Company Quick10K Filing
Canada Goose
20-F 2020-03-29 Filed 2020-06-03
20-F 2019-03-31 Filed 2019-05-29
20-F 2018-03-31 Filed 2018-06-15
20-F 2017-03-31 Filed 2017-06-06

GOOS 20F Annual Report

Part I
Item 1. Identity of Directors, Senior Management and Advisers
Item 2. Offer Statistics and Expected Timetable
Item 3. Key Information
Item 4. Information on The Company
Item 4A. Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects
Item 6. Directors, Senior Management and Employees
Item 7. Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions
Item 8. Financial Information
Item 9. The Offer and Listing
Item 10. Additional Information
Item 11. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 12. Description of Securities Other Than Equity Securities
Part II
Item 13. Defaults, Dividend Arrearages and Delinquencies
Item 14. Material Modifications To The Rights of Security Holders and Use of Proceeds
Item 15. Controls and Procedures
Item 16A. Audit Committee Financial Expert
Item 16B. Code of Ethics
Item 16C. Principal Accountant Fees and Services
Item 16D. Exemptions From The Listing Standards for Audit Committees
Item 16E. Purchases of Equity Securities By The Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers
Item 16F. Change in Registrant's Certifying Accountant
Item 16G. Corporate Governance
Item 16H. Mine Safety Disclosure
Part III
Item 17. Financial Statements.
Item 18. Financial Statements.
Item 19. Exhibits
Note 1. The Company
Note 2. Significant Accounting Policies
Note 3. Significant Accounting Judgments, Estimates, and Assumptions
Note 4. Changes in Accounting Policies
Note 5. Business Combination
Note 6. Segment Information
Note 7. Income Taxes
Note 8. Earnings per Share
Note 9. Leases
Note 10. Trade Receivables
Note 11. Inventories
Note 12. Property, Plant and Equipment
Note 13. Intangible Assets
Note 14. Goodwill
Note 15. Accounts Payables and Accrued Liabilities
Note 16. Provisions
Note 17. Borrowings
Note 18. Shareholders' Equity
Note 19. Share - Based Payments
Note 20. Related Party Transactions
Note 21. Financial Instruments and Fair Values
Note 22. Financial Risk Management Objectives and Policies
Note 23. Selected Cash Flow Information
Note 24. Subsequent Events
EX-2.2 exhibit22fy2020.htm
EX-4.14 exhibit414fy2020.htm
EX-8.1 exhibit81fy2020.htm
EX-12.1 exhibit121fy2020.htm
EX-12.2 exhibit122fy2020.htm
EX-13.1 exhibit131fy2020.htm
EX-13.2 exhibit132fy2020.htm
EX-15.1 exhibit151fy2020.htm

Canada Goose Earnings 2020-03-29

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

20-F 1 cg-20fxfy2020.htm 20-F Document
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 20-F
 
(Mark One)
¨
REGISTRATION STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OR (g) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

OR

x
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended March 29, 2020

OR

¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from to

OR

¨
SHELL COMPANY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Date of event requiring this shell company report

Commission file number 001-38027
 
CANADA GOOSE HOLDINGS INC.
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)
 

N/A
 
(Translation of Registrant’s name into English)
British Columbia
 
(Jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
250 Bowie Ave
Toronto, Ontario, Canada M6E 4Y2
 
(Address of principal executive offices)

-1-




David M. Forrest
Senior Vice President, General Counsel
250 Bowie Ave
Toronto, Ontario, Canada M6E 4Y2
Tel: (416) 780-9850
 
(Name, telephone, email and/or facsimile number and address of Company contact person)
Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
Trading Symbol(s)
Name of each exchange on which  registered
Subordinate voting shares
GOOS
New York Stock Exchange
Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Subordinate voting shares
 
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
None
 
(Title of Class)
Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act:
None
 
(Title of Class)

 

Indicate the number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer’s classes of capital or common stock as of the close of the period covered by the Annual Report: At March 29, 2020, 58,999,182 subordinate voting shares and 51,004,076 multiple voting shares were issued and outstanding.

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. x Yes ¨ No

If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. ¨ Yes x No

Note—checking the box above will not relieve any registrant required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 from their obligations under those sections.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. x Yes ¨ No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). x Yes ¨ No


-2-




Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large Accelerated Filer x Accelerated Filer ¨ Non-Accelerated Filer ¨ Emerging growth company ¨

If an emerging growth company that prepares its financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards† provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ¨

† The term “new or revised financial accounting standard” refers to any update issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board to its Accounting Standards Codification after April 5, 2012.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report. x 

Indicate by check mark which basis of accounting the registrant has used to prepare the financial statements included in this filing:
U.S. GAAP  ¨
International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board x
Other  ¨


If “Other” has been checked in response to the previous question, indicate by check mark which financial statement item the registrant has elected to follow. ¨ Item 17 ¨ Item 18

If this is an Annual Report, indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). ¨ Yes x No

(APPLICABLE ONLY TO ISSUERS INVOLVED IN BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDINGS DURING THE PAST FIVE YEARS)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed all documents and reports required to be filed by Sections 12, 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 subsequent to the distribution of securities under a plan confirmed by a court. ¨ Yes ¨ No
 

-3-




Canada Goose Holdings Inc.
Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION
CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
PART I
 
ITEM 1. IDENTITY OF DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND ADVISERS
 
ITEM 2. OFFER STATISTICS AND EXPECTED TIMETABLE
 
ITEM 3. KEY INFORMATION
 
ITEM 4. INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY
 
ITEM 4A. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
 
ITEM 5. OPERATING AND FINANCIAL REVIEW AND PROSPECTS
 
ITEM 6. DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEES
 
ITEM 7. MAJOR SHAREHOLDERS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS
 
ITEM 8. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
 
ITEM 9. THE OFFER AND LISTING
 
ITEM 10. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
ITEM 11. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
 
ITEM 12. DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES OTHER THAN EQUITY SECURITIES
PART II
 
ITEM 13. DEFAULTS, DIVIDEND ARREARAGES AND DELINQUENCIES
 
ITEM 14. MATERIAL MODIFICATIONS TO THE RIGHTS OF SECURITY HOLDERS AND USE OF PROCEEDS
 
ITEM 15. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
 
ITEM 16A. AUDIT COMMITTEE FINANCIAL EXPERT
 
ITEM 16B. CODE OF ETHICS
 
ITEM 16C. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES
 
ITEM 16D. EXEMPTIONS FROM THE LISTING STANDARDS FOR AUDIT COMMITTEES
 
ITEM 16E. PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES BY THE ISSUER AND AFFILIATED PURCHASERS
 
ITEM 16F. CHANGE IN REGISTRANT’S CERTIFYING ACCOUNTANT
 
ITEM 16G. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
 
ITEM 16H. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE
PART III
 
ITEM 17. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
ITEM 18. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
ITEM 19. EXHIBITS
 
EXHIBIT INDEX
SIGNATURES
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
F-1

-4-




INTRODUCTION
Unless otherwise indicated, all references in this Annual Report on Form 20-F to “Canada Goose,” “we,” “our,” “us,” “the company” or similar terms refer to Canada Goose Holdings Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries. We publish our consolidated financial statements in Canadian dollars. In this Annual Report, unless otherwise specified, all monetary amounts are in Canadian dollars, all references to “$,” “C$,” “CDN$,” “CAD$,” and “dollars” mean Canadian dollars and all references to “US$” and “USD” mean U.S. dollars.
In connection with our initial public offering (“IPO”), we re-designated our Class A common shares into multiple voting shares. In addition, we eliminated all of our previously outstanding series of common and preferred shares and created our subordinate voting shares.
This Annual Report on Form 20-F contains our audited consolidated financial statements and related notes for the years ended March 29, 2020, March 31, 2019 and March 31, 2018 (“Annual Financial Statements”). Our Annual Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”), as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (“IASB”).
Trademarks and Service Marks
This Annual Report contains references to a number of trademarks which are our registered trademarks or trademarks for which we have pending applications or common law rights. Our major trademarks include the CANADA GOOSE word mark and the ARCTIC PROGRAM & DESIGN trademark (our disc logo consisting of the colour-inverse design of the North Pole and Arctic Ocean) as well as the BAFFIN word mark and BAFFIN Half Maple Leaf design trademark.
Solely for convenience, the trademarks, service marks and trade names referred to in this Annual Report are listed without the ®, (sm) and (TM) symbols, but we will assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, our rights or the rights of the applicable licensors to these trademarks, service marks and trade names.
CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD‑LOOKING STATEMENTS
This Annual Report contains forward-looking statements. These statements are neither historical facts nor assurances of future performance. Instead, they are based on our current beliefs, expectations and assumptions regarding the future of our business, future plans and strategies, and other future conditions. Forward-looking statements can be identified by words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “envision,” “estimate,” “expect,” “forecast,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “predict,” “project,” “target,” “potential,” “will,” “would,” “could,” “should,” “continue,” “contemplate” and other similar expressions, although not all forward-looking statements contain these identifying words. These forward-looking statements include all matters that are not historical facts. They appear in many places throughout this Annual Report and include statements regarding our intentions, beliefs or current expectations concerning, among other things, our results of operations, financial condition, liquidity, business prospects, growth, strategies, expectations regarding industry trends and the size and growth rates of addressable markets, our business plan and growth strategies, including plans for expansion to new markets and new products, expectations for seasonal trends, and the industry in which we operate.

-5-




Certain assumptions made in preparing the forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report include:
our ability to continue operating our business amid the societal and economic disruption caused by the global COVID-19 (as defined below) pandemic;
our ability to implement our growth strategies;
our ability to maintain strong business relationships with our customers, suppliers, wholesalers and distributors;
our ability to keep pace with changing consumer preferences;
our ability to protect our intellectual property; and
the absence of material adverse changes in our industry or the global economy.
By their nature, forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties because they relate to events and depend on circumstances that may or may not occur in the future. We believe that these risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, those described in the “Risk Factors” section of this Annual Report, which include, but are not limited to, the following risks:
global disruptions, including the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic significantly affecting numerous countries;
we may not be able to re-open our retail stores and our wholesale partners may not be able to re-open their retail stores by our peak selling season;
we may not open retail stores or expand e-commerce access on our planned timelines;
we may be unable to maintain the strength of our brand or to expand our brand to new products and geographies;
an economic downturn may further affect discretionary consumer spending;
we may not be able to satisfy changing consumer preferences;
our indebtedness may adversely affect our financial condition;
we may not be able to compete in our markets effectively;
we may not be able to manage our growth effectively;
poor performance during our peak season may affect our operating results for the full year;
global political events, including the impact of political disruptions in Hong Kong and recent protests in many North American cities;
our ability to maintain relationships with our select number of suppliers;
our ability to procure high quality raw materials and certain finished goods globally;
our ability to forecast our inventory needs;
we may be unable to protect or preserve our brand image and proprietary rights;
our ability to manage our product distribution through our wholesale partners and international distributors;

-6-




the success of our new store openings;
the success of our expansion into Greater China;
the success of our marketing programs;
our ability to manage our exposure to data security and cyber security events;
the risk our business is interrupted because of a disruption at our headquarters;
fluctuations in raw material costs, interest rates and currency exchange rates; and
we may be unable to maintain effective internal controls over financial reporting.
Although we base the forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report on assumptions that we believe are reasonable, we caution you that actual results and developments (including our results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the development of the industry in which we operate) may differ materially from those made in or suggested by the forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report. Additional impacts may arise that we are not aware of currently. The potential of such additional impacts intensifies the business and operating risks that we face, and should be considered when reading the forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report. In addition, even if results and developments are consistent with the forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report, those results and developments may not be indicative of results or developments in subsequent periods. As a result, any or all of our forward-looking statements in this Annual Report may prove to be inaccurate. We have included important factors in the cautionary statements included in this Annual Report on Form 20-F, particularly in Section 3.D of this Annual Report on Form 20-F titled “Risk Factors”, that we believe could cause actual results or events to differ materially from the forward-looking statements that we make. No forward-looking statement is a guarantee of future results. Moreover, we operate in a highly competitive and rapidly changing environment in which new risks often emerge. It is not possible for our management to predict all risks, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements we may make.
You should read this Annual Report and the documents that we reference herein and have filed as exhibits hereto completely and with the understanding that our actual future results may be materially different from what we expect. The forward-looking statements contained herein are made as of the date of this Annual Report, and we do not assume any obligation to update any forward-looking statements except as required by applicable laws.


-7-




PART I
ITEM 1. IDENTITY OF DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND ADVISERS
Not applicable.
ITEM 2. OFFER STATISTICS AND EXPECTED TIMETABLE
Not applicable.
ITEM 3. KEY INFORMATION
A.    Selected Financial Data
See the selected financial data disclosure included under Item 5. — “Operating and Financial Review and Prospects”.
B.
Capitalization and Indebtedness
Not applicable.
C.
Reasons for the Offer and Use of Proceeds
Not applicable.
D.
Risk Factors
Risks Related to our Business
Our business has been and will continue to be adversely affected by the global coronavirus outbreak.
Our global operations, and those of the third parties upon whom we rely, are experiencing disruptions from the outbreak of the novel coronavirus ("COVID-19"). To date, they include mandatory and elective shut-downs of retail and manufacturing operations, and a decrease in discretionary consumer spending. We expect to continue to have material adverse impacts on our business, financial condition and results of operations as a result of the global COVID-19 pandemic.
These and other potential impacts make it more challenging for management to estimate the future performance of our business. While we cannot predict the specific impacts to our business, financial condition and results of operations, we do expect such impacts to be significantly negative. These impacts will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and out of our control, including, among others, the duration and intensity of the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as the subsequent resumption of business operations and recovery of discretionary consumer spending and tourism and business travel across the globe. Additional impacts may arise that we are not aware of currently. The potential of such additional impacts intensifies the business and operating risks that we face, and should be considered when reading the additional risk factors below.

-8-




Our growth strategy involves expansion of our DTC channel, including retail stores and on-line, which may present risks and challenges.
Our business has evolved from one in which we only distributed products on a wholesale basis for resale by others to a multi-channel distribution model, which includes retail and online stores operated by us. As of March 29, 2020, our DTC channel includes 13 national e-commerce markets and 20 directly operated retail stores across North America, Europe, and Asia. In February 2020, we temporarily reduced operating hours for all of our retail locations in Mainland China, restoring normal operating hours in April 2020 with precautionary health measures in place, including wearing masks, temperature checks, and regular hand sanitization. Reduced operating hours put in place for our retail locations in Hong Kong as of April 2020 currently remain in effect. In March 2020, we temporarily closed all of our retail locations and production facilities in North America and Europe. As of June 2, 2020, other than our retail locations in Montreal, Canada, Paris, France and Milan, Italy, these retail locations currently remain closed. Our global DTC expansion has been the largest driver of operational and financial growth historically. We expect this to continue in the future.
Growing our e-commerce platforms and number of retail stores is essential to our future strategy. This strategy has and will continue to require significant investment in cross-functional operations and management focus, along with investment in supporting technologies and retail store spaces. If we are unable to provide a convenient and consistent experience for our customers, our ability to compete and our results of operations could be adversely affected. In addition, if our e-commerce platforms or retail store formats do not appeal to our customers, reliably function as designed, or maintain the privacy of customer data, or if we are unable to consistently meet our brand promise to our customers, we may experience a loss of customer confidence or lost sales, or be exposed to fraudulent purchases, which could adversely affect our reputation and results of operations. Furthermore, with our increasing retail footprint, we are increasingly subject to risks relating to brick and mortar store locations, such as social distancing requirements implemented by local governments as well as mandatory or elective shut-downs due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic resulting in lower or no foot traffic, that we will be unable to secure new leases upon desirable terms, or that lower profitability levels at new or existing retail stores will adversely affect our margins.
We are also subject to different and evolving local laws and regulatory requirements in the various jurisdictions in which we operate retail stores and online stores. In particular, we are subject to different and evolving laws and orders governing social distancing, the operation and marketing of e-commerce websites, as well as the collection, storage and use of information on consumers interacting with those websites. We may incur additional costs and operational challenges in complying with these laws, and differences in these laws may cause us to operate our businesses differently in different territories. If so, we may incur additional costs and may not fully realize the investment in our global DTC expansion.
Our business depends on our strong brand, and if we are not able to maintain and enhance our brand we may be unable to sell our products, which would adversely affect our business.
The Canada Goose name and brand image are integral to the growth of our business, and to the implementation of our strategies for expanding our business. We believe that the brand image we have developed has significantly contributed to the success of our business and is critical to maintaining and expanding our customer base. Maintaining and enhancing our brand may require us to make substantial investments in areas such as product design, store openings and operations, marketing, e-commerce, community relations and employee training, and these investments may not be successful.
We anticipate that, as our business continues to expand into new markets and new product categories and as the market becomes increasingly competitive, maintaining and enhancing our

-9-




brand may become difficult and expensive. Conversely, as we penetrate these new markets and our brand becomes more widely available, it could potentially detract from the appeal stemming from the scarcity of our brand. Our brand may also be adversely affected if our public image or reputation is tarnished by negative publicity. In addition, ineffective marketing, product diversion to unauthorized distribution channels, product defects, counterfeit products, unfair labour practices, and failure to protect the intellectual property rights in our brand are some of the potential threats to the strength of our brand, and those and other factors could rapidly and severely diminish consumer confidence in us. Maintaining and enhancing our brand will depend largely on our ability to be a leader in performance luxury outerwear and to continue to offer a range of high quality products to our customers, which we may not execute successfully. Any of these factors could harm our sales, profitability or financial condition.
A key element of our growth strategy is expansion of our product offerings into new product categories. We may be unsuccessful in designing products that meet our customers’ expectations for our brand or that are attractive to new customers. If we are unable to anticipate customer preferences or industry changes, or if we are unable to modify our products on a timely basis or expand effectively into new product categories, we may lose customers. Our ability to successfully implement our growth strategy may be impacted by periods of mandatory store closures, voluntary or mandated social distancing and global economic contraction. Our brand is sold in 47 countries as of March 29, 2020 and we sold through 2,121 wholesale points of distribution during our Fall / Winter 2019 season. As we expand into new geographic markets, consumers in these new markets may be less compelled by our brand image and may not be willing to pay a higher price to purchase our products as compared to traditional outerwear. Our operating results would also suffer if our investments and innovations do not anticipate the needs of our customers, are not appropriately timed with market opportunities or are not effectively brought to market.
A downturn in the global economy, including as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak worldwide, will likely affect, and in the case of the COVID-19 outbreak, has substantially affected and will likely continue to affect, customer purchases of discretionary items, which could materially harm our sales, profitability and financial condition.
Many factors affect the level of consumer spending for discretionary items including performance luxury outerwear. These factors include general economic conditions, interest and tax rates, the availability of consumer credit, disposable consumer income, unemployment and consumer confidence in future economic conditions. Consumer purchases of discretionary items, such as our performance luxury outerwear, tend to decline during recessionary periods when disposable income is lower. During our history, we have experienced recessionary periods, but we cannot predict the effect of future recessionary periods on our sales and profitability. A downturn in the economy in markets in which we sell our products may materially harm our sales, profitability and financial condition.
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has led to a general slow-down in the global economy and reduced the amount of discretionary income available for consumers to purchase our products. We have already seen significant decreases in consumer spending as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, and such trends may continue. These circumstances have been amplified by the significant decline in global travel that has also occurred as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. If periods of decreased consumer spending persist, our sales could decrease, and our financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

-10-




Because our business is highly concentrated on a single, discretionary product category, performance luxury outerwear, we are vulnerable to changes in consumer preferences that could harm our sales, profitability and financial condition.
Our business is not currently diversified and consists primarily of designing, manufacturing and distributing performance luxury outerwear. In fiscal 2020, our main product category, down-filled jackets, was made up of over 177 parka styles and 95 lightweight down styles. It represented the majority of our sales. Consumer preferences often change rapidly. Therefore, our business is substantially dependent on our ability to attract customers who are willing to pay a premium for our products. Any future shifts in consumer preferences away from retail spending for our products would also have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.
In addition, we believe that continued increases in sales of performance luxury outerwear will largely depend on customers continuing to demand technical superiority from their products. If the number of customers demanding performance luxury outerwear does not continue to increase, or if our customers are not convinced that our products are more functional or stylish than other outerwear alternatives, we may not achieve the level of sales necessary to support new growth platforms and our ability to grow our business will be severely impaired.
Our indebtedness could adversely affect our financial condition.
As of March 29, 2020, we had $226.6 million of unused commitments under our Revolving Facility (as defined below) and no borrowings outstanding, had $159.3 million of term loans under our Term Loan Facility (as defined below), and had no amounts owing under the China Loan Facility (as defined below) for total indebtedness of $159.3 million. We also generally experience significant fluctuations in our aggregate indebtedness and working capital over our operating cycle due to the seasonality in our business. Our debt could have important consequences, including:
limiting our ability to obtain additional financing to fund future working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions or other general corporate requirements and increasing our cost of borrowing;
requiring a portion of our cash flow to be dedicated to debt service payments instead of other purposes, thereby reducing the amount of cash flow available for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions and other general corporate purposes;
requiring the net cash proceeds of certain equity offerings to be used to prepay our debt as opposed to other purposes;
exposing us to the risk of increased interest rates as certain of our borrowings, including borrowings under our senior secured credit facilities, are at variable rates of interest; and
limiting our flexibility in planning for and reacting to changes in the industry in which we compete.
The credit agreements governing our senior secured credit facilities contain a number of restrictive covenants that impose operating and financial restrictions on us, including restrictions on our ability to incur certain liens, make investments and acquisitions, incur or guarantee additional indebtedness, pay dividends or make other distributions in respect of, or repurchase or redeem our common or preferred shares, or enter into certain other types of contractual arrangements affecting our subsidiaries or indebtedness. In addition, the restrictive covenants in the credit agreement governing our Revolving Facility require us to maintain a minimum fixed charge coverage ratio if excess availability under our Revolving Facility falls below a specified threshold.
If we are unable to comply with these restrictions and covenants at times and to the extent they are applicable, including as a result of events beyond our control, we may risk an event of default under the credit facilities, which could accelerate the payment of any amounts then due, and limit

-11-




our ability to incur future borrowings under the credit facilities, either of which could have a material adverse effect on our business. In addition, in light of the impacts to our ability to generate cash from operations as a result of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, our results may be further negatively impacted by our payment obligations (including interest) with respect to our outstanding borrowings under our Revolving Facility.
Although the credit agreements governing our senior secured credit facilities contain restrictions on the incurrence of additional indebtedness, those restrictions are subject to a number of qualifications and exceptions and the additional indebtedness incurred in compliance with those restrictions could be substantial. We may also seek to amend or refinance one or more of our debt instruments to permit us to finance our growth strategy or improve the terms of our indebtedness.
We operate in a highly competitive market and the size and resources of some of our competitors may allow them to compete more effectively than we can, resulting in a loss of our market share and a decrease in our revenue and profitability.
The market for outerwear is highly fragmented. We compete against a wide range of brands and retailers. Many of our competitors have significant competitive advantages, including larger and broader customer bases, more established relationships with a broader set of suppliers, greater brand recognition, greater financial resources, more established research and development processes, a longer history of store development, greater marketing resources, more established distribution processes, and other resources which we do not have.
Our competitors may be able to achieve and maintain brand affinity and market share more quickly and effectively than we can. Many of our competitors have more established and diversified marketing programs, including with respect to promotion of their brands through traditional forms of advertising, such as print media and television commercials, and through celebrity endorsements, and have substantial resources to devote to such efforts. Our competitors may also create and maintain brand affinity using traditional forms of advertising more quickly than we can. Our competitors may also be able to increase sales in their new and existing markets faster than we can by emphasizing different distribution channels than we can, such as catalog sales or an extensive retail network, and many of our competitors have substantial resources to devote toward increasing sales in such ways.
We have grown rapidly in recent years. If we are unable to manage our operations at our current size or to manage any future growth effectively, the pace of our growth may slow.
We have expanded our operations rapidly for many years and plan to continue our expansion efforts. Total revenue increased to $958.1 million for fiscal 2020 from $591.2 million for fiscal 2018, at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (“CAGR”) of 27.3%.
As we expect the impact of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic on our business, financial condition and results of operations to be significantly negative, it is possible that growth of our operations and expansion efforts will be significantly delayed or non-existent. If our operations continue to grow, of which there can be no assurance, we will be required to continue to expand our sales and marketing, product development, manufacturing and distribution functions, to upgrade our management information systems and other processes, and to obtain more space for our expanding administrative support and other personnel. Continued or fluctuating growth could strain our resources, and we could experience operating difficulties, including difficulties in hiring, training and managing an increasing number of employees and manufacturing capacity to produce our products, and delays in production and shipments. These difficulties may result in the erosion of our brand image, divert the attention of management and key employees and impact financial and operational results. In order to continue to expand our DTC channel, we expect to add selling, general & administrative expenses to our cost base. These costs, which include lease commitments,

-12-




headcount and capital assets, could result in decreased margins if we are unable to drive commensurate DTC revenue growth.
Our financial performance is subject to significant seasonality and variability, which could cause the price of our subordinate voting shares to decline.
Our business is affected by a number of factors common to our industry and by other factors specific to our business model, which drive seasonality and variability. Historically, key metrics, including those related to our growth, profitability and financial condition, have fluctuated significantly across fiscal periods. We expect this to continue in the future, although the patterns of this seasonality, in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, may shift substantially as compared to historical trends in the near term.
Consumer purchases of down-filled jackets are heavily concentrated in the Fall / Winter season. As a result, the majority of our DTC revenue is recognized in the third and fourth fiscal quarter. Our wholesale revenue is weighted earlier in the second and third fiscal quarters, when most orders are shipped to wholesale partners.
At the consolidated level, our revenue is concentrated in the second and third fiscal quarters, while our operating costs are more evenly distributed throughout the year. In fiscal 2020, these two quarters represented 77.9% of total revenue. We have historically experienced reduced or negative net income in our first and fourth fiscal quarters, where we have significantly less revenue to offset our cost base. We expect our expanding DTC channel to continue increasing as a percentage of total revenue, resulting in a growing proportion of our revenue occurring during the third and fourth fiscal quarters.
Guided by expected demand in both channels, we manufacture on a linear basis throughout the fiscal year, while adding capacity to our manufacturing network, resulting in the buildup and staging of inventory for future periods. As we have moved more production in-house, we have also created an inventory buffer ahead of demand and to support the planned rationalization of third-party manufacturing capacity. These dynamics cause significant fluctuations in our working capital, cash conversion, and leverage throughout the fiscal year. At certain points in time, our inventory has increased at a significantly higher rate than our historical revenue growth in the same period.
Conversely, while we maintain a general surplus of inventory, it is possible that we will experience delays or not be able to fulfill orders generally or for specific inventory as a result of transitioning our eight manufacturing facilities in March 2020 to producing personal protective equipment (“PPE”) for frontline healthcare workers in Canada as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. We are not experienced in the production, distribution and sale of PPE and our participation in these highly regulated activities may result in increased costs, liabilities or other unforeseen consequences that could have a negative impact on our business. If we continue to produce PPE after resuming production of outerwear, it is possible that our production capacity will be reduced even after outerwear production resumes.
Historical results, especially comparisons across fiscal quarters, should not be considered indicative of the results to be expected for any future periods. In addition to the seasonality of demand for our products, our financial performance is influenced by a number of factors which are difficult to predict and variable in nature. These include input cost volatility, the timing of consumer purchases and wholesale deliveries which very often shift between fiscal quarters, demand forecast accuracy, inventory availability and the evolution of our channel mix, as well as external trends in weather, retail traffic and discretionary consumer spending.
A number of other factors which are difficult to predict could also affect the seasonality or variability of our financial performance. Therefore, you should not rely on the results of a single fiscal quarter as an indication of our annual results or future performance.

-13-




If we fail to attract new customers, we may not be able to increase sales.
Our success depends, in part, on our ability to attract new customers. In order to expand our customer base, we must appeal to and attract consumers who identify with our brand and products. We have made significant investments in enhancing our brand and attracting new customers. We expect to continue to make significant investments to promote our current products to new customers and new products to current and new customers, including through our e-commerce platforms and retail store presence. Such marketing investments can be expensive and may not result in increased sales. Further, as our brand becomes more widely known, we may not attract new customers as we have in the past. If we are unable to attract new customers, we may not be able to increase our sales.
Our business may be adversely affected by global climate change trends.
A significant portion of our business is highly dependent on cold-weather seasons and patterns to generate consumer demand for our products. Consumer demand for our products may be negatively affected to the extent global weather patterns trend warmer, reducing typical patterns of cold-weather events or increasing weather volatility, which could have an adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
Our plans to improve and expand our product offerings may not be successful, and implementation of these plans may divert our operational, managerial and administrative resources, which could harm our competitive position and reduce our revenue and profitability.
In addition to our global DTC expansion plans, we are growing our business by expanding our product offerings outside down-filled jackets, including windwear, rainwear, knitwear and footwear. The principal risks to our ability to successfully carry out our plans to expand our product offering include:
the success of new products and new product lines will depend on market demand and there is a risk that new products and new product lines will not deliver expected results, which could negatively impact our future sales and results of operations;
if our expanded product offerings fail to maintain and enhance our distinctive brand identity, our brand image may be diminished and our sales may decrease;
implementation of these plans may divert management’s attention from other aspects of our business and place a strain on our management, operational and financial resources, as well as our information systems; and
incorporation of novel materials or features into our products may not be accepted by our customers or may be considered inferior to similar products offered by our competitors.
In addition, our ability to successfully carry out our plans to expand our product offerings may be affected by economic and competitive conditions, changes in consumer spending patterns (including reductions in discretionary consumer spending as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic) and changes in consumer preferences and styles. These plans could be abandoned, could cost more than anticipated and could divert resources from other areas of our business, any of which could negatively impact our competitive position and reduce our revenue and profitability.
Unexpected obstacles in new markets may limit our expansion opportunities and cause our business and growth to suffer.
Our future growth depends in part on our expansion efforts outside of North America, including in developing markets. We have limited experience with regulatory environments and market

-14-




practices outside of this region, and we may not be able to penetrate or successfully operate in any new market, as a result of unfamiliar regulation or other unexpected barriers to entry. In connection with our expansion efforts we may encounter obstacles, including cultural and linguistic differences, differences in regulatory environments, economic or governmental instability, labour practices and market practices, difficulties in keeping abreast of market, business and technical developments, and foreign customers’ tastes and preferences. In developing markets, potential challenges include relatively higher risk of political instability, economic volatility, crime, corruption and social unrest. For example, the political disruptions in Hong Kong which began in 2019 negatively impacted our customers and employees in Hong Kong, reduced consumer spending, and adversely impacted our business and results of operations in Hong Kong. Such challenges may be exacerbated in many cases by uncertainties regarding how local law is applied and enforced, and with respect to judiciary and administrative mechanism. Furthermore, global events such as pandemics, the related governmental, private sector and individual consumer responsive actions and any subsequent waves of outbreaks of COVID-19 after the management of the initial outbreak, could reduce store traffic and consumer spending, result in temporary or permanent closures of stores, offices, and factories, and could negatively impact the flow of goods. For example, in response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, local and national governments in many countries have implemented regional quarantines and mandated the closure of nonessential businesses, which has halted store traffic in certain markets and significantly disrupted consumer spending.
We may also encounter difficulty expanding into new international markets because of limited brand recognition leading to delayed acceptance of our outerwear by customers in these new international markets. Our failure to develop our business in new international markets or disappointing growth or inadequate management of risks outside of existing markets could harm our business and results of operations.
We rely on a limited number of third-party suppliers to provide high quality raw materials.
Our products require high quality raw materials, including cotton, polyester, wool, down and coyote fur. The price of raw materials depends on a wide variety of factors largely beyond the control of Canada Goose. A shortage, delay or interruption of supply for any reason, including delays caused by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, could negatively impact our ability to fulfill orders and have an adverse impact on our financial results.
In addition, while our suppliers, in turn, source from a number of sub-suppliers, we rely on a very small number of direct suppliers for certain raw materials. As a result, any disruption to these relationships could have an adverse effect on our business. Events that adversely affect our suppliers could impair our ability to obtain inventory in the quantities and at the quality that we require. Such events include difficulties or problems with our suppliers’ businesses, finances, labour relations, ability to import raw materials, costs, production, insurance and reputation, as well as natural disasters, public health emergencies or other catastrophic occurrences. Our supply of fabrics and raw materials, for example, could be disrupted by the impact of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and the related government and private sector responsive actions such as border closures, restrictions on product shipments, and travel restrictions. A significant slowdown in the retail industry as a whole as a result of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, may also result in bankruptcies or permanent closures of some of our suppliers and third party vendors. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that our suppliers will continue to provide fabrics and raw materials or provide products that are consistent with our standards.
More generally, if we need to replace an existing supplier, additional supplies or additional manufacturing capacity may not be available when required on terms that are acceptable to us, or at all, and any new supplier may not meet our strict quality requirements. In the event we are required to find new sources of supply, we may encounter delays in production, inconsistencies in

-15-




quality and added costs as a result of the time it takes to train our suppliers and manufacturers in our methods, products and quality control standards. Any delays, interruption or increased costs in the supply of our raw materials could have an adverse effect on our ability to meet customer demand for our products and result in lower sales and profitability both in the short and long-term.
We could experience significant disruptions in supply from our current sources.
We generally do not enter into long-term formal written agreements with our suppliers, and typically transact business with our suppliers on an order-by-order basis. There can be no assurance that there will not be a disruption in the supply of raw materials and certain finished goods from current sources or, in the event of a disruption, that we would be able to locate alternative suppliers of materials of comparable quality at an acceptable price, or at all. Identifying a suitable supplier is an involved process that requires us to become satisfied with their quality control, responsiveness and service, financial stability and labour and other ethical practices. Any delays, interruption or increased costs in the supply of fabric or manufacture of our products, including as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, could have an adverse effect on our ability to meet customer demand for our products and result in lower revenue and operating income both in the short and long-term.
Our business and results of operations could be harmed if we are unable to accurately forecast demand for our products.
To ensure adequate inventory supply, we forecast inventory needs, which are subject to seasonal and quarterly variations in consumer demand. If we fail to accurately forecast demand, we may experience excess inventory levels or a shortage of product. Our ability to forecast accurately has become increasingly important as we have expanded our DTC channel globally and could be affected by many factors outside of our control, including an increase or decrease in consumer demand for our products or for products of our competitors, our failure to accurately forecast consumer acceptance of new products, product introductions by competitors, unanticipated changes in general market conditions and, therefore, consumer spending in the sector (for example, because of unexpected effects on inventory supply and consumer demand caused by the current COVID-19 pandemic), and weakening of economic conditions or consumer confidence in future economic conditions. In our wholesale channel, a majority of orders delivered in a given fiscal year are received in the prior fiscal year, enabling us to manufacture inventory relative to a defined order book. In the DTC channel, we manufacture according to our forecasts of consumer demand. As we have moved more production in-house, we have created an inventory buffer ahead of demand and to support the planned rationalization of third-party manufacturing capacity. If we overestimate the demand for our products, we could face inventory levels in excess of demand, which could result in inventory write-downs or write-offs and the sale of excess inventory at discounted prices, which would harm our gross margins and our brand management efforts. The impact of an overestimation is expected to increase as a larger portion of our sales comes through our DTC channel, and as we expand our product offerings. If we underestimate the demand for our products, we may not be able to produce products to meet our wholesale partner requirements, and this could result in delays in the shipment of our products and our failure to satisfy demand, as well as damage to our reputation and wholesale partner relationships. In addition, failures to accurately predict the level of demand for our products could harm our profitability and financial condition.
If we are unable to establish and protect our trademarks and other intellectual property rights, counterfeiters may produce copies of our products and such counterfeit products could damage our brand image.
We expect that there is a high likelihood that counterfeit products or other products infringing on our intellectual property rights will continue to emerge, seeking to benefit from the consumer demand for Canada Goose products. These counterfeit products do not provide the functionality

-16-




of our products and we believe they are of substantially lower quality, and if customers are not able to differentiate between our products and counterfeit products, this could damage our brand image. In order to protect our brand, we devote significant resources to the registration and protection of our trademarks and to anti-counterfeiting efforts worldwide. We actively pursue entities involved in the trafficking and sale of counterfeit merchandise through legal action or other appropriate measures. In spite of our efforts, counterfeiting still occurs and, if we are unsuccessful in challenging a third-party’s rights related to trademark, copyright or other intellectual property rights, this could adversely affect our future sales, financial condition and results of operations. We cannot guarantee that the actions we have taken to curb counterfeiting and protect our intellectual property will be adequate to protect the brand and prevent counterfeiting in the future or that we will be able to identify and pursue all counterfeiters who may seek to benefit from our brand.
Competitors have and will likely continue to attempt to imitate our products and technology and divert sales. If we are unable to protect or preserve our intellectual property rights, brand image and proprietary rights, our business may be harmed.
As our business has expanded, our competitors have imitated, and will likely continue to imitate, our product designs and branding, which could harm our business and results of operations. Competitors who flood the market with products seeking to imitate our products could divert sales and dilute the value of our brand. We believe our trademarks, copyrights and other intellectual property rights are extremely important to our success and our competitive position.
However, enforcing rights to our intellectual property may be difficult and costly, and we may not be successful in stopping infringement of our intellectual property rights, particularly in foreign countries, which could make it easier for competitors to capture market share. Intellectual property rights necessary to protect our products and brand may also be unavailable or limited in certain countries. Furthermore, our efforts to enforce our trademarks, copyrights and other intellectual property rights may be met with defenses, counterclaims and countersuits attacking the validity and enforceability of our trademark and other intellectual property rights. Continued sales of competing products by our competitors could harm our brand and adversely impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Labour-related matters, including labour disputes, may adversely affect our operations.
As of March 29, 2020, less than 7% of our employees are members of labour unions, comprised of employees at 3 of our 8 in-house manufacturing facilities. The exposure to unionized labour in our workforce presents an increased risk of strikes and other labour disputes, and our ability to alter labour costs will be subject to collective bargaining, which could adversely affect our results of operations. In addition, potential labour disputes at independent factories where our goods are produced, shipping ports, or transportation carriers create risks for our business, particularly if a dispute results in work slowdowns, lockouts, strikes or other disruptions during our peak manufacturing, shipping and selling seasons. Any potential labour dispute, either in our own operations or in those of third parties, on whom we rely, could materially affect our costs, decrease our sales, harm our reputation or otherwise negatively affect our sales, profitability or financial condition.
The majority of our workforce is composed of manufacturing employees based in the provinces of Ontario, Manitoba and Québec, a sizeable portion of whom are paid wage rates based on the applicable provincial minimum wage. Many jurisdictions, including certain Canadian provinces, either have increased or plan to increase their minimum wage and other benefits requirements, which may materially increase our manufacturing costs. Minimum wage increases such as the foregoing may not only increase the wages of our minimum wage employees, but also the wages paid to our other hourly or salaried employees who, in recognition of their tenure, performance, responsibilities and other similar considerations, historically received a rate of pay exceeding the

-17-




applicable minimum wage. Further, if we fail to pay such higher wages, we could suffer increased employee turnover. It is difficult to predict when such increases may take place and any such increase could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
Further, the risks to our business due to a pandemic or other public health emergency, such as the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, include risks to employee health and safety, prolonged restrictive measures put in place in order to control the crisis and limitations on travel, which may result in temporary shortages of staff or unavailability of certain employees or consultants with key expertise or knowledge of our business and, impact on workforce productivity.
We rely significantly on information technology systems for our distribution systems and other critical business functions, and are increasing our reliance on these functions as our DTC channel expands. Any failure, inadequacy, or interruption of those systems could harm our ability to operate our business effectively.
We rely on information systems to effectively manage all aspects of our business, including merchandise planning, manufacturing, allocation, distribution, sales and financial reporting. Our reliance on these systems, and their importance to our business, will increase as we expand our DTC channel and global operations. We rely on a number of third parties to help us effectively manage these systems. If information systems we rely on fail to perform as expected, our business could be disrupted. The failure of us or our vendors to manage and operate our information technology systems as expected could disrupt our business, result in our not providing adequate product, losing sales or market share, and reputational harm, causing our business to suffer. Any such failure or disruption could have a material adverse effect on our business.
Our information technology systems and vendors also may be vulnerable to damage or interruption from circumstances beyond our or their control, including fire, flood, natural disasters, systems failures, network or communications failures, power outages, public health emergencies, security breaches, cyber-attacks and terrorism. For example, we have implemented a work-from-home policy due to the COVID-19 outbreak for our corporate workforce in North America and Europe. This increase in working remotely could increase our cyber security risk, create data accessibility concerns, and make us more susceptible to communication disruptions, any of which could adversely impact our business operations. We maintain disaster recovery procedures intended to mitigate the risks associated with such events, but there is no guarantee that these procedures will be adequate in any particular circumstance. As a result, such an event could materially disrupt, and have a material adverse effect on, our business.
We partially depend on our wholesale partners to display and present our products to customers in our wholesale channel, and our failure to maintain and further develop our relationships with our wholesale partners could harm our business.
We sell our products in our wholesale channel either directly or indirectly, through distributors and to wholesale partners. Our wholesale partners service customers by stocking and displaying our products, and explaining our product attributes. Our relationships with these partners are important to the authenticity of our brand and the marketing programs we continue to deploy. Our failure to maintain these relationships with our wholesale partners or financial difficulties experienced by these wholesale partners could harm our business.
Our sales depend, in part, on wholesale partners effectively displaying our products, including providing attractive space in their stores, including shop-in-shops, and training their sales personnel to sell our products. If our wholesale partners reduce or terminate those activities, we may experience reduced sales of our products, resulting in lower revenue and gross margins, which would harm our profitability and financial condition.

-18-




If we lose any of our wholesale partners, or if they reduce their purchases of our existing or new products, or their number of stores or operations are reduced, or they promote products of our competitors over ours, or they suffer financial difficulty or insolvency, our sales would be harmed. The recent decline in the overall retail sector, including ongoing disruptions related to COVID-19, has been challenging for our wholesale partners. Further, our ability to secure credit insurance may be negatively impacted due to the COVID-19 pandemic, resulting in us undertaking additional risk related to collecting payments from our wholesale partners on time, or at all. Such conditions, among other things, have resulted, and in the future may result, in financial difficulties leading to restructurings, bankruptcies, liquidations and other unfavorable events for our wholesale partners and may cause such partners to reduce or discontinue orders of our products or be unable to pay us for products they have purchased from us. This has caused us to negotiate shortened payment terms and reduce credit limits in certain cases. If the overall retail environment continues to decline or if one or more of our wholesale partners is unable or unwilling to meet our payment terms, our business and results of operations could be harmed.
A significant portion of our sales are to wholesale partners, directly and through distributors.
A significant portion of our sales are made to wholesale partners, either directly or indirectly, through distributors, who may decide to emphasize products from our competitors, to redeploy their retail floor space to other product categories, or to take other actions that reduce their purchases of our products. We do not receive long-term purchase commitments from our wholesale partners, and confirmed orders received from our wholesale partners may be difficult to enforce. Factors that could affect our ability to maintain or expand our sales to these wholesale partners include: (a) failure to accurately identify the needs of our customers; (b) lack of customer acceptance of new products or product expansions; (c) unwillingness of our wholesale partners and customers to attribute premium value to our new or existing products or product expansions relative to competing products; (d) failure to obtain shelf space from our wholesale partners; and (e) new, well-received product introductions by competitors.
We cannot assure you that our wholesale partners will continue to purchase and carry our products in accordance with current practices or carry any new products that we develop particularly in light of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. A significant slowdown in the retail industry as a whole as a result of pandemics or other public health emergencies, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, has resulted in and may continue to result in bankruptcies or permanent closures of some of our wholesale partners. If these risks occur, they could harm our brand as well as our results of operations and financial condition.
Our marketing programs, e-commerce initiatives and use of customer information are governed by an evolving set of laws and enforcement trends and unfavorable changes in those laws or trends, or our failure to comply with existing or future laws, could substantially harm our business and results of operations.
We collect, process, maintain and use data, including sensitive information on individuals, available to us through online activities and other customer interactions in our business. Our current and future marketing programs may depend on our ability to collect, maintain and use this information, and our ability to do so is subject to evolving and increasingly demanding international, U.S., Canadian, European and other laws and enforcement trends. For example, the European Union’s comprehensive General Data Privacy Regulation (the "GDPR"), which became fully effective in May 2018. The GDPR requires companies to satisfy new requirements regarding the handling of personal and sensitive data, including its use, protection and the ability of persons whose data is stored to correct or delete such data about themselves. Failure to comply with GDPR requirements could result in significant penalties. We strive to comply with all applicable laws and other legal obligations relating to privacy, data protection and customer protection, including those relating to

-19-




the use of data for marketing purposes. It is possible, however, that these requirements may be interpreted and applied in a manner that is inconsistent from one jurisdiction to another, may conflict with other rules, may conflict with our practices or fail to be observed by our employees or business partners. If so, we may suffer damage to our reputation and be subject to proceedings or actions against us by governmental entities or others. Any such proceeding or action could hurt our reputation, force us to spend significant amounts to defend our practices, distract our management or otherwise have an adverse effect on our business.
Certain of our marketing practices rely upon e-mail to communicate with consumers on our behalf. We may face risk if our use of e-mail is found to violate the applicable law. We post our privacy policy and practices concerning the use and disclosure of user data on our websites. Any failure by us to comply with our posted privacy policy or other privacy-related laws and regulations could result in proceedings which could potentially harm our business. In addition, as data privacy and marketing laws change, we may incur additional costs to ensure we remain in compliance. If applicable data privacy and marketing laws become more restrictive at the international, federal, provincial or state levels, our compliance costs may increase, our ability to effectively engage customers via personalized marketing may decrease, our investment in our e-commerce platform may not be fully realized, our opportunities for growth may be curtailed by our compliance burden and our potential reputational harm or liability for security breaches may increase.
Data security breaches and other cyber security events could result in disruption to our operations or financial losses and could negatively affect our reputation, credibility and business.
As with other companies, we are subject to risks associated with data security breaches and other cyber security events. We collect, process, maintain and use personal information relating to our customers and employees, and rely on third parties for the operation of our e-commerce site and for the various social media tools and websites we use as part of our marketing strategy. Any attempted or actual unauthorized disclosure of personally identifiable information regarding our employees, customers or website visitors could harm our reputation and credibility, reduce our e-commerce sales, impair our ability to attract website visitors, reduce our ability to attract and retain customers and could result in litigation against us or the imposition of significant fines or penalties.
Our on-line activities, including our e-commerce websites, also may be subject to denial of service or other forms of cyber attacks. While we have taken measures we believe are reasonable to protect against those types of attacks, those measures may not adequately protect our on-line activities from such attacks. If a denial of service attack or other cyber event were to affect our e-commerce sites or other information technology systems, our business could be disrupted, we may lose sales or valuable data, and our reputation may be adversely affected. Additionally, new and evolving data protection legislation such as the GDPR impose new requirements such as shorter notification timeframes that could increase the risks associated with data security breaches.
We have procedures and technology in place designed to safeguard our customers’ debit and credit cards and our customers’ and employees’ other personal information, and we continue to devote significant resources to network security, backup and disaster recovery, and other security measures. Nevertheless, these security measures cannot provide absolute security or guarantee that we will be successful in preventing or responding to every such breach or disruption.
Recently, data security breaches suffered by well-known companies and institutions have attracted a substantial amount of media attention, prompting new foreign, federal, provincial and state laws and legislative proposals addressing data privacy and security, as well as increased data protection obligations imposed on merchants by credit card issuers. As a result, we may become subject to more extensive requirements to protect the customer information that we process in connection with the purchase of our products, resulting in increased compliance costs.

-20-




A significant portion of our business functions operate out of our headquarters in Toronto. As a result, our business is vulnerable to disruptions due to local weather, economics and other factors.
All of our significant business functions reside at our headquarters in Toronto, Canada. Events such as public health emergencies, including the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, extreme local weather, natural disasters, transportation strikes, acts of terrorism, significant economic disruptions or unexpected damage to the facility have resulted and could result in an unexpected disruption to our business as a whole. If a disruption of this type should occur, our ability to conduct our business could be adversely affected or interrupted entirely and adversely affect our financial and operating results.
Our success is substantially dependent on the continued service of our senior management.
Our success is substantially dependent on the continued service of our senior management, including Dani Reiss, who is our President and Chief Executive Officer. The loss of the services of our senior management could make it more difficult to successfully operate our business and achieve our business goals. We also may be unable to retain existing management, technical, sales and client support personnel that are critical to our success, which could result in harm to our customer and employee relationships, loss of key information, expertise or know-how and unanticipated recruitment and training costs.
We have not obtained key man life insurance policies on any members of our senior management team. As a result, we would not be protected against the associated financial loss if we were to lose the services of members of our senior management team.
We rely on payment cards to receive payments, and are subject to payment-related risks.
For our DTC sales, as well as for sales to certain wholesale partners, we accept a variety of payment methods, including credit cards, debit cards and electronic funds transfers. Accordingly, we are, and will continue to be, subject to significant and evolving regulations and compliance requirements relating to payment card processing. This includes laws governing the collection, processing and storage of sensitive consumer information, as well as industry requirements such as the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (“PCI-DSS”). These laws and obligations may require us to implement enhanced authentication and payment processes that could result in increased costs and liability, and reduce the ease of use of certain payment methods. For certain payment methods, including credit and debit cards, we pay interchange and other fees, which may increase over time. We rely on independent service providers for payment processing, including credit and debit cards. If these independent service providers become unwilling or unable to provide these services to us or if the cost of using these providers increases, our business could be harmed. We are also subject to payment card association operating rules and agreements, including PCI-DSS, certification requirements and rules governing electronic funds transfers, which could change or be reinterpreted to make it difficult or impossible for us to comply. If we fail to comply with these rules or requirements, or if our data security systems are breached or compromised, we may be liable for losses incurred by card issuing banks or consumers, subject to fines and higher transaction fees, lose our ability to accept credit or debit card payments from our consumers, or process electronic fund transfers or facilitate other types of payments. Any failure to comply could significantly harm our brand, reputation, business, and results of operations.
If our independent manufacturers or our suppliers fail to use ethical business practices and fail to comply with changing laws and regulations or our applicable guidelines, our brand image could be harmed due to negative publicity.
Our core values, which include developing the highest quality products while operating with integrity, are an important component of our brand image, which makes our reputation sensitive to allegations

-21-




of unethical or improper business practices, whether real or perceived. We do not control our suppliers and manufacturers or their business practices. Accordingly, we cannot guarantee their compliance with our guidelines or the law. A lack of compliance could lead to reduced sales or recalls or damage to our brand or cause us to seek alternative suppliers, which could increase our costs and result in delayed delivery of our products, product shortages or other disruptions of our operations.
In addition, many of our products include materials that are heavily regulated in many jurisdictions. Certain jurisdictions in which we sell have various regulations related to manufacturing processes and the chemical content of our products, including their component parts. Monitoring compliance by our manufacturers and suppliers is complicated, and we are reliant on their compliance reporting in order to comply with regulations applicable to our products. This is further complicated by the fact that expectations of ethical business practices continually evolve and may be substantially more demanding than applicable legal requirements. Ethical business practices are also driven in part by legal developments and by diverse groups active in publicizing and organizing public responses to perceived ethical shortcomings. Accordingly, we cannot predict how such regulations or expectations might develop in the future and cannot be certain that our guidelines or current practices would satisfy all parties who are active in monitoring our products or other business practices worldwide.
Our current and future products may experience quality problems from time to time that can result in negative publicity, litigation, product recalls and warranty claims, which could result in decreased revenue and operating margin, and harm to our brand.
There can be no assurance we will be able to detect, prevent, or fix all defects that may affect our products. Failure to detect, prevent, or fix defects, or the occurrence of real or perceived quality, health or safety problems or material defects in our current and future products, could result in a variety of consequences, including a greater number of product returns than expected from customers and our wholesale partners, litigation, product recalls, and credit, warranty or other claims, among others, which could harm our brand, sales, profitability and financial condition. We stand behind every Canada Goose product with a warranty against defects with reasonable use, for the expected lifetime of the product. Because of this comprehensive warranty, quality problems could lead to increased warranty costs, and divert the attention of our manufacturing facilities. Such problems could hurt our premium brand image, which is critical to maintaining and expanding our business. Any negative publicity or lawsuits filed against us related to the perceived quality and safety of our products could harm our brand and decrease demand for our products.
Our business could be adversely affected by protestors or activists.
We have been the target of protestors and activists in the past, and may continue to be in the future. Our products include certain animal products, including goose and duck down in all of our down-filled parkas and coyote fur on the hoods of some of our parkas, which has drawn the attention of animal welfare activists. We have been, and may in the future, also be impacted by widespread protests such as the protests related to economic justice in France beginning in 2018, the political disruptions in Hong Kong beginning in 2019 and the recent protests that have occurred in many North American cities.
Protestors can disrupt sales at our stores, cause or prolong store closures, and lead to property damage. Protestors can also use social media or other campaigns to sway public opinion against our products. In addition, such activism could influence laws or regulations applicable to the jurisdictions in which we operate, including laws and regulations related to the use of animal by-products. If any such activists are successful, our sales and results of operations may be adversely affected.

-22-




The cost of raw materials could increase our cost of goods sold and cause our results of operations and financial condition to suffer.
The raw materials used in our supply chain include synthetic fabrics and natural products, including cotton, polyester, down and coyote fur. Significant price fluctuations or shortages in the cost of these raw materials may increase our cost of goods sold and cause our results of operations and financial condition to suffer. In particular, in our experience, pricing for fur products tends to be unpredictable. If we are unable to secure coyote fur for our jackets at a reasonable price or in accordance with our standards, we may have to alter or discontinue selling some of our designs, or attempt to pass along the cost to our customers, any of which could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition. Furthermore, any fluctuations or shortages in the availability of reclaimed coyote fur may delay plans to use only reclaimed fur in our outerwear starting in 2022.
Additionally, increasing costs of labour, freight and energy could increase our and our suppliers’ cost of goods. If our suppliers are affected by increases in their costs of labour, freight and energy, (for example, because of the unexpected disruption of movement of freight caused by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic) they may attempt to pass these cost increases on to us. If we pay such increases, we may not be able to offset them through increases in our pricing, which could adversely affect our results of operation and financial condition.
Fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates could harm our results of operations as well as the price of our subordinate voting shares.
The presentation currency for our consolidated financial statements is the Canadian dollar. Because we recognize sales in U.S. dollars, Euros, British pounds, Swiss francs, Hong Kong dollars and Chinese yuan, if any of these currencies weakens against the Canadian dollar it would have a negative impact on our local operating results upon translation of those results into Canadian dollars for the purposes of financial statement consolidation. Although we engage in short-term hedging transactions for a portion of our foreign currency denominated cash flows to mitigate foreign exchange risks, depending upon changes in future currency rates, including those fluctuations derived from the broader impact on the global economy caused by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, such gains or losses could have a significant, and potentially adverse, effect on our results of operations. Foreign exchange variations have been significant in the past and current foreign exchange rates may not be indicative of future exchange rates. Significant variations in foreign exchange rates may also make hedging contracts ineffective for hedge accounting purposes in future periods.
Our earnings per share are reported in Canadian dollars, and accordingly may be translated into U.S. dollars by analysts or our investors. As a result, the perceived value of an investment in our subordinate voting shares to a U.S. shareholder will fluctuate as the U.S. dollar rises and falls against the Canadian dollar. Our decision to declare a dividend depends on results of operations reported in Canadian dollars. As a result, U.S. and other shareholders seeking U.S. dollar total returns, including increases in the share price and dividends paid, are subject to foreign exchange risk as the U.S. dollar rises and falls against the Canadian dollar.
Political uncertainty and an increase in trade protectionism could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operation and financial condition.
As a prominent Canadian brand, geopolitical events that involve Canada may have an impact on our business and share price. In addition, our brand and Canadian heritage may be detrimental to the company in the context of geopolitical disputes aimed at Canada or actors or situations with significant actual or perceived connection to Canada. We sell a significant portion of our products to customers outside of Canada and changes, potential changes or uncertainties in regulatory and economic conditions or laws and policies governing foreign trade, manufacturing, and development

-23-




and investment in the territories and countries where we operate, could adversely affect our business and consolidated financial statements. Recent events, including the U.S. presidential election and “Brexit” in the U.K., have resulted in substantial regulatory uncertainty regarding international trade and trade policy. For example, in November 2018, the United States, Mexico and Canada signed the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (“USMCA”) (in Canada, known as the Canada-United-States-Mexico Agreement (“CUSMA”), which succeeds the North American Free Trade Agreement (“NAFTA”). USMCA/CUSMA has been ratified by the legislature of each of the United States, Canada and Mexico. The impact of USMCA/CUSMA on our business and operations is uncertain. In addition, beginning in 2018, the U.S. imposed tariffs on certain imports from China and other countries, resulting in retaliatory tariffs by China and other countries. In January 2020, a “Phase One” agreement was signed between the United States and China reducing or removing certain tariffs, but negotiations remain ongoing, the outcome of which is uncertain. This uncertainty and potential governmental action related to tariffs or international trade agreements has the potential to adversely impact demand for our products, our costs, customers, suppliers and/or the Canadian, U.S. or world economy or certain sectors thereof and, thus, to adversely impact our business.
Because of our international operations, which we are expanding as our DTC channel expands, we could be adversely affected by violations of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and similar worldwide anti-bribery and anti-kickback laws.
We source an increasingly significant portion of our products from outside Canada. The U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the U.K. Bribery Act and other similar anti-bribery and anti-kickback laws and regulations generally prohibit companies and their intermediaries from making improper payments government officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. While we take steps to ensure that our distributors, consultant and personnel comply with applicable law, we cannot assure you that we will be successful in preventing our employees or other agents from taking actions in violation of these laws or regulations. Such violations, or allegations of such violations, could disrupt our business and result in a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
We may become involved in legal or regulatory proceedings and audits.
Our business requires compliance with many laws and regulations, including labour and employment, sales and other taxes, customs, and consumer protection laws and ordinances that regulate retailers generally and/or govern the importation, promotion and sale of merchandise, and the operation of stores and warehouse facilities. Failure to comply with these laws and regulations could subject us to lawsuits and other proceedings, and could also lead to damage awards, fines and penalties. We have in the past and may become involved in legal proceedings or audits, including government and agency investigations, and consumer, employment, tort and other litigation. The outcome of some of these legal proceedings, audits, and other contingencies could require us to take, or refrain from taking, actions that could harm our operations or require us to pay substantial amounts of money, harming our financial condition. Additionally, defending against these lawsuits and proceedings may be necessary, which could result in substantial costs and diversion of management’s attention and resources, harming our financial condition. There can be no assurance that any pending or future legal or regulatory proceedings and audits will not harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We are subject to many hazards and operational risks that can disrupt our business, some of which may not be insured or fully covered by insurance.
Our operations are subject to many hazards and operational risks inherent to our business, including: general business risks, product liability, product recall and damage to third parties, our

-24-




infrastructure or properties caused by fires, floods and other natural disasters, power losses, telecommunications failures, terrorist attacks, public health emergencies, human errors and similar events.
Our insurance coverage may be inadequate to cover our liabilities related to such hazards or operational risks. In addition, we may not be able to maintain adequate insurance in the future at rates we consider reasonable and commercially justifiable, and insurance may not continue to be available on terms as favorable as our current arrangements. The occurrence of a significant uninsured claim, or a claim in excess of the insurance coverage limits maintained by us could harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.
Any failure to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting could have a material adverse effect on our ability to produce accurate and timely financial statements, which could harm our operating results, financial condition, and cash flows, our ability to operate our business and our reputation.
The process of designing and implementing effective internal controls is a continuous effort that requires us to anticipate and react to changes in our business and to expend resources to maintain a system of internal controls that is adequate to satisfy our reporting obligations as a public company. The measures we take may not be sufficient to satisfy our obligations as a public company and if we are unable to establish or maintain appropriate internal financial reporting controls and procedures, it could cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations on a timely basis, result in material misstatements in our consolidated financial statements and harm our results of operations.
We previously disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended March 31, 2019, material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting primarily related to control deficiencies within various aspects of our control environment. As a result of these control deficiencies, we concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was not effective for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2019. During fiscal 2020, we completed a series of actions and measures that effectively remediated the previously disclosed material weakness and concluded that as of March 29, 2020 our internal control over financial reporting was effective. See Item 15. - “Controls and Procedures” of this Annual Report. We cannot provide assurances that material weaknesses or significant deficiencies will not occur in the future and that we will be able to remediate such weaknesses or deficiencies in a timely manner, which could have a material adverse effect on our ability to produce accurate and timely financial statements, which could harm our operating results, financial condition, and cash flows, our ability to operate our business and our reputation.
If we identify any material weakness in the future, it could negatively impact the company’s ability to prepare its future financial statements in conformity with IFRS. If the company were unable to prepare its future financial statements in conformity with IFRS, we may be unable to report our financial results accurately, which could increase operating costs, trigger an event of default under our credit agreements and harm our business, including our investors’ perception of our business, our share price and our ability to finance our operations.
Failure to maintain adequate financial and management processes and controls could lead to errors in our financial reporting, which could harm our business and cause a decline in our share price.
Reporting obligations as a public company and our anticipated growth have placed and are likely to continue to place a considerable strain on our financial and management systems, processes and controls, as well as on our personnel. In addition, we are required to document and test our internal controls over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act so that our management can certify the effectiveness of our internal controls. If any material weaknesses

-25-




in our internal controls are identified in the future, we could be subject to regulatory scrutiny and a loss of public confidence, which could harm our business and cause a decline in our share price. In addition, if we do not maintain adequate financial and management personnel, processes and controls, we may not be able to accurately report our financial performance on a timely basis, which could cause a decline in our share price and harm our ability to raise capital. Failure to accurately report our financial performance on a timely basis could also jeopardize our continued listing on the Toronto Stock Exchange (“TSX”), the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) or any other exchange on which our subordinate voting shares may be listed. Delisting of our subordinate voting shares from any exchange would reduce the liquidity of the market for our subordinate voting shares, which would reduce the price of our subordinate voting shares and increase the volatility of our share price.
We do not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures and internal controls over financial reporting will prevent all error or fraud. A control system, no matter how well-designed and implemented, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the control system’s objectives will be met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Due to the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues within an organization are detected. Due to the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and may not be detected in a timely manner or at all. If we cannot provide reliable financial reports or prevent fraud, our reputation and operating results could be materially adversely affected, which could also cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, which in turn could result in a reduction in the trading price of the subordinate voting shares.
Risks Related to Our Subordinate Voting Shares
The dual-class structure contained in our articles has the effect of concentrating voting control and the ability to influence corporate matters with Bain Capital and our President and Chief Executive Officer, who held our shares prior to our initial public offering.
Our multiple voting shares have 10 votes per share and our subordinate voting shares have 1 vote per share. As of March 29, 2020, shareholders who hold multiple voting shares (Bain Capital and our President and Chief Executive Officer (including their respective affiliates)), together hold approximately 89.6% of the voting power of our outstanding voting shares and therefore have significant influence over our management and affairs and over all matters requiring shareholder approval, including the election of directors and significant corporate transactions.
In addition, because of the 10-to-1 voting ratio between our multiple voting shares and subordinate voting shares, the holders of our multiple voting shares will control a majority of the combined voting power of our voting shares even where the multiple voting shares represent a substantially reduced percentage of our total outstanding shares. The concentrated voting control of holders of our multiple voting shares limits the ability of holders of our subordinate voting shares to influence corporate matters for the foreseeable future, including the election of directors as well as with respect to decisions regarding amending of our share capital, creating and issuing additional classes of shares, making significant acquisitions, selling significant assets or parts of our business, merging with other companies and undertaking other significant transactions. As a result, holders of multiple voting shares will have the ability to influence or control many matters affecting us and actions may be taken that holders of our subordinate voting shares may not view as beneficial. The market price of our subordinate voting shares could be adversely affected due to the significant influence and voting power of the holders of multiple voting shares. Additionally, the significant voting interest of holders of multiple voting shares may discourage transactions involving a change of control, including transactions in which an investor, as a holder of the subordinate voting shares,

-26-




might otherwise receive a premium for the subordinate voting shares over the then-current market price, or discourage competing proposals if a going private transaction is proposed by one or more holders of multiple voting shares.
Future transfers by holders of multiple voting shares, other than permitted transfers to such holders’ respective affiliates or direct family members or to other permitted holders, will result in those shares automatically converting to subordinate voting shares, which will have the effect, over time, of increasing the relative voting power of those holders of multiple voting shares who retain their multiple voting shares.
Bain Capital continues to have significant influence over us in the future, including control over decisions that require the approval of shareholders, which could limit shareholders’ ability to influence the outcome of matters submitted to shareholders for a vote.
We are currently controlled by Bain Capital. As of March 29, 2020, Bain Capital beneficially owned approximately 60.5% of our outstanding multiple voting shares, or approximately 54.3% of the combined voting power of our multiple voting and subordinate voting shares outstanding. In addition, our President and Chief Executive Officer beneficially owns approximately 39.5% of our outstanding multiple voting shares, or approximately 35.4% of the combined voting power of our outstanding voting shares. As long as Bain Capital owns or controls at least a majority of our outstanding voting power, it will have the ability to exercise substantial control over all corporate actions requiring shareholder approval, irrespective of how our other shareholders may vote, including the election and removal of directors and the size of our board of directors, any amendment of our certificate of incorporation, notice of articles and articles, or the approval of any merger or other significant corporate transaction, including a sale of substantially all of our assets. Even if its ownership falls below 50% of the voting power of our outstanding voting shares, Bain Capital will continue to be able to strongly influence or effectively control our decisions. Bain Capital’s multiple voting shares convert automatically to subordinate voting shares at the time that Bain Capital and its affiliates no longer beneficially own at least 15% of the outstanding subordinate voting shares and multiple voting shares on a non-diluted basis. Even once Bain Capital’s multiple voting shares convert into subordinate voting shares we may continue to be a controlled company so long as an entity controlled by our President and Chief Executive Officer continues to hold multiple voting shares.
Additionally, Bain Capital’s interests may not align with the interests of our other shareholders. Bain Capital is in the business of making investments in companies and may acquire and hold interests in businesses that compete directly or indirectly with us. Bain Capital may also pursue acquisition opportunities that may be complementary to our business, and, as a result, those acquisition opportunities may not be available to us.

-27-




We are a controlled company within the meaning of the NYSE listing rules and, as a result, will qualify for, and intend to rely on, exemptions from certain corporate governance requirements. Our shareholders will not have the same protections afforded to shareholders of companies that are subject to such requirements.
We are a controlled company within the meaning of the corporate governance standards of the NYSE. Under these rules, a company of which more than 50% of the voting power for the election of directors is held by an individual, group or another company is a controlled company and may elect not to comply with certain corporate governance requirements, including the requirements that:
we have a compensation committee that is composed entirely of independent directors; and
we have a nominating and governance committee that is composed entirely of independent directors.
As a foreign private issuer, we are exempt from certain U.S. securities law disclosure requirements that apply to a domestic U.S. issuer, which may limit the information publicly available to our shareholders.
As a foreign private issuer we are not required to comply with all of the periodic disclosure and current reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (“Exchange Act”) and therefore there may be less publicly available information about us than if we were a U.S. domestic issuer. For example, we are not subject to the proxy rules in the United States and disclosure with respect to our annual meetings and any special meeting of shareholders will be governed by Canadian requirements. In addition, our officers, directors and principal shareholders are exempt from the reporting and short-swing profit recovery provisions of Section 16 of the Exchange Act and the rules thereunder. Furthermore, as a foreign private issuer, we may take advantage of certain provisions in the NYSE listing rules that allow us to follow Canadian law for certain governance matters.
Our articles, and certain Canadian legislation contain provisions that may have the effect of delaying or preventing a change in control.
Certain provisions of our articles, together or separately, could discourage potential acquisition proposals, delay or prevent a change in control and limit the price that certain investors may be willing to pay for our subordinate voting shares. For instance, our articles contain provisions that establish certain advance notice procedures for nomination of candidates for election as directors at shareholders’ meetings. A non-Canadian must file an application for review with the Minister responsible for the Investment Canada Act and obtain approval of the Minister prior to acquiring control of a “Canadian business” within the meaning of the Investment Canada Act, where prescribed financial thresholds are exceeded. Furthermore, acquisitions of our subordinate voting shares and multiple voting shares may be reviewed pursuant to the Competition Act (Canada). This legislation permits the Commissioner of Competition, or Commissioner, to review any acquisition or establishment, directly or indirectly, including through the acquisition of shares, of control over or of a significant interest in us. Otherwise, there are no limitations either under the laws of Canada or British Columbia, or in our articles on the rights of non-Canadians to hold or vote our subordinate voting shares and multiple voting shares. Any of these provisions may discourage a potential acquirer from proposing or completing a transaction that may have otherwise presented a premium to our shareholders.

-28-




Because we are a corporation incorporated in British Columbia and some of our directors and officers are resident in Canada, it may be difficult for investors in the United States to enforce civil liabilities against us based solely upon the federal securities laws of the United States. Similarly, it may be difficult for Canadian investors to enforce civil liabilities against our directors and officers residing outside of Canada.
We are a corporation incorporated under the laws of British Columbia with our principal place of business in Toronto, Canada. Some of our directors and officers and the auditors or other experts named herein are residents of Canada and all or a substantial portion of our assets and those of such persons are located outside the United States. Consequently, it may be difficult for U.S. investors to effect service of process within the United States upon us or our directors or officers or such auditors who are not residents of the United States, or to realize in the United States upon judgments of courts of the United States predicated upon civil liabilities under the Securities Act. Investors should not assume that Canadian courts: (1) would enforce judgments of U.S. courts obtained in actions against us or such persons predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the U.S. federal securities laws or the securities or blue sky laws of any state within the United States or (2) would enforce, in original actions, liabilities against us or such persons predicated upon the U.S. federal securities laws or any such state securities or blue sky laws.
Similarly, some of our directors and officers are residents of countries other than Canada and all or a substantial portion of the assets of such persons are located outside Canada. As a result, it may be difficult for Canadian investors to initiate a lawsuit within Canada against these non-Canadian residents. In addition, it may not be possible for Canadian investors to collect from these non-Canadian residents judgments obtained in courts in Canada predicated on the civil liability provisions of securities legislation of certain of the provinces and territories of Canada. It may also be difficult for Canadian investors to succeed in a lawsuit in the United States, based solely on violations of Canadian securities laws.
Changes in U.S. tax laws and regulations or trade rules may impact our effective tax rate and may adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating results.
Changes in tax laws in any of the multiple jurisdictions in which we operate, or adverse outcomes from tax audits that we may be subject to in any of the jurisdictions in which we operate, could result in an unfavorable change in our effective tax rate, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating results. Additionally, the current U.S. administration has introduced greater uncertainty with respect to tax and trade policies, tariffs and government regulations affecting trade between the United States and other countries. Major developments in tax policy or trade relations, such as the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement or the imposition of unilateral tariffs on imported products, could have a material adverse effect on our growth opportunities, business and results of operations.
The U.S. legislation commonly known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act comprehensively changed the U.S. federal income tax system. This law and related future legislation, regulations and rulings could adversely affect the U.S. federal income tax treatment of us and the U.S. Holders of our subordinate voting shares. The interpretation and application of many provisions of this law are unclear. U.S. Holders should consult their own tax advisors in that regard.
There could be adverse tax consequence for our shareholders in the United States if we are a passive foreign investment company.
Under United States federal income tax laws, if a company is, or for any past period was, a passive foreign investment company (“PFIC”) it could have adverse United States federal income tax consequences to U.S. shareholders even if the company is no longer a PFIC. The determination of whether we are a PFIC is a factual determination made annually based on all the facts and

-29-




circumstances and thus is subject to change, and the principles and methodology used in determining whether a company is a PFIC are subject to interpretation. We do not believe that we currently are or have been a PFIC, and we do not expect to be a PFIC in the future, but we cannot assure you that we will not be a PFIC in the future. United States purchasers of our subordinate voting shares are urged to consult their tax advisors concerning United States federal income tax consequences of holding our subordinate voting shares if we are considered to be a PFIC.
If we are a PFIC, U.S. holders would be subject to adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences, such as ineligibility for any preferred tax rates on capital gains or on actual or deemed dividends, interest charges on certain taxes treated as deferred, and additional reporting requirements under U.S. federal income tax laws or regulations. Whether or not U.S. holders make a timely qualified electing fund (“QEF”) election or mark-to-market election may affect the U.S. federal income tax consequences to U.S. holders with respect to the acquisition, ownership and disposition of our subordinate voting shares and any distributions such U.S. holders may receive. Investors should consult their own tax advisors regarding all aspects of the application of the PFIC rules to our subordinate voting shares.
Canada Goose Holdings Inc. is a holding company with no operations of its own and, as such, it depends on its subsidiary for cash to fund its operations and expenses, including future dividend payments, if any.
As a holding company, our principal source of cash flow is distributions from our main operating subsidiary, Canada Goose Inc. Therefore, our ability to fund and conduct our business, service our debt and pay dividends, if any, in the future will depend on the ability of our subsidiary to generate sufficient cash flow to make upstream cash distributions to us. Our subsidiary is a separate legal entity, and although it is wholly-owned and controlled by us, it has no obligation to make any funds available to us, whether in the form of loans, dividends or otherwise. The ability of our subsidiary to distribute cash to us will also be subject to, among other things, restrictions that may be contained in our subsidiary agreements (as entered into from time to time), availability of sufficient funds in such subsidiary and applicable laws and regulatory restrictions. Claims of any creditors of our subsidiary generally will have priority as to the assets of such subsidiary over our claims and claims of our creditors and shareholders. To the extent the ability of our subsidiary to distribute dividends or other payments to us is limited in any way, our ability to fund and conduct our business, service our debt and pay dividends, if any, could be harmed.
If securities or industry analysts do not publish or cease publishing research or reports about us, our business or our market, or if they change their recommendations regarding our subordinate voting shares adversely, the price and trading volume of our subordinate voting shares could decline.
The trading market for our subordinate voting shares is influenced by the research and reports that industry or securities analysts publish about us, our business, our market or our competitors. If any of the analysts who cover us or may cover us in the future change their recommendation regarding our subordinate voting shares adversely, or provide more favorable relative recommendations about our competitors, the price of our subordinate voting shares would likely decline. If any analyst who covers us or may cover us in the future were to cease coverage of our company or fail to regularly publish reports on us, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which in turn could cause the price or trading volume of our subordinate voting shares to decline.
Our constating documents permit us to issue an unlimited number of subordinate voting shares and multiple voting shares without additional shareholder approval.
Our articles permit us to issue an unlimited number of subordinate voting shares and multiple voting shares. We anticipate that we will, from time to time, issue additional subordinate voting shares in

-30-




the future. Subject to the requirements of the NYSE and the TSX, we will not be required to obtain the approval of shareholders for the issuance of additional subordinate voting shares. Although the rules of the TSX generally prohibit us from issuing additional multiple voting shares, there may be certain circumstances where additional multiple voting shares may be issued, including upon receiving shareholder approval. Any further issuances of subordinate voting shares or multiple voting shares will result in immediate dilution to existing shareholders and may have an adverse effect on the value of their shareholdings. Additionally, any further issuances of multiple voting shares may significantly lessen the combined voting power of our subordinate voting shares due to the 10-to-1 voting ratio between our multiple voting shares and subordinate voting shares.
ITEM 4. INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY
A. History and Development of the Company
Founded in a small warehouse in Toronto in 1957, Canada Goose has grown into one of the world’s leading makers of performance luxury apparel. Our products are informed by the rugged demands of the Arctic and inspired by relentless innovation and uncompromised craftsmanship. From the coldest places on Earth to global fashion capitals, people are proud to wear Canada Goose.
We are deeply involved in every stage of our business as a designer, manufacturer, distributor and retailer of outerwear, knitwear and accessories for men, women and children. This vertically integrated business model allows us to directly control the quality of our products while capturing higher margins. As of March 29, 2020, our products are sold through our DTC channel, which has e-commerce operations in 13 countries and 20 retail stores, and our wholesale channel, which is comprised of select wholesale partners and distributors in 47 countries.
In December 2013, we partnered with Bain Capital through a sale of a 70% equity interest in our business (the “Acquisition”). In connection with such sale, Canada Goose Holdings Inc. was incorporated under the Business Corporations Act (British Columbia) (the “BCBCA”) on November 21, 2013. The initial public offering of our subordinate voting shares in the United States and Canada was completed on March 21, 2017.
In November 2018, we acquired the business of Baffin Inc. (“Baffin”), a Canadian designer and manufacturer of performance outdoor and industrial footwear. Field-tested and trusted in extreme cold weather conditions, Baffin products are predominantly sold through distributors and retailers in Canada and the United States. As a wholly-owned subsidiary, Baffin is managed and operated on a stand-alone basis, with distinct products, sales channels, and customers. In the future, we intend to develop a separate Canada Goose footwear offering leveraging Baffin’s expertise, infrastructure and technology.
Our principal office is located at 250 Bowie Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M6E 4Y2 and our telephone number is (416) 780-9850. Our registered office is located at Suite 1700, Park Place, 666 Burrard Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V6C 2X8. Our website address is www.canadagoose.com. Information contained on, or accessible through, our website is not a part of this Annual Report and the inclusion of our website address in this Annual Report is an inactive textual reference. The SEC maintains a website at www.sec.gov that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding registrants that make electronic filings with the SEC using its EDGAR system. Corporation Service Company, located at 251 Little Falls Drive, Wilmington, Delaware, is the company’s agent for service of process in the United States.

-31-




Our Competitive Strengths
We believe that the following strengths are central to the power of our brand and business model:
Authentic brand. For decades, we have helped explorers, scientists, athletes and film crews embrace the elements in some of the harshest environments in the world. Our stories are real and are best told through the unfiltered lens of Goose People, our brand ambassadors. The journeys, achievements and attitudes of these incredible adventurers embody our core belief that greatness is out there and they inspire our customers to chart their own course.
Uncompromised craftsmanship. We develop superior functional products centered around protection from the elements and adaptability for a wide range of uses, climates and environments. Our expertise in matching our technical fabrics with the optimal blends of down enables us to create warmer, lighter and more durable products. The superior quality and performance of our products also extends into freedom of movement, breathability and protection from wind and rain.
Beloved and coveted globally. We believe that Canada Goose is the reference parka in the performance luxury space. On a global basis, consumer research shows that we are consistently amongst the highest in our competitive set for awareness and affinity. In a market which is largely fragmented and regional, the international breadth of our brand equity is a significant point of strength.
Proudly made in Canada. Our Canadian heritage and commitment to local manufacturing are at the heart of our business and brand. While many companies in our industry outsource to offshore manufacturers, we are deeply committed to producing our core down-filled jackets in Canada. We believe that our recognized Made-in-Canada leadership is valued by our customers and difficult to replicate.
Vertically integrated. We directly control the design, innovation, development, engineering and testing of our products, which we believe allows us to achieve greater operating efficiencies and deliver superior product quality. We manage our production through a combination of in-house manufacturing facilities and long-standing relationships with third party sub-contractors. This gives us distinct advantages including the ability to scale our operations and achieve higher margins.
Multi-channel distribution. Our distribution strategy allows us to reach customers how and where they want to shop, through two distinct and complementary channels. In our most important markets, our DTC channel allows us to have direct and unfiltered relationships with our customers, while realizing more favourable margins. In a world that is increasingly digital, our e-commerce platform is strong and dynamic, offering the full breadth of our product offering, available anytime. The response to our retail stores, which we began opening in the Fall of 2016, has also demonstrated that our customers value physical and immersive experiences, such as our cold rooms, in an exceptional service environment. We are also evaluating and experimenting with omni-channel elements in our retail stores. This includes the Journey at CF Sherway Gardens in Toronto, which combines guided digital and physical experiences with inventory-free online shopping and same-day home delivery. Canada Goose also recognizes that many consumers value shopping in multi-brand environments. Our complementary wholesale channel, which represented 2,121 points of distribution during the Fall / Winter 2019 season, plays an important role in our business, extending the reach and influence of our distribution. We work closely with our curated network of best-in-

-32-




class partners and distributors, to ensure the highest standards of customer experience and brand storytelling.
Proven management team. Dani Reiss, our President and Chief Executive Officer since 2001, has led the transformation of Canada Goose from a small Canadian jacket manufacturer to a global luxury brand. Mr. Reiss has played a central role in transitioning the business into a consumer-facing brand, developing our international markets and building a world-class team of senior business leaders. Our current management team has established our innovative multi-channel distribution model, rapidly scaled Made-in-Canada manufacturing and successfully evolved our product offering beyond the parka.
B.
Business Overview
Our Growth Strategies
Pursue global growth. We believe that we have a significant opportunity to grow demand, distribution and penetration, in both existing and new geographic markets.
Strengthen brand affinity. Driving interest from new customers and building deeper connections with those who already know us is central to our market development strategy. While our brand is recognized and coveted globally, we have potential to meaningfully increase awareness, consideration and conversion. Through authentic storytelling and unique experiences, amplified by our digital-first approach, we plan to continue introducing Canada Goose to the world, activating local markets to support our distribution, and encouraging our fans to explore the full breadth of our offering.
Enhance our wholesale network. With a focus on providing a compelling and consistent brand experience, we plan to strengthen our relationships with best-in-class wholesale partners and distributors, while strategically editing down total points of distribution. Through a wide range of collaborations in areas such as assortment planning, merchandising, creative content, events and campaigns, we are working closely with our wholesale network to build awareness and affinity for the long term, while driving traffic and full price sell through.
Continue our DTC rollout. Since opening our first e-commerce site in Canada in August of 2014, we have achieved annual DTC revenue of $525.0 million in fiscal 2020, which represents 54.8% of total revenue. Alongside our complementary wholesale channel, we intend to continue expanding our retail stores and e-commerce operations on a global basis.
Drive higher penetration globally. While we plan to continue expanding our business in Canada, we have a larger long-term opportunity globally. In recent years, we have had early success developing a wide range of geographies including the United States, the United Kingdom and Greater China. Building on this momentum, we plan to drive further penetration gains in major international markets where we already enjoy strong demand, through brand building and distribution expansion.

-33-




The following table presents our revenue in each of our geographic segments over the past three fiscal years:
In CAD $millions
Fiscal year ended
 
'18 - '20
 
March
29, 2020
 
March
31, 2019
 
March
31, 2018
 
CAGR
Canada
293.1

 
293.3

 
228.8

 
13.2
%
United States
279.0

 
251.1

 
184.2

 
23.1
%
Asia
199.9

 
112.1

 
36.1

 
135.3
%
Europe and Rest of World
186.1

 
174.0

 
142.1

 
14.4
%
Total
958.1

 
830.5

 
591.2

 
27.3
%
Canada, which is our most developed market in terms of brand affinity and distribution, was our largest geographic segment by revenue in fiscal 2020. Comparatively, in the United States and our Rest of World segment, which is comprised of key markets in Western Europe and Asia, we estimate that the addressable populations of potential local and travelling Canada Goose consumers are much larger. This is supported by broader luxury outerwear and apparel spending levels in these regions. With penetration at an earlier stage of development in these markets, we believe that we have substantial runway to increase the size of our business globally.
Enhance and expand our product offering. As a product-led, function-first brand we will continue to evolve and expand our product offering across styles, uses and climates. Giving people new ways to experience Canada Goose builds deeper brand loyalty, drives higher penetration and expands our geographic appeal.
Fall / Winter. While our long-standing styles continue to grow, we are also broadening our jacket offering through innovation and new styles. With outerwear becoming a more prominent part of wardrobes, we intend to continue responding to demand for more choice and variety with new down-filled jackets that address a wider range of silhouettes, colours, fits, uses and weather conditions.
Spring. We plan to continue successfully building out our Spring collections in categories such as lightweight down, rainwear and windwear. While keeping our customers warm, comfortable and protected across three seasons, these extensions also increase our relevance in markets with more temperate climates.
Beyond outerwear. Our strategy is to selectively and carefully respond to customer demand for complementary functional products in adjacent categories. As a product-led, function-first brand, we are focused on going places which stay true to our heritage and where we have the right capabilities to create exceptional products that are undeniably authentic Canada Goose. Outside of outerwear, we currently offer collections of knitwear and accessories, which we intend to thoughtfully expand in offering and distribution going forward. We are also developing a strategy and internal capabilities for a cold weather footwear offering, which we plan to commercially release in the medium to longer term.
Drive higher margins. As we scale our business, we plan to continue leveraging our brand and business model to drive operational efficiencies and higher margins in the following ways:
Channel mix. As our mix further shifts towards the DTC channel, we expect to continue to capture incremental gross margin and realize higher operating margins. A jacket sale in our DTC channel

-34-




provides significantly greater contribution to segment operating income as compared to a sale of the same product in our wholesale channel.
Price optimization. We believe that we have a significant degree of pricing power with our products and we plan to continue optimizing our pricing to capture their full value to consumers. In addition, we intend to continue offering new styles at higher price points, which is incrementally beneficial to gross margin over the longer term as volumes and production efficiencies scale.
Manufacturing. We intend to continue increasing in-house domestic jacket production relative to third-party manufacturing to realize efficiencies, with efficiencies over time expected to offset the price inflation of inputs to manufacturing, and capture incremental gross margin to fund strategic investments in new product. In fiscal 2020, 53% of total down-filled jacket production was in-house, as compared to 47% in fiscal 2019.
Our Products
Outerwear
Since 1957, Canada Goose has been making purpose-driven products known for unparalleled warmth and functionality to thrive in some of the most extreme conditions in the world.
Over time, our product offering has evolved significantly. We leverage our tactical industrial heritage to inspire, develop and refine functional outerwear for extreme conditions and beyond. Recognizing that our consumers want to bring the functionality of our Arctic parkas into their everyday lives, we have expanded our offering for a wider range of audiences, including urban explorers and discerning luxury consumers. True to our heritage, we partner with Goose People as a source of inspiration and real-world testing. For example, while developing our award-winning HyBridge Lite product, Ray Zahab, extreme adventure athlete, put the jacket to the test while running the Sahara. The Skreslet Parka, co-designed by Laurie Skreslet, the first Canadian to summit Everest, inspired our Altitude line of mountaineering products.
We have also expanded into functional outerwear for shoulder seasons and more temperate climates. Canada Goose’s authentic, adaptable and function-first approach to design delivers true protection from unpredictable weather anywhere. Our collection of raincoats, windwear and lightweight jackets are designed to offer unparalleled performance on their own - and unmatched adaptability when worn as a system.
Knitwear
Canada Goose introduced its first Knitwear Collection in 2017, pairing the natural moisture wicking and temperature regulating properties of premium ultra-fine Merino wool with the function-first focus at the core of all of our products. Our knitwear uses Thermal Mapping™ technology for maximum comfort by increasing breathability where your body needs it most. This technique combines loose and tight stitches to increase airflow to the parts of the body that generate the most heat or require more insulation.
Accessories
Canada Goose’s accessories are designed to transition seamlessly from weekday commutes to weekend retreats. Our collection of scarves and beanies are made in Italy from premium ultra-fine Merino wool and our gloves are available in reinforced leather that resists abrasion or in heavy duty fleece and down-filled styles for ultimate warmth in colder climates.

-35-




Thermal Experience Index
From hiking trails to embarking on an urban adventure, or exploring the coldest places on Earth, Canada Goose has developed the Thermal Experience Index (TEI) to help consumers select the right product for them no matter the adventure. The five-point system breaks down each piece into a category, activity and suggested temperature. TEI categorizes warmth from lightweight pieces to parkas made for extreme weather systems; ranging from five degrees Celsius (40 degrees Fahrenheit) to negative 30 degrees Celsius (negative 25 degrees Fahrenheit) and below.
Sourcing and Manufacturing
Uncompromised craftsmanship begins with sourcing the right raw materials. We use premium fabrics and finishings that are built to last. Our blends of down and fabrics enable us to create warmer, lighter and more durable products across seasons and applications. Our products are made with down because it is recognized as one of the world’s best natural insulators.
In 2019, we committed to the Responsible Down Standard (“RDS”) and we intend to be 100% RDS-certified by 2021. The RDS aims to ensure that down and feathers come from animals that have not been subjected to unnecessary harm. Under this standard, Canada Goose will join with other brands and supply chain members to respect the Five Freedoms (as referenced by the RDS) of the animals that provide the down and feathers in our garments.
For five decades, our parkas have featured wild coyote fur sourced from western Canada and the United States. Natural fur provides functionality in extreme environments and is an integral feature of authentic Arctic outerwear. In 2020, Canada Goose announced a bold new initiative that will introduce reclaimed fur into our supply chain. We plan to begin making parkas using reclaimed fur and end the purchasing of new fur in 2022. Customers should begin to see reclaimed fur in some of our products as early as Fall 2022.
As of March 29, 2020, we operate eight Canada Goose manufacturing facilities in Toronto, Winnipeg and Greater Montreal and one Baffin manufacturing facility in Stoney Creek, Ontario. As of March 29, 2020, we also work with 22 Canadian subcontractors and 8 international manufacturing partners who offer specialized expertise, which provides us with flexibility to scale our production and effectively offer a broader range of product categories. We have been recognized by the Government of Canada for supporting the apparel manufacturing industry in Canada.
Intellectual Property
We own the trademarks used in connection with the marketing, distribution and sale of all of our products in the United States, Canada and in the other countries in which our products are sold. Our major trademarks include the CANADA GOOSE word mark and the ARCTIC PROGRAM & DESIGN trademark (our disc logo consisting of the colour-inverse design of the North Pole and Arctic Ocean). In addition to the registrations in Canada and the United States, our word mark and design are registered in other jurisdictions which cover approximately 60 countries. Furthermore, in certain jurisdictions we register as trademarks certain elements of our products, such as fabric, warmth categorization and style names such as our Snow Mantra parka.
We enforce our trademarks and we have taken several measures to protect our customers from counterfeiting activities. Since 2011, we have sewn a unique hologram, designed exclusively for us, into every jacket and accessory as proof of authenticity. Additionally, our website has a tool for potential online customers to verify the integrity of third party retailers that purport to sell our products. We are also active in enforcing rights on a global basis to our trademarks and taking action against counterfeiters, online and in physical stores.

-36-




Seasonality
Our business is seasonal in nature. See Item 5.A - “Operating and Financial Review and Prospects” - “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Results” - “Factors Affecting our Performance” - “Seasonality” and Item 3.D - “Risk Factors” - “Risks Related to our Business” for a discussion.
Government Regulation
In Canada and in the other jurisdictions in which we operate, we are subject to labour and employment laws, laws governing advertising, privacy and data security laws, safety regulations and other laws, including consumer protection regulations that apply to retailers and/or the promotion and sale of merchandise and the operation of stores and warehouse facilities. Our products sold outside of Canada are subject to tariffs, treaties and various trade agreements as well as laws affecting the importation of consumer goods. We monitor changes in these laws, regulations, treaties and agreements, and believe that we are in material compliance with applicable laws.
C.    Organizational Structure
The following chart reflects our organizational structure (including the jurisdiction of formation or incorporation of the various entities).
image004_2.jpg

-37-




D.    Property, Plants and Equipment
We maintain leased facilities for our corporate headquarters and to conduct our principal manufacturing and retail activities, which we believe are in good condition and working order.
In Canada, we lease 19 properties, comprised of nine retail stores, one office, showroom and manufacturing facility, seven additional manufacturing facilities, one warehouse and one logistics facility. Our manufacturing, warehouse and logistics properties range in size from 50,000-170,000 square feet. In the United States, we lease six properties comprised of five retail stores and one office and showroom. In Europe, we lease four properties comprised of three retail stores and one office and showroom. In Asia, we lease nine properties comprised of six retail stores and three offices.
ITEM 4A. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
None.
ITEM 5. OPERATING AND FINANCIAL REVIEW AND PROSPECTS
The following tables set forth our selected consolidated financial data. The selected historical consolidated financial data below should be read in conjunction with our Annual Financial Statements (Item 18), as well as Item 4. - “Information on the Company” of this Annual Report.
We have derived the statements of operations data for the years ended March 29, 2020, March 31, 2019 and March 31, 2018 and the consolidated financial position information as at March 29, 2020 and March 31, 2019 from our Annual Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report. The statements of operations data for the years ended March 31, 2017 and March 31, 2016 and the consolidated financial position information as at March 31, 2018, March 31, 2017, and March 31, 2016 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements, which are not included in this Annual Report. Our Annual Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with IFRS and are presented in millions of Canadian dollars except where otherwise indicated. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results that should be expected in any future period.

-38-




 
For the year ended
CAD $ millions (except per share data)
March
29, 2020
 
March
31, 2019
 
March
31, 2018
 
March
31, 2017
 
March
31, 2016
Statement of Operations Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenue
958.1

 
830.5

 
591.2

 
403.8

 
290.8

Cost of sales
364.8

 
313.7

 
243.6

 
191.7

 
145.2

Gross profit
593.3

 
516.8

 
347.6

 
212.1

 
145.6

Selling, general and administrative expenses
350.5

 
302.1

 
200.1

 
165.0

 
100.1

Depreciation and amortization
50.7

 
18.0

 
9.4

 
6.6

 
4.5

Operating income
192.1

 
196.7

 
138.1

 
40.5

 
41.0

Net interest and other finance costs
28.4

 
14.2

 
12.9

 
10.0

 
8.0

Income before income taxes
163.7

 
182.5

 
125.2

 
30.5

 
33.0

Income tax expense
12.0

 
38.9

 
29.1

 
8.9

 
6.5

Net income
151.7

 
143.6

 
96.1

 
21.6

 
26.5

Other comprehensive income (loss)
2.8

 
0.7

 
(1.8
)
 
(0.6
)
 
(0.7
)
Total comprehensive income
154.5

 
144.3

 
94.3

 
21.0

 
25.8

Earnings per share
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
$
1.38

 
$
1.31

 
$
0.90

 
$
0.22

 
$
0.26

Diluted
$
1.36

 
$
1.28

 
$
0.86

 
$
0.21

 
$
0.26

Weighted average number of shares outstanding
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
109,892,031
 
109,422,574
 
107,250,039
 
100,262,026
 
100,000,000

Diluted
111,168,788
 
111,767,584
 
111,519,238
 
102,023,196
 
101,692,301

CAD $ millions
March
29, 2020
 
March
31, 2019
 
March
31, 2018
 
March
31, 2017
 
March
31, 2016
Financial Position Information:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash
31.7

 
88.6

 
95.3

 
9.7

 
7.2

Net working capital (1)
327.1

 
188.0

 
72.1

 
89.2

 
97.5

Total assets
1,112.7

 
725.4

 
548.4

 
380.9

 
353.0

Total non-current liabilities
391.2

 
189.7

 
171.2

 
170.4

 
160.3

Shareholders' equity
520.2

 
399.1

 
243.6

 
146.1

 
142.7

(1) 
Net working capital is a non-IFRS financial measure. See “Non-IFRS Financial Measures” for a description of these measures.


-39-




CANADA GOOSE HOLDINGS INC.
MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
For the fourth quarter and year ended March 29, 2020
The following Management’s Discussion and Analysis (“MD&A”) for Canada Goose Holdings Inc. (“us,” “we,” “our,” “Canada Goose” or the “Company”) is dated June 2, 2020 and provides information concerning our results of operations and financial condition for the fourth quarter and year ended March 29, 2020 (“fiscal 2020”). You should read this MD&A together with our audited consolidated financial statements and the related notes for the year ended March 29, 2020 (“Annual Financial Statements”). Additional information about Canada Goose is available on our website at www.canadagoose.com, on the SEDAR website at www.sedar.com, and on the EDGAR section of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) website at www.sec.gov, including this Annual Report on Form 20-F.
CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD‑LOOKING STATEMENTS
This MD&A contains forward-looking statements. These statements are neither historical facts nor assurances of future performance. Instead, they are based on our current beliefs, expectations and assumptions regarding the future of our business, future plans and strategies, and other future conditions. Forward-looking statements can be identified by words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “envision,” “estimate,” “expect,” “forecast,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “predict,” “project,” “target,” “potential,” “will,” “would,” “could,” “should,” “continue,” “contemplate” and other similar expressions, although not all forward-looking statements contain these identifying words. These forward-looking statements include all matters that are not historical facts. They appear in many places throughout this MD&A and include statements regarding our intentions, beliefs or current expectations concerning, among other things, our results of operations, financial condition, liquidity, business prospects, growth, strategies, expectations regarding industry trends and the size and growth rates of addressable markets, our business plan and our growth strategies, including plans for expansion to new markets and new products, expectations for seasonal trends, and the industry in which we operate.
Certain assumptions made in preparing the forward-looking statements contained in this MD&A include:
our ability to continue operating our business amid the societal and economic disruption caused by the global COVID-19 (as defined below) pandemic;
our ability to implement our growth strategies;
our ability to maintain strong business relationships with our customers, suppliers, wholesalers and distributors;
our ability to keep pace with changing consumer preferences;
our ability to protect our intellectual property; and
the absence of material adverse changes in our industry or the global economy.

-40-




By their nature, forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties because they relate to events and depend on circumstances that may or may not occur in the future. We believe that these risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, those described in the “Risk Factors” section of our Annual Report and other risk factors described herein, which include, but are not limited to, the following risks:
global disruptions, including the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic significantly affecting numerous countries;
we may not be able to re-open our retail stores and our wholesale partners may not be able to re-open their retail stores by our peak selling season;
we may not open retail stores or expand e-commerce access on our planned timelines;
we may be unable to maintain the strength of our brand or to expand our brand to new products and geographies;
an economic downturn may further affect discretionary consumer spending;
we may not be able to satisfy changing consumer preferences;
our indebtedness may adversely affect our financial condition;
we may not be able to compete in our markets effectively;
we may not be able to manage our growth effectively;
poor performance during our peak season may affect our operating results for the full year;
global political events, including the impact of political disruptions in Hong Kong and recent protests in many North American cities;
our ability to maintain relationships with our select number of suppliers;
our ability to procure high quality raw materials and certain finished goods globally;
our ability to forecast our inventory needs;
we may be unable to protect or preserve our brand image and proprietary rights;
our ability to manage our product distribution through our wholesale partners and international distributors;
the success of our new store openings;
the success of our expansion into Greater China;
the success of our marketing programs;
our ability to manage our exposure to data security and cyber security events;
the risk our business is interrupted because of a disruption at our headquarters;
fluctuations in raw material costs, interest rates and currency exchange rates; and
we may be unable to maintain effective internal controls over financial reporting.
Although we base the forward-looking statements contained in this MD&A on assumptions that we believe are reasonable, we caution you that actual results and developments (including our results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the development of the industry in which we operate) may differ materially from those made in or suggested by the forward-looking statements contained in this MD&A. Additional impacts may arise that we are not aware of currently. The potential of such additional impacts intensifies the business and operating risks which we face, and these should be considered when reading the forward-looking statements contained in this

-41-




MD&A. In addition, even if results and developments are consistent with the forward-looking statements contained in this MD&A, those results and developments may not be indicative of results or developments in subsequent periods. As a result, any or all of our forward-looking statements in this MD&A may prove to be inaccurate. No forward-looking statement is a guarantee of future results. Moreover, we operate in a highly competitive and rapidly changing environment in which new risks often emerge. It is not possible for our management to predict all risks, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements we may make.
You should read this MD&A and the documents that we reference herein completely and with the understanding that our actual future results may be materially different from what we expect. The forward-looking statements contained herein are made as of the date of this MD&A, and we do not assume any obligation to update any forward-looking statements except as required by applicable laws.
BASIS OF PRESENTATION
The Annual Financial Statements are prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”) as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (“IASB”), and are presented in millions of Canadian dollars, except where otherwise indicated. Certain financial measures contained in this MD&A are non-IFRS financial measures and are discussed further under “Non-IFRS Financial Measures” below.
All references to “$”, “CAD” and “dollars” refer to Canadian dollars, “USD” and “US$” refer to U.S. dollars, “GBP” refer to British pounds sterling, “EUR” refer to euros, “CHF” refer to Swiss francs, “CNY” refer to Chinese yuan, ”RMB” refer to Chinese renminbi and “HKD” refer to Hong Kong dollars unless otherwise indicated. Certain totals, subtotals and percentages throughout this MD&A may not reconcile due to rounding. This MD&A and the accompanying Annual Financial Statements are presented in millions of Canadian dollars.
All references to “fiscal 2018” are to the Company’s year ended March 31, 2018; to “fiscal 2019” are to the Company’s year ended March 31, 2019; to “fiscal 2020” are to the Company’s year ended March 29, 2020; and to “fiscal 2021” are to the Company’s year ending March 28, 2021.
CHANGE IN FISCAL YEAR EFFECTIVE APRIL 1, 2019
Effective April 1, 2019, the Company changed its fiscal year from a calendar basis of twelve months ended March 31 to a 52 or 53-week reporting cycle with the fiscal year ending on the Sunday closest to March 31. Each fiscal quarter is 13 weeks. The additional week in a 53 week fiscal year is added to the fourth quarter. The Company's first 53 week fiscal year will occur in 2022. Fiscal 2020 comprises four fiscal quarters ending on June 30, 2019, September 29, 2019, December 29, 2019 and March 29, 2020. The Company has not adjusted financial results for quarters prior to fiscal 2020. In the Annual Financial Statements and in this MD&A, the term "fourth quarter ended March 29, 2020" refers to the 13 week period ended March 29, 2020 (91 days) and the term “fourth quarter ended March 31, 2019” refers to the three months ended March 31, 2019 (90 days). The term "year ended March 29, 2020” refers to the 52-week period ended March 29, 2020 (364 days), the term “year ended March 31, 2019” refers to the twelve months ended March 31, 2019 (365 days), and the term “year ended March 31, 2018” refers to the twelve months ended March 31, 2018 (365 days).

-42-




SUMMARY OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE
The following table summarizes results of operations for the years ended March 29, 2020, March 31, 2019 and March 31, 2018 and the fourth quarters ended March 29, 2020 and March 31, 2019, and expresses the percentage relationship to revenues of certain financial statement captions. See “Results of Operations” for additional details and for the comparison discussions between the years ended March 29, 2020 and March 31, 2019. For the comparison discussions between the years ended March 31, 2019 and March 31, 2018, please refer to Item 5. “Operating and Financial Review and Prospects” of our Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended March 31, 2019, filed with the SEC on May 29, 2019.
CAD $ millions (except per share data)
For the year ended
 
For the fourth quarter ended
March
29, 2020
March
31, 2019
March
31, 2018
 
March
29, 2020
March
31, 2019
Statement of Operations data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenue
958.1

830.5

591.2

 
140.9

156.2

Gross profit
593.3

516.8

347.6

 
93.6

102.4

Gross margin
61.9
%
62.2
%
58.8
%
 
66.4
 %
65.6
%
Operating income
192.1

196.7

138.1

 
(17.2
)
11.7

Net income
151.7

143.6

96.1

 
2.5

9.0

Earnings per share
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
$
1.38

$
1.31

$
0.90

 
$
0.02

$
0.08

Diluted
$
1.36

$
1.28

$
0.86

 
$
0.02

$
0.08

Other data:(1)
 
 
 
 
 
 
EBIT
192.1

196.7

138.1

 
(17.2
)
11.7

Adjusted EBIT
207.4

206.9

136.4

 
(9.7
)
13.0

Adjusted EBIT margin
21.6
%
24.9
%
23.1
%
 
(6.9
)%
8.3
%
Adjusted net income (loss)
147.2

151.6

94.1

 
(13.3
)
10.0

Adjusted net income (loss) per basic share
$
1.34

$
1.39

$
0.88

 
$
(0.12
)
$
0.09

Adjusted net income (loss) per diluted share
$
1.32

$
1.36

$
0.84

 
$
(0.12
)
$
0.09

CAD $ millions
March
29, 2020
 
March
31, 2019
 
March
31, 2018
Financial Position:
 
 
 
 
 
Cash
31.7

 
88.6

 
95.3

Net working capital (1)
327.1

 
188.0

 
72.1

Total assets
1,112.7

 
725.4

 
548.4

Total non-current liabilities
391.2

 
189.7

 
171.2

Shareholders' equity
520.2

 
399.1

 
243.6

(1) 
EBIT, adjusted EBIT, adjusted EBIT margin, adjusted net income (loss), adjusted net income (loss) per basic and diluted share, and net working capital are non-IFRS financial measures. See “Non-IFRS Financial Measures” for a description of these measures and a reconciliation to the nearest IFRS measure.

-43-




Segments
Canada Goose reporting segments align with our sales channels: Direct-to-Consumer (“DTC”), Wholesale, and Other. We measure each reportable operating segment’s performance based on revenue and operating income. Our DTC segment includes sales to customers through our 13 national e-commerce markets and 20 directly operated retail stores across North America, Europe, and Asia. Through our wholesale segment, we sell to a mix of retailers, including major luxury department stores, outdoor specialty stores, individual shops, and to international distributors.
In the fourth quarter of fiscal 2020, the Company revised the previous Unallocated segment to the Other segment. The Other segment includes sales and costs not directly allocated to the DTC or Wholesale channels, such as sales to employees and selling, general and administrative expenses not directly allocated to the DTC or Wholesale segments. The Other segment includes the cost of marketing expenditures to build brand awareness across all segments, corporate costs in support of manufacturing operations, other corporate costs and foreign exchange gains and losses not specifically associated with DTC or Wholesale segment operations. It also includes overhead costs resulting from the temporary closure of our manufacturing facilities in March 2020 due to COVID-19. Comparative information has been restated to conform with the presentation adopted in the current year.
Factors Affecting our Performance
We believe that our performance depends on many factors including those discussed below.
COVID-19 pandemic. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is significantly affecting countries in which we operate. The measures aimed at limiting its expansion include government orders that require the closure of non-essential businesses and people to remain at home in Canada, the United States, and in many other countries globally. In February 2020, we temporarily reduced operating hours for all of our retail locations in Mainland China. Although normal operating hours for these locations were restored in April 2020, with precautionary health measures in place, traffic trends remain below pre-pandemic levels. Reduced operating hours put in place for our retail locations in Hong Kong as of April 2020 currently remain in effect. In March 2020, we temporarily closed all of our retail locations in North America and Europe as well as our North American manufacturing facilities. Other than our retail locations in Montreal, Canada, Paris, France and Milan, Italy, these retail locations currently remain closed. Further openings are being evaluated on a staged region-by-region basis, based on regulatory guidelines and supporting traffic trends as well as the health and safety of employee and guests. In April 2020, we partially reopened our eight manufacturing facilities across Canada for the domestic production of personal protective equipment (“PPE”). We have also experienced a significant reduction to wholesale shipments due to COVID-19 disruptions to partner operations. We expect these circumstances to have significant adverse consequences on our results of operations for the first quarter of fiscal 2021 and these circumstances are likely to negatively impact future fiscal periods as disruptions and prolonged consequences associated with the COVID-19 pandemic continue. Prolonged disruptions could also affect our ability to procure raw materials and certain finished goods globally and have delayed and may further delay or reduce our DTC expansion plans.
During fiscal 2020, we created an inventory buffer ahead of demand and to support the planned rationalization of third-party manufacturing capacity as we move more production in-house. These elevated finished goods inventory levels enable the Company to conserve cash and meet demand in the short-term as stores re-open and we undertake a staggered and gradual resumption of production.
In addition, our liquidity position is enhanced by available borrowing capacity, the calculation of which includes inventory, from our senior secured asset-based revolving credit facility (the

-44-




“Revolving Facility”) and the uncommitted loan facility in China (the “Short-term Borrowings”). As of May 26, 2020, the Revolving Facility also includes the first-in, last-out revolving facility (“FILO Revolving Facility”). Refer to the “Financial Condition, Liquidity and Capital Resources” and “Subsequent Events” sections of this MD&A for additional details.
Global political events and other disruptions. We are conscious of risks related to social, economic and political instability, including geopolitical tensions, regulatory matters, market volatility and social unrest that are affecting consumer spending in certain countries and travel corridors. We have been, and may in the future, be impacted by widespread protests such as the political disruptions in Hong Kong which began in 2019 and the recent protests that have occurred in many North American cities. The events in Hong Kong have severely impacted the level of tourism in the region, retail traffic in its public spaces, and store operating hours, negatively affecting our retail store performance and our Greater China expansion strategy. Moreover, tourists and other travelers from Greater China account for an important portion of the global demand for luxury products, including premium outerwear. To the extent that such disruptions persist, we expect that our operations and traffic at our retail stores will continue to be impacted in Hong Kong, and may also be impacted in certain North American cities.
Market development. Our market development strategy has been a key driver of our recent revenue growth and we plan to continue to execute our global expansion strategy, though such expansion has been delayed and may be delayed further due to COVID-19. Across our various markets, we intend to continue increasing brand awareness and activating local markets while expanding our distribution globally.
Growth in our DTC Channel. We intend to continue expanding retail and e-commerce access globally, though such expansion has been delayed and may be delayed further due to COVID-19. This is expected to further alter the seasonality of our financial performance, as customers tend to purchase goods in retail stores and on e-commerce sites at a higher rate in our third and fourth fiscal quarters, compared to the wholesale channel, where products are primarily delivered to wholesale partners in the second and third quarters ahead of their peak selling season.
New Products. We intend to continue investing in innovation and the development and introduction of new products across styles, uses and climates. This includes our Fall/Winter and Spring collections of parkas, lightweight down jackets, rainwear, windwear, knitwear and accessories. Additionally, in connection with the acquisition of the business of Baffin Inc. (the “Baffin Vendor”), in November 2018 (the “Baffin acquisition”), we continue to sell Baffin branded footwear through Baffin’s own distinct sales channels. We are also planning to develop a separate Canada Goose footwear offering in the medium to longer term, leveraging Baffin’s infrastructure, processes and technology. We expect that certain new products may carry a lower gross margin per unit relative to our long-standing styles which are produced in significantly higher volumes.

-45-




Seasonality. We experience seasonal fluctuations in our revenue and operating results and have historically realized a significant portion of our annual wholesale revenue during our second and third fiscal quarters, and our annual DTC revenue in our third and fourth fiscal quarters. We generated 77.9%, 75.8%, and 74.2% of our consolidated revenues in the combined second and third fiscal quarters of fiscal 2020, fiscal 2019, and fiscal 2018, respectively. Because of seasonal fluctuations in revenue and fixed costs associated with our business, particularly the headcount growth and premises costs associated with our expanding DTC channel, we typically experience negative and substantially reduced net income and adjusted EBIT(1) in the first and fourth quarters, respectively. As a result of our seasonality, changes that impact gross margin and adjusted EBIT(1) can have a disproportionate impact on the quarterly results when they are recorded in our off-peak revenue periods.
(1) 
Adjusted EBIT is a non-IFRS measure. See “Non-IFRS Financial Measures” for a description of these measures.
Guided by expected demand and wholesale orders, we have manufactured on a linear basis throughout the fiscal year. Net working capital requirements typically increase as inventory builds. We finance these needs through a combination of cash on hand and borrowings on the Revolving Facility and the Short-term Borrowings. Cash flows from operations are typically highest in the third and fourth fiscal quarters of the fiscal year due to revenue from the DTC channel and the collection of receivables from wholesale revenue earlier in the year.
Developments in international trade. We continue to prepare for the impact on our operations in Europe and the U.K. as a result of the British exit from the European Union (“Brexit”). We do not expect any consequences, positive or negative, emanating from the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (“USMCA”). The Company continues to benefit from reduced tariffs on certain of our products imported into Europe under the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (“CETA”) which entered into force provisionally on September 21, 2017 and is pending ratification by certain EU countries. We monitor developments in international trade in countries where we operate that could have an impact on our business.
Foreign Exchange. We sell a significant portion of our products to customers outside of Canada, which exposes us to fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates. In fiscal years 2020, 2019, and 2018, we generated 62.3%, 58.0%, and 53.7%, respectively, of our revenue in currencies other than Canadian dollars. Historically, most of our wholesale revenue was derived from orders made prior to the beginning of the fiscal year. This high degree of visibility into our anticipated future cash flows from wholesale operations is now less certain given the current economic environment. Most of our raw materials are sourced outside of Canada, primarily in U.S. dollars, and selling, general, and administrative (“SG&A”) expenses are typically denominated in the currency of the country in which they are incurred. As part of our risk management program, we have entered into foreign exchange derivative contracts to manage certain of our exposures to exchange rate fluctuations for future foreign currency transactions, which is intended to reduce the variability of our operating costs and future cash flows denominated in local currencies. We continue to monitor our risk management program to take into account the prevailing global uncertainty of COVID-19.
We are exposed to translation and transaction risks associated with foreign currency exchange fluctuations on the Chinese renminbi denominated principal and interest amounts payable on our Short-term Borrowings and U.S. dollar denominated principal and interest amounts payable on our Revolving Facility and senior secured term loan facility (the “Term Loan Facility”). The Company has entered into foreign exchange cross-currency swap and forward contracts to hedge a portion of the exposure to foreign currency exchange and interest rate risk on the

-46-




principal amount of the Term Loan Facility. See “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk - Foreign Exchange Risk” below.
The main foreign currency exchange rates that impact our business and operations as at and for the year ended March 29, 2020 and for the year ended March 31, 2019 are summarized below:
 
Foreign currency exchange rate to $1.00 CAD
 
Fiscal 2020
 
Average Rate
Closing Rate
Currency
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
2020
March
29, 2020
USD/CAD
1.3375

1.3206

1.3200

1.3442

1.3306

1.4056

EUR/CAD
1.5032

1.4677

1.4617

1.4811

1.4784

1.5525

GBP/CAD
1.7190

1.6280

1.7004

1.7185

1.6915

1.7353

CHF/CAD
1.3345

1.3394

1.3338

1.3887

1.3491

1.4666

CNY/CAD
0.1960

0.1882

0.1874

0.1925

0.1910

0.1981

HKD/CAD
0.1706

0.1687

0.1687

0.1730

0.1702

0.1813

 
Foreign currency exchange rate to $1.00 CAD
 
Fiscal 2019
 
Average Rate
Closing Rate
Currency
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
2019
March
31, 2019
USD/CAD
1.2912

1.3069

1.3214

1.3292

1.3122

1.3363

EUR/CAD
1.5390

1.5204

1.5080

1.5094

1.5192

1.5002

GBP/CAD
1.7567

1.7039

1.6992

1.7315

1.7228

1.7418

CHF/CAD
1.3108

1.3291

1.3274

1.3329

1.3251

1.3421

CNY/CAD
0.2024

0.1920

0.1911

0.1970

0.1956

0.1991

HKD/CAD
0.1645

0.1666

0.1688

0.1694

0.1673

0.1702

Source: Bank of Canada
IFRS 16 Impact on Results of Operations
The adoption of IFRS 16, Leases replacing IAS 17, Leases has had a significant impact on certain financial metrics in fiscal 2020. The Company adopted the standard on April 1, 2019 using the modified retrospective approach with the cumulative effect of initial application recorded in opening retained earnings. Prior year results have not been restated, as permitted by the standard.
Under IFRS 16, depreciation expense on right-of-use assets and interest expense on lease liabilities replace rent expense, which was previously recognized under IAS 17 on a straight-line basis in operating income over the term of a lease. Depreciation is recognized on a straight-line basis while interest expense declines over the lease term. Compared to the previous standard, lease-related expenses are higher in the earlier years as interest expense is recognized on an amortized cost basis, and lower in the later years of the lease term.

-47-




The following table presents our results of operations for the year ended March 29, 2020, both including and excluding the impacts of IFRS 16, compared with reported results for the year ended March 31, 2019, without restatement and as reported under IAS 17. Basis points (“bps”) expresses the change between percentages.
 
For the year ended March 29, 2020
 
 
 
 
For the year ended March 29, 2020
 
For the year ended March 31, 2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CAD $ millions (except per share data)
 As reported (IFRS 16)
 
IFRS 16 Impact
 
Excluding IFRS 16(1)
 
 As reported (IAS 17)
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
Depreciation and interest
Rent expense
 
 
 
 
Revenue
958.1

 
 
 
 
958.1

 
830.5

 
127.6

 
15.4%
Cost of sales
364.8

 
(4.8
)
5.8

 
365.8

 
313.7

 
(52.1
)
 
(16.6)%
Gross profit
593.3

 
 
 
 
592.3

 
516.8

 
75.5

 
14.6%
Gross margin
61.9
%
 
 
 
 
61.8
%
 
62.2
%
 
 
 
(40) bps
Selling, general and administrative expenses
350.5

 

32.1

 
382.6

 
302.1

 
(80.5
)
 
(26.6)%
SG&A expenses as % of revenue
36.6
%
 
 
 
 
39.9
%
 
36.4
%
 
 
 
(350) bps
Depreciation and amortization
50.7

 
(28.2
)

 
22.5

 
18.0

 
(4.5
)
 
(25.0)%
Operating income
192.1

 
 
 
 
187.2

 
196.7

 
(9.5
)
 
(4.8)%
Operating margin
20.1
%
 
 
 
 
19.5
%
 
23.7
%
 
 
 
(420) bps
Net interest and other finance costs
28.4

 
(8.4
)

 
20.0

 
14.2

 
(5.8
)
 
(40.8)%
Income before income taxes
163.7

 
 
 
 
167.2

 
182.5

 
(15.3
)
 
(8.4)%
Income tax expense
12.0

 
 
 
 
12.2

 
38.9

 
26.7

 
68.6%
Effective tax rate
7.3
%
 
 
 
 
7.3
%
 
21.3
%
 
 
 
1,400 bps
Net income
151.7

 
 
 
 
155.0

 
143.6

 
11.4

 
7.9%
Earnings per share
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
$
1.38

 
 
 
 
$
1.41

 
$
1.31

 
0.10

 
7.6%
Diluted
$
1.36

 
 
 
 
$
1.40

 
$
1.28

 
0.12

 
9.4%
Other data:(2)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adjusted net income
147.2

 
 
 
 
149.1

 
151.6

 
(2.5
)
 
(1.6)%
Adjusted net income per basic share
$
1.34

 
 
 
 
$
1.36

 
$
1.39

 
(0.03
)
 
(2.2)%
Adjusted net income per diluted share
$
1.32

 
 
 
 
$
1.34

 
$
1.36

 
(0.02
)
 
(1.5)%
(1) 
Presented using IAS 17, as if IFRS 16 had not been adopted, for comparative purposes only.
(2) 
Adjusted net income, and adjusted net income per basic and diluted share are non-IFRS measures. See “Non-IFRS Financial Measures” for a description of these measures and a reconciliation to the nearest IFRS measure.

-48-




The following table presents our results of operations for the fourth quarter ended March 29, 2020, both including and excluding the impacts of IFRS 16, compared with reported results for the fourth quarter ended March 31, 2019, without restatement and as reported under IAS 17.
 
For the fourth quarter ended March 29, 2020
 
 
 
 
For the fourth quarter ended March 29, 2020
 
For the fourth quarter ended March 31, 2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CAD $ millions (except per share data)
 As reported (IFRS 16)
 
IFRS 16 Impact
 
Excluding IFRS 16(1)
 
 As reported (IAS 17)
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
Depreciation and interest
Rent expense
 
 
 
 
Revenue
140.9

 
 
 
 
140.9

 
156.2

 
(15.3
)
 
(9.8)%
Cost of sales
47.3

 
(1.3
)
1.6

 
47.6

 
53.8

 
6.2

 
11.5%
Gross profit
93.6

 
 
 
 
93.3

 
102.4

 
(9.1
)
 
(8.9)%
Gross margin
66.4
 %
 
 
 
 
66.2
 %
 
65.6
 %
 
 
 
60 bps
Selling, general and administrative expenses
95.9

 

8.7

 
104.6

 
85.0

 
(19.6
)
 
(23.1)%
SG&A expenses as % of revenue
68.1
 %
 
 
 
 
74.2
 %
 
54.4
 %
 
 
 
(1,980) bps
Depreciation and amortization
14.9

 
(7.8
)

 
7.1

 
5.7

 
(1.4
)
 
(24.6)%
Operating income
(17.2
)
 
 
 
 
(18.4
)
 
11.7

 
(30.1
)
 
(257.3)%
Operating margin
(12.2
)%
 
 
 
 
(13.1
)%
 
7.5
 %
 
 
 
(2,060) bps
Net interest and other finance costs
4.5

 
(2.1
)

 
2.4

 
3.1

 
0.7

 
22.6%
(Loss) income before income taxes
(21.7
)
 
 
 
 
(20.8
)
 
8.6

 
(29.4
)
 
(341.9)%
Income tax (recovery) expense
(24.2
)
 
 
 
 
(23.1
)
 
(0.4
)
 
22.7

 
5,675.0%
Effective tax rate
111.5
 %
 
 
 
 
111.5
 %
 
(5.1
)%
 
 
 
(11,660) bps
Net income
2.5

 
 
 
 
2.3

 
9.0

 
(6.7
)
 
(74.4)%
Earnings per share
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
$
0.02

 
 
 
 
$
0.02

 
$
0.08

 
(0.06
)
 
(75.0)%
Diluted
$
0.02

 
 
 
 
$
0.02

 
$
0.08

 
(0.06
)
 
(75.0)%
Other data:(2)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adjusted net loss
(13.3
)
 
 
 
 
(14.5
)
 
10.0

 
(24.5
)
 
(245.0)%
Adjusted net loss per basic share
$
(0.12
)
 
 
 
 
$
(0.13
)
 
$
0.09

 
(0.22
)
 
(244.4)%
Adjusted net loss per diluted share
$
(0.12
)
 
 
 
 
$
(0.13
)
 
$
0.09

 
(0.22
)
 
(244.4)%
(1) 
Presented using IAS 17, as if IFRS 16 had not been adopted, for comparative purposes only.
(2) 
Adjusted net (loss) income, and adjusted net (loss) income per basic and diluted share are non-IFRS measures. See “Non-IFRS Financial Measures” for a description of these measures and a reconciliation to the nearest IFRS measure.
Income for the year and fourth quarter ended March 29, 2020, excluding IFRS 16 compared to income as reported
To explain the impact of the initial application of IFRS 16 and facilitate comparison with the results for the year and fourth quarter ended March 31, 2019 without restatement of the prior year, the Company has presented its results of operations for the year and fourth quarter ended March 29, 2020 on the basis of the previous accounting standard.

-49-




Under both approaches, changes in financial performance are the result of the growth in business activity; the results for the current year measured in terms of earnings per share and adjusted net income per basic share, and the change between years, are not significantly different, although the cost of leasing is accounted for differently. Lease related costs are characterized as rent under the previous standard and as depreciation and interest expense under IFRS 16, and are included in different components of the financial results.
Elsewhere in this MD&A, the Company compares the reported financial results under IFRS 16 with the reported financial results for the prior year without restatement. Changes as a result of the change in lease accounting are explained for the income statement components that are affected.
See “Changes in Accounting Policies” below, for further details on the impact from adopting this standard.
Components of Our Results of Operations
Revenue
DTC revenue comprises sales through our e-commerce operations and retail stores. Revenue through e-commerce operations and retail stores is recognized upon delivery of the goods to the customer and when consideration is received, net of an estimated provision for sales returns.
Wholesale revenue comprises sales to third party resellers, which includes retailers and distributors of our products. Wholesale revenue from the sale of goods, net of an estimated provision for sales returns, discounts and allowances, is recognized when the control of the goods has been transferred to the reseller, which, depending on the terms of the agreement with the reseller, occurs when the products have been shipped to the reseller, are picked up from our third party warehouse, or arrive at the reseller’s facilities.
Other revenue comprises sales not directly allocated to the DTC or wholesale channels, such as sales to employees.
Gross Profit
Gross profit is our revenue less cost of sales. Cost of sales comprises the cost of manufacturing our products, including raw materials, direct labour and overhead, plus freight, duties and non-refundable taxes incurred in delivering the goods to distribution centres managed by third parties or to our retail stores. It also includes costs incurred in our production, design and merchandise departments, depreciation on our manufacturing right-of-use assets and plant assets as well as rent expense related to our manufacturing facilities (in prior fiscal years), inventory provisions, and allowances related to obsolescence and shrinkage. The primary drivers of our cost of sales are the costs of raw materials (which are sourced in both Canadian dollars and U.S. dollars), manufacturing labour rates in the provinces of Canada, and the allocation of overhead. Gross margin measures our gross profit as a percentage of revenue. Inventory acquired in connection with the Baffin acquisition (November 2018) was recorded at its fair value, measured as net realizable value, less costs to sell. As the opening inventory has been sold, the gross profit otherwise recognized without the inventory valuation adjustment has been reduced by the associated gross profit and gross margin.

-50-




SG&A Expenses
SG&A expenses consist of selling costs to support our customer relationships and to deliver our products to our e-commerce customers, retail stores and wholesale partners. It also includes our marketing and brand investment activities and the corporate infrastructure required to support our ongoing operations. Foreign exchange gains and losses are recorded in SG&A and comprise the translation of assets and liabilities denominated in currencies other than the functional currency of the Company or its subsidiaries, including cash balances, the Short-term Borrowings, the Term Loan Facility, a portion of our Revolving Facility, mark-to-market adjustments on derivative contracts, gains or losses associated with our term loan hedges, and realized gains on settlement of foreign currency denominated assets and liabilities.
Selling costs, other than headcount-related costs, generally correlate to revenue timing and therefore experience similar seasonal trends. As a percentage of sales, we expect these selling costs to change as our business evolves. This change has been and is expected to be primarily driven by the expansion of our retail network, including the investment required to support e-commerce sites and retail stores. Retail store costs are mostly fixed and are incurred throughout the year.
General and administrative expenses represent costs incurred in our corporate offices, primarily related to marketing, personnel costs (including salaries, variable incentive compensation, benefits, and share-based compensation), technology support, and other professional service costs required to support our ongoing operations. We have invested considerably in this area to support the growing volume and complexity of our business and anticipate continuing to do so in the future.
Depreciation and amortization
Depreciation and amortization represent the economic benefit incurred in using the Company’s property, plant and equipment, and intangible assets and, beginning in fiscal 2020, right-of-use assets.
Operating Income
Operating income is our gross profit less SG&A expenses and depreciation and amortization.
Net Interest and Other Finance Costs
Net interest and other finance costs represents interest expense on our borrowings including the Short-term Borrowings, the Revolving Facility, the Term Loan Facility, and, beginning in fiscal 2020, lease liabilities, as well as standby fees, net of interest income.
Income Taxes
We are subject to income taxes in the jurisdictions in which we operate and, consequently, income tax expense is a function of the allocation of taxable income by jurisdiction and the various activities that impact the timing of taxable events. The primary regions that determine the effective tax rate are Canada, Switzerland, the U.S., the U.K., Greater China, France, and Italy.

-51-




RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
For the year ended March 29, 2020 compared to the year ended March 31, 2019
The following table summarizes results of operations and expresses the percentage relationship to revenue of certain financial statement captions.
CAD $ millions
(except share and per share data)
For the year ended
 
$ Change
 
% Change
March
29, 2020
 
March
31, 2019
 
 
Statement of Income data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenue
958.1

 
830.5

 
127.6

 
15.4%
Cost of sales
364.8

 
313.7

 
(51.1
)
 
(16.3)%
Gross profit
593.3

 
516.8

 
76.5

 
14.8%
Gross margin
61.9
%
 
62.2
%
 
 
 
(30) bps
Selling, general and administrative expenses
350.5

 
302.1

 
(48.4
)
 
(16.0)%
SG&A expenses as % of revenue
36.6
%
 
36.4
%
 
 
 
(20) bps
Depreciation and amortization
50.7

 
18.0

 
(32.7
)
 
(181.7)%
Operating income
192.1

 
196.7

 
(4.6
)
 
(2.3)%
Operating margin
20.1
%
 
23.7
%
 
 
 
(360) bps
Net interest and other finance costs
28.4

 
14.2

 
(14.2
)
 
(100.0)%
Income before income taxes
163.7

 
182.5

 
(18.8
)
 
(10.3)%
Income tax expense
12.0

 
38.9

 
26.9

 
69.2%
Effective tax rate
7.3
%
 
21.3
%
 
 
 
1,400 bps
Net income
151.7

 
143.6

 
8.1

 
5.6%
Other comprehensive income
2.8

 
0.7

 
2.1

 
300.0%
Comprehensive income
154.5

 
144.3

 
10.2

 
7.1%
Earnings per share
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
$
1.38

 
$
1.31

 
0.07

 
5.3%
Diluted
$
1.36

 
$
1.28

 
0.08

 
6.3%
Weighted average number of shares outstanding
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
109,892,031

 
109,422,574

 
 
 
 
Diluted
111,168,788

 
111,767,584

 
 
 
 
Other data:(1)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
EBIT
192.1

 
196.7

 
(4.6
)
 
2.3%
Adjusted EBIT
207.4

 
206.9

 
0.5

 
0.2%
Adjusted EBIT margin
21.6
%
 
24.9
%
 
 
 
(330) bps
Adjusted net income
147.2

 
151.6

 
(4.4
)
 
(2.9)%
Adjusted net income per basic share
$
1.34

 
$
1.39

 
(0.05
)
 
(3.6)%
Adjusted net income per diluted share
$
1.32

 
$
1.36

 
(0.04
)
 
(2.9)%
(1) 
EBIT, adjusted EBIT, adjusted EBIT margin, adjusted net income, and adjusted net income per basic and diluted share are non-IFRS measures. See “Non-IFRS Financial Measures” for a description of these measures and a reconciliation to the nearest IFRS measure.

-52-




Revenue
Revenue for the year ended March 29, 2020 increased by $127.6m, or 15.4%, to $958.1m from $830.5m for the year ended March 31, 2019. On a constant currency(1) basis, revenue increased by 15.9% for the year ended March 29, 2020 compared to the year ended March 31, 2019. Revenue generated from our DTC channel represented 54.8% of total revenue for the year ended March 29, 2020 compared to 51.9% for the year ended March 31, 2019.
 
For the year ended
 
$ Change
 
% Change
CAD $ millions
March
29, 2020
 
March
31, 2019
 
As reported
 
Foreign exchange impact
 
In constant currency(1)
 
As reported
 
In constant currency
DTC
525.0

 
431.3

 
93.7

 
2.7

 
96.4

 
21.7
%
 
22.4
%
Wholesale
424.0

 
394.7

 
29.3

 
1.9

 
31.2

 
7.4
%
 
7.9
%
Other
9.1

 
4.5

 
4.6

 
0.1

 
4.7

 
102.2
%
 
104.4
%
Total revenue
958.1

 
830.5

 
127.6

 
4.7

 
132.3

 
15.4
%
 
15.9
%
(1) 
Constant currency revenue is a non-IFRS financial measure. See “Non-IFRS Financial Measures” for a description of this measure.
DTC
Revenue from our DTC channel for the year ended March 29, 2020 was $525.0m compared to $431.3m for the year ended March 31, 2019. The increase of $93.7m was driven by the incremental revenue from new retail stores that were not open in the year ended March 31, 2019. Revenues were negatively impacted by political disruptions in Hong Kong and global COVID-19 disruptions in the third and fourth quarters of fiscal 2020, respectively. These matters resulted in lower levels of tourism, retail traffic, and consumer spending, in addition to frequent reductions to regular store operating hours and unplanned store closures, all impacting revenue.
Wholesale
Revenue from our wholesale channel for the year ended March 29, 2020 was $424.0m compared to $394.7m for the year ended March 31, 2019. The increase of $29.3m was driven by incremental revenue contributed by Baffin, which was acquired in November 2018, higher pricing, and higher order values from international distributors. This was partially offset by a significant reduction to shipments in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2020 due to COVID-19 disruptions to partner operations.
Other
Revenue from our other channel for the year ended March 29, 2020 was $9.1m compared to $4.5m for the year ended March 31, 2019 due to higher sales to employees.

-53-




Revenue by geography
 
For the year ended
 
$ Change
 
% Change
CAD $ millions
March
29, 2020
 
March
31, 2019
 
As reported
 
Foreign exchange impact
 
In constant currency(1)
 
As reported
 
In constant currency(1)
Canada
293.1

 
293.3

 
(0.2
)
 

 
(0.2
)
 
(0.1
)%