Company Quick10K Filing
Quick10K
Independent Bank
Closing Price ($) Shares Out (MM) Market Cap ($MM)
$22.31 24 $527
10-K 2018-12-31 Annual: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-09-30 Quarter: 2018-09-30
10-Q 2018-06-30 Quarter: 2018-06-30
10-Q 2018-03-31 Quarter: 2018-03-31
10-K 2017-12-31 Annual: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-09-30 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-Q 2017-06-30 Quarter: 2017-06-30
10-Q 2017-03-31 Quarter: 2017-03-31
10-K 2016-12-31 Annual: 2016-12-31
10-Q 2016-09-30 Quarter: 2016-09-30
10-Q 2016-06-30 Quarter: 2016-06-30
10-Q 2016-03-31 Quarter: 2016-03-31
10-K 2015-12-31 Annual: 2015-12-31
10-Q 2015-09-30 Quarter: 2015-09-30
10-Q 2015-06-30 Quarter: 2015-06-30
10-Q 2015-03-31 Quarter: 2015-03-31
10-K 2014-12-31 Annual: 2014-12-31
10-Q 2014-09-30 Quarter: 2014-09-30
10-Q 2014-06-30 Quarter: 2014-06-30
10-Q 2014-03-31 Quarter: 2014-03-31
10-K 2013-12-31 Annual: 2013-12-31
8-K 2019-01-29 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-12-18 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-10-25 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-07-26 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-04-24 Exhibits
8-K 2018-04-23 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-02-15 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-01-30 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-01-01
Z Zillow Group 7,810
CBU Community Bank System 3,280
AWR American States Water 2,500
TMST Timkensteel 499
NNBR NN 417
CRT Cross Timbers Royalty Trust 71
RELV Reliv 7
NXMD Nexeon Medsystems 0
IVTP Inventrust Properties 0
CTY Qwest 0
IBCP 2018-12-31
Part I
Item 1. Business
Item 1. Business -- Statistical Disclosure
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 2. Properties
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Part II.
Item 5. Market for Our Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6. Selected Financial Data
Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures
Item 9B. Other Information
Part III.
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11. Executive Compensation
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services
Part IV.
Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
Item 16. Form 10-K Summary
EX-13 h10061063x1_ex13.htm
EX-21 h10061063x1_ex21.htm
EX-23 h10061063x1_ex23.htm
EX-31.1 h10061063x1_ex31-1.htm
EX-31.2 h10061063x1_ex31-2.htm
EX-32.1 h10061063x1_ex32-1.htm
EX-32.2 h10061063x1_ex32-2.htm

Independent Bank Earnings 2018-12-31

IBCP 10K Annual Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

10-K 1 h10061063x1_10k.htm FORM 10-K

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K

☒ Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018 or
☐ Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 for the transition period from                           to                          
Commission file number  0-7818
 

INDEPENDENT BANK CORPORATION
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

MICHIGAN
 
38-2032782
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation)
 
(I.R.S. employer identification no.)

4200 East Beltline, Grand Rapids, Michigan
  49525
(Address of principal executive offices)  
  (Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code 
 (616)    527-5820
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Common Stock, No Par Value  
NASDAQ
(Title of class)   (Name of Exchange)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None.
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
Yes ☐ No ☒
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.   Yes ☐ No ☒
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
Yes ☒ No ☐
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).  Yes ☒    No ☐
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  ☐    
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company.
Large accelerated filer ☐
Accelerated filer ☒
Non-accelerated filer ☐ Smaller reporting company ☐
Emerging growth company ☐
 
 
 
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  ☐
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b of the Act).
Yes ☐ No ☒
The aggregate market value of common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of June 29, 2018, was $600,264,131.
The number of shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock as of March 5, 2019 was 23,616,379.
Documents incorporated by reference:  Portions of our definitive proxy statement and annual report, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, are incorporated by reference into Part I, Part II, Part III, and Part IV of this Form 10-K.
The Exhibit Index appears on Page 37



FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

Statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K that are not statements of historical fact, including statements that include terms such as “will,” “may,” “should,” “believe,” “expect,” “forecast,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “project,” “intend,” “likely,” “optimistic” and “plan” and statements about future or projected financial and operating results, plans, projections, objectives, expectations, and intentions, are forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, descriptions of plans and objectives for future operations, products or services; projections of our future revenue, earnings or other measures of economic performance; forecasts of credit losses and other asset quality trends; statements about our business and growth strategies; and expectations about economic and market conditions and trends.  These forward-looking statements express our current expectations, forecasts of future events, or long-term goals.  They are based on assumptions, estimates, and forecasts that, although believed to be reasonable, may turn out to be incorrect.   Actual results could differ materially from those discussed in the forward-looking statements for a variety of reasons, including:


·
economic, market, operational, liquidity, credit, and interest rate risks associated with our business;

·
economic conditions generally and in the financial services industry, particularly economic conditions within Michigan and the regional and local real estate markets in which our bank operates;

·
the failure of assumptions underlying the establishment of, and provisions made to, our allowance for loan losses;

·
increased competition in the financial services industry, either nationally or regionally;

·
our ability to achieve loan and deposit growth;

·
volatility and direction of market interest rates;

·
challenges we may face in acquiring or integrating other businesses;

·
the continued services of our management team; and

·
implementation of new legislation, which may have significant effects on us and the financial services industry.

This list provides examples of factors that could affect the results described by forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, but the list is not intended to be all-inclusive.  The risk factors disclosed in Part I – Item 1A below include all known risks our management believes could materially affect the results described by forward-looking statements in this report.  However, those risks may not be the only risks we face.  Our results of operations, cash flows, financial position, and prospects could also be materially and adversely affected by additional factors that are not presently known to us, that we currently consider to be immaterial, or that develop after the date of this report.  We cannot assure you that our future results will meet expectations. While we believe the forward-looking statements in this report are reasonable, you should not place undue reliance on any forward-looking statement. In addition, these statements speak only as of the date made. We do not undertake, and expressly disclaim, any obligation to update or alter any statements, whether as a result of new information, future events, or otherwise, except as required by applicable law.

2

PART I

ITEM 1.
BUSINESS

Independent Bank Corporation was incorporated under the laws of the State of Michigan on September 17, 1973, for the purpose of becoming a bank holding company.  We are registered under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended, and own all of the outstanding stock of Independent Bank (the “bank”), which is also organized under the laws of the State of Michigan.

Aside from the stock of our bank, we have no other substantial assets.  We conduct no business except for the collection of dividends or returns of capital from our bank and the payment of dividends to our shareholders and the payment of interest on subordinated debentures.  We have established certain employee retirement plans, including an employee stock ownership plan (ESOP) and deferred compensation plans, as well as health and other insurance programs, the cost of which is borne by our subsidiaries.  We have no material patents, trademarks, licenses or franchises except the corporate charter of our bank, which permits it to engage in commercial banking pursuant to Michigan law.

Our bank transacts business in the single industry of commercial banking.  It offers a broad range of banking services to individuals and businesses, including checking and savings accounts, commercial lending, direct and indirect consumer financing, mortgage lending, and safe deposit box services.  Our bank does not offer trust services.  Our principal markets are the rural and suburban communities across Lower Michigan, which are served by the bank’s main office in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and a total of 67 branches, one drive-thru facility, and 12 loan production offices.  We also recently opened two loan production offices in Ohio (Columbus and Fairlawn).  Most of our bank’s branches provide full-service lobby and drive-thru services, as well as automatic teller machines (ATMs).  In addition, we provide internet and mobile banking capabilities to our customers.  We continue to see customer transaction volume declining at our bank offices and increasing through our electronic channels.

Our bank competes with other commercial banks, savings banks, credit unions, mortgage banking companies, securities brokerage companies, insurance companies, and money market mutual funds.  Many of these competitors have substantially greater resources than we do and offer certain services that we do not currently provide.  Such competitors may also have greater lending limits than our bank.  In addition, non-bank competitors are generally not subject to the extensive regulations applicable to us.  Price (the interest charged on loans and paid on deposits) remains a principal means of competition within the financial services industry.  Our bank also competes on the basis of service and convenience in providing financial services.

As of December 31, 2018, our bank had total loans (excluding loans held for sale) of $2.583 billion and total deposits of $2.913 billion.  As of December 31, 2018, we had 830 full-time employees and 146 part-time employees.

In addition to general banking services, we also offer title insurance services and insurance brokerage services through separate subsidiaries and investment services through a third party agreement with Cetera Investment Services LLC.

Effective April 1, 2018, we completed the acquisition of all of the issued and outstanding shares of common stock of TCSB Bancorp, Inc. (“TCSB”), the holding company and sole shareholder of Traverse City State Bank, through a merger of TCSB into our holding company, with our holding company as the surviving corporation.  On that same date, we also consolidated Traverse City State Bank into Independent Bank (with Independent Bank as the surviving institution). Under the terms of the merger agreement, each holder of TCSB common stock received 1.1166 shares of IBCP common stock plus cash in lieu of fractional shares totaling $0.005 million. TCSB option holders had their options converted into stock options of Independent Bank Corporation. As a result, we issued a total of approximately 2.71 million shares of our common stock and 0.19 million stock options, with an aggregate fair value of approximately $64.5 million, to the shareholders and option holders of TCSB. The fair value of common stock and stock options issued as the consideration paid for TCSB was determined using the closing price of our common stock on the acquisition date. This acquisition was accounted for under the acquisition method of accounting. Accordingly, we recognized amounts for identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed at their estimated acquisition date fair values. TCSB results of operations are included in our results beginning April 1, 2018. Non-interest expense includes $3.5 million of costs incurred during 2018 related to this acquisition. Any remaining acquisition-related costs will be expensed as incurred in future periods.

3

ITEM 1.
BUSINESS (continued)

On December 30, 2016, our bank and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Mepco Finance Corporation (“Mepco”), entered into an Asset Purchase Agreement (“APA”) with Seabury Asset Management LLC (“Seabury”).  Pursuant to the terms of the APA, the bank sold its payment plan processing business, payment plan receivables, and certain other assets to Seabury, who also assumed certain liabilities of Mepco.  This transaction closed on May 18, 2017, with an effective date of May 1, 2017.  As a result of the closing, Mepco sold $33.1 million of net payment plan receivables, $0.5 million of commercial loans, $0.2 million of furniture and equipment, and $1.6 million of other assets to Seabury, who also assumed $2.0 million of specified liabilities. We recorded a $0.32 million loss related to the sale of these assets in the fourth quarter of 2016.    Mepco was liquidated on June 30, 2017, with the remaining assets and liabilities transferred to the bank.  We do not believe that the sale of the Mepco business and assets will have a significant impact on our future overall financial condition or results of operations.

On a consolidated basis, our principal sources of revenue are interest and fees on loans, other interest income, and non-interest income.  The sources of revenue for the three most recent years are as follows:

   
2018
   
2017
   
2016
 
Interest and fees on loans
   
66.6
%
   
59.8
%
   
57.6
%
Other interest income
   
7.9
     
10.0
     
9.6
 
Non-interest income
   
25.5
     
30.2
     
32.8
 
     
100.0
%
   
100.0
%
   
100.0
%

Supervision and Regulation

The following is a summary of certain statutes and regulations affecting us.  This summary is qualified in its entirety by reference to the particular statutes and regulations.  A change in applicable laws or regulations may have a material effect on us and our bank.

General

Financial institutions and their holding companies are extensively regulated under federal and state law.  Consequently, our growth and earnings performance can be affected not only by management decisions and general and local economic conditions, but also by the statutes administered by, and the regulations and policies of, various governmental regulatory authorities.  Those authorities include, but are not limited to, the Federal Reserve, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”), the Michigan Department of Insurance and Financial Services (“Michigan DIFS”), the Internal Revenue Service, and state taxing authorities.  The effect of such statutes, regulations and policies and any changes thereto can be significant and cannot necessarily be predicted.

Federal and state laws and regulations generally applicable to financial institutions and their holding companies regulate, among other things, the scope of business, investments, reserves against deposits, capital levels, lending activities and practices, the nature and amount of collateral for loans, the establishment of branches, mergers, consolidations and dividends.  The system of supervision and regulation applicable to us establishes a comprehensive framework for our operations and is intended primarily for the protection of the FDIC’s deposit insurance fund, our depositors, and the public, rather than our shareholders.

Independent Bank Corporation

We are a bank holding company and, as such, are registered with, and subject to regulation by, the Federal Reserve under the Bank Holding Company Act, as amended (the “BHCA”).  Under the BHCA, we are subject to periodic examination by the Federal Reserve and are required to file periodic reports of operations and such additional information as the Federal Reserve may require.

Federal law requires bank holding companies to act as a source of strength to their bank subsidiaries and to commit capital and financial resources to support those subsidiaries. Such support may be required by the Federal Reserve at times when we might otherwise determine not to provide it.

4

ITEM 1.
BUSINESS (continued)

In addition, if the Michigan DIFS deems a bank’s capital to be impaired, it may require a bank to restore its capital by special assessment upon the bank holding company, as the bank’s sole shareholder.  If the bank holding company failed to pay such assessment, the directors of that bank would be required, under Michigan law, to sell the shares of bank stock owned by the bank holding company to the highest bidder at either public or private auction and use the proceeds of the sale to restore the bank’s capital.

Any capital loans by a bank holding company to a subsidiary bank are subordinate in right of payment to deposits and to certain other indebtedness of such subsidiary bank.  In the event of a bank holding company’s bankruptcy, any commitment by the bank holding company to a federal bank regulatory agency to maintain the capital of a subsidiary bank will be assumed by the bankruptcy trustee and entitled to a priority of payment.

Investments and Activities.   Federal law places restrictions on the ability of our holding company to engage in certain transactions, make investments, and participate (directly or indirectly through a subsidiary) in various activities.

In general, any direct or indirect acquisition by a bank holding company of any voting shares of any bank which would result in the bank holding company’s direct or indirect ownership or control of more than 5% of any class of voting shares of such bank, and any merger or consolidation of the bank holding company with another bank holding company, will require the prior written approval of the Federal Reserve under the BHCA.  In acting on such applications, the Federal Reserve must consider various statutory factors including the effect of the proposed transaction on competition in relevant geographic and product markets and each party’s financial condition, managerial resources, and record of performance under the Community Reinvestment Act.

The merger or consolidation of an existing bank subsidiary of a bank holding company with another bank, or the acquisition by such a subsidiary of the assets of another bank, or the assumption of the deposit and other liabilities by such a subsidiary requires the prior written approval of the responsible federal regulatory agency under the Bank Merger Act, based upon a consideration of statutory factors similar to those outlined above with respect to the BHCA.  In addition, in certain cases, an application to, and the prior approval of, the Federal Reserve under the BHCA and/or Michigan DIFS under Michigan banking laws, may be required.

With certain limited exceptions, the BHCA prohibits any bank holding company from engaging, either directly or indirectly through a subsidiary, in any activity other than managing or controlling banks unless the proposed non-banking activity is one the Federal Reserve has determined to be so closely related to banking as to be a proper incident thereto.  Under current Federal Reserve regulations, such permissible non-banking activities include such things as mortgage banking, equipment leasing, securities brokerage, and consumer and commercial finance company operations.  Well-capitalized and well-managed bank holding companies may, however, engage de novo in certain types of non-banking activities without prior notice to, or approval of, the Federal Reserve, provided that written notice of the new activity is given to the Federal Reserve within 10 business days after the activity is commenced.  If a bank holding company wishes to engage in a non-banking activity by acquiring a going concern, prior notice and/or prior approval will be required, depending upon the activities in which the company to be acquired is engaged, the size of the company to be acquired and the financial and managerial condition of the acquiring bank holding company.

Eligible bank holding companies that elect to operate as financial holding companies may engage in, or own shares in companies engaged in, a wider range of non-banking activities, including securities and insurance activities and any other activity the Federal Reserve, in consultation with the Treasury, determines by regulation or order is financial in nature, incidental to any such financial activity or complementary to any such financial activity and does not pose a substantial risk to the safety or soundness of depository institutions or the financial system generally.  The BHCA generally does not place territorial restrictions on the domestic activities of non-bank subsidiaries of bank or financial holding companies.  We have not applied for approval to operate as a financial holding company and have no current intention of doing so.

Capital Requirements.  The Federal Reserve uses capital adequacy guidelines in its examination and regulation of bank holding companies.  If capital falls below minimum guidelines, a bank holding company may, among other things, be denied approval to acquire or establish additional banks or non-bank businesses.

5

ITEM 1.
BUSINESS (continued)

The Federal Reserve’s capital guidelines establish the following minimum regulatory capital requirements for bank holding companies: (i) a leverage capital requirement expressed as a percentage of total assets, and (ii) a risk-based requirement expressed as a percentage of total risk-weighted assets.  The leverage capital requirement consists of a minimum ratio of Tier 1 capital (which consists principally of shareholders’ equity) to total assets of 3% for the most highly-rated companies with minimum requirements of 4% to 5% for all others.  The risk-based requirement consists of a minimum ratio of total capital to total risk-weighted assets of 8%, of which at least one-half must be Tier 1 capital.  The risk‑based and leverage standards presently used by the Federal Reserve are minimum requirements, and higher capital levels will be required if warranted by the particular circumstances or risk profiles of individual banking organizations.  The federal bank regulatory agencies are required biennially to review risk-based capital standards to ensure that they adequately address interest rate risk, concentration of credit risk and risks from non-traditional activities.

Our Tier 1 capital as of December 31, 2018, includes $38.2 million of trust preferred securities (classified on our Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition as “Subordinated debentures”).  The Federal Reserve has issued rules regarding trust preferred securities as a component of the Tier 1 capital of bank holding companies. The aggregate amount of trust preferred securities and certain other capital elements is limited to 25 percent of Tier 1 capital elements, net of goodwill (net of any associated deferred tax liability). The amount of trust preferred securities and certain other elements in excess of the limit could be included in the Tier 2 capital, subject to restrictions.  The provisions of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act adopted in 2010 (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) imposed additional limitations on the ability to include trust preferred securities as Tier 1 capital; however, these additional limitations do not apply to our outstanding trust preferred securities.

On January 1, 2015, we became subject to new regulatory capital rules issued by the Federal Reserve in 2013.  In general, these new capital rules increase the minimum requirements for both the quantity and quality of capital we maintain. The rules include a new minimum ratio of common equity Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets of 4.5% and a common equity Tier 1 capital conservation buffer of 2.5% of risk-weighted assets. This 2.5% capital conservation buffer is being phased in over a four-year period that began in 2016. The rules also raise the minimum ratio of Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets from 4% to 6% and include a minimum leverage ratio of 4%.  As to the quality of capital, the new rules emphasize common equity Tier 1 capital, the most loss-absorbing form of capital, and implements strict eligibility criteria for regulatory capital instruments. The rules also change the methodology for calculating risk-weighted assets to enhance risk sensitivity.  The application of the new capital rules to our organization is described below. Under these new capital rules, our existing trust preferred securities are grandfathered as qualifying regulatory capital.  We believe we currently exceed all of the capital ratio requirements of these new capital rules.

Dividends.  Historically, most of our revenues have been received in the form of dividends paid by our bank. We can also make requests for returns of capital from our bank; however, such requests require the approval of the Michigan DIFS.  Thus, our ability to pay dividends to our shareholders is indirectly limited by restrictions on the ability of our bank to pay dividends or return capital to us, as described below.  Further, in a policy statement, the Federal Reserve has expressed its view that a bank holding company experiencing earnings weaknesses should not pay cash dividends exceeding its net income or that can only be funded in ways that weaken the bank holding company’s financial health, such as by borrowing.  The Federal Reserve possesses enforcement powers over bank holding companies and their non-bank subsidiaries to prevent or remedy actions that represent unsafe or unsound practices or violations of applicable statutes and regulations.  Among these powers is the ability to proscribe the payment of dividends by banks and bank holding companies.  The “prompt corrective action” provisions of federal law and regulation authorize the Federal Reserve to restrict the amount of dividends that can be paid by an insured bank that fails to meet specified capital levels.

In addition to the restrictions on dividends imposed by the Federal Reserve, the Michigan Business Corporation Act provides that dividends may be legally declared or paid only if, after the distribution, the corporation can pay its debts as they come due in the usual course of business and its total assets equal or exceed the sum of its liabilities plus the amount that would be needed to satisfy the preferential rights upon dissolution of any holders of preferred stock whose preferential rights are superior to those receiving the distribution.

6

ITEM 1.
BUSINESS (continued)

Change in Control LimitationsSubject to certain exceptions, the Change in the Bank Control Act (“Control Act”) and regulations promulgated thereunder by the Federal Reserve, require any person acting directly or indirectly, or through or in concert with one or more persons, to give the Federal Reserve 60 days’ written notice before acquiring control of a bank holding company.  Pursuant to the Control Act, the Federal Reserve has the authority to prevent any such acquisition.  Transactions that are presumed to constitute the acquisition of control include the acquisition of any voting securities of a bank holding company having securities registered under Section 12 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, if, after the transaction, the acquiring person (or persons acting in concert) owns, controls or holds with power to vote 10% or more of any class of voting securities of the institution.

Federal Securities Regulation.  Our common stock is registered with the SEC under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). We are therefore subject to the information, proxy solicitation, insider trading and other restrictions and requirements of the SEC under the Exchange Act.

Independent Bank

Independent Bank is a Michigan banking corporation and a member of the Federal Reserve System, and its deposit accounts are insured by the FDIC’s Deposit Insurance Fund (“DIF”).  As a member of the Federal Reserve System and a Michigan-chartered bank, our bank is subject to the examination, supervision, reporting and enforcement requirements of the Federal Reserve as its primary federal regulator and the Michigan DIFS as the chartering authority for Michigan banks. These agencies and the federal and state laws applicable to our bank and its operations extensively regulate various aspects of the banking business including, among other things, permissible types and amounts of loans, investments and other activities, capital adequacy, branching, interest rates on loans and on deposits, the maintenance of non-interest bearing reserves on deposit accounts, and the safety and soundness of banking practices.

Deposit Insurance.  As an FDIC-insured institution, our bank is required to pay deposit insurance premium assessments to the FDIC.  Under the FDIC’s risk-based assessment system for deposit insurance premiums, all insured depository institutions are placed into one of four categories (Risk Categories I, II, III, and IV), based primarily on their level of capital and supervisory evaluations, for purposes of determining the institution’s assessment rate.  Deposit insurance premium assessments are generally based on an institution’s total assets minus its tangible equity.

FICO Assessments.  Our bank, as a member of the DIF, is subject to assessments to cover the payments on outstanding obligations of the Financing Corporation (“FICO”).  FICO was created to finance the recapitalization of the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation, the predecessor to the FDIC’s Savings Association Insurance Fund, which was created to insure the deposits of thrift institutions and was merged with the Bank Insurance Fund into the newly formed DIF in 2006.  From now until the maturity of the outstanding FICO obligations in 2019, DIF members will share the cost of the interest on the FICO bonds on a pro rata basis.  It is estimated that FICO assessments during this period will be approximately 0.001% of average tangible assets.

Michigan DIFS Assessments.  Michigan banks are required to pay supervisory fees to the Michigan DIFS to fund their operations.  The amount of supervisory fees paid by a bank is based upon the bank’s total assets.

Capital Requirements. The Federal Reserve has established the following minimum capital standards for state-chartered, FDIC-insured member banks, such as our bank:  a leverage requirement consisting of a minimum ratio of Tier 1 capital to total assets of 3% for the most highly-rated banks with minimum requirements of 4% to 5% for all others, and a risk-based capital requirement consisting of a minimum ratio of total capital to total risk-weighted assets of 8%, at least one-half of which must be Tier 1 capital.  Tier 1 capital consists principally of shareholders’ equity.  These capital requirements are minimum requirements.  Higher capital levels will be required if warranted by the particular circumstances or risk profiles of individual institutions.  For example, Federal Reserve regulations provide that higher capital may be required to take adequate account of, among other things, interest rate risk and the risks posed by concentrations of credit, nontraditional activities, or securities trading activities.

7

ITEM 1.
BUSINESS (continued)

On January 1, 2015, we became subject to new regulatory capital rules issued by the Federal Reserve in 2013.  In general, these new capital rules increase the minimum requirements for both the quantity and quality of capital we maintain. The rules include a new minimum ratio of common equity Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets of 4.5% and a common equity Tier 1 capital conservation buffer of 2.5% of risk-weighted assets. This 2.5% capital conservation buffer is being phased in over a four-year period that began in 2016. The rules also raise the minimum ratio of Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets from 4% to 6% and include a minimum leverage ratio of 4%.  As to the quality of capital, the new rules emphasize common equity Tier 1 capital, the most loss-absorbing form of capital, and implements strict eligibility criteria for regulatory capital instruments. The rules also change the methodology for calculating risk-weighted assets to enhance risk sensitivity.  The application of the new capital rules to our organization is described below.  We believe we currently exceed all of the capital ratio requirements of these new capital rules.

Federal law provides the federal banking regulators with broad power to take prompt corrective action to resolve the problems of undercapitalized institutions.  The extent of the regulators’ powers depends on whether the institution in question is “well capitalized,” “adequately capitalized,” “undercapitalized,” “significantly undercapitalized,” or “critically undercapitalized.”  Federal regulations define these capital categories as follows:

   
Total
Risk-Based
Capital Ratio
 
Tier 1
Risk-Based
Capital Ratio
 
Common
Equity Tier 1
Risk-Based
Capital Ratio
 
Leverage
Ratio
Well capitalized
 
10% or above
 
8% or above
 
6.5% or above
 
5% or above
Adequately capitalized
 
8% or above
 
6% or above
 
4.5% or above
 
4% or above
Undercapitalized
 
Less than 8%
 
Less than 6%
 
Less than 4.5%
 
Less than 4%
Significantly undercapitalized
 
Less than 6%
 
Less than 4%
 
Less than 3%
 
Less than 3%
Critically undercapitalized
 
Tangible equity to total assets of 2% or less

At December 31, 2018, our bank’s ratios exceeded minimum requirements for the well-capitalized category.

Depending upon the capital category to which an institution is assigned, the regulators’ corrective powers include:  requiring the submission of a capital restoration plan; placing limits on asset growth and restrictions on activities; requiring the institution to issue additional capital stock (including additional voting stock) or to be acquired; restricting transactions with affiliates; restricting the interest rates the institution may pay on deposits; ordering a new election of directors of the institution; requiring that senior executive officers or directors be dismissed; prohibiting the institution from accepting deposits from correspondent banks; requiring the institution to divest certain subsidiaries; prohibiting the payment of principal or interest on subordinated debt; and ultimately, appointing a receiver for the institution.

In general, a depository institution may be reclassified to a lower category than is indicated by its capital levels if the appropriate federal depository institution regulatory agency determines the institution to be otherwise in an unsafe or unsound condition or to be engaged in an unsafe or unsound practice.  This could include a failure by the institution to correct the deficiency following receipt of a less-than-satisfactory rating on its most recent examination report.

Dividends.  Under Michigan law, banks are restricted as to the maximum amount of dividends they may pay on their common stock.  Our bank may not pay dividends except out of its net income after deducting its losses and bad debts.  In addition, a Michigan bank may not declare or pay a dividend unless the bank will have a surplus amounting to at least 20 percent of its capital after the payment of the dividend.

In addition, as a member of the Federal Reserve System, our bank is required to obtain the prior approval of the Federal Reserve for the declaration or payment of a dividend if the total of all dividends declared in any year will exceed the total of (a) the bank’s retained net income (as defined by federal regulation) for that year, plus (b) the bank’s retained net income for the preceding two years.

8

ITEM 1.
BUSINESS (continued)

Federal law also generally prohibits a depository institution from making any capital distribution (including payment of a dividend) or paying any management fee to its holding company if the depository institution would thereafter be undercapitalized.  In addition, the Federal Reserve may prohibit the payment of dividends by a bank if such payment is determined, by reason of the financial condition of the bank, to be an unsafe and unsound banking practice or if the bank is in default of payment of any assessment due to the FDIC.

Insider Transactions. Our bank is subject to certain restrictions imposed by the Federal Reserve Act on “covered transactions” with us or our subsidiaries, which include investments in our stock or other securities issued by us or our subsidiaries, the acceptance of our stock or other securities issued by us or our subsidiaries as collateral for loans, and extensions of credit to us or our subsidiaries.  Certain limitations and reporting requirements are also placed on extensions of credit by our bank to the directors and officers of the holding company, the bank, and the subsidiaries of the bank; to the principal shareholders of the holding company; and to “related interests” of such directors, officers, and principal shareholders.  In addition, federal law and regulations may affect the terms upon which any person becoming one of our directors or officers or a principal shareholder may obtain credit from banks with which our bank maintains a correspondent relationship.

Safety and Soundness Standards. Pursuant to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act of 1991 (“FDICIA”), the FDIC adopted guidelines to establish operational and managerial standards to promote the safety and soundness of federally-insured depository institutions. The guidelines establish standards for internal controls, information systems, internal audit systems, loan documentation, credit underwriting, interest rate exposure, asset growth, compensation, fees and benefits, asset quality, and earnings.

Investment and Other Activities.  Under federal law and regulations, FDIC-insured state banks are prohibited, subject to certain exceptions, from making or retaining equity investments of a type, or in an amount, that are not permissible for a national bank.  FDICIA, as implemented by FDIC regulations, also prohibits FDIC-insured state banks and their subsidiaries, subject to certain exceptions, from engaging as a principal in any activity that is not permitted for a national bank or its subsidiary, respectively, unless the bank meets, and continues to meet, its minimum regulatory capital requirements and the bank’s primary federal regulator determines the activity would not pose a significant risk to the DIF.  Impermissible investments and activities must be otherwise divested or discontinued within certain time frames set by the bank’s primary federal regulator in accordance with federal law.  These restrictions are not currently expected to have a material impact on the operations of our bank.

Consumer Banking.  Our bank’s business includes making a variety of types of loans to individuals.  In making these loans, our bank is subject to state usury and other consumer protection laws and to various federal statutes, including provisions of the Gramm Leach-Bliley Act aimed at protecting the privacy of consumer financial information, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, the Truth in Lending Act (TILA), the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA), the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act, and the regulations promulgated under these statutes, which (among other things) prohibit discrimination, specify disclosures to be made to borrowers regarding credit and settlement costs, and regulate the mortgage loan servicing activities of our bank, including the maintenance and operation of escrow accounts and the transfer of mortgage loan servicing.  In receiving deposits, our bank is subject to extensive regulation under state and federal law and regulations, including the Truth in Savings Act, the Expedited Funds Availability Act, the Electronic Funds Transfer Act, and the Federal Deposit Insurance Act.  Violation of these laws could result in the imposition of significant damages and fines upon our bank and its directors and officers.

Anti-Money Laundering and the USA PATRIOT Act.  The bank is subject to a number of  financial recordkeeping and anti-money laundering laws and regulations including the Bank Secrecy Act and the USA PATRIOT Act, as well as similar rules and guidelines implemented and enforced by the Department of the Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (“FinCEN”) and the Federal Financial Institutions Council (“FFIEC”).  These laws and regulations require the bank to take certain steps to prevent the use of the bank or its systems from facilitating the flow of illegal or illicit money or terrorist funds.  As of May 11, 2018, the bank is required to comply with FinCEN’s new Customer Due Diligence Requirements for Financial Institutions, which is designed to identify and verify the identity of natural persons (known as beneficial owners) of legal entity customers who own, control and profit from companies when those companies open accounts.

9

ITEM 1.
BUSINESS (continued)

A number of new consumer protection laws were implemented following the 2008 recession, including:


·
The Homeowner Affordability and Stability Plan (HASP) was implemented in 2009 to support a recovery in the housing market and ensure that borrowers can continue to pay off their mortgages through initiatives such as access to low-cost refinancing for responsible homeowners suffering from falling home prices; a $75 billion homeowner stability plan to prevent foreclosure, and support of low mortgage rates by strengthening confidence in Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

·
The Dodd-Frank Act, adopted in 2010, included the creation of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), which was given the power to issue and enforce certain consumer protection laws. The CFPB has issued several new consumer protection regulations, including regulations that impact residential mortgage lending and servicing.

·
The Dodd-Frank Act also implemented new restrictions on how mortgage brokers and loan originators may be compensated.

We have experienced, and expect to continue to experience, increased costs and expenses related to compliance with these and other new consumer protection regulations.

2018 Regulatory Reform.  In May 2018 the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief and Consumer Protection Act (the “2018 Act”), was enacted to modify or remove certain financial reform rules and regulations, including some of those implemented under the Dodd-Frank Act.  While the 2018 Act maintains most of the regulatory structure established by the Dodd-Frank Act, it amends certain aspects of the regulatory framework for small depository institutions with assets of less than $10 billion and for large banks with assets of more than $50 billion.

Among other changes, the 2018 Act expands the definition of qualified mortgages that may be held by a financial institution and simplifies the regulatory capital rules for financial institutions and their holding companies with total consolidated assets of less than $10 billion by instructing the federal banking regulators to establish a single “Community Bank Leverage Ratio” of between 8% and 10% to replace the leverage and risk-based regulatory capital ratios.  The 2018 Act also includes regulatory relief for community banks regarding regulatory examination cycles, call reports, the Volcker Rule (proprietary trading prohibitions), mortgage disclosures, and risk weights for certain high-risk commercial real estate loans.  It is difficult to predict at this time when or how any new standards under the 2018 Act will ultimately be applied to us or what specific impact the 2018 Act and the yet-to-be-written implementing rules and regulations will have on community banks.

Branching Authority.  Michigan banks, such as our bank, have the authority under Michigan law to establish branches anywhere in the State of Michigan, subject to receipt of all required regulatory approvals.  Banks may establish interstate branch networks through acquisitions of other banks.  The establishment of de novo interstate branches or the acquisition of individual branches of a bank in another state (rather than the acquisition of an out-of-state bank in its entirety) is allowed only if specifically authorized by state law.

Michigan permits both U.S. and non-U.S. banks to establish branch offices in Michigan.  The Michigan Banking Code permits, in appropriate circumstances and with the approval of the Michigan DIFS (1) the acquisition of Michigan banks by FDIC-insured banks or savings banks located in other states, (2) the sale by a Michigan bank of branches to an FDIC-insured bank or savings bank located in a state in which a Michigan bank could purchase branches of the purchasing entity, (3) the consolidation of Michigan banks and FDIC-insured banks or savings banks located in other states having laws permitting such consolidation, (4) the establishment of branches in Michigan by FDIC-insured banks located in other states, the District of Columbia or U.S. territories or protectorates having laws permitting a Michigan bank to establish a branch in such jurisdiction, and (5) the establishment by foreign banks of branches located in Michigan.

10

ITEM 1.
BUSINESS (continued)

Future Legislation

Various other legislative and regulatory initiatives, including proposals to overhaul the bank regulatory system, are from time to time introduced in Congress and state legislatures, as well as regulatory agencies.  Such future legislation regarding financial institutions may change banking statutes and our operating environment in substantial and unpredictable ways and could increase or decrease the cost of doing business, limit or expand permissible activities, or affect the competitive balance among organizations within the industry. The nature and extent of future legislative and regulatory changes affecting financial institutions is very unpredictable. We cannot determine the ultimate effect that any such potential legislation, if enacted, would have upon our financial condition or results of operations.

Available Information

Our annual reports on Forms 10-K, quarterly reports on Forms 10-Q, current reports on Forms 8-K, and all amendments to those reports are available free of charge through our website at www.IndependentBank.com as soon as reasonably practicable after filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

11

ITEM 1.
BUSINESS -- STATISTICAL DISCLOSURE

I. (A)
DISTRIBUTION OF ASSETS, LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY;
 
(B)
INTEREST RATES AND INTEREST DIFFERENTIAL
 
(C)
INTEREST RATES AND DIFFERENTIAL

The information set forth in the tables captioned “Average Balances and Rates” and “Change in Net Interest Income” of our annual report, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (filed as exhibit 13 to this report on Form 10-K), is incorporated herein by reference.

II.
INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO

(A)  The following table sets forth the fair value of securities at December 31:

   
2018
   
2017
   
2016
 
   
(in thousands)
 
                   
Equity securities at fair value
 
$
393
   
$
-
   
$
-
 
Trading securities
 
$
-
   
$
455
   
$
410
 
                         
Available for sale
                       
Obligations of states and political subdivisions
 
$
127,555
   
$
172,945
   
$
170,899
 
U.S. agency residential mortgage-backed
   
123,751
     
137,918
     
156,289
 
Other asset backed
   
83,319
     
93,898
     
146,709
 
Corporate
   
34,309
     
47,853
     
56,180
 
Private label mortgage-backed
   
29,419
     
29,109
     
34,727
 
U.S. agency
   
20,014
     
25,682
     
28,988
 
U.S. agency commercial mortgage-backed
   
5,726
     
9,760
     
12,632
 
Trust preferred
   
1,819
     
2,802
     
2,579
 
Foreign government
   
2,014
     
2,060
     
1,613
 
U.S. Treasury
   
-
     
898
     
-
 
Total
 
$
427,926
   
$
522,925
   
$
610,616
 

12

ITEM 1.
BUSINESS -- STATISTICAL DISCLOSURE  (Continued)

(B)   The following table sets forth contractual maturities of securities at December 31, 2018 and the weighted average yield of such securities:

   
Maturing
Within
One Year
   
Maturing
After One
But Within
Five Years
   
Maturing
After Five
But Within
Ten Years
   
Maturing
After
Ten Years
 
   
Amount
   
Yield
   
Amount
   
Yield
   
Amount
   
Yield
   
Amount
   
Yield
 
   
(dollars in thousands)
 
Available for sale
                                               

                                               
Obligations of states and political subdivisions
 
$
7,904
     
2.32
%
 
$
43,485
     
2.56
%
 
$
35,767
     
3.41
%
 
$
40,399
     
3.43
%
U.S. agency residential mortgage-backed
   
1,370
     
1.97
     
36,426
     
1.45
     
29,803
     
1.40
     
56,152
     
2.95
 
Other asset backed
   
40,008
     
2.76
     
25,562
     
1.80
     
15,515
     
0.30
     
2,234
     
2.46
 
Corporate
   
2,205
     
1.62
     
19,441
     
2.93
     
12,663
     
4.35
     
-
         
Private label mortage -backed
   
404
     
2.12
     
20,356
     
2.61
     
7,867
     
3.21
     
792
     
5.66
 
U.S. agency
   
41
     
0.63
     
12,102
     
1.59
     
7,871
     
2.44
     
-
         
U.S. agency commercial mortgage-backed
   
349
     
2.17
     
4,012
     
2.36
     
-
             
1,365
     
2.92
 
Trust preferred
   
-
             
-
             
-
             
1,819
     
3.22
 
Foreign government
   
-
             
2,014
     
4.82
     
-
             
-
         
Total
 
$
52,281
     
2.61
%
 
$
163,398
     
2.19
%
 
$
109,486
     
2.45
%
 
$
102,761
     
3.15
%
                                                                 
Tax equivalent adjustment for calculation of yield
 
$
23
           
$
163
           
$
105
           
$
117
         

The rates set forth in the tables above for those obligations of state and political subdivisions that are tax exempt have been restated on a tax equivalent basis assuming a marginal tax rate of 21%.  The amount of the adjustment is as follows.

Available for sale
 
Tax-Exempt
Rate
   
Adjustment
   
Rate on Tax
Equivalent
Basis
 
Under 1 year
   
1.82
%
   
0.48
%
   
2.30
%
1-5 years
   
2.14
     
0.57
     
2.71
 
5-10 years
   
2.77
     
0.74
     
3.51
 
After 10 years
   
3.65
     
0.97
     
4.62
 

13

ITEM 1.
BUSINESS -- STATISTICAL DISCLOSURE  (Continued)

III.
LOAN PORTFOLIO

  (A)
The following table sets forth total loans outstanding at December 31:

   
2018
   
2017
   
2016
   
2015
   
2014
 
   
(in thousands)
 
Loans held for sale(a)
 
$
86,224
   
$
39,436
   
$
67,380
   
$
27,866
   
$
23,662
 
Mortgage
   
1,042,890
     
849,530
     
538,615
     
498,036
     
471,435
 
Commercial
   
1,144,481
     
853,260
     
804,017
     
748,398
     
690,955
 
Installment
   
395,149
     
316,027
     
265,616
     
234,017
     
207,571
 
Payment plan receivables
   
-
     
-
     
-
     
34,599
     
40,001
 
Total Loans
 
$
2,668,744
   
$
2,058,253
   
$
1,675,628
   
$
1,542,916
   
$
1,433,624
 

(a)
2016 includes $30.6 million of payment plan receivables and $0.8 million commercial loans related to the then pending sale of Mepco and $35.9 million of 1-4 family residential mortgages.

The loan portfolio is periodically and systematically reviewed, and the results of these reviews are reported to the Board of Directors of our bank.  The purpose of these reviews is to assist in assuring proper loan documentation, to facilitate compliance with applicable laws and regulations, to provide for the early identification of potential problem loans (which enhances collection prospects) and to evaluate the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses.

(B)  The following table sets forth scheduled loan repayments (excluding 1-4 family residential mortgages and installment loans) at December 31, 2018:

   
Due
Within
One Year
   
Due
After One
But Within
Five Years
   
Due
After
Five Years
   
Total
 
   
(in thousands)
 
Mortgage
 
$
351
   
$
205
   
$
129,715
   
$
130,271
 
Commercial
   
117,780
     
344,640
     
682,061
     
1,144,481
 
Total
 
$
118,131
   
$
344,845
   
$
811,776
   
$
1,274,752
 

The following table sets forth loans due after one year which have predetermined (fixed) interest rates and/or adjustable (variable) interest rates at December 31, 2018:

   
Fixed
Rate
   
Variable
Rate
   
Total
 
   
(in thousands)
 
Due after one but within five years
 
$
180,503
   
$
164,342
   
$
344,845
 
Due after five years
   
458,634
     
353,142
     
811,776
 
Total
 
$
639,137
   
$
517,484
   
$
1,156,621
 

14

ITEM 1.
BUSINESS -- STATISTICAL DISCLOSURE  (Continued)

(C)  The following table sets forth loans on non-accrual, loans ninety days or more past due and troubled debt restructured loans at December 31:

   
2018
   
2017
   
2016
   
2015
   
2014
 
   
(in thousands)
 
(a)  Loans accounted for on a non-accrual basis (1, 2)
 
$
9,029
   
$
8,184
   
$
13,364
   
$
10,607
   
$
15,231
 
                                         
(b)  Aggregate amount of loans ninety days or more past due (excludes loans in (a) above)
   
5
     
-
     
-
     
116
     
7
 
                                         
(c)  Loans not included above which are “troubled debt restructurings” as defined by accounting guidance
   
53,087
     
60,115
     
70,286
     
81,512
     
102,971
 
                                         
Total
 
$
62,121
   
$
68,299
   
$
83,650
   
$
92,235
   
$
118,209
 

(1)
The accrual of interest income is discontinued when a loan becomes 90 days past due and the borrower’s capacity to repay the loan and collateral values appear insufficient.  Non-accrual loans may be restored to accrual status when interest and principal payments are current and the loan appears otherwise collectible.

(2)
Interest in the amount of $3.37 million would have been earned in 2018 had loans in categories (a) and (c) remained at their original terms; however, only $2.82 million was included in interest income for the year with respect to these loans.

Potential problem loans identified by the loan review department which are not included as non-performing in the table above were zero at December 31, 2018.

At December 31, 2018, there was no concentration of loans exceeding 10% of total loans which is not already disclosed as a category of loans in this section “Loan Portfolio” (Item III(A)).

There were no other interest-bearing assets at December 31, 2018, that would be required to be disclosed above (Item III(C)), if such assets were loans.

There were no foreign loans at December 31, 2018, 2017, 2016, 2015 and 2014.

15

ITEM 1.
BUSINESS -- STATISTICAL DISCLOSURE  (Continued)

IV.
SUMMARY OF LOAN LOSS EXPERIENCE

  (A)
The following table sets forth loan balances and summarizes the changes in the allowance for loan losses for each of the years ended December 31:

   
2018
     2017     2016  
               
(dollars in thousands)
             
Total loans outstanding at the end of the year (net of unearned fees)
 
$
2,668,744
           
$
2,058,253
           
$
1,675,628
         
                                                 
Average total loans outstanding for the year (net of unearned fees)
 
$
2,424,539
           
$
1,848,860
           
$
1,599,899
         
                                     
   
Loan
Losses
   
Unfunded
Commit-
ments
   
Loan
Losses
   
Unfunded
Commit-
ments
   
Loan
Losses
   
Unfunded
Commit-
ments
 
Balance at beginning of year
 
$
22,587
   
$
1,125
   
$
20,234
   
$
650
   
$
22,570
   
$
652
 
Loans charged-off
                                               
Mortgage
   
1,946
             
1,122
             
2,599
         
Commercial
   
448
             
455
             
1,317
         
Installment
   
1,430
             
1,474
             
1,671
         
Total loans charged-off
   
3,824
             
3,051
             
5,587
         
Recoveries of loans previously
                                               
charged-off
                                               
Mortgage
   
734
             
1,741
             
1,047
         
Commercial
   
2,889
             
1,497
             
2,472
         
Installment
   
999
             
967
             
1,100
         
Total recoveries
   
4,622
             
4,205
             
4,619
         
Net loans charged-off (recovered)
   
(798
)
           
(1,154
)
           
968
         
Reclassification to loans held for sale
   
-
             
-
             
59
         
Additions (deductions) included in operations
   
1,503
     
171
     
1,199
     
475
     
(1,309
)
   
(2
)
Balance at end of year
 
$
24,888
   
$
1,296
   
$
22,587
   
$
1,125
   
$
20,234
   
$
650
 

                                               
Net loans charged-off (recovered) as a percent of average loans outstanding (includes loans held for sale) for the year
   
(0.03
)
 
%
     
(0.06
)
 
%
     
0.06
   
%
 

                                               
Allowance for loan losses as a percent of loans outstanding (includes loans held for sale) at the end of the year
   
0.93
             
1.10
             
1.21
         

16

ITEM 1.
BUSINESS -- STATISTICAL DISCLOSURE  (Continued)

    2015    
2014
 
   
(dollars in thousands)
 
Total loans outstanding at the end of the year (net of unearned fees)
  $
1,542,916
            $
1,433,624
         
                                 
Average total loans outstanding for the year (net of unearned fees)
  $
1,461,480
            $
1,388,772
         
                                 
   
Loan
Losses
   
Unfunded
Commit-
ments
   
Loan
Losses
   
Unfunded
Commit-
ments
 
Balance at beginning of year
 
$
25,990
   
$
539
   
$
32,325
   
$
508
 
Loans charged-off
                               
Mortgage
   
2,567
             
4,119
         
Commercial
   
1,694
             
4,613
         
Installment
   
1,467
             
1,885
         
Payment plan receivables
   
-
             
2
         
Total loans charged-off
   
5,728
             
10,619
         
Recoveries of loans previously
                               
charged-off
                               
Mortgage
   
1,258
             
1,397
         
Commercial
   
2,656
             
4,914
         
Installment
   
1,108
             
1,104
         
Payment plan receivables
   
-
             
5
         
Total recoveries
   
5,022
             
7,420
         
Net loans charged-off
   
706
             
3,199
         
Additions (deductions) included in operations
   
(2,714
)
   
113
     
(3,136
)
   
31
 
Balance at end of year
 
$
22,570
   
$
652
   
$
25,990
   
$
539
 
                                 
Net loans charged-off as a percent of average loans outstanding (includes loans held for sale) for the year
   
0.05
   
%
     
0.23
   
%
 

                         
Allowance for loan losses as a percent of loans outstanding (includes loans held for sale) at the end of the year
   
1.46
             
1.81
         

The allowance for loan losses reflected above is a valuation allowance in its entirety and the only allowance available to absorb probable incurred loan losses.

Further discussion of the provision and allowance for loan losses (a critical accounting policy) as well as non-performing loans, is presented in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations in our annual report, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (filed as exhibit 13 to this report on Form 10-K), and is incorporated herein by reference.

17

ITEM 1.
BUSINESS -- STATISTICAL DISCLOSURE  (Continued)

IV.
SUMMARY OF LOAN LOSS EXPERIENCE  (Continued)

(B)  We have allocated the allowance for loan losses to provide for probable incurred losses within the categories of loans set forth in the table below.   The amount of the allowance for loan losses that is allocated and the ratio of loans within each category to total loans at December 31 follow:

   
2018
   
2017
   
2016
 
   
Allowance
for Loan
Losses
Amount
   
Percent
of Loans to
Total Loans
   
Allowance
for Loan
Losses
Amount
   
Percent
of Loans to
Total Loans
   
Allowance
for Loan
Losses
Amount
   
Percent
of Loans to
Total Loans
 
     
    (dollars in thousands)      
 
Commercial
 
$
7,090
     
42.9
%
 
$
5,595
     
41.5
%
 
$
4,880
     
48.0
%
Mortgage
   
7,978
     
42.3
     
8,733
     
43.2
     
8,681
     
34.3
 
Installment
   
895
     
14.8
     
864
     
15.3
     
1,011
     
15.9
 
Payment plan receivables(a)
   
-
     
-
     
-
     
-
     
-
     
1.8
 
Subjective allocation
   
8,925
     
-
     
7,395
     
-
     
5,662
     
-
 
Total
 
$
24,888
     
100.0
%
 
$
22,587
     
100.0
%
 
$
20,234
     
100.0
%

   
2015
   
2014
 
   
Allowance
for Loan
Losses
Amount
   
Percent
of Loans to
Total Loans
   
Allowance
for Loan
Losses
Amount
   
Percent
of Loans to
Total Loans
 
   
(dollars in thousands)
 
Commercial
 
$
5,670
     
48.5
%
 
$
5,445
     
48.2
%
Mortgage
   
10,391
     
34.1
     
13,444
     
34.5
 
Installment
   
1,181
     
15.2
     
1,814
     
14.5
 
Payment plan receivables
   
56
     
2.2
     
64
     
2.8
 
Subjective allocation
   
5,272
     
-
     
5,223
     
-
 
Total
 
$
22,570
     
100.0
%
 
$
25,990
     
100.0
%

(a)
Allowance for loan losses of $0.06 million related to payment plan receivables was reclassified to loans held for sale at December 31, 2016.

18

ITEM 1.
BUSINESS -- STATISTICAL DISCLOSURE  (Continued)

V.
DEPOSITS

The following table sets forth average deposit balances and the weighted-average rates paid thereon for the years ended December 31:

 
2018
   
2017
   
2016
 
 
Average
Balance
   
Rate
   
Average
Balance
   
Rate
   
Average
Balance
   
Rate
 
 
   
(dollars in thousands)
 
Non-interest bearing
 
$
846,718
         
$
728,208
         
$
688,697
       
Savings and interest-bearing checking
   
1,218,243
     
0.34
%
   
1,052,215
     
0.15
%
   
1,018,685
     
0.11
%
Time
   
632,330
     
1.63
     
502,284
     
1.04
     
447,243
     
0.86
 
Total
 
$
2,697,291
     
0.54
%
 
$
2,282,707
     
0.30
%
 
$
2,154,625
     
0.23
%

The following table summarizes time deposits in amounts of 0.10 million or more by time remaining until maturity at December 31, 2018:

   
(in thousands)
 
Three months or less
 
$
59,468
 
Over three through six months
   
46,860
 
Over six months through one year
   
57,420
 
Over one year
   
72,361
 
Total
 
$
236,109
 

VI.
RETURN ON EQUITY AND ASSETS

The ratio of net income to average shareholders’ equity and to average total assets, and certain other ratios, for the years ended December 31 follow:

   
2018
   
2017
   
2016
   
2015
   
2014
 
Net income as a percent of
                             
Average common equity
   
12.38
%
   
7.82
%
   
9.21
%
   
7.89
%
   
7.43
%
Average total assets
   
1.27
     
0.77
     
0.92
     
0.86
     
0.80
 

                                       
Dividends declared per share as a percent of diluted net income per share
   
35.71
     
44.21
     
32.38
     
30.23
     
23.38
 

                                       
Average shareholders’ equity as a percent of average total assets
   
10.27
     
9.88
     
9.98
     
10.93
     
10.83
 

Additional performance ratios are set forth in Selected Consolidated Financial Data in our annual report, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (filed as exhibit 13 to this report on Form 10-K), and is incorporated herein by reference.  Any significant changes in the current trend of the above ratios are reviewed in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations in our annual report, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (filed as exhibit 13 to this report on Form 10-K), and is incorporated herein by reference.

VII.
SHORT-TERM BORROWINGS

Short-term borrowings are discussed in note 9 to the consolidated financial statements incorporated herein by reference to Part II, Item 8 of this report.

19

ITEM 1A.
RISK FACTORS

Investing in our common stock involves risks, including (among others) the following factors:

Downturns in general political, economic or industry conditions, either domestically or internationally, would have an adverse effect on our financial condition and performance.

Local, domestic, and international economic, political and industry-specific conditions affect the financial services industry, directly and indirectly. Conditions such as or related to inflation, recession, unemployment, volatile interest rates, international conflicts and other factors outside of our control, such as real estate values, energy costs, fuel prices, state and local municipal budget deficits, and government spending and the U.S. national debt, may, directly and indirectly, adversely affect us. Economic downturns could result in the delinquency of outstanding loans, which could have a material adverse impact on our earnings.

Governmental monetary and fiscal policies may adversely affect the financial services industry and therefore impact our financial condition and results of operations.

Monetary and fiscal policies of various governmental and regulatory agencies, particularly the Federal Reserve, affect the financial services industry, directly and indirectly. The Federal Reserve regulates the supply of money and credit in the U.S., and its monetary and fiscal policies determine in a large part our cost of funds for lending and investing and the return that can be earned on such loans and investments. Changes in such policies, including changes in interest rates, will influence the origination of loans, the value of investments, the generation of deposits and the rates received on loans and investment securities and paid on deposits. Changes in monetary and fiscal policies are beyond our control and difficult to predict. Our financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely impacted by changes in governmental monetary and fiscal policies.

Volatility and disruptions in global capital and credit markets may adversely impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Even though we operate in a distinct geographic region in the U.S., we are impacted by global capital and credit markets, which are sometimes subject to periods of extreme volatility and disruption. Disruptions, uncertainty or volatility in the capital and credit markets may limit our ability to access capital and manage liquidity, which may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Further, our customers may be adversely impacted by such conditions, which could have a negative impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The soundness of other financial institutions could adversely affect us.

Our ability to engage in routine funding transactions could be adversely affected by the actions and commercial soundness of other financial institutions. Financial services institutions are interrelated as a result of trading, clearing, counterparty and other relationships. We have exposure to many different industries and counterparties, and we routinely execute transactions with counterparties in the financial industry.  As a result, defaults by, or even rumors or questions about, one or more financial services institutions, or the financial services industry generally, can lead to market-wide liquidity problems and losses or defaults by us or by other institutions. Many of these transactions could expose us to credit risk in the event of default by a counterparty. In addition, our credit risk may be impacted when the collateral held by us cannot be realized upon or is liquidated at prices not sufficient to recover the full amount of the financial instrument exposure due to us. There is no assurance that any such losses would not adversely affect us and possibly be material in nature.

Changes in regulation or oversight may have a material adverse impact on our operations.

We are subject to extensive regulation, supervision and examination by the Federal Reserve, the FDIC, the Michigan DIFS, the SEC and other regulatory bodies. Such regulation and supervision governs the activities in which we may engage. Regulatory authorities have extensive discretion in their supervisory and enforcement activities, including the imposition of restrictions on our operations, investigations and limitations related to our securities, the classification of our assets and determination of the level of our allowance for loan losses. Any change in such

20

ITEM 1A.
RISK FACTORS (continued)

regulation and oversight, whether in the form of regulatory policy, regulations, legislation or supervisory action, may have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

Additional regulatory focus on the financial services industry is common in connection with an economic downturn, as the industry experienced following the most recent financial crisis. As a result, the adverse effects on our business relating to a future economic downturn could be exacerbated by additional regulations and regulatory scrutiny that accompanied or followed any such downturn. We can neither predict when or whether future regulatory or legislative reforms will be enacted nor what their contents will be. The impact of any future legislation or regulatory actions on our businesses or operations cannot be determined at this time, and such impact may adversely affect us.

We have credit risk inherent in our loan portfolios, and our allowance for loan losses may not be sufficient to cover actual loan losses.

Our loan customers may not repay their loans according to their respective terms, and the collateral securing the payment of these loans may be insufficient to cover any losses we may incur. We make various assumptions and judgments about the collectability of our loan portfolio, including the creditworthiness of our borrowers and the value of the real estate and other assets serving as collateral for the repayment of many of our loans. Non-performing loans amounted to $9.0 million and $8.2 million at December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively. Our allowance for loan losses coverage ratio of non-performing loans was 275.5% and 276.0% at December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively. In determining the size of the allowance for loan losses, we rely on our experience and our evaluation of current economic conditions. If our assumptions or judgments prove to be incorrect, our current allowance for loan losses may not be sufficient to cover certain loan losses inherent in our loan portfolio, and adjustments may be necessary to account for different economic conditions or adverse developments in our loan portfolio. Material additions to our allowance for loan losses would adversely impact our operating results.

In addition, federal and state regulators periodically review our allowance for loan losses and may require us to increase our provision for loan losses or recognize additional loan charge-offs, notwithstanding any internal analysis that has been performed. Any increase in our allowance for loan losses or loan charge-offs required by these regulatory agencies could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

We have credit risk in our securities portfolio.

We maintain diversified securities portfolios, which include obligations of the Treasury and government-sponsored agencies as well as securities issued by states and political subdivisions, mortgage-backed securities, corporate securities and asset-backed securities.  We seek to limit credit losses in our securities portfolios by principally purchasing highly rated securities (generally rated “AA” or higher by a major debt rating agency) and by conducting due diligence on the issuer. However, gross unrealized losses on securities available for sale in our portfolio totaled approximately $6.8 million as of December 31, 2018 (compared to approximately $3.8 million as of December 31, 2017). We believe these unrealized losses are temporary in nature and are expected to be recovered within a reasonable time period as we believe we have the ability to hold the securities to maturity or until such time as the unrealized losses reverse. However, we evaluate securities available for sale for other than temporary impairment (OTTI) at least quarterly and more frequently when economic or market concerns warrant such evaluation. Those evaluations may result in OTTI charges to our earnings. In addition to these impairment charges, we may, in the future, experience additional losses in our securities portfolio which may result in charges that could materially adversely affect our results of operations.

21

ITEM 1A.
RISK FACTORS (continued)

We have agreed to indemnify the purchaser of Mepco’s business against certain losses it may incur as a result of its purchase of the business.

In connection with our sale of substantially all of the assets of our Mepco subsidiary in May of 2017, we agreed to contractually indemnify the purchaser from certain losses it may incur, including as a result of its failure to collect certain receivables it purchased as part of the business as well as breaches of representations and warranties we made in the sale agreement, subject to various limitations. We have not accrued any liability related to this sale in our financial statements because we believe the likelihood of having to pay any amount as a result of these indemnification obligations is remote. However, if the purchaser is unable to collect the receivables it purchased from Mepco or otherwise encounters difficulties in operating the business, it is possible it could make one or more claims against us pursuant to the sale agreement. In that event, we may incur expenses in defending any such claims and/or amounts paid to such purchaser to resolve such claims. As of December 31, 2018, the balance of these receivables had declined to $0.8 million, and to date the purchaser has made no claims for indemnification.

Our mortgage-banking revenues are susceptible to substantial variations, due in part to factors we do not control, such as market interest rates.

A portion of our revenues are derived from net gains on mortgage loans. These net gains primarily depend on the volume of loans we sell, which in turn depends on our ability to originate real estate mortgage loans and the demand for fixed-rate obligations and other loans that are outside of our established interest-rate risk parameters. Net gains on mortgage loans are also dependent upon economic and competitive factors as well as our ability to effectively manage exposure to changes in interest rates. Consequently, they can often be a volatile part of our overall revenues.  We realized net gains of $10.6 million on mortgage loans during 2018 compared to $11.8 million during 2017 and $10.6 million during 2016.

We are subject to liquidity risk in our operations, which could adversely impact our ability to fund various obligations.

Liquidity risk is the possibility of being unable to meet obligations as they come due or capitalize on growth opportunities as they arise because of an inability to liquidate assets or obtain adequate funding on a timely basis, at a reasonable cost and within acceptable risk tolerances. Liquidity is required to fund various obligations, including credit obligations to borrowers, loan originations, withdrawals by depositors, repayment of debt, dividends to shareholders, operating expenses and capital expenditures. Liquidity is derived primarily from retail deposit growth and earnings retention, principal and interest payments on loans and investment securities, net cash provided from operations and access to other funding. If we are unable to maintain adequate liquidity, then our business, financial condition and results of operations could be negatively impacted.

Our parent company must rely on dividends or returns of capital from our bank for most of its cash flow.

Our parent company is a separate and distinct legal entity from our bank.  Generally, our parent company receives substantially all of its cash flow from dividends or returns of capital from our subsidiary bank. These dividends or returns of capital are the principal source of funds to pay our parent company’s operating expenses and for cash dividends on our common stock. Various federal and/or state laws and regulations limit the amount of dividends that the bank may pay to the parent company.

22

ITEM 1A.
RISK FACTORS (continued)

Any future strategic acquisitions or divestitures may present certain risks to our business and operations.

Difficulties in capitalizing on the opportunities presented by a future acquisition may prevent us from fully achieving the expected benefits from the acquisition, or may cause the achievement of such expectations to take longer to realize than expected.  Further, the assimilation of the acquired entity’s customers and markets could result in higher than expected deposit attrition, loss of key employees, disruption of our businesses or the businesses of the acquired entity or otherwise adversely affect our ability to maintain relationships with customers and employees or achieve the anticipated benefits of the acquisition. These matters could have an adverse effect on us for an undetermined period. We will be subject to similar risks and difficulties in connection with any future decisions to downsize, sell or close units or otherwise change our business mix.

Compliance with new capital requirements may adversely affect us.

The capital requirements applicable to us as a bank holding company as well as to our subsidiary bank have been substantially revised in connection with Basel III and the requirements of the Financial Reform Act. These more stringent capital requirements, and any other new regulations, could adversely affect our ability to pay dividends in the future, or could require us to reduce business levels or to raise capital, including in ways that may adversely affect our results of operations or financial condition and/or existing shareholders. The ultimate impact of the new capital requirements cannot be determined at this time and will depend on a number of factors, including treatment and implementation by the U.S. bank regulators. However, maintaining higher levels of capital may reduce our profitability and otherwise adversely affect our business, financial condition, or results of operations.

Declines in the businesses or industries of our customers could cause increased credit losses, which could adversely affect us.

Our business customer base consists, in part, of customers in volatile businesses and industries such as the automotive production industry and the real estate business. These industries are sensitive to global economic conditions and supply chain factors. Any decline in one of those customers’ businesses or industries could cause increased credit losses, which in turn could adversely affect us.

The introduction, implementation, withdrawal, success and timing of business initiatives and strategies may be less successful or may be different than anticipated, which could adversely affect our business.

We make certain projections and develop plans and strategies for our banking and financial products. If we do not accurately determine demand for or changes in our banking and financial product needs, it could result in us incurring significant expenses without the anticipated increases in revenue, which could result in a material adverse effect on our business.

We may not be able to utilize technology to efficiently and effectively develop, market, and deliver new products and services to our customers.

The financial services industry experiences rapid technological change with regular introductions of new technology-driven products and services. The efficient and effective utilization of technology enables financial institutions to better serve customers and to reduce costs. Our future success depends, in part, upon our ability to address the needs of our customers by using technology to market and deliver products and services that will satisfy customer demands, meet regulatory requirements, and create additional efficiencies in our operations. We may not be able to effectively develop new technology-driven products and services or be successful in marketing or supporting these products and services to our customers, which could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition and results of operations.

23

ITEM 1A.
RISK FACTORS (continued)

Operational difficulties, failure of technology infrastructure or information security incidents could adversely affect our business and operations.

We are exposed to many types of operational risk, including reputational risk, legal and compliance risk, the risk of fraud or theft by employees or outsiders, failure of our controls and procedures and unauthorized transactions by employees or operational errors, including clerical or recordkeeping errors or those resulting from computer or telecommunications systems malfunctions. Given the high volume of transactions we process, certain errors may be repeated or compounded before they are identified and resolved.  In particular, our operations rely on the secure processing, storage and transmission of confidential and other information on our technology systems and networks. Any failure, interruption or breach in security of these systems could result in failures or disruptions in our customer relationship management, general ledger, deposit, loan and other systems.

We also face the risk of operational disruption, failure or capacity constraints due to our dependency on third party vendors for components of our business infrastructure, including our core data processing systems which are largely outsourced. While we have selected these third party vendors carefully, we do not control their operations. As such, any failure on the part of these business partners to perform their various responsibilities could also adversely affect our business and operations.

We may also be subject to disruptions of our operating systems arising from events that are wholly or partially beyond our control, which may include, for example, computer viruses, cyber attacks, spikes in transaction volume and/or customer activity, electrical or telecommunications outages, or natural disasters. Although we have programs in place related to business continuity, disaster recovery and information security to maintain the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of our systems, business applications and customer information, such disruptions may give rise to interruptions in service to customers and loss or liability to us.

The occurrence of any failure or interruption in our operations or information systems, or any security breach, could cause reputational damage, jeopardize the confidentiality of customer information, result in a loss of customer business, subject us to regulatory intervention or expose us to civil litigation and financial loss or liability, any of which could have a material adverse effect on us.

Changes in the financial markets, including fluctuations in interest rates and their impact on deposit pricing, could adversely affect our net interest income and financial condition.

The operations of financial institutions such as us are dependent to a large degree on net interest income, which is the difference between interest income from loans and investments and interest expense on deposits and borrowings. Prevailing economic conditions, the trade, fiscal and monetary policies of the federal government and the policies of various regulatory agencies all affect market rates of interest and the availability and cost of credit, which in turn significantly affect financial institutions’ net interest income. Volatility in interest rates can also result in disintermediation, which is the flow of funds away from financial institutions into direct investments, such as federal government and corporate securities and other investment vehicles, which, because of the absence of federal insurance premiums and reserve requirements, generally pay higher rates of return than financial institutions. Our financial results could be materially adversely impacted by changes in financial market conditions.

Competitive product and pricing pressures among financial institutions within our markets may change.

We operate in a very competitive environment, which is characterized by competition from a number of other financial institutions in each market in which we operate. We compete with large national and regional financial institutions and with smaller financial institutions in terms of products and pricing. If we are unable to compete effectively in products and pricing in our markets, business could decline, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

24

ITEM 1A.
RISK FACTORS (continued)

Changes in customer behavior may adversely impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We use a variety of methods to anticipate customer behavior as a part of our strategic planning and to meet certain regulatory requirements. Individual, economic, political, industry-specific conditions and other factors outside of our control, such as fuel prices, energy costs, real estate values or other factors that affect customer income levels, could alter predicted customer borrowing, repayment, investment and deposit practices. Such a change in these practices could materially adversely affect our ability to anticipate business needs and meet regulatory requirements.

Further, difficult economic conditions may negatively affect consumer confidence levels. A decrease in consumer confidence levels would likely aggravate the adverse effects of these difficult market conditions on us, our customers and others in the financial institutions industry.

Our ability to maintain and expand customer relationships may differ from expectations.

The financial services industry is very competitive. We not only vie for business opportunities with new customers, but also compete to maintain and expand the relationships we have with our existing customers. While we believe that we can continue to grow many of these relationships, we will continue to experience pressures to maintain these relationships as our competitors attempt to capture our customers. Failure to create new customer relationships and to maintain and expand existing customer relationships to the extent anticipated may adversely impact our earnings.

Our ability to retain key officers and employees may change.

Our future operating results depend substantially upon the continued service of our executive officers and key personnel. Our future operating results also depend in significant part upon our ability to attract and retain qualified management, financial, technical, marketing, sales and support personnel. Competition for qualified personnel is intense, and we cannot ensure success in attracting or retaining qualified personnel. There may be only a limited number of persons with the requisite skills to serve in these positions, and it may be increasingly difficult for us to hire personnel over time.

Further, our ability to retain key officers and employees may be impacted by legislation and regulation affecting the financial services industry. Our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially adversely affected by the loss of any key employees, or our inability to attract and retain skilled employees.

Legal and regulatory proceedings and related matters with respect to the financial services industry, including those directly involving us, could adversely affect us or the financial services industry in general.

We have been, and may in the future be, subject to various legal and regulatory proceedings. It is inherently difficult to assess the outcome of these matters, and there can be no assurance that we will prevail in any proceeding or litigation. Any such matter could result in substantial cost and diversion of our efforts, which by itself could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and operating results. Further, adverse determinations in such  matters could result in actions by our regulators that could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations.

Methods of reducing risk exposures might not be effective.

Instruments, systems and strategies used to hedge or otherwise manage exposure to various types of credit, market and liquidity, operational, compliance, business risks and enterprise-wide risk could be less effective than anticipated. As a result, we may not be able to effectively mitigate our risk exposures in particular market environments or against particular types of risk, which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

25

ITEM 1A.
RISK FACTORS (continued)

Terrorist activities or other hostilities may adversely affect the general economy, financial and capital markets, specific industries, and us.

Terrorist attacks or other hostilities may disrupt our operations or those of our customers. In addition, these events have had and may continue to have an adverse impact on the U.S. and world economies in general and consumer confidence and spending in particular, which could harm our operations. Any of these events could increase volatility in the U.S. and world financial markets, which could harm our stock price and may limit the capital resources available to us and our customers. This could have a material adverse impact on our operating results, revenues and costs and may result in increased volatility in the market price of our common stock.

Catastrophic events, including, but not limited to, hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, fires and floods, may adversely affect the general economy, financial and capital markets, specific industries, and us.

We have significant operations and a significant customer base in Michigan where natural and other disasters may occur, such as tornadoes and floods. These types of natural catastrophic events at times have disrupted the local economy, our business, and our customers and have posed physical risks to our property. In addition, catastrophic events occurring in other regions of the world may have an impact on our customers and in turn, on us. A significant catastrophic event could materially adversely affect our operating results.

Changes in accounting standards could materially impact our financial statements.

From time to time, changes are made to the financial accounting and reporting standards that govern the preparation of our financial statements. These changes can be difficult to predict and can materially impact how we record and report our financial condition and results of operations. In some cases, we could be required to apply a new or revised standard retroactively, resulting in changes to previously reported financial results, or a cumulative charge to accumulated deficit.

Our failure to appropriately apply certain critical accounting policies could result in our misstatement of our financial results and condition.

Accounting policies and processes are fundamental to how we record and report our financial condition and results of operations. We must exercise judgment in selecting and applying many of these accounting policies and processes so they comply with U.S. GAAP. In some cases, we must select the accounting policy or method to apply from two or more alternatives, any of which may be reasonable under the circumstances, yet may result in our reporting materially different results than would have been reported under a different alternative.

We have identified certain accounting policies as being critical because they require us to make difficult, subjective or complex judgments about matters that are uncertain. Materially different amounts could be reported under different conditions or using different assumptions or estimates. We have established detailed policies and control procedures that are intended to ensure these critical accounting estimates and judgments are well controlled and applied consistently. In addition, the policies and procedures are intended to ensure that the process for changing methodologies occurs in an appropriate manner. Because of the uncertainty surrounding management’s judgments and the estimates pertaining to these matters, we cannot guarantee that we will not be required to adjust accounting policies or restate prior period financial statements. See note #1, “Accounting Policies” in the Notes to Consolidated  Financial Statements in our annual report, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (filed as exhibit 13 to this report on Form 10-K).

26

ITEM 1A.
RISK FACTORS (continued)

The trading price of our common stock may be subject to significant fluctuations and volatility.

The market price of our common stock could be subject to significant fluctuations due to, among other things:


·
variations in quarterly or annual results of operations;


·
changes in dividends per share;


·
deterioration in asset quality, including declining real estate values;


·
changes in interest rates;


·
significant acquisitions or business combinations, strategic partnerships, joint ventures, or capital commitments by or involving us or our competitors;


·
regulatory actions, including changes to regulatory capital levels, the components of regulatory capital and how regulatory capital is calculated;


·
new regulations that limit or significantly change our ability to continue to offer products or services;


·
volatility of stock market prices and volumes;


·
issuance of additional shares of common stock or other debt or equity securities;


·
changes in market valuations of similar companies;


·
changes in securities analysts’ estimates of financial performance or recommendations;


·
perceptions in the marketplace regarding the financial services industry, us and/or our competitors; and/or


·
the occurrence of any one or more of the risk factors described above.

ITEM 1B.
UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

ITEM 2.
PROPERTIES

We and our bank operate a total of 86 facilities in Michigan and two leased facilities in Ohio.  We own 60 and lease 26 of the facilities in Michigan.

With the exception of the potential remodeling of certain facilities to provide for the efficient use of work space or to maintain an appropriate appearance, each property is considered reasonably adequate for current and anticipated needs.

27

ITEM 3.
LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

In the fourth quarter of 2016, we reached a tentative settlement regarding litigation initiated against the Bank in Wayne County, Michigan Circuit Court. The Court issued a preliminary approval of this settlement in the first quarter of 2017 and a final approval of this settlement in January 2018. This litigation concerned the Bank’s checking account transaction sequencing during a period from February 2009 to June 2011. Under the terms of the settlement, we agreed to pay $2.2 million and to be also responsible for class notification costs and certain other expenses which were approximately $0.1 million. The $2.2 million was paid in January 2018. We recorded a $2.3 million expense in the fourth quarter of 2016 for this settlement. Although, we deny any liability associated with this matter and believe we have meritorious defenses to the allegations in the complaint, given the costs and uncertainty of litigation, we determined that this settlement was in the best interests of the organization.

We are also involved in various other litigation matters in the ordinary course of business. At the present time, we do not believe any of these matters will have a significant impact on our consolidated financial position or results of operations. The aggregate amount we have accrued for losses we consider probable as a result of these other litigation matters is immaterial. However, because of the inherent uncertainty of outcomes from any litigation matter, we believe it is reasonably possible we may incur losses in addition to the amounts we have accrued. At this time, we estimate the maximum amount of additional losses that are reasonably possible is insignificant. However, because of a number of factors, including the fact that certain of these litigation matters are still in their early stages, this maximum amount may change in the future.

The litigation matters described in the preceding paragraph primarily include claims that have been brought against us for damages, but do not include litigation matters where we seek to collect amounts owed to us by third parties (such as litigation initiated to collect delinquent loans). These excluded, collection-related matters may involve claims or counterclaims by the opposing party or parties, but we have excluded such matters from the disclosure contained in the preceding paragraph in all cases where we believe the possibility of us paying damages to any opposing party is remote. Risks associated with the likelihood that we will not collect the full amount owed to us, net of reserves, are disclosed elsewhere in this report.

ITEM 4.
MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.

28

ADDITIONAL ITEM - EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

Our executive officers are appointed annually by our Board of Directors at the meeting of directors preceding the Annual Meeting of Shareholders.  There are no family relationships among these officers and/or our directors nor any arrangement or understanding between any officer and any other person pursuant to which the officer was elected.

The following sets forth certain information with respect to our executive officers at February 22, 2019.

Name (Age)
Position
First elected
as an
executive
officer
     
William B. Kessel  (54)
President, Chief Executive Officer and Director
2004
     
Robert N. Shuster (61)
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
1999
     
Stefanie M. Kimball (59)
Executive Vice President and Chief Risk Officer
2007
     
Dennis J. Mack (57)
Executive Vice President and Chief Lending Officer
2012
     
Larry R. Daniel (55)
Executive Vice President, Operations and Digital Banking (1)
2017
     
Patrick J. Ervin (53)
Executive Vice President, Mortgage Banking (2)
2017
     
James J. Twarozynski (53)
Senior Vice President, Controller
2002

(1)
Mr. Daniel joined Independent Bank over 19 years ago as a commercial lender. Prior to being named Executive Vice President – Operations and Digital Banking in November 2017, he served as Senior Vice President of Retail and Mortgage Lending at Independent Bank, a position he held since 2012.
(2)
Mr. Ervin joined Independent Bank in August 2016, as Senior Vice President – Mortgage Banking. He was promoted to Executive Vice President – Mortgage Banking in November 2017. Prior to joining Independent Bank, Mr. Ervin served as Executive Managing Director Mortgage Banking and Servicing at Talmer Bank and Trust, a position he held since 2009.

29

PART II.

ITEM 5.
MARKET FOR OUR COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

The information set forth under the caption “Quarterly Summary” in our annual report, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (filed as exhibit 13 to this report on Form 10-K), is incorporated herein by reference.

We maintain a Deferred Compensation and Stock Purchase Plan for Non-Employee Directors (the “Plan”) pursuant to which non-employee directors can elect to receive shares of our common stock in lieu of fees otherwise payable to the director for his or her service as a director.  A director can elect to receive shares on a current basis or to defer receipt of the shares, in which case the shares are issued to a trust to be held for the account of the director and then generally distributed to the director after his or her retirement from the Board.  Pursuant to this Plan, during the fourth quarter of 2018, we issued 633 shares of common stock to non-employee directors on a current basis and 1,569 shares of common stock to the trust for distribution to directors on a deferred basis.  The shares were issued on October 1, 2018, at a price of $23.65 per share, representing aggregate fees of $0.05 million.   The price per share was the consolidated closing bid price per share of our common stock as of the date of issuance, as determined in accordance with NASDAQ Marketplace Rules.  We issued the shares pursuant to an exemption from registration under Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933 due to the fact that the issuance of the shares was made on a private basis pursuant to the Plan.

ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

The following table shows certain information relating to purchases of common stock for the three-months ended December 31, 2018:

Period
 
Total Number of
Shares Purchased(1)
   
Average Price
Paid Per Share
   
Total Number of
Shares Purchased
as Part of a
Publicly
Announced Plan
   
Remaining
Number of
Shares Authorized
for Purchase
Under the Plan
 
October 2018
   
45,179
   
$
21.99
     
42,800
     
1,023,893
 
November 2018
   
158,407
     
22.52
     
140,368
     
883,525
 
December 2018
   
404,801
     
21.20
     
404,801
     
-
 
Total
   
608,387
   
$
21.61
     
587,969
     
-
 

(1)
Represents (i) 20,418 shares withheld from the shares that would otherwise have been issued to certain officers in order to satisfy tax withholding obligations and the stock option exercise price resulting from the exercise of stock options and (ii) 587,969 shares purchased in the open market pursuant to a publicly announced plan.

The share repurchase plan we had in place for 2018 expired on December 31, 2018. On December 18, 2018, we announced the adoption by our Board of Directors of a 2019 share repurchase plan that authorizes the repurchase during 2019 of up to 5% of our outstanding common stock.

ITEM 6.
SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The information set forth under the caption “Selected Consolidated Financial Data” in our annual report, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (filed as exhibit 13 to this report on Form 10-K), is incorporated herein by reference.

ITEM 7.
MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The information set forth under the caption “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in our annual report, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (filed as exhibit 13 to this report on Form 10-K), is incorporated herein by reference.

30

ITEM 7A.
QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

The information set forth in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” under the caption “Asset/liability management” in our annual report, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (filed as exhibit 13 to this report on Form 10-K), is incorporated herein by reference.

ITEM 8.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

The following consolidated financial statements and the independent auditor’s report are set forth in our annual report, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (filed as exhibit 13 to this report on Form 10-K), and are incorporated herein by reference.

Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition at December 31, 2018 and 2017

Consolidated Statements of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income for the years ended December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016

Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity for the years ended December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

ITEM 8.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA (continued)

The supplementary data required by this item set forth under the caption “Quarterly Financial Data (Unaudited)” in our annual report, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (filed as exhibit 13 to this report on Form 10-K), is incorporated herein by reference.

The portions of our annual report, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (filed as exhibit 13 to this report on Form 10-K), which are not specifically incorporated by reference as part of this Form 10-K are not deemed to be a part of this report.

ITEM 9.
CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

None

31

ITEM 9A.
CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

1.
Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures.  With the participation of management, our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, after evaluating the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a – 15e and 15d – 15e) as of the year ended December 31, 2018 (the “Evaluation Date”), have concluded that, as of such date, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective.
2.
Internal Control Over Financial Reporting.  “Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting” and our independent registered public accounting firm’s audit of internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2018 included within the “Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm,” each as set forth in our annual report, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (filed as exhibit 13 to this report on Form 10-K) are incorporated herein by reference.

ITEM 9B.
OTHER INFORMATION

None.

32

PART III.

ITEM 10.
DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

DIRECTORS - The information with respect to our directors set forth under the caption “Proposal I Submitted for Your Vote -- Election of Directors” in our definitive proxy statement, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, is incorporated herein by reference.

BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP REPORTING – The information set forth under the caption “Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance” in our definitive proxy statement, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, is incorporated herein by reference.

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS - Reference is made to the additional item under Part I of this report on Form 10-K.

CODE OF ETHICS - We have adopted a “Code of Ethics for Chief Executive Officer and Senior Financial Officers” that applies to our Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, and Controller.  A copy of our Code of Ethics is posted on our website at www.IndependentBank.com, under Investor Relations, and a printed copy is available upon request by writing to our Chief Financial Officer, Independent Bank Corporation, 4200 East Beltline, Grand Rapids, Michigan  49525.

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE – Information relating to our audit committee, set forth under the caption “Board Committees and Functions” in our definitive proxy statement, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, is incorporated herein by reference.

ITEM 11.
EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

The information set forth under the captions “Executive Compensation,” “Director Compensation,” “Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation,” and “Compensation Committee Report” in our definitive proxy statement, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, is incorporated herein by reference.

ITEM 12.
SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

The information set forth under the captions “Voting Securities and Record Date”, “Proposal I Submitted for Your Vote -- Election of Directors” and “Securities Ownership of Management” in our definitive proxy statement, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, is incorporated herein by reference.

We maintain certain equity compensation plans under which our common stock is authorized for issuance to employees and directors, including our Deferred Compensation and Stock Purchase Plan for Non-employee Directors and our Long-Term Incentive Plan.

The following sets forth certain information regarding our equity compensation plans as of December 31, 2018.

Plan Category
 
(a)
Number of securities
to be issued upon
exercise of outstanding
options, warrants
and rights
   
(b)
Weighted-average
exercise price of
outstanding options,
warrants and rights
   
(c)
Number of securities
remaining available for
future issuance under
equity compensation
plans (excluding
securities reflected
in column (a))
 
                   
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders
   
211,421
   
$
6.48
     
491,464
 
Equity compensation plan not approved by security holders
 
None
     
N/A
     
193,686
 

33

ITEM 12.
SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS (continued)

The equity compensation plan not approved by security holders referenced above is our Deferred Compensation and Stock Purchase Plan for Non-employee Directors.  This plan allows our non-employee directors to defer payment of all or a part of their director fees and to receive shares of common stock in lieu of cash for these fees. Under the plan, each non-employee director may elect to participate in a Current Stock Purchase Account, a Deferred Cash Investment Account, or a Deferred Stock Account.  A Current Stock Purchase Account is credited with shares of our common stock having a fair market value equal to the fees otherwise payable. A Deferred Cash Investment Account is credited with an amount equal to the fees deferred and on each quarterly credit date with an appreciation factor that may not exceed the prime rate of interest charged by our bank. A Deferred Stock Account is credited with the amount of fees deferred and converted into stock units based on the fair market value of our common stock at the time of the deferral. Amounts in the Deferred Stock Account are credited with cash dividends and other distributions on our common stock. Fees credited to a Deferred Cash Investment Account or a Deferred Stock Account are deferred for income tax purposes. This plan does not provide for distributions of amounts deferred prior to a participant’s termination as a non-employee director. Participants may generally elect either a lump sum or installment distribution.

ITEM 13.
CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

The information set forth under the captions “Transactions Involving Management” and “Determination of Independence of Board Members” in our definitive proxy statement, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, is incorporated herein by reference.

ITEM 14.
PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

The information set forth under the caption “Disclosure of Fees Paid to our Independent Auditors” in our definitive proxy statement, to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, is incorporated herein by reference.

34

PART IV.

ITEM 15.
EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

(a)
1.
Financial Statements
All of our financial statements are incorporated herein by reference as set forth in the annual report to be delivered to shareholders in connection with the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (filed as exhibit 13 to this report on Form 10-K).


2.
Exhibits (Numbered in accordance with Item 601 of Regulation S-K)
The Exhibit Index is located on the final three pages of this report on Form 10-K.

ITEM 16.
FORM 10-K SUMMARY

Not applicable.

35

SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized, dated March 5, 2019.

INDEPENDENT BANK CORPORATION

s/Robert N. Shuster
 Robert N. Shuster, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial
Officer (Principal Financial Officer)
 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.  Each director whose signature appears below hereby appoints William B. Kessel and Robert N. Shuster and each of them severally, as his or her attorney-in-fact, to sign in his or her name and on his or her behalf, as a director, and to file with the Securities and Exchange Commission any and all amendments to this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

William B. Kessel, President, Chief
Executive Officer, and Director
(Principal Executive Officer)
s/William B. Kessel
March 5, 2019
Robert N. Shuster, Executive Vice
President and Chief Financial Officer
(Principal Financial Officer)
s/Robert N. Shuster
March 5, 2019
James J. Twarozynski, Senior Vice
President and Controller
(Principal Accounting Officer)
 s/James J. Twarozynski
March 7, 2019
     
Michael M. Magee, Jr.    
Chairman and Director
s/Michael M. Magee Jr. March 7, 2019

Terance L. Beia, Director


     
William J. Boer, Director
s/William J. Boer
March 7, 2019
     
Joan A. Budden, Director
s/Joan A. Budden
March 5, 2019
     
Michael J. Cok, Director
s/Michael J. Cok
March 7, 2019
     
Stephen L. Gulis, Jr., Director
s/Stephen L. Gulis, Jr.
March 5, 2019
     
Terry L. Haske, Director
s/Terry L. Haske
March 7, 2019
     
Christina L. Keller, Director
s/Christina L. Keller
March 1, 2019
     
William B. Kessel, Director
s/William B. Kessel
March 5, 2019
     
Matthew J. Missad, Director


     
Charles C. Van Loan, Director
s/Charles C. Van Loan
March 7, 2019

36

EXHIBIT INDEX

Exhibit number and description

EXHIBITS FILED HEREWITH

Annual report, relating to the April 23, 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders.  This annual report will be delivered to our shareholders in compliance with Rule 14(a)-3 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.
List of Subsidiaries.
Consent of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm (Crowe LLP).
Power of Attorney (included on page 36).
Certificate of the Chief Executive Officer of Independent Bank Corporation pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
Certificate of the Chief Financial Officer of Independent Bank Corporation pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
Certificate of the Chief Executive Officer of Independent Bank Corporation pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
Certificate of the Chief Financial Officer of Independent Bank Corporation pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
101.INS Instance Document
101.SCH XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
101.CAL XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
101.DEF XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
101.LAB XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
101.PRE XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

EXHIBITS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Restated Articles of Incorporation (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to our quarterly report on Form 10-Q filed November 3, 2017).
Amended and Restated Bylaws (incorporated here by reference to Exhibit 3.2 to our annual report on Form 10-K filed March 7, 2017).
The form of Indemnity Agreement, as executed with all of the directors of the registrant (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to the Form S-4 we filed on December 29, 2017).
The form of Management Continuity Agreement as executed with executive officers and certain senior managers (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.4 to the Form S-4 we filed on December 29, 2017).
Long-Term Incentive Plan, as amended through January 24, 2017 (incorporated herein by reference to Appendix A to our proxy statement filed on Schedule 14A on March 7, 2017).
Amended and Restated Deferred Compensation and Stock Purchase Plan for Nonemployee Directors, as amended through March 8, 2011 (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to our annual report on Form 10-K filed March 10, 2011).
First Amendment to Amended and Restated Deferred Compensation and Stock Purchase Plan for Nonemployee Directors, effective March 1, 2012 (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to our annual report on Form 10-K filed March 13, 2012).
Form of Restricted Stock Unit Grant Agreement as executed with certain executive officers (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to our quarterly report on Form 10-Q filed May 9, 2011).
Form of TSR Performance Share Award Agreement as executed with certain executive officers (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.12 to our annual report on Form 10-K filed March 7, 2014).
Summary of Independent Bank Corporation Management Incentive Compensation Plan (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.10 to our annual report on Form 10-K filed March 6, 2015).
Agreement and Plan of Merger between Independent Bank Corporation and TCSB Bancorp, Inc. (incorporated here by reference to Exhibit 2.1 to our current report on Form 8-K filed December 5, 2017).
Voting Agreement of directors of TCSB Bancorp, Inc., dated December 4, 2017 (incorporated here by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to our current report on Form 8-K filed December 5, 2017).
Form of Non-Competition and Non-Solicitation Agreement signed by each director of TCSB Bancorp, Inc., dated December 4, 2017 (incorporated here by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to our current report on Form 8-K filed December 5, 2017).

*
Represents a compensation plan.


37