Company Quick10K Filing
GrowGeneration
Closing Price ($) Shares Out (MM) Market Cap ($MM)
$0.00 36 $121
10-K 2020-03-27 Annual: 2019-12-31
10-Q 2019-11-12 Quarter: 2019-09-30
10-Q 2019-08-08 Quarter: 2019-06-30
10-Q 2019-05-07 Quarter: 2019-03-31
10-K 2019-04-01 Annual: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-11-09 Quarter: 2018-09-30
10-Q 2018-08-14 Quarter: 2018-06-30
10-Q 2018-05-15 Quarter: 2018-03-31
10-K 2018-03-27 Annual: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-11-08 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-Q 2017-08-02 Quarter: 2017-06-30
10-Q 2017-05-15 Quarter: 2017-03-31
10-K 2017-03-31 Annual: 2016-12-31
10-Q 2016-11-14 Quarter: 2016-09-30
10-Q 2016-08-19 Quarter: 2016-06-30
8-K 2020-03-11 Amend Bylaw, Exhibits
8-K 2020-02-26 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2020-01-13 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-12-18 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-12-02 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2019-11-11 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-11-04 Officers, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-09-05 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-09-03 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-08-08 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-07-10 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-06-26 Sale of Shares, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-06-21 Officers
8-K 2019-05-16 Shareholder Vote, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-05-13 Enter Agreement, M&A, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-05-03 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-02-07 Enter Agreement, M&A, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-02-04 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-01-21 Enter Agreement, M&A, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-12-11 Regulation FD, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-10-23 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-10-16 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-09-14 Enter Agreement, M&A, Exhibits
8-K 2018-09-11 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-28 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-14 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-07-13 Enter Agreement, M&A, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-05-16 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-05-09 Sale of Shares, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-04-20 Shareholder Vote, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-04-12 Enter Agreement, M&A, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-04-09 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-03-12 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-01-30 Enter Agreement, M&A, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-01-23 Enter Agreement, M&A, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-01-16 Officers, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-01-08 Sale of Shares, Regulation FD, Exhibits
GRWG 2019-12-31
Part I
Item 1. Business
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 2. Properties
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Part II
Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6. Selected Financial Data
Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Item 9. Changes and Disagreement with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures
Item 9B. Other Information.
Part III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11. Executive Compensation
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services
Part IV
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules
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EX-10.30 f10k2019ex10-30_growgen.htm
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EX-21.1 f10k2019ex21-1_growgen.htm
EX-23.1 f10k2019ex23-1_growgen.htm
EX-31.1 ex31_1.htm
EX-31.2 ex31_2.htm
EX-32.1 ex32_1.htm
EX-32.2 ex32_2.htm
EX-99.1 f10k2019ex99-1_growgen.htm
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GrowGeneration Earnings 2019-12-31

GRWG 10K Annual Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

Comparables ($MM TTM)
Ticker M Cap Assets Liab Rev G Profit Net Inc EBITDA EV G Margin EV/EBITDA ROA
RCAR 126 15 0 0 0 -2 -2 112 -55.0 -14%
WMIH 125 18,405 16,727 1,583 0 1,637 2,337 -424 0% -0.2 9%
DBP 124 116 0 0 0 7 7 124 18.8 6%
XCUR 124 20 9 1 0 -21 -20 112 0% -5.6 -102%
MYLI 123 0 1 0 0 -1 -1 123 0% -158.3 -1,698%
NMUS 123 3 15 0 0 -7 -7 120 -18.0 -233%
CWAY 122 835 761 0 0 3 12 72 6.2 0%
STDY 122 28 24 0 0 -17 -17 101 0% -6.0 -61%
AMPY 122 723 318 286 0 64 114 278 0% 2.4 9%
GRWG 121 60 13 50 13 -2 -1 103 26% -76.4 -3%

10-K 1 f10k2019_growgeneration.htm ANNUAL REPORT

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

☒ ANNUAL REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the Fiscal year ended December 31, 2019

 

OR

 

☐ TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from _________ to __________

 

Commission File Number 333-207889

 

GROWGENERATION CORP.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Colorado   46-5008129
(State or Other Jurisdiction of   (I.R.S. Employer
Incorporation or Organization)   Identification No.)
     

1000 W Mississippi Ave

Denver, Colorado

  80223
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)   (Zip Code)

 

(800) 935-8420

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: 

Title of each class   Trading symbol   Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, par value $0.001 per share   GRWG   The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: 

Title of class

Not Applicable

 

Not Applicable

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

  

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ☐ No ☒

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act during the past 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).  Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ☒

 

 Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

  Large accelerated filer Accelerated filer                         
  Non-accelerated filer Smaller reporting company    
      Emerging Growth Company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐  No ☒

 

State the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was last sold, or the average bid and asked price of such common equity, as of June 30, 2019: $90,776,147.

 

As of March 26, 2020, the Company had 38,135,408 shares of its common stock issued and outstanding, par value $0.001 per share.

  

 Document Incorporated by Reference

 

Portions of a definitive proxy relating to the registrant’s 2020 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days after the close of the fiscal year covered by this Form 10-K, are incorporated into Part III of this Form 10-K. 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

    Page
  PART I  
     
Item 1. Business 1
Item 1A. Risk Factors 6
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments 9
Item 2. Properties 9
Item 3. Legal Proceedings 9
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 9
     
  PART II  
     
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities 10
Item 6. Selected Financial Data 11
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 12
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 20
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data F-1
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure 21
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures 21
Item 9B. Other Information 21
     
  PART III  
     
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance 22
Item 11. Executive Compensation 24
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management   and Related Stockholder Matters 24
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence 24
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services 24
     
  PART IV  
     
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules 25
     
Signatures 29

 

i

 

 

PART I

 

Forward-Looking Information

 

This Annual Report of GrowGeneration Corp.  on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements, particularly those identified with the words, “anticipates,” “believes,” “expects,” “plans,” “intends,” “objectives,” and similar expressions. These statements reflect management’s best judgment based on factors known at the time of such statements. The reader may find discussions containing such forward-looking statements in the material set forth under “Management’s Discussion and Analysis and Plan of Operations,” generally, and specifically therein under the captions “Liquidity and Capital Resources” as well as elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Actual events or results may differ materially from those discussed herein. The forward-looking statements specified in the following information have been compiled by our management on the basis of assumptions made by management and considered by management to be reasonable. Our future operating results, however, are impossible to predict and no representation, guaranty, or warranty is to be inferred from those forward-looking statements. The assumptions used for purposes of the forward-looking statements specified in the following information represent estimates of future events and are subject to uncertainty as to possible changes in economic, legislative, industry, and other circumstances. As a result, the identification and interpretation of data and other information and their use in developing and selecting assumptions from and among reasonable alternatives require the exercise of judgment. To the extent that the assumed events do not occur, the outcome may vary substantially from anticipated or projected results, and, accordingly, no opinion is expressed on the achievability of those forward-looking statements. No assurance can be given that any of the assumptions relating to the forward-looking statements specified in the following information are accurate, and we assume no obligation to update any such forward-looking statements.

 

Unless the context otherwise requires, the terms “we”, “our”, “ours” “us” and “GrowGeneration”, refer to GrowGeneration Corp. and its subsidiaries, including GrowGeneration Pueblo Corp, GrowGeneration California Corp., Grow Generation Nevada Corp., GrowGeneration Washington Corp., GrowGeneration Rhode Island Corp., GrowGeneration Michigan Corp, GrowGeneration Oklahoma Corp, GrowGeneration New England Corp, GrowGeneration Canada Corp, GrowGeneration HG Corp, GrowGeneration Hemp Corp, GGen Distribution Corp., GrowGeneration Management Corp., and GrowGeneration Florida Corp., on a combined basis.

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

 

Background

 

GrowGeneration Corp. (together with all of its wholly-owned subsidiaries, collectively “GrowGeneration” the “Company”) was incorporated in Colorado in 2014, and is the largest chain of hydroponic garden centers in North America and is a leading marketer and distributor of nutrients, growing media, advanced indoor and greenhouse lighting, ventilation systems and accessories for hydroponic gardening. As of March 27, 2020, the Company owns and operates a chain of twenty seven (27) retail and commercial hydroponic/gardening centers, with five (5) located in the state of Colorado, four (4) in the state of California, four (4) in the state of Michigan, two (2) in the state of Nevada, one (1) in the state of Washington, one (1) in the state of Oregon, four (4) in the State of Oklahoma, one (1) in the state of Rhode Island, three (3) in Maine, (1) in Florida, one (1) distribution center in California and an online e-commerce store, GrowGen.Pro. Our plan is to acquire, open and operate hydroponic/gardening centers and related businesses throughout the United States and Canada.

 

Today, our 27 centers operate in 10 states, each state considered an operating region.

 

1

 

 

Products

 

GrowGeneration is the largest retailers of hydroponic products in the United States and is engaged in the business of marketing and distributing horticultural, organics, lighting and hydroponics products, including lighting fixtures, nutrients, seeds and growing media systems, trays, fans, filters, humidifiers and dehumidifiers, timers, instruments, water pumps, irrigation supplies and hand tools.

 

GrowGeneration is also actively developing a line of private labeled products, which would be sold through GrowGeneration garden centers under brands owned or controlled by the Company. In this regard, the Company acquired a variety of trademarks in March 2019 to bolsters its ability to supply branded ‘house’ products to our customers.  From trellis netting, to plastic pots, to organic nutrients, GrowGeneration introduced its first private-labeled products in the first quarter of 2020, expects to roll out a complete line of private labeled products to offer our customers at great prices, which is expected to have a positive impact on margins and profitability in the near term.

 

A list of the product trademarks the Company acquired are listed as follows: Blueprint,Carbide, DuraBreeze, Elemental Solutions, GrowXcess, GaurdenWare, Harvester’s Edge, Hydro Thrive, Ion, MixSure +, OptiLUME, Pioneer, Predator Lighting, Smart Support, Sunleaves Garden, Sunspot, Super Starter, Utopian Systems, VitaLUME, and VitaPlant.

 

Markets

 

Our stores sell thousands of products, that include nutrients, growing media, advanced indoor and greenhouse lighting, ventilation systems and accessories for hydroponic gardening and other products needed to grow indoors and outdoors. Our strategy is to target two distinct groups of customers, namely commercial growers and smaller growers that require a local store to fulfill their daily and weekly growing needs. Our supply chain includes over 10,000 sku’s across 12 product departments. We can deliver directly to the grower’s facility, and they can pick up the products at one of our stores or order online.

 

GrowGeneration serves a new, yet sophisticated community of commercial and urban cultivators growing specialty crops including organics, greens and plant-based medicines. Unlike the traditional agricultural industry, these cultivators use innovative indoor and outdoor growing techniques to produce specialty crops in highly controlled environments. This enables them to produce crops at higher yields without having to compromise quality, regardless of the season or weather and drought conditions.

 

Our target market segments include the commercial growers in the plant-based medicine market, the home grower and businesses and individuals who grow organically grown herbs and leafy green vegetables. The landscape for hydroponic retail stores is very fragmented, with numerous single stores which we consider very ripe for our roll up strategy. Further, the products we sell are in demand due to the ever-increasing legalization of pant-based medicines, primarily cannabis and hemp, and the number of licensed cultivation facilities in both the US and Canada. Total sales for the hydroponic equipment industry were well over $8 billion in 2019.

 

Indoor growing techniques have primarily been used to cultivate plant-based medicines. Plant-based medicines often require high-degree of regulation and controls including government compliance, security, and crop consistency, making indoor growing techniques a preferred method. Cultivators of plant-based medicines often make a significant investment to design and build-out their facilities. They look to work with companies such as GrowGeneration that understand their specific needs and can help mitigate risks that could jeopardize their crops. Plant-based medicines are believed to be among the fastest-growing market in the U.S. and several industry pundits believe that plant-based medicines may even displace prescription pain medication by providing patients with a safer, more affordable alternative.

 

Indoor growing techniques, however, are not limited to plant-based medicines. Vertical farms producing organic fruits and vegetables are beginning to emerge in the market due to a rising shortage of farmland, and environmental vulnerabilities including drought, other severe weather conditions and insect pests. Indoor growing techniques enable cultivators to grow crops all-year-round in urban areas and take up less ground while minimizing environmental risks. Indoor growing techniques typically require a more significant upfront investment to design and build-out these facilities than traditional farmlands. If new innovations lower the costs for indoor growing, and the costs to operate traditional farmlands continue to rise, then indoor growing techniques may be a compelling alternative for the broader agricultural industry.

 

Research and Development 

 

The Company has not incurred any research and development expenses during the period covered by this report.

 

2

 

 

Customers and Suppliers

 

Our key customers vary by state and are expected to be more defined as the Company moves from its retail walk-in purchasing sales strategy to serving cultivation facilities directly and under predictable purchasing activity. Currently, none of our customers accounted for more than 5% of our sales in 2019 or 2018.

 

Our key suppliers include several manufacturers and distributors such as FoxFarm Fertilizer, Canna, USA Mills Nutrients, Hawthorne Garden Supply, Hydrofarm, and others. All the products purchased and sold are applicable to indoor and outdoor growing for organics, greens, and plant-based medicines. As of December 31, 2019, and 2018, two suppliers represent 51% and 56%, respectively of our purchases. The Company is of the opinion that the loss of either supplier would not have a material adverse impact on our business, because both suppliers provide the same products and the Company maintains direct manufacturing agreements with vendors.

 

Demand for Products

 

Demand for indoor and outdoor growing equipment is currently high due to legalization of plant-based medicines, primarily cannabis and hemp, which requires equipment purchases for build-out and repeat purchases of consumable nutrients needed during the growing period. This demand is projected to continue to increase as a result of the approval of a comprehensive, publicly available medical marijuana/cannabis programs laws in 33 states and 11 states for adult-use plus the District of Columbia as of the date thereof. Continued innovation and more efficient build-out technologies along with larger and consolidated cultivation facilities are expected to further expand market demand for GrowGeneration products and services. We expect the market to continue to segment into urban farmers serving groups of individuals, community cultivators, and large-scale cultivation facilities across the states. Each segment will be optimized to different distribution channels that GrowGeneration currently provides. We are of the opinion that as our volume increases, we will obtain volume discounts on purchasing that should allow us to maximize our revenues and expand gross profit margins.

 

E-Commerce Strategy

 

The Company has developed its e-commerce website and portal, www.GrowGen.Pro which offers for sale hydroponic, specialty and organic gardening products. Online shoppers are able to shop from product departments, from nutrients to lighting to hydroponic and greenhouse equipment, delivering an easy and quick method to find the products that they want to purchase. Our e-commerce site is designed to appeal to the professional growers. Each product listed on the site contains product descriptions, product reviews and a picture so the customers can make an informed and educated purchase. Our product filters allow the customers to search by brand, manufacturer, or by function such as wattage. Designed as an information portal as well as an e-commerce store, the customers will find videos, articles, blogs and other relevant content, all generated by GrowGeneration’s internal staff, which we call our “Grow Pros”. The GrowGeneration customers are able to shop and order online 24/7 and, choose to receive products delivered directly to their grow operations, or for pick up at one of the GrowGeneration retail stores. In addition, customers may simply use our site as a resource and shop with our Grow Pros at one of our retail locations. Google advertising, social media and in store advertising are the primary advertising tools we use to drive traffic to www.GrowGen.Pro.

 

Acquisitions

 

Subsequent to year end, on February 26, 2020, the Company entered into an asset purchase agreement through its wholly-owned subsidiary, GrowGeneration Florida Corp, to purchase the assets of Healthy & Harvest, LLC, with one location in Pembroke Pines, FL. In connection with the purchase of the assets, the Company also entered a three-year commercial lease for warehouse space, effective February 26, 2020 and subleased the store space whose current lease expires July 31, 2020.

 

On December 18, 2019, the Company entered into an asset purchase agreement through its wholly-owned subsidiary, GrowGeneration Washington Corp, to purchase the assets of GrowWorld with one location in Portland, OR. In connection with the purchase of the assets, the Company also entered into an assignment of lease, effective December 18, 2019, to rent the premises in Portland, OR. The lease terminates on December 31, 2026.

 

On September 3, 2019, the Company entered into an asset purchase agreement through its wholly-owned subsidiary, GrowGeneration Michigan Corp, to purchase the assets of Grand Rapids Hydroponics with one location in Grand Rapids, MI. In connection with the purchase of the assets, the Company also entered into a ten-year commercial lease agreement, effective from September 9, 2019, to rent the premises in Grand Rapids, MI.

 

3

 

 

On April 23, 2019, the Company entered into an asset purchase agreement through its wholly-owned subsidiary, GrowGeneration Rhode Island Corp., to purchase the assets of GreenLife Garden Supply Corp., with two store locations in Maine and one in New Hampshire. In connection with the purchase of the assets, the Company also entered into five-year commercial lease agreements, effective from May 9, 2019 and July 1, 2019, respectively, to rent the premises in York and Biddeford, Maine where store assets are located.

 

On January 26, 2019, the Company entered into an asset purchase agreement through its wholly-owned subsidiary, GrowGeneration California Corp., to purchase the assets from Palm Springs Hydroponics, Inc. located in Palm Springs, California. The acquisition was completed on February 7, 2019. In connection with the purchase of the assets, the Company also entered into a commercial lease agreement with a term of five years and three months, effective from February 7, 2019 to April 30, 2024, to rent the premises where the assets were located to open a new store.

 

On January 26, 2019, the Company entered into an asset purchase agreement through its wholly-owned subsidiary, GrowGeneration Nevada Corp., to purchase the assets from Reno Hydroponics, Inc. located in Reno, Nevada. The acquisition was completed on February 11, 2019. In connection with the purchase of the assets, the Company also entered into a one-year commercial lease agreement, effective from February 1, 2019 to January 31, 2020, to rent the premises where the assets were located to open a new store. The Company has since entered into a new lease expiring March 31, 2021.

 

On November 28, 2018, the Company entered into an asset purchase agreement through its wholly-owned subsidiary, GrowGeneration Pueblo Corp., to purchase the assets of Chlorophyll, Inc., located in Denver, Colorado. The acquisition was completed on January 21, 2019. In connection with the purchase of the assets, the Company also entered into a five-year commercial lease agreement, effective from January 21, 2019, to rent the premises where the assets are located to open a new store

 

On August 30, 2018, the Company entered into an asset purchase agreement, amended on September 14, 2018, with Virgus, Inc. d/b/a/ Heavy Gardens, an online store of hydroponic and garden supplies (“Heavy Gardens”), to purchase the assets of Heavy Gardens through its wholly-owned subsidiary, GrowGeneration HG Corp. The closing of the asset purchase took place on September 14, 2018.

 

On June 28, 2018, the Company entered into a restated and amended asset purchase agreement to purchase the assets of a retail hydroponic store, Santa Rosa Hydroponics & Grower Supply Inc., located in Santa Rosa, California. On July 13, 2018, the parties entered into an amendment to the purchase agreement and conducted the closing of the asset purchase. In connection with the purchase of the assets, the Company also entered into a commercial lease agreement, effective from July 14, 2018 to July 13, 2023, to rent the premises where the assets were located to open the new store.

 

On April 12, 2018, the Company entered into an asset purchase agreement through its wholly-owned subsidiary, GrowGeneration Michigan Corp., to purchase substantially all of the assets of Superior Growers Supply, Inc.’s business located in Michigan. In connection with the purchase of the assets, the Company also entered into a commercial lease, effective from April 12, 2018 to April 11, 2023, to rent the premises where a part of the assets are located. The Company entered into two additional leases. Following this acquisition, the Company opened three stores in the state of Michigan.

 

Seasonality

 

Our business is subject to some seasonal influences. Generally, our highest volume of sales occurs in our second and third fiscal quarter, and the lower volume occurs during our first or fourth fiscal quarter. 

 

Competition

 

The markets in which we sell our products are highly competitive. Our key competitors include many local and national vendors of gardening supplies, local product resellers of hydroponic and other specialty growing equipment, as well as online product resellers and large online marketplaces such as Amazon.com and eBay. Our industry is a highly fragmented industry with over 1,000 retail outlets throughout the U.S. We compete with companies that have greater capital resources, facilities and diversity of product lines. Our competitors may also introduce new hydroponic growing equipment, manufacturers may sell equipment direct to consumers, and our distributers could cease sales of product to us.

 

4

 

 

Notwithstanding the foregoing, we do believe that our pricing, inventory and product availability and overall customer service provide us with the ability to compete in this marketplace. In addition, as we increase our number of stores and inventory per store, we expect to be able to purchase larger amounts of inventory at lower volume sale prices, which we expect will enable us to price competitively and deliver the products that our customers are seeking. We compete on supply chain competency, field sales support, in-store sales support, the strength of our relationships with major manufacturers, distributors and advertising.

 

Based on our knowledge and communication with our suppliers, we do not believe our suppliers sell directly to the retail market or our customers.

 

Intellectual Property and Proprietary Rights

 

Our intellectual property consists of our brands and their related trademarks, domain names and websites, customer lists and affiliations, product know-how and technology, and marketing intangibles. We also hold rights to website addresses related to our business including websites that are actively used in our day-to-day business such as www.GrowGeneration.com. We own the federally registered trademark for “GrowGeneration®” “Where the Pros Go to Grow®” and GrowGen.Pro. In addition, we own several registered trademarks acquired March 2019 as detailed previously under the caption Products.

 

Government Regulation

 

We sell products, including hydroponic gardening products, that end users may purchase for use in new and emerging industries or segments, including the growing of cannabis and hemp, that may not grow or achieve market acceptance in a manner that we can predict. The demand for these products depends on the uncertain growth of these industries or segments. 

 

In addition, we sell products that end users may purchase for use in industries or segments, including the growing of cannabis and hemp, that are subject to varying, inconsistent, and rapidly changing laws, regulations, administrative practices, enforcement approaches, judicial interpretations, and consumer perceptions.  For example, certain countries and 33 U.S. states have adopted frameworks that authorize, regulate, and tax the cultivation, processing, sale, and use of cannabis for medicinal and/or non-medicinal use, while the U.S. Controlled Substances Act and the laws of other U.S. states prohibit growing cannabis. In addition, with the passage of the Farm Bill in December 2018, hemp cultivation is now broadly permitted. The Farm Bill explicitly allows the transfer of hemp-derived products across state lines for commercial or other purposes. It also puts no restrictions on the sale, transport, or possession of hemp-derived products, so long as those items are produced in a manner consistent with the law. We believe the recent passage of the 2018 Farm Bill will allow the Company to expand its marketplace opportunities.

 

Our gardening products, including our hydroponic gardening products, are multi-purpose products designed and intended for growing a wide range of plants and are purchased by cultivators who may grow any variety of plants, including cannabis and hemp.  Although the demand for our products may be negatively impacted depending on how laws, regulations, administrative practices, enforcement approaches, judicial interpretations, and consumer perceptions develop, we cannot reasonably predict the nature of such developments or the effect, if any, that such developments could have on our business.

 

Employees

 

As of December 31, 2019, we had 184 full time employees and 21 part-time employees. No employees are subject to collective bargaining agreements.

 

Principal Offices

 

Our principal offices are located at 1000 W Mississippi Ave., Denver, CO 80223. As of December 31, 2019, we leased six (6) facilities in the State of Colorado, eight (8) in the State of California, one (1) in the State of Nevada, one (1) in the State of Washington, one (1) in the State of Oregon, one (1) in the State of Rhode Island, four (4) in the State of Oklahoma, four (4) in the State of Michigan, three (3) in the State of Maine, two (2) in the State of Florida, all for our corporate and retail operations. In total the Company leases approximately 350,000 square feet of space, which consists primarily of 3,000 feet of corporate office space, 100,000 square feet of warehouse space and 247,000 square feet of store space.

 

5

 

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

The risks and uncertainties described below could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations and could cause actual results to differ materially from our expectations and projections. You should read these Risk Factors in conjunction with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in Item 7 and our Consolidated Financial Statements and related notes in Item 8. There also may be other factors that we cannot anticipate or that are not described in this report generally because we do not currently perceive them to be material. Those factors could cause results to differ materially from our expectations.

 

Actual or threatened epidemics, pandemics, outbreaks, or other public health crises may adversely affect our customers’ financial condition and the operations of our business.

 

Our business could be materially and adversely affected by the risks, or the public perception of the risks, related to an epidemic, pandemic, outbreak, or other public health crisis, such as the recent outbreak of novel coronavirus (COVID-19). The risk of a pandemic, or public perception of the risk, could cause customers to avoid public places, including retail properties, and could cause temporary or long-term disruptions in our supply chains and/or delays in the delivery of our inventory. Further, such risks could also adversely affect our customers’ financial condition, resulting in reduced spending for the products we sell. Moreover, an epidemic, pandemic, outbreak or other public health crisis, such as COVID-19, could cause employees to avoid our properties, which could adversely affect our ability to adequately staff and manage our businesses. Risks related to an epidemic, pandemic or other health crisis, such as COVID-19, could also lead to the complete or partial closure of one or more of our stores, facilities or operations of our sourcing partners. The ultimate extent of the impact of any epidemic, pandemic or other health crisis on our business, financial condition and results of operations will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted, including new information that may emerge concerning the severity of such epidemic, pandemic or other health crisis and actions taken to contain or prevent their further spread, among others. These and other potential impacts of an epidemic, pandemic or other health crisis, such as COVID-19, could therefore materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

 We face intense competition that could prohibit us from developing or increasing our customer base.

 

The industry within which we compete is highly competitive. We compete with companies that have greater capital resources, facilities and diversity of product lines. We compete in the specialty gardening industry, selling hydroponic and organic nutrients, soils and other gardening related products. Additionally, if demand for our hydroponic growing equipment and products continues to grow, we expect many new competitors to enter the market, as there are no significant barriers to retail sales of hydroponic growing equipment and related gardening products. More established gardening companies with much greater financial resources which do not currently compete with us may be able to easily adapt their existing operations to sales of hydroponic growing equipment. Due to this competition, there is no assurance that we will not encounter difficulties in increasing revenues and maintaining and/or increasing market share. In addition, increased competition may lead to reduced prices and/or margins for products we sell. Our competitors may also introduce new hydroponic growing equipment, manufacturers may sell equipment direct to consumers, and our distributers could cease sales of product to us.

 

If we need additional capital to fund our operations, we may not be able to obtain sufficient capital and may be forced to limit the scope of our operations.

 

In connection with our growth strategies, we may experience increased capital needs and accordingly, we may not have sufficient capital to fund our future operations without additional capital investments. There can be no assurance that additional capital will be available to us. If we cannot obtain sufficient capital to fund our operations, we may be forced to limit the scope of our expansion.

 

Our business depends substantially on the continuing efforts of our executive officers and our business may be severely disrupted if we lose their services.

 

Our future success depends substantially on the continued services of our executive officers, especially our Chief Executive Officer, Darren Lampert, our President, Michael Salaman, our Chief Financial Officer, Monty Lamirato, and our Chief Operating Officer, Tony Sullivan. We do not maintain key man life insurance on any of our executive officers and directors. If one or more of our executive officers are unable or unwilling to continue in their present positions, we may not be able to replace them readily, if at all. Therefore, our business may be severely disrupted, and we may incur additional expenses to recruit and retain new officers.

 

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If we are not successful in attracting and retaining highly qualified personnel, we may not be able to successfully implement our business strategy.

 

Our ability to compete in the highly competitive hydroponics and gardening industry depends in large part upon our ability to attract highly qualified managerial and sales personnel. In order to induce valuable employees to come and work for us or to remain with us, we intend to provide employees with stock options that vest over time. However, the value to employees of stock options that vest over time will be significantly affected by movements in our stock price that we will not be able to control and may at any time be insufficient to counteract more lucrative offers from other companies. Our success also depends on our ability to continue to attract, retain and motivate highly skilled junior, mid-level, and senior personnel.

 

In order to increase our sales and marketing infrastructure, we will need to grow the size of our organization, and we may experience difficulties in managing this growth.

 

As we continue to work to open and/or acquire additional retail store locations, we will need to expand the size of our employee base for managerial, operational, sales, marketing, financial and other resources. Future growth would impose significant added responsibilities on members of management, including the need to identify, recruit, maintain, motivate and integrate additional employees. In addition, our management may have to divert a disproportionate amount of its attention away from our day-to-day activities and devote a substantial amount of time to managing these growth activities. Our future financial performance and our ability to continue to grow our operation and compete in the hydroponics industry effectively will depend, in part, on our ability to effectively manage any future growth.

 

Litigation may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

From time to time in the normal course of our business operations, we may become subject to litigation that may result in liability material to our financial statements as a whole or may negatively affect our operating results if changes to our business operation are required. The cost to defend such litigation may be significant and may require a diversion of our resources. There also may be adverse publicity associated with litigation that could negatively affect customer perception of our business, regardless of whether the allegations are valid or whether we are ultimately found liable. As a result, litigation may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Some of our customers are cannabis growers. Disruption to the cannabis industry could have a negative impact on our revenue.

 

Our products are sold to growers of various crops and some of our products may be utilized by cannabis growers. Disruption to the cannabis industry could cause some current and/or potential customers to be more reluctant to invest in growing equipment, including equipment we sell.

 

There are a significant number of shares of common stock eligible for sale, which could depress the market price of such shares.

 

Our Registration Statement on Form S-1 has registered a total of 1,242,756 shares of our common stock available for sale in the public market. The availability of such a large number of shares of common stock for sale in the public market could harm the market price of the stock. Further, additional shares may be offered from time to time in the open market pursuant to Rule 144, and these sales may have a depressive effect as well.

 

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If product liability lawsuits are brought against us, we may incur substantial liabilities.

 

We face a potential risk of product liability as a result of any of the products that we offer for sale. For example, we may be sued if any product we sell allegedly causes injury or is found to be otherwise unsuitable during product testing, manufacturing, marketing or sale. Any such product liability claims may include allegations of defects in manufacturing, defects in design, a failure to warn of dangers inherent in the product, negligence, strict liability and a breach of warranties. Claims could also be asserted under state consumer protection acts. If we cannot successfully defend ourselves against product liability claims, we may incur substantial liabilities. Even successful defense would require significant financial and management resources. Regardless of the merits or eventual outcome, liability claims may result in:

 

  decreased demand for products that we may offer for sale;
  injury to our reputation;
  costs to defend the related litigation;
  a diversion of management’s time and our resources;
  substantial monetary awards to trial participants or patients;
  product recalls, withdrawals or labeling, marketing or promotional restrictions; and
  a decline in our stock price. 

 

We do not maintain any product liability insurance. Our inability to obtain and retain sufficient product liability insurance at an acceptable cost to protect against potential product liability claims could prevent or inhibit the commercialization of products we developed. Even if we obtain product liability insurance in the future, we may have to pay amounts awarded by a court or negotiated in a settlement that exceed our coverage limitations or that are not covered by our insurance, and we may not have, or be able to obtain, sufficient capital to pay such amounts.

 

We may acquire businesses or products, or form strategic alliances, in the future, and we may not realize the benefits of such acquisitions.

 

We may acquire additional businesses or products, form strategic alliances or create joint ventures with third parties that we believe will complement or augment our existing business. If we acquire businesses with promising markets or products, we may not be able to realize the benefit of acquiring such businesses if we are unable to successfully integrate them with our existing operations and company culture. We may encounter numerous difficulties in developing, manufacturing and/or marketing any new products resulting from a strategic alliance or acquisition that delay or prevent us from realizing their expected benefits or enhancing our business. We cannot assure you that, following any such acquisition, we will achieve the expected synergies to justify the transaction.

 

Risks Related to Our Common Stock

 

There are risks, including stock market volatility, inherent in owning our common stock

 

The market price and volume of our common stock have been, and may continue to be, subject to significant fluctuations. These fluctuations may arise from general stock market conditions, the impact of risk factors described in this Item 1A on our results of operations and financial position, or a change in opinion in the market regarding our business prospects or other factors, many of which may be outside our immediate control.

  

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The shares of our common stock may experience substantial dilution by exercises of outstanding warrants and options.

 

As of the date hereof, we had outstanding warrants to purchase an aggregate of 3,387,701 shares of our common stock at a weighted average exercise price of $2.96 per share, and options to purchase an aggregate of 2,109,170 shares of our common stock (out of which 1,210,837 are vested as of this date) at a weighted average exercise prices of $2.97 per share. The exercise of such outstanding options and warrants will result in substantial dilution of your investment. In addition, our shareholders may experience additional dilution if we issue common stock in the future. Any of such dilution may have adverse effect on the price of our common stock. 

 

We are an “emerging growth company,” and will be able take advantage of reduced disclosure requirements applicable to “emerging growth companies,” which could make our common stock less attractive to investors.

 

We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012, or JOBS Act, and, for as long as we continue to be an “emerging growth company,” we intend to take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements applicable to other public companies but not to “emerging growth companies,” including, but not limited to, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports and proxy statements, and exemptions from the requirements of holding a nonbinding advisory vote on executive compensation and stockholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. We could be an “emerging growth company” for up to five years, or until the earliest of (i) the last day of the first fiscal year in which our annual gross revenues exceed $1 billion, (ii) the date that we become a “large accelerated filer” as defined in Rule 12b-2 under the Exchange Act, which would occur if the market value of our common stock that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the last business day of our most recently completed second fiscal quarter, or (iii) the date on which we have issued more than $1 billion in non-convertible debt during the preceding three year period.

 

For as long as we remain an “emerging growth company” as defined in the JOBS Act, we intend to take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not “emerging growth companies.”

 

After we are no longer an “emerging growth company,” we expect to incur additional management time and cost to comply with the more stringent reporting requirements applicable to companies that are deemed accelerated filers or large accelerated filers, including complying with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. We cannot predict or estimate the amount of additional costs we may incur or the timing of such costs.

  

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

None.

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

 

Description of Property

 

Our principal offices are located at 1000 W Mississippi Ave., Denver, CO 80223. As of the date of this report, we lease six (6) facilities in the State of Colorado, eight (8) in the State of California, one (1) in the State of Nevada, one (1) in the State of Washington, one (1) in the State of Rhode Island, one (1) in the State of Oregon, two (2) in the State of Florida, four (4) in the State of Oklahoma, four (4) in the State of Michigan and three (3) in the State of Maine for our retail operations. Information relating to our stores is set forth in the table below:

 

   Number of Locations  Square feet  Lease Expiration Dates
Colorado  6  2,000-12,500  January 2021 to April 2024
California  8  2,625-59,000  May 2020 to April 2024
Nevada  1  8,800  February 2022
Washington  1  3,200  April 2020
Rhode Island  1  9,000  January 2023
Michigan  4  5,300-11,000  March 2023 to August 2029
Maine  3  23,500  February 2023-June 2024
Oklahoma  4  9,800-40,000  September 2023 to February 2026
Oregon  1  15,000  December 2026
Florida  2  5,000 – 10,000  July 2020 to February 2023

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

There are no current, past, pending or threatened legal proceedings or administrative actions either by or against the issuer that could have a material effect on the issuer’s business, financial condition, or operations.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Not applicable.

 

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PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

MARKET INFORMATION

 

The Company commenced trading on the Nasdaq Capital Market on December 2, 2019 under the symbol “GRWG”. Prior to that date, our stock traded on the OTCQB Best Market since October 10, 2017, prior to which it was traded on the OTCQB Market since November 11, 2016.

 

The following table sets forth, for each quarter for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, the reported high and low bid prices of our Common Stock.

 

Quarter Ended  High Bid   Low Bid 
         
December 31, 2019  $5.06   $3.45 
September 30, 2019  $5.75   $3.10 
June 30, 2019  $3.79   $2.53 
March 31, 2019  $3.62   $2.18 
December 31, 2018  $4.05   $2.05 
September 30, 2018  $5.07   $3.41 
June 30, 2018  $5.49   $3.10 
March 31, 2018  $9.94   $3.00 

 

Future sales of substantial amounts of our shares in the public market could adversely affect market prices prevailing from time to time and could impair our ability to raise capital through the sale of our equity securities.

 

HOLDERS

 

The approximate number of stockholders of record as of December 31, 2019 was 140.  The number of stockholders of record does not include beneficial owners of our Common Stock, whose shares are held in the names of various dealers, clearing agencies, banks, brokers and other fiduciaries.

 

DIVIDEND POLICY

 

We have never paid any cash dividends on our Common Stock. We anticipate that we will retain funds and future earnings to support operations and to finance the growth and development of our business. Therefore, we do not expect to pay cash dividends in the foreseeable future. Any future determination to pay dividends will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend on our financial condition, results of operations, capital requirements and other factors that our board of directors deems relevant. In addition, the terms of any future debt or credit financings may preclude us from paying dividends.

 

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RECENT SALES OF UNREGISTERED SECURITIES

 

2019 Private Placement

 

On June 26, 2019, the Company completed a private placement of a total of 4,123,257 units of the Company’s securities at the price of $3.10 per unit pursuant to Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act and Rule 506 of Regulation D promulgated under the Securities Act. Each unit consisted of (i) one share of Common Stock and (ii) one 3-year warrant, each entitling the holder to purchase one half share of Common Stock, at a price of $3.50 per share. The Company raised a total of $12,782,099 from 19 accredited investors.

 

2018 Private Placement

 

On January 17, 2018, the Company completed a private placement of a total of 36 units of its securities at the price of $250,000 per unit. Each unit consists of (i) a .1% unsecured convertible promissory note of the principal amount of $250,000, and (ii) a 3-year warrant entitling the holder to purchase 37,500 shares of Common Stock, at a price of $.01 per share or through cashless exercise. The Company raised gross proceeds of $9,000,000 from 23 accredited investors in the offering. 

 

On May 9, 2018, the Company completed a private placement of a total of 33.33 units of its securities at a price of $300,000 per unit to 3 accredited investors. Each unit consists of (i) 100,000 share of the Company’s Common Stock and (ii) 50,000 3-year warrant to purchase one share of Common Stock at an exercise price of $.35 per share. The Company raised an aggregate of $10,000,000 gross proceeds in the offering.

 

2017 Private Placements

 

On March 10, 2017, the Company completed a private placement of a total of 825,000 units of its securities to 4 accredited investors. Each unit consists of (i) one share of the Company’s Common Stock and (ii) one 5-year warrant to purchase one share of Common Stock at an exercise price of $2.75 per share. The Company raised an aggregate of $1,650,000 gross proceeds in the offering.

 

On May 16, 2017, the Company completed a private placement of a total of 1,000,000 units of its securities to 27 accredited investors through GVC Capital LLC (“GVC Capital”) as its placement agent. Each unit consists of (i) one share of the Company’s Common Stock and (ii) one 5-year warrant to purchase one share of Common Stock at an exercise price of $2.75 per share. The Company raised an aggregate of $2,000,000 gross proceeds in the offering. The Company paid GVC Capital total compensation for its services, (i) for a price of $100, 5-year warrants to purchase 75,000 shares at $2.00 per share and 5-year warrants to purchase 75,000 shares at $2.75 per share, (ii) a cash fee of $150,000, (iii) a non-accountable expense allowance of $60,000, and (iv) a warrant exercise fee equal to 3% of all sums received by the Company from the exercise of 750,000 warrants (not including 250,000 warrants issued to one investor) when they are exercised.

 

Stock Options and Stock Awards

 

The Company has a 2014 Equity Compensation Plan (the “2014 Plan”) and an Amended and Restated 2018 Equity Compensation Plan (which is pending shareholder approval) (the “2018 Plan”).

  

From inception to December 31, 2019, we have granted stock options under our 2014 Plan to purchase an aggregate of 2,273,500 shares at exercise prices ranging from $0.60 to $5.11 per share. Of the total options granted as of December 31, 2019, 1,778,333 have been exercised and 159,667 have been forfeited, resulting in 335,500 options outstanding. In addition, as of December 31, 2019, 375,000 stock awards have been issued under our 2014 Plan.

 

From inception to December 31, 2019, we have granted stock options under our 2018 Plan to purchase an aggregate of 1,661,500 shares at exercise prices ranging from $2.25 to $4.45 per share. As of December 31, 2019, 7,500 options have been exercised and 11,667 forfeited under the 2018 Plan. In addition, as of December 31, 2019, 69,750 stock awards have been issued under our 2018 Plan. On February 7, 2020, the Board approved the amendment and restatement of the 2018 Plan to increase the number of shares issuable thereunder from 2,500,000 to 5,000,000, which amendment is pending shareholder approval.

  

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

Not applicable.

 

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ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATION

 

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read together with our financial statements and the related notes and the other financial information included elsewhere in this report. This discussion contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. Our actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of various factors, including those discussed below and elsewhere in this report, particularly those under “Risk Factors.” Dollars in tabular format are presented in thousands, except per share data, or otherwise indicated.

 

OVERVIEW

 

GrowGeneration Corp. (“GrowGeneration, together with all of its wholly- subsidiaries or the “Company”) was incorporated in Colorado in 2014 to build a national chain of hydroponic equipment and supply garden centers in the U.S. GrowGeneration is the largest and fastest growing chain of hydroponic garden centers in North America. Today, GrowGeneration is a service provider of a wide selection of supplies and equipment for commercial and home growers and a leading marketer and distributor of nutrients, growing media, advanced indoor garden, lighting and ventilation systems and accessories for hydroponic gardening. As of March 27, 2020, the Company owns and operates a chain of twenty seven (27) retail hydroponic/gardening centers, with five (5) located in the state of Colorado, four (4) in the state of California, four (4) in the state of Michigan, two (2) in the state of Nevada, one (1) in the state of Washington, one (1) in the state of Oregon, four (4) in the State of Oklahoma, one (1) in the state of Rhode Island, three (3) in Maine, (1) in Florida , one (1) distribution facility in California and an online e-commerce store, GrowGen.Pro. Our plan is to acquire, open and operate hydroponic/gardening stores and related businesses throughout the United States and Canada. The Florida location was acquired in February 2020 and the fourth Oklahoma store was open in March 2020.

 

In 2019, we added Tony Sullivan, an experienced and proven multi-store operator, as our Chief Operating Officer. His initiatives include, but not be limited to, providing unwavering support to the 27 GrowGeneration Stores, adding new locations, integrating our e-commerce and store supply channels and leveraging synergies amongst interconnected departments, working to drive more cost efficiencies across all areas of our company.

 

We saw triple-digit growth in revenue in Colorado, Michigan and Nevada and double-digit growth in all other markets. Our online business has risen over 100% for the same period year over year. GrowGeneration Management Corp, our commercial division, is now approaching sales of $5.0 million per quarter, and we added hundreds of new commercial accounts in 2019. With our success in Oklahoma, we opened our fourth location in the state, located in Tulsa, OK, a 40,000 Sq. ft. super garden center, the largest hydroponic garden center in the US. Our private label program, under the Sunleaves brand, began to be stocked on our shelves and online in the fourth quarter of 2019. Our initial private label lineup includes a one- part micro and macro nutrient+ Cal mag powder line, for both cannabis and hemp farmers, a silica+ micronutrient booster and a root stimulant, all additives that can be used with any nutrient regimen. Additional private level products that will be on shelf in second quarter of 2020 include, rope rachets for hoisting lighting, breathable fabric pots and T5 florescent lights for indoor gardens.

 

We improved the financial performance of the Company in all areas in 2019. Revenue was up 175% year over year, at $79.7 million. Adjusted EBITDA, for 2019 was slightly over $6,600,000, a positive $.20 per share. Our same store sales were up approximately 36% year over year. Gross profit margins increased to 28.3%, an increase of 610 basis points year over year. We believe our strategies to increase margins are working, by purchasing in larger volumes and buying more efficiently. We saw significant revenue increases in all key markets. Colorado was up 114%, California 70%, Nevada 126 %, Michigan 200%, and Rhode Island 79% Our new stores in Oklahoma contributed $11.8 million in revenue and our stores in Maine added $6.2 million. Our e-commerce store, GrowGen.Pro added approximately $4.8 million in revenue. Our commercial division generated approximately $17 million in revenue all of which is reflected in store revenues. With our significant top and bottom-line growth, we reduced our store operating expenses to 12.7% of revenues in 2019 compared to 18% in 2018 and our corporate overhead to 8.5% as a percentage of our revenue, not including non-cash expenditures. The Company has successfully completed the implementation of our Enterprise Resource Planning (“ERP”) platform, designed to lower costs, integrate our online and store sales and supply channels, improve departmental productivity, and provides forecasting and reporting tools.

 

Management focuses on a variety of key indicators and operating metrics to monitor the financial condition and performance of the continuing operations of our business. These metrics include consumer purchases (point-of-sale data), market share, category growth, net sales, gross profit margins, income from operations, net income and earnings per share. We also focus on measures to optimize cash flow and return on invested capital, including the management of working capital and capital expenditures.

 

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In 2019, the Company continued focusing its efforts on increasing its distributions through acquisitions and opening of new locations. We increased our store footprint from 21 to 26 locations in 2019, which included three store closing/consolidations. Sales increased 175% between 2018 and 2019. The Company’s acquired e-commerce operation, HeavyGarden.com, rebranded as GrowGen.Pro, is the basis for an omni-channel strategy that is being developed now to enable e-commerce at all of the GrowGeneration locations. We expect this omni-channel rollout to commence in the second quarter of 2020. We formed wholly-owned subsidiaries GrowGeneration Canada Corp and GrowGeneration Hemp Corp in order to develop supply chain and sales strategies for both of these high value markets, in the U.S and Canada. Furthermore, the Company completed its implementation of an ERP system in all its operations, which is business process management software that allows an organization to use a system of integrated applications to manage the business and automate many back office functions related to technology, services and human resources.

 

Capital raised in 2019 included a $12.8 million raise from 19 accredited investors. Capital raised in 2018 totaled $19 million, which was raised primarily from the three largest private equity firms, Gotham Green Partners, Navy Capital and Merida Capital Partners.

 

On December 2, 2019, the Company was approved to commence trading its Common Stock on the Nasdaq Capital Market under the ticker symbol of “GRWG”. Prior to that date, the Company’s stock traded on the OTCQX Best Market since October 10, 2017, prior to which it traded on the OTCQB Market since November 11, 2016.

 

Subsequent to December 31, 2019, on February 26, 2020, the Company entered into an asset purchase agreement through its wholly-owned subsidiary, GrowGeneration Florida Corp, to purchase the assets of Healthy & Harvest, LLC with one location in Pembroke Pines, FL. In connection with the purchase of the assets, the Company also entered a three-year commercial lease for warehouse space, effective February 26, 2020 and subleased the store space whose current lease expires July 31, 2020.

 

On December 18, 2019, the Company entered into an asset purchase agreement through its wholly-owned subsidiary, GrowGeneration Washington Corp, to purchase the assets of GrowWorld with one location in Portland, OR. In connection with the purchase of the assets, the Company also entered into an assignment of lease, effective December 18, 2019, to rent the premises in Portland, OR. The lease terminates on December 31, 2026.

 

On September 3, 2019, the Company entered into an asset purchase agreement through its wholly-owned subsidiary, GrowGeneration Michigan Corp, to purchase the assets of Grand Rapids Hydroponics with one location in Grand Rapids, MI. In connection with the purchase of the assets, the Company also entered into a ten-year commercial lease agreement, effective from September 9, 2019, to rent the premises in Grand Rapids, MI.

 

On April 23, 2019, the Company entered into an asset purchase agreement through its wholly-owned subsidiary, GrowGeneration Rhode Island Corp., to purchase the assets of GreenLife Garden Supply Corp., with two store locations in Maine and one in New Hampshire. In connection with the purchase of the assets, the Company also entered into five-year commercial lease agreements, effective from May 9, 2019 and July 1, 2019, respectively, to rent the premises in York and Biddeford, Maine where store assets are located.

 

On January 26, 2019, the Company entered into an asset purchase agreement through its wholly-owned subsidiary, GrowGeneration California Corp., to purchase the assets from Palm Springs Hydroponics, Inc. located in Palm Springs, California. The acquisition was completed on February 7, 2019. In connection with the purchase of the assets, the Company also entered into a commercial lease agreement with a term of five years and three months, effective from February 7, 2019 to April 30, 2024, to rent the premises where the assets were located to open a new store.

 

On January 26, 2019, the Company entered into another asset purchase agreement through its wholly-owned subsidiary, GrowGeneration Nevada Corp., to purchase the assets from Reno Hydroponics, Inc. located in Reno, Nevada. The acquisition was completed on February 11, 2019. In connection with the purchase of the assets, the Company also entered into a one-year commercial lease agreement, effective from February 1, 2019 to January 31, 2020, to rent the premises where the assets were located to open a new store. The Company has since entered into a new lease expiring March 31, 2021.

 

In March 2019, the Company consolidated its store located in Canon City, CO with its Pueblo West, CO store.

 

Effective January 1, 2019 our two Santa Rosa, CA stores were consolidated into a single store at our Santa Rosa Moorland location acquired in July 2018.

 

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On December 1, 2018, the Company entered into a lease agreement through its wholly-owned subsidiary, GrowGeneration Rhode Island, Corp., to rent certain premises located in Brewer, Maine, to be effective from December 1, 2018 to February 28, 2023. This premises will be used by the Company to open a new store.

 

On November 28, 2018, the Company entered into an asset purchase agreement through its wholly-owned subsidiary, GrowGeneration Pueblo Corp., to purchase the assets of Chlorophyll, Inc., located in Denver, Colorado. In connection with the purchase of the assets, the Company also entered into a five-year commercial lease agreement, effective from January 21, 2019, to rent the premises where the assets are located to open a new store.

 

In November 2018, the Company signed a commercial lease to open a 9,600 Sq. Ft. warehouse and product showroom in Tulsa to service the emerging legal cannabis cultivators in the State of Oklahoma. The lease is effective from January 1, 2019 to December 31, 2024. The Company opened this store for business on February 1, 2019.

 

In October 2018, the Company consolidated its store located in Boulder, CO with our Denver, CO store.

 

On August 30, 2018, the Company entered into an asset purchase agreement, amended on September 14, 2018, with Virgus, Inc. d/b/a/ Heavy Gardens, an online store of hydroponic and garden supplies (“Heavy Gardens”) to purchase the assets of Heavy Gardens through its wholly-owned subsidiary, GrowGeneration HG Corp. The closing of the asset purchase took place on September 14, 2018.

 

On August 23, 2018, the Company signed a commercial lease to open a 10,000 Sq. Ft. warehouse and product showroom in Oklahoma City to service the emerging legal cannabis cultivators in the State of Oklahoma. The lease is effective from October 1, 2018 to September 30, 2023. The Company opened this store for business on October 1, 2018.

 

On June 28, 2018, the Company entered into a restated and amended asset purchase agreement to purchase the assets of a retail hydroponic store, Santa Rosa Hydroponics & Grower Supply Inc., located in Santa Rosa, California. On July 13, 2018, the parties entered into an amendment to the purchase agreement and conducted the closing of the asset purchase. In connection with the purchase of the assets, the Company also entered into a commercial lease agreement, effective from July 14, 2018 to July 13, 2023, to rent the premises where the assets were located.

 

In May 2018, the Company consolidated its store located in Colorado Springs, CO with our Denver, CO store and in April 2018, consolidated its store located in Pueblo West with its Pueblo Downtown store.

 

On May 9, 2018, GrowGeneration Corp. (the “Company”) completed a private placement (the “Offering”) of a total of 33.33 units (the “Units”) of the Company’s securities at the price of $300,000 per Unit pursuant to Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”) and Rule 506 of Regulation D promulgated under the Securities Act. Each Unit consists of (i) 100,000 shares of the Company’s $.001 par value common stock (the “Shares”) and (ii) 50,000 3-year warrants (the “Warrants”), each entitling the holder to purchase one share of the Company’s common stock, at a price of $.35 per share or through cashless exercise. The Company raised a total of $10,000,000 from three accredited investors.

 

On April 12, 2018, the Company entered into an asset purchase agreement through its wholly-owned subsidiary, GrowGeneration Michigan Corp., to purchase substantially all of the assets of Superior Growers Supply, Inc.’s business located in Michigan. In connection with the purchase of the assets, the Company also entered into a commercial lease, effective from April 12, 2018 to April 11, 2023, to rent the premises where a part of the assets are located. The Company entered into two additional leases. Following this acquisition, the Company opened three stores in the state of Michigan.

 

14

 

 

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

   For the Year Ended    Year to Year Comparison 
   December 31,   Increase/   Percentage 
   2019   2018   (decrease)   Change 
                 
Sales  $79,733,568   $29,000,730   $50,732,838    174.9%
Cost of Sales   57,171,721    22,556,172    34,615,549    153.5%
Gross profit   22,561,847    6,444,558    16,117,289    250.1%
Operating expenses   20,421,726    10,700,206    9,721,520    90.9%
Income (loss) from operations   2,140,121    (4,255,648)   6,395,769    298.8%
Other income (expense)   (261,317)   (818,107)   556,790      
Net Income (loss)  $1,878,804   $(5,073,755)  $6,952,559    370.1%

 

Revenue

 

Net revenue for the year ended December 31, 2019 were approximately $79.7 million, compared to approximately $29 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of $50.7 million, or 175%. The increase in revenues is due to the addition of 10 new retail stores opened or acquired during 2019 for which there were no sales for these retail stores for the year ended December 31, 2018, and 8 stores and the e-commerce site opened or acquired at various times during 2018 that were open for all of 2019. Sales in the 10 new stores opened or acquired in 2019 were $26 million. Sales from the e-commerce site and the 8 stores opened in 2018 were approximately $38.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to approximately $14.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2018. The Company also had store closures and consolidations in 2019 and 2018. Sales of the closed and consolidated stores was approximately $909,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019 and approximately $4.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

While the Company continues to focus on the 9 markets noted below and the growth opportunities that exist in each market, we also are focusing on new store acquisitions, proprietary products, and developing our online sales with GrowGen.Pro and Amazon sales.

 

   Sales by Market 
   Year Ended
December 31,
2019
   Year Ended
December 31,
2018
   Variance 
Colorado market  $15,490,021   $6,665,197   $8,824,824 
California market   15,570,418    5,964,080    9,606,338 
Rhode Island market   8,395,123    4,700,102    3,695,021 
Michigan market   9,268,460    3,086,693    6,181,767 
Maine market   6,203,649    -    6,203,649 
Nevada market   4,360,013    1,924,025    2,435,988 
Washington market   1,283,169    939,231    343,938 
Oklahoma market   11,793,303    463,264    11,330,039 
Oregon market   153,856    -    153,856 
Closed/consolidated locations   908,642    4,473,222    (3,564,580)
Hemp market   1,583,176    -    1,583,176 
E-commerce site   4,763,738    784,916    3,978,822 
Total revenues  $79,773,568   $29,000,730   $50,772,838 

 

Overall sales in the Colorado market increased approximately $8.8 million or 132%, as noted above, comparing the year ended December 31, 2019 to the year ended December 31, 2018, with a majority of that increase, $6 million, attributable to the acquisition of our new Denver north store location in January 2019. The remaining Colorado stores saw an increase of approximately $2.8 million from 2018 to 2019. We continue to focus selling efforts in building growth in this market primarily the commercial market.

 

15

 

 

Our sales in the California market have seen growth of approximately $9.6 million or 161% primarily from the addition of 5 new stores through acquisitions during 2018, these 5 stores contributed revenue of $15.6 million in 2019, compared to $6 million in 2018, The California market experienced slower growth in 2018 as a result of a change in the regulatory environment, and the implementation of new rules and regulations which slowed the issuance of new licenses. However, the Company positioned itself well in 2018 with its acquisitions to take advantage of the new licenses issued.

 

Revenues in the Rhode Island and Michigan markets are the result of new acquisitions in 2018 and one acquisition in Michigan in 2019. Rhode Island sales increased $3.7 million from 2018 to 2019, an increase of 79% and sales in Michigan increased $6.2 million or 200% from 2018 to 2019. In both Rhode Island and Michigan increases in commercial sales are primarily responsible for the overall increase.

 

Maine was a new market in 2019 as a result of us opening a new store in February 2019 and the acquisition of two stores in May 2019.

 

Our revenue in the Nevada market increased by approximately $2.4 million, comparing the year ended December 31, 2019 to year ended December 31, 2018, primarily because of the acquisition of our Reno location in February 2019 that contributed $2.1 million in revenues in 2019. The Las Vegas store saw an increase of $329,000 or 17% from 2018 to 2019. The Company continues to focus on adding commercial customers in the Nevada market.

 

Revenues in the Washington market increased $344,000 or 37% from 2018 to 2019, as the Company continues to focus on adding commercial customers in this location.

 

Oregon was a new market in 2019, with an acquisition of a new store in December 2019.

 

The Company opened its first store in Oklahoma in October 2018, followed by new store openings in February 2019 and November 2019. Oklahoma has been a significant new market for the Company contributing sales of $11.8 million in 2019 compared to $463,000 in 2018. The Company has a very strong presence in this market and opened its fourth location in March 2020. Oklahoma has generated strong sales in both commercial and non-commercial customers.

 

The Company had the same 6 stores (four in Colorado, one in Washington and one in Nevada) opened for the entire year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018. These same stores generated $13 million in sales for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to $9.5 million in sales for the same period ended December 31, 2018, an increase of 36.4%. The increase in revenues in these six same store sales was primarily an increase in the commercial sales.

 

   6 Same Stores 
   Year ended   Year ended     
   December 31,
2019
   December 31,
2018
   Variance 
Net revenue  $12,995,795   $9,528,453   $3,467,342 

 

Cost of Goods Sold

 

Cost of goods sold for the year ended December 31, 2019 increased approximately $34.6 million or 153.5%, to $57.2 million, compared to $22.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2018. The increase in cost of goods sold was due to the 174.9% increase in revenues, comparing the year ended December 31, 2018 to 2019 primarily due to the increase in the number of stores between 2018 and 2019 as noted in more detail above.

 

Gross profit was $22.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, as compared to $6.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of approximately $16.1 million or 250.1%. Gross profit as a percentage of sales was 28.3% for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to 22.2% for the year ended December 31, 2018. The increase in the gross profit margin percentage in 2019 was due to (1) reduced pricing from vendors as a result of our increasing purchases from those vendors, and (2) the sale of product acquired in a large bulk purchase in the first quarter of 2019 at a substantial discount. The increase in the gross profit percentage was also due to the slight decrease in non-cash inventory valuation adjustments of approximately $870,000 in 2018, compared to $809,000 in 2019. The inventory valuation adjustments consist of a reserve for obsolete inventory as well as the write down of inventory resulting from physical inventory counts and to its current fair market value where that is lower than cost.

 

16

 

 

Operating Expenses

 

Operating expenses are comprised of store operations, primarily payroll, rent and utilities, and corporate overhead. Store operating costs were approximately $10.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to approximately $5.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of approximately $4.9 million or 94%. The increase in store operating costs was due to the addition of 10 new stores in 2019 and 9 new stores 2018. Revenues increased 174.9%, but store operating costs increased only 94%. Store operating costs as a percentage of sales were 12.7% for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to 18% for the year ended December 31, 2018, a 41% improvement. Store operating costs were positively impacted by the acquisitions of new stores in 2018 and 2019 which have a lower percentage of operating costs to revenues due to their larger size and higher volume. The net impact, as noted above, resulted in lower store operating costs as a percentage of revenues. 

 

Corporate overhead is comprised of, share-based compensation, depreciation and amortization, general and administrative costs and corporate salaries and related expenses and were approximately $10.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to approximately $5.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2018. Corporate overhead costs were 13% of revenue for the year ended December 31, 2019, compare to 18.9% for the year ended December 31, 2018. The increase in salaries and related expense from 2018 to 2019 was due to the increase in corporate staff, primarily, accounting and finance, inventory management, sales and information technology, store operations, to support both current and future operations and to increase stores commercial sales. Corporate salaries as a percentage of sales were 4.5% for the year ended December 31, 2019 and 5.7% for the year ended December 31, 2018. The decrease in this percentage is because corporate staff costs do not rise directly commensurate with the increase in revenues. Current corporate staff levels will not rise commensurate with increase in revenues in the future and the percentage of salaries to sales will decline. General and administrative expenses, comprised mainly of advertising and promotions, travel & entertainment, professional fees and insurance, was approximately $3.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2019 and approximately $1.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2018 with a majority of the increase in advertising and promotion and travel and entertainment. General and administrative costs as a percentage of revenue was 4% for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to 5.5% for the year ended December 31, 2018. The decrease in this percentage once again is because the general and administrative costs do not rise commensurate with the increase in revenues.

 

Corporate overhead includes non-cash expenses, consisting primarily of depreciation and share-based compensation, which was approximately $3.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to approximately $2.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Net Income (Loss)

 

Net income for the year ended December 31, 2019 was approximately $1.9 million, compared to a loss of approximately $5.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of $6.9 million. Net income for 2019 compared to the net loss for 2018 was primarily due to a 174.9% increase in revenues with only a 153.5% increase in cost of goods sold thereby increasing margin % and margin dollars by $16.1 million in 2019. Store operating costs increased only $4.9 million in 2019 compared to 2018, so the store operations contributed $11.6 million more in profit in 2019 than in 2018. As noted previously, corporate overhead increased $4.9 million over 2018 resulting in net income of $1.9 million for 2019, compared to a loss of $5.1 million for 2018.

 

Operating Activities

 

Net cash used in operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2019 was approximately $3.3 million, compared to $1.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of approximately $1.8 million. Cash provided by operating activities is driven by our net income (loss) and adjusted by non-cash items as well as changes in operating assets and liabilities. Non-cash adjustments primarily include depreciation, amortization of intangible assets, share based compensation expense and changes in valuation allowances. Non-cash adjustment totaled approximately $4.4 million and approximately $3.4 for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively, so non-cash adjustments had a greater impact on net cash provided by operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2019 than the same period in 2018. Despite net income of $1.9 million and non-cash adjustments of $4.4 million for 2019, these positive adjustments were offset by increases in inventory of $10.5 million, increases in trade receivable of $3.8 million and increases in other current assets of $2.1 million offset by increases in trade accounts payable of $4.2 million, customer deposits of $2 million and other current liabilities of $500,000. For the year ended December 31, 2018 the net loss of $5.1 million was offset by non-cash adjustments totaling $3.4 million and the increases in current assets of $1.2 million were offset the increase in current liabilities of $1.3 million, so the net cash used in operating activities in 2018 was primarily related to the net loss.

 

17

 

 

Net cash used in investing activities was approximately $11.8 for the year ended December 31, 2019 and approximately $6.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2018. The increase in 2019 was due to the multiple asset acquisitions throughout 2019 and the purchase of vehicles and store equipment to support new store operations. During 2019, we opened or acquired 10 new stores and as such we incurred expenditures for store racking and displays, vehicles and other store furniture and fixtures. During 2018, we opened or acquired 9 new stores and as such we incurred expenditures for store racking and displays, vehicles and other store furniture and fixtures.

 

Net cash provided by financing activities for the year ended December 31, 2019 was approximately $13 million and represented proceeds from the sale of Common Stock and exercise of warrants, net of offering costs, of $13.9 million offset by payments of long-term debt of $460,000. Net cash provided by financing activities for the year ended December 31, 2018 was approximately $21.3 million and was comprised of primarily from proceeds from the sales of Common Stock and exercise of warrants, net of offering costs of $12.9 million and proceeds from convertible debt of $8.9 million, net of payments of long-term debt of $455,000.

 

Use of Non-GAAP Financial Information

 

The Company believes that the presentation of results excluding certain items in “Adjusted EBITDA,” such as non-cash equity compensation charges, provides meaningful supplemental information to both management and investors, facilitating the evaluation of performance across reporting periods. The Company uses these non-GAAP measures for internal planning and reporting purposes. These non-GAAP measures are not in accordance with, or an alternative for, generally accepted accounting principles and may be different from non-GAAP measures used by other companies. The presentation of this additional information is not meant to be considered in isolation or as a substitute for net income or net income per share prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.

 

Set forth below is a reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA to net income (loss):

 

   Year ended 
   December 31,
2019
   December 31,
2018
 
Net Income (loss)  $1,878,804   $(5,073,755)
Interest   45,191    23,565 
Depreciation and Amortization   1,044,553    351,070 
EBITDA   2,968,548    (4,699,120)
Lease termination fees   -    35,000 
Audit fees related to business combinations   -    85,200 
Non-cash operating lease expense   16,375    - 
Inventory valuation adjustments   809,286    870,257 
Amortization of debt discount   356,306    989,601 
Share based compensation (option comp, warrant comp, stock issued for services)   2,490,535    1,895,219 
           
Adjusted EBITDA  $6,641,050   $(823,843)
           
Adjusted EBITDA per share, basic  $.20   $(.04)
Adjusted EBITDA per share, diluted  $.17   $(.04)

 

18

 

 

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

 

As of December 31, 2019, we had working capital of approximately $30.6 million, compared to working capital of approximately $21.6 million as of December 31, 2018, an increase of approximately $9 million. The increase in working capital from December 31, 2018 to December 31, 2019 was due primarily to the proceeds from the sale of Common Stock, proceeds for a convertible debt offering and exercise of warrants totaling approximately $13.9 million. At December 31, 2019, we had cash and cash equivalents of approximately $13 million. We believe that existing cash and cash equivalents are sufficient to fund existing operations for the next twelve months.

 

We anticipate that we will need additional financing in the future to continue to acquire and open new stores. To date we have financed our operations through the issuance of the sale of Common Stock, warrants and convertible debentures.

 

Financing Activities

 

2019 Offerings

 

On June 26, 2019, the Company completed a private placement of a total of 4,123,257 units of the Company’s securities at the price of $3.10 per unit pursuant to Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act and Rule 506 of Regulation D promulgated under the Securities Act. Each unit consisted of (i) one share of Common Stock and (ii) one 3-year warrant, each entitling the holder to purchase one half share of Common Stock, at a price of $3.50 per share. The Company raised a total of $12,782,099 from 19 accredited investors.

 

2018 Offerings

 

On January 17, 2018, the Company completed a private placement of a total of 36 units of its securities at the price of $250,000 per unit. Each unit consists of (i) a .1% unsecured convertible promissory note of the principal amount of $250,000, and (ii) a 3-year warrant entitling the holder to purchase 37,500 shares of Common Stock, at a price of $.01 per share or through cashless exercise. The Company raised gross proceeds of $9,000,000 from 23 accredited investors in the offering.

 

On May 9, 2018, (the Company completed a private placement of a total of 33.33 units of the Company’s securities at the price of $300,000 per unit pursuant to Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act and Rule 506 of Regulation D promulgated thereunder. Each unit consists of (i) 100,000 shares of the Company’s $.001 par value common stock and (ii) 50,000 3-year warrants, each entitling the holder to purchase one share of the Company’s common stock, at a price of $.35 per share or through cashless exercise. The Company raised a total of $10,000,000 from three accredited investors.

 

OFF-BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS

 

We do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements (as that term is defined in Item 303 of Regulation S-K) that are reasonably likely to have a current or future material effect on our financial condition, revenue or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources.

 

RECENTLY ISSUED ACCOUNTING STANDARDS

 

Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

 

During the first quarter of 2019, the Company adopted the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2016-02, Leases (ASC 842), which introduces the balance sheet recognition of lease assets and lease liabilities by lessees for those leases classified as operating leases under previous guidance. The Company has adopted the new lease standard using the new transition option issued under the amendments in ASU 2018-11, Leases, which allowed the Company to continue to apply the legacy guidance in Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) 840, Leases, in the comparative periods presented in the year of adoption. The Company elected the package of practical expedients permitted under the transition guidance within the new standard, which among other things, allowed the Company to carry forward the historical lease classification. The Company made an accounting policy election to keep leases with an initial term of 12 months or less off the balance sheet. The Company will recognize those lease payments on a straight-line basis over the lease term. The impact of the adoption was an increase to the Company’s operating lease assets and liabilities on January 1, 2019 of $3.2 million.

 

19

 

 

On January 1, 2019, the Company also adopted ASU 2018-07, “Improvements to Nonemployee Share-Based Payment Accounting.” ASU 2018-07 more closely aligns the accounting for employee and nonemployee share-based payments. The amendment is effective commencing in 2019 with early adoption permitted. The adoption of this new guidance did not have a material impact on our Financial Statements.

 

In August 2018, the SEC adopted amendments to certain disclosure requirements in Securities Act Release No. 33-10532, Disclosure Update and Simplification. These amendments eliminate, modify, or integrate into other SEC requirements certain disclosure rules. Among the amendments is the requirement to present an analysis of changes in stockholders’ equity in the interim financial statements included in Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q. The analysis, which can be presented as a footnote or separate statement, is required for the current and comparative quarter and year-to-date interim periods. The amendments are effective for all filings made on or after November 5, 2018. The Company adopted these amendments in its Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2019.

 

In January 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-01, Financial Instruments-Overall: Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities, which requires that (i) all equity investments, other than equity-method investments, in unconsolidated entities generally be measured at fair value through earnings and (ii) when the fair value option has been elected for financial liabilities, changes in fair value due to instrument-specific credit risk will be recognized separately in other comprehensive income. Additionally, the ASU 2016-01 changes the disclosure requirements for financial instruments. The new standard was effective for the Company starting in the first quarter of fiscal 2019. The adoption of this standard on January 1, 2019 did not have any effect on the consolidated financial statements and footnote disclosure.

 

On August 28, 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-12, “Derivatives and Hedging,” which better aligns risk management activities and financial reporting for hedging relationships through changes to both the designation and measurement guidance for qualifying hedging relationships and the presentation of hedge results. The amendments expand and refine hedge accounting for both nonfinancial and financial risk components and in some situations better align the recognition and presentation of the effects of the hedging instrument and the hedged item in the financial statements. The new standard was effective for the Company as of January 1, 2019. The adoption of this new standard on January 1, 2019 did not have any impact on our consolidated financial statements and footnote disclosures.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements – Pending Adoption

 

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments-Credit Losses: Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments, which changes the impairment model for most financial assets and certain other instruments. For trade receivables and other instruments, entities will be required to use a new forward-looking expected loss model that generally will result in the earlier recognition of allowances for losses. For available-for-sale debt securities with unrealized losses, the losses will be recognized as allowances rather than as reductions in the amortized cost of the securities. This guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019, including interim periods within those years, with early adoption permitted only as of annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of the adoption of this guidance on the Company’s consolidated financial statements. 

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Disclosure Framework - Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement. The new guidance modifies the disclosure requirements on fair value measurements in Topic 820. The amendments in ASU 2018-13 are effective for all entities for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2019. The Company does not anticipate that the adoption of ASU 2018-13 will have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements or related financial statement disclosures.

  

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

Not applicable.

 

20

 

 

ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

F-1

 

 

 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and

Stockholders of GrowGeneration Corp

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of GrowGeneration Corp and Subsidiaries (the Company) as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, and the related consolidated statements of operations, stockholder s’ equity, and cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended December 31, 2019, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the financial statements). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended December 31, 2019, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

/s/ Connolly Grady & Cha, P.C

 

Certified Public Accountants

We have served as the Company's auditor since 2014

Springfield, Pennsylvania

  

March 27, 2020

 

F-2

 

 

GrowGeneration Corp. and Subsidiaries

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

   December 31,
2019
   December 31,
2018
 
         
ASSETS        
Current assets:        
Cash  $12,979,444   $14,639,981 
Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $291,372 and $133,288 at December 31, 2019 and 2018   4,455,209    862,397 
Inventory   22,659,357    8,869,469 
Prepaids and other current assets   2,549,559    606,037 
Total current assets   42,643,569    24,977,884 
           
Property and equipment, net   3,340,616    1,820,821 
Operating leases right-of-use assets, net   7,628,591    - 
Intangible assets, net   233,280    114,155 
Goodwill   17,798,932    8,752,909 
Other assets   377,364    227,205 
TOTAL ASSETS  $72,022,352   $35,892,974 
           
LIABILITIES & STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY          
Current liabilities:          
Accounts payable  $6,024,750   $1,819,411 
Accrued liabilities   -    40,151 
Payroll and payroll tax liabilities   1,072,142    410,345 
Customer deposits   2,503,785    516,038 
Sales tax payable   533,656    191,958 
Current maturities of right-of-use assets   1,836,700    - 
Current portion of long-term debt   110,231    436,813 
Total current liabilities   12,081,264    3,414,716 
           
Long-term convertible debt, net of debt discount and debt issuance costs   -    2,044,113 
Operating leases right-of-use assets, net of current maturities   5,807,266    - 
Long-term debt, net of current portion   242,079    375,626 
Total liabilities   18,130,609    5,834,455 
           
Commitments and contingencies          
           
Stockholders’ Equity:          
Common stock; $.001 par value; 100,000,000 shares authorized; 36,876,305 and 27,948,609 shares issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively   36,876    27,949 
Additional paid-in capital   60,742,055    38,796,562 
Accumulated deficit   (6,887,188)   (8,765,992)
Total stockholders’ equity   53,891,743    30,058,519 
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY  $72,022,352   $35,892,974 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these audited consolidated financial statements.

 

F-3

 

 

GrowGeneration Corp. and Subsidiaries

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

 

   For the Years Ended
December 31,
 
   2019   2018 
         
Sales  $79,733,568   $29,000,730 
Cost of sales   57,171,721    22,556,172 
Gross profit   22,561,847    6,444,558 
           
Operating expenses:          
Store operations   10,095,422    5,202,330 
General and administrative   3,172,019    1,603,421 
Share based compensation   2,490,535    1,895,219 
Depreciation and amortization   1,044,553    351,070 
Salaries and related expenses   3,619,197    1,648,166 
Total operating expenses   20,421,726    10,700,206 
           
Net income (loss) from operations   2,140,121    (4,255,648)
           
Other income (expense):          
Miscellaneous income (expense)   (4,545)   115,875 
Interest income   144,725    79,184 
Interest expense   (45,191)   (23,565)
Amortization of debt discount   (356,306)   (989,601)
Total non-operating income (expense), net   (261,317)   (818,107)
           
Net income (loss)  $1,878,804   $(5,073,755)
           
Net income (loss) per share, basic  $.06   $(.22)
Net income (loss) per share, diluted  $.05   $(.22)
           
Weighted average shares outstanding, basic   32,833,594    23,492,650 
Weighted average shares outstanding, diluted   39,228,696    23,492,650 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these audited consolidated financial statements.

 

F-4

 

 

GrowGeneration Corp. and Subsidiaries

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 and 2018

 

       Additional       Total 
   Common Stock   Paid-In   Accumulated   Stockholders’ 
   Shares   Amount   Capital   (Deficit)   Equity 
Balances, December 31, 2017   16,846,835   $16,846   $11,254,212   $(3,692,237)  $7,578,821 
                          
Sale of Common stock and warrants, net of fees   3,333,333    3,333    9,956,544    -    9,959,877 
Warrants issued for services   -    -    456,807    -    456,807 
Stock option expense   -    -    546,370    -    546,370 
Common stock issued upon warrant exercise   3,076,461    3,077    2,590,617    -    2,593,694 
Common stock issued upon exercise of options   995,186    995    320,706    -    321,701 
Common stock issued in connection with business combinations   1,550,000    1,550    5,303,600    -    5,305,150 
Common stock issued upon conversion of convertible debt   2,013,294    2,014    3,619,917    -    3,621,931 
Warrants issued with convertible debt   -    -    4,239,000    -    4,239,000 
Common stock issued for services   107,500    108    400,395    -    400,503 
Common stock issued for accrued share-based compensation   26,000    26    108,394    -    108,420 
Net loss                  (5,073,755)   (5,073,755)
Balances, December 31, 2018   27,948,609   $27,949    38,796,562   $(8,765,992)  $30,058,519 
                          
Sale of Common stock and warrants, net of fees   4,123,254    4,123    12,639,510    -    12,643,633 
Share based compensation             1,215,273         1,215,273 
Common stock issued upon warrant exercise   1,757,913    1,758    1,298,141         1,299,899 
Common stock issued upon exercise of options   10,000    10    5,990         6,000 
Common stock issued upon cashless exercise of options   505,868    506    (506)        - 
Common stock issued in connection with business combinations   969,553    969    3,624,411    -    3,625,380 
Common stock issued upon conversion of convertible debt   1,258,608    1,259    2,404,010         2,405,269 
Common stock issued for services   202,500    202    548,564         548,766 
Common stock issued for accrued share-based compensation   100,000    100    210,100         210,200 
Net income                  1,878,804    1,878,804 
Balances, December 31, 2019   36,876,305   $36,876   $60,742,055   $(6,887,188)  $53,891,743 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of theses audited consolidated financial statements.

 

F-5

 

 

GrowGeneration Corp. and Subsidiaries

 CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

   Years Ended December 31, 
   2019   2018 
Cash Flows from Operating Activities:        
Net income (loss)  $1,878,804   $(5,073,755)
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash used in operating activities:          
Depreciation and amortization   1,044,553    351,069 
Provision for doubtful accounts receivable   172,135    35,459 
Inventory valuation reserve   429,126    153,397 
Amortization of debt discount   356,306    989,601 
Stock based compensation   2,490,535    1,895,219 
Noncash operating lease expense   15,375    - 
Other   (66,536)   - 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:          
(Increase) decrease in:          
Accounts receivable   (3,764,947)   (244,288)
Inventory   (10,482,014)   (792,575)
Prepaid expenses and other assets   (2,061,701)   (182,616)
Increase (decrease) in:          
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities   4,165,188    514,154 
Customer deposits   1,987,747    423,688 
Payroll and payroll tax liabilities   154,471    270,878 
Sales taxes payable   341,698    118,738 
Net Cash (Used In) Operating Activities   (3,339,260)   (1,541,031)
Cash Flows from Investing Activities:          
Assets acquired in business combinations   (9,458,743)   (5,680,409)
Purchase of property and equipment   (2,232,812)   (625,379)
Purchase of goodwill and other intangibles   (119,125)   (61,523)
Net Cash (Used In) Investing Activities   (11,810,680)   (6,367,311)
Cash Flows from Financing Activities:          
Principal payments on long term debt   (460,129)   (454,979)
Proceeds from issuance of convertible debt, net of expenses   -    8,912,765 
Proceeds from the sales of common stock and exercise of warrants and options, net of expenses   13,949,532    12,875,272 
Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities   13,489,403    21,333,058 
           
Net Increase(decrease) in Cash and Cash Equivalents   (1,660,537)   13,424,716 
Cash and Cash Equivalents at Beginning of year   14,639,981    1,215,265 
Cash and Cash Equivalents at End of year  $12,979,444   $14,639,981 
           
Supplemental Information:          
Common stock and warrants issued for prepaid services  $96,000   $45,000 
Common stock issued for accrued payroll liability   210,200    - 
Debt converted to Equity   2,310,832    3,621,931 
Assets acquired by issuance of stock   3,625,380    5,305,150 
Warrants issued for debt discount   -    4,239,000 
Acquisition of vehicles with debt financing   -    56,174 
Interest paid during the period  $45,191   $23,565 
Acquisition of assets with seller financing   -    1,087,000 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these audited consolidated financial statements.

 

F-6

 

 

GROWGENERATION CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 and 2018

  

1. NATURE OF OPERATIONS

 

GrowGeneration Corp (the “Company”) was incorporated on March 6, 2014 in Colorado under the name of Easylife Corp and changed its name to GrowGeneration Corp. It maintains its principal office in Denver, Colorado.

 

GrowGeneration is the largest chain of hydroponic garden centers in North America and is a leading marketer and distributor of nutrients, growing media, advanced indoor and greenhouse lighting, ventilation systems and accessories for hydroponic gardening. As of March 27, 2020, the Company owns and operates a chain of twenty seven (27) retail hydroponic/gardening stores, with five (5) located in the state of Colorado, four (4) in the state of California, four (4) in the state of Michigan, two (2) in the state of Nevada, one (1) in the state of Washington, one (1) in the state of Oregon, four (4) in the State of Oklahoma, one (1) in the state of Rhode Island, three (3) in Maine, (1) in Florida, one (1) distribution center in California and an online e-commerce store, GrowGen.Pro. In addition, we operate a warehouse out of Sacramento, CA. Our plan is to acquire, open and operate hydroponic/gardening stores and related businesses throughout the United States and Canada.

 

The Company engages in its business through its wholly owned subsidiaries, GrowGeneration Pueblo Corp, GrowGeneration California Corp, Grow Generation Nevada Corp, GrowGeneration Washington Corp, GrowGeneration Rhode Island Corp, GrowGeneration Oklahoma Corp, GrowGeneration Canada, GrowGeneration HG Corp, GrowGeneration Hemp Corp, GGen Distribution Corp, GrowGeneration Michigan Corp, GrowGeneration New England Corp, GrowGeneration Florida Corp and GrowGeneration Management Corp.

 

2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of Presentation and Consolidation

 

The financial statements are prepared under the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 105-10, Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the U.S. (“GAAP”).

 

The consolidated financial statements include the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries. All intercompany balances and transactions are eliminated in consolidation.

 

Reclassifications

 

Certain amounts in the prior period financial statements have been reclassified to conform to the current period presentation. These reclassifications had no effect on reported consolidated net income (loss).

 

Use of Estimates

 

Management uses estimates and assumptions in preparing these consolidated financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. These estimates and assumptions affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements, and the reported revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could vary from the estimates that were used.

 

Segment Reporting

 

Management makes significant operating decisions based upon the analysis of the entire Company and financial performance is evaluated on a company-wide basis. Accordingly, the various products sold are aggregated into one reportable operating segment as under guidance in the Financial Accounting Standards Board (the “FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC or codification”) Topic 280 for segment reporting.

 

F-7

 

 

 GROWGENERATION CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 and 2018

 

2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company recognizes revenue, net of estimated returns and sales tax, at the time the customer takes possession of merchandise or receives services. When the Company receives payment from customers before the customer has taken possession of the merchandise or the service has been performed, the amount received is recorded as Deferred Revenue in the accompanying Consolidated Balance Sheets until the sale or service is complete.

 

Vendor Allowances

 

Vendor allowances primarily consist of volume rebates that are earned as a result of attaining certain purchase levels. These vendor allowances are accrued as earned, with those allowances received as a result of attaining certain purchase levels accrued over the incentive period based on estimates of purchases.

 

Volume rebates, when earned, are recorded as a reduction in Cost of Sales.

 

Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments purchased with original maturities of three months or less to be cash equivalents. The Company’s cash equivalents are carried at fair market value and consist primarily of money market funds.

 

Accounts Receivable

 

Accounts receivable are stated at the amount the Company expects to collect from balances outstanding at year-end, based on the Company’s assessment of the credit history with customers having outstanding balances and current relationships with them. A reserve for uncollectable receivables is established when collection of amounts due is deemed improbable. Indicators of improbable collection include client bankruptcy, client litigation, client cash flow difficulties or ongoing service or billing disputes. Credit is generally extended on a short-term basis thus receivables do not bear interest. At December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company established an allowance for doubtful accounts of $291,372 and $133,288, respectively.

 

Inventory

 

Inventory consists primarily of gardening supplies and materials and is recorded at the lower of cost (first-in, first-out method) or market. The company periodically reviews the value of items in inventory and provides write-downs or write-offs of inventory based on its assessment of market conditions. Write-downs and write-offs are charged to cost of goods sold.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are carried at cost. Leasehold Improvements are amortized using the straight-line method over the original term of the lease or the useful life of the improvement, whichever is shorter. Renewals and betterment that materially extend the life of the asset are capitalized. Expenditures for maintenance and repairs are charged against operations. Depreciation of property and equipment is provided on the straight-line method for financial reporting purposes at rates based on the following estimated useful lives:

 

   Estimated Lives
Vehicle  5 years
Furniture and fixtures  5-7 years
Computers and equipment  3-5 years
Leasehold improvements  10 years not to exceed lease term

 

F-8

 

 

GROWGENERATION CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 and 2018

 

2.SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

 

Leases

 

We assess whether an arrangement is a lease at inception. Leases with an initial term of 12 months or less are not recorded on the balance sheet. We have elected the practical expedient to not separate lease and non-lease components for all assets. Operating lease assets and operating lease liabilities are calculated based on the present value of the future minimum lease payments over the lease term at the lease start date. As most of our leases do not provide an implicit rate, we use our incremental borrowing rate based on the information available at the lease start date in determining the present value of future payments. The operating lease asset is increased by any lease payments made at or before the lease start date and reduced by lease incentives and initial direct costs incurred. The lease term includes options to renew or terminate the lease when it is reasonably certain that we will exercise that option. The exercise of lease renewal options is at our sole discretion. The depreciable life of lease assets and leasehold improvements are limited by the lease term. Lease expense for operating leases is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The fair value of certain of our financial instruments including cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, prepaid assets, employee advances, accounts payable, customer deposits, payroll and payroll tax liabilities, sales tax payable and notes payable approximate their carrying amounts because of the short-term maturity of these instruments.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes in accordance with FASB ASC 740, Income Taxes, which requires the recognition of deferred income taxes for differences between the basis of assets and liabilities for financial statement and income tax purposes. The differences relate principally to depreciation of property and equipment, reserve for obsolete inventory and bad debt. Deferred tax assets and liabilities represent the future tax consequence for those differences, which will either be deductible or taxable when the assets and liabilities are recovered or settled. Deferred taxes are also recognized for operating losses that are available to offset future taxable income. Valuation allowances are established to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount expected to be realized.

 

The Company adopted the provisions of FASB ASC 740-10-25, which prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement attribute for the recognition and measurement of tax positions taken or expected to be taken in income tax returns. FASB ASC 740-10-25 also provides guidance on de-recognition of income tax assets and liabilities, classification of current and deferred income tax assets and liabilities, and accounting for interest and penalties associated with tax positions. The Company’s tax returns are subject to tax examinations by U.S. federal and state authorities until respective statute of limitation. Currently, the 2018, 2017, and 2016 tax years are open and subject to examination by taxing authorities. However, the Company is not currently under audit nor has the Company been contacted by any of the taxing authorities. The Company does not have any accruals for uncertain tax positions as of December 31, 2019. It is not anticipated that unrecognized tax benefits would significantly increase or decrease within 12 months of the reporting date.

 

Concentration of Risk

 

Financial instruments that potentially expose us to concentrations of risk consist primarily of cash and cash equivalents and accounts receivable, which are generally not collateralized. Our policy is to place our cash and cash equivalents with high quality financial institutions, in order to limit the amount of credit exposure. Accounts at each institution are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), up to $250,000. At December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company had $11,229,444 and $12,962,958, respectively, in excess of the FDIC insurance limit. The Company generally does not require collateral from its customers, but its credit extension and collection policies include analyzing the financial condition of potential customers, establishing credit limits, monitoring payments, and aggressively pursuing delinquent accounts. The Company maintains allowance for potential credit losses.

 

F-9

 

 

GROWGENERATION CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 and 2018

 

2.SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

 

Advertising

 

The Company expenses advertising and promotional costs when incurred. Advertising and promotional expenses for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 amounted to $736,656 and $269,550, respectively.

 

Goodwill

 

Goodwill represents the excess of purchase price over the fair value of net assets. The Company accounts for goodwill in accordance with the provisions of FASB Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2014-02, Intangibles – Goodwill and Other (Topic 350) Accounting for Goodwill. In accordance with FASB ASC Topic 350 for Intangibles – Goodwill and Other, goodwill is not amortized but is reviewed for potential impairment on an annual basis, or if events or circumstances indicate a potential impairment, at the reporting unit level. The Company’s review for impairment includes an assessment of qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its´ carrying value, including goodwill. If it is determined that it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its´ carrying value, including goodwill, the first step of the two-step quantitative goodwill impairment test is performed, which compares the fair value of the reporting unit with its´ carrying amounts, including goodwill. If the fair value of the reporting unit exceeds its´ carrying amount, goodwill of the reporting unit is considered not impaired. However, if the carrying amount of the reporting unit exceeds its fair value, additional procedures must be performed. That additional procedure compares the implied fair value of the reporting unit’s goodwill with the carrying amount of that goodwill. An impairment loss is recorded to the extent that the carrying amount of goodwill exceeds its implied fair value.

  

Earnings (Loss) Per Share

 

The Company computes net earnings (loss) per share under Accounting Standards Codification subtopic 260-10, “Earnings Per Share” (“ASC 260-10”). Basic earnings or loss per share (“EPS”) is computed by dividing net income (loss) available to common stockholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted EPS is computed by dividing net income (loss) by the weighted-average of all potentially dilutive shares of common stock that were outstanding during the periods presented. 

 

The treasury stock method is used in calculating diluted EPS for potentially dilutive stock options and share purchase warrants, which assumes that any proceeds received from the exercise of in-the-money stock options and share purchase warrants, would be used to purchase common shares at the average market price for the period.

 

Stock Based Compensation

 

The Company records stock-based compensation in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718, Compensation-Stock Compensation (“ASC 718”). The Company estimates the fair value of stock options using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. The fair value of stock options granted is recognized as an expense over the requisite service period. Stock-based compensation expense for all share-based payment awards are recognized using the straight-line single-option method.

 

The Black-Scholes option pricing model requires subjective assumptions, including future stock price volatility and expected time to exercise, which greatly affect the calculated values. The expected term of options granted is derived from historical data on employee exercises and post-vesting employment termination behavior. The risk-free rate selected to value any particular grant is based on the U.S. Treasury rate that corresponds to the expected life of the grant effective as of the date of the grant. The expected volatility is based on the historical volatility of the Company’s stock price. These factors could change in the future, affecting the determination of stock-based compensation expense in future periods.

 

F-10

 

 

GROWGENERATION CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 and 2018

 

3.RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

 

From time to time, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) or other standard setting bodies issue new accounting pronouncements. Updates to the FASB Accounting Standards Codification are communicated through issuance of an Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”). We have implemented all new accounting pronouncements that are in effect and that may impact our financial statements. We have evaluated recently issued accounting pronouncements and determined that there is no material impact on our financial position or results of operations. 

 

Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

 

During the first quarter of 2019, the Company adopted the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2016-02, Leases (ASC 842), which introduces the balance sheet recognition of lease assets and lease liabilities by lessees for those leases classified as operating leases under previous guidance. The Company has adopted the new lease standard using the new transition option issued under the amendments in ASU 2018-11, Leases, which allowed the Company to continue to apply the legacy guidance in Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) 840, Leases, in the comparative periods presented in the year of adoption. The Company elected the package of practical expedients permitted under the transition guidance within the new standard, which among other things, allowed the Company to carry forward the historical lease classification. The Company made an accounting policy election to keep leases with an initial term of 12 months or less off the balance sheet. The Company will recognize those lease payments on a straight-line basis over the lease term. The impact of the adoption was an increase to the Company’s operating lease assets and liabilities on January 1, 2019 of $3.2 million.

 

On January 1, 2019, the Company also adopted ASU 2018-07, “Improvements to Nonemployee Share-Based Payment Accounting.” ASU 2018-07 more closely aligns the accounting for employee and nonemployee share-based payments. The amendment is effective commencing in 2019 with early adoption permitted. The adoption of this new guidance did not have a material impact on our Financial Statements.

 

In August 2018, the SEC adopted amendments to certain disclosure requirements in Securities Act Release No. 33-10532, Disclosure Update and Simplification. These amendments eliminate, modify, or integrate into other SEC requirements certain disclosure rules. Among the amendments is the requirement to present an analysis of changes in stockholders’ equity in the interim financial statements included in Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q. The analysis, which can be presented as a footnote or separate statement, is required for the current and comparative quarter and year-to-date interim periods. The amendments are effective for all filings made on or after November 5, 2018. The Company adopted these amendments in its Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2019.

 

In January 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-01, Financial Instruments-Overall: Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities, which requires that (i) all equity investments, other than equity-method investments, in unconsolidated entities generally be measured at fair value through earnings and (ii) when the fair value option has been elected for financial liabilities, changes in fair value due to instrument-specific credit risk will be recognized separately in other comprehensive income. Additionally, the ASU 2016-01 changes the disclosure requirements for financial instruments. The new standard was effective for the Company starting in the first quarter of fiscal 2019. The adoption of this standard on January 1, 2019 did not have any effect on the consolidated financial statements and footnote disclosure.

 

On August 28, 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-12, “Derivatives and Hedging,” which better aligns risk management activities and financial reporting for hedging relationships through changes to both the designation and measurement guidance for qualifying hedging relationships and the presentation of hedge results. The amendments expand and refine hedge accounting for both nonfinancial and financial risk components and in some situations better align the recognition and presentation of the effects of the hedging instrument and the hedged item in the financial statements. The new standard was effective for the Company as of January 1, 2019. The adoption of this new standard on January 1, 2019 did not have any impact on our consolidated financial statements and footnote disclosures.

 

F-11

 

 

GROWGENERATION CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 and 2018

 

3.RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS, Continued

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements – Pending Adoption

 

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments-Credit Losses: Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments, which changes the impairment model for most financial assets and certain other instruments. For trade receivables and other instruments, entities will be required to use a new forward-looking expected loss model that generally will result in the earlier recognition of allowances for losses. For available-for-sale debt securities with unrealized losses, the losses will be recognized as allowances rather than as reductions in the amortized cost of the securities. This guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019, including interim periods within those years, with early adoption permitted only as of annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of the adoption of this guidance on the Company’s consolidated financial statements. 

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Disclosure Framework - Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement. The new guidance modifies the disclosure requirements on fair value measurements in Topic 820. The amendments in ASU 2018-13 are effective for all entities for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2019. The Company does not anticipate that the adoption of ASU 2018-13 will have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements or related financial statement disclosures.

 

4.PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

 

Property and equipment at December 31, 2019 and 2018 consists of the following: 

   December 31, 
   2019   2018 
Vehicle  $1,148,993   $535,857 
Leasehold improvements   884,685    441,725 
Furniture, fixtures and equipment   2,858,777    1,417,061 
    4,892,455    2,394,643 
Accumulated depreciation and amortization   (1,551,839)   (573,822)
           
Property and equipment, net  $3,340,616   $1,820,821 

 

Depreciation expense was $1,046,328 and $350,415 for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

5.INCOME TAXES

  

On December 22, 2017, the U.S. President signed into law H.R.1, formerly known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Legislation”). The Tax Legislation significantly revised the U.S. tax code by, (i) lowering the U.S federal statutory income tax rate from 35% to 21%, (ii) implementing a territorial tax system, (iii) imposing a one-time transition tax on deemed repatriated earnings of foreign subsidiaries (“Transition Tax”), (iv) requiring a current inclusion of global intangible low taxed income (“GILTI”) of certain earnings of controlled foreign corporations in U.S. federal taxable income, (v) creating the base erosion anti-abuse tax (“BEAT”) regime, (vi) implementing bonus depreciation that will allow for full expensing of qualified property, and (vii) limiting deductibility of interest and executive compensation expense, among other changes. The Company has computed its 2018 current tax benefit using the U.S. federal statutory rates of 21% while it has computed its deferred tax expense using the new statutory rate effective on January 1, 2018 of 21%.

 

Other provisions of the new legislation that were not applicable to the Company until the year ended December 31, 2018 include, but are not limited to, limiting deductibility of interest and executive compensation expense. These additional items have been considered in our income tax provision for the year ended December 31, 2019 and the impact was not material to the overall financial statements.

 

The provision (benefit) for income taxes for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 consisted of the following: 

   Year Ended   Year Ended 
   December 31,
2019
   December 31,
2018
 
Income Tax Expense (benefit)        
Current federal tax expense        
Federal  $479,000   $-0- 
State   -0-    -0- 
Deferred tax (benefit)          
Federal  $(479,000)  $-0- 
State   -0-    -0- 
Total  $-0-   $-0- 

  

F-12

 

 

GROWGENERATION CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 and 2018

 

5.INCOME TAXES, Continued

 

A summary of deferred tax assets and liabilities as of December 31, 2019 and 2018 is as follows:

  

   Year Ended   Year Ended 
   December 31,
2019
   December 31,
2018
 
Deferred tax assets:        
Net operating losses   1,033,300   $2,165,100 
Deferred right to use lease liabilities   1,671,700    - 
Stock based compensation   354,800    663,300 
Amortization of debt discount   -    346,400 
Accruals, reserves and other   160,200    66,100 
    3,220,000    3,240,900 
Deferred tax liabilities:          
Deferred right to use lease assets   1,678,300    - 
Accumulated depreciation and amortization  $360,000   $358,000 
    2,038,300    358,000 
Gross deferred tax asset   1,181,700    2,882,900 
Valuation Allowance   (1,181,700)   (2,882,900)
Deferred tax asset (liability), net  $0   $-0 

  

As of December 31, 2019, the Company had approximately $4.7 million of operating loss carryforwards, which results in a Federal and State deferred tax asset of approximately $1.03 million, expiring in 2037 through 2038.

 

We recorded a valuation allowance against all of our deferred tax assets as of both December 31, 2019, and December 31, 2018. We intend to continue maintaining a full valuation allowance on our deferred tax assets until there is sufficient evidence to support the reversal of all or some portion of these allowances. However, given our current earnings and anticipated future earnings, we believe that there is a reasonable possibility that within the next 12 months, sufficient positive evidence may become available to allow us to reach a conclusion that a significant portion of the valuation allowance will no longer be needed. Release of the valuation allowance would result in the recognition of certain deferred tax assets and a decrease to income tax expense for the period the release is recorded. However, the exact timing and amount of the valuation allowance release are subject to change on the basis of the level of profitability that we are able to actually achieve

  

The differences between the U.S. Federal statutory income tax rate and the Company’s effective tax rate were as follows for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018:

 

   Years Ended December 31, 
   2019   2018 
Federal statutory tax rate   21%   21%
State and local income taxes (net of federal tax benefit)   -    - 
    21%   21 
Valuation allowance   (21)   (21)
    0%   0%

 

F-13

 

 

GROWGENERATION CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 and 2018

 

6.LONG-TERM DEBT

 

   December 31, 
   2019   2018 
Long term debt is as follows:        
Hitachi Capital, interest at 8.0% per annum, payable in monthly installments of $631.13 beginning September 2015 through August 2019, secured by delivery equipment with a book value of $24,910   -    3,211 
           
Wells Fargo Equipment Finance, interest at 3.5% per annum, payable in monthly installments of $518.96 beginning April 2016 through March 2021, secured by warehouse equipment with a book value of $25,437   7,109    12,976 
           
Notes payable issued in connection with seller financing of assets acquired, interest at 1%, payable in 24 installments of $24,996, due February 2020   24,997    350,000 
           
Notes payable issued in connection with seller financing of assets acquired, interest at 1%, payable in 12 installments of $6,003, due September 2019   -    54,000 
           
Notes payable issued in connection with seller financing of assets acquired, interest at 8.125%, payable in 60 installments of $8,440, due August 2023   320,204    392,252 
   $352,310   $812,439 
Less Current Maturities   (110,231)   (436,813)
Total Long-Term Debt  $242,079   $375,626 

  

Debt maturities as of December 31, 2019 are as follows:    
2020  $110,231 
2021   84,714 
2022   91,860 
2023   65,505 
   $352,310 

 

Interest expense for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 was $45,191 and $23,565, respectively.

 

7.LEASES

 

We determine if a contract contains a lease at inception. Our material operating leases consist of retail and warehouse locations as well as office space. Our leases generally have remaining terms of 1- 5 years, most of which include options to extend the leases for additional 3 to 5 year periods. Generally, the lease term is the minimum of the noncancelable period of the lease or the lease term inclusive of reasonably certain renewal periods.

 

Operating lease assets and liabilities are recognized at the lease commencement date. Operating lease liabilities represent the present value of lease payments not yet paid. Operating lease assets represent our right to use an underlying asset and are based upon the operating lease liabilities adjusted for prepayments or accrued lease payments, initial direct costs, lease incentives, and impairment of operating lease assets. To determine the present value of lease payments not yet paid, we estimate incremental secured borrowing rates corresponding to the maturities of the leases. Our leases typically contain rent escalations over the lease term. We recognize expense for these leases on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

 

We elected this expedient to account for lease and non-lease components as a single component for our entire population of operating lease assets.

 

F-14

 

 

GROWGENERATION CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 and 2018

 

7.LEASES, Continued

 

We have elected the short-term lease recognition exemption for all applicable classes of underlying assets. Short-term disclosures include only those leases with a term greater than one month and 12 months or less, and expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term. Leases with an initial term of 12 months or less, that do not include an option to purchase the underlying asset that we are reasonably certain to exercise, are not recorded on the balance sheet.

 

   December 31, 
   2019 
Right to use assets, operating lease assets  $7,628,591 
      
Current lease liability  $1,836,700 
Non-current lease liability   5,807,266 
   $7,643,966 

 

   December 31, 
   2019 
Weighted average remaining lease term   3.9 years 
Weighted average discount rate   7.6%
      
Operating lease assets obtained for operating lease liabilities  $3,050,164 

 

 

Maturities of lease liabilities    
2020  $2,496,070 
2021   2,525,468 
2022   2,078,123 
2023   1,596,229, 
2024   813,984 
2025   654,160 
2026   352,955 
2027   152,637 
Total lease payments   10,669,626 
Less: Imputed interest   (3,025,660)
Lease Liability at December 31, 2019  $7,643,966 

 

F-15

 

 

GROWGENERATION CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 and 2018

 

8.CONVERTIBLE DEBT

 

On January 12, 2018, the Company completed a private placement of a total of 36 units of the Company’s securities at the price of $250,000 per unit pursuant to Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”) and Rule 506 of Regulation D promulgated thereunder. Each unit consisted of (i) a .1% unsecured convertible promissory note of the principal amount of $250,000, and (ii) a 3-year warrant entitling the holder to purchase 37,500 shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $.001 per share, at a price of $.01 per share or through cashless exercise.

 

The convertible debt has a maturity date of January 12, 2021 and the principal balance and any accrued interest is convertible by the holder at any time into Common Stock of the Company at conversion price of $3.00 a share.  Principal due and interest accrued on the notes will automatically convert into shares of Common Stock, at the conversion price, if at any time during the term of the notes, commencing twelve (12) months from the date of issuance, the Common Stock trades minimum daily volume of at least 50,000 shares for twenty (20) consecutive days with a volume weighted average price of at least $4.00 per share.

 

In relation to this transaction, the Company recorded a debt discount of $4,239,000 related to the fair market value of warrants issued as noted above. The debt discount, which was based on an imputed interest rate, is being amortized on a straight-line basis over the life of the convertible debt.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, convertible debt and accrued interest of $2,405,269, net of unamortized debt discount of $674,581, was converted into 1,258,608 shares of common stock at the conversion rate of $3.00 per share.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, convertible debt and accrued interest of $5,927,677, net of unamortized debt discount of $2,305,746, was converted into 2,013,294 shares of common stock at the conversion rate of $3.00 per share.

 

   December 31, 
   2019   2018 
Convertible debt  $-   $3,075,000 
Remaining unamortized debt discount and debt issue costs   -    (1,030,887 
Convertible debt, net of debt discount and debt issue costs  $-   $2,044,113 

 

Amortization of debt discount for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 was $356,306 and $998,601, respectively.

 

At December 31, 2019 and 2018 there were 131,250 and 536,250 warrants outstanding, respectively, related to the issuance of convertible debt.

 

9.SHARE BASED PAYMENTS AND STOCK OPTIONS

 

On March 6, 2014, the Company’s Board of Directors (the “Board”) approved the 2014 Equity Incentive Plan (“2014 Plan) pursuant to which the Company may grant incentive, non-statutory options, stock appreciation rights, restricted stock, restricted stock units, performance shares, performance units and other stock or cash awards to employees, nonemployee members of our Board, consultants and other independent advisors who provide services to the Company. The maximum shares of common stock which may be issued over the term of the plan shall not exceed 2,500,000 shares. Awards under this plan are made by the Board or a committee designated by the Board. Options under the plan are to be issued at the market price of the stock on the day of the grant except to those issued to holders of 10% or more of the Company’s common stock which is required to be issued at a price not less than 110% of the fair market value on the day of the grant. Each option is exercisable at such time or times, during such period and for such numbers of shares shall be determined by the plan administrator. No option may be exercisable for more than ten years (five years in the case of an incentive stock option granted to a 10% stockholder) from the date of grant.

 

F-16

 

 

GROWGENERATION CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 and 2018

 

9.SHARE BASED PAYMENTS AND STOCK OPTIONS, Continued

 

On January 7, 2018, the Board adopted the 2018 Equity Compensation Plan (the “2018 Plan”) and on April 20, 2018, the shareholders approved the 2018 Plan. On February 7, 2020, the Board approved the amendment and restatement of the 2018 Plan to increase the number of shares issuable thereunder from 2,500,000 to 5,000,000, which amendment is pending shareholder approval. The 2018 Plan will be administered by the Board. The Board may grant options to purchase shares of Common Stock, stock appreciation rights, restricted stock units, restricted or unrestricted shares of Common Stock, performance shares, performance units, other cash-based awards and other stock-based awards. The Board also has broad authority to determine the terms and conditions of each option or other kind of equity award, adopt, amend and rescind rules and regulations for the administration of the 2018 Plan and amend or modify outstanding options, grants and awards.

 

No options, stock purchase rights or awards may be made under the 2018 Plan on or after the ten-year anniversary of the adoption of the 2018 Plan by the Board, but the 2018 Plan will continue thereafter while previously granted options, stock appreciation rights or awards remain subject to the 2018 Plan. The maximum shares of Common Stock which may be issued over the term of the plan, as amended shall not exceed 5,000,000 shares. Options granted under the 2018 Plan may be either “incentive stock options” that are intended to meet the requirements of Section 422 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”) or “nonstatutory stock options” that do not meet the requirements of Section 422 of the Code. The Board will determine the exercise price of options granted under the 2018 Plan. The exercise price of stock options may not be less than the fair market value, on the date of grant, per share of our Common Stock issuable upon exercise of the option (or 110% of fair market value in the case of incentive options granted to a ten-percent stockholder). No option may be exercisable for more than ten years (five years in the case of an incentive stock option granted to a 10% stockholder) from the date of grant.

 

Awards issued under the 2014 Plan as of December 31, 2019 are summarized below:  2019 
Total Shares available for issuance pursuant to the 2014 Plan   2,500,000 
Options outstanding, December 31 2019   (995,500)
Total options exercised under 2014 Plan   (1,118,333)
Total shares issued pursuant to the 2014 Plan   (375,000)
Awards available for issuance under the 2014 Plan, December 31, 2019   11,167 

 

Awards issued under the 2018 Plan as of December 31, 2019 are summarized below:

 

   2019 
Total Shares available for issuance pursuant to the 2018 Plan, prior to amendment   2,500,000 
Options outstanding, December 31 2019   (281,500)
Total options exercised under 2018 Plan   - 
Total shares issued pursuant to the 2018 Plan   (9,500)
Awards available for issuance under the 2018 Plan, December 31, 2019   2,209,000 

  

   2019   2018 
Expected volatility   87.8%-92.7%   72.91%-90.81%
Expected dividends   None    None 
Expected term   2-5 years    2.5 years 
Risk-free rate   1.64%   1.64%

 

F-17

 

 

GROWGENERATION CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 and 2018

 

9.SHARE BASED PAYMENTS AND STOCK OPTIONS, Continued

 

The table below summarizes all the options granted by the Company during years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018:

 

Options  Shares   Weighted-
Average Exercise
Price
   Weighted- Average Remaining Contractual Term  Weighted-
Average Grant Date Fair Value
 
                
Outstanding at January 1, 2018   2,622,000   $.99      $.32 
Granted   386,500   $3.21      $1.91 
Exercised   (1,068,333)  $.67      $.12 
Forfeited or expired   (124,667)  $.76      $.16 
Outstanding at December 31, 2018   1,815,500   $1.66   2.65 years  $.78 
Vested and exercisable at December 31 2018   1,393,831   $1.39   2.22 years     
                   
Outstanding at January 1, 2019   1,815,500   $1.66   2.65 years  $.78 
Granted   1,380,000   $3.25      $2.18 
Exercised   (667,500)  $.72      $.16 
Forfeited or expired   (11,667)  $3.05      $1.63 
Outstanding at December 31, 2019   2,516,333   $2.78   3.81 years  $1.71 
Vested and exercisable at December 31, 2019   1,346,333   $2.35   3.25 years  $1.32 

 

Share-based payment expense to officers, directors and employees and the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 was approximately $2,223,100 and $901,900, respectively.

 

Expense related to issuance of shares, options and warrants to consultants for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 was approximately $267,400 and $501,800, respectively.

 

10.STOCK PURCHASE WARRANTS

 

A summary of the status of the Company’s outstanding stock warrants as of December 31, 2019 is as follows:

 

       Weighted Average 
       Exercise
Price
 
Outstanding January 1, 2018   3,605,728   $1.84 
Granted/issued   1,916,500   $1.01 
Exercised   (2,242,728)  $1.16 
Forfeited   -      
Outstanding December 31, 2018   3,279,500   $1.94 
Granted/issued   2,061,629   $3.50 
Exercised   (1,643,610)  $.79 
Forfeited   -      
Outstanding December 31, 2019   3,697,519   $3.25 

 

F-18

 

 

GROWGENERATION CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2018 and 2017

 

11.STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

Common Stock

 

The Company’s current Certificate of Incorporation authorizes it to issue 100,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $0.001 per share. As of December 31, 2019, and 2018, there were 36,876,305 and 27,948,609 shares of common stock issued and outstanding, respectively.

 

2019

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company sold 4,123,254 shares of common stock for net proceeds of $12,643,634.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company issued 1,757,913 shares of common stock upon exercise of warrants resulting in proceeds to the Company of $1,299,899.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company issued 515,868 shares of common stock upon exercise of 667,500 options resulting in proceeds to the Company of $6,000. Of the total options exercised, 657,500 options we exercised in a cashless option exercise.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company issued 1,258,608 shares of common stock upon conversion of convertible debt and accrued interest. (See Note 7)

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company issued 969,553 shares of common stock in connection with business combinations. (See Note 14)

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company issued 152,500 shares of common stock to employees valued at $452,766, issued 100,000 shares of common stock to employees for accrued employee awards valued at $210,200 and 50,000 shares of common stock to consultants valued at $96,000.

 

2018

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company sold 3,333,333 shares of common stock for net proceeds of $9,959,877.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company issued 3,076,461 shares of common stock upon exercise of 3,056,478 warrants resulting in proceeds to the Company of $2,593,694.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company issued 995,186 shares of common stock upon exercise of 1,068,333 options resulting in proceeds to the Company of $321,701.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company issued 2,013,294 shares of common stock upon conversion of convertible debt and accrued interest. (See Note 7)

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company issued 1,550,000 shares of common stock in connection with business combinations. (See Note 14)

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company issued 123,500 shares of common stock to employees valued at $463,922 and issued 10,000 shares of common stock to consultants valued at $45,001.

 

F-19

 

 

GROWGENERATION CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 and 2018

 

12.EARNINGS PER SHARE

  

Basic net income (loss) per share is computed by dividing net income (loss) attributable to common shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding. Diluted net income (loss) per share is computed by dividing net income (loss) attributable to common shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding plus the number of common shares that would be issued assuming exercise or conversion of all potentially dilutive common shares. Potentially dilutive securities are excluded from the calculation when their effect would be antidilutive. For the year ended December 31, 2018 all potentially dilutive securities have been excluded from the diluted share calculations as they were anti-dilutive as a result of the net loss incurred. Accordingly, basic shares equal diluted shares for the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Potentially dilutive securities were comprised of the following:

 

   December 31,
2019
   December 31,
2018
 
Warrants   3,697,519    3,279,500 
Convertible debt warrants   131,250    536,250 
Options   2,516,333    1,815,500 
Total   6,345,102    5,631,250 

 

The following table sets forth the composition of the weighted average shares (denominator) used in the basic and dilutive earnings per share computation for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018.

 

   December 31,
2019
   December 31,
2018
 
         
Net income (loss)  $1,878,804   $(5,073,755)
Weighted average shares outstanding, basic   32,883,594    23,492,650 
Effect of dilutive common stock equivalents   6,345,102    - 
Adjusted weighted average shares outstanding, dilutive   39,228,696    23,492,650 
Basic net income (loss) per share  $.06   $(.22)
Dilutive net income (loss) per share  $.05   $(.22)

 

13.VENDOR CONCENTRATIONS

 

As of December 31, 2019, and 2018, two suppliers represent 51% and 56% of our purchases, respectively. Although the Company expects to maintain relationships with these vendors, the loss of either supplier would not have a material adverse impact on our business, because both suppliers provide the same products.

 

F-20

 

 

GROWGENERATION CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 and 2018

   

14.ACQUISITIONS

 

The Company accounts for acquisitions in accordance with ASC 805 “Business Combinations.” Assets acquired and liabilities assumed are recorded in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets at their estimated fair values, as of the acquisition date. For all acquisitions, the preliminary allocation of the purchase price was based upon a preliminary valuation, and the Company’s estimates and assumptions are subject to change within the measurement period as valuations are finalized. The Company has not made any adjustments to the preliminary valuations. The table below represents the allocation of the preliminary purchase price to the acquired net assets during the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

   Grow
World
LLC
   Grand
Rapids
Hydro
   Green
Life
Garden
   Chlorophyll   Reno
Hydroponics
   Palm
Springs
Hydroponics
   Total 
Inventory  $553,900   $1,453,100   $1,038,600   $1,441,000   $238,000   $465,500   $5,190,100 
Prepaids and other current assets   -         14,100    22,000    -         36,100 
Furniture and equipment   35,000    50,000    100,000    100,000    25,000    25,000    335,000 
Goodwill   696,900    2,376,900    2,305,900    2,596,100    516,300    554,000    9,046,100 
Total  $1,285,800   $3,880,000   $3,458,600   $4,159,100   $779,300   $1,044,500   $14,607,300 

 

The table below represents the consideration paid for the net assets acquired in business combinations.

 

   Grow
World
LLC
   Grand
Rapids
Hydro
   Green
Life
Garden
   Chlorophyll   Reno
Hydroponics
   Palm
Springs
Hydroponics
   Total 
Cash  $1,000,000   $2,350,000   $2,647,700   $3,659,100   $525,000   $800,000   $10,981,800 
Common stock   285,800    1,530,000    810,900    500,000    254,300    244,500    3,625,500 
Total  $1,285,800   $3,880,000   $3,458,600   $4,159,100   $779,300   $1,044,500   $14,607,300 

 

The following table discloses the date of the acquisitions noted above and the revenue and earnings included in the consolidated income statement from the date of acquisition to the period ended December 31, 2019.

 

   Grow
World
LLC
   Grand
Rapids
Hydro
   Green
Life
Garden
   Chlorophyll   Reno
Hydroponics
   Palm
Springs
Hydroponics
   Total 
Acquisition date  12/16/19   9/3/2019   5/14/2019   1/21/2019   2/11/2019   2/7/2019     
Revenue  $153,900   $2,412,700   $4,829,800   $6,030,500   $2,106,900   $3,075,300   $18,609,100 
Earnings  $6,400   $444,500   $998,700   $936,600   $366,742   $651,400   $3,404,342 

 

The following represents the unaudited pro forma consolidated income statement as if the acquisitions had been included in the consolidated results of the Company for the year ended December 31, 2018. These unaudited pro forma results are presented for information purposes only and are not necessarily indicative of what the actual results of operations of the combined company would have been if the acquisition had occurred at the beginning of the earliest period presented, nor are they indicative of future results of operations.

  

   December 31,
2018
 
Revenue  $59,650,900 
Earnings  $(2,087,900)

 

F-21

 

 

GROWGENERATION CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 and 2018

 

15.SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

  

On February 26, 2020 the Company purchased the assets of Healthy Harvest LLC for $1,750,000 and 250,000 shares of the Company’s common stock valued at $1,102,500. Healthy Harvest has been in business since 2011 and is the largest hydroponic operation in the Southeast region.

 

On February 7, 2020, the Board approved the amendment and restatement of the 2018 Plan to increase the number of shares issuable thereunder from 2,500,000 to 5,000,000, which amendment is pending shareholder approval.

 

F-22

 

 

ITEM 9. CHANGES AND DISAGREEMENT WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

 

None.

  

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

We maintain disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”)) that are designed to be effective in providing reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed in our reports under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the rules and forms of the SEC, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

In designing and evaluating disclosure controls and procedures, management recognizes that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute assurance of achieving the desired objectives. Also, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. The design of any system of controls is based, in part, upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. As of the end of the period covered by this report, we carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of management, including our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures. Based upon that evaluation, management concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of December 31, 2019 to cause the information required to be disclosed by us in reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods prescribed by SEC, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to management, including our chief executive officer and principal financial officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting 

 

As required by the SEC rules and regulations for the implementation of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. Our internal control over financial reporting is designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of our consolidated financial statements for external reporting purposes in accordance with U.S. GAAP. Our internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that: (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the Company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of consolidated financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, and that our receipts and expenditures are being made only in accordance with authorizations of our management and directors, and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of our assets that could have a material effect on the consolidated financial statements.

 

In making the assessments on the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting as of December 31, 2019, management used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) in Internal Control — Integrated Framework (2013). Based on our assessments and those criteria, management determined that we maintained effective internal controls over financial reporting as of December 31, 2019.

 

This Report does not include an attestation report of the Company’s registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. As an emerging growth company, management’s report is not subject to attestation by our registered public accounting firm.

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the most recent fiscal quarter, that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

Item 9B. Other Information.

 

None

 

21

 

 

PART III

 

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

Other than provided below, the information required by Items 401, 405, 406 and 407 (c)(3); (d)(4) and (d)(5) of Regulation S-K is incorporated into this Annual Report on Form 10-K by reference to the Company’s Definitive Proxy Statement for its 2020 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be filed within 120 days following December 31, 2019.

 

All directors of the Company hold office for one-year terms until the election and qualification of their successors. Officers are appointed by our Board and serve at the discretion of the board, subject to applicable employment agreements. The following table sets forth information regarding our executive officers and the members of our Board.  

 

Name   Age   Position
Darren Lampert   59   Chief Executive Officer and Director
Michael Salaman   57   President and Director
Tony Sullivan   55   Chief Operating Officer, Executive VP
Monty Lamirato   64   Chief Financial Officer and Secretary
Stephen Aiello   59   Director
Peter Rosenberg   57   Director
Sean Stiefel   32   Director

 

Darren Lampert has been our Chief Executive Officer and a Director since our inception in 2014. Mr. Lampert began his career in 1986 as a founding member of the law firm of Lampert and Lampert (1986-1999), where he concentrated on securities litigation, NASD (now FINRA) compliance and arbitration and corporate finance matters. Mr. Lampert has represented clients in actions and investigations brought before government agencies and self-regulatory bodies. Mr. Lampert has spent 15 years working as a portfolio manager and proprietary trader at Schonfeld Securities (1999-2005), Schottenfeld Group (2007) and Incremental Capital (2008-2010). From 2010 to 2014, Mr. Lampert was a private investor. Mr. Lampert graduated in 1982 with a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration from Ithaca College. Mr. Lampert received a JD from Bridgeport University School of Law in 1985. Mr. Lampert was admitted to practice law in New York in 1986 and is also admitted to practice before the United States District Courts for the Southern and Eastern Districts of New York.

 

Michael Salaman has been our President and a Director since our inception. Mr. Salaman served as the Chairman of Skinny Nutritional Corp. from January 2002 to March 2014 and as Chief Executive Officer and President of Skinny Nutritional Corp. from June 2010 to March 2014. He also served as Chief Executive Officer of Skinny Nutritional Corp. Skinny Nutritional Corp. filed for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy protection in 2013 and the assets were sold to a private equity firm in March 2014. Mr. Salaman has over 20 years’ experience in the area of start-ups, new product development, distribution and marketing. Mr. Salaman began his business career as Vice President of Business Development for National Media Corp., an infomercial marketing company in the United States from 1985-1993. From 1995-2001, Mr. Salaman started a Digital Media company called American Interactive Media, Inc., a developer of Web TV set-top boxes and ISP services. In 2002, Mr. Salaman became the principal officer of that entity and directed its operations as a marketing and distribution company and in 2005 focused its efforts in the enhanced water business. Mr. Salaman received a Bachelor of Business Administration degree in business from Temple University in 1986.

 

Tony Sullivan joined the Company as Chief Operating Officer and Executive Vice President in November 2019. From 2017 to recently, Mr. Sullivan served as Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Forman Mills, a $300 million Private Equity sponsored business. From 2015 to 2017, he was Senior Vice President Operations for Dollar Express, a $500 million carve-out of 330 Family Dollar stores in 36 states, Private Equity sponsored business. From 2006 to 2015, he was employed at Anna’s Linens for 9+ years where he served in several operating roles, most recently as SVP, Chief Operating Officer. Previously Mr. Sullivan served for 20+ years at Foot Locker Inc. leading 2100 + stores, 3 Divisions (Foot Locker, Kids Foot Locker and Foot Action) over $2.5B in sales as VP Store Operations. Mr. Sullivan is known and respected for his expertise in wide-range governance, hypergrowth, and macro-level strategic management methodologies, with an emphasis on identifying and addressing business infrastructure to position organizations for expansion and profitability. He has achieved outstanding success scaling businesses for rapid profits and market dominance in start-ups, private, PE-backed, and public companies with revenues up to $2.5 billion.

 

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Monty Lamirato joined the Company as Chief Financial Officer and Secretary in May 2017. From March 2009 to just prior to joining GrowGen, Mr. Lamirato worked as an independent consultant providing chief financial officer and financial reporting consulting services to companies of various sizes in a variety of industries. In this capacity, he prepared and reviewed SEC filings and GAAP-compliant financial statements, provided technical accounting assistance, designed and developed inventory and logistics systems for inventory management, developed scalable accounting and reporting systems, internal accounting controls and annual budgets and evaluated short-term investment alternatives for idle cash. From March 2013 until November 2016, Mr. Lamirato served as Chief Financial Officer of Strategic Environmental & Energy Resources, Inc., a publicly traded holding company that provides a wide range of environmental, renewable fuels and industrial waste stream management services, where he was responsible for all SEC filings, prepared all GAAP and SEC compliant financial statements and developed financial and operating metrics and other key performance indicators for evaluation of business results by management. Mr. Lamirato has also served as Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer of ARC Group Worldwide, Inc. from June 2001 to March 2009, Vice President of Finance at GS2.net, LLC from November 2000 to May 2001, and also Vice President of Finance for PlanetOutdoors.com, Inc. from June 1999 to October 2000. He began his career as an audit staff member with Coopers & Lybrand in 1977, where he remained until he served as an Audit Manager and Audit Partner with Mitchell Finley and Company, P.C. from 1986 to 1993. Mr. Lamirato received a Bachelor of Science, cum laude, from Regis College in Denver and is a Certified Public Accountant.

 

Stephen Aiello has been a Director of the Company since May 2014. Mr. Aiello was a partner at Jones and Company from 2004-2008. From 2001-2003, he worked at 033 Asset Management. From 1986-2001, he was a partner at Montgomery Securities. Mr. Aiello received a B.A. in Psychology from Ithaca College and an MBA from Fordham University. Since 2010, Mr. Aiello has been a private investor and owner of real estate properties.

 

Peter Rosenberg has been a Director of the Company since July 2017. He has about 30 years of experience in the financial services industry, specifically in leveraged finance, capital markets, strategic advisory, private equity and asset management. Throughout his career, he has executed capital raising, mergers and acquisitions, and restructuring transactions. Mr. Rosenberg was previously with Duff & Phelps as a Managing Director in the Consumer and Retail Merger and Acquisitions Group. Prior to Duff & Phelps, Mr. Rosenberg was a Managing Director with Wells Fargo Securities, where he was responsible for sourcing and executing financing and mergers and acquisitions transactions for independent and financial sponsor-backed middle market companies. Previously, Mr. Rosenberg established and managed the San Francisco office for Barrington Associates, a boutique mergers and acquisitions advisory firm. At Barrington, he completed divestiture and recapitalization transactions in the consumer, retail, industrial and business services sectors and was responsible for coverage of middle market private equity firms. Prior to Barrington, Mr. Rosenberg was a Director at Salomon Smith Barney, focusing on corporate finance and mergers and acquisitions transactions for West Coast consumer product, specialty retail, financial services and industrial companies. Mr. Rosenberg has also held positions at Richard C. Blum & Associates (now BLUM Capital) and Comann, Howard & Flamen. He graduated magna cum laude from the University of Colorado with a B.S. degree in Business and Administration and was a member of the Beta Gamma Sigma academic honor society. Mr. Rosenberg holds Series 7, 24, and 63 securities industry registrations. 

 

Sean Stiefel has been a Director of the Company since January 2018. Mr. Stiefel founded Navy Capital LLC in 2014, where he is currently a Portfolio Manager and is responsible for all aspects of stock selection, investment due diligence and portfolio construction. Mr. Stiefel launched the Navy Capital Green Fund, LP in 2017 as a global public equity focused cannabis dedicated fund. Navy Capital has been involved in cannabis related investing since early 2016. Prior to founding Navy Capital, Mr. Stiefel was a research analyst and trader for Northwoods Capital Management Partners, a global equity fund with a fundamental value and special situations investment strategy. Mr. Stiefel had previously served as an associate within an equity long/short fund at Millennium Partners, and he began his career as an equities trading analyst for Barclays Capital. He is a graduate of the University of Southern California’s Marshall school of Business.

 

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ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

The information required by Item 402 of Regulation S-K is incorporated into this Annual Report Form 10-K by reference to the Definitive Proxy Statement for its 2020 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be filed within 120 days following December 31, 2019.

 

ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

The information required by Item 201(d) and Item 403 of Regulation S-K is incorporated into this Annual Report Form 10-K by reference to the Definitive Proxy Statement for its 2020 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be filed within 120 days following December 31, 2019.

 

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

 

The information required by Items 404 and 407(a) of Regulation S-K is incorporated into this Annual Report Form 10-K by reference to the Definitive Proxy Statement for its 2020 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be filed within 120 days following December 31, 2019. 

 

ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES

 

The information required by Item 9(e) of Schedule 14A is incorporated into this Annual Report Form 10-K by reference to the Definitive Proxy Statement for its 2020 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be filed within 120 days following December 31, 2019. 

 

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PART IV

 

ITEM 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

 

3.1   Certificate of Incorporation of GrowGeneration Corp. (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Registration Statement on Form S-1 as filed on November 9, 2015)
     
3.2   Amended and Restated Bylaws of GrowGeneration Corp. (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3(ii) to Form 8-K filed on March 11, 2020
     
4.1   Form of Warrant for private placement in March 2017 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on March 16, 2017)
     
4.2   Form of Investor Warrant for second 2017 private placement (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on May 19, 2017)
     
4.3   Form of Placement Agent Warrant ($2.75 Per Share) for second 2017 private placement (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.4 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on May 19, 2017)
     
4.4   Form of .1% Unsecured Convertible Promissory Note for private placement in January 2018 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.3 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on January 12, 2018)
     
4.5   Form of Warrant for private placement in January 2018 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.4 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on January 12, 2018)
     
4.6   Form of Promissory Note issued to Santa Rosa Hydroponics & Grower Supply, Inc. (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.3 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on July 16, 2018)
     
10.1   GrowGeneration Corp. 2014 Equity Incentive Plan (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.5 to the Registration Statement on Form S-1 as filed on November 9, 2015)
     
10.2   Form of GrowGeneration Corp. Stock Option Agreement in connection with the 2014 Equity Incentive Plan (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.6 to the Registration Statement on Form S-1 as filed on November 9, 2015)
     
10.3   GrowGeneration Corp. Amended and Restated 2018 Equity Incentive Plan (Filed herewith)
     
10.4   Form of GrowGeneration Corp. Stock Option Agreement in connection with the Amended and Restated 2018 Equity Incentive Plan (Filed herewith)

 

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10.5   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement for first 2017 private placement (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on March 16, 2017)
     
10.6   Form of Subscription Agreement for second 2017 private placement (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on May 19, 2017)
     
10.7   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement for 2018 private placement (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on January 12, 2018)
     
10.8   Form of Supplement to Securities Purchase Agreement for 2018 private placement (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on January 12, 2018)
     
10.9   Form of Asset Purchase Agreement, dated April 12, 2018, by and among GrowGeneration, Corp., GrowGeneration Michigan Corp. and Superior Growers Supply, Inc. (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on April 16, 2018)
     
10.10   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement for second 2018 private placement (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on May 9, 2018)
     
10.11   Form of Side Letter by and between GrowGeneration Corp. and Gotham Green Fund 1, L.P. (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on May 9, 2018)
     
10.12   Form of Warrant to Purchase Common Stock (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.3 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on May 9, 2018)
     
10.13   Form of Indemnification Agreement (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.10 to the Registration Statement on Form S-1 as filed on November 9, 2015)
     
10.14   Consulting Agreement with Merida Capital Partners, LP, dated April 3, 2017 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on April 5, 2017)
     
10.15   Separation and Release Agreement with Jason Dawson, dated April 10, 2017 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on April 14, 2017)

 

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10.16   Form of Revised Asset Purchase Agreement, dated June 28, 2018, by and among GrowGeneration Corp., Santa Rosa Hydroponics & Grower Supply Inc., Rick Barretta and Jason Barretta (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on July 16, 2018)
     
10.17   Form of Amendment to Revised Asset Purchase Agreement, dated July 13, 2018 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on July 16, 2018)
     
10.18   Form of Asset Purchase Agreement, dated August 30, 2018, by and among GrowGeneration Corp., GrowGeneration HG Corp. and Virgus, Inc. d/b/a/ Heavy Gardens (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on September 20, 2018)
     
10.19   Form of Asset Purchase Agreement, dated November 28, 2018, by and among GrowGeneration Corp., GrowGeneration Pueblo Corp. and Chlorophyll, Inc. (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on January 22, 2019)
     
10.20   Form of Asset Purchase Agreement, dated January 26, 2019, by and among GrowGeneration Corp., GrowGeneration California Corp. and Palm Springs Hydroponics, Inc. (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on February 12, 2019)
     
10.21   Form of Asset Purchase Agreement, dated January 26, 2019, by and among GrowGeneration Corp., GrowGeneration Nevada Corp. and Reno Hydroponics, Inc. (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.4 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on February 12, 2019)
     
10.22   Form of Asset Purchase Agreement, dated April 23, 2019, by and among GrowGeneration Corp., GrowGeneration Rhode Island Corp. and GreenLife Garden Supply Corp (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on May 14, 2019)
     
10.23   Form of Subscription Agreement for 2019 private placement (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on June 26, 2019)
     
10.24   Form of Subscription Warrant to Purchase Common Stock (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 to the Current Report on Form 8-K as filed on June 26, 2019)
     
10.25   Employment Agreement dated November 4, 2019 between GrowGeneration Corp and Tony Sullivan (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Current Report on Form 10-Q as filed on November 12, 2019)
     
10.26  

Form of Employment Agreement dated November 5, 2019 between GrowGeneration Corp and Monty Lamirato (Filed herewith)

     
10.27  Form of Employment Agreement dated March 23, 2020 between GrowGeneration Corp and Darren Lampert (Filed herewith)
    
10.28  Form of Employment Agreement dated March 23, 2020 between GrowGeneration Corp and Michael Salaman (Filed herewith)
    
14.1   Code of Ethics and Business Conduct for Officers, Directors and Employees (Filed herewith)

 

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21.1   List of Subsidiaries of GrowGeneration Corp. (Filed herewith)
     
23.1   Consent of Connolly Grady & Cha, P.C. (Filed herewith)
     
99.1   Charter of Audit Committee (Filed herewith)
     
99.2   Charter of Compensation Committee (Filed herewith)
     
99.3   Charter of Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee (Filed herewith)
     
101.INS   XBRL Instance Document (Filed herewith.)
     
101.SCH   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document (Filed herewith.)
     
101.CAL   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document (Filed herewith.)
     
101.LAB   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document (Filed herewith.)
     
101.PRE   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document (Filed herewith.)
     
101.DEF   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Definition (Filed herewith.)
     
31.1   Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Certification of Principal Executive Officer (Filed herewith.)
     
31.2   Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Certification of Principal Financial and Accounting Officer (Filed herewith.)
     
32.1   Section 1350 Certification of Principal Executive Officer (Filed herewith.)
     
32.2   Section 1350 Certification of Principal Financial and Accounting Officer (Filed herewith.)

  

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SIGNATURES

 

In accordance with the requirements of the Exchange Act, the registrant caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized on March 27, 2020.

 

  GROWGENERATION CORP.
   
  By: /s/ Darren Lampert
    Name: Darren Lampert
    Title:  Chief Executive Officer
(Principal Executive Officer)
     
  By: /s/ Monty Lamirato
    Name:  Monty Lamirato
    Title:  Chief Financial Officer
(Principal Financial Officer)

 

KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that we, the undersigned officers and directors GrowGeneration Corp., a Colorado corporation (the “Registrant”), do hereby constitute and appoint Darren Lampert and Monty Lamirato, and each of them, as his or her true and lawful attorney-in-fact and agents, with full power of substitution and re-substitution, for him and in his name, place, and stead, in any and all capacities, to sign any and all amendments to this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and to file the same, with all exhibits thereto, and other documents in connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange Commission, granting unto said attorneys-in-fact and agents, and each of them, full power and authority to do and perform each and every act and thing requisite and necessary to be done in connection therewith, as fully to all intents and purposes as he might or could do in person, hereby ratifying and confirming that all said attorneys-in-fact and agents, or any of them or their or his substitute or substitutes, may lawfully do or cause to be done by virtue hereof.

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this Annual Report on Form 10-K has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the Registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

Person   Capacity   Date
         
/s/ Darren Lampert   Chief Executive Officer and Director   March 27, 2020
Darren Lampert   (Principal Executive Officer)    
         
/s/ Monty Lamirato   Chief Financial Officer   March 27, 2020
Monty Lamirato   (Principal Financial and Accounting Officer)    
         
/s/ Michael Salaman   President and Director   March 27, 2020
Michael Salaman        
         
/s/ Stephen Aiello   Director   March 27, 2020
Stephen Aiello        
         
/s/ Peter Rosenberg   Director   March 27, 2020
Peter Rosenberg        
         
/s/ Sean Stiefel   Director   March 27, 2020
Sean Stiefel        

 

 

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