Company Quick10K Filing
Quick10K
Halozyme Therapeutics
Closing Price ($) Shares Out (MM) Market Cap ($MM)
$16.33 146 $2,380
10-Q 2019-03-31 Quarter: 2019-03-31
10-K 2018-12-31 Annual: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-09-30 Quarter: 2018-09-30
10-Q 2018-06-30 Quarter: 2018-06-30
10-Q 2018-03-31 Quarter: 2018-03-31
10-K 2017-12-31 Annual: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-09-30 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-Q 2017-06-30 Quarter: 2017-06-30
10-Q 2017-03-31 Quarter: 2017-03-31
10-K 2016-12-31 Annual: 2016-12-31
10-Q 2016-09-30 Quarter: 2016-09-30
10-Q 2016-06-30 Quarter: 2016-06-30
10-Q 2016-03-31 Quarter: 2016-03-31
10-K 2015-12-31 Annual: 2015-12-31
10-Q 2015-09-30 Quarter: 2015-09-30
10-Q 2015-06-30 Quarter: 2015-06-30
10-Q 2015-03-31 Quarter: 2015-03-31
10-K 2014-12-31 Annual: 2014-12-31
10-Q 2014-09-30 Quarter: 2014-09-30
10-Q 2014-06-30 Quarter: 2014-06-30
10-Q 2014-03-31 Quarter: 2014-03-31
10-K 2013-12-31 Annual: 2013-12-31
8-K 2019-06-12 Other Events
8-K 2019-05-07 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-05-02 Amend Bylaw, Shareholder Vote, Exhibits
8-K 2019-02-21 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-01-09 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-12-12 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2018-11-26 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-11-06 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-09-07 Officers
8-K 2018-09-05 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-07 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-05-02 Shareholder Vote
8-K 2018-04-05 Officers, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-03-20 Officers
8-K 2018-01-09 Earnings, Exhibits
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DHT DHT Holdings 836
WLH William Lyon Homes 723
SREV ServiceSource 98
RCON Recon Technology 20
SYN Synthetic Biologics 9
SPEX Spherix 7
HALO 2019-03-31
Part I - Financial Information
Item 1. Financial Statements
Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 3.Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 4. Controls and Procedures
Part II - Other Information
Item 1. Legal Proceedings
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Item 5. Other Information
Item 6. Exhibits
EX-31.1 ex311q12019.htm
EX-31.2 ex312q12019.htm
EX-32 ex32q12019.htm

Halozyme Therapeutics Earnings 2019-03-31

HALO 10Q Quarterly Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

10-Q 1 haloq12019-10q.htm 10-Q Document


 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-Q
(Mark One)
ý
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2019
OR
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from           to             
Commission File Number 001-32335
___________________________
HALOZYME THERAPEUTICS, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
___________________________
Delaware
 
88-0488686
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 
 
11388 Sorrento Valley Road, San Diego, CA
 
92121
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
(858) 794-8889
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
Trading Symbol(s)
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, $0.001 par value
HALO
The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes x    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.:
 
Large accelerated filer
 x
Accelerated filer
  ¨
  
Non-accelerated filer
  ¨
Smaller reporting company
 ¨
Emerging growth company
 ¨
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ¨    No  x
The number of outstanding shares of the registrant’s common stock, par value $0.001 per share, was 145,509,170 as of April 30, 2019
 




HALOZYME THERAPEUTICS, INC.
INDEX
 
 
 
 
Page
 
 
Item 1.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 2.
 
 
Item 3.
 
 
Item 4.
 
 
 
 
 
Item 1.
 
 
Item 1A.
 
 
Item 2.
 
 
Item 3.
 
 
Item 4.
 
 
Item 5.
 
 
Item 6.
 
 
 
 
 

2



PART I — FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Item 1.
Financial Statements
HALOZYME THERAPEUTICS, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(Unaudited)
(In thousands, except per share amounts)
 
 
March 31,
2019

December 31,
2018
ASSETS
 
 
 
 
Current assets:
 
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
 
$
60,595


$
57,936

Marketable securities, available-for-sale
 
268,122


296,590

Accounts receivable, net
 
28,164


30,005

Inventories
 
31,241


22,625

Prepaid expenses and other assets
 
20,914


20,693

Total current assets
 
409,036


427,849

Property and equipment, net
 
14,542


7,465

Prepaid expenses and other assets
 
5,031


4,434

Restricted cash
 
500


500

Total assets
 
$
429,109


$
440,248

 
 
 
 
 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
 
 
 
 
Current liabilities:




Accounts payable

$
4,089


$
4,079

Accrued expenses

43,663


49,529

Deferred revenue, current portion

4,247


4,247

Current portion of long-term debt, net

86,663


91,506

Total current liabilities

138,662


149,361

Deferred revenue, net of current portion

4,509


5,008

Long-term debt, net

18,742


34,874

Other long-term liabilities

7,149


2,118

Stockholders’ equity:
 
 
 
 
Preferred stock - $0.001 par value; 20,000 shares authorized; no shares
     issued and outstanding
 

 

Common stock - $0.001 par value; 200,000 shares authorized;145,364 and 144,725 shares issued and outstanding at March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively
 
145


145

Additional paid-in capital

789,483


780,457

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)

61


(277
)
Accumulated deficit

(529,642
)

(531,438
)
Total stockholders’ equity

260,047


248,887

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

$
429,109


$
440,248

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

3



HALOZYME THERAPEUTICS, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(Unaudited)
(In thousands, except per share amounts)

 
 
Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
 
2019
 
2018
Revenues:
 
 
 
 
Royalties
 
$
17,953

 
$
20,944

Product sales, net
 
8,390

 
6,801

Revenues under collaborative agreements
 
30,606

 
3,127

Total revenues
 
56,949

 
30,872

Operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
Cost of product sales
 
4,649

 
3,052

Research and development
 
31,328

 
37,976

Selling, general and administrative
 
18,006

 
13,556

Total operating expenses
 
53,983

 
54,584

Operating income (loss)
 
2,966

 
(23,712
)
Other income (expense):
 
 
 
 
Investment and other income, net
 
2,057

 
1,668

Interest expense
 
(3,205
)
 
(5,230
)
Net income (loss) before income taxes
 
1,818

 
(27,274
)
Income tax expense
 
22

 
187

Net income (loss)
 
$
1,796

 
$
(27,461
)
 
 
 
 
 
Net income (loss) per share:
 
 
 
 
Basic
 
$
0.01

 
$
(0.19
)
Diluted
 
$
0.01

 
$
(0.19
)
 
 
 
 
 
Shares used in computing net income (loss) per share:
 
 
 
 
Basic
 
144,743

 
142,656

Diluted
 
147,474

 
142,656

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

4



HALOZYME THERAPEUTICS, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)
(Unaudited)
(In thousands)
 
 
Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
 
2019
 
2018
Net income (loss)
 
$
1,796

 
$
(27,461
)
Other comprehensive income (loss):
 
 
 
 
Unrealized gain (loss) on marketable securities
 
335

 
(418
)
Foreign currency translation adjustment
 
1

 
(2
)
Unrealized gain on foreign currency
 
2

 

Total comprehensive income (loss)
 
$
2,134

 
$
(27,881
)
See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

5



HALOZYME THERAPEUTICS, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Unaudited)
(In thousands)
 
 
Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
 
 
 
2019
 
2018
Operating activities:
 
 
 
 
Net income (loss)
 
$
1,796

 
$
(27,461
)
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash used in operating activities:
 
 
 
 
Share-based compensation
 
9,475

 
8,339

Depreciation and amortization
 
990

 
566

Amortization of debt discount
 
306

 
435

Accretion of discounts on marketable securities, net
 
(936
)
 
(565
)
Recognition of deferred revenue
 
(499
)
 
(1,834
)
Deferral of lease payments
 
(93
)
 
132

Other
 
11

 
(2
)
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:
 
 
 
 
Accounts receivable, net
 
1,841

 
15,044

Inventories
 
(8,616
)
 
752

Prepaid expenses and other assets
 
(818
)
 
(5,939
)
Accounts payable and accrued expenses
 
(7,881
)
 
(11,644
)
Net cash used in operating activities
 
(4,424
)

(22,177
)
Investing activities:
 
 
 
 
Purchases of marketable securities
 
(167,670
)
 
(114,661
)
Proceeds from maturities of marketable securities
 
197,410

 
79,600

Purchases of property and equipment
 
(927
)
 
(839
)
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities
 
28,813

 
(35,900
)
Financing activities:
 
 
 
 
Repayment of long-term debt
 
(21,281
)
 
(17,628
)
Proceeds from issuance of common stock under equity incentive plans, net of taxes paid related to net share settlement
 
(449
)
 
4,977

Net cash used in financing activities
 
(21,730
)
 
(12,651
)
Net increase (decrease) in cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash
 
2,659

 
(70,728
)
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at beginning of period
 
58,436

 
169,240

Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at end of period
 
$
61,095

 
$
98,512

 
 
 
 
 
Supplemental disclosure of non-cash investing and financing activities:
 
 
 
 
Amounts accrued for purchases of property and equipment
 
$
200

 
$
177

Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for lease obligation
 
$
165

 
$

Leasehold improvements paid by lessor
 
$

 
$
1,322

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

6



HALOZYME THERAPEUTICS, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
(Unaudited)
(in thousands)
 
 
Common Stock
 
Additional
Paid-In
Capital
 
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive Loss
 
Accumulated
Deficit
 
Total
Stockholders’
Equity
 
 
Shares
 
Amount
 
BALANCE AT JANUARY 1, 2019
 
144,725

 
145

 
780,457

 
(277
)
 
(531,438
)
 
248,887

Share-based compensation expense
 

 

 
9,475

 

 

 
9,475

Issuance of common stock pursuant to exercise of stock options and vesting of restricted stock units, net
 
641

 

 
(449
)
 

 

 
(449
)
Cancellation of restricted stock awards, net
 
(2
)
 

 

 

 

 

Other comprehensive income
 

 

 

 
338

 

 
338

Net income
 

 

 

 

 
1,796

 
1,796

BALANCE AT MARCH 31, 2019
 
145,364

 
145

 
789,483

 
61

 
(529,642
)
 
260,047

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common Stock
 
Additional
Paid-In
Capital
 
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive Loss
 
Accumulated
Deficit
 
Total
Stockholders’
Equity
 
 
Shares
 
Amount
 
BALANCE AT JANUARY 1, 2018
 
142,789

 
143

 
731,044

 
(450
)
 
(522,371
)
 
208,366

Adjustment to beginning accumulated deficit
 

 

 

 

 
71,263

 
71,263

Share-based compensation expense
 

 

 
8,339

 

 

 
8,339

Issuance of common stock pursuant to exercise of stock options and vesting of restricted stock units, net
 
1,116

 
1

 
4,976

 

 

 
4,977

Cancellation of restricted stock awards, net
 
(19
)
 

 

 

 

 

Other comprehensive loss
 

 

 

 
(420
)
 

 
(420
)
Net loss
 

 

 

 

 
(27,461
)
 
(27,461
)
BALANCE AT MARCH 31, 2018
 
143,886

 
144

 
744,359

 
(870
)
 
(478,569
)
 
265,064

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.





7




HALOZYME THERAPEUTICS, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)
1. Organization and Business
Halozyme Therapeutics, Inc. is a biotechnology company focused on developing and commercializing novel oncology therapies. We are seeking to translate our unique knowledge of the tumor microenvironment to create therapies that have the potential to improve cancer patient survival. Our research primarily focuses on human enzymes that alter the extracellular matrix and tumor microenvironment. The extracellular matrix is a complex matrix of proteins and carbohydrates surrounding the cell that provides structural support in tissues and orchestrates many important biological activities, including cell migration, signaling and survival. Over many years, we have developed unique technology and scientific expertise enabling us to pursue this target-rich environment for the development of therapies.
Our proprietary enzymes are used to facilitate the delivery of injected drugs and fluids, potentially enhancing the efficacy and the convenience of other drugs or can be used to alter tissue structures for potential clinical benefit. We exploit our technology and expertise using a two pillar strategy that we believe enables us to manage risk and cost by: (1) developing our own proprietary products in therapeutic areas with significant unmet medical needs, with a focus on oncology, and (2) licensing our technology to biopharmaceutical companies to collaboratively develop products that combine our technology with the collaborators’ proprietary compounds.
The majority of our approved product and product candidates are based on rHuPH20, our patented recombinant human hyaluronidase enzyme. rHuPH20 is the active ingredient in our first commercially approved product, Hylenex® recombinant, and it works by temporarily breaking down hyaluronan (or “HA”), a naturally occurring carbohydrate that is a major component of the extracellular matrix in tissues throughout the body such as skin and cartilage. We believe this temporary degradation creates an opportunistic window for the improved subcutaneous delivery of injectable biologics, such as monoclonal antibodies and other large therapeutic molecules, as well as small molecules and fluids. We refer to the application of rHuPH20 to facilitate the delivery of other drugs or fluids as our ENHANZE® Drug Delivery Technology (“ENHANZE”). We license the ENHANZE technology to form collaborations with biopharmaceutical companies that develop or market drugs requiring or benefiting from injection via the subcutaneous route of administration.
We currently have ENHANZE collaborations with F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Ltd. and Hoffmann-La Roche, Inc. (“Roche”), Baxalta US Inc. and Baxalta GmbH (now members of the Takeda group of companies, following the acquisition of Shire plc by Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited in January 2019) (“Baxalta”), Pfizer Inc. (“Pfizer”), Janssen Biotech, Inc. (“Janssen”), AbbVie, Inc. (“AbbVie”), Eli Lilly and Company (“Lilly”), Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (“BMS”), Alexion Pharma Holding (“Alexion”) and ARGENX BVBA (“argenx”).We receive royalties from two of these collaborations, including royalties from sales of one product from the Baxalta collaboration and two products from the Roche collaboration. Future potential revenues from the sales and/or royalties of our approved products, product candidates, and ENHANZE collaborations will depend on the ability of Halozyme and our collaborators to develop, manufacture, secure and maintain regulatory approvals for approved products and product candidates and commercialize product candidates.
Our proprietary development pipeline consists primarily of pre-clinical and clinical stage product candidates in oncology. Our lead oncology program is Pegvorhyaluronidase alfa (PVHA), also referred to as PEGylated recombinant human hyaluronidase (“PEGPH20”), a molecular entity we are developing in combination with currently approved cancer therapies as a candidate for the systemic treatment of tumors that accumulate HA. We have demonstrated that when HA accumulates in a tumor, it can cause increased pressure in the tumor, reducing blood flow into the tumor and with that, reduced access of cancer therapies to the tumor. PEGPH20 has been demonstrated in animal models to work by temporarily degrading HA surrounding cancer cells resulting in reduced pressure and increased blood flow to the tumor thereby enabling increased amounts of anticancer treatments administered concomitantly gaining access to the tumor. Through our efforts and efforts of our partners and collaborators, we are currently in Phase 3 clinical testing for PEGPH20 with ABRAXANE® (nab-paclitaxel) and gemcitabine in stage IV pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (“PDA”) (HALO 109-301), in Phase 1b/2 clinical testing for PEGPH20 with Tecentriq® (atezolizumab) in patients with previously treated metastatic PDA, in Phase 1b/2 clinical testing for PEGPH20 with Tecentriq in patients with gastric cancer and in Phase 1b/2 clinical testing for PEGPH20 with Tecentriq in patients with cholangiocarcinoma and gall bladder cancer (HALO 110-101/MATRIX).
Except where specifically noted or the context otherwise requires, references to “Halozyme,” “the Company,” “we,” “our,” and “us” in these notes to consolidated financial statements refer to Halozyme Therapeutics, Inc. and its wholly owned subsidiary, Halozyme, Inc., and Halozyme, Inc.’s wholly owned subsidiaries, Halozyme Holdings Ltd., Halozyme Royalty LLC, Halozyme Switzerland GmbH and Halozyme Switzerland Holdings GmbH.

8



2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Basis of Presentation
The accompanying interim unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles (“U.S. GAAP”) and with the rules and regulations of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) related to a quarterly report on Form 10-Q. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and disclosures required by U.S. GAAP for a complete set of financial statements. These interim unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and notes thereto should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018, filed with the SEC on February 21, 2019. The unaudited financial information for the interim periods presented herein reflects all adjustments which, in the opinion of management, are necessary for a fair presentation of the financial condition and results of operations for the periods presented, with such adjustments consisting only of normal recurring adjustments. Certain reclassifications have been made to the prior period condensed consolidated statement of cash flows within operating activities to conform to the current period presentation. There was no change to net cash used in operating activities. Operating results for interim periods are not necessarily indicative of the operating results for an entire fiscal year.
The accompanying interim unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Halozyme Therapeutics, Inc. and our wholly owned subsidiary, Halozyme, Inc., and Halozyme, Inc.’s wholly owned subsidiaries, Halozyme Holdings Ltd., Halozyme Royalty LLC, Halozyme Switzerland GmbH and Halozyme Switzerland Holdings GmbH. All intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated.
Use of Estimates
The preparation of interim unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in our interim unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates and judgments, which are based on historical and anticipated results and trends and on various other assumptions that management believes to be reasonable under the circumstances. By their nature, estimates are subject to an inherent degree of uncertainty and, as such, actual results may differ from management’s estimates.
Cash Equivalents and Marketable Securities
Cash equivalents consist of highly liquid investments, readily convertible to cash, that mature within ninety days or less from the date of purchase. As of March 31, 2019, our cash equivalents consisted of money market funds.
Marketable securities are investments with original maturities of more than ninety days from the date of purchase that are specifically identified to fund current operations. Marketable securities are considered available-for-sale. These investments are classified as current assets, even though the stated maturity date may be one year or more beyond the current balance sheet date which reflects management’s intention to use the proceeds from the sale of these investments to fund our operations, as necessary. Such available-for-sale investments are carried at fair value with unrealized gains and losses recorded in other comprehensive income (loss) and included as a separate component of stockholders’ equity (deficit). The cost of marketable securities is adjusted for amortization of premiums or accretion of discounts to maturity, and such amortization or accretion is included in investment and other income, net in the interim unaudited condensed consolidated statements of operations. We use the specific identification method for calculating realized gains and losses on marketable securities sold. Realized gains and losses and declines in value judged to be other-than-temporary on marketable securities, if any, are included in investment and other income, net in the interim unaudited condensed consolidated statements of operations.
Restricted Cash
Under the terms of the leases of our facilities, we are required to maintain letters of credit as security deposits during the terms of such leases. At March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, restricted cash of $0.5 million was pledged as collateral for the letters of credit.
Fair Value of Financial Instruments
The authoritative guidance for fair value measurements establishes a three tier fair value hierarchy, which prioritizes the inputs used in measuring fair value. These tiers include: Level 1, defined as observable inputs such as quoted prices in active markets; Level 2, defined as inputs other than quoted prices in active markets that are either directly or indirectly observable; and Level 3, defined as unobservable inputs in which little or no market data exists, therefore requiring an entity to develop its own assumptions.

9



Our financial instruments include cash equivalents, available-for-sale marketable securities, accounts receivable, prepaid expenses and other assets, accounts payable, accrued expenses and long-term debt. Fair value estimates of these instruments are made at a specific point in time, based on relevant market information. These estimates may be subjective in nature and involve uncertainties and matters of significant judgment and therefore cannot be determined with precision. The carrying amount of cash equivalents, accounts receivable, prepaid expenses and other assets, accounts payable and accrued expenses are generally considered to be representative of their respective fair values because of the short-term nature of those instruments. Based on Level 3 inputs and the borrowing rates currently available for loans with similar terms, we believe the fair value of long-term debt approximates its carrying value.
Available-for-sale marketable securities consist of asset-backed securities, corporate debt securities, U.S. Treasury securities and commercial paper, and are measured at fair value using Level 1 and Level 2 inputs. Level 2 financial instruments are valued using market prices on less active markets and proprietary pricing valuation models with observable inputs, including interest rates, yield curves, maturity dates, issue dates, settlement dates, reported trades, broker-dealer quotes, issue spreads, benchmark securities or other market related data. We obtain the fair value of Level 2 investments from our investment manager, who obtains these fair values from a third-party pricing source. We validate the fair values of Level 2 financial instruments provided by our investment manager by comparing these fair values to a third-party pricing source.
Inventories
Inventories are stated at lower of cost or net realizable value. Cost is determined on a first-in, first-out basis. Net realizable value is the estimated selling price in the ordinary course of business, less reasonably predictable costs of completion, disposal, and transportation. Inventories are reviewed periodically for potential excess, dated or obsolete status. We evaluate the carrying value of inventories on a regular basis, taking into account such factors as historical and anticipated future sales compared to quantities on hand, the price we expect to obtain for products in their respective markets compared with historical cost and the remaining shelf life of goods on hand.
We capitalize inventory costs associated with our drug candidates prior to receipt of regulatory approval, based on management’s judgment of probable future commercialization.  We would be required to expense these capitalized costs upon a change in such judgment, due to, among other factors, a decision denying approval of the drug candidate by regulatory agencies.
Bulk rHuPH20 formulations manufactured for partner use prior to our partner receiving marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) or comparable regulatory agencies in foreign countries and with no alternative future use are recorded as research and development expense. All direct manufacturing costs incurred after the partner receives marketing approval are capitalized as inventory. Bulk rHuPH20 formulations manufactured for general partner and internal use, which can potentially be used by any collaboration partner or by us in any stage of development or in commercial product, and ENHANZE drug product used by our partners in clinical trials, is considered to have alternative future use and all manufacturing costs are capitalized as inventory. Inventories used in our clinical trials are expensed at the time the inventories are packaged for the clinical trials.
As of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, inventories consisted of $2.4 million and $2.2 million, respectively, of Hylenex recombinant inventory, net and $28.8 million and $20.4 million, respectively, of bulk rHuPH20.
Leases

The Company has entered into operating leases primarily for real estate and automobiles. These leases have terms which range from 3 years to 6 years. We determine if an arrangement contains a lease at inception. Right of use (“ROU”) assets and liabilities resulting from operating leases are included in property and equipment, accrued expenses and other long-term liabilities on our consolidated balance sheets. Operating lease ROU assets and liabilities are recognized based on the present value of the future minimum lease payments over the lease term at commencement date. As most of our leases do not provide an implicit rate, we use our incremental borrowing rate based on the information available at commencement date in determining the discount rate to calculate the present value of future payments. The operating lease ROU asset also includes any lease payments made and excludes lease incentives and initial direct costs incurred. Our leases often include options to extend or terminate the lease. These options are included in the lease term when it is reasonably certain that we will exercise that option. As of March 31, 2019 it is not reasonably certain that these options will be exercised and they are not included within the lease term. Short-term leases with an initial term of 12 months or less are not recorded on the balance sheet. Lease expense for minimum lease payments is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

We have lease agreements with lease and non-lease components, which are generally accounted for separately. For certain equipment leases, such as automobiles, we account for the lease and non-lease components as a single lease component.     
    

10



Revenue Recognition
We generate revenues from payments received under collaborative agreements and product sales. We recognize revenue when we transfer promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which we expect to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. To determine revenue recognition for contracts with customers we perform the following five steps: (i) identify the promised goods or services in the contract; (ii) identify the performance obligations in the contract, including whether they are distinct in the context of the contract; (iii) determine the transaction price, including the constraint on variable consideration; (iv) allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract; and (v) recognize revenue when (or as) we satisfy the performance obligations.
Royalties and Revenues under Collaborative Agreements
Under these agreements, we grant the collaboration partner a worldwide license to develop and commercialize products using our ENHANZE technology to combine our patented rHuPH20 enzyme with their proprietary biologics directed at up to a specified number of targets. Targets are usually licensed on an exclusive, global basis. Targets selected subsequent to inception of the arrangement require payment of an additional license fee. The collaboration partner is responsible for all development, manufacturing, clinical, regulatory, sales and marketing costs for any products developed under the agreement. We are responsible for supply of bulk rHuPH20 based on the collaboration partner’s purchase orders and may also be separately engaged to perform research and development services.
We collect an upfront license payment from the collaboration partner and are also entitled to receive event-based payments subject to the collaboration partner’s achievement of specified development, regulatory and sales-based milestones. In several agreements, collaboration partners pay us annual fees to maintain their exclusive license rights if they are unable to advance product development to specified stages. We earn separate fees for bulk rHuPH20 supplies and research and development services. In addition, the collaboration partner will pay us royalties at an on average mid-single digit percent rate of their sales if products under the collaboration are commercialized. All amounts owed to us are noncancelable after the underlying triggering event occurs, and nonrefundable once paid. Unless terminated earlier in accordance with its terms, the collaboration generally continues in effect until the later of: (i) expiration of the last to expire of the valid claims of our patents covering rHuPH20 or other specified patents developed under the collaboration which valid claim covers a product developed under the collaboration, and (ii) expiration of the last to expire royalty term for a product developed under the collaboration, which is determined separately for each country. In the event such valid claims expire prior to the last to expire royalty term, the royalty rate is reduced for the remaining royalty term following such expiration. The collaboration partner may terminate the agreement prior to expiration for any reason in its entirety or on a target-by-target basis generally upon 90 days prior written notice to us. Upon any such termination, the license granted to the collaboration partner (in total or with respect to the terminated target, as applicable) will terminate provided, however, that in the event of expiration of the agreement, the licenses granted will become perpetual, non-exclusive and fully paid.
Although these agreements are in form structured as collaborative agreements, we concluded for accounting purposes they represent contracts with customers, and are not subject to accounting literature on collaborative arrangements. This is because we grant to collaboration partners licenses to our intellectual property, and provide supply of bulk rHuPH20 and research and development services which are all outputs of our ongoing activities, in exchange for consideration. We do not develop assets jointly with collaboration partners, and do not share in significant risks of their development or commercialization activities.
Under all of our collaborative agreements, we have identified licenses to use functional intellectual property as the only performance obligation. The intellectual property underlying the license is our proprietary ENHANZE technology which represents application of rHuPH20 to facilitate delivery of drugs or fluids. The license grants the collaboration partners right to use our intellectual property as it exists on the effective date of the license, because there is no ongoing development of the ENHANZE technology required. Therefore, we recognize revenue from licenses at the point when the license becomes effective and the collaboration partner has received access to our intellectual property, usually at the inception of the agreement.
When collaboration partners can select additional targets to add to the licenses granted, we consider these rights to be options. We evaluate whether such options contain material rights, i.e. have exercise prices that are discounted compared to what we would charge for a similar license to a new collaboration partner. The exercise price of these options includes a combination of the target selection fees, event-based milestone payments and royalties. When these amounts in aggregate are not offered at a discount that exceeds discounts available to other customers, we conclude the option does not contain a material right, and we consider grants of additional licensing rights upon option exercises to be separate contracts (target selection contracts).
We provide standard indemnification and protection of licensed intellectual property for our customers. These provisions are part of assurance that the licenses meet the agreements representations and are not obligations to provide goods or services.

11



We also fulfill purchase orders for supply of bulk rHuPH20 and perform research and development services pursuant to projects authorization forms for our collaboration partners, which represent separate contracts. Additionally, we price our supply of bulk rHuPH20 and research and development services at our regular selling prices, called standalone selling price or SSP. Therefore, our collaboration partners do not have material rights to order these items at prices not reflective of SSP. Refer to the discussion below regarding recognition of revenue for these separate contracts.
Transaction price for a contract represents the amount to which we are entitled in exchange for providing goods and services to the customer. Transaction price does not include amounts subject to uncertainties unless it is probable that there will be no significant reversal of revenue when the uncertainty is resolved. Apart from the upfront license payment (or target selection fees in the target selection contracts), all other fees we may earn under our collaborative agreements are subject to significant uncertainties of product development. Achievement of many of the event-based development and regulatory milestones may not be probable until such milestones are actually achieved. This generally relates to milestones such as obtaining marketing authorization approvals and successful completion of clinical trials. With respect to other development milestones, e.g. dosing of a first patient in a clinical trial, achievement could be considered probable prior to its actual occurrence, based on the progress towards commencement of the trial. We do not include any amounts subject to uncertainties into the transaction price until it is probable that the amount will not result in a significant reversal of revenue in the future. At the end of each reporting period, we re-evaluate the probability of achievement of such milestones and any related constraint, and if necessary, adjust our estimate of the overall transaction price.
When target exchange rights are held by collaboration partners, and the amounts attributed to these rights are not refundable, they are included in the transaction price. However, they are recorded as deferred revenues because we have a potential performance obligation to provide a new target if the exchange right is exercised. These amounts are recognized in revenue when the right of exchange expires or is exercised.
Because our agreements only have one type of performance obligation (licenses) which are typically all transferred at the same time at agreement inception, allocation of transaction price often is not required. However, allocation is required when licenses for some of the individual targets are subject to rights of exchange, because revenue associated with these targets cannot be recognized. We perform an allocation of the upfront amount based on relative SSP of licenses for individual targets. We determine license SSP using income-based valuation approach utilizing risk-adjusted discounted cash flow projections of the estimated return a licensor would receive. When amounts subject to uncertainties, such as milestones and royalties, are included in the transaction price, we attribute them to the specific individual target licenses which generate such milestone or royalty amounts.
We also estimate SSP of bulk rHuPH20 and research and development services, to determine that our collaboration partners do not have material rights to order them at discounted prices. For supplies of bulk rHuPH20, because we effectively act as a contract manufacturer to our collaboration partners, we estimate and charge SSP based on the typical contract manufacturer margins consistently with all of our collaborative partners. We determine SSP of research and development services based on a fully-burdened labor rate. Our rates are comparable to those we observe in other collaborative agreements. We also have a history of charging similar rates to all of our collaboration partners.
Upfront amounts allocated to licenses to individual targets are recognized as revenue when the license is transferred to the collaboration partner, as discussed above, if the license is not subject to exchange rights, or when the exchange right expires or is exercised. Development milestones and other fees are recognized in revenue when they are included in the transaction price, because by that time we have already transferred the related license to the collaboration partner.
Sales-based milestones and royalties cannot be recognized until the underlying sales occur. We do not receive final royalty reports from our collaboration partners until after we complete our financial statements for a prior quarter. Therefore, we recognize revenue based on estimates of the royalty earned, which are based on preliminary reports provided by our collaboration partners. We will record a true-up in the following quarter if necessary, when final royalty reports are received. To date, we have not recorded any material true-ups.
In contracts to provide research and development services, such services represent the only performance obligation. The fees are charged based on hours worked by our employees and the fixed contractual rate per hour, plus third-party pass-through costs, on a monthly basis. We recognize revenues as the related services are performed based on the amounts billed, as the collaboration partner consumes the benefit of research and development work simultaneously as we perform these services, and the amounts billed reflect the value of these services to the customer.
Refer to Note 4 Revenue, for further discussion on our collaborative arrangements.

12



Product Sales, Net
Hylenex Recombinant
We sell Hylenex recombinant in the U.S. to wholesale pharmaceutical distributors, who sell the product to hospitals and other end-user customers. Sales to wholesalers are made pursuant to purchase orders subject to the terms of a master agreement, and delivery of individual packages of Hylenex recombinant represent performance obligations under each purchase order. We use a contract manufacturer to produce Hylenex recombinant and a third-party logistics (3PL) vendor to process and fulfill orders. We concluded we are the principal in the sales to wholesalers because we control access to services rendered by both vendors and direct their activities. We have no significant obligations to wholesalers to generate pull-through sales.
Selling prices initially billed to wholesalers are subject to discounts for prompt payment and subsequent chargebacks when wholesalers sell Hylenex recombinant at negotiated discounted prices to members of certain group purchasing organizations (“GPOs”) and government programs. We also pay quarterly distribution fees to certain wholesalers for inventory reporting and chargeback processing, and to GPOs as administrative fees for services and for access to GPO members. We concluded the benefits received in exchange for these fees are not distinct from our sales of Hylenex recombinant, and accordingly we apply these amounts to reduce revenues. Wholesalers also have rights to return unsold product nearing or past the expiration date. Because of the shelf life of Hylenex recombinant and our lengthy return period, there may be a significant period of time between when the product is shipped and when we issue credits on returned product.
We estimate the transaction price when we receive each purchase order taking into account the expected reductions of the selling price initially billed to the wholesaler arising from all of the above factors. We have compiled historical experience and data to estimate future returns and chargebacks of Hylenex recombinant and the impact of the other discounts and fees we pay. When estimating these adjustments to the transaction price, we reduce it sufficiently to be able to assert that it is probable that there will be no significant reversal of revenue when the ultimate adjustment amounts are known.
Each purchase order contains only one type of product and is usually shipped to the wholesaler in a single shipment. Therefore, allocation of the transaction price to individual packages is not required.
We recognize revenue from Hylenex recombinant product sales and related cost of sales upon product delivery to the wholesaler location. At that time, the wholesalers take control of the product as they take title, bear the risk of loss of ownership, and have an enforceable obligation to pay us. They also have the ability to direct sales of product to their customers on terms and at prices they negotiate. Although wholesalers have product return rights, we do not believe they have a significant incentive to return the product to us.
Upon recognition of revenue from product sales of Hylenex recombinant, the estimated amounts of credit for product returns, chargebacks, distribution fees, prompt payment discounts, and GPO fees are included in sales reserves, accrued liabilities and net of accounts receivable. We monitor actual product returns, chargebacks, discounts and fees subsequent to the sale. If these amounts differ from our estimates, we make adjustments to these allowances, which are applied to increase or reduce product sales revenue and earnings in the period of adjustment.
In connection with the orders placed by wholesalers, we incur costs such as commissions to our sales representatives. However, as revenue from product sales is recognized upon delivery to the wholesaler, which occurs shortly after we receive a purchase order, we do not capitalize these commissions and other costs, based on application of the practical expedient allowed within the applicable guidance.
Bulk rHuPH20
We sell bulk rHuPH20 to collaboration partners for use in research and development; subsequent to receiving marketing approval, we sell it for use in collaboration commercial products. Sales are made pursuant to purchase orders subject to the terms of the collaborative agreement, and delivery of units of bulk rHuPH20 represent performance obligations under each purchase order. We provide a standard warranty that the product conforms to specifications. We use a contract manufacturer to produce bulk rHuPH20 and have concluded we are the principal in the sales to collaboration partners. The transaction price for each purchase order of bulk rHuPH20 is fixed based on the cost of production plus a contractual markup and is not subject to adjustments. Allocation of the transaction price to individual quantities of the product is usually not required because each order contains only one type of product.
We recognize revenue from the sale of bulk rHuPH20 as product sales and related cost of sales upon transfer of title to our partners. At that time, the partners take control of the product, bear the risk of loss of ownership, and have an enforceable obligation to pay us.

13



ENHANZE Drug Product
We sell ENHANZE drug product to collaboration partners for use in research and development in early phase clinical studies. Sales are made pursuant to purchase orders subject to the terms of the collaborative agreement, and delivery of units of ENHANZE drug product represent performance obligations under each purchase order. We provide a standard warranty that the product conforms to specifications. We use a contract manufacturer to produce ENHANZE drug product and we concluded we are the principal in the sales to collaboration partners. The transaction price for each purchase order of ENHANZE drug product is fixed based on the cost of production plus a contractual markup and is not subject to adjustments. Allocation of the transaction price to individual quantities of the product is usually not required because each order contains only one type of product.
We recognize revenue from the sale of ENHANZE drug product as product sales and related cost of sales upon transfer of title to our partners. At that time, the partners take control of the product, bear the risk of loss of ownership, and have an enforceable obligation to pay us.
Revenue Presentation
In our statements of operations, we report as revenues under collaborative agreements the upfront payments, event-based development and regulatory milestones and sales milestones. We also include in this category revenues from separate research and development contracts pursuant to project authorization forms and sales of bulk rHuPH20 that has no alternative future use. We report royalties received from collaboration partners as a separate line in our statements of operations.
Revenues from sales of Hylenex recombinant, bulk rHuPH20 that has alternative future use and ENHANZE drug product are included in product sales, net.
In footnotes to our financial statements, we provide disaggregated revenue information by type of arrangement (product sales, net, collaborative agreements and research and development services), and additionally, by type of payment stream received under collaborative agreements (upfront license fees, event-based development and regulatory milestones and other fees, sales milestones and royalties).
Cost of Product Sales
Cost of product sales consists primarily of raw materials, third-party manufacturing costs, fill and finish costs, freight costs, internal costs and manufacturing overhead associated with the production of Hylenex recombinant and bulk rHuPH20 and ENHANZE drug product that has alternative future use. Cost of product sales also consists of the write-down of excess, dated and obsolete inventories and the write-off of inventories that do not meet certain product specifications, if any. Prior to bulk rHuPH20 and ENHANZE drug product having alternative future use, all costs related to the manufacturing of those products were charged to research and development expenses in the periods such costs were incurred. During the three months ended March 31, 2019, sales of bulk rHuPH20 and ENHANZE drug product included $0.2 million of cost of sales that were previously expensed as research and development. Of the bulk rHuPH20 and ENHANZE drug product that has alternative future use on hand as of March 31, 2019, approximately $1.4 million in manufacturing costs were previously recorded as research and development expenses. We expect to sell this inventory by the end of 2020.
Research and Development Expenses
Research and development expenses include salaries and benefits, facilities and other overhead expenses, external clinical trial expenses, research related manufacturing services, contract services and other outside expenses. Research and development expenses are charged to operating expenses as incurred when these expenditures relate to our research and development efforts and have no alternative future uses. When bulk rHuPH20 is manufactured for use in research and development by us or our partners and the product cannot be redirected for alternative use due to formulation and manufacturing specifications, the manufacturing costs are recorded as research and development expense. Bulk rHuPH20 that is manufactured for partner use prior to our partner receiving marketing approval from the FDA or comparable regulatory agencies in foreign countries and meet these specifications is recorded as research and development expenses. Bulk rHuPH20 formulations manufactured for general partner and internal use, which can potentially be used by any collaboration partner or by us in any stage of development or in commercial products, is considered to have alternative future use and all manufacturing costs are capitalized as inventory. Inventories used in our clinical trials are expensed at the time the inventories are packaged for the clinical trials.
We are obligated to make upfront payments upon execution of certain research and development agreements. Advance payments, including nonrefundable amounts, for goods or services that will be used or rendered for future research and development activities are deferred. Such amounts are recognized as expense as the related goods are delivered or the related services are performed or such time when we do not expect the goods to be delivered or services to be performed.

14



Milestone payments that we make in connection with in-licensed technology for a particular research and development project that have no alternative future uses (in other research and development projects or otherwise) and therefore no separate economic value are expensed as research and development costs at the time the costs are incurred. We currently have no in-licensed technologies that have alternative future uses in research and development projects or otherwise.
Clinical Trial Expenses
We make payments in connection with our clinical trials under contracts with contract research organizations that support conducting and managing clinical trials. The financial terms of these agreements are subject to negotiation and vary from contract to contract and may result in uneven payment flows. Generally, these agreements set forth the scope of work to be performed at a fixed fee, unit price or on a time and materials basis. A portion of our obligation to make payments under these contracts depends on factors such as the successful enrollment or treatment of patients or the completion of other clinical trial milestones.
Expenses related to clinical trials are accrued based on our estimates and/or representations from service providers regarding work performed, including actual level of patient enrollment, completion of patient studies and progress of the clinical trials. Other incidental costs related to patient enrollment or treatment are accrued when reasonably certain. If the amounts we are obligated to pay under our clinical trial agreements are modified (for instance, as a result of changes in the clinical trial protocol or scope of work to be performed), we adjust our accruals accordingly on a prospective basis. Revisions to our contractual payment obligations are charged to expense in the period in which the facts that give rise to the revision become reasonably certain.
Share-Based Compensation
We record compensation expense associated with stock options, restricted stock awards (“RSAs”), restricted stock units (“RSUs”), and RSUs with performance conditions (“PRSUs”) in accordance with the authoritative guidance for stock-based compensation. The cost of employee services received in exchange for an award of an equity instrument is measured at the grant date, based on the estimated fair value of the award, and is recognized as expense on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period of the award. Share-based compensation expense for an award with a performance condition is recognized when the achievement of such performance condition is determined to be probable. If the outcome of such performance condition is not determined to be probable or is not met, no compensation expense is recognized and any previously recognized compensation expense is reversed. Forfeitures are recognized as a reduction of share-based compensation expense as they occur.
Income Taxes
We provide for income taxes using the liability method. Under this method, deferred income tax assets and liabilities are determined based on the differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities at each year end and their respective tax bases and are measured using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which the differences are expected to affect taxable income. Significant judgment is required by management to determine our provision for income taxes, our deferred tax assets and liabilities, and the valuation allowance to record against our net deferred tax assets, which are based on complex and evolving tax regulations throughout the world. Deferred tax assets and other tax benefits are recorded when it is more likely than not that the position will be sustained upon audit. While we have begun to utilize certain of our net operating losses, we have not yet established a track record of profitability. Accordingly, valuation allowances have been recorded to reduce our net deferred tax assets to zero, with the exception of the alternative minimum tax ("AMT") credit carryover of $3.0 million. Under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Act”) enacted in December 2017, the AMT credit carryover will either be utilized, or if unutilized fully refunded in 2022. For all other deferred tax assets the valuation allowance will reduce the net value to zero until such time as we can demonstrate an ability to realize them.
The Company’s 2015 and 2016 federal returns were selected for audit by the IRS. The audit is currently in process and no adjustments have been proposed. The Company does not expect any material adjustments as a result of the IRS audit.
Net Income (Loss) Per Share
Basic net income (loss) per common share is computed by dividing net income (loss) for the period by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period, without consideration for common stock equivalents. Outstanding stock options, unvested RSAs, unvested RSUs and unvested PRSUs are considered common stock equivalents and are only included in the calculation of diluted earnings per common share when net income is reported and their effect is dilutive. For the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, approximately 7.7 million and 14.6 million shares, respectively, of outstanding stock options, unvested RSAs, unvested RSUs were excluded from the calculation of diluted net income (loss) per common share because their effect was anti-dilutive. A reconciliation of the numerators and the denominators of the basic and diluted net income (loss) per common share computations is as follows (in thousands, except per share amounts):

15



 
 
Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
 
2019
 
2018
Numerator:
 
 
 
 
Net income (loss)
 
$
1,796

 
$
(27,461
)
Denominator:
 
 
 
 
Weighted average common shares outstanding for basic
net income (loss) per share
 
144,743

 
142,656

Net effect of dilutive common stock equivalents
 
2,731

 

Weighted average common shares outstanding for diluted
net income (loss) per share
 
147,474


142,656

Net income (loss) per share:
 
 
 
 
Basic
 
$
0.01

 
$
(0.19
)
Diluted
 
$
0.01

 
$
(0.19
)
Segment Information
We operate our business in one segment, which includes all activities related to the research, development and commercialization of our proprietary enzymes. This segment also includes revenues and expenses related to (i) research and development and bulk rHuPH20 manufacturing activities conducted under our collaborative agreements with third parties and (ii) product sales of Hylenex recombinant. The chief operating decision-maker reviews the operating results on an aggregate basis and manages the operations as a single operating segment. Our long-lived assets located in foreign countries had no book value as of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018.

16



Adoption and Pending Adoption of Recent Accounting Pronouncements
The following table provides a brief description of recently issued accounting standards, those adopted in the current period and those not yet adopted:
Standard
 
Description
 
Effective Date
 
Effect on the Financial
Statements or Other Significant Matters
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842). In July 2018, the FASB issued additional guidance related to Topic 842.
 
The new guidance requires lessees to recognize assets and liabilities for most leases and provides enhanced disclosures.
 
January 1, 2019
 
We implemented the guidance on January 1, 2019 using a modified retrospective transition basis for leases existing as of the period of adoption. In order to adopt the new standard, we used the available practical expedients and newly implemented processes and internal controls for lease accounting. The practical expedients allowed us to carry forward our historical assessment of whether existing agreements are or contain a lease and the classification of our existing lease arrangements. All of our real-estate and automobile operating lease commitments are recognized as lease liabilities with corresponding right-of-use assets, which resulted in an increase in the assets and liabilities of the consolidated balance sheet of $7.2 million, using an assumed weighted average discount rate of 10.0%. The adoption did not have an impact on our consolidated statements of operations and did not require recognition of a cumulative-effect adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings in the period of adoption. We elected to continue applying the guidance under ASC 840 for comparative periods, as allowed through ASC 2018-11.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820).
 
The new guidance removes, modifies and adds to certain disclosure requirements on fair value measurements in Topic 820, Fair Value Measurement.
 
January 1, 2020
 
We plan to adopt the new guidance on January 1, 2020. We do not anticipate the adoption will have a material impact on our condensed consolidated financial position or results of operations.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326), Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments

 
The standard amends the impairment model by requiring entities to use a forward-looking approach based on expected losses to estimate credit losses for most financial assets and certain other instruments that aren’t measured at fair value through net income. For available-for-sale debt securities, entities will be required to recognize an allowance for credit losses rather than a reduction in carrying value of the asset. Entities will no longer be permitted to consider the length of time that fair value has been less than amortized cost when evaluating when credit losses should be recognized.

 
January 1, 2020

 
We plan to adopt the new guidance on January 1, 2020. We are currently in the process of evaluating the impact of the standard on our accounting policy for losses related to available-for-sale securities and accounts receivable.
      

17



3. Fair Value Measurement
Available-for-sale marketable securities consisted of the following (in thousands):
 
 
March 31, 2019
 
 
Amortized Cost
 
Gross Unrealized Gains
 
Gross Unrealized Losses
 
Estimated Fair Value
Asset-backed securities
 
35,765

 
18

 
(5
)
 
35,778

Corporate debt securities
 
68,877

 
67

 
(18
)
 
68,926

U.S. Treasury securities
 
84,448

 
36

 
(17
)
 
84,467

Commercial paper
 
78,951

 

 

 
78,951

 
 
268,041

 
121

 
(40
)
 
268,122

 
 
December 31, 2018
 
 
Amortized Cost
 
Gross Unrealized Gains
 
Gross Unrealized Losses
 
Estimated Fair Value
Asset-backed securities
 
$
39,787

 
$

 
$
(40
)
 
$
39,747

Corporate debt securities
 
57,860

 

 
(127
)
 
57,733

U.S. Treasury securities
 
84,924

 

 
(87
)
 
84,837

Commercial paper
 
114,273

 

 

 
114,273

 
 
$
296,844

 
$

 
$
(254
)
 
$
296,590

As of March 31, 2019, nine of our available-for-sale debt securities with a fair market value of $71.2 million were in a gross unrealized loss position of $40 thousand. Based on our review of these marketable securities, we believe we had no other than-temporary impairments on these securities as of March 31, 2019, because we do not intend to sell these securities and it is not more-likely-than-not that we will be required to sell these securities before the recovery of their amortized cost basis.
Contractual maturities of available-for-sale debt securities are as follows (in thousands):
 
 
March 31, 2019
 
December 31, 2018
 
 
Estimated Fair Value
Due within one year
 
$
264,140

 
$
296,590

After one but within five years
 
3,982

 

 
 
$
268,122

 
$
296,590

The following table summarizes, by major security type, our cash equivalents and available-for-sale marketable securities that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis and are categorized using the fair value hierarchy (in thousands):
 
 
March 31, 2019
 
December 31, 2018
 
 
Level 1
 
Level 2
 
Total estimated fair value
 
Level 1
 
Level 2
 
Total estimated fair value
Cash equivalents:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Money market funds
 
$
64,026

 
$

 
$
64,026

 
$
57,987

 
$

 
$
57,987

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Available-for-sale marketable
   securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Asset-backed securities
 

 
35,778

 
35,778

 

 
39,747

 
39,747

Corporate debt securities
 

 
68,926

 
68,926

 

 
57,733

 
57,733

U.S. Treasury securities
 
84,467

 

 
84,467

 
84,837

 

 
84,837

Commercial paper
 

 
78,951

 
78,951

 

 
114,273

 
114,273

 
 
$
148,493

 
$
183,655

 
$
332,148

 
$
142,824

 
$
211,753

 
$
354,577


18



There were no transfers between Level 1 and Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy during the three months ended March 31, 2019. We had no instruments that were classified within Level 3 as of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018.
4. Revenue
Our disaggregated revenues were as follows (in thousands):
 
 
Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
 
2019
 
2018
Royalties
 
$
17,953

 
$
20,944

 
 
 
 
 
Product sales, net
 
 
 
 
  Sales of bulk rHuPH20
 
$
5,082

 
$
3,378

  Sales of ENHANZE drug product
 
137

 

  Sales of Hylenex
 
3,171

 
3,423

Total product sales, net
 
8,390

 
6,801

 
 
 
 
 
Revenues under collaborative agreements:
 
 
 
 
  Upfront license fees
 
30,000

 
1,336

  Event-based development and regulatory milestones and other fees
 

 
1,000

  Research and development services
 
606

 
791

Total revenues under collaborative agreements
 
30,606

 
3,127

 
 
 
 
 
Total revenue
 
$
56,949

 
$
30,872

During the three months ended March 31, 2019 we recognized revenue related to licenses granted to collaboration partners in prior periods in the amount of $18.0 million. This amount represents royalties earned in the current period. We recognized revenue of $0.5 million during the three months ended March 31, 2019 that had been included in deferred revenues at December 31, 2018. We did not recognize any adjustments to reduce sales reserves and allowances liability related to Hylenex recombinant sales in prior periods.
Accounts receivable, net and deferred revenues (contract liabilities) from contracts with customers, including collaboration partners, consisted of the following (in thousands):
 
 
March 31, 2019
 
December 31, 2018
Accounts receivable, net
 
$
28,164

 
$
30,005

Deferred revenues
 
8,756

 
9,255

As of March 31, 2019, the amounts included in the transaction price of our contracts with customers, including collaboration partners, and allocated to goods and services not yet provided were $9.7 million, of which $0.9 million relates to unfulfilled product purchase orders and the remaining amount has been collected and is reported as deferred revenues. The unfulfilled product purchase orders are estimated to be delivered during the remainder of 2019. Of the total deferred revenues, $3.0 million represents pre-payment of bulk rHuPH20 that we estimate will be delivered during the remainder of 2019. Of the remaining deferred revenues, for which the timing of when these goods and services will be provided is controlled by our customers, $3.5 million can be used by the customers at any time through 2022 and the remaining $2.3 million at any time through November 2019.

19



There were no contract assets related to collaborative agreements at March 31, 2019 . While we may become entitled to receive additional event-based development and regulatory milestones and other fees under our collaborative agreements, which relate to intellectual property licenses granted to collaboration partners in prior periods, no amounts were probable. The following table presents amounts under our collaborative agreements included in the transaction price (i.e. cumulative amounts triggered or probable) as of March 31, 2019 (in thousands):
 
 
Upfront
(1)
 
Event-based
(2)
 
Sales
(3)
 
Total
Collaboration partner and agreement date:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Roche (December 2006, September 2017 and October 2018)
 
$
95,000

 
$
30,000

 
$
22,000

 
$
147,000

Baxalta (September 2007)
 
10,000

 
3,000

 
9,000

 
22,000

Pfizer (December 2012)
 
14,500

 
2,000

 

 
16,500

Janssen (December 2014)
 
15,250

 
15,000

 

 
30,250

AbbVie (June 2015)
 
23,000

 
6,000

 

 
29,000

Lilly (December 2015)
 
33,000

 

 

 
33,000

BMS (September 2017)
 
105,000

 
5,000

 

 
110,000

Alexion (December 2017)
 
40,000

 
5,000

 

 
45,000

argenx (February 2019)

 
30,000

 

 

 
30,000

Royalties
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
271,341

Total amounts under our collaborative agreements included in the transaction price
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
734,091

(1)
Upfront and additional target selection fees
(2)
Event-based development and regulatory milestone amounts and other fees
(3)
Sales-based milestone amounts
Through March 31, 2019, our collaboration partners have completed development, obtained marketing authorization approvals for certain indications and commenced commercialization of the following products:
Roche, for Herceptin SC in the European Union (“EU”) in August 2013 and in Canada in September 2018, and its equivalent Herceptin Hylecta in the US in February 2019; and MabThera SC in the EU in March 2014 and its equivalent RITUXAN HYCELA in the US in June 2017;
Baxalta, for HYQVIA in the EU and in the US in May 2013.
The remaining targets and products are currently in the process of development by the collaboration partners.
5. Certain Balance Sheet Items
Accounts receivable, net consisted of the following (in thousands):
 
 
March 31,
2019
 
December 31,
2018
Accounts receivable from product sales to collaborators
 
$
8,109

 
$
3,717

Accounts receivable from revenues under collaborative agreements
 
527

 
5,499

Accounts receivable from royalty payments
 
17,992

 
19,199

Accounts receivable from other product sales
 
2,170

 
2,182

     Subtotal
 
28,798

 
30,597

Allowance for distribution fees and discounts
 
(634
)
 
(592
)
     Total accounts receivable, net
 
$
28,164

 
$
30,005


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Inventories consisted of the following (in thousands):
 
 
March 31,
2019
 
December 31,
2018
Raw materials
 
$
1,461

 
$
735

Work-in-process
 
18,983

 
11,430

Finished goods
 
10,797

 
10,460

     Total inventories
 
$
31,241

 
$
22,625

Prepaid expenses and other assets consisted of the following (in thousands):
 
 
March 31,
2019
 
December 31,
2018
Prepaid manufacturing expenses
 
$
9,346

 
$
8,230

Prepaid research and development expenses
 
7,734

 
7,922

Other prepaid expenses
 
2,552

 
2,513

Other assets
 
6,313

 
6,462

     Total prepaid expenses and other assets
 
25,945

 
25,127

Less long-term portion
 
5,031

 
4,434

     Total prepaid expenses and other assets, current
 
$
20,914

 
$
20,693

Prepaid manufacturing expenses include raw materials, slot reservation fees and other amounts paid to contract manufacturing organizations. Such amounts are reclassified to work-in-process inventory as materials are used or the CMO services are complete.
Property and equipment, net consisted of the following (in thousands):
 
 
March 31,
2019
 
December 31,
2018
Research equipment
 
$
9,969

 
$
9,945

Manufacturing equipment
 
4,009

 
3,979

Computer and office equipment
 
5,666

 
5,211

Leasehold improvements
 
4,780

 
4,569

     Subtotal
 
24,424

 
23,704

Accumulated depreciation and amortization
 
(16,820
)
 
(16,239
)
     Subtotal
 
7,604

 
7,465

Right of use assets
 
6,938

 

     Property and equipment, net
 
$
14,542

 
$
7,465

Depreciation and amortization expense was approximately $1.0 million and $0.6 million, inclusive of ROU asset amortization of $0.4 million and zero for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

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Accrued expenses consisted of the following (in thousands):
 
 
March 31,
2019
 
December 31,
2018
Accrued outsourced research and development expenses
 
$
19,885

 
$
21,921

Accrued compensation and payroll taxes
 
6,929

 
16,604

Accrued outsourced manufacturing expenses
 
7,912

 
3,975

Other accrued expenses
 
7,289

 
7,623

Lease liability
 
8,797

 

     Total accrued expenses
 
50,812

 
50,123

Less long-term portion
 
7,149

 
594

     Total accrued expenses, current
 
$
43,663

 
$
49,529

Expense associated with the accretion of the lease liabilities was approximately $0.2 million and zero for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. Total lease expense for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 was $0.6 million. Cash paid for amounts related to leases the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 was $0.7 million and $0.4 million, respectively.
Deferred revenue consisted of the following (in thousands):
 
 
March 31,
2019
 
December 31,
2018
Collaborative agreements
 
 
 
 
License fees and event-based payments
 
$
2,264

 
$
2,264

Product sales
 
6,492

 
6,991

Total deferred revenue
 
8,756

 
9,255

Less current portion
 
4,247

 
4,247

Deferred revenue, net of current portion
 
$
4,509

 
$
5,008

6. Long-Term Debt, Net
Royalty-backed Loan
In January 2016, through our wholly-owned subsidiary Halozyme Royalty LLC (“Halozyme Royalty”), we received a $150 million loan (the “Royalty-backed Loan”) pursuant to a credit agreement (the “Credit Agreement”) with BioPharma Credit Investments IV Sub, LP and Athyrium Opportunities II Acquisition LP (the “Royalty-backed Lenders”). Under the terms of the Credit Agreement, Halozyme Therapeutics, Inc. transferred to Halozyme Royalty the right to receive royalty payments from the commercial sales of ENHANZE products owed under the Roche Collaboration and Baxalta Collaboration (“Collaboration Agreements”). The royalty payments from the Collaboration Agreements will be used to repay the principal and interest on the loan (the “Royalty Payments”).  The Royalty-backed Loan bears interest at a per annum rate of 8.75% plus the three-month LIBOR rate. The three-month LIBOR rate is subject to a floor of 0.7% and a cap of 1.5%. The interest rate as of March 31, 2019 was 10.25%.
The Credit Agreement provides that none of the Royalty Payments were required to be applied to the Royalty-backed Loan prior to January 1, 2017, 50% of the Royalty Payments are required to be applied to the Royalty-backed Loan between January 1, 2017 and January 1, 2018 and thereafter all Royalty Payments must be applied to the Royalty-backed Loan. However, the amounts available to repay the Royalty-backed Loan are subject to caps of $13.75 million per quarter in 2017, $18.75 million per quarter in 2018, $21.25 million per quarter in 2019 and $22.5 million per quarter in 2020 and thereafter. Amounts available to repay the Royalty-backed Loan will be applied first to pay interest and second to repay principal on the Royalty-backed Loan. Any accrued interest that is not paid on any applicable quarterly payment date, as defined, will be capitalized and added to the principal balance of the Royalty-backed Loan on such date. Halozyme Royalty will be entitled to receive and distribute to Halozyme any Royalty Payments that are not required to be applied to the Royalty-backed Loan or which are in excess of the foregoing caps.

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Because the repayment of the term loan is contingent upon the level of Royalty Payments received, the repayment term may be shortened or extended depending on the actual level of Royalty Payments. The final maturity date of the Royalty-backed Loan will be the earlier of (i) the date when principal and interest is paid in full, (ii) the termination of Halozyme Royalty’s right to receive royalties under the Collaboration Agreements, and (iii) December 31, 2050.  Currently, we estimate that the loan will be repaid in the first quarter of 2020. This estimate could be adversely affected and the repayment period could be extended if future royalty amounts are less than currently expected. Under the terms of the Credit Agreement, at any time after January 1, 2019, Halozyme Royalty may, subject to certain limitations, prepay the outstanding principal of the Royalty-backed Loan in whole or in part, at a price equal to 105% of the outstanding principal on the Royalty-backed Loan, plus accrued but unpaid interest. The Royalty-backed Loan constitutes an obligation of Halozyme Royalty and is non-recourse to Halozyme. Halozyme Royalty retains its right to the Royalty Payments following repayment of the loan.
As of March 31, 2019, we were in compliance with all covenants under the Royalty-backed Loan and there was no material adverse change in our business, operations or financial condition.
We began making principal and interest payments against the Royalty-backed Loan in the first quarter of 2017 and therefore had no capitalized interest in the three months ended March 31, 2019. In addition, we recorded accrued interest, which is included in accrued expenses, of $0.3 million and $0.4 million as of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively
In connection with the Royalty-backed Loan, we paid the Royalty-backed Lenders a fee of $1.5 million and incurred additional debt issuance costs totaling $0.4 million, which includes expenses that we paid on behalf of the Royalty-backed Lenders and expenses incurred directly by us. Debt issuance costs and the lender fee have been netted against the debt as of March 31, 2019 and are being amortized over the estimated term of the debt using the effective interest method. For the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company recognized interest expense, including amortization of the debt discount, related to the Royalty-backed Loan of $2.2 million and $3.9 million, respectively. The assumptions used in determining the expected repayment term of the debt and amortization period of the issuance costs requires that we make estimates that could impact the short- and long-term classification of these costs, as well as the period over which these costs will be amortized. The outstanding balance of the Royalty-backed Loan as of March 31, 2019 was $68.2 million, net of unamortized debt discount of $0.2 million.
Oxford and SVB Loan and Security Agreement
In June 2016, we entered into a Loan and Security Agreement (the “Loan Agreement”) with Oxford Finance LLC and Silicon Valley Bank (“SVB”) (collectively, the “Lenders”), providing a senior secured loan facility of up to an aggregate principal amount of $70.0 million, comprising a $55.0 million draw in June 2016 and an additional $15.0 million tranche, which we had the option to draw during the second quarter of 2017 and did not exercise. The initial proceeds were partially used to pay the outstanding principal and final payment of $4.25 million owed on a previous loan agreement with the Lenders. The remaining proceeds are being used for working capital and general business requirements. The senior secured loan facility carries a fixed interest rate of 8.25%. The repayment schedule provides for interest only payments for the first 18 months, followed by consecutive equal monthly payments of principal and interest in arrears through the maturity date of January 1, 2021. The Loan Agreement provides for a final payment equal to 5.50% of the initial $55.0 million principal amount. The final payment is due when the Loan Agreement becomes due or upon the prepayment of the facility. We have the option to prepay the outstanding balance of the Loan Agreement in full.
In connection with the Loan Agreement, the debt offering costs have been recorded as a debt discount in our condensed consolidated balance sheets which, together with the final payment and fixed interest rate payments, are being amortized and recorded as interest expense throughout the life of the loan using the effective interest rate method.
The Loan Agreement is secured by substantially all of the assets of the Company and our subsidiary, Halozyme, Inc., except that the collateral does not include any equity interests in Halozyme, Inc., any of our intellectual property (including all licensing, collaboration and similar agreements relating thereto), and certain other excluded assets. The Loan Agreement contains customary representations, warranties and covenants by us, which covenants limit our ability to convey, sell, lease, transfer, assign or otherwise dispose of certain of our assets; engage in any business other than the businesses currently engaged in by us or reasonably related thereto; liquidate or dissolve; make certain management changes; undergo certain change of control events; create, incur, assume, or be liable with respect to certain indebtedness; grant certain liens; pay dividends and make certain other restricted payments; make certain investments; make payments on any subordinated debt; enter into transactions with any of our affiliates outside of the ordinary course of business or permit our subsidiaries to do the same; and make any voluntary prepayment of or modify certain terms of the Royalty-backed Loan. In addition, subject to certain exceptions, we are required to maintain with SVB our primary deposit accounts, securities accounts and commodities, and to do the same for our subsidiary, Halozyme, Inc.

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The Loan Agreement also contains customary indemnification obligations and customary events of default, including, among other things, our failure to fulfill certain of our obligations under the Loan Agreement and the occurrence of a material adverse change which is defined as a material adverse change in our business, operations, or condition (financial or otherwise), a material impairment of the prospect of repayment of any portion of the loan, a material impairment in the perfection or priority of the Lender’s lien in the collateral or in the value of such collateral or the occurrence of an event of default under the Royalty-backed Loan. In the event of default by us under the Loan Agreement, the Lenders would be entitled to exercise their remedies thereunder, including the right to accelerate the debt, upon which we may be required to repay all amounts then outstanding under the Loan Agreement, which could harm our financial condition.
 As of March 31, 2019, we were in compliance with all covenants under the Loan Agreement and there was no material adverse change in our business, operations or financial condition.
Interest expense, including amortization of the debt discount, related to the Loan Agreement totaled $1.0 million and $1.4 million for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. Accrued interest, which is included in accrued expenses, was $0.2 million and $0.3 million as of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively. The outstanding term loan balance was $37.2 million as of March 31, 2019, inclusive of $2.4 million of accretion of the final payment and net of unamortized debt discount related to offering costs of $0.1 million.
7. Share-based Compensation
Total share-based compensation expense related to share-based awards was comprised of the following (in thousands):
 
 
Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
 
2019
 
2018
Research and development
 
$
4,290

 
$
3,914

Selling, general and administrative
 
5,185

 
4,425

Share-based compensation expense
 
$
9,475

 
$
8,339

Share-based compensation expense by type of share-based award (in thousands):
 
 
Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
 
2019
 
2018
Stock options
 
$
5,053

 
$
4,559

RSAs, RSUs and PRSUs
 
4,422

 
3,780

 
 
$
9,475

 
$
8,339

We granted stock options to purchase approximately 2.2 million and 1.6 million shares of common stock during the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. The exercise price of stock options granted is equal to the closing price of the common stock on the date of grant. The fair value of each option award is estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing model (“Black-Scholes model”). Expected volatility is based on historical volatility of our common stock. The expected term of options granted is based on analyses of historical employee termination rates and option exercises. The risk-free interest rate is based on the U.S. Treasury yield for a period consistent with the expected term of the option in effect at the time of the grant. The dividend yield assumption is based on the expectation of no future dividend payments. The assumptions used in the Black-Scholes model were as follows:
 
 
Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
 
2019
 
2018
Expected volatility
 
56.6-56.9%
 
62.6-70.1%

Average expected term (in years)
 
5.4
 
5.5

Risk-free interest rate
 
2.49-2.56%
 
2.25-2.65%

Expected dividend yield
 
 


24



Total unrecognized estimated compensation cost by type of award and the weighted-average remaining requisite service period over which such expense is expected to be recognized (in thousands, unless otherwise noted):
 
 
March 31, 2019
 
 
Unrecognized
Expense
 
Remaining
Weighted-Average
Recognition Period
(years)
Stock options
 
$
48,253

 
2.81
RSAs
 
$
1,120

 
0.57
RSUs
 
$
36,062

 
2.61
8. Stockholders’ Equity
During the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, we issued an aggregate of 163,421 and 705,856 shares of common stock, respectively, in connection with the exercises of stock options at a weighted average exercise price of $9.66 and $10.47 per share, respectively, for net proceeds of approximately $1.6 million and $7.4 million, respectively. For the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, we issued 478,037 and 410,306 shares of common stock, respectively, upon vesting of certain RSUs for which 123,095 and 129,465 RSUs were withheld from the RSU holders, respectively, to pay for minimum withholding taxes totaling approximately $2.0 million and $2.4 million, respectively. Stock options and unvested restricted units totaling approximately 15.5 million shares and 13.4 million shares of our common stock were outstanding as of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively.
9. Commitments and Contingencies
From time to time, we may be involved in disputes, including litigation, relating to claims arising out of operations in the normal course of our business. Any of these claims could subject us to costly legal expenses and, while we generally believe that we have adequate insurance to cover many different types of liabilities, our insurance carriers may deny coverage or our policy limits may be inadequate to fully satisfy any damage awards or settlements. If this were to happen, the payment of any such awards could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial position. Additionally, any such claims, whether or not successful, could damage our reputation and business. We currently are not a party to any legal proceedings, the adverse outcome of which, in management’s opinion, individually or in the aggregate, would have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations or financial position.
Our commitments include payments related to our operating leases. Approximate annual future minimum operating lease payments as of March 31, 2019 are as follows (in thousands; excluding the three months ended March 31, 2019): 
Year:
 
Operating
Leases
2019
 
$
2,265

2020
 
3,066

2021
 
2,565

2022
 
2,506

2023
 
112

Total minimum lease payments
 
$
10,514

Less imputed interest
 
$
(1,717
)
Total
 
$
8,797

The weighted-average remaining lease term of our operating leases is approximately 3.6 years. As of March 31, 2019 we have an additional operating lease for real estate that has not yet commenced of $0.9 million. This lease will commence in the third quarter of 2019 and has a lease term of 3 years.


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Item 2.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
As used in this report, unless the context suggests otherwise, references to “Halozyme,” “the Company,” “we,” “our,” “ours,” and “us” refer to Halozyme Therapeutics, Inc., its wholly owned subsidiary, Halozyme, Inc. and Halozyme Inc.’s wholly owned subsidiaries, Halozyme Holdings Ltd., Halozyme Royalty LLC, Halozyme Switzerland GmbH and Halozyme Switzerland Holdings GmbH. References to “Notes” refer to the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements included herein (refer to Item 1 of Part I).
The following information should be read in conjunction with the interim unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and Notes thereto included in Item 1 of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, as well as the audited financial statements and notes thereto and Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018, included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018. Past financial or operating performance is not necessarily a reliable indicator of future performance, and our historical performance should not be used to anticipate results or future period trends.
This report contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. All statements in this report other than statements of historical fact are, or may be deemed to be, forward-looking statements. Words such as “expect,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “believe,” “seek,” “estimate,” “think,” “may,” “could,” “will,” “would,” “should,” “continue,” “potential,” “likely,” “opportunity,” “project” and similar expressions or variations of such words are intended to identify forward-looking statements, but are not the exclusive means of identifying forward-looking statements in this report. Additionally, statements concerning future matters such as the anticipated timing and scope of planned clinical trials, the development or regulatory approval of new products, enhancements of existing products or technologies, timing and success of the launch of new products by us or by our collaborators, third party performance under key collaboration agreements, revenue, expense and cash burn levels and expected trends, expected repayment of the Royalty-backed Loan and trends and other statements regarding matters that are not historical are forward-looking statements. Such statements reflect management’s current forecast of certain aspects of our future, are based on currently available operating, financial and competitive information and are subject to various risks, uncertainties and assumptions that could cause actual results to differ materially from those anticipated or implied in our forward-looking statements due to a number of factors including, but not limited to, those set forth below under the section entitled “Risks Factors” and elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and our most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K. Readers are urged not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this Quarterly Report. We undertake no obligation to revise or update any forward-looking statements in order to reflect any event or circumstance that may arise after the date of this Quarterly Report.
Overview
Halozyme Therapeutics, Inc. is a biotechnology company focused on developing and commercializing novel oncology therapies. Our proprietary enzymes are used to facilitate the delivery of injected drugs and fluids, potentially enhancing the efficacy and the convenience of other drugs or can be used to alter tissue structures for potential clinical benefit. We exploit our technology and expertise using a two pillar strategy that we believe enables us to manage risk and cost by: (1) developing our own proprietary products in therapeutic areas with significant unmet medical needs, with a focus on oncology, and (2) licensing our technology to biopharmaceutical companies to collaboratively develop products that combine our technology with the collaborators’ proprietary compounds.
The majority of our approved product and product candidates are based on rHuPH20, our patented recombinant human hyaluronidase enzyme. Our proprietary development pipeline consists primarily of pre-clinical and clinical stage product candidates in oncology. Our lead oncology program is Pegvorhyaluronidase alfa (PVHA), also referred to as PEGylated recombinant human hyaluronidase (PEGPH20), a molecular entity we are developing in combination with currently approved cancer therapies as a candidate for the systemic treatment of tumors that accumulate HA. We have demonstrated that when HA accumulates in a tumor, it can cause higher pressure in the tumor, reducing blood flow into the tumor and with that, reduced access of cancer therapies to the tumor. Through our efforts and efforts of our partners and collaborators, we are currently in Phase 3 clinical testing for PEGPH20 with ABRAXANE® (nab-paclitaxel) and gemcitabine in stage IV pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) (HALO 109-301), in Phase 1b/2 clinical testing for PEGPH20 with Tecentriq® (atezolizumab) in patients with previously treated metastatic PDA, in Phase 1b/2 clinical testing for PEGPH20 with Tecentriq in patients with gastric cancer and in Phase 1b/2 clinical testing for PEGPH20 with Tecentriq in patients with cholangiocarcinoma and gall bladder cancer (HALO 110-101/MATRIX).

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We refer to the application of rHuPH20 to facilitate the delivery of other drugs or fluids as our ENHANZE ® Drug Delivery Technology (ENHANZE). We license the ENHANZE technology to form collaborations with biopharmaceutical companies that develop or market drugs requiring or benefiting from injection via the subcutaneous route of administration. We currently have ENHANZE collaborations with F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Ltd. and Hoffmann-La Roche, Inc. (Roche), Baxalta US Inc. and Baxalta GmbH (now members of the Takeda group of companies, following the acquisition of Shire plc by Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited in January 2019) (Baxalta), Pfizer Inc. (Pfizer), Janssen Biotech, Inc. (Janssen), AbbVie, Inc. (AbbVie), Eli Lilly and Company (Lilly), Bristol Myers Squibb Company (BMS), Alexion Pharma Holding (Alexion) and ARGENX BVBA (argenx).We receive royalties from two of these collaborations, including royalties from sales of one product from the Baxalta collaboration and two products from the Roche collaboration. Future potential revenues from the sales and/or royalties of our approved products, product candidates, and ENHANZE collaborations will depend on the ability of Halozyme and our collaborators to develop, manufacture, secure and maintain regulatory approvals for approved products and product candidates and commercialize product candidates.
Our first quarter of 2019 and recent key events include:
In February 2019, we announced that Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, received approval from the FDA for Herceptin Hylecta™ (trastuzumab and hyaluronidase-oysk), a co-formulation of trastuzumab and rHuPH20 marketed as Herceptin SC outside of the U.S. Herceptin Hylecta is approved for the treatment of certain people with HER2-positive early breast cancer and is a ready-to-use formulation that can be administered in two to five minutes, compared to 30 to 90 minutes for intravenous trastuzumab. In April 2019, Roche made Herceptin Hylecta available in the U.S.
In February 2019, Janssen’s development partner, Genmab, announced positive Phase 3 trial results from the COLUMBA study evaluating subcutaneous DARZALEX® in comparison to DARZALEX IV in patients with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma. DARZALEX SC (utilizing ENHANZE technology) was found to be non-inferior to DARZALEX IV with regard the co-primary endpoints of Overall Response Rate and Maximum Trough concentration.
In February 2019, we entered into an agreement with argenx for the right to develop and commercialize one exclusive target, the human neonatal Fc receptor FcRn, which includes argenx's lead asset efgartigimod (ARGX-113), and an option to select two additional targets using our ENHANZE technology for an upfront payment of $30.0 million. We will receive payments of $10.0 million per target for future target nominations and potential milestone payments of up to $160.0 million per target, subject to the achievement of specific development, regulatory and sales-based milestones. We will receive mid-single digit royalties on sales of commercialized products.

27



Product and Product Candidates
We have one marketed proprietary product, three partnered products, one proprietary product candidate targeting several indications in various stages of development, and one preclinical product candidate. The following table summarizes our proprietary product and product candidate as well as products and product candidates under development with our collaborators:
slide1a88.jpg
slide2a71.jpg

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slide3a76.jpg
Proprietary Pipeline
Hylenex Recombinant (hyaluronidase human injection)
Hylenex recombinant is a formulation of rHuPH20 that has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval to facilitate subcutaneous fluid administration for achieving hydration, to increase the dispersion and absorption of other injected drugs and, in subcutaneous urography, to improve resorption of radiopaque agents. Hylenex recombinant is currently the number one prescribed branded hyaluronidase.
PEGPH20
We are developing PEGPH20 in combination with currently approved cancer therapies as a candidate for the systemic treatment of tumors that accumulate HA. ‘PEG’ refers to the attachment of polyethylene glycol to rHuPH20, thereby creating PEGPH20. One of the novel properties of PEGPH20 is that it lasts for an extended duration in the bloodstream and, therefore, can be administered systemically to maintain its therapeutic effect to treat disease.
Cancer malignancies, including pancreatic, lung, breast, gastric, and biliary tract cancers can accumulate high levels of HA and therefore we believe that PEGPH20 has the potential to help patients with these types of cancer when used with certain currently approved cancer therapies. Among solid tumors, PDA has been reported to be associated with one of the highest frequencies of HA accumulation. There are approximately 65,000 annual diagnoses of PDA in the United States and the European Union, and we estimate that 35-40% have high levels of HA based on our companion diagnostic assay cutpoint.
The pathologic accumulation of HA, along with other matrix components, creates a unique microenvironment for the growth of tumor cells compared to normal cells. We believe that degrading the HA component of the tumor microenvironment with PEGPH20 remodels the tumor microenvironment and we have observed tumor growth inhibition in animal models. Removal of HA from the tumor microenvironment results in expansion of previously constricted blood vessels allowing increased blood flow, potentially increasing the access of activated immune cells and factors in the blood into the tumor microenvironment. If PEGPH20 is administered in conjunction with other anti-cancer therapies, the increase in blood flow may allow anti-cancer therapies to have greater access to the tumor, which may enhance the treatment effect of therapeutic modalities like chemotherapies, monoclonal antibodies and other agents.
We are developing PEGPH20 as a targeted therapy, for patients who have tumors with high levels of HA. We have a collaboration with Ventana Medical Systems Inc. (Ventana), a member of the Roche Group, to develop, and for Ventana to ultimately commercialize, a companion diagnostic assay for use with PEGPH20. The companion diagnostic assay is being used to identify high levels of HA in tumor biopsies and may be the first diagnostic to target tumor-associated HA and possibly the first companion diagnostic assay in pancreatic cancer.

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Pancreatic cancer indications:
Based on the results of Phase 1b and Phase 2 studies, HALO 109-201 and HALO 109-202, we embarked on a randomized, double blinded, placebo controlled study in previously untreated pancreas cancer patients to test PEGPH20 plus gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel (ABRAXANE®) versus gemcitabine and ABRAXANE alone.
HALO 109-301:
In March 2015, we met with the FDA to discuss the interim efficacy and safety data from HALO-202, and the proposed selection of eligible patients based on a 50% cutpoint using the Ventana companion diagnostic for HA. Based on the feedback from that meeting, we proceeded with HALO 109-301 (HALO-301), a Phase 3 multicenter randomized clinical trial evaluating PEGPH20 as a first-line therapy for patients with stage IV PDA, using a design allowing for potential marketing application based on progression-free survival (PFS) (accelerated approval pathway) or overall survival (OS). The study enrolled patients whose tumors accumulate high levels of HA measured using the Ventana companion diagnostic test. Enoxaparin 1mg/kg once a day is used as a prophylactic against thromboembolic events in HALO-301. The FDA provided feedback on the current companion diagnostic approach and confirmed that an approved investigational device exemption (IDE) was required for the Phase 3 study.
In June 2015, we received scientific advice/protocol assistance from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) regarding our Phase 3 study. The EMA agreed to the patient population, and the use of both PFS and OS as co-primary endpoints stating that OS is the preferred endpoint and that ultimate approval would require an overall positive benefit:risk balance.
In March 2016, Ventana received approval for an IDE application from the FDA for our companion diagnostic test to enable patient selection in our Phase 3 Study HALO-301 of PEGPH20 in HA-High patients and we dosed the first patient in HALO-301.
In November 2018, the FDA agreed to our request to change the primary endpoint of the HALO-301 study from two primary endpoints of PFS and OS to a single primary endpoint of OS. As a result, a previously planned interim analysis, that was to be performed when the target number of PFS events was achieved, will not be conducted. PFS will remain as a secondary endpoint, along with objective response rate. In January 2019, the FDA completed their review of the submitted clinical study protocol amendment and statistical analysis plan with no additional questions or comments.
Over 200 sites in 22 countries located in North America, Europe, South America, Asia and Australia were initiated to participate in the HALO-301 study. The study was fully enrolled with approximately 500 patients by the end of 2018. In January 2019, our independent Data Safety Monitoring Committee met to review ongoing safety data from the trial and informed us the study should proceed as planned. We project achieving the target number of OS events in the third quarter of 2019 and plan to initiate the database lock process for final analysis after 330 OS events have been achieved with mature data. As a result, the topline results will be available in the second half of 2019.
SWOG Study S1313:
In October 2013, SWOG, a cancer research cooperative group of more than 4,000 researchers in over 500 institutions around the world, initiated a 144 patient Phase 1b/2 randomized clinical trial in some of their study centers, examining PEGPH20 in combination with modified FOLFIRINOX chemotherapy compared to modified FOLFIRINOX treatment alone in patients with stage IV PDA, irrespective of HA levels, referred to as an all-comer population. This study was funded by the National Cancer Institute. In March 2017, SWOG stopped enrollment in the Phase 1b/2 trial following a recommendation of SWOG’s independent Data Monitoring committee after a preplanned futility analysis. In January 2018, SWOG presented final data of the all-comers population at the ASCO-GI conference which was subsequently published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology in February 2019. The median OS was 7.7 months for the PEGPH20 arm vs. 14.4 months in the modified FOLFIRINOX alone arm. Also, increased GI-toxicities and substantially shorter median treatment duration for modified FOLFIRINOX were reported for the PEGPH20 arm compared to the modified FOLFIRINOX alone arm. Collection of biopsy samples from participating sites to potentially enable an HA biomarker subgroup analysis has been completed. Due to the limited number of samples available, the data is not interpretable. Our PEGPH20 studies and clinical collaborations in combination with agents other than modified FOLFIRINOX continue unchanged.
Clinical collaboration:
In October 2016, we announced that PEGPH20 will be included in a pancreatic cancer clinical trial initiative called Precision Promise, an initiative that aims to change the current treatment approach to pancreatic cancer by offering options to patients based on the molecular profile of their tumor. This is being accomplished through the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network leading a collaboration that brings together clinicians, researchers, and drug developers. Pancreatic Cancer Action Network continues to work to finalize the trial design and protocol which may include a potential PEGPH20 trial arm or trial.

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Other indications outside of pancreatic cancer:
HALO 107-101:
In November 2015, we initiated a Phase 1b study exploring the combination of PEGPH20 and KEYTRUDA®, an immuno-oncology agent in relapsed non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and gastric cancer. Following the results of Merck’s KEYNOTE-189 study evaluating KEYTRUDA in combination with chemotherapy as a first-line treatment, the standard of care in lung cancer is expected to change. Accordingly, we ended enrollment in the NSCLC cohort. Enrollment also ended in the gastric cancer cohort when the overall enrollment goal was reached. Both cohorts have completed patient treatments and study closure activities have been initiated. When the database is considered complete and locked, a Final Study Report will be generated and data presented.
In the NSCLC cohort we enrolled 17 of the target 30 patients in the dose expansion cohort prior to closing enrollment. Of the 13 currently evaluable patients, four patients experienced a greater than 30% reduction in tumor volume as assessed by investigator sites. Two of these patients had a further scan confirming the greater than 30% reduction was maintained. Of the four patients experiencing a greater than 30% reduction, three were PD-L1 negative, while data was unavailable for the fourth. We plan to present the data from the study at an upcoming medical conference.
In the gastric cancer cohort, we reached target enrollment of 34 patients in the dose finding and dose expansion cohort. Of the 26 currently evaluable patients, we have seen one responder in a PD-L1 positive patient. This response rate does not meet our threshold to continue development of PEGPH20 in combination with Keytruda alone in gastric cancer. The data was presented at the European Society for Medical Oncology Asia 2018 Conference.
Ongoing clinical collaboration:
In November 2016, we entered into an agreement with Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, to collaborate on clinical studies to evaluate their cancer immunotherapy Tecentriq, an anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody, in combination with PEGPH20, in up to eight different tumor types. Genentech initiated a Phase 1b/2 clinical trial in patients with previously treated metastatic PDA in July 2017 and a Phase 1b/2 clinical trial in patients with gastric cancer in October 2017, as part of its Morpheus master protocol. In February 2019, Genentech removed gastric cancer from its Morpheus master protocol and therefore closed enrollment in the gastric arm of the study, for which results will be reported when data is available. In March 2019, Genentech completed enrollment in the PDA arm of the study with 65 patients. We are supplying PEGPH20 for the Genentech-funded studies.
As part of our clinical collaboration with Genentech, we initiated a Phase 1b/2 clinical trial to assess Tecentriq with PEGPH20 in patients with cholangiocarcinoma and gall bladder cancer (HALO 110-101/MATRIX). Genentech is supplying Tecentriq for the Halozyme sponsored study. Enrollment is completed with a total of 74 patients enrolled in USA, South-Korea and Thailand. The study is ongoing with patients still receiving study medication. During the course of the study the initial fixed dose of 40mg Enoxaparin once a day was changed to a weight-adjusted dose of 1mg/kg once a day, which is used as a prophylactic against thromboembolic events. A higher incidence of thromboembolic events in the PEGPH20 containing experimental arms versus the control arm (17% vs 10%) triggered this change. The updated dose of Enoxaparin is consistent with the dose being used in HALO-301.
Regulatory
The FDA has granted Fast Track designation for our program investigating PEGPH20 in combination with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel for the treatment of patients with stage IV PDA to demonstrate an improvement in OS. The Fast Track designation process was developed by the FDA to facilitate the development and expedite the review of drugs to treat serious or life-threatening diseases and address unmet medical needs.
The FDA has also granted Orphan Drug designation for PEGPH20 for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. The FDA Office of Orphan Products Development’s mission is to advance the evaluation and development of products (drugs, biologics, devices, or medical foods) that demonstrate promise for the diagnosis and/or treatment of rare diseases or conditions. Similarly, the European Committee for Orphan Medicinal Products of the EMA designated PEGPH20 an orphan medicinal product for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.
Other Pipeline Asset
PEG-ADA2: PEGylated adenosine deaminase 2, or PEG-ADA2, is an immune checkpoint inhibitor that targets adenosine, which may accumulate to high levels in the tumor microenvironment and has been linked to immunosuppression. We are currently in preclinical development with PEG-ADA2 and are exploring potential collaboration or partnership interest in this program prior to making additional investments in the development of PEG-ADA2.

31



ENHANZE Collaborations
Roche Collaboration
In December 2006, we and Roche entered into a collaboration and license agreement under which Roche obtained a worldwide license to develop and commercialize product combinations of rHuPH20 and up to thirteen Roche target compounds (the Roche Collaboration). Under this agreement, Roche elected a total of eight targets, two of which are exclusive.
In September 2013, Roche launched a subcutaneous (SC) formulation of Herceptin (trastuzumab) (Herceptin SC) in Europe for the treatment of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer followed by launches in additional countries. This formulation utilizes our ENHANZE technology and is administered in two to five minutes, compared to 30 to 90 minutes with the standard intravenous form. Directed at the same target, Roche initiated a Phase 1 study of PERJETA® (pertuzumab) and Herceptin (trastuzumab) using ENHANZE technology in patients with early breast cancer in March 2016. In June 2018, Roche initiated a global Phase 3 study of a fixed-dose combination of PERJETA and Herceptin using ENHANZE technology in patients with HER2-positive early breast cancer. In September 2018, we announced that Roche received approval from Health Canada for Herceptin SC for the treatment of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. In February 2019, we announced that Roche received approval from the FDA for Herceptin SC under the brand name Herceptin Hylecta™ (trastuzumab and hyaluronidase-oysk). In April 2019, Roche made Herceptin Hylecta available in the U.S.
In June 2014, Roche launched MabThera SC in Europe for the treatment of patients with common forms of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) followed by launches in additional countries. This formulation utilizes our ENHANZE technology and is administered in approximately five minutes compared to the approximately 1.5 to 4 hour intravenous infusion. In May 2016, Roche announced that the EMA approved Mabthera SC to treat patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). In June 2017, the FDA approved Genentech’s RITUXAN HYCELA™, a combination of rituximab and rHuPH20 (approved and marketed under the MabThera SC brand in countries outside the U.S.), for CLL and two types of NHL, follicular lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
In September 2017, we and Roche entered into an agreement providing Roche the right to develop and commercialize one additional exclusive target using ENHANZE technology. The upfront license payment may be followed by event-based payments subject to Roche’s achievement of specified development, regulatory and sales-based milestones. In addition, Roche will pay royalties to us if products under the collaboration are commercialized.
In October 2018, we entered into an agreement with Roche for the right to develop and commercialize one additional exclusive target and an option to select two additional targets within four years using ENHANZE technology. The upfront license payment may be followed by event-based payments subject to Roche’s achievement of specified development, regulatory and sales-based milestones. In addition, Roche will pay royalties to us if products under the collaboration are commercialized.
In December 2018, Roche initiated a Phase 1b/2 study in patients with non-small cell lung cancer for Tecentriq (atezolizumab) using ENHANZE technology.
Baxalta Collaboration
In September 2007, we and Baxalta entered into a collaboration and license agreement under which Baxalta obtained a worldwide, exclusive license to develop and commercialize product combinations of rHuPH20 with GAMMAGARD LIQUID (HYQVIA) (the Baxalta Collaboration). HYQVIA is indicated for the treatment of primary immunodeficiency disorders associated with defects in the immune system.
In May 2013, the European Commission granted Baxalta marketing authorization in all EU Member States for the use of HYQVIA (solution for subcutaneous use) as replacement therapy for adult patients with primary and secondary immunodeficiencies. Baxalta launched HYQVIA in the first EU country in July 2013 and has continued to launch in additional countries.
In September 2014, HYQVIA was approved by the FDA for treatment of adult patients with primary immunodeficiency in the U.S. HYQVIA is the first subcutaneous immune globulin (IG) treatment approved for adult primary immunodeficiency patients with a dosing regimen requiring only one infusion up to once per month (every three to four weeks) and one injection site per infusion in most patients, to deliver a full therapeutic dose of IG. The FDA’s approval of HYQVIA was a significant milestone for us as it represented the first U.S. approved BLA which utilizes our rHuPH20 platform.
In May 2016, Baxalta announced that HYQVIA received a marketing authorization from the European Commission for a pediatric indication, which was launched in Europe to treat primary and certain secondary immunodeficiencies.

32



Pfizer Collaboration
In December 2012, we and Pfizer entered into a collaboration and license agreement, under which Pfizer has the worldwide license to develop and commercialize products combining our rHuPH20 enzyme with Pfizer proprietary biologics directed to up to six targets in primary care and specialty care indications. Targets may be selected on an exclusive or non-exclusive basis. Pfizer has elected five targets on an exclusive basis and returned two targets.
Janssen Collaboration
In December 2014, we and Janssen entered into a collaboration and license agreement, under which Janssen has the worldwide license to develop and commercialize products combining our rHuPH20 enzyme with Janssen proprietary biologics directed to up to five targets. Targets may be selected on an exclusive basis. Janssen has elected CD38 as the first target on an exclusive basis. In October 2017, Janssen initiated its first Phase 3 study of subcutaneous delivery of DARZALEX® (daratumumab), directed at CD38, using ENHANZE technology, in multiple myeloma patients. Janssen has initiated six Phase 3 studies, one Phase 2 study and one Phase 1 study of daratumumab using ENHANZE technology in patients with amyloidosis, smoldering myeloma and multiple myeloma.
In February 2019, Janssen’s development partner, Genmab, announced positive Phase 3 trial results from the COLUMBA study evaluating subcutaneous DARZALEX in comparison to DARZALEX IV in patients with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma. DARZALEX SC (utilizing ENHANZE technology) was found to be non-inferior to Darzalex IV with regard the co-primary endpoints of Overall Response Rate and Maximum Trough concentration.
AbbVie Collaboration
In June 2015, we and AbbVie entered into a collaboration and license agreement, under which AbbVie has the worldwide license to develop and commercialize products combining our rHuPH20 enzyme with AbbVie proprietary biologics directed to up to nine targets. Targets may be selected on an exclusive basis. AbbVie elected one target on an exclusive basis, TNF alpha, for which it has discontinued development and returned the target.
Lilly Collaboration
In December 2015, we and Lilly entered into a collaboration and license agreement, under which Lilly has the worldwide license to develop and commercialize products combining our rHuPH20 enzyme with Lilly proprietary biologics directed to up to five targets. Targets may be selected on an exclusive basis. Lilly has elected two targets on an exclusive basis and one target on a semi-exclusive basis. In August 2017, Lilly initiated a Phase 1 study of an investigational new therapy in combination with rHuPH20.
BMS Collaboration
In September 2017, we and BMS entered into a collaboration and license agreement, which became effective in November 2017, under which BMS has the worldwide license to develop and commercialize products combining our rHuPH20 enzyme with BMS immuno-oncology targets directed at up to eleven targets. Targets may be selected on an exclusive basis, with the exception of one co-exclusive target. BMS has designated multiple immuno-oncology targets including programmed death 1 (PD-1) and has an option to select additional targets within five years from the effective date. In October 2018, BMS dosed the first patient in a Phase 1 study evaluating the safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of BMS-986179, an investigational anti-CD-73 antibody using ENHANZE technology. BMS is currently in a Phase 1 study of OPDIVO® (nivolumab) using ENHANZE technology.
Alexion Collaboration
In December 2017, we and Alexion entered into a collaboration and license agreement, under which Alexion has the worldwide license to develop and commercialize products combining our rHuPH20 enzyme with Alexion’s portfolio of products directed at up to four targets. Targets may be selected on an exclusive basis. Alexion elected two targets on an exclusive basis, including a C5 complement inhibitor and has an option to select two additional targets within five years from the effective date. In August 2018, Alexion initiated a Phase 1 trial to study a next-generation subcutaneous formulation of ALXN1210 using ENHANZE technology. This next-generation subcutaneous formulation, called ALXN1810, has the potential to extend the dosing interval from once a week to once every two weeks or once per month.
argenx Collaboration
In February 2019, we entered into an agreement with argenx for the right to develop and commercialize one exclusive target, the human neonatal Fc receptor, FcRn, which includes argenx's lead asset efgartigimod (ARGX-113), and an option to select two additional targets using ENHANZE technology.
For a further discussion of the collaboration agreements, refer to Note 4, Revenue.

33



Results of Operations
Three Months Ended March 31, 2019 Compared to Three Months Ended March 31, 2018
Royalties Royalty revenue was $18.0 million for the three months ended March 31, 2019 compared to $20.9 million for the three months ended March 31, 2018. The decrease was mainly driven by lower sales of Herceptin SC by Roche, partially offset by higher sales of RITUXAN HYCELA™ in the U.S. by Roche. In general, we expect royalty revenue to be flat or decline in the near term, primarily attributable to the ongoing impact from biosimilars in Europe.
Product Sales, Net Product sales, net were as follows (in thousands):
 
 
Three Months Ended
 
 
 
 
March 31,
 
 
 
 
2019
 
2018
 
Change
Sales of bulk rHuPH20:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Roche
 
$
4,461

 
$
2,131

 
$
2,330

Baxalta
 
45

 
712

 
(667
)
Other
 
576

 
535

 
41

Sales of ENHANZE drug product
 
137

 

 
137

Sales of Hylenex
 
3,171

 
3,423

 
(252
)
Total product sales, net
 
$
8,390

 
$
6,801

 
$
1,589

Product sales, net increased $1.6 million in the three months ended March 31, 2019 compared to the same period in 2018, mainly due to an increase in the sales of bulk rHuPH20 to Roche, offset by a decrease in sales of Hylenex and bulk rHuPH20 to Baxalta. We expect that product sales of bulk rHuPH20 and ENHANZE drug product will fluctuate in future periods based on the needs of our collaborators. We expect that future product sales of Hylenex to be flat or declining as we experience competition for market share.
Revenues Under Collaborative Agreements – Revenues under collaborative agreements were as follows (in thousands):
 
 
Three Months Ended
 
 
 
 
March 31,
 
 
 
 
2019
 
2018
 
Change
Upfront license fees, license fees for the election of additional targets,
     license maintenance fees and other license fees and event-based
     payments:
 
 
 
 
 
BMS
 

 
1,336

 
(1,336
)
Roche
 

 
1,000

 
(1,000
)
argenx
 
30,000

 

 
30,000

 
 
30,000


2,336


27,664

Reimbursements for research and development services
 
606

 
791

 
(185
)
Total revenues under collaborative agreements
 
$
30,606

 
$
3,127

 
$
27,479

Revenue from license fees increased $27.5 million in the three months ended March 31, 2019, compared to the same period in 2018 mainly due to a $30.0 million upfront license fee for the argenx Collaboration recognized in the three months ended March 31, 2019, and no such revenue recognized in the three months ended March 31, 2018. Revenue from upfront licenses fees, license fees for the election of additional targets, license maintenance fees and other license fees and event-based payments vary from period to period based on our ENHANZE collaboration activity. We expect these revenues to continue to fluctuate in future periods based on our collaborators’ ability to meet various clinical and regulatory milestones set forth in such agreements and our abilities to obtain new collaborative agreements.
Revenue from reimbursements for research and development services decreased in the three months ended March 31, 2019, compared to the same period in 2018 mainly due to a decrease in services provided to Janssen and Baxalta. Research and development services rendered by us on behalf of our collaborators are at the request of the collaborators; therefore, the amount and timing of future revenues related to reimbursable research and development services is uncertain.
Cost of Product Sales Cost of product sales were $4.6 million for the three months ended March 31, 2019 compared to $3.1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2018. The increase of $1.5 million in cost of product sales was mainly due to an increase in sales of bulk rHuPH20 to Roche. There were $0.2 million of costs of bulk rHuPH20 and ENHANZE drug product sales for the three months ended March 31, 2019 that were previously expensed as research and development.

34



Research and Development Research and development expenses consist of external costs, salaries and benefits and allocation of facilities and other overhead expenses related to research manufacturing, clinical trials, preclinical and regulatory activities. Research and development expenses incurred were as follows (in thousands):
 
 
Three Months Ended
 
 
 
 
March 31,
 
 
Programs
 
2019
 
2018
 
Change
PEGPH20
 
$
25,899

 
$
32,511

 
$
(6,612
)
ENHANZE collaborations and rHuPH20 platform
 
4,911

 
5,001

 
(90
)
Other
 
518

 
464

 
54

Total research and development expenses
 
$
31,328

 
$
37,976

 
$
(6,648
)
Research and development expenses relating to our PEGPH20 programs for the three months ended March 31, 2019 decreased by 20%, compared to the same period in 2018, primarily due to decreased clinical trial activities resulting from the completion of enrollment of HALO-301 in December 2018 and decreased clinical trial activities related to the HALO-202 study and the HALO 107-101 study, partially offset by an increase in clinical trial activities in the HALO 110-101/MATRIX study. We expect these expenses to decrease as our clinical trial activities decrease in the near term.
Research and development expenses relating to our ENHANZE collaborations and our rHuPH20 platform for the three months ended March 31, 2019 decreased by 2%, compared to the same period in 2018, primarily due to a decrease in support for one-time partner research and development projects, partially offset by increased costs to support new partners and targets related to our ENHANZE collaboration activity. We expect research and development expenses relating to our ENHANZE collaborations and our rHuPH20 platform to increase in the near term. The rHuPH20 platform includes research, development and manufacturing expenses related to our proprietary rHuPH20 enzyme. These expenses were not designated to a specific program at the time the expenses were incurred.
Selling, General and Administrative Selling, general and administrative (SG&A) expenses were $18.0 million for the three months ended March 31, 2019 compared to $13.6 million for the three months ended March 31, 2018. The increase of $4.4 million, or 32%, was primarily due to an increase in market research expenses as we prepare for a potential commercial launch of PEGPH20 and compensation expense including stock compensation. We expect SG&A expenses to increase moderately in future periods as our operations expand.
Interest Expense Interest expense was $3.2 million for the three months ended March 31, 2019 compared to $5.2 million for the three months ended March 31, 2018. The decrease of $2.0 million was primarily due to a decrease in the Royalty-backed Loan balance.
Income Tax Expense Income tax expense was $22 thousand for the three months ended March 31, 2019, compared to $0.2 million for the three months ended March 31, 2018 due to a decrease in estimated state taxes.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
Overview
Our principal sources of liquidity are our existing cash, cash equivalents and available-for-sale marketable securities. As of March 31, 2019, we had cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities of $328.7 million. We will continue to have significant cash requirements to support product development activities. The amount and timing of cash requirements and cash on hand will depend on the progress and success of our clinical development programs, regulatory and market acceptance, the resources we devote to research and commercialization activities and the achievement of various milestones and royalties under our existing collaborative agreements.
We believe that our current cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities will be sufficient to fund our operations for at least the next twelve months. We expect to fund our operations going forward with existing cash resources, anticipated revenues from our existing collaborations and cash that we may raise through future transactions. We may raise cash through any one of the following financing vehicles: (i) the public offering of securities; (ii) new collaborative agreements; (iii) expansions or revisions to existing collaborative relationships; (iv) private financings; (v) other equity or debt financings; and/or (vi) monetizing assets.
In February 2017, we filed an automatic shelf registration statement on Form S-3 (Registration No. 333-216315) with the SEC, which allow us, from time to time, to offer and sell equity, debt securities and warrants to purchase any of such securities, either individually or in units. We may, in the future, offer and sell additional equity, debt securities and warrants to purchase any of such securities, either individually or in units to raise capital to fund the continued development of our product candidates, the commercialization of our products or for other general corporate purposes.

35



Our existing cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities may not be adequate to fund our operations until we become profitable, if ever. We cannot be certain that additional financing will be available when needed or, if available, financing will be obtained on favorable terms. If we are unable to raise sufficient funds, we may need to delay, scale back or eliminate some or all of our research and development programs, delay the launch of our product candidates, if approved, and/or restructure our operations. If we raise additional funds by issuing equity securities, substantial dilution to existing stockholders could result. If we raise additional funds by incurring debt financing, the terms of the debt may involve significant cash payment obligations, the issuance of warrants that may ultimately dilute existing stockholders when exercised and covenants that may restrict our ability to operate our business
Cash Flows
Operating Activities
Net cash used in operations was $4.4 million for the three months ended March 31, 2019 compared to $22.2 million for the three months ended March 31, 2018. The $17.8 million decrease in utilization of cash in operations was mainly due to an increase in cash received related to the argenx upfront license fee of $30.0 million, offset by a decrease in working capital for the three months ended March 31, 2019 compared to the corresponding period in the prior year.
Investing Activities
Net cash provided by investing activities was $28.8 million for the three months ended March 31, 2019 compared to $35.9 million net cash used in investing activities for the three months ended March 31, 2018. The decrease in net cash used in investing activities was primarily due to an increase in proceeds from maturities of marketable securities for the three months ended March 31, 2019.
Financing Activities
Net cash used in financing activities was $21.7 million for the three months ended March 31, 2019, compared to net cash used in financing activities of $12.7 million for the three months ended March 31, 2018, mainly due to $5.4 million decrease in net proceeds from the issuance of common stock under equity incentive plans and increased amount of repayments of long-term debt of $3.7 million in the three months ended March 31, 2019.
Long-Term Debt
Royalty-backed Loan
In January 2016, through our wholly-owned subsidiary Halozyme Royalty LLC (Halozyme Royalty), we received a $150 million loan (the Royalty-backed Loan) pursuant to a credit agreement (the Credit Agreement) with BioPharma Credit Investments IV Sub, LP and Athyrium Opportunities II Acquisition LP (the Royalty-backed Lenders). Under the terms of the Credit Agreement, Halozyme Therapeutics, Inc. transferred to Halozyme Royalty the right to receive royalty payments from the commercial sales of ENHANZE products owed under the Roche Collaboration and Baxalta Collaboration (Collaboration Agreements). The royalty payments from the Collaboration Agreements will be used to repay the principal and interest on the loan (the Royalty Payments). The Royalty-backed Loan bears interest at a per annum rate of 8.75% plus the three-month LIBOR rate. The three-month LIBOR rate is subject to a floor of 0.7% and a cap of 1.5%. The interest rate as of March 31, 2019 was 10.25%. The outstanding balance of the Royalty-backed Loan as of March 31, 2019 was $68.2 million net of unamortized debt discount of $0.2 million.
The Credit Agreement provides that none of the Royalty Payments were required to be applied to the Royalty-backed Loan prior to January 1, 2017, 50% of the Royalty Payments were required to be applied to the Royalty-backed Loan between January 1, 2017 and January 1, 2018 and thereafter all Royalty Payments must be applied to the Royalty-backed Loan. However, the amounts available to repay the Royalty-backed Loan are subject to caps of $13.75 million per quarter in 2017, $18.75 million per quarter in 2018, $21.25 million per quarter in 2019 and $22.5 million per quarter in 2020 and thereafter. Amounts available to repay the Royalty-backed Loan will be applied first, to pay interest and second, to repay principal on the Royalty-backed Loan. Any accrued interest that is not paid on any applicable quarterly payment date, as defined, will be capitalized and added to the principal balance of the Royalty-backed Loan on such date. Halozyme Royalty will be entitled to receive and distribute to Halozyme any Royalty Payments that are not required to be applied to the Royalty-backed Loan or which are in excess of the foregoing caps.

36



The final maturity date of the Royalty-backed Loan will be the earlier of (i) the date when principal and interest is paid in full, (ii) the termination of Halozyme Royalty’s right to receive royalties under the Collaboration Agreements, and (iii) December 31, 2050. Currently, we estimate that the loan will be repaid in the first quarter of 2020. This estimate could be adversely affected and the repayment period could be extended if future royalty amounts are less than currently expected. Under the terms of the Credit Agreement, at any time after January 1, 2019, Halozyme Royalty may, subject to certain limitations, prepay the outstanding principal of the Royalty-backed Loan in whole or in part, at a price equal to 105% of the outstanding principal on the Royalty-backed Loan, plus accrued but unpaid interest. The Royalty-backed Loan constitutes an obligation of Halozyme Royalty, and is non-recourse to Halozyme. Halozyme Royalty retains its right to the Royalty Payments following repayment of the loan.
Oxford and SVB Loan and Security Agreement
In June 2016, we entered into a Loan and Security Agreement (the Loan Agreement) with Oxford Finance LLC and Silicon Valley Bank (SVB) (collectively, the Lenders), providing a senior secured loan facility of up to an aggregate principal amount of $70 million, comprising a $55.0 million draw in June 2016 and an additional $15.0 million tranche, which we had the option to draw during the second quarter of 2017 and did not exercise. The proceeds were partially used to pay the outstanding principal and final payment owed on a previous loan agreement with the Lenders. The remaining proceeds are being used for working capital and general business requirements. The Loan Agreement repayment schedule provides for interest only payments for the first 18 months, followed by consecutive equal monthly payments of principal and interest in arrears through the maturity date of January 1, 2021. The Loan Agreement provides for a final payment equal to 5.50% of the initial $55.0 million principal amount. The final payment is due when the Loan Agreement becomes due or upon the prepayment of the facility. We have the option to prepay the outstanding balance of the Loan Agreement in full. The outstanding term loan balance was $37.2 million as of March 31, 2019 net of unamortized debt discount of $0.8 million.
The Loan Agreement is secured by substantially all of the assets of the Company and its subsidiary, Halozyme, Inc., except that the collateral does not include any equity interests in Halozyme, Inc. and any intellectual property (including all licensing, collaboration and similar agreements relating thereto), and certain other excluded assets. The Loan Agreement contains customary representations, warranties and covenants by us, which covenants limit our ability to convey, sell, lease, transfer, assign or otherwise dispose of certain of our assets; engage in any business other than the businesses currently engaged in by us or reasonably related thereto; liquidate or dissolve; make certain management changes; undergo certain change of control events; create, incur, assume, or be liable with respect to certain indebtedness; grant certain liens; pay dividends and make certain other restricted payments; make certain investments; make payments on any subordinated debt; enter into transactions with any of our affiliates outside of the ordinary course of business or permit our subsidiaries to do the same; and make any voluntary prepayment of or modify certain terms of the Royalty-backed Loan. In addition, subject to certain exceptions, we are required to maintain with SVB our primary deposit accounts, securities accounts and commodities, and to do the same for our domestic subsidiary.
The Loan Agreement also contains customary indemnification obligations and customary events of default, including, among other things, our failure to fulfill certain of our obligations under the Loan Agreement and the occurrence of a material adverse change which is defined as a material adverse change in our business, operations or condition (financial or otherwise), a material impairment of the prospect of repayment of any portion of the loan, a material impairment in the perfection or priority of the Lender’s lien in the collateral or in the value of such collateral or the occurrence of an event of default under the Royalty-backed Loan. In the event of default by us under the Loan Agreement, the Lenders would be entitled to exercise their remedies thereunder, including the right to accelerate the debt, upon which we may be required to repay all amounts then outstanding under the Loan Agreement, which could harm our financial condition.
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
As of March 31, 2019, we did not have any relationships with unconsolidated entities or financial partnerships, such as entities often referred to as structured finance or special purpose entities, which would have been established for the purpose of facilitating off-balance sheet arrangements or other contractually narrow or limited purposes. In addition, we did not engage in trading activities involving non-exchange traded contracts. As such, we are not materially exposed to any financing, liquidity, market or credit risk that could arise if we had engaged in such relationships.
 Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
The discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based on our condensed consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, or U.S. GAAP. The preparation of our condensed consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities.

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As described in our 2018 Form 10-K, the most critical accounting policies and estimates upon which our condensed consolidated financial statements were prepared were those relating to revenue recognition, debt classification, stock compensation and research and development expenses - clinical trials. We have reviewed our policies and estimates and determined that these remain the most critical accounting policies and estimates for the three months ended March 31, 2019. Readers should refer to our 2018 Form 10-K under “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Critical Accounting Estimates” and Note 1 to the accompanying financial statements for descriptions of these policies and estimates.
Recent Accounting Pronouncements
Refer to Note 2, Summary of Significant Accounting Policies, of our condensed consolidated financial statements for a discussion of recent accounting pronouncements and their effect, if any.
Risk Factors
Risks Related To Our Business
We have generated only limited revenues from product sales to date; we have a history of net losses and negative cash flows, and we may never achieve or maintain profitability.
Relative to expenses incurred in our operations, we have generated only limited revenues from product sales, royalties, licensing fees, milestone payments, bulk rHuPH20 supply payments and research reimbursements to date and we may never generate sufficient revenues from future product sales, licensing fees and milestone payments to offset expenses. Even if we ultimately do achieve significant revenues from product sales, royalties, licensing fees, research reimbursements, bulk rHuPH20 supply payments and/or milestone payments, we expect to incur significant operating losses over the next few years and we may never become profitable on an extended basis. Through March 31, 2019, we have incurred aggregate net losses of $529.6 million.
If our product candidates do not receive and maintain regulatory approvals, or if approvals are not obtained in a timely manner, such failure or delay would substantially impair our ability to generate revenues.
Approval from the FDA or equivalent health authorities is necessary to manufacture and market pharmaceutical products in the U.S. and the other countries in which we anticipate doing business have similar requirements. The process for obtaining FDA and other regulatory approvals is extensive, time-consuming, risky and costly, and there is no guarantee that the FDA or other regulatory bodies will approve any applications that may be filed with respect to any of our product candidates, or that the timing of any such approval will be appropriate for the desired product launch schedule for a product candidate. We and our collaborators attempt to provide guidance as to the timing for the filing and acceptance of such regulatory approvals, but such filings and approvals may not occur when we or our collaborators expect, or at all. The FDA or other foreign regulatory agency may refuse or delay approval of our product candidates for failure to collect sufficient clinical or animal safety data and require us or our collaborators to conduct additional clinical or animal safety studies which may cause lengthy delays and increased costs to our programs. For example, the approval of Baxalta’s HYQVIA BLA in the U.S. was delayed until we and Baxalta provided additional preclinical data sufficient to address concerns regarding non-neutralizing antibodies to rHuPH20 that were detected in the registration trial. Although these antibodies have not been associated with any known adverse clinical effects, and the HYQVIA BLA was approved by the FDA in September 2014, we cannot assure you that they will not arise and have an adverse impact on future development of products which include rHuPH20, future sales of Hylenex recombinant, our ability to enter into collaborations, or be raised by the FDA or other health authorities in connection with testing or approval of products including rHuPH20.
We and our collaborators may not be successful in obtaining approvals for any additional potential products in a timely manner, or at all. Refer to the risk factor titled “Our proprietary and collaboration product candidates or companion diagnostic assays may not receive regulatory approvals or their development may be delayed for a variety of reasons, including delayed or unsuccessful clinical trials, regulatory requirements or safety concerns” for additional information relating to the approval of product candidates.
Additionally, even with respect to products which have been approved for commercialization, in order to continue to manufacture and market pharmaceutical products, we or our collaborators must maintain our regulatory approvals. If we or any of our collaborators are unsuccessful in maintaining our regulatory approvals, our ability to generate revenues would be adversely affected.

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We may need to raise additional capital in the future and there can be no assurance that we will be able to obtain such funds.
We may need to raise additional capital in the future to continue the development of our product candidates or for other current corporate purposes. Our current cash reserves and expected revenues during the next few years will not be sufficient for us to continue the development of our proprietary product candidates, to fund general operations and conduct our business at the level desired. In addition, if we engage in acquisitions of companies, products or technologies in order to execute our business strategy, we may need to raise additional capital. We may raise additional capital in the future through one or more financing vehicles that may be available to us including (i) the public offering of securities; (ii) new collaborative agreements; (iii) expansions or revisions to existing collaborative relationships; (iv) private financings; (v) other equity or debt financings; and/or (vi) monetizing assets.
In view of our stage of development, business prospects, the nature of our capital structure and general market conditions, if we are required to raise additional capital in the future, the additional financing may not be available on favorable terms, or at all. If additional capital is not available on favorable terms when needed, we will be required to raise capital on adverse terms or significantly reduce operating expenses through the restructuring of our operations or deferral of one or more product development programs. If we raise additional capital, a substantial number of additional shares may be issued, which may negatively affect our stock price and these additional shares will dilute the ownership interest of our current investors.
Use of our product candidates or those of our collaborators could be associated with side effects or adverse events.
As with most pharmaceutical products, use of our product candidates or those of our collaborators could be associated with side effects or adverse events which can vary in severity (from minor reactions to death) and frequency (infrequent or prevalent). Side effects or adverse events associated with the use of our product candidates or those of our collaborators may be observed at any time, including in clinical trials or when a product is commercialized, and any such side effects or adverse events may negatively affect our or our collaborators’ ability to obtain or maintain regulatory approval or market our product candidates. Side effects such as toxicity or other safety issues associated with the use of our product candidates or those of our collaborators could require us or our collaborators to perform additional studies or halt development or commercialization of these product candidates or expose us to product liability lawsuits which will harm our business. We or our collaborators may be required by regulatory agencies to conduct additional animal or human studies regarding the safety and efficacy of our pharmaceutical product candidates which we have not planned or anticipated. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that we or our collaborators will resolve any issues related to any product related adverse events to the satisfaction of the FDA or any regulatory agency in a timely manner or ever, which could harm our business, prospects and financial condition. For example, in April 2014, a clinical hold was placed on patient enrollment and dosing of PEGPH20 in Study HALO-202 as a result of a possible difference in the TE event rate that had been observed at that time in the trial between the group of patients treated with PEGPH20 versus the group of patients treated without PEGPH20. The clinical hold was lifted by the FDA in June 2014, and we have completed Study HALO-202.
If our contract manufacturers are unable to manufacture and supply to us bulk rHuPH20 or other raw materials in the quantity and quality required by us or our collaborators for use in our products and product candidates, our product development and commercialization efforts could be delayed or stopped and our collaborations could be damaged.
We have existing supply agreements with contract manufacturing organizations Avid Bioservices, Inc. (Avid) and Catalent Indiana LLC (formerly Cook Pharmica LLC) (Catalent) to produce bulk rHuPH20. These manufacturers each produce bulk rHuPH20 under cGMP for clinical uses. Catalent currently produces bulk rHuPH20 for use in Hylenex recombinant, product candidates and collaboration product candidates. Avid currently produces bulk rHuPH20 for use in collaboration products and collaboration product candidates. In addition to supply obligations, Avid and Catalent will also provide support for the chemistry, manufacturing and controls sections for FDA and other regulatory filings. We rely on their ability to successfully manufacture these batches according to product specifications. If either Avid or Catalent: (i) is unable to retain its status as an FDA approved manufacturing facility; (ii) is unable to otherwise successfully scale up bulk rHuPH20 production to meet corporate or regulatory authority quality standards; or (iii) fails to manufacture and supply bulk rHuPH20 in the quantity and quality required by us or our collaborators for use in our proprietary and collaboration products and product candidates for any other reason, our business will be adversely affected. In addition, a significant change in such parties’ or other third party manufacturers’ business or financial condition could adversely affect their abilities to fulfill their contractual obligations to us. We have not established, and may not be able to establish, favorable arrangements with additional bulk rHuPH20 manufacturers and suppliers of the ingredients necessary to manufacture bulk rHuPH20 should the existing manufacturers and suppliers become unavailable or in the event that our existing manufacturers and suppliers are unable to adequately perform their responsibilities. We have attempted to mitigate the impact of a potential supply interruption through the establishment of excess bulk rHuPH20 inventory where possible, but there can be no assurances that this safety stock will be maintained or that it will be sufficient to address any delays, interruptions or other problems experienced by Avid and/or Catalent. Any delays, interruptions or other problems regarding the ability of Avid and/or Catalent to supply bulk rHuPH20 or the ability of other third party manufacturers, to supply other raw materials or ingredients necessary to produce our products on a timely basis could: (i) cause the delay of clinical trials or otherwise delay or prevent the regulatory approval of proprietary or collaboration product candidates; (ii) delay or prevent the effective

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commercialization of proprietary or collaboration products; and/or (iii) cause us to breach contractual obligations to deliver bulk rHuPH20 to our collaborators. Such delays would likely damage our relationship with our collaborators, and they would have a material adverse effect on royalties and thus our business and financial condition.
If we or any party to a key collaboration agreement fail to perform material obligations under such agreement, or if a key collaboration agreement, is terminated for any reason, our business could significantly suffer.
We have entered into multiple collaboration agreements under which we may receive significant future payments in the form of milestone payments, target designation fees, maintenance fees and royalties. We are dependent on our collaborators to develop and commercialize product candidates subject to our collaborations in order for us to realize any financial benefits from these collaborations. Our collaborators may not devote the attention and resources to such efforts that we would ourselves, change their clinical development plans, promotional efforts or simultaneously develop and commercialize products in competition to those products we have licensed to them. Any of these actions could not be visible to us immediately and could negatively impact the benefits and revenue we receive from such collaboration. In addition, in the event that a party fails to perform under a key collaboration agreement, or if a key collaboration agreement is terminated, the reduction in anticipated revenues could delay or suspend our product development activities for some of our product candidates, as well as our commercialization efforts for some or all of our products. Specifically, the termination of a key collaboration agreement by one of our collaborators could materially impact our ability to enter into additional collaboration agreements with new collaborators on favorable terms, if at all. In certain circumstances, the termination of a key collaboration agreement would require us to revise our corporate strategy going forward and reevaluate the applications and value of our technology.
Most of our current proprietary and collaboration products and product candidates rely on the rHuPH20 enzyme, and any adverse development regarding rHuPH20 could substantially impact multiple areas of our business, including current and potential collaborations, as well as proprietary programs.
rHuPH20 is a key technological component of ENHANZE technology and our most advanced proprietary and collaboration products and product candidates, including the current and future products and product candidates under our ENHANZE collaborations, our PEGPH20 program, and Hylenex recombinant. If there is an adverse development for rHuPH20 (e.g., an adverse regulatory determination relating to rHuPH20, if we are unable to obtain sufficient quantities of rHuPH20, if we are unable to obtain or maintain material proprietary rights to rHuPH20 or if we discover negative characteristics of rHuPH20), multiple areas of our business, including current and potential collaborations, as well as proprietary programs would be substantially impacted. For example, elevated anti-rHuPH20 antibody titers were detected in the registration trial for Baxalta’s HYQVIA product as well as in a former collaborator’s product in a Phase 2 clinical trial with rHuPH20, but have not been associated, in either case, with any adverse events. We monitor for antibodies to rHuPH20 in our collaboration and proprietary programs, and although we do not believe at this time that the incidence of non-neutralizing anti-rHuPH20 antibodies in either the HYQVIA program or the former collaborator’s program will have a significant impact on our other proprietary and other collaboration product candidates, there can be no assurance that there will not be other such occurrences in the foregoing programs or our other programs or that concerns regarding these antibodies will not also be raised by the FDA or other health authorities in the future, which could result in delays or discontinuations of our development or commercialization activities or deter entry into additional collaborations with third parties.
We routinely evaluate, and may modify, our business strategy and our strategic focus to only a few fields or applications of our technology which may increase the risk for potential negative impact from adverse developments.
We routinely evaluate our business strategy, and may modify this strategy in the future in light of our assessment of unmet medical needs, growth potential, resource requirements, regulatory issues, competition, risks and other factors. As a result of these strategic evaluations, we may focus our resources and efforts on one or a few programs or fields and may suspend or reduce our efforts on other programs and fields. For example, in the third quarter of 2014, we decided to focus our resources on advancing PEGPH20 and expanding utilization of our ENHANZE technology. While we believe these are applications with the greatest potential value, we have reduced the diversification of our programs and increased our dependence on the success of the areas we are pursuing. By focusing on one or a few areas, we increase the potential impact on us if one of those programs or product candidates does not successfully complete clinical trials, achieve commercial acceptance or meet expectations regarding sales and revenue. Our decision to focus on one or a few programs may also reduce the value of programs that are no longer within our principal strategic focus, which could impair our ability to pursue collaborations or other strategic alternatives for those programs we are not pursuing.

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Our proprietary and collaboration product candidates or companion diagnostic assays may not receive regulatory approvals or their development may be delayed for a variety of reasons, including delayed or unsuccessful clinical trials, regulatory requirements or safety concerns.
Clinical testing of pharmaceutical products is a long, expensive and uncertain process, and the failure or delay of a clinical trial can occur at any stage, including the patient enrollment stage. Even if initial results of preclinical and nonclinical studies or clinical trial results are promising, we or our collaborators may obtain different results in subsequent trials or studies that fail to show the desired levels of safety and efficacy, or we may not, or our collaborators may not, obtain applicable regulatory approval for a variety of other reasons. Preclinical, nonclinical, and clinical trials for any of our proprietary or collaboration product candidates or development of any collaboration companion diagnostic assays could be unsuccessful, which would delay or preclude regulatory approval and commercialization of the product candidates or companion diagnostic assays. In the U.S. and other jurisdictions, regulatory approval can be delayed, limited or not granted for many reasons, including, among others:
during the course of clinical studies, the final data may differ from initial reported data, and clinical results may not meet prescribed endpoints for the studies or otherwise provide sufficient data to support the efficacy of our product candidates;
clinical and nonclinical test results may reveal side effects, adverse events or unexpected safety issues associated with the use of our product candidates; for example, in April 2014, a clinical hold was placed on patient enrollment and dosing of PEGPH20 in Study HALO-202 as a result of a possible difference in the TE event rate that had been observed at that time in the trial between the group of patients treated with PEGPH20 versus the group of patients treated without PEGPH20. The clinical hold was lifted by the FDA in June 2014, and we have completed enrollment and continue to monitor patients who remain either on treatment or in follow-up on Study HALO-202 under a revised clinical protocol;
completion of clinical trials may be delayed for a variety of reasons including the amount of time it may take to identify and enroll patients with high levels of HA in our target population, and the ability to procure drug supply required in clinical trial protocols;
clinical trial results may be negatively impacted if our companion diagnostic does not accurately identify patients most likely to respond to the therapy, including the level of HA in patients;
third parties, such as contract research organizations, upon whom we rely to help conduct and manage our clinical trials may not perform satisfactorily, fulfill their contractual obligations to us, meet expected deadlines or conduct our clinical trials in accordance with regulatory requirements or our stated protocols;
regulatory review may not find a product candidate safe or effective enough to merit either continued testing or final approval;
regulatory review may not find that the data from preclinical testing and clinical trials justifies approval;
regulatory authorities may require that we change our studies or conduct additional studies which may significantly delay or make continued pursuit of approval commercially unattractive;
a regulatory agency may reject our trial data or disagree with our interpretations of either clinical trial data or applicable regulations;
a regulatory agency may approve only a narrow use of our product or may require additional safety monitoring and reporting through Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies or conditions to assure safe use programs;
the cost of clinical trials required for product approval may be greater than what we originally anticipate, and we may decide to not pursue regulatory approval for such a product;
a regulatory agency may not approve our manufacturing processes or facilities, or the processes or facilities of our collaborators, our contract manufacturers or our raw material suppliers;
a regulatory agency may identify problems or other deficiencies in our existing manufacturing processes or facilities, or the existing processes or facilities of our collaborators, our contract manufacturers or our raw material suppliers;
a regulatory agency may change its formal or informal approval requirements and policies, act contrary to previous guidance, adopt new regulations or raise new issues or concerns late in the approval process; or
a product candidate may be approved only for indications that are narrow or under conditions that place the product at a competitive disadvantage, which may limit the sales and marketing activities for such product candidate or otherwise adversely impact the commercial potential of a product.

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If a proprietary or collaboration product candidate or companion diagnostic assay is not approved in a timely fashion or obtained on commercially viable terms, or if development of any product candidate or a companion diagnostic assay is terminated due to difficulties or delays encountered in the regulatory approval process, it could have a material adverse impact on our business, and we would become more dependent on the development of other proprietary or collaboration product candidates and/or our ability to successfully acquire other products and technologies. There can be no assurances that any proprietary or collaboration product candidate or companion diagnostic assay will receive regulatory approval in a timely manner, or at all. There can be no assurance that we will be able to gain clarity as to the FDA’s requirements or that the requirements may be satisfied in a commercially feasible way, in which case our ability to enter into collaborations with third parties or explore other strategic alternatives to exploit this opportunity will be limited or may not be possible.
We anticipate that certain proprietary and collaboration products will be marketed, and perhaps manufactured, in foreign countries. The process of obtaining regulatory approvals in foreign countries is subject to delay and failure for the reasons set forth above, as well as for reasons that vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. The approval process varies among countries and jurisdictions and can involve additional testing. The time required to obtain approval may differ from that required to obtain FDA approval. Foreign regulatory agencies may not provide approvals on a timely basis, if at all. Approval by the FDA does not ensure approval by regulatory authorities in other countries or jurisdictions, and approval by one foreign regulatory authority does not ensure approval by regulatory authorities in other foreign countries or jurisdictions or by the FDA.
Our third party collaborators are responsible for providing certain proprietary materials that are essential components of our collaboration products and product candidates, and any failure to supply these materials could delay the development and commercialization efforts for these collaboration products and product candidates and/or damage our collaborations.
Our development and commercialization collaborators are responsible for providing certain proprietary materials that are essential components of our collaboration products and product candidates. For example, Roche is responsible for producing the Herceptin and MabThera required for its subcutaneous products and Baxalta is responsible for producing the GAMMAGARD LIQUID for its product HYQVIA. If a collaborator, or any applicable third party service provider of a collaborator, encounters difficulties in the manufacture, storage, delivery, fill, finish or packaging of the collaboration product or product candidate or component of such product or product candidate, such difficulties could (i) cause the delay of clinical trials or otherwise delay or prevent the regulatory approval of collaboration product candidates; and/or (ii) delay or prevent the effective commercialization of collaboration products. Such delays could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition.
We rely on third parties to manufacture, prepare, fill, finish and package our products and product candidates, and if such third parties should fail to perform, our commercialization and development efforts for our products and product candidates could be delayed or stopped.
We rely on third parties to manufacture, prepare, fill, finish, package, store and ship our products and product candidates on our behalf. If we are unable to locate third parties to perform these functions on terms that are acceptable to us, or if the third parties we identify fail to perform their obligations, the progress of clinical trials could be delayed or even suspended and the commercialization of approved product candidates could be delayed or prevented. In addition, we have scaled up our manufacturing of PEGPH20 with third party suppliers to support additional clinical trials, including the Phase 3 trial, and ultimately, if approved, potential commercial supply. If our contract manufacturers are unable to successfully manufacture and supply PEGPH20, the progress of our clinical trials could be delayed or halted for a period of time.
If we are unable to sufficiently develop our sales, marketing and distribution capabilities or enter into successful agreements with third parties to perform these functions, we will not be able to fully commercialize our products.
We may not be successful in marketing and promoting our approved product, Hylenex recombinant, or any other products we develop or acquire in the future. Our sales, marketing and distribution capabilities are very limited. In order to commercialize any products successfully, we must internally develop substantial sales, marketing and distribution capabilities or establish collaborations or other arrangements with third parties to perform these services. We do not have extensive experience in these areas, and we may not be able to establish adequate in-house sales, marketing and distribution capabilities or engage and effectively manage relationships with third parties to perform any or all of such services. To the extent that we enter into co-promotion or other licensing arrangements, our product revenues are likely to be lower than if we directly marketed and sold our products, and any revenues we receive will depend upon the efforts of third parties, whose efforts may not meet our expectations or be successful. These third parties would be largely responsible for the speed and scope of sales and marketing efforts, and may not dedicate the resources necessary to maximize product opportunities. Our ability to cause these third parties to increase the speed and scope of their efforts may also be limited. In addition, sales and marketing efforts could be negatively impacted by the delay or failure to obtain additional supportive clinical trial data for our products. In some cases, third party collaborators are responsible for conducting these additional clinical trials, and our ability to increase the efforts and resources allocated to these trials may be limited.

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If we or our collaborators fail to comply with regulatory requirements applicable to promotion, sale and manufacturing of approved products, regulatory agencies may take action against us or them, which could significantly harm our business.
Any approved products, along with the manufacturing processes, post-approval clinical data, labeling, advertising and promotional activities for these products, are subject to continual requirements and review by the FDA, state and foreign regulatory bodies. Regulatory authorities subject a marketed product, its manufacturer and the manufacturing facilities to continual review and periodic inspections. We, our collaborators and our respective contractors, suppliers and vendors, will be subject to ongoing regulatory requirements, including complying with regulations and laws regarding advertising, promotion and sales of drug products, required submissions of safety and other post-market information and reports, registration requirements, cGMP regulations (including requirements relating to quality control and quality assurance, as well as the corresponding maintenance of records and documentation), and the requirements regarding the distribution of samples to physicians and recordkeeping requirements. Regulatory agencies may change existing requirements or adopt new requirements or policies. We, our collaborators and our respective contractors, suppliers and vendors, may be slow to adapt or may not be able to adapt to these changes or new requirements.
In particular, regulatory requirements applicable to pharmaceutical products make the substitution of suppliers and manufacturers costly and time consuming. We have minimal internal manufacturing capabilities and are, and expect to be in the future, entirely dependent on contract manufacturers and suppliers for the manufacture of our products and for their active and other ingredients. The disqualification of these manufacturers and suppliers through their failure to comply with regulatory requirements could negatively impact our business because the delays and costs in obtaining and qualifying alternate suppliers (if such alternative suppliers are available, which we cannot assure) could delay clinical trials or otherwise inhibit our ability to bring approved products to market, which would have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition. Likewise, if we, our collaborators and our respective contractors, suppliers and vendors involved in sales and promotion of our products do not comply with applicable laws and regulations, for example off-label or false or misleading promotion, this could materially harm our business and financial condition.
Failure to comply with regulatory requirements may result in any of the following:
restrictions on our products or manufacturing processes;
warning letters;
withdrawal of the products from the market;
voluntary or mandatory recall;
fines;
suspension or withdrawal of regulatory approvals;
suspension or termination of any of our ongoing clinical trials;
refusal to permit the import or export of our products;
refusal to approve pending applications or supplements to approved applications that we submit;
product seizure;
injunctions; or
imposition of civil or criminal penalties.
We currently have significant debt and failure by us to fulfill our obligations under the applicable loan agreements may cause the repayment obligations to accelerate.
In December 2015, our subsidiaries, Halozyme, Inc. (Halozyme) and Halozyme Royalty LLC (Halozyme Royalty) entered into a credit agreement (the Credit Agreement) with BioPharma Credit Investments IV Sub, LP and Athyrium Opportunities II Acquisition LP (the Royalty-backed Lenders) pursuant to which we borrowed $150 million through Halozyme Royalty (the Royalty-backed Loan). The Royalty-backed Loan will be repaid primarily from a specified percentage of the royalty payments we receive under our collaboration agreements with Roche and Baxalta (the Royalty Payments).
The obligations of Halozyme Royalty under the Credit Agreement to repay the Royalty-backed Loan may be accelerated upon the occurrence of certain events of default under the Credit Agreement, including but not limited to:
if any payment of principal is not made within three days of when such payment is due and payable or otherwise made in accordance with the terms of the Credit Agreement;
if any representations or warranties made in the Credit Agreement or any other transaction document proves to be incorrect or misleading in any material respect when made;
if there occurs a default in the performance of affirmative and negative covenants set forth in the Credit Agreement or any other transaction document;
the failure by either Baxalta or Roche to pay material amounts owed under our collaboration agreements because of an actual breach or default by us under the collaboration agreements;

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the voluntary or involuntary commencement of bankruptcy proceedings by either Halozyme or Halozyme Royalty and other insolvency related defaults;
any materially adverse effect on the binding nature of any of the transaction documents or the collaboration agreements with Baxalta and Roche; or
Halozyme ceases to own, of record and beneficially, 100% of the equity interests in Halozyme Royalty.
The Credit Agreement also contains covenants applicable to Halozyme and Halozyme Royalty, including certain visitation, information and audits rights granted to the collateral agent and the lenders and restrictions on the conduct of business, including continued compliance with the Baxalta and Roche collaboration agreements and specified affirmative actions regarding the escrow account established to facilitate payment of Royalty Payments to the Royalty-backed Lenders or other specified parties. The Credit Agreement also contains covenants solely applicable to Halozyme Royalty, including restrictions on incurring indebtedness, creating or granting liens, making acquisitions and making specified restricted payments. These covenants could make it more difficult for us to execute our business strategy.
In connection with the Royalty-backed Loan, Halozyme Royalty granted a first priority lien and security interest (subject only to permitted liens) in all of its assets and all real, intangible and personal property, including all of its right, title and interest in and to the Royalty Payments.
In June 2016, we entered into a Loan and Security Agreement (the Loan Agreement) with Oxford Finance LLC (Oxford) and Silicon Valley Bank (SVB) (collectively, the Lenders), providing a senior secured loan facility of up to an aggregate principal amount of $70 million, comprising a $55.0 million draw in June 2016 and an additional $15.0 million tranche, which we had the option to draw during the second quarter of 2017 and did not exercise. The initial proceeds were partially used to pay the outstanding principal and final payment owed on our previous loan agreement with the Lenders. The remaining proceeds are to be used for working capital and general business requirements. The Loan Agreement is secured by substantially all of the assets of the Company and its subsidiary, Halozyme, Inc., except that the collateral does not include any equity interests in Halozyme, Inc., any intellectual property (including all licensing, collaboration and similar agreements relating thereto), and certain other excluded assets. The Loan Agreement contains customary representations, warranties and covenants by us, which covenants limit our ability to convey, sell, lease, transfer, assign or otherwise dispose of certain of our assets; engage in any business other than the businesses currently engaged in by us or reasonably related thereto; liquidate or dissolve; make certain management changes; undergo certain change of control events; create, incur, assume, or be liable with respect to certain indebtedness; grant certain liens; pay dividends and make certain other restricted payments; make certain investments; make payments on any subordinated debt; and enter into transactions with any of our affiliates outside of the ordinary course of business or permit our subsidiaries to do the same. In addition, subject to certain exceptions, we are required to maintain with SVB our primary deposit accounts, securities accounts and commodities, and to do the same for our domestic subsidiary. Complying with these covenants may make it more difficult for us to successfully execute our business strategy.
The Loan Agreement also contains customary indemnification obligations and customary events of default, including, among other things, our failure to fulfill certain of our obligations under the Loan Agreement and the occurrence of a material adverse change which is defined as a material adverse change in our business, operations or condition (financial or otherwise), a material impairment of the prospect of repayment of any portion of the loan, or a material impairment in the perfection or priority of the Lender’s lien in the collateral or in the value of such collateral.
Our ability to make payments on our debt will depend on our future operating performance and ability to generate cash and may also depend on our ability to obtain additional debt or equity financing. We will need to use cash to pay principal and interest on our debt, thereby reducing the funds available to fund our research and development programs, strategic initiatives and working capital requirements. If we are unable to generate sufficient cash to service our debt obligation, an event of default may occur. In the event of default by us under the Credit Agreement or the Loan Agreement, the lenders would be entitled to exercise their remedies thereunder, including the right to accelerate the debt, upon which we may be required to repay all amounts then outstanding under the Credit Agreement or the Loan Agreement which could harm our financial condition.
If proprietary or collaboration product candidates are approved for marketing but do not gain market acceptance, our business may suffer and we may not be able to fund future operations.
Assuming that our proprietary or collaboration product candidates obtain the necessary regulatory approvals for commercial sale, a number of factors may affect the market acceptance of these existing product candidates or any other products which are developed or acquired in the future, including, among others:
the price of products relative to other therapies for the same or similar treatments;
the perception by patients, physicians and other members of the health care community of the effectiveness and safety of these products for their prescribed treatments relative to other therapies for the same or similar treatments;
our ability to fund our sales and marketing efforts and the ability and willingness of our collaborators to fund sales and marketing efforts;

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the degree to which the use of these products is restricted by the approved product label;
the effectiveness of our sales and marketing efforts and the effectiveness of the sales and marketing efforts of our collaborators;
the introduction of generic competitors; and
the extent to which reimbursement for our products and related treatments will be available from third party payors including government insurance programs (Medicare and Medicaid) and private insurers.
If these products do not gain market acceptance, we may not be able to fund future operations, including the development or acquisition of new product candidates and/or our sales and marketing efforts for our approved products, which would cause our business to suffer.
In addition, our proprietary and collaboration product candidates will be restricted to the labels approved by FDA and applicable regulatory bodies, and these restrictions may limit the marketing and promotion of the ultimate products. If the approved labels are restrictive, the sales and marketing efforts for these products may be negatively affected.
Developing and marketing pharmaceutical products for human use involves significant product liability risks for which we currently have limited insurance coverage.
The testing, marketing and sale of pharmaceutical products involves the risk of product liability claims by consumers and other third parties. Although we maintain product liability insurance coverage, product liability claims can be high in the pharmaceutical industry, and our insurance may not sufficiently cover our actual liabilities. If product liability claims were to be made against us, it is possible that the liabilities may exceed the limits of our insurance policy, or our insurance carriers may deny, or attempt to deny, coverage in certain instances. If a lawsuit against us is successful, then the lack or insufficiency of insurance coverage could materially and adversely affect our business and financial condition. Furthermore, various distributors of pharmaceutical products require minimum product liability insurance coverage before purchase or acceptance of products for distribution. Failure to satisfy these insurance requirements could impede our ability to achieve broad distribution of our proposed products, and higher insurance requirements could impose additional costs on us. In addition, since many of our collaboration product candidates include the pharmaceutical products of a third party, we run the risk that problems with the third party pharmaceutical product will give rise to liability claims against us.
Our inability to attract, hire and retain key management and scientific personnel could negatively affect our business.
Our success depends on the performance of key management and scientific employees with relevant experience. For example, in order to pursue our current business strategy, we will need to recruit and retain personnel experienced in oncology drug development which is a highly competitive market for talent. We depend substantially on our ability to hire, train, motivate and retain high quality personnel, especially our scientists and management team. Particularly in view of the small number of employees on our staff to cover our numerous programs and key functions, if we are unable to retain existing personnel or identify or hire additional personnel, we may not be able to research, develop, commercialize or market our products and product candidates as expected or on a timely basis and we may not be able to adequately support current and future alliances with strategic collaborators. Our use of domestic and international third-party contractors, consultants and staffing agencies also subjects us to potential co-employment liability claims.
Furthermore, if we were to lose key management personnel, we would likely lose some portion of our institutional knowledge and technical know-how, potentially causing a substantial delay in one or more of our development programs until adequate replacement personnel could be hired and trained. We currently have a severance policy applicable to all employees and a change in control policy applicable to senior executives.
We do not have key man life insurance policies on the lives of any of our employees.
Our operations might be interrupted by the occurrence of a natural disaster or other catastrophic event.
Our operations, including laboratories, offices and other research facilities, are located in four buildings in San Diego, California. In addition, we have a satellite office in South San Francisco, California. We depend on our facilities and on our collaborators, contractors and vendors for the continued operation of our business. Natural disasters or other catastrophic events, interruptions in the supply of natural resources, political and governmental changes, wildfires and other fires, floods, explosions, actions of animal rights activists, earthquakes and civil unrest could disrupt our operations or those of our collaborators, contractors and vendors. Even though we believe we carry commercially reasonable business interruption and liability insurance, and our contractors may carry liability insurance that protect us in certain events, we may suffer losses as a result of business interruptions that exceed the coverage available under our and our contractors’ insurance policies or for which we or our contractors do not have coverage. Any natural disaster or catastrophic event could have a significant negative impact on our operations and financial results. Moreover, any such event could delay our research and development programs.

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If we or our collaborators do not achieve projected development, clinical, regulatory or sales goals in the timeframes we publicly announce or otherwise expect, the commercialization of our products and the development of our product candidates may be delayed and, as a result, our stock price may decline, and we may face lawsuits relating to such declines.
From time to time, we or our collaborators may publicly articulate the estimated timing for the accomplishment of certain scientific, clinical, regulatory and other product development goals. The accomplishment of any goal is typically based on numerous assumptions, and the achievement of a particular goal may be delayed for any number of reasons both within and outside of our control. If scientific, regulatory, strategic or other factors cause us to not meet a goal, regardless of whether that goal has been publicly articulated or not, our stock price may decline rapidly. For example, the announcement in April 2014 of the temporary halting of our Phase 2 clinical trial for PEGPH20 caused a rapid decline in our stock price. Stock price declines may also trigger direct or derivative shareholder lawsuits. As with any litigation proceeding, the eventual outcome of any legal action is difficult to predict. If any such lawsuits occur, we will incur expenses in connection with the defense of these lawsuits, and we may have to pay substantial damages or settlement costs in connection with any resolution thereof. Although we have insurance coverage against which we may claim recovery against some of these expenses and costs, the amount of coverage may not be adequate to cover the full amount or certain expenses and costs may be outside the scope of the policies we maintain. In the event of an adverse outcome or outcomes, our business could be materially harmed from depletion of cash resources, negative impact on our reputation, or restrictions or changes to our governance or other processes that may result from any final disposition of the lawsuit. Moreover, responding to and defending pending litigation significantly diverts management’s attention from our operations.
In addition, the consistent failure to meet publicly announced milestones may erode the credibility of our management team with respect to future milestone estimates.
Future acquisitions could disrupt our business and harm our financial condition.
In order to augment our product pipeline or otherwise strengthen our business, we may decide to acquire additional businesses, products and technologies. As we have limited experience in evaluating and completing acquisitions, our ability as an organization to make such acquisitions is unproven. Acquisitions could require significant capital infusions and could involve many risks, including, but not limited to, the following:
we may have to issue convertible debt or equity securities to complete an acquisition, which would dilute our stockholders and could adversely affect the market price of our common stock;
an acquisition may negatively impact our results of operations because it may require us to amortize or write down amounts related to goodwill and other intangible assets, or incur or assume substantial debt or liabilities, or it may cause adverse tax consequences, substantial depreciation or deferred compensation charges;
we may encounter difficulties in assimilating and integrating the business, products, technologies, personnel or operations of companies that we acquire;
certain acquisitions may impact our relationship with existing or potential collaborators who are competitive with the acquired business, products or technologies;
acquisitions may require significant capital infusions and the acquired businesses, products or technologies may not generate sufficient value to justify acquisition costs;
we may take on liabilities from the acquired company such as debt, legal liabilities or business risk which could be significant;
an acquisition may disrupt our ongoing business, divert resources, increase our expenses and distract our management;
acquisitions may involve the entry into a geographic or business market in which we have little or no prior experience; and
key personnel of an acquired company may decide not to work for us.

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If any of these risks occurred, it could adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating results. There is no assurance that we will be able to identify or consummate any future acquisitions on acceptable terms, or at all. If we do pursue any acquisitions, it is possible that we may not realize the anticipated benefits from such acquisitions or that the market will not view such acquisitions positively.
Security breaches may disrupt our operations and harm our operating results.
We and our partners are subject to increasingly sophisticated attempts to gain unauthorized access to our information technology storage and access systems and are devoting resources to protect against such intrusion. The wrongful use, theft, deliberate sabotage or any other type of security breach with respect to any of our or any of our vendors and partners’ information technology storage and access systems could result in the disruption of our ability to use such systems or disclosure or dissemination of our or our partners’ proprietary and confidential information that is electronically stored, including research or clinical data and information regarding strategic initiatives, resulting in a material adverse impact on our business, operating results and financial condition. Our security and data recovery measures may not be adequate to protect against computer viruses, break-ins, and similar disruptions from unauthorized tampering with our electronic storage systems. Furthermore, any physical break-in or trespass of our facilities could result in the misappropriation, theft, sabotage or any other type of security breach with respect to our proprietary and confidential information, including research or clinical data or damage to our research and development equipment and assets. Such adverse effects could be material and irrevocable to our business, operating results and financial condition.
Risks Related To Ownership of Our Common Stock
Our stock price is subject to significant volatility.
We participate in a highly dynamic industry which often results in significant volatility in the market price of common stock irrespective of company performance. The high and low sales prices of our common stock during the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 were $20.54 and $13.24, respectively. We expect our stock price to continue to be subject to significant volatility and, in addition to the other risks and uncertainties described elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and all other risks and uncertainties that are either not known to us at this time or which we deem to be immaterial, any of the following factors may lead to a significant drop in our stock price:
the presence of competitive products to those being developed by us;
failure (actual or perceived) of our collaborators to devote attention or resources to the development or commercialization of product candidates licensed to such collaborator;
a dispute regarding our failure, or the failure of one of our third party collaborators, to comply with the terms of a collaboration agreement;
the termination, for any reason, of any of our collaboration agreements;
the sale of common stock by any significant stockholder, including, but not limited to, direct or indirect sales by members of management or our Board of Directors;
the resignation, or other departure, of members of management or our Board of Directors;
general negative conditions in the healthcare industry;
general negative conditions in the financial markets;
the cost associated with obtaining regulatory approval for any of our proprietary or collaboration product candidates;
the failure, for any reason, to secure or defend our intellectual property position;
for those products that are not yet approved for commercial sale, the failure or delay of applicable regulatory bodies to approve such products;
identification of safety or tolerability issues;
failure of clinical trials to meet efficacy endpoints;
suspensions or delays in the conduct of clinical trials or securing of regulatory approvals;
adverse regulatory action with respect to our and our collaborators’ products and product candidates such as clinical holds, imposition of onerous requirements for approval or product recalls;
our failure, or the failure of our third party collaborators, to successfully commercialize products approved by applicable regulatory bodies such as the FDA;
our failure, or the failure of our third party collaborators, to generate product revenues anticipated by investors;
disruptions in our clinical or commercial supply chains, including disruptions caused by problems with a bulk rHuPH20 contract manufacturer or a fill and finish manufacturer for any product or product candidate;
the sale of additional debt and/or equity securities by us;
our failure to obtain financing on acceptable terms or at all; or
a restructuring of our operations.

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Future transactions where we raise capital may negatively affect our stock price.
We are currently a “Well-Known Seasoned Issuer” and may file automatic shelf registration statements at any time with the SEC. In February 2017, we filed an automatic shelf registration statement on Form S-3 (Registration No. 333-216315) with the SEC. Sales of substantial amounts of shares of our common stock or other securities under our current or future shelf registration statements could lower the market price of our common stock and impair our ability to raise capital through the sale of equity securities.
Anti-takeover provisions in our charter documents and Delaware law may make an acquisition of us more difficult.
Anti-takeover provisions in our charter documents and Delaware law may make an acquisition of us more difficult. First, our board of directors is classified into three classes of directors. Under Delaware law, directors of a corporation with a classified board may be removed only for cause unless the corporation’s certificate of incorporation provides otherwise. Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation, as amended, does not provide otherwise. In addition, our bylaws limit who may call special meetings of stockholders, permitting only stockholders holding at least 50% of our outstanding shares to call a special meeting of stockholders. Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation, as amended, does not include a provision for cumulative voting for directors. Under cumulative voting, a minority stockholder holding a sufficient percentage of a class of shares may be able to ensure the election of one or more directors. Finally, our bylaws establish procedures, including advance notice procedures, with regard to the nomination of candidates for election as directors and stockholder proposals.
These provisions may discourage potential takeover attempts, discourage bids for our common stock at a premium over market price or adversely affect the market price of, and the voting and other rights of the holders of, our common stock. These provisions could also discourage proxy contests and make it more difficult for stockholders to elect directors other than the candidates nominated by our board of directors.
In addition, because we are incorporated in Delaware, we are governed by the provisions of Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law, which may prohibit large stockholders from consummating a merger with, or acquisition of, us.
These provisions may deter an acquisition of us that might otherwise be attractive to stockholders.
Risks Related to Our Industry
Our products must receive regulatory approval before they can be sold, and compliance with the extensive government regulations is expensive and time consuming and may result in the delay or cancellation of product sales, introductions or modifications.
Extensive industry regulation has had, and will continue to have, a significant impact on our business. All pharmaceutical companies, including ours, are subject to extensive, complex, costly and evolving regulation by the health regulatory agencies including the FDA (and with respect to controlled drug substances, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)) and equivalent foreign regulatory agencies and state and local/regional government agencies. The Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, the Controlled Substances Act and other domestic and foreign statutes and regulations govern or influence the testing, manufacturing, packaging, labeling, storing, recordkeeping, safety, approval, advertising, promotion, sale and distribution of our products. We are dependent on receiving FDA and other governmental approvals, including regulatory approvals in jurisdictions outside the United States, prior to manufacturing, marketing and shipping our products. Consequently, there is always a risk that the FDA or other applicable governmental authorities, including those outside the United States, will not approve our products or may impose onerous, costly and time-consuming requirements such as additional clinical or animal testing. Regulatory authorities may require that we change our studies or conduct additional studies, which may significantly delay or make continued pursuit of approval commercially unattractive. For example, the approval of Baxalta’s HYQVIA BLA was delayed by the FDA until we and Baxalta provided additional preclinical data sufficient to address concerns regarding non-neutralizing antibodies to rHuPH20 that were detected in the registration trial. Although these antibodies have not been associated with any known adverse clinical effects, and the HYQVIA BLA was approved by the FDA in September 2014, the FDA or other foreign regulatory agency may, at any time, halt our and our collaborators’ development and commercialization activities due to safety concerns. In addition, even if our products are approved, regulatory agencies may also take post-approval action limiting or revoking our ability to sell our products. Any of these regulatory actions may adversely affect the economic benefit we may derive from our products and therefore harm our financial condition.
Under certain of these regulations, we and our contract suppliers and manufacturers are subject to periodic inspection of our or their respective facilities, procedures and operations and/or the testing of products by the FDA, the DEA and other authorities, which conduct periodic inspections to confirm that we and our contract suppliers and manufacturers are in compliance with all applicable regulations. The FDA also conducts pre-approval and post-approval reviews and plant inspections to determine whether our systems, or our contract suppliers’ and manufacturers’ processes, are in compliance with cGMP and other FDA regulations. If we, or our contract supplier, fail these inspections, we may not be able to commercialize our product in a timely manner without incurring significant additional costs, or at all.

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In addition, the FDA imposes a number of complex regulatory requirements on entities that advertise and promote pharmaceuticals including, but not limited to, standards and regulations for direct-to-consumer advertising, off-label promotion, industry-sponsored scientific and educational activities, and promotional activities involving the internet.
We may be subject, directly or indirectly, to various broad federal and state healthcare laws. If we are unable to comply, or have not fully complied, with such laws, we could face civil, criminal and administrative penalties, damages, monetary fines, disgorgement, possible exclusion from participation in Medicare, Medicaid and other federal healthcare programs, contractual damages, reputational harm, diminished profits and future earnings and curtailment or restructuring of our operations, any of which could adversely affect our ability to operate.
Our business operations and activities may be directly, or indirectly, subject to various broad federal and state healthcare laws, including without limitation, anti-kickback laws, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), false claims laws, civil monetary penalty laws, data privacy and security laws, tracing and tracking laws, as well as transparency laws regarding payments or other items of value provided to healthcare providers. These laws may restrict or prohibit a wide range of business activities, including, but not limited to, research, manufacturing, distribution, pricing, discounting, marketing and promotion and other business arrangements. These laws may impact, among other things, our current activities with principal investigators and research subjects, as well as sales, marketing and education programs. Many states have similar healthcare fraud and abuse