We acquire customers through two channels, real estate and DTC, and we have operations in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. We believe our ability to acquire customers through the DTC channel helps to mitigate the effect of potential cyclicality in the home resale market and our nationwide presence limits the impact of poor economic conditions or adverse weather conditions in any particular geography. We also benefit from predictable and recurring revenue as our customers sign twelve-month contracts and 68 percent of our revenue was generated through existing customer renewals in 2019, in line with historical averages. In addition, our business model has proven resilient through various business cycles as evidenced by our growth each year during the 2008 financial downturn and compound annual revenue growth rate of approximately four percent from 2007 to 2011 and approximately nine percent from 2011 to 2019.

Capital-Light Business Model. Our business model generates strong Adjusted EBITDA margins and negative working capital and requires limited capital expenditures. As such, we have a capital-light business model that drives potential for strong generation of cash flow. We may, from time to time, make more significant investments in capability-expanding technology, including investments to develop a world-class data platform to fuel our growth. Net cash provided from operating activities was $200 million for the year ended December 31, 2019 compared to $189 million for the year ended December 31, 2018 and $194 million for the year ended December 31, 2017. Free Cash Flow was $178 million, $163 million and $179 million for the years ended December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively. For a reconciliation of Free Cash Flow to net cash provided from operating activities, see “Item 6. Selected Financial Data.”

Experienced Management Team. We have a management team of highly experienced leaders who have strong track records in a wide variety of industries and economic conditions. Our management team is highly focused on execution and driving growth and profitability, and, as such, our compensation structure is tied to key performance metrics that are designed to incentivize senior management to drive the long-term success of our business. Our chief executive officer brings direct experience from industry-leading companies like Lyft and Amazon. He is well versed in scaling large businesses, leveraging technology to innovate and grow and building on-demand marketplaces. Our chief financial officer has over 20 years as a finance executive and seven years with our core business, bringing deep industry insights, continuity and financial acumen. We believe our management team has the vision and experience to position us for continued success and to implement and execute our business strategies over the long term. Further, we believe that we have a deep pool of talent across our organization, including long-tenured individuals with significant expertise, knowledge of our business and experience building and scaling technology-enabled businesses.

Our Business Strategies

We intend to profitably grow our business by:

Increasing Our Home Service Plan Penetration

Between 2014 and 2019, we increased our share of home service plan category revenue while the overall size of the home service plan category increased from approximately three million to five million households over the same period. We intend to further increase our home service plan penetration by making strategic investments to educate consumers on our compelling value proposition, target homeowners more effectively, further improve the customer experience and attract new real estate brokers and contractors. In addition, we see an opportunity to expand our repair services to property managers who currently use our services through individual home service plans by helping them aggregate such plans and better manage their utilization of our services.

Deliver Superior Customer Experience. We will continue to improve the customer experience by investing in our integrated technology platform, self-service capabilities, business intelligence platforms, customer care center operations and contractor management systems. These targeted investments are expected to result in an enhanced customer experience by providing a more convenient service and improving contractor efficiencies and engagement. We believe these initiatives will lead to improved retention rates, more grassroots marketing and the opportunity to deliver additional services to satisfied customers.

Grow Our Supply Network of Independent Contractors. We will continue to grow our network of pre-qualified professional contractor firms while maintaining the high quality of our network. Our contractor relations team utilizes a highly selective process to choose new contractor firms and continuously monitors their service quality. We believe growing our contractor base within existing service locations and in new geographies, while maintaining service excellence, will drive further penetration of our home service plans and differentiate our product offering relative to competitors.

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Continue Digital Innovation. We are continuing to invest in digital innovation to further increase the ease-of-use of our technology platform for customers, contractors and realtors. In recent years, we have developed robust customer technology platforms, which make it easy for customers to purchase from us, request service and manage their account from the convenience of a smartphone or tablet. Our contractor technology platform makes it easier for contractors to work with us and improves communication between contractors and our customers. Our realtor technology platform makes it easier for realtors to work with us and, therefore, recommend our products to their clients. Approximately 60 percent of real estate channel orders were placed online in 2019. As we continue to make investments in digital innovation, these enhanced digital platforms will be the foundation of both our home service plan business and our new on-demand business.

Develop Dynamic Pricing. We launched the first phase of dynamic pricing in the fourth quarter of 2019, which allows us to leverage our proprietary data platform to adjust our plan prices based on factors such as the strength of our contractor network or characteristics of homes in a market. We expect to utilize these capabilities to improve the profitability of higher risk customers, while offering more attractive prices to lower risk and price-sensitive customers. We will continue to test and expand our dynamic pricing capabilities in 2020 and beyond.

Expanding into Home Maintenance and Improvement Services

We intend to continue to leverage our existing sales channels and service platform to deliver additional value-added services to our customers by expanding beyond repair services to offer home maintenance and improvement services. Repair services only comprise approximately 25 percent of the U.S. home services market, and home improvement and maintenance work is highly valued by our contractors. Our product development teams draw upon the experience of technicians in the field to both create innovative customer solutions for the existing product suite and identify service and category adjacencies. For example, in 2019, we launched a new maintenance service offering of central HVAC pre-season checkups. In the real estate channel, we have recently launched a successful nationwide service offering of re-keying locks for recent home buyers with a home service plan. We are also testing smart home technology services, which we believe will add value to our plans and result in increases in renewals. We believe these new service offerings will lead to higher customer engagement, ultimately leading to stronger customer loyalty.

Providing Customers Access to Our High-Quality, Pre-Qualified Network of Contractors for On-Demand Home Services

We see a significant opportunity to leverage our existing contractor base to develop home repair and maintenance services through our Candu on-demand membership service, which we believe will increase our customer satisfaction and contractor value proposition and provide us with additional revenue opportunities. By offering on-demand services, we can provide additional services to our existing home service plan customers and reach new customers, including those not currently interested in home service plans. The home service plan category currently consists of five million homes, while the market opportunity for on-demand services is 124 million homes. We are evolving with our customers’ ever-changing preferences, including demand for new services and how those services are solicited and procured.

For homeowners, our Candu free home services membership offers access to appliance repair services from vetted and highly-rated appliance service professionals. Candu is unlike other on-demand home services, as it serves as a homeowner’s personal go-to resource, guide and advisor for projects, offering do-it-yourself videos and content, upfront flat-fee pricing, next-day repairs on weekdays with convenient two-hour appointment windows, and a “Candu Will Do Guarantee”—a six-month guarantee of the work performed under flat-fee pricing. For contractors, we can provide actual revenue opportunities (not just leads), access to our preferred pricing for replacement parts, appliances and home systems, as well as access to our scheduling services. We also believe that our on-demand services offering will strengthen our core home service plan business by highlighting the value proposition of our services and the convenience of our vast contractor network to new customers.

In December 2019, we launched our on-demand business in select Atlanta-area neighborhoods. We expect to begin expanding to additional geographic markets and skilled trades throughout 2020.

Developing a World-Class Data Platform

We believe we have the opportunity to become the authoritative source of home service information. Since the founding of our core home service plan business in 1971, we have amassed a significant amount of data on historic maintenance trends, recall and repair history and parts and labor pricing for most home repairs. We are constantly analyzing and using our data to make better business decisions and improve visibility on future costs. We also intend to identify additional opportunities to use technology to capture valuable home data, making it easier for customers and contractors to interact and ultimately enable us to anticipate repair needs. We intend for this aggregated data platform to be the definitive source of information for the home that enables both customers and contractors to make informed decisions. We believe these investments will both improve the customer experience and reduce our operating expenses. We also believe this data platform will provide additional revenue opportunities as real estate companies, manufacturers and other companies recognize the benefit of this aggregated data.

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Pursuing Selective Acquisitions

We have a track record of sourcing and purchasing other businesses and successfully integrating them into our business. We anticipate that the highly fragmented nature of the home service plan industry will continue to create strategic opportunities for further consolidation, and, with our scale, we believe we will be the acquirer of choice in the industry. In particular, we intend to focus strategically on underserved regions where we can enhance and expand service capabilities. Historically, we have used acquisitions to cost-effectively grow our customer base in high-growth geographies, and we intend to continue to do so. We may also explore opportunities to make strategic acquisitions that will expand our service offering in the broader home services segment.

We also expect to use acquisitions to enhance our technological capabilities. In 2019, we acquired Streem to support the service experience for our customers, reduce costs and create potential new revenue opportunities across a variety of channels. Streem uses augmented reality, computer vision and machine learning to help home service professionals more quickly and accurately diagnose breakdowns and complete repairs. The technology enables homeowners to use their smartphone cameras to instantly connect with a service professional who can remotely see the item that needs attention and capture a variety of important details about the item, potentially helping to reduce the time required for completing repairs and even eliminating the need for a technician to visit the home by offering a simple do-it-yourself solution. We expect to use Streem’s services in our core home service plan business and in Candu’s on-demand business to deliver a superior service experience and reduce our costs.

Sales and Marketing

We market our services to homeowners on a national and local level through various means, including marketing partnerships, search engine marketing, content marketing, social media, direct mail, television and radio, print advertisements and telemarketing. We partner with various participants in the residential real estate marketplace, such as real estate brokers and insurance carriers, to market and sell our home service plans. In addition, we sell through our customer care centers, mobile-optimized e-commerce platform and national sales teams. We utilize the following customer acquisition channels:

Real estate channel. Our plans have historically been used to provide peace of mind to home buyers by protecting them from large, unanticipated out-of-pocket expenses related to the breakdown of major home systems and appliances during the first year after a home purchase. We leverage marketing service agreements and a team of 170 field-based account managers, business development managers and sales leaders who focus on a defined geographic area to train and educate real estate brokers and agents within their territory about the benefits of a home service plan by working directly with real estate offices and participating in broker meetings and national sales events. Those brokers and agents then market our home service plans to home buyers.

We have strategic relationships with each of the top ten real estate brokers in the United States and continue to improve relationships with other key brokers. Our long-standing relationships with many of these brokers help to secure and grow our position. In addition, for 18 years running, we have had a strategic alliance agreement with the National Association of Realtors, which is the largest real estate association in the United States representing approximately 1.4 million realtors.

We had a 32 percent share of plans sold in connection with a home resale transaction in 2019, up from 29 percent in 2014. In 2019, 1.5 million homes were sold with a home service plan out of the approximately 5.3 million homes sold. In 2019, customers in this channel renewed at 27 percent after the first contract year. Revenue from this channel, including associated renewals, was $610 million, $578 million and $533 million for the years ended December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Overall revenues within this channel have grown at a five percent CAGR from 2007 through 2019.

Direct-to-consumer channel. Leveraging our experience in the real estate channel, we invested significant resources to develop the DTC channel to broaden our reach beyond home resale transactions. Our value proposition resonates with a wide demographic of homeowners who find security in a plan protecting against expensive and unexpected breakdowns in the home. This strong value proposition is promoted to our potential customers through search engine marketing, content marketing, social media, direct mail, television and radio, print advertisements and telemarketing and sold through our customer care centers and mobile-optimized e-commerce platform. Over the past decade, we have strategically invested to expand the DTC channel given its high retention rates and customer lifetime value. Our research indicates a relatively low home service plan penetration rate of four percent of occupied U.S. households. We believe that penetration rates will increase over time as consumers become more aware of, and educated about, home service plans.

Since 2014, we have maintained an over 50 percent share of home service plans purchased or renewed outside of a home resale transaction. This industry remains underpenetrated, with approximately three million homes out of the 119 million U.S. households (excluding home resales) having a home service plan. In 2019, customers in this channel renewed at 75 percent after the first contract year. Revenue from this channel, including associated renewals, was $746 million, $674 million and $618 million for the years ended December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Overall revenues within this channel have grown at a nine percent CAGR from 2007 through 2019.

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Customer renewals. We generated 68 percent of our revenue through existing customer renewals for the year ended December 2019 compared to 66 percent for each of the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017. Our customer retention rate has grown from 73 percent in 2007 to 75 percent in 2019. We have made significant investments in our integrated technology platform, self-service capabilities, customer care center operations and contractor management systems, which we believe position us to further improve retention.

Customers, Contractors, Suppliers and Geographies

Customers. As our customers are predominantly owners of single-family residences, we do not have significant customer concentration. We had 2.2 million, 2.1 million and 2.0 million customers as of December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Approximately 69 percent of our customers are on a monthly auto-pay program. Auto-pay customers are more likely to renew than non-auto-pay customers.

Contractors. We have a network of approximately 17,000 high-quality, pre-qualified professional contractor firms that employ approximately 60,000 technicians. The qualification process for a contractor includes assessing their online presence and customer reviews, gathering public information about the company, reviewing references from customers and other contractors, and confirming they meet all insurance and licensing standards. In addition, contractors must agree to our service requirements, such as timely appointments and follow-ups with all customers, guaranteed work, professionalism, and availability. Our contractors are supported by a designated contractor relations representative who guides them through the process of working with us, from on-boarding to the first service call to continuous monitoring and training. No contractor accounted for more than five percent of our cost of services rendered. We estimate that approximately 95 percent of our contractor base plans to maintain or expand their relationship with us over the next two years.

Suppliers. We are dependent on a limited number of suppliers for various key components used in the services and products we offer to customers, and the cost, quality and availability of these components are essential to our services. Direct supplier spend, which excludes purchases made by our contractors, made up approximately 20 percent of our cost of services rendered in 2019, and we have multiple national supplier agreements in place. We have seven national suppliers of repair parts and home systems and appliances that each account for more than five percent of our supplier spend.

Geographies. A significant percentage of our revenue is concentrated in the southern and western regions of the United States, including California, Texas, Florida and Arizona.

Technology

We are continuing to invest in digital innovation to further increase the ease-of-use of our technology platform for customers, contractors and realtors.

Customers. In recent years, we have developed robust customer technology platforms, which make it easy for customers to purchase from us, request service and manage their account from the convenience of a smartphone or tablet. Approximately 40 percent of our DTC sales in 2019 were entered online, and 50 percent of our total service request volume was entered online or through our interactive voice response system. Our customer MyAccount platform had over one million active users at the end of 2019, allowing customers to pay bills, request service, review account information or chat with a representative online without having to call our customer care centers.

Contractors. Our contractor technology platform makes it easier for contractors to work with us and improves communication between contractors and our customers. Our contractor portal had over 7,500 active users at the end of 2019, and our platform sent nearly 1.5 million “On-My-Way” notifications to customers, letting them know their contractor was en route to their home.

Realtors. Our realtor technology platform makes it easier for realtors to work with us, and, therefore, recommend our products to their clients. Approximately 60 percent of real estate channel orders were placed online in 2019. Our realtor portal had over 90,000 active users at the end of 2019, allowing realtors to enter, edit and pay for orders; view or print order confirmations, invoices and contracts for active customers; request service on behalf of their clients; and view and manage expiring orders.

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Competition

We compete in the home service plan industry and the broader U.S. home services market. The home service plan industry is a highly competitive industry. The principal methods of competition, and by which we differentiate ourselves from our competitors, are quality and speed of service, contract offerings, brand awareness and reputation, customer satisfaction, pricing and promotions, contractor network and referrals. While we compete with a broad range of competitors in each locality and region, we are the only home service plan company providing home service plans in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Our primary direct competitors are First American Home Warranty Corporation and Old Republic Home Protection. We also compete in the broader home services market with HomeAdvisor and HomeServe. We believe our network of approximately 17,000 pre-qualified professional contractor firms, in combination with our large base of contracted customers, differentiate us from other platforms in the home services market.

Employees

As of December 31, 2019, we had approximately 2,300 employees, none of whom is represented by a labor union.

Seasonality

The demand for our services, and our results of operations, are affected by weather conditions and seasonality. Such seasonality causes our results of operations to vary considerably from quarter to quarter. Accordingly, results for any quarter are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be achieved for the full fiscal year. Extreme temperatures, typically in the winter and summer months, can lead to an increase in service requests related to home systems, particularly central HVAC systems, resulting in higher claim frequency and costs and lower profitability, while mild temperatures in the winter or summer months can lead to lower home systems claim frequency. For example, we experienced an increase in contract claims costs driven by a higher number of central HVAC work orders due to colder winter temperatures in the first quarter of 2018 and higher summer temperatures in the second and third quarters of 2018, as compared to historical averages, in many of the markets that we serve. See “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Key Factors and Trends Affecting Our Results of Operations—Seasonality” in Part II of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information.

Intellectual Property

We hold various service marks, trademarks and trade names, such as Frontdoor, American Home Shield, Candu and Streem, that we deem particularly important to our advertising and marketing activities.

Insurance

We maintain insurance coverage that we believe is appropriate for our business, including workers’ compensation, auto liability, general liability, umbrella, cybersecurity and property insurance. In addition, we provide insurance for our service requests in Texas via our wholly-owned captive insurance company, which is domiciled in Houston, Texas.

Regulatory Compliance

We are subject to various federal, state and local laws and regulations, compliance with which increases our operating costs, limits or restricts the services we provide or the methods by which we may offer, sell and fulfill those services or conduct our business, or subjects us to the possibility of regulatory actions or proceedings. Noncompliance with these laws and regulations can subject us to fines, loss of licenses or registrations or various forms of civil or criminal prosecution, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our reputation, business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

These federal, state and local laws and regulations include laws relating to consumer protection, deceptive trade practices, home service plans, real estate settlement, wage and hour requirements, state contractor laws, the employment of immigrants, labor relations, licensing, building code requirements, workers’ safety, environmental, privacy and data protection, securities, insurance coverages, sales tax collection and remittance, healthcare reforms, employee benefits, marketing (including, without limitation, telemarketing) and advertising. In addition, we are regulated in certain states by the applicable state insurance regulatory authority and by other regulatory bodies, such as the Texas Real Estate Commission.

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We are subject to federal, state and local laws and regulations designed to protect consumers, including laws governing consumer privacy and fraud, the collection and use of consumer data, telemarketing and other forms of solicitation. The telemarketing rules adopted by the Federal Communications Commission pursuant to the Federal Telephone Consumer Protection Act and the Federal Telemarketing Sales Rule issued by the Federal Trade Commission govern our telephone sales practices. In addition, some states and local governing bodies have adopted laws and regulations targeted at direct telephone sales, i.e., “do-not-call” regulations. The implementation of these marketing regulations requires us to rely more extensively on other marketing methods and channels. In addition, if we were to fail to comply with any applicable law or regulation, we could be subject to substantial fines or damages, be involved in lawsuits, enforcement actions and other claims by third parties or governmental authorities, suffer losses to our reputation and our business or suffer the loss of licenses or registrations or incur penalties that may affect how the business is operated, any of which, in turn, could have a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Available Information

Our website address is www.frontdoorhome.com. We use our website as a channel of distribution for company information. We will make available free of charge on the Investor section of our website our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and all amendments to those reports as soon as reasonably practicable after such material is electronically filed with or furnished to the SEC pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act. We also make available through our website other reports filed with or furnished to the SEC under the Exchange Act, including our proxy statements and reports filed by officers and directors under Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act, as well as our Code of Conduct and Financial Code of Ethics. Financial and other material information regarding Frontdoor is routinely posted on our website and is readily accessible. We do not intend for information contained in our website to be part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

In addition to the other information contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and the exhibits hereto, you should carefully consider the following risk factors in evaluating our business. Our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially adversely affected by any of these risks. The selected risks described below, however, are not the only risks we face. Additional risks and uncertainties, not currently known to us or those we currently view to be immaterial may also materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations. The risk factors generally have been separated into four groups: risks related to our business, risks related to the Spin-off, risks related to our common stock and risks related to our substantial indebtedness.

The materialization of any risks and uncertainties set forth below or identified in Cautionary Statement Concerning Forward-Looking Statements contained in this report and our other filings with the SEC or those that are presently unforeseen could result in significant adverse effects on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. See “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in Part II of this Annual Report on Form 10-K and “Cautionary Statement Concerning Forward-Looking Statements” above.

Risks Related to Our Business

Our industry is highly competitive. Competition could reduce our share and adversely affect our reputation, business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

We operate in a highly competitive industry. Changes in the sources and intensity of competition in the industry in which we operate may impact the demand for our services and may also result in additional pricing pressure. Heightened industry competition could adversely affect our business operations by eroding our competitive advantage in contractor selection and purchasing power for replacement parts, appliances and home systems. Regional and local competitors operating in a limited geographic area may have lower labor, employee benefits and overhead costs than us. The principal measures of competition in our business include customer service, brand awareness and reputation, fairness of contract terms, including contract price and coverage scope, contractor network and quality and speed of service. We may be unable to compete successfully against current or future competitors, and the competitive pressures that we face may result in reduced market share, reduced pricing, and other adverse impacts to our reputation, business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Weakening general economic conditions, especially as they may affect home sales, unemployment or consumer confidence or spending levels, may adversely impact our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Our results of operations are dependent upon consumer spending. Deterioration in general economic conditions and consumer confidence, particularly in California, Texas, Florida and Arizona, could affect the demand for our services. Consumer spending and confidence tend to decline during times of declining economic conditions. A worsening of macroeconomic indicators, including weak home sales, higher home foreclosures, declining consumer confidence or rising unemployment rates, could adversely affect consumer spending levels, reduce demand for our services and adversely impact our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

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Changes in the real estate market could also affect the demand for our services as home buyers elect not to purchase our services, which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows. Among others, the number of real estate transactions in which our services are purchased could decrease in the following situations:

when mortgage interest rates are high or rising;

when the availability of credit, including commercial and residential mortgage funding, is limited; or

when real estate values are declining.

We may not successfully implement our business strategies, including achieving our growth objectives.

We may not be able to fully implement our business strategies or realize, in whole or in part within the expected time frames, the anticipated benefits of various growth or other initiatives. Our business strategies and initiatives, including increasing our home service plan penetration, expanding into home maintenance and improvement services, providing on-demand home services, developing a world-class data platform and pursuing selective acquisitions, are subject to significant business, economic and competitive uncertainties and contingencies, many of which are beyond our control.

In addition, our financial performance is affected by changes in the services and products we offer to customers. There can be no assurance that our strategies or service and product offerings will succeed in increasing revenue and growing profitability. An unsuccessful execution of strategies, including the rollout or adjustment of any new services or products or sales and marketing plans, could cause us to reevaluate or change our business strategies and could have a material adverse impact on our reputation, business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

We will incur certain costs to achieve efficiency improvements and growth in our business, and we may not meet anticipated implementation timetables or stay within budgeted costs. As these efficiency improvement and growth initiatives are implemented, we may not fully achieve expected cost savings and efficiency improvements or growth rates, or these initiatives could adversely impact customer retention or our operations. Also, our business strategies may change in light of our ability to implement new business initiatives, competitive pressures, economic uncertainties or developments or other factors.

Our future success depends on our ability to attract, retain and maintain our network of third-party contractors and vendors and their performance.

Our ability to conduct our operations is in part impacted by reliance on a network of third-party contractors. Our future success and financial performance depend substantially on our ability to attract and retain third-party contractors and ensure third-party contractor compliance with our policies and standards and performance expectations. However, these third-party contractors are independent parties that we do not control, and who own, operate and oversee the daily operations of their individual businesses. If third-party contractors do not successfully operate their businesses in a manner consistent with required laws, standards and regulations, we could be subject to claims from regulators or legal claims for the actions or omissions of such third-party contractors. In addition, our relationship with our third-party contractors could become strained (including resulting in litigation) as we impose new standards or assert more rigorous enforcement practices of our existing standards and performance expectations. When a contractor relationship is terminated, there is a risk that we may not be able to enter into a similar agreement with an alternate contractor in a timely manner or on favorable terms. We could incur costs to transition to other contractors, and these costs could materially adversely affect our results of operations and cash flows. We could also fail to provide service to our customers if we lose contractors that we cannot replace in a timely manner, which could lead to customer complaints and possible claims and litigation.

We are also dependent on vendors for home systems, replacement appliances and parts, and the ability to rely on the pricing for such goods in the contracts we negotiate with these vendors. If we cannot obtain the replacement appliances, systems or parts from vendors within our existing stable of vendors to satisfy consumer claims, we may be forced to obtain replacement appliances, systems and parts from other vendors at higher costs, which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Adverse credit and financial market events and conditions could, among other things, impede access to or increase the cost of financing, which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Disruptions in credit or financial markets could make it more difficult for us to obtain, or increase our cost of obtaining, financing for our operations or investments or to refinance our existing indebtedness, or cause existing or future debt financing sources to not give technical or other waivers under credit facility or other agreements to the extent we may seek them in the future, thereby causing us to be in default.

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Weather conditions and seasonality, including Acts or God, can affect the demand for our services, our ability to operate, and our results of operations and cash flows.

The demand for our services, and our results of operations, are affected by weather conditions and seasonality, including, without limitation, potential impacts of climate change, known and unknown. Such seasonality causes our results of operations to vary considerably from quarter to quarter. Accordingly, results for any quarter are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be achieved for the full fiscal year. Extreme temperatures, typically in the winter and summer months, can lead to an increase in service requests related to home systems, particularly central HVAC systems, resulting in higher claim frequency and costs and lower profitability, while mild temperatures in the winter or summer months can lead to lower home systems claim frequency. For example, we experienced an increase in contract claims costs driven by a higher number of central HVAC work orders due to colder winter temperatures in the first quarter of 2018 and higher summer temperatures in the second and third quarters of 2018, as compared to historical averages, in many of the markets that we serve. Acts of God, or natural disasters such as typhoons, hurricanes, tornadoes or earthquakes, could also affect our facilities, or those of our major suppliers or business process outsource providers, which could affect our costs, our ability to meet supply requirements, our ability to provide services and our ability to access our data and other records. Extreme or unpredictable weather conditions could materially adversely impact our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

We may not be able to attract and retain qualified key executives or transition smoothly under our new leadership, which could adversely impact us and our business and inhibit our ability to operate and grow successfully.

The execution of our business strategy and our financial performance will depend in significant part on our executive management team and other key management personnel. Our future success will depend in large part on our success in attracting new talent and in utilizing current, experienced senior leadership and smoothly transitioning responsibilities to, and implementing the goals and objectives of, our new management team. Any inability to attract qualified key executives in a timely manner, retain our leadership team and recruit other important personnel could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

We are dependent on labor availability at our customer care centers.

Our ability to conduct our operations is in part affected by our ability to increase our labor force, including on a seasonal basis at our customer care centers, which may be adversely affected by a number of factors. While we employ domestic and retain overseas third-party customer care center resources to help fulfill our service and other obligations, the effectiveness of such resources may be adversely affected by the availability of labor in such other markets and the continuing viability of contract relations with such third parties. In the event of a labor shortage, we could experience difficulty in responding to customer calls in a timely fashion or delivering our services in a high-quality or timely manner and could be forced to increase wages to attract and retain associates, which would result in higher operating costs and reduced profitability. Long call and service wait times by customers during peak operating times could have a material adverse impact on our reputation, business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Laws and government regulations applicable to our business and lawsuits, enforcement actions and other claims by third parties or governmental authorities could increase our legal and regulatory expenses, and impact our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Our business is subject to significant federal, state and local laws and regulations. These laws and regulations include but are not limited to laws relating to consumer protection, deceptive trading practices, home service plans, real estate settlement, wage and hour requirements, state contractor laws, the employment of immigrants, labor relations, licensing, building code requirements, workers’ safety, environmental, privacy and data protection, securities, insurance coverages, sales tax collection and remittance, healthcare reforms, employee benefits, marketing (including, without limitation, telemarketing) and advertising. In addition, we are regulated in certain states by the applicable state insurance regulatory authority and by other regulatory bodies, such as the Texas Real Estate Commission.

While we do not consider ourselves to be an insurance company, the IRS or state agencies could deem us to be taxed as such, which could adversely impact the timing of our tax payments. We cannot predict whether our operation as a stand-alone company following the separation and distribution will increase the likelihood that the IRS or any state agency may view us as an insurance company.

In addition, U.S. Tax Reform was enacted in December 2017. This legislation made significant changes to the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”). U.S. Tax Reform, among other things, contains significant changes to corporate taxation, including a reduction of the corporate income tax rate, a partial limitation on the deductibility of business interest expense, limitation of the deduction for certain net operating losses to 80 percent of current year taxable income, an indefinite carryforward of certain net operating losses, limitations on certain deductions for compensation paid to certain executive offices, immediate deductions for certain new investments instead of deductions for depreciation expense over time and the modification or repeal of many business deductions and credits.

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We are also subject to various federal, state and local laws and regulations designed to protect consumers, including laws governing consumer privacy and fraud, the collection and use of consumer data, telemarketing and other forms of solicitation. From time to time, we have received and we expect that we may continue to receive inquiries or investigative demands from regulatory bodies, including the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection and state attorneys general and other state agencies. The telemarketing rules adopted by the Federal Communications Commission pursuant to the Federal Telephone Consumer Protection Act and the Federal Telemarketing Sales Rule issued by the Federal Trade Commission govern our telephone sales practices. In addition, some states and local governing bodies have adopted laws and regulations targeted at direct telephone sales, i.e., “do-not-call” regulations. The implementation of these marketing regulations requires us to rely more extensively on other marketing methods and channels.

Various federal, state and local governing bodies may propose additional legislation and regulation that may be detrimental to our business or may substantially increase our operating costs, including increases in the minimum wage; environmental regulations related to climate change, equipment efficiency standards, refrigerant production and use and other environmental matters; health care coverage; “do-not-call” or other marketing regulations; or regulations implemented in response to business practices of others in our industry. It is difficult to predict the future impact of the broad and expanding legislative and regulatory requirements affecting our business and changes to such requirements may adversely affect our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows. In addition, if we were to fail to comply with any applicable law or regulation, we could be subject to substantial fines or damages, be involved in lawsuits, enforcement actions and other claims by third parties or governmental authorities, suffer harm to our reputation, suffer the loss of licenses or incur penalties that may affect how our business is operated, any of which, in turn, could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Changes to U.S. tariff and import/export regulations may increase the costs of home systems, appliances and repair parts and, in turn, adversely impact our business.

Tariff policies are under continuous review and subject to change. The current U.S. administration has voiced strong concerns about imports from countries that it perceives as engaging in unfair trade practices and could impose import duties or restrictions on components and raw materials that are applicable to our business from countries it perceives as engaging in unfair trade practices. Such duties or restrictions, or the perception that they could occur, may materially and adversely affect our business by increasing our costs or reducing global trade. For example, rising costs due to blanket tariffs on imported steel and aluminum could increase the costs of parts associated with our repair and replacement of home systems and appliances, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Moreover, new tariffs and changes to U.S. trade policy could prompt retaliation from affected countries, potentially triggering the imposition of tariffs on U.S. goods. Such a “trade war” could lead to general economic downturn or could materially and adversely affect the demand for our services, thus negatively impacting our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Disruptions or failures in our technology systems could create liability for us or limit our ability to effectively monitor, operate and control our operations and adversely impact our reputation, business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Our technology systems facilitate our ability to monitor, operate and control our operations. These systems were developed in conjunction with other systems at ServiceMaster prior to the Spin-off and have been significantly changed and modified since then. Such changes and modifications to our technology systems could cause disruption to our operations or cause challenges with respect to compliance with laws, regulations or other applicable standards. As the development and implementation of our technology systems (including our operating systems) evolve, we may elect to modify, replace or abandon certain technology initiatives, which could result in write-downs.

Any disruption in our technology systems, including capacity limitations, instabilities, or failure to operate as expected, could, depending on the magnitude of the problem, adversely impact our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows, including by limiting our capacity to monitor, operate and control our operations effectively. Failures of our technology systems could also lead to violations of privacy laws, regulations, trade guidelines or practices related to our customers and associates. If our disaster recovery plans do not work as anticipated, or if the third-party vendors to which we have outsourced certain technology, contact center or other services fail to fulfill their obligations, our operations may be adversely affected, and any of these circumstances could adversely affect our reputation, business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

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Increases in appliance, parts and system prices and other operating costs could adversely impact our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Our financial performance may be adversely affected by increases in the level of our operating expenses, such as refrigerants, appliances and equipment, parts, raw materials, wages and salaries, employee benefits, healthcare, contractor costs, self-insurance costs and other insurance premiums, as well as various regulatory compliance costs, all of which may be subject to inflationary and other pressures. For example, in 2018, we experienced a higher mix of appliance replacements versus repairs, which, in turn, increased our contract claims costs. Such increase in operating expenses, including service request costs, could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Prices for raw materials, such as steel and fuel, are subject to market volatility. We cannot predict the extent to which we may experience future increases in costs of chemicals, refrigerants, appliances and equipment, parts, raw materials, wages and salaries, employee benefits, healthcare, contractor costs, self-insurance costs and other insurance premiums, as well as various regulatory compliance costs and other operating costs. To the extent such costs increase, we may be prevented, in whole or in part, from passing these cost increases through to our existing and prospective customers, which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

We depend on a limited number of third-party components suppliers. Our reputation, business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows may be harmed if these parties do not perform their obligations or if they suffer interruptions to their own operations, or if alternative component sources are unavailable or if there is an increase in the costs of these components.

We are dependent on a limited number of suppliers for various key components used in the services and products we offer to customers, and the cost, quality and availability of these components are essential to our services. In particular, we have seven national suppliers of repair parts and home systems and appliances that each account for more than five percent of our supplier spend. We are subject to the risk of shortages, increased costs and long lead times in the supply of these components and other materials, and the risk that our suppliers discontinue or modify, or increase the price of, the components used. If the supply of these components were to be delayed or constrained, or if one or more of our main suppliers were to go out of business, alternative sources or suppliers may not be available on acceptable terms or at all. For example, certain of our suppliers are located in or near, or source from other suppliers in or near, regions affected by the coronavirus COVID-19. Further, if there were a shortage of supply, the cost of these components may increase and harm our ability to provide our services on a cost-effective basis. In connection with any supply shortages in the future, reliable and cost-effective replacement sources may not be available on short notice or at all, and this may force us to increase prices and face a corresponding decrease in demand for our services. In the event that any of our suppliers were to discontinue production of our key product components, developing alternate sources of supply for these components would be time consuming, difficult and costly. This would harm our ability to market our services in order to meet market demand and could materially and adversely affect our reputation, business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

We have limited control over these parties on which our business depends. If any of these parties fails to perform its obligations on schedule, or breaches or ends its relationship with us, we may be unable to satisfy demand for our services. Delays, product shortages and other problems could impair our distribution and brand image and make it difficult for us to attract new customers. If we experience significantly increased demand, or if we need to replace an existing supplier, we may be unable to supplement or replace such supply capacity on terms that are acceptable to us, which may undermine our ability to deliver our services to customers in a timely and cost-efficient manner. Accordingly, a loss or interruption in the service of any key party could adversely impact our reputation, business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

If we fail to protect the security of personal information about our customers, associates or third parties, we could be subject to interruption of our business operations, private litigation, reputational damage and costly penalties.

We rely on, among other things, commercially available systems, software, tools and monitoring to provide security for processing, transmission and storage of confidential information of customers, associates and third parties, such as payment cards and personal information. The systems currently used for transmission and approval of payment card transactions, and the technology utilized in payment cards themselves, all of which can put payment card data at risk, are central to meeting standards set by the payment card industry (“PCI”). We continue to evaluate and modify these systems and protocols for PCI compliance purposes, and such PCI standards may change from time to time.

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Activities by third parties, advances in computer and software capabilities and encryption technology, new tools and discoveries and other events or developments may facilitate or result in a compromise or breach of these systems. Any compromises, breaches or errors in applications related to these systems or failures to comply with standards set by the PCI could cause damage to our reputation and interruptions in our operations, including customers’ ability to pay for services and products by credit card or their willingness to purchase our services and products and could result in a violation of applicable laws, regulations, orders, industry standards or agreements and subject us to costs, penalties and liabilities. We are subject to risks caused by data breaches and operational disruptions, particularly through cyber-attack or cyber-intrusion, including by computer hackers, foreign governments and cyber terrorists. Any cyber or similar attack we experience could damage our technology systems and infrastructures, prevent us from providing our services, erode our reputation and those of our various brands, lead to the termination of advantageous contracts, result in inaccurate reporting of financial information, result in the disclosure of confidential consumer and professional contractor information, expose us to significant liabilities for the violation of data privacy laws, result in the disclosure of confidential and sensitive business information or intellectual property, result in claims or litigation against us and/or otherwise be costly to mitigate or remedy. The frequency of data breaches of companies and governments has increased in recent years as the number, intensity and sophistication of attempted attacks and intrusions from around the world have increased. The occurrence of any of these events could have a material adverse impact on our reputation, business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

In addition, although we have insurance to mitigate some of these risks, such policies may not cover the particular cyber or similar attack experienced and, even if the risk is covered, such insurance coverage may not be adequate to compensate for related losses.

The impact of cybersecurity events experienced by third parties with whom we do business (or upon whom we otherwise rely in connection with our day-to-day operations) could have similar effects on us. Moreover, even cyber or similar attacks that do not directly affect us or third parties with whom we do business may result in a loss of consumer confidence in online and/or technology-reliant businesses generally, which could make consumers and professional contractors less likely to use or continue to use our services. The occurrence of any of these events could adversely affect our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Data protection legislation is also becoming increasingly common in the United States at both the federal and state level. For example, the State of California enacted the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (the “CCPA”), which became effective on January 1, 2020. The CCPA requires companies that process information of California residents to make new disclosures to consumers about their data collection, use and sharing practices, allows consumers to opt out of certain data sharing with third parties and provides a new cause of action for data breaches. Additionally, the Federal Trade Commission and many state attorneys general are interpreting federal and state consumer protection laws to impose standards for the online collection, use, dissemination and security of data. The burdens imposed by the CCPA and other similar laws that may be enacted at the federal and state level may require us to further modify our data processing practices and policies and to incur substantial expenditures in order to comply.

We may not be able to adequately protect our intellectual property and other proprietary rights that are material to our business.

Our ability to compete effectively depends in part on our rights to proprietary information, service marks, trademarks, trade names and other intellectual property rights we own or license, particularly our brand names, Frontdoor, American Home Shield, HSA, OneGuard, Landmark, Candu and Streem. We have not sought to register or protect every one of our marks in the United States. If we are unable to protect our proprietary information and intellectual property rights, including brand names, it could cause a material adverse effect on our reputation, business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows. Litigation may be necessary to enforce our intellectual property rights and protect our proprietary information, or to defend against claims by third parties that our products, services or activities infringe their intellectual property rights.

Future acquisitions or other strategic transactions could negatively affect our reputation, business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Our business strategy includes the pursuit of strategic transactions, which could involve acquisitions or dispositions of businesses or assets. For example, in 2019, we acquired Streem. Any future strategic transaction could involve integration or implementation challenges, business disruption or other risks, or change our business profile significantly. Any inability on our part to consolidate and manage growth from acquired businesses or successfully implement other strategic transactions could have an adverse impact on our reputation, business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows. Any acquisition that we make may not provide us with the benefits that were anticipated when entering into such acquisition. The process of integrating an acquired business may create unforeseen difficulties and expenses, including the diversion of resources needed to integrate new businesses, technologies, products, personnel or systems; the inability to retain associates, customers and suppliers; the assumption of actual or contingent liabilities; failure to effectively and timely adopt and adhere to internal control processes and other policies; write-offs or impairment charges relating to goodwill and other intangible assets; unanticipated liabilities; and potential expense associated with litigation with sellers of such businesses. Any future disposition transactions could also impact our business and may subject us to various risks, including failure to obtain appropriate value for the disposed businesses and post-closing claims.

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We may be required to recognize impairment charges.

We have significant amounts of goodwill and intangible assets, such as trade names. In accordance with applicable accounting standards, goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets are not amortized and are subject to assessment for impairment by applying a fair-value-based test annually, or more frequently if there are indicators of impairment, including:

significant adverse changes in the business climate, including economic or financial conditions;

significant adverse changes in expected operating results;

adverse actions or assessments by regulators;

unanticipated competition;

loss of key personnel; and

a current expectation that it is more likely than not that a reporting unit or intangible asset will be sold or otherwise disposed of.

Based upon future economic and financial market conditions, the operating performance of our reporting units and other factors, including those listed above, we may incur impairment charges in the future. It is possible that such impairment, if required, could be material. Any future impairment charges that we are required to record could have a material adverse impact on our results of operations. See “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Critical Accounting Policies” in Part II of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information.

We depend on our key personnel.

Our future success depends upon our ability to identify, hire, develop, motivate and retain highly skilled individuals. Competition for well-qualified employees is intense and our ability to compete effectively will depend, in part, upon our ability to attract new employees and retain existing employees. While we have established programs to attract new employees and provide incentives to retain existing employees, no assurances can be provided that we will be able to attract new employees or retain the services of our key employees in the future.

Our business process outsourcing initiatives may increase our reliance on third-party vendors and may expose our business to harm upon the termination or disruption of our third-party vendor relationships.

Our strategy to increase profitability, in part, by reducing our costs of operations includes the implementation of certain business process outsourcing initiatives, including off-shore outsourcing of certain aspects of our call center operations, some of which are located near regions that have been affected recently by the coronavirus COVID-19 and previously by Acts of God, such as earthquakes and typhoons. Any disruption, termination or substandard performance of these outsourced services, including possible breaches by third-party vendors of their agreements with us, could adversely affect our brands, reputation, customer relationships, financial position, results of operations and cash flows. Also, to the extent a third-party vendor relationship is terminated, there is a risk of disputes or litigation and that we may not be able to enter into a similar agreement with an alternate provider in a timely manner or on terms that we consider favorable. Even if we find an alternate provider, or choose to insource such services, there are significant risks associated with any transitioning activities. In addition, to the extent we decide to terminate outsourcing services and insource such services, there is a risk that we may not have the capabilities to perform these services internally, resulting in a disruption to our business, which could adversely impact our reputation, businesses, financial position, results of operations and cash flows. We could incur costs, including personnel and equipment costs, to insource previously outsourced services like these, and these costs could adversely affect our results of operations and cash flows.

Furthermore, off-shore outsourcing of certain aspects of our call center operations may induce negative public reaction. Off-shore outsourcing is a politically sensitive topic in the United States. For example, several organizations in the United States have publicly expressed concern about a perceived association between outsourcing providers and the loss of jobs in the United States. In response to such expressions, federal legislative measures have been proposed in the past, such as limiting income tax credits for companies that off-shore American jobs. In addition, there is ongoing publicity about some negative experiences that companies have had with outsourcing, such as theft and misappropriation of sensitive client data. Such negative perceptions that may be associated with using an off-shore provider could adversely impact our reputation, businesses, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

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We may be subject to litigation or other legal proceedings, and adverse outcomes in such litigation or other legal proceedings could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We have from time to time become and expect that we may continue to be subject to litigation and various other legal proceedings, including those related to intellectual property matters, privacy and consumer protection laws, as well as stockholder derivative suits, class action lawsuits and other matters, that involve claims for substantial amounts of money or for other relief or that might necessitate changes to our business and/or operations. The defense of these actions may be both time consuming and expensive. We will evaluate these litigation claims and legal proceedings to assess the likelihood of unfavorable outcomes and to estimate, if possible, the amount of potential losses. Based on these assessments and estimates, we may establish reserves and/or disclose the relevant litigation claims or legal proceedings, as and when required or appropriate. These assessments and estimates will be based on information available to our management at the time of such assessment or estimation and will involve a significant amount of judgment. As a result, actual outcomes or losses could differ materially from initial assessments and estimates. Our failure to successfully defend or settle any litigation claim or other legal proceeding could result in liability that, to the extent not covered by insurance, could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flow.

We depend on our real estate customer acquisition channel for a significant percentage of our sales.

Our strategic relationships with top real estate brokerages and agents and the National Association of Realtors are important to our business. These brokers and agents are independent parties that we do not control, and we cannot guarantee that our strategic partnership arrangements with them will continue at current levels or at all. An inability to maintain these relationships could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Marketing efforts to increase sales through our real estate and direct-to-consumer channels may not be successful or cost-effective.

Attracting customers, professional contractors and real estate brokers to our brands and businesses involves considerable expenditures for marketing. We have made, and expect to continue to make, significant expenditures on marketing partnerships, search engine marketing, content marketing, social media, direct mail, television and radio, print advertisements and telemarketing. These efforts may not be successful or cost-effective. Historically, we have had to increase marketing expenditures over time to attract and retain customers and professional contractors and sustain growth.

With respect to our online marketing efforts, rapid and frequent changes in the pricing and operating dynamics of search engines, as well as changing policies and guidelines applicable to keyword advertising (which may unilaterally be updated by search engines without advance notice), could adversely affect our paid search engine marketing efforts and free search engine traffic. Such changes could adversely affect paid listings (both their placement and pricing), as well as the ranking of our brands and businesses within paid and organic search results, any or all of which could increase our marketing expenditures (particularly if free traffic is replaced with paid traffic).

In addition, evolving consumer behavior can affect the availability of profitable marketing opportunities. For example, as traditional television viewership declines and media is increasingly consumed through various digital means, the reach of traditional advertising channels is contracting, and the number of digital advertising channels is expanding. To continue to reach and engage with customers and professional contractors and grow in this environment, we will need to identify and devote more of our overall marketing expenditures to newer digital advertising channels (such as online video and other digital platforms), as well as target customers, professional contractors and real estate brokers via these channels. Generally, the opportunities in (and the sophistication of) newer advertising channels are undeveloped and unproven relative to traditional channels, which could make it difficult for us to assess returns on our marketing investment in newer channels. Additionally, as we increasingly depend on newer digital channels for traffic, these efforts will involve challenges and risks similar to those we face in connection with our search engine marketing efforts.

Lastly, we also enter into various third-party affiliate agreements in an effort to drive traffic to our various brands and businesses. These arrangements are generally more cost-effective than traditional marketing efforts. If we are unable to renew existing (and enter into new) arrangements of this nature, sales and marketing as a percentage of revenue could increase over the long-term.

No assurances can be provided that we will be able to continue to appropriately manage our marketing efforts in response to any or all of the events and trends discussed above and the failure to do so could adversely affect our reputation, business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flow.

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Third-party use of our trademarks as keywords in Internet search engine advertising programs may direct potential customers to competitors’ websites, which could harm our reputation and cause us to lose sales.

Competitors and other third parties purchase our trademarks and confusingly similar terms as keywords in Internet search engine advertising programs in order to divert potential customers to their websites. Preventing such unauthorized use is inherently difficult. If we are unable to protect our trademarks from such unauthorized use and curtail the use of confusingly similar terms, competitors and other third parties may drive potential online customers away from our websites to competing and unauthorized websites, which could harm our reputation and cause us to lose sales.

The use of social media by us and other parties could result in damage to our reputation or otherwise adversely affect us.

We increasingly utilize social media to communicate with current and potential customers, contractors, real estate brokers and employees, as well as other individuals interested in us. Information delivered by us, or by third parties about us, via social media can be easily accessed and rapidly disseminated, and could result in reputational harm, decreased customer loyalty or other issues that could diminish the value of our brand or result in significant liability.

Our operations outside the United States are subject to special risks that could adversely affect us.

Our revenues are currently derived within the United States; however, certain aspects of our call center operations and other services are conducted outside the United States by business process outsource providers in the Philippines and Trinidad and Tobago, and we have recently established a technology center in India. These operations are currently conducted in India, the Philippines, and Trinidad and Tobago. Accordingly, developments in those parts of the world generally have a more significant effect on our operations than developments in other places. Our operations outside the United States are also subject to special risks, including fluctuations in currency values and foreign-currency exchange rates, which may affect our net income and the book value of our assets outside the United States; exchange control regulations; changes in local political or economic conditions; other potentially detrimental domestic and foreign governmental practice or policies affecting U.S. companies operating abroad; difficulties in staffing and managing international operations; and operational and compliance challenges resulting from distance, language and cultural differences. Acts of God, war, terror acts and epidemic disease, such as the novel coronavirus COVID-19, may impair our ability to operate, or the ability of our business process outsource providers to operate, in particular countries or regions.

Risks Related to the Recent Spin-Off and Our Operations as an Independent Publicly Traded Company

We have a limited history of operating as an independent, public company, and our historical financial information is not necessarily representative of the results that we would have achieved as a separate, publicly traded company and may not be a reliable indicator of our future results.

The historical information in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for periods prior to the Spin-off on October 1, 2018, refers to our business as operated by and integrated with ServiceMaster. Our historical financial information included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for periods prior to the Spin-off is derived from the consolidated financial statements and accounting records of ServiceMaster and Frontdoor when it was an indirect, wholly owned subsidiary of ServiceMaster. Accordingly, the historical financial information included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for periods prior to the Spin-off does not necessarily reflect the financial position, results of operations and cash flows that we would have achieved as a separate, publicly traded company during the periods presented or those that we will achieve in the future primarily as a result of the factors described below:

Prior to the Spin-off, our business had been operated by ServiceMaster as part of its broader corporate organization, rather than as an independent company. ServiceMaster or one of its affiliates performed certain corporate functions for us. Our historical financial results for periods prior to the Spin-off reflect allocations of corporate expenses from ServiceMaster for such functions and are likely to be less than the expenses we would have incurred had we operated as a separate publicly traded company. 

Prior to the Spin-off, our business had been integrated with the other businesses of ServiceMaster. We had shared economies of scope and scale in costs, employees and vendor relationships. Although we entered into a transition services agreement with ServiceMaster prior to the Spin-off, these arrangements are temporary and may not retain or fully capture the benefits that we had enjoyed as a result of being integrated with ServiceMaster and may result in us paying higher charges than in the past for these services. This could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Generally, our working capital requirements and capital for our general corporate purposes, including acquisitions and capital expenditures, had been satisfied as part of the corporate-wide cash management policies of ServiceMaster. As a separate, independent company, we may need to obtain financing from banks, through public offerings or private placements of debt or equity securities, strategic relationships or other arrangements, which may or may not be available and may be more costly.

 

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As a separate, independent company, the cost of capital for our business may be higher than ServiceMaster’s cost of capital prior to the Spin-off.

Our historical financial information for periods prior to the Spin-off does not reflect the debt that we incurred in connection with the Spin-off.

We had historically been able to rely on the net worth of ServiceMaster when calculating our reserve requirements as a home service plan company in certain states. As a separate, independent company, we may be required to hold more reserves than we were required to hold as a subsidiary of ServiceMaster. This could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

As a public company, we are subject to the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”) and the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) and are required to prepare our financial statements according to the rules and regulations promulgated by the SEC. Complying with these requirements could result in significant costs and require us to divert substantial resources, including management time, from other activities.

Other significant changes may occur in our cost structure, management, financing and business operations as a result of operating as a company separate from ServiceMaster. We incurred incremental operating costs (“dis-synergies”) of $4 million in each of the years ended 2019 and 2018 for an annualized increase in operating costs of approximately $8 million, which we expect to represent our normal operating costs associated with these dis-synergies. For additional information about the past financial performance of our business and the basis of presentation of the historical consolidated and combined financial statements, see “Item 6. Selected Financial Data,” “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our audited consolidated and combined financial statements and accompanying notes thereto included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

If the distribution, together with certain related transactions, were to fail to qualify as a transaction that is generally tax-free for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we could be subject to significant tax liabilities and, in certain circumstances, we could be required to indemnify ServiceMaster for material taxes and other related amounts pursuant to indemnification obligations under the tax matters agreement.

It was a condition to the distribution that the private letter ruling from the IRS (the “IRS private letter ruling”) regarding certain U.S. federal income tax matters relating to the separation and distribution received by ServiceMaster remain valid and be satisfactory to the ServiceMaster board of directors and that the ServiceMaster board of directors receive one or more opinions from its tax advisors, in each case satisfactory to the ServiceMaster board of directors, regarding certain U.S. federal income tax matters relating to the separation and the distribution. The IRS private letter ruling and the opinions of tax advisors were based upon and relied on, among other things, various facts and assumptions, as well as certain representations, statements and undertakings of ServiceMaster and us, including those relating to the past and future conduct of ServiceMaster and us. If any of these representations, statements or undertakings is, or becomes, inaccurate or incomplete, or if ServiceMaster or we breach any of the representations or covenants contained in any of the separation-related agreements and documents or in any documents relating to the IRS private letter ruling and/or the opinions of tax advisors, the IRS private letter ruling and/or the opinions of tax advisors may be invalid and the conclusions reached therein could be jeopardized.

Notwithstanding receipt of the IRS private letter ruling and the opinions of tax advisors, the IRS could determine that the distribution and/or certain related transactions should be treated as taxable transactions for U.S. federal income tax purposes if it determines that any of the representations, assumptions, or undertakings upon which the IRS private letter ruling or the opinions of tax advisors were based are false or have been violated. In addition, neither the IRS private letter ruling nor the opinions of tax advisors addressed all of the issues that are relevant to determining whether the distribution, together with certain related transactions, qualifies as a transaction that is generally tax-free for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Further, the opinions of tax advisors represented the judgment of such tax advisors and are not binding on the IRS or any court, and the IRS or a court may disagree with the conclusions in the opinions of tax advisors. Accordingly, notwithstanding receipt by ServiceMaster of the IRS private letter ruling and the opinions of tax advisors, there can be no assurance that the IRS will not assert that the distribution and/or certain related transactions do not qualify for tax-free treatment for U.S. federal income tax purposes or that a court would not sustain such a challenge. In the event the IRS were to prevail in such challenge, we could be subject to significant U.S. federal income tax liability.

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If the distribution, together with related transactions, fails to qualify as a transaction that is generally tax-free for U.S. federal income tax purposes under Sections 355 and 368(a)(1)(D) of the Code, in general, for U.S. federal income tax purposes, ServiceMaster would recognize taxable gain as if it had sold our common stock in a taxable sale for its fair market value (unless ServiceMaster and we jointly make an election under Section 336(e) of the Code with respect to the distribution, in which case, in general, (a) the ServiceMaster group would recognize taxable gain as if we had sold all of our assets in a taxable sale in exchange for an amount equal to the fair market value of our common stock and the assumption of all our liabilities and (b) we would obtain a related step-up in the basis of our assets) and, if the distribution fails to qualify as a transaction that is generally tax-free for U.S. federal income tax purposes under Section 355, in general, for U.S. federal income tax purposes, ServiceMaster stockholders who received our shares in the distribution would be subject to tax as if they had received a taxable distribution equal to the fair market value of such shares.

Under the tax matters agreement that ServiceMaster entered into with us, we are required to indemnify ServiceMaster against any additional taxes and related amounts resulting from (a) an acquisition of all or a portion of our equity securities or assets, whether by merger or otherwise (and regardless of whether we participated in or otherwise facilitated the acquisition), (b) other actions or failures to act by us or (c) any inaccuracy or breach of our representations, covenants or undertakings contained in any of the separation-related agreements and documents or in any documents relating to the IRS private letter ruling and/or the opinions of tax advisors. Any such indemnity obligations, including the obligation to indemnify ServiceMaster for taxes resulting from the distribution and certain related transactions not qualifying as tax-free, could be material.

U.S. federal income tax consequences may restrict our ability to engage in certain desirable strategic or capital-raising transactions after the separation.

Under current law, a separation can be rendered taxable to the parent corporation and its stockholders as a result of certain post-separation acquisitions of shares or assets of the spun-off corporation. For example, a separation may result in taxable gain to the parent corporation under Section 355(e) of the Code if the separation were later deemed to be part of a plan (or series of related transactions) pursuant to which one or more persons acquire, directly or indirectly, shares representing a 50 percent or greater interest (by vote or value) in the spun-off corporation. To preserve the U.S. federal income tax treatment of the separation and distribution, and in addition to our indemnity obligation described above, the tax matters agreement restricts us, for the two-year period following the distribution, except in specific circumstances, from:

entering into any transaction pursuant to which all or a portion of our common stock or assets would be acquired, whether by merger or otherwise;

issuing equity securities beyond certain thresholds;

repurchasing shares of our capital stock other than in certain open-market transactions;

ceasing to actively conduct certain aspects of our business; and/or

taking or failing to take any other action that would jeopardize the expected U.S. federal income tax treatment of the distribution and certain related transactions.

These restrictions may limit our ability to pursue certain strategic transactions or other transactions that we may believe to be in the best interests of our stockholders or that might increase the value of our business.

We may not achieve some or all of the expected benefits of the Spin-off, and the Spin-off may materially and adversely affect our financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

We may be unable to achieve the full strategic and financial benefits expected to result from the Spin-off, or such benefits may be delayed or not occur at all.

We may not achieve these and other anticipated benefits for a variety of reasons, including, among others that: (a) the Spin-off required significant amounts of management’s time and effort, which may have diverted management’s attention from operating and growing our business; (b) following the Spin-off, we may be more susceptible to market fluctuations and other adverse events than if we were still a part of ServiceMaster; (c) following the Spin-off, our business is less diversified than ServiceMaster’s business prior to the Spin-off; and (d) the other actions required to separate ServiceMaster’s and our respective businesses could disrupt our operations. If we fail to achieve some or all of the benefits expected to result from the Spin-off, or if such benefits are delayed, it could have a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

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After the Spin-off, certain members of management, directors and stockholders may hold stock in both ServiceMaster and our Company, and as a result may face actual or potential conflicts of interest.

After the Spin-off, the management and directors of each of ServiceMaster and Frontdoor may own both ServiceMaster common stock and our common stock. This ownership overlap could create, or appear to create, potential conflicts of interest when our management and directors and ServiceMaster’s management and directors face decisions that could have different implications for us and ServiceMaster. For example, potential conflicts of interest could arise in connection with the resolution of any dispute between ServiceMaster and us regarding the terms of the agreements governing the distribution and our relationship with ServiceMaster thereafter. These agreements include the separation and distribution agreement, the tax matters agreement, the employee matters agreement, the transition services agreement, the stockholder and registration rights agreement and any commercial agreements between the parties or their affiliates. Potential conflicts of interest may also arise out of any commercial arrangements that we or ServiceMaster may enter into in the future.

Failure to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act could materially and adversely affect us.

As a public company, we are subject to the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and the Dodd-Frank Act and are required to prepare our financial statements according to the rules and regulations promulgated by the SEC. In addition, the Exchange Act requires that we file annual, quarterly and current reports. Our failure to prepare and disclose this information in a timely manner or to otherwise comply with applicable law could subject us to penalties under federal securities laws, expose us to lawsuits and restrict our ability to access financing. In addition, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires that, among other things, we establish and maintain effective internal controls and procedures for financial reporting and disclosure purposes. Internal control over financial reporting is complex and may be revised over time to adapt to changes in our business, or changes in applicable accounting rules. We cannot assure you that our internal control over financial reporting will be effective in the future or that a material weakness will not be discovered with respect to a prior period for which we had previously believed that internal controls were effective. If we are not able to maintain or document effective internal control over financial reporting, our independent registered public accounting firm will not be able to certify as to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. While we have been adhering to these laws and regulations as a subsidiary of ServiceMaster, we will need to demonstrate our ability to manage our compliance with these corporate governance laws and regulations as an independent, public company.

Matters affecting our internal controls may cause us to be unable to report our financial information on a timely basis or may cause us to restate previously issued financial information, and thereby subject us to adverse regulatory consequences, including sanctions or investigations by the SEC, or violations of applicable stock exchange listing rules. There could also be a negative reaction in the financial markets due to a loss of investor confidence in our Company and the reliability of our financial statements. Confidence in the reliability of our financial statements is also likely to suffer if we or our independent registered public accounting firm reports a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting. This could have a material and adverse effect on us by, for example, leading to a decline in our share price and impairing our ability to raise additional capital.

As an independent, publicly traded company, we may not enjoy the same benefits that we did as a segment of ServiceMaster.

Prior to the Spin-off, our business operated as one of ServiceMaster’s business segments, and ServiceMaster performed or substantially oversaw all the corporate functions for our operations, including managing financial and human resources systems, internal auditing, investor relations, treasury services, accounting functions, finance and tax administration, benefits administration, legal, regulatory, and corporate branding functions.

As an independent, publicly traded company, we may become more susceptible to market fluctuations and other adverse events than we would have been were we still a part of ServiceMaster. As part of ServiceMaster, we had been able to enjoy certain benefits from ServiceMaster’s operating diversity and available capital for investments. As an independent, publicly traded company, we do not have similar operating diversity and may not have similar access to capital markets, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

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In connection with the Spin-off, ServiceMaster will indemnify us for certain liabilities and we will indemnify ServiceMaster for certain liabilities. If we are required to pay under these indemnities to ServiceMaster, our financial results could be negatively impacted. The ServiceMaster indemnity may not be sufficient to hold us harmless from the full amount of liabilities for which ServiceMaster will be allocated responsibility, and ServiceMaster may not be able to satisfy its indemnification obligations in the future.

Pursuant to the separation and distribution agreement and certain other agreements with ServiceMaster, ServiceMaster agreed to indemnify us for certain liabilities, and we agreed to indemnify ServiceMaster for certain liabilities, in each case for uncapped amounts. Our indemnification obligations to ServiceMaster are not subject to any cap, may be significant and could negatively impact our business, particularly with respect to indemnities provided in the tax matters agreement. See “—If the distribution, together with certain related transactions, were to fail to qualify as a transaction that is generally tax-free for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we could be subject to significant tax liabilities and, in certain circumstances, we could be required to indemnify ServiceMaster for material taxes and other related amounts pursuant to indemnification obligations under the tax matters agreement.” Third parties could also seek to hold us responsible for any of the liabilities that ServiceMaster has agreed to retain. Any amounts we are required to pay pursuant to these indemnification obligations and other liabilities could require us to divert cash that would otherwise have been used in furtherance of our operating business. Further, the indemnity from ServiceMaster may not be sufficient to protect us against the full amount of such liabilities, and ServiceMaster may not be able to fully satisfy its indemnification obligations. Moreover, even if we ultimately succeed in recovering from ServiceMaster any amounts for which we are held liable, we may be temporarily required to bear these losses ourselves. Each of these risks could have a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Risks Related to Our Common Stock

The trading market for our common stock has existed for only a short period following the Spin-off, and the market price and trading volume of our common stock may fluctuate significantly.

Prior to the Spin-off, there was no public market for our common stock. An active trading market for our common stock commenced following the Spin-off and may not be sustainable. The trading price of our common stock has been and may continue to be volatile and the trading volume in our common stock may fluctuate and cause significant price variations to occur. If the per share trading price of our common stock declines significantly, you may be unable to resell your shares at or above the purchase price.

The market price of our common stock may fluctuate significantly. Among the factors that could affect our stock price are:

industry or general market conditions;

domestic and international economic factors unrelated to our performance;

lawsuits, enforcement actions and other claims by third parties or governmental authorities;

changes in our customers’ preferences;

new regulatory pronouncements and changes in regulatory guidelines;

actual or anticipated fluctuations in our quarterly operating results;

changes in securities analysts’ estimates of our financial performance or lack of research coverage and reports by industry analysts;

action by institutional stockholders or other large stockholders;

failure to meet any guidance given by us or any change in any guidance given by us, or changes by us in our guidance practices;

announcements by us of significant impairment charges;

speculation in the press or investment community;

investor perception of us and our industry;

changes in market valuations or earnings of similar companies;

announcements by us or our competitors of significant contracts, acquisitions, dispositions or strategic partnerships;

war, terrorist acts and epidemic disease, such as the novel coronavirus COVID-19;

any future sales of our common stock or other securities; and

additions or departures of key personnel.

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The stock markets have experienced volatility in recent years that has been unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies. These broad market fluctuations may adversely affect the market price of our common stock. In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, class action litigation has often been instituted against the affected company. Any litigation of this type brought against us could result in substantial costs and a diversion of our management’s attention and resources, which would harm our business, operating results and financial condition.

Future issuances of common stock by us may cause the market price of our common stock to decline.

Sales of substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market, or the perception that these sales could occur, could cause the market price of our common stock to decline. Substantially all of the outstanding shares of our common stock were available for resale in the public market following the Spin-off. The market price of our common stock could drop significantly if the holders of these shares sell them or are perceived by the market as intending to sell them. These sales, or the possibility that these sales may occur, also might make it more difficult for us to sell equity securities in the future at a time and at a price that we deem appropriate.

In the future, we may issue additional shares of common stock or other equity or debt securities convertible into or exercisable or exchangeable for shares of our common stock in connection with a financing, acquisition, litigation settlement or employee arrangement or otherwise. Any of these issuances could result in substantial dilution to our existing stockholders and could cause the trading price of our common stock to decline.

We do not intend to pay cash dividends on our common stock and, consequently, your ability to achieve a return on your investment will depend on appreciation in the price of our common stock.

We currently intend to use our future earnings to repay debt, to repurchase shares of our common stock, to fund our growth, to develop our business and for working capital needs and general corporate purposes. As a result, we did not pay cash dividends in 2019 and we do not expect to pay any cash dividend for the foreseeable future. All decisions regarding the payment of dividends will be made by our board of directors from time to time in accordance with applicable law. There can be no assurance that we will have sufficient surplus under Delaware law to be able to pay any dividends at any time in the future. An insufficient surplus may result from extraordinary cash expenses, actual expenses exceeding contemplated costs, funding of capital expenditures or increases in reserves. If we do not pay dividends, the price of the shares of our common stock must appreciate for you to receive a gain on your investment. This appreciation may not occur. Further, you may have to sell some or all of your shares of our common stock to generate cash flow from your investment.

If securities or industry analysts do not publish regular reports on us or publish misleading or unfavorable research about our business, our stock price and trading volume could decline.

The trading market for our common stock depends in part on the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us or our business. If one or more of the analysts that covers our common stock downgrades our stock or publishes misleading or unfavorable research about our business, our stock price would likely decline. If one or more of the analysts ceases coverage of our common stock or fails to publish reports on us regularly, demand for our common stock could decrease, which could cause our common stock price or trading volume to decline.

Future offerings of debt or equity securities which would rank senior to our common stock may adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

If, in the future, we decide to issue debt or equity securities that rank senior to our common stock, it is likely that such securities will be governed by an indenture or other instrument containing covenants restricting our operating flexibility. Additionally, any convertible or exchangeable securities that we issue in the future may have rights, preferences and privileges more favorable than those of our common stock and may result in dilution of owners of our common stock. We and, indirectly, our stockholders, will bear the cost of issuing and servicing such securities. Because our decision to issue debt or equity securities in any future offering will depend on market conditions and other factors beyond our control, we cannot predict or estimate the amount, timing or nature of our future offerings. Thus, holders of our common stock will bear the risk of our future offerings reducing the market price of our common stock and diluting the value of their stock holdings in us.

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Provisions in our certificate of incorporation and bylaws and of applicable law may prevent or delay an acquisition of our Company, which could decrease the trading price of our common stock.

Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated bylaws, and Delaware law, contain provisions that are intended to deter coercive takeover practices and inadequate takeover bids by making such practices or bids more expensive to the acquiror and to encourage prospective acquirors to negotiate with our board of directors rather than to attempt a hostile takeover. These provisions include rules regarding how stockholders may present proposals or nominate directors for election at stockholder meetings and the right of our board of directors to issue preferred stock without stockholder approval. Delaware law also imposes some restrictions on mergers and other business combinations between any holder of 15 percent or more of our outstanding common stock and us.

We believe these provisions protect our stockholders from coercive or otherwise unfair takeover tactics by requiring potential acquirors to negotiate with our board of directors and by providing our board of directors with more time to assess any acquisition proposal. These provisions are not intended to make us immune from takeovers. However, these provisions apply even if the offer may be considered beneficial by some stockholders and could delay or prevent an acquisition that our board of directors determines is not in the best interests of our Company and our stockholders. Accordingly, in the event that our board of directors determines that a potential business combination transaction is not in the best interests of our Company and our stockholders, but certain stockholders believe that such a transaction would be beneficial to us and our stockholders, such stockholders may elect to sell their shares in our Company and the trading price of our common stock could decrease.

These and other provisions of our amended and restated certificate of incorporation, amended and restated bylaws and the Delaware General Corporation Law, as amended (the “DGCL”), could have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a proxy contest, tender offer, merger or other change in control, which may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, because we are regulated by state regulators in certain states, we are subject to certain state statutes that generally require any person or entity desiring to acquire direct or indirect control of certain of our subsidiaries obtain prior approval from the applicable regulator. Control is generally presumed to exist under these state laws with the acquisition of 10 percent or more of our outstanding voting securities of either the subsidiary or its controlling parent. Applicable state insurance laws and regulations could delay or impede a change of control of the Company.

Furthermore, an acquisition or further issuance of our stock could trigger the application of Section 355(e) of the Code, causing the distribution to be taxable to ServiceMaster. Under the tax matters agreement, and as described in more detail above, we would be required to indemnify ServiceMaster for the resulting taxes and related amount, and this indemnity obligation might discourage, delay or prevent a change of control that you may consider favorable.

Our certificate of incorporation designates the state courts of the State of Delaware, or, if no state court located in the State of Delaware has jurisdiction, the federal court for the District of Delaware, as the sole and exclusive forum for certain types of actions and proceedings that may be initiated by our stockholders, which could discourage lawsuits against us and our directors and officers.

Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation provides that, unless the board of directors otherwise determines, the state courts of the State of Delaware, or, if no state court located in the State of Delaware has jurisdiction, the federal court for the District of Delaware, will be the sole and exclusive forum for any derivative action or proceeding brought on behalf of our Company, any action asserting a claim of breach of a fiduciary duty owed by any director or officer to our Company or our stockholders, creditors or other constituents, any action asserting a claim against us or any director or officer arising pursuant to any provision of the DGCL or our amended and restated certificate of incorporation or amended and restated bylaws, or any action asserting a claim against us or any director or officer governed by the internal affairs doctrine. This exclusive forum provision may limit the ability of our stockholders to bring a claim in a judicial forum that such stockholders find favorable for disputes with our Company or our directors or officers, which may discourage such lawsuits against us and our directors and officers. Alternatively, if a court outside of the State of Delaware were to find this exclusive forum provision inapplicable to, or unenforceable in respect of, one or more of the specified types of actions or proceedings described above, we may incur additional costs associated with resolving such matters in other jurisdictions, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations.

27


 

Risks Related to Our Substantial Indebtedness

We have substantial indebtedness and may incur substantial additional indebtedness, which could adversely affect our financial health and our ability to obtain financing in the future, react to changes in our business and satisfy our obligations.

As of December 31, 2019, we had approximately $992 million of total consolidated long-term indebtedness, including the current portion of long-term debt, outstanding.

As of December 31, 2019, there were no letters of credit outstanding, and there was $250 million of available borrowing capacity under the Revolving Credit Facility. In addition, we are able to incur additional indebtedness in the future, subject to the limitations contained in the agreements governing our indebtedness. Our substantial indebtedness could have important consequences to you. Because of our substantial indebtedness:

our ability to engage in large acquisitions without raising additional equity or obtaining additional debt financing is limited;

our ability to obtain additional financing for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions, debt service requirements or general corporate purposes and our ability to satisfy our obligations with respect to our indebtedness may be impaired in the future;

a large portion of our cash flow from operations must be dedicated to the payment of principal and interest on our indebtedness, thereby reducing the funds available to us for other purposes;

we are exposed to the risk of increased interest rates because a portion of our borrowings are or will be at variable rates of interest;

it may be more difficult for us to satisfy our obligations to our creditors, resulting in possible defaults on, and acceleration of, such indebtedness;

we may be more vulnerable to general adverse economic and industry conditions;

we may be at a competitive disadvantage compared to our competitors with proportionately less indebtedness or with comparable indebtedness on more favorable terms and, as a result, they may be better positioned to withstand economic downturns;

our ability to refinance indebtedness may be limited or the associated costs may increase;

our flexibility to adjust to changing market conditions and ability to withstand competitive pressures could be limited; and

we may be prevented from carrying out capital spending and restructurings that are necessary or important to our growth strategy and efforts to improve operating margins of our business.

Increases in interest rates would increase the cost of servicing our indebtedness and could reduce our profitability.

A significant portion of our outstanding indebtedness, including indebtedness incurred under the Credit Facilities, bears interest at variable rates. As a result, increases in interest rates would increase the cost of servicing our indebtedness and could materially reduce our profitability and cash flows. As of December 31, 2019, each one percentage point change in interest rates would result in an approximately $3 million change in the annual interest expense on the Term Loan Facility after considering the impact of the effective interest rate swap. Assuming all revolving loans were fully drawn as of December 31, 2019, each one percentage point change in interest rates would result in an approximately $3 million change in annual interest expense on the Revolving Credit Facility. The impact of increases in interest rates could be more significant for us than it would be for some other companies because of our substantial indebtedness. Our variable rate indebtedness uses the LIBOR as a benchmark for establishing the interest rate. LIBOR is the subject of recent national, international and other regulatory guidance and proposals for reform. In the event that LIBOR is phased out as is currently expected, the Credit Facilities provide that the Company and the administrative agent may amend the credit agreement to replace the LIBOR definition with a successor rate based on prevailing market convention, subject to notifying the lending syndicate of such change and not receiving within 5 business days of such notification written, good faith objections to such replacement rate from lenders holding at least a majority of the aggregate principal amount of loans and commitments then outstanding under the credit agreement. The consequences of these developments cannot be entirely predicted, but could include an increase in the interest cost of our variable rate indebtedness.

A lowering or withdrawal of the ratings, outlook or watch assigned to our debt securities by rating agencies may increase our future borrowing costs and reduce our access to capital.

Our indebtedness currently has a non-investment grade rating, and any rating, outlook or watch assigned could be lowered or withdrawn entirely by a rating agency if, in that rating agency’s judgment, current or future circumstances relating to the basis of the rating, outlook or watch, such as adverse changes to our business, so warrant. Any future lowering of our ratings, outlook or watch likely would make it more difficult or more expensive for us to obtain additional debt financing.

28


 

The agreements and instruments governing our indebtedness contain restrictions and limitations that could significantly impact our ability to operate our business.

The credit agreement governing our Credit Facilities and the indenture governing our senior notes contain covenants that, among other things, restrict our ability to:

incur additional indebtedness (including guarantees of other indebtedness);

receive dividends from certain of our subsidiaries, redeem stock or make other restricted payments, including investments and, in the case of the Revolving Credit Facility, make acquisitions;

prepay, repurchase or amend the terms of certain outstanding indebtedness;

enter into certain types of transactions with affiliates;

transfer or sell assets;

create liens;

merge, consolidate or sell all or substantially all of our assets; and

enter into agreements restricting dividends or other distributions by our subsidiaries.

The restrictions in the agreements governing the Credit Facilities and the instruments governing our other indebtedness may prevent us from taking actions that we believe would be in the best interest of our business and may make it difficult for us to execute our business strategy successfully or effectively compete with companies that are not similarly restricted. We may also incur future debt obligations that might subject us to additional restrictive covenants that could affect our financial and operational flexibility. We may be unable to refinance our indebtedness, at maturity or otherwise, on terms acceptable to us, or at all.

Our ability to comply with the covenants and restrictions contained in the agreements governing the Credit Facilities and the instruments governing our other indebtedness may be affected by economic, financial and industry conditions beyond our control including credit or capital market disruptions. The breach of any of these covenants or restrictions could result in a default that would permit the applicable lenders to declare all amounts outstanding thereunder to be due and payable, together with accrued and unpaid interest. If we are unable to repay indebtedness, lenders having secured obligations, such as the lenders under the Credit Facilities, could proceed against the collateral securing the indebtedness. In any such case, we may be unable to borrow under the Credit Facilities and may not be able to repay the amounts due under such facilities or our other outstanding indebtedness. This could have serious consequences for our financial position and results of operations and could cause us to become bankrupt or insolvent.

Our ability to generate the significant amount of cash needed to pay interest and principal on our indebtedness and our ability to refinance all or a portion of our indebtedness or obtain additional financing depends on many factors beyond our control.

We are a holding company, and substantially all of our assets are held by, and our operations are conducted through, our subsidiaries. We depend on our subsidiaries to distribute funds to us so that we may pay obligations and expenses, including satisfying obligations with respect to indebtedness. Our ability to make scheduled payments on, or to refinance our obligations under, our indebtedness depends on the financial and operating performance of our subsidiaries and their ability to make distributions and dividends to us, which, in turn, depends on their operating results, cash requirements, financial position and general business conditions and any legal and regulatory restrictions on the payment of dividends to which they may be subject, many of which may be beyond our control.

There are third-party restrictions on the ability of certain of our subsidiaries to transfer funds to us. These restrictions are related to regulatory requirements. The payments of ordinary and extraordinary dividends by certain of our subsidiaries (through which we conduct our business) are subject to significant regulatory restrictions under the laws and regulations of the states in which they operate. Among other things, such laws and regulations require certain subsidiaries to maintain minimum capital and net worth requirements and may limit the amount of ordinary and extraordinary dividends and other payments that these subsidiaries can pay to us. As of December 31, 2019, the total net assets subject to these third-party restrictions was $168 million. We expect that such limitations will be in effect for the foreseeable future. In Texas, we are relieved of the obligation to post 75 percent of our otherwise required reserves because we operate a captive insurer approved by Texas regulators in order to satisfy such obligations. None of our subsidiaries are obligated to make funds available to us through the payment of dividends. If we cannot receive sufficient distributions from our subsidiaries, we may not be able to meet our obligations to fund general corporate expenses or service our debt obligations.

We may be unable to maintain a level of cash flows from operating activities sufficient to permit us to pay the principal and interest on our indebtedness. If our cash flow and capital resources are insufficient to fund our debt service obligations, we may be forced to reduce or delay capital expenditures, sell assets, seek to obtain additional equity capital or restructure our indebtedness. In the future, our cash flow and capital resources may not be sufficient for payments of interest on and principal of our indebtedness, and such alternative measures may not be successful and may not permit us to meet our scheduled debt service obligations.

29


 

If we cannot make scheduled payments on our indebtedness, we will be in default, the lenders under the Credit Facilities could terminate their commitments to loan money, the secured lenders could foreclose against the assets securing their borrowings and we could be forced into bankruptcy or liquidation.

Despite our indebtedness levels, we and our subsidiaries may be able to incur substantially more indebtedness. This could further exacerbate the risks associated with our substantial indebtedness.

We and our subsidiaries may be able to incur substantial additional indebtedness in the future. The terms of the instruments governing our indebtedness do not prohibit us or fully prohibit our subsidiaries from doing so. The Credit Facilities permit additional borrowings beyond the committed amounts under certain circumstances. If new indebtedness is added to our current indebtedness levels, the related risks we face would increase, and we may not be able to meet all of our debt obligations.

We utilize derivative financial instruments to reduce our exposure to market risks from changes in interest rates on our variable-rate indebtedness and are exposed to risks related to counterparty credit worthiness or non-performance of these instruments.

We are exposed to the impact of interest rate changes and manage this exposure through the use of variable-rate and fixed-rate debt and by utilizing interest rate swaps. On October 24, 2018, we entered into an interest rate swap agreement effective October 31, 2018 that expires on August 16, 2025. The notional amount of the agreement was $350 million. We entered into this interest rate swap agreement in the normal course of business to manage interest rate risks, with a policy of matching positions. The effect of derivative financial instrument transactions under the agreements could have a material impact on our financial statements. There can be no guarantee that our hedging strategy will be effective, and we may experience credit-related losses in some circumstances.

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

Our corporate headquarters is located in downtown Memphis, Tennessee, in a leased facility. We operate five customer care centers throughout the United States that field inbound claims calls and initiate sales calls. Those customer care centers are located in Carroll, Iowa; LaGrange, Georgia; Memphis, Tennessee; Phoenix, Arizona; and Salt Lake City, Utah. The facilities in Carroll and LaGrange are owned, and the facilities in Memphis, Phoenix and Salt Lake City are leased. We also lease office space in Portland, Oregon for our Streem business and in Denver, Colorado for a technology center. We believe that these facilities, when considered with our corporate headquarters, are suitable and adequate to support the needs of our business.

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

Due to the nature of our business activities, we are at times subject to pending and threatened legal and regulatory actions that arise out of the ordinary course of business. In the opinion of management, based in part upon advice of legal counsel, the disposition of any such matters is not expected, individually or in the aggregate, to have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition or cash flows. However, the results of legal actions cannot be predicted with certainty. Therefore, it is possible that our results of operations, financial condition or cash flows could be materially adversely affected in any particular period by the unfavorable resolution of one or more legal actions. See Note 10 to the audited consolidated and combined financial statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for more details.

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

None.


30


 

PART II

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Market Information

Our common stock is listed on the NASDAQ under the symbol ‘‘FTDR.’’ As of February 21, 2020, there were approximately 26 registered holders of our common stock.

Dividends

We did not pay any cash dividends in 2019. We do not intend to declare or pay cash dividends on our common stock for the foreseeable future. We currently intend to use our future earnings to repay debt, to repurchase shares of our common stock, to fund our growth, to develop our business and for working capital needs and general corporate purposes.

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

On December 4, 2019, we acquired Streem for a total purchase price of $55 million, which consisted of $36 million in cash and $19 million in fair value of Frontdoor restricted stock awards. Stock consideration included 81,249 restricted shares of our common stock subject to time-vesting, continued employment that lapse quarterly and transfer restrictions, and 494,121 restricted shares of our common stock subject to time-vesting, certain performance milestone-vesting restrictions, continued employment that lapse annually and transfer restrictions.

The equity awards issued in connection with the acquisition were exempt from registration under the Securities Act in reliance upon Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act as transactions by an issuer not involving any public offering.

 

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ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The following table sets forth our selected financial data for each of the five years ended December 31, 2019, 2018, 2017, 2016 and 2015. The selected operating data for the years ended December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017 and balance sheet data as of December 31, 2019 and 2018 were derived from our audited consolidated and combined financial statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for each of the periods indicated. The selected operating data for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015 and balance sheet data as of December 31, 2016 were derived from our audited historical combined financial statements, which are not included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The balance sheet data as of December 31, 2015 is derived from the financial records of ServiceMaster, which are not included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The results of operations for any period are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for any future period.

The selected financial data presented below should be read in conjunction with “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and the audited consolidated and combined financial statements and related notes thereto included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The selected historical financial data for periods prior to the Spin-off reflects our results as historically operated as a part of ServiceMaster, and these results may not be indicative of our future performance as a stand-alone company following the separation and distribution.

Five-Year Financial Summary

Year Ended December 31,

(In millions, except per share data)

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

Operating Results:

Revenue

$

1,365

$

1,258

$

1,157

$

1,020

$

917

Cost of services rendered

687

686

589

526

467

Gross Profit

678

572

567

494

449

Selling and administrative expenses

392

338

312

286

256

Restructuring charges(1)

1

3

7

3

Spin-off charges(2)

1

24

13

Interest expense(3)

62

23

1

Income before Income Taxes

204

166

220

196

189

Net Income

153

125

160

124

120

Net Income Margin

11.2

%

9.9

%

13.9

%

12.2

%

13.1

%

Earnings Per Share:

Basic

$

1.81

$

1.47

$

1.90

$

1.47

$

1.42

Diluted

$

1.80

$

1.47

$

1.90

$

1.47

$

1.42

Number of Shares Used in Calculating Earnings Per Share(4):

Basic

84.7

84.5

84.5

84.5

84.5

Diluted

84.9

84.7

84.5

84.5

84.5

Financial Position (as of period end):

Total assets(5)

$

1,250

$

1,041

$

1,416

$

1,276

$

1,136

Total long-term debt

980

984

9

14

1

Total (deficit) equity

(179)

(344)

661

560

518

Cash Flow Data:

Net cash provided from operating activities

$

200

$

189

$

194

$

155

$

135

Net cash (used for) provided from investing activities

(61)

(10)

(11)

(55)

19

Net cash used for financing activities

(7)

(165)

(68)

(88)

(100)

Other Non-GAAP Financial Data: