Company Quick10K Filing
Kimball
Closing Price ($) Shares Out (MM) Market Cap ($MM)
$0.00 37 $616
10-Q 2019-11-05 Quarter: 2019-09-30
10-K 2019-08-27 Annual: 2019-06-30
10-Q 2019-05-08 Quarter: 2019-03-31
10-Q 2019-02-05 Quarter: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-11-06 Quarter: 2018-09-30
10-K 2018-08-28 Annual: 2018-06-30
10-Q 2018-05-02 Quarter: 2018-03-31
10-Q 2018-02-01 Quarter: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-11-02 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-K 2017-08-29 Annual: 2017-06-30
10-Q 2017-05-04 Quarter: 2017-03-31
10-Q 2017-02-02 Quarter: 2016-12-31
10-Q 2016-11-02 Quarter: 2016-09-30
10-K 2016-08-30 Annual: 2016-06-30
10-Q 2016-05-04 Quarter: 2016-03-31
10-Q 2016-02-03 Quarter: 2015-12-31
10-Q 2015-11-04 Quarter: 2015-09-30
10-K 2015-08-26 Annual: 2015-06-30
10-Q 2015-05-06 Quarter: 2015-03-31
10-Q 2015-02-04 Quarter: 2014-12-31
10-Q 2014-11-07 Quarter: 2014-09-30
10-K 2014-08-27 Annual: 2014-06-30
10-Q 2014-05-05 Quarter: 2014-03-31
10-Q 2014-02-05 Quarter: 2013-12-31
10-Q 2013-11-05 Quarter: 2013-09-30
10-K 2013-08-26 Annual: 2013-06-30
10-Q 2013-05-02 Quarter: 2013-03-31
10-Q 2013-02-04 Quarter: 2012-12-31
10-Q 2012-11-01 Quarter: 2012-09-30
10-K 2012-08-27 Annual: 2012-06-30
10-Q 2012-05-03 Quarter: 2012-03-31
10-Q 2012-02-03 Quarter: 2011-12-31
10-Q 2011-11-01 Quarter: 2011-09-30
10-K 2011-08-29 Annual: 2011-06-30
10-Q 2011-05-05 Quarter: 2011-03-31
10-Q 2011-02-04 Quarter: 2010-12-31
10-Q 2010-11-05 Quarter: 2010-09-30
10-K 2010-08-30 Annual: 2010-06-30
10-Q 2010-05-06 Quarter: 2010-03-31
10-Q 2010-02-05 Quarter: 2009-12-31
8-K 2019-11-04 Earnings, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-10-24 Enter Agreement, Off-BS Arrangement, Exhibits
8-K 2019-10-22
8-K 2019-07-29 Earnings, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-07-09 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2019-06-19 Exit Costs, Impairments, Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2019-06-19 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2019-05-07 Earnings, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-02-28 Officers
8-K 2019-02-04 Earnings, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-11-02 Earnings, Regulation FD, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-10-30 Officers, Amend Bylaw, Shareholder Vote, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-10-25 Officers, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-01 Earnings, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-07-06 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-07-02 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2018-05-07 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2018-05-01 Earnings, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-01-31 Earnings, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-01-22 Officers, Exhibits
KBAL 2019-09-30
Part I. Financial Information
Item 1. Financial Statements
Note 1. Basis of Presentation
Note 2. Recent Accounting Pronouncements and Supplemental Information
Note 3. Restructuring
Note 4. Acquisition
Note 5. Revenue
Note 6. Leases
Note 7. Earnings per Share
Note 8. Income Taxes
Note 9. Inventories
Note 10. Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income
Note 11. Commitments and Contingent Liabilities
Note 12. Fair Value
Note 13. Investments
Note 14. Derivative Instruments
Note 15. Postemployment Benefits
Note 16. Stock Compensation
Note 17. Variable Interest Entities
Note 18. Credit Quality and Allowance for Credit Losses of Notes Receivable
Note 19. Subsequent Event
Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 4. Controls and Procedures
Part II. Other Information
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds
Item 6. Exhibits
EX-31.1 exhibit31109302019q1.htm
EX-31.2 exhibit31209302019q1.htm
EX-32.1 exhibit32109302019q1.htm
EX-32.2 exhibit32209302019q1.htm

Kimball Earnings 2019-09-30

KBAL 10Q Quarterly Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

Comparables ($MM TTM)
Ticker M Cap Assets Liab Rev G Profit Net Inc EBITDA EV G Margin EV/EBITDA ROA
CODI 949 2,370 1,369 1,733 584 109 227 1,869 34% 8.2 5%
TILE 932 1,454 1,102 1,311 476 51 153 1,520 36% 10.0 4%
CSWI 862 367 90 363 167 49 79 874 46% 11.1 13%
KBAL 616 365 148 768 255 39 66 542 33% 8.2 11%
HOME 601 2,891 2,048 1,270 392 65 133 931 31% 7.0 2%
ETH 550 510 146 747 409 32 60 530 55% 8.9 6%
TCS 349 1,122 860 909 529 24 88 610 58% 6.9 2%
HOFT 248 401 133 660 134 30 47 267 20% 5.6 8%
HBB 240 306 247 732 181 5 20 239 25% 12.2 2%
TTS 201 417 279 349 245 3 39 259 70% 6.6 1%

10-Q 1 kbal10q09302019q1.htm KIMBALL INTERNATIONAL, INC. FORM 10-Q Document


UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-Q
(Mark One)
x  QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2019
OR
o TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from              to             
Commission File Number    0-3279
kimballlogonobrand.jpg
KIMBALL INTERNATIONAL, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Indiana
 
35-0514506
(State or other jurisdiction of
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
incorporation or organization)
 
 
1600 Royal Street, Jasper, Indiana
 
47546-2256
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
(812) 482-1600
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code
Not Applicable
Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each Class
Trading Symbol(s)
Name of each exchange on which registered
Class B Common Stock, par value $0.05 per share
KBAL
The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  
Yes  x    No o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (Section 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).
Yes  x   No  o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer  o                         Accelerated filer  x 
Non-accelerated filer  o                         Smaller reporting company  o
Emerging growth company  o
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). 
Yes  o    No  x
The number of shares outstanding of the Registrant’s common stock as of October 24, 2019 was:
Class A Common Stock - 220,010 shares
Class B Common Stock - 36,723,073 shares




KIMBALL INTERNATIONAL, INC.
FORM 10-Q
INDEX
 
Page No.
 
 
 
 
PART I    FINANCIAL INFORMATION
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PART II    OTHER INFORMATION
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

2



PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1. Financial Statements

KIMBALL INTERNATIONAL, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(Amounts in Thousands, Except for Share and Per Share Data)
 
(Unaudited)
 
 

 
September 30,
2019
 
June 30,
2019
ASSETS
 

 
 

Current Assets:
 

 
 

Cash and cash equivalents
$
79,934

 
$
73,196

Short-term investments
26,433

 
33,071

Receivables, net of allowances of $1,377 and $1,321, respectively
60,649

 
63,120

Inventories
47,270

 
46,812

Prepaid expenses and other current assets
11,409

 
13,105

Assets held for sale
281

 
281

Total current assets
225,976

 
229,585

Property and Equipment, net of accumulated depreciation of $187,793 and $185,865, respectively
93,577

 
90,671

Right-of-use Lease Assets
18,021

 

Goodwill
11,160

 
11,160

Other Intangible Assets, net of accumulated amortization of $38,841 and $38,320, respectively
12,069

 
12,108

Deferred Tax Assets
9,362

 
8,722

Other Assets
12,584

 
12,420

Total Assets
$
382,749

 
$
364,666

 
 
 
 
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
 
 
 
Current Liabilities:
 
 
 
Current maturities of long-term debt
$
27

 
$
25

Accounts payable
47,899

 
47,916

Customer deposits
23,980

 
24,611

Current portion of lease liability
4,673

 

Dividends payable
3,469

 
3,038

Accrued expenses
44,865

 
57,494

Total current liabilities
124,913

 
133,084

Other Liabilities:
 
 
 
Long-term debt, less current maturities
109

 
136

Long-term lease liability
17,660

 

Other
15,035

 
14,956

Total other liabilities
32,804

 
15,092

Shareholders’ Equity:
 
 
 
Common stock-par value $0.05 per share:
 
 
 
Class A - Shares authorized: 50,000,000
               Shares issued: 249,000 and 251,000, respectively
12

 
12

Class B - Shares authorized: 100,000,000
               Shares issued: 42,776,000 and 42,773,000, respectively
2,139

 
2,139

Additional paid-in capital
2,438

 
3,570

Retained earnings
285,405

 
277,391

Accumulated other comprehensive income
1,976

 
1,937

Less: Treasury stock, at cost, 6,088,000 shares and 6,212,000 shares, respectively
(66,938
)
 
(68,559
)
Total Shareholders’ Equity
225,032

 
216,490

Total Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity
$
382,749

 
$
364,666


3



KIMBALL INTERNATIONAL, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME
(Amounts in Thousands, Except for Per Share Data)
 
(Unaudited)
 
Three Months Ended
 
September 30
 
2019
 
2018
Net Sales
$
201,452

 
$
194,123

Cost of Sales
131,082

 
128,250

Gross Profit
70,370

 
65,873

Selling and Administrative Expenses
50,914

 
52,179

Restructuring Expense
4,350

 

Operating Income
15,106

 
13,694

Other Income (Expense):
 
 
 
Interest income
607

 
419

Interest expense
(23
)
 
(50
)
Non-operating income (expense), net
1

 
327

Other income (expense), net
585

 
696

Income Before Taxes on Income
15,691

 
14,390

Provision for Income Taxes
4,307

 
3,514

Net Income
$
11,384

 
$
10,876

 
 
 
 
Earnings Per Share of Common Stock:
 

 
 

Basic Earnings Per Share
$
0.31

 
$
0.29

Diluted Earnings Per Share
$
0.31

 
$
0.29

 
 
 
 
Dividends Per Share of Common Stock
$
0.09

 
$
0.08

 
 
 
 
Class A and B Common Stock:
 
 
 
Average Number of Shares Outstanding - Basic
36,937

 
37,109

Average Number of Shares Outstanding - Diluted
37,247

 
37,392



4



KIMBALL INTERNATIONAL, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
(Amounts in Thousands)
 
(Unaudited)
 
(Unaudited)
 
Three Months Ended
 
Three Months Ended
 
September 30, 2019
 
September 30, 2018
(Unaudited)
Pre-tax
 
Tax
 
Net of Tax
 
Pre-tax
 
Tax
 
Net of Tax
Net income
 
 
 
 
$
11,384

 
 
 
 
 
$
10,876

Other comprehensive income (loss):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Available-for-sale securities
$
(8
)
 
$
2

 
$
(6
)
 
$
(26
)
 
$
7

 
$
(19
)
Postemployment severance actuarial change
149

 
(39
)
 
110

 
80

 
(20
)
 
60

Derivative gain (loss)

 

 

 
(9
)
 
2

 
(7
)
Reclassification to (earnings) loss:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Amortization of actuarial change
(88
)
 
23

 
(65
)
 
(99
)
 
25

 
(74
)
Derivatives

 

 

 
16

 
(4
)
 
12

Other comprehensive income (loss)
$
53

 
$
(14
)
 
$
39

 
$
(38
)
 
$
10

 
$
(28
)
Total comprehensive income
 
 
 
 
$
11,423

 
 
 
 
 
$
10,848

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


5



KIMBALL INTERNATIONAL, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Amounts in Thousands)
 
(Unaudited)
 
Three Months Ended
 
September 30
 
2019
 
2018
Cash Flows From Operating Activities:
 
 
 
Net income
$
11,384

 
$
10,876

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
 
 
Depreciation
3,610

 
3,632

Amortization
521

 
475

Loss (Gain) on sales of assets
41

 
(1,128
)
Restructuring and asset impairment charges
2,675

 

Deferred income tax and other deferred charges
(639
)
 
(1,456
)
Stock-based compensation
1,661

 
1,945

Other, net
2,295

 
(867
)
Change in operating assets and liabilities:
 
 
 
Receivables
2,521

 
2,414

Inventories
(458
)
 
(2,616
)
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
1,712

 
4,341

Accounts payable
(192
)
 
(556
)
Customer deposits
(631
)
 
4,283

Accrued expenses
(13,444
)
 
(14,222
)
Net cash provided by operating activities
11,056

 
7,121

Cash Flows From Investing Activities:
 
 
 
Capital expenditures
(6,873
)
 
(4,531
)
Proceeds from sales of assets
101

 
1,196

Purchases of capitalized software
(481
)
 
(193
)
Purchases of available-for-sale securities
(5,971
)
 
(16,842
)
Maturities of available-for-sale securities
12,667

 
9,963

Other, net
47

 
26

Net cash used for investing activities
(510
)
 
(10,381
)
Cash Flows From Financing Activities:
 
 
 
Change in long-term debt
(25
)
 
(23
)
Dividends paid to shareholders
(2,939
)
 
(2,595
)
Repurchases of Common Stock

 
(3,300
)
Repurchase of employee shares for tax withholding
(842
)
 
(840
)
Net cash used for financing activities
(3,806
)
 
(6,758
)
Net Increase (Decrease) in Cash, Cash Equivalents, and Restricted Cash (1)
6,740

 
(10,018
)
Cash, Cash Equivalents, and Restricted Cash at Beginning of Period (1)
73,837

 
53,321

Cash, Cash Equivalents, and Restricted Cash at End of Period (1)
$
80,577

 
$
43,303

Supplemental Disclosure of Cash Flow Information
 
 
 
Cash paid during the period for:
 
 
 
Income taxes
$
34

 
$
24

Interest expense
$
15

 
$
40


(1) The following table reconciles cash and cash equivalents in the balance sheets to cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash per the statements of cash flows. The restricted cash included in other assets on the balance sheet represents amounts pledged as collateral for a long-term financing arrangement as contractually required by a lender. The restriction will lapse when the related long-term debt is paid off. Restricted cash also included customer deposits held due to a foreign entity being classified as a restricted entity by a government agency subsequent to our receipt of the deposit.
(Amounts in Thousands)
September 30,
2019
 
June 30,
2019
 
September 30,
2018
 
June 30,
2018
Cash and Cash Equivalents
$
79,934

 
$
73,196

 
$
42,643

 
$
52,663

Restricted cash included in Other Assets
643

 
641

 
660

 
658

Total Cash, Cash Equivalents, and Restricted Cash at end of period
$
80,577

 
$
73,837

 
$
43,303

 
$
53,321


6



KIMBALL INTERNATIONAL, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
(Amounts in Thousands, Except for Share and Per Share Data)
 
Common Stock
 
Additional Paid-In Capital
 
Retained Earnings
 
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
 
Treasury Stock
 
Total Shareholders’ Equity
Three months ended September 30, 2019 (Unaudited)
Class A
 
Class B
 
Amounts at June 30, 2019
$
12

 
$
2,139

 
$
3,570

 
$
277,391

 
$
1,937

 
$
(68,559
)
 
$
216,490

Net income
 
 
 
 
 
 
11,384

 
 
 
 
 
11,384

Other comprehensive income (loss)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
39

 
 
 
39

Issuance of non-restricted stock (9,000 shares)
 
 
 
 
(118
)
 
 
 
 
 
118

 

Conversion of Class A to Class B common stock (2,000 shares)

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Compensation expense related to stock compensation plans
 
 
 
 
2,011

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2,011

Performance share issuance (67,000 shares)
 
 
 
 
(1,391
)
 
 
 
 
 
879

 
(512
)
Relative total shareholder return performance units issuance (48,000 shares)
 
 
 
 
(954
)
 
 
 
 
 
624

 
(330
)
Reclassification of equity-classified awards
 
 
 
 
(680
)
 


 
 
 
 
 
(680
)
Dividends declared ($0.09 per share)
 
 
 
 
 
 
(3,370
)
 
 
 
 
 
(3,370
)
Amounts at September 30, 2019
$
12

 
$
2,139

 
$
2,438

 
$
285,405

 
$
1,976

 
$
(66,938
)
 
$
225,032

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Three months ended September 30, 2018 (Unaudited)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Amounts at June 30, 2018
$
13

 
$
2,138

 
$
1,881

 
$
249,945

 
$
1,816

 
$
(62,769
)
 
$
193,024

Net income
 
 
 
 
 
 
10,876

 
 
 
 
 
10,876

Other comprehensive income (loss)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(28
)
 
 
 
(28
)
Issuance of non-restricted stock (12,000 shares)
 
 
 
 
(163
)
 
 
 
 
 
151

 
(12
)
Compensation expense related to stock compensation plans
 
 
 
 
1,945

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1,945

Performance share issuance (81,000 shares)
 
 
 
 
(1,709
)
 
 
 
 
 
1,057

 
(652
)
Relative total shareholder return performance units issuance (27,000 shares)
 
 
 
 
(523
)
 
 
 
 
 
350

 
(173
)
Repurchase of Common Stock (196,000 shares)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(3,300
)
 
(3,300
)
Dividends declared ($0.08 per share)
 
 
 
 
 
 
(2,996
)
 
 
 
 
 
(2,996
)
Amounts at September 30, 2018
$
13

 
$
2,138

 
$
1,431

 
$
257,825

 
$
1,788

 
$
(64,511
)
 
$
198,684


7



KIMBALL INTERNATIONAL, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)
Note 1. Basis of Presentation
The accompanying unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements of Kimball International, Inc. (the “Company,” “Kimball International,” “we,” “us,” or “our”) have been prepared in accordance with the instructions to Form 10-Q. As such, certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) have been condensed or omitted, although we believe that the disclosures are adequate to make the information presented not misleading. Intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated. Management believes the financial statements include all adjustments (consisting only of normal recurring adjustments) considered necessary to present fairly the financial statements for the interim periods. The results of operations for the interim periods shown in this report are not necessarily indicative of results for any future interim period or for the entire fiscal year. It is suggested that these financial statements be read in conjunction with the financial statements and the notes thereto included in our latest annual report on Form 10-K.
Note 2. Recent Accounting Pronouncements and Supplemental Information
Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements:
In March 2017, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB)” issued guidance that will shorten the amortization period for certain callable debt securities held at a premium to the earliest call date. This guidance does not require an accounting change for securities held at a discount. The guidance was effective for our first quarter of fiscal year 2020. The adoption did not have a material effect on our condensed consolidated financial statements.
In February 2016, the FASB issued guidance that revises the accounting for leases. The guidance is intended to improve financial reporting of leasing transactions by requiring lessees to record right-of-use assets and corresponding lease liabilities on the balance sheet. Leases will continue to be classified as either operating or finance leases, with the classification affecting the pattern of expense recognition in the statement of income. The guidance also requires additional disclosures to help investors and other financial statement users better understand the amount, timing, and uncertainty of cash flows arising from leases. In January 2018, the FASB issued additional guidance for land easements which permits entities to forgo the evaluation of existing land easement arrangements to determine if they contain a lease. New land easement arrangements, or modifications to existing arrangements, after the adoption of the lease standard will be evaluated to determine if they meet the definition of a lease. In July 2018, the FASB amended the new standard to clarify certain aspects of the guidance, and they also issued another new standard in July 2018 that allows the option to apply the transition provisions at the adoption date instead of at the earliest comparative period in the condensed consolidated financial statements. In March 2019, the FASB issued clarifying guidance regarding interim transition disclosures. We adopted this lease guidance as of the beginning of our fiscal year 2020. We have assessed our portfolio of leases and compiled a central repository of leases, recording a right-of-use asset and a lease liability for all leases with a lease term of greater than twelve months. All changes required by the new standard, including accounting policies, controls, and disclosures, have been identified and implemented. See Note 6 - Leases in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.
Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements Not Yet Adopted:
In August 2018, the FASB issued guidance on a customer’s accounting for implementation, set-up, and other upfront costs incurred in a cloud computing arrangement that is hosted by the vendor. Under the new guidance, customers will apply the same criteria for capitalizing implementation costs as they would for an arrangement that has a software license. The guidance is effective for our first quarter of fiscal year 2021 with early adoption permitted. Entities can choose to adopt the guidance prospectively to eligible costs incurred on or after the date this guidance is first applied or retrospectively. We have not yet determined the effect of this guidance on our condensed consolidated financial statements.
In August 2018, the FASB issued guidance which changes the fair value measurement disclosure requirements. The guidance modifies and removes certain disclosures related to the fair value hierarchy, and adds new disclosure requirements such as disclosing the changes in unrealized gains and losses included in other comprehensive income for recurring Level 3 fair value measurements and disclosing the range and weighted average of significant unobservable inputs used to develop Level 3 fair value measurements. The guidance is effective for our first quarter of fiscal year 2021 with early adoption permitted and should

8



be applied retrospectively except for certain disclosures. We have not yet determined the effect of this guidance on our condensed consolidated financial statements.
In June 2016, the FASB issued guidance on the measurement of credit losses on financial instruments. Under the guidance, an entity recognizes as an allowance its estimate of expected credit losses, which the FASB believes will result in more timely recognition of such losses. The guidance is also intended to reduce the complexity by decreasing the number of credit impairment models that entities use to account for debt instruments. In May 2019, the FASB amended the new standard to allow entities to elect the fair value option on certain financial instruments that were previously recorded at amortized cost. The guidance is effective for our first quarter of fiscal year 2021 with early adoption in our fiscal year 2020 permitted. We have not yet determined the effect of this guidance on our condensed consolidated financial statements.
Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets:
Goodwill represents the difference between the purchase price and the related underlying tangible and intangible net asset fair values resulting from business acquisitions. Goodwill is assigned to and the fair value is tested at the reporting unit level. Annually, or if conditions indicate an earlier review is necessary, we may assess qualitative factors to determine if it is more likely than not that the fair value is less than its carrying amount. We also have the option to bypass the qualitative assessment and proceed directly to performing the quantitative goodwill impairment test which compares the carrying value of the reporting unit to the reporting unit’s fair value to identify impairment. Under the quantitative assessment, if the fair value of the reporting unit is less than the carrying value, goodwill is written down to its fair value. The fair value is established primarily using a discounted cash flow analysis and secondarily a market approach utilizing current industry information. The calculation of the fair value of the reporting unit considers current market conditions existing at the assessment date. As of September 30, 2019 and June 30, 2019 our goodwill totaled $11.2 million. During the quarter ended September 30, 2019, no goodwill impairment was recognized.
Other Intangible Assets reported on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets consist of capitalized software, product rights, customer relationships, trade names, and non-compete agreements. Intangible assets are reviewed for impairment when events or circumstances indicate that the carrying value may not be recoverable over the remaining lives of the assets. A summary of intangible assets subject to amortization is as follows:
 
September 30, 2019
 
June 30, 2019
(Amounts in Thousands)
Cost
 
Accumulated
Amortization
 
Net Value
 
Cost
 
Accumulated
Amortization
 
Net Value
Capitalized Software
$
40,190

 
$
36,879

 
$
3,311

 
$
39,708

 
$
36,662

 
$
3,046

Customer Relationships
7,050

 
1,240

 
5,810

 
7,050

 
1,030

 
6,020

Trade Names
3,570

 
684

 
2,886

 
3,570

 
595

 
2,975

Non-Compete Agreements
100

 
38

 
62

 
100

 
33

 
67

Other Intangible Assets
$
50,910

 
$
38,841

 
$
12,069

 
$
50,428

 
$
38,320

 
$
12,108

Amortization expense related to intangible assets was, in thousands, $521 during the quarter ended September 30, 2019, and $475 during the quarter ended September 30, 2018. Amortization expense in future periods is expected to be, in thousands, $1,560 for the remainder of fiscal year 2020, and $1,923, $1,583, $1,340, and $1,168 in the four years ending June 30, 2024, and $4,495 thereafter. The estimated useful life of capitalized software ranges from 3 to 10 years. The amortization period for customer relationship intangible assets is 20 years. The estimated useful life of trade names is 10 years. The estimated useful life of non-compete agreements is 5 years.
Capitalized software is stated at cost less accumulated amortization and is amortized using the straight-line method. During the software application development stage, capitalized costs include external consulting costs, cost of software licenses, and internal payroll and payroll-related costs for employees who are directly associated with a software project. Upgrades and enhancements are capitalized if they result in added functionality which enable the software to perform tasks it was previously incapable of performing. Software maintenance, training, data conversion, and business process re-engineering costs are expensed in the period in which they are incurred. 
Trade names and non-compete agreements are amortized on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives. Capitalized customer relationships are amortized based on estimated attrition rates of customers. We have no intangible assets with indefinite useful lives which are not subject to amortization.

9



Notes Receivable and Trade Accounts Receivable:
Notes receivable and trade accounts receivable are recorded per the terms of the agreement or sale, and accrued interest is recognized when earned. We determine on a case-by-case basis the cessation of accruing interest, the resumption of accruing interest, the method of recording payments received on nonaccrual receivables, and the delinquency status for our limited number of notes receivable.
Our policy for estimating the allowance for credit losses on trade accounts receivable and notes receivable includes analysis of such items as aging, credit worthiness, payment history, and historical bad debt experience. Management uses these specific analyses in conjunction with an evaluation of the general economic and market conditions to determine the final allowance for credit losses on the trade accounts receivable and notes receivable. Trade accounts receivable and notes receivable are written off after exhaustive collection efforts occur and the receivable is deemed uncollectible. Our limited amount of notes receivable allows management to monitor the risks, credit quality indicators, collectability, and probability of impairment on an individual basis. Adjustments to the allowance for credit losses are recorded in selling and administrative expenses. Customary terms require payment within 30 days, with terms beyond 30 days being considered extended.
Non-operating Income (Expense), net:
The non-operating income (expense), net line item includes the impact of such items as fair value adjustments on Supplemental Employee Retirement Plan (“SERP”) investments, amortization of actuarial income, bank charges, and other miscellaneous non-operating income and expense items that are not directly related to operations. The gain or loss on SERP investments is offset by a change in the SERP liability that is recognized in selling and administrative expenses.
Components of the Non-operating income (expense), net line, were:
 
Three Months Ended
 
September 30
(Amounts in Thousands)
2019
 
2018
Gain on Supplemental Employee Retirement Plan Investments
$
58

 
$
371

Other
(57
)
 
(44
)
 Non-operating income, net
$
1

 
$
327

Note 3. Restructuring
Transformation Restructuring Plan:
In June 2019, we announced a transformation restructuring plan that is expected to optimize resources for future growth, improve efficiency, and build capabilities across our organization. We believe the transformation restructuring plan will establish a more cost-efficient structure to better align our operations with our long-term strategic goals. The transformation restructuring plan includes the following:
Our overall manufacturing facility footprint is being reviewed to reduce excess capacity and gain efficiencies. We plan to exit a leased seating manufacturing facility in Martinsville, Virginia in the second half of fiscal year 2020 and are evaluating our production capabilities and capacity across our organization to identify additional opportunities.
The creation of center-led functions for finance, human resources, information technology and legal functions is expected to result in the standardization of processes and the elimination of duplication. In addition, we are centralizing our supply chain efforts to maximize supplier value and plan to drive more efficient practices and operations within our logistics function.
Kimball brand selling resources are being reallocated to higher-growth markets. We also ceased use of four leased furniture showrooms across our brands during the first quarter of fiscal year 2020 and recognized impairment of the leases and associated leasehold improvements.
The efforts are expected to generate annualized pre-tax savings of approximately $10.0 million when the transformation restructuring plan is fully implemented. We estimate that pre-tax restructuring charges incurred through the end of fiscal year 2020 will be approximately $8.0 million to $9.0 million. The restructuring charges are expected to consist of approximately $3.0 million to $3.3 million for severance and other employee-related costs, $2.0 million to $2.5 million for facility exit and other

10



costs, and $3.0 million to $3.2 million for asset impairment. Approximately 65% of the total cost estimate is expected to be cash expense.
A summary of the charges recorded in connection with the Transformation Restructuring Plan is as follows:
 
 
 
 
(Amounts in Thousands)
Three Months Ended
September 30, 2019
 
Charges incurred to date
Cash-related restructuring charges:
 
 
 
Severance and other employee related costs
$
1,206

 
$
1,869

Facility exit costs and other cash charges
469

 
672

Total cash-related restructuring charges
$
1,675

 
$
2,541

Non-cash charges:
 
 
 
Transition stock compensation
470

 
541

Impairment of assets
2,205

 
2,205

Total non-cash charges
$
2,675

 
$
2,746

Total charges
$
4,350

 
$
5,287

A summary of the current period activity in accrued restructuring related to the Transformation Restructuring Plan is as follows:
(Amounts in Thousands)
Severance and other employee related costs
 
Facility exit and other costs
 
Total
Balance at June 30, 2019
$
619

 
$
203

 
$
822

Additions charged to expense
1,336

 
372

 
1,708

Cash payments charged against reserve
(292
)
 
(575
)
 
(867
)
Non-cash adjustments
(130
)
 

 
(130
)
Balance at September 30, 2019
$
1,533

 
$

 
$
1,533

To date, we have recognized $5.3 million of restructuring costs related to the Transformation Restructuring Plan. We expect this restructuring plan to be complete by June 30, 2020. It is currently estimated that this plan will incur an additional $2.7 million to $3.7 million of future restructuring charges.
We utilized available market prices and management estimates to determine the fair value of impaired assets. Restructuring is included in the Restructuring Expense line item on our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income.
Note 4. Acquisition
On October 26, 2018, we acquired substantially all the assets and assumed certain specified limited liabilities of David Edward headquartered in Baltimore, Maryland. David Edward is a premier designer and manufacturer of contract furniture, sold in the healthcare, corporate, education, and premium hospitality markets. The David Edward product portfolio consists of classic and contemporary designs, focused primarily in the seating, tables, and ancillary furniture categories. In conjunction with the asset acquisition, we leased two existing David Edward production facilities in Baltimore, Maryland and Red Lion, Pennsylvania. The purchase price allocation did not change from the amounts disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for 2019 and is final as of September 30, 2019.

11



Note 5. Revenue
Disaggregation of Revenue
The following table provides information about revenue by vertical market:
 
 
Three Months Ended
 
 
September 30
(Amounts in Millions)
 
2019

2018
Commercial
 
$
55.3

 
$
56.6

Education
 
34.7

 
34.6

Finance
 
17.2

 
18.2

Government
 
18.6

 
17.1

Healthcare
 
28.9

 
24.4

Hospitality
 
46.8

 
43.2

Total Net Sales
 
$
201.5

 
$
194.1

We report revenue under a single aggregated reportable segment consisting of three operating segments which have similar products and services in nature, utilize similar production and distribution processes, and share similar long-term economic characteristics.
Contract Balances
Receivables in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets represent the amount of consideration to which we are entitled in exchange for the goods or services sold to our customers, net of allowances for doubtful accounts. Receivables are recorded when the right to consideration from the customer becomes unconditional, which is generally upon billing or upon satisfaction of a performance obligation, whichever is earlier.
We also receive deposits from certain customers before revenue is recognized, resulting in the recognition of a contract liability reported as Customer Deposits in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. Customer deposits are typically utilized within a year of the receipt of the deposit. The amount of revenue recognized during the three months ended September 30, 2019 that was included in the June 30, 2019 customer deposit balance was $20.9 million.
Note 6. Leases
At the beginning of our fiscal year 2020, we adopted new accounting guidance (“ASC 842”) regarding leases on a prospective basis. This guidance requires lessees to record right-of-use assets and corresponding lease liabilities on the balance sheet. The effects of the initial application did not result in a cumulative adjustment to retained earnings. We recognize lease liabilities at the lease commencement date based upon the present value of the remaining lease payments. Right-of-use assets are based on the lease liability adjusted for prepaid rent, deferred rent, and tenant allowances received. Lease liabilities are amortized based upon the effective interest method, while right-of-use assets are amortized based upon the straight line expense less interest on the lease liability. Lease expense for lease payments is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term, except for impaired leases for which the lease expense is recognized on a declining basis over the remaining lease term. Variable lease expense associated with our leases is recognized when the event, activity, or circumstance in the lease agreement on which those payments are assessed occurs. Variable lease expense is presented as operating expense in our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income and Comprehensive Income in the same line item as expense arising from fixed lease payments for operating leases.
We have operating leases for showrooms, manufacturing facilities, warehouses, certain offices, and other facilities to support our operations in addition to select equipment that expire at various dates through 2028. We have no financing leases. Certain operating lease agreements include rental payments adjusted periodically for inflationary indexes. Additionally, some leases include options to renew or terminate the leases which can be exercised at our discretion. Lease terms include the noncancellable portion of the underlying leases along with any reasonably certain lease periods associated with available renewal periods. Our leases do not contain residual value guarantees or material restrictive covenants. As our lease contracts do not contain an implicit discount rate, we use an estimated incremental borrowing rate based on the information available at the lease commencement date in determining the present value of the lease payments. The estimated incremental borrowing rate represents the estimated rate of

12



interest we would have to pay to borrow an amount equal to the lease payments for a similar period of time on a collateralized basis.
The components of our lease expenses are as follows:
 
Three Months Ended
(Amounts in Millions)
September 30, 2019
Operating lease expense
$
0.8

Variable lease expense
0.7

Total lease expense
$
1.5

Right-of-use assets for operating leases are tested for impairment in the same manner as long-lived assets used in operations. We recorded $2.2 million of right-of-use asset and associated leasehold improvement impairment resulting from ceasing use of four furniture showrooms after the implementation of ASC 842 as part of our transformation restructuring plan. The impairment is included in the Restructuring Expense line item on our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income.
Supplemental cash flow and other information related to leases are as follows:
 
Three Months Ended
(Amounts in Millions)
September 30, 2019
Cash flow information:
 
Operating lease payments impacting lease liability
$
1.2

Leased assets obtained in exchange for operating lease liabilities
$
0.1

Other information:
 
Weighted-average remaining term (in years)
6.1

Weighted-average discount rate
4.6
%
The following table summarizes the future minimum lease payments as of September 30, 2019:
 
Fiscal Year Ended
(Amounts in Millions)
June 30 (1)
2020
$
3.5

2021
4.6

2022
4.4

2023
3.9

2024
3.1

Thereafter
6.2

Total lease payments
$
25.7

Less interest
$
3.4

Present value of lease liabilities
$
22.3

(1) Lease payments include options to extend lease terms that are reasonably certain of being exercised. The payments exclude legally binding minimum lease payments for leases signed but not yet commenced. At September 30, 2019, we have an additional operating lease that has not yet commenced for which we will record a right-of-use asset and lease liability of $1.6 million. The lease will commence in our second quarter of fiscal year 2020 with a lease term of approximately 7 years.

13



The following table summarizes the future minimum lease payments as of June 30, 2019 before adoption of ASC 842:
 
Fiscal Year Ended
(Amounts in Millions)
June 30
2020
$
4.6

2021
4.2

2022
4.1

2023
3.6

2024
2.5

Thereafter
3.8

Total lease payments
$
22.8

Practical Expedients Elected
We elected the following practical expedients as a result of adopting ASC 842:
We elected not to separate non-lease components of a contract from the lease components to which they relate for all classes of lease assets.
We elected the package of practical expedients available for transition which allowed us not to reassess (1) whether any expired or existing contracts contain leases, (2) the classification of the leases as operating or finance and (3) the amount of initial direct costs associated with the leases.
We elected that our date of initial application be the beginning of our period of adoption which was July 1, 2019.
We elected not to recognize a right-of-use asset or lease liability for short-term leases that have a lease term of twelve months or less.
We elected not to assess whether land easements that were not previously accounted for as leases are or contain a lease.
We did not elect to use hindsight in determining the lease term and in assessing the likelihood that a lessee purchase option will be exercised.
Note 7. Earnings Per Share
Basic earnings per share are based on the weighted average number of shares outstanding during the period. Diluted earnings per share are based on the weighted average number of shares outstanding plus the assumed issuance of common shares for all potentially dilutive securities.
 
Three Months Ended
 
September 30
(Amounts in Thousands, Except for Per Share Data)
2019
 
2018
Net Income
$
11,384

 
$
10,876

 
 
 
 
Average Shares Outstanding for Basic EPS Calculation
36,937

 
37,109

Dilutive Effect of Average Outstanding Compensation Awards
310

 
283

Average Shares Outstanding for Diluted EPS Calculation
37,247

 
37,392

 
 
 
 
Basic Earnings Per Share
$
0.31

 
$
0.29

Diluted Earnings Per Share
$
0.31

 
$
0.29


14



Note 8. Income Taxes
In determining the quarterly provision for income taxes, we use an estimated annual effective tax rate which is based on expected annual income, statutory tax rates, and available tax planning opportunities in the various jurisdictions in which we operate. Unusual or infrequently occurring items are separately recognized in the quarter in which they occur. Our effective tax rate for the three months ended September 30, 2019 of 27.4% was higher than the effective tax rate of 24.4% for the three months ended September 30, 2018 primarily due to prior year state tax provision adjustments.
Note 9. Inventories
Inventory components were as follows:
(Amounts in Thousands)
September 30, 2019
 
June 30,
2019
Finished products
$
26,757

 
$
26,304

Work-in-process
2,322

 
2,455

Raw materials
34,955

 
34,335

Total FIFO inventory
64,034

 
63,094

LIFO reserve, net
(16,764
)
 
(16,282
)
Total inventory
$
47,270

 
$
46,812

For interim reporting, LIFO inventories are computed based on quantities as of the end of the quarter and interim changes in price levels. Changes in quantities and price levels are reflected in the interim financial statements in the period in which they occur, except in cases where LIFO inventory liquidations are expected to be reinstated by fiscal year end. The earnings impact of LIFO inventory liquidations during the three month periods ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 was immaterial.
Note 10. Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income
During the three months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, the changes in the balances of each component of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income, net of tax, were as follows:
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Amounts in Thousands)
 
Unrealized Investment Gain (Loss)
 
Postemployment Benefits Net Actuarial Gain (Loss)
 
Derivative Gain (Loss)
 
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income
Balance at June 30, 2019
 
$
23

 
$
1,914

 
$

 
$
1,937

Other comprehensive income (loss) before reclassifications
 
(6
)
 
110

 

 
104

Reclassification to (earnings) loss
 

 
(65
)
 

 
(65
)
Net current-period other comprehensive income (loss)
 
(6
)
 
45

 

 
39

Balance at September 30, 2019
 
$
17

 
$
1,959

 
$

 
$
1,976

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Balance at June 30, 2018
 
$
(31
)
 
$
1,854

 
$
(7
)
 
$
1,816

Other comprehensive income (loss) before reclassifications
 
(19
)
 
60

 
(7
)
 
34

Reclassification to (earnings) loss
 

 
(74
)
 
12

 
(62
)
Net current-period other comprehensive income (loss)
 
(19
)
 
(14
)
 
5

 
(28
)
Balance at September 30, 2018
 
$
(50
)
 
$
1,840

 
$
(2
)
 
$
1,788


15



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The following reclassifications were made from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income to the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income:
Reclassifications from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income
 
Three Months Ended
 
Affected Line Item in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income
 
September 30,
 
(Amounts in Thousands)
 
2019
 
2018
 
Postemployment Benefits Amortization of Actuarial Gain (1)
 
$
88

 
$
99

 
Non-operating income (expense), net
 
 
(23
)
 
(25
)
 
Benefit (Provision) for Income Taxes
 
 
$
65

 
$
74

 
Net Income
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Derivative Gain (Loss)
 
$

 
$
(16
)
 
Non-operating income (expense), net
 
 

 
4

 
Benefit (Provision) for Income Taxes
 
 
$

 
$
(12
)
 
Net Income
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total Reclassifications for the Period
 
$
65

 
$
62

 
Net Income
Amounts in parentheses indicate reductions to income.
(1) See Note 15 - Postemployment Benefits in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for further information on postemployment benefit plans.
Note 11. Commitments and Contingent Liabilities
Guarantees:
Standby letters of credit were issued to lessors and insurance institutions and can only be drawn upon in the event of our failure to pay our obligations to a beneficiary. As of September 30, 2019, we had a maximum financial exposure from unused standby letters of credit totaling $1.5 million.
We are periodically required to provide performance bonds in order to conduct business with certain customers. The bonds are required to provide assurances to customers that the products and services they have purchased will be installed and/or provided properly and without damage to their facilities. We are ultimately liable for claims that may occur against the performance bonds. We had a maximum financial exposure from one performance bond totaling $5.1 million as of September 30, 2019.
We are not aware of circumstances that would require us to perform under these arrangements and believe that the resolution of any claims that might arise in the future, either individually or in the aggregate, would not materially affect our condensed consolidated financial statements. Accordingly, no liability has been recorded as of September 30, 2019 with respect to the standby letters of credit. We also enter into commercial letters of credit to facilitate payments to vendors and from customers.
Product Warranties:
We provide an assurance-type warranty that guarantees our product complies with agreed-upon specifications. This warranty is not sold separately and does not convey any additional services to the customer. We estimate product warranty liability at the time of sale based on historical repair or replacement cost trends in conjunction with the length of the warranty offered. Management refines the warranty liability periodically based on changes in historical cost trends and in certain cases where specific warranty issues become known.

16



Changes in the product warranty accrual for the three months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 were as follows:
 
Three Months Ended
 
September 30
(Amounts in Thousands)
2019
 
2018
Product Warranty Liability at the beginning of the period
$
2,238

 
$
2,294

Additions to warranty accrual (including changes in estimates)
278

 
343

Settlements made (in cash or in kind)
(370
)
 
(318
)
Product Warranty Liability at the end of the period
$
2,146

 
$
2,319


Note 12. Fair Value
We categorize assets and liabilities measured at fair value into three levels based upon the assumptions (inputs) used to price the assets or liabilities. Level 1 provides the most reliable measure of fair value, whereas Level 3 generally requires significant management judgment. The three levels are defined as follows:
Level 1: Unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets and liabilities.
Level 2: Observable inputs other than those included in Level 1. For example, quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets or quoted prices for identical assets or liabilities in inactive markets.
Level 3: Unobservable inputs reflecting management’s own assumptions about the inputs used in pricing the asset or liability.
Our policy is to recognize transfers between these levels as of the end of each quarterly reporting period. There were no transfers between these levels during the three months ended September 30, 2019. There were also no changes in the inputs or valuation techniques used to measure fair values compared to those disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2019.
We hold a total investment of $2.0 million in a privately-held company, consisting of $0.5 million in equity securities without readily determinable fair value and $1.5 million in stock warrants. The investment in equity securities without readily determinable fair value is classified as a Level 3 financial asset, as explained in the Financial Instruments Not Carried At Fair Value section below. The investment in stock warrants is also classified as a Level 3 financial asset and is accounted for as a derivative instrument valued on a recurring basis, as explained in the Financial Instruments Recognized at Fair Value section below. See Note 13 - Investments in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for further information regarding the investment in equity securities without readily determinable fair value, and Note 14 - Derivative Instruments in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for further information regarding the investment in stock warrants. No purchases or sales of Level 3 assets occurred during the three months ended September 30, 2019.

17



Financial Instruments Recognized at Fair Value:
The following methods and assumptions were used to measure fair value:
Financial Instrument
 
Level
 
Valuation Technique/Inputs Used
Cash Equivalents: Money market funds
 
1
 
Market - Quoted market prices
Cash Equivalents: Commercial paper
 
2
 
Market - Based on market data which use evaluated pricing models and incorporate available trade, bid, and other market information.
Available-for-sale securities: Secondary market certificates of deposit
 
2
 
Market - Based on market data which use evaluated pricing models and incorporate available trade, bid, and other market information.
Available-for-sale securities: Municipal bonds
 
2
 
Market - Based on market data which use evaluated pricing models and incorporate available trade, bid, and other market information.
Available-for-sale securities: U.S. Treasury and federal agencies
 
2
 
Market - Based on market data which use evaluated pricing models and incorporate available trade, bid, and other market information.
Trading securities: Mutual funds held in nonqualified SERP
 
1
 
Market - Quoted market prices
Derivative Assets: Stock warrants
 
3
 
Market - The privately-held company is in a start-up phase. The pricing of recent purchases or sales of the investment are considered, if any, as well as positive and negative qualitative evidence, in the assessment of fair value.
Contingent earn-out liability
 
3
 
Income - Based on a valuation model that measures the present value of the probable cash payments based upon the forecasted operating performance of the acquisition and a discount rate that captures the risk associated with the liability.


18



Recurring Fair Value Measurements:
As of September 30, 2019 and June 30, 2019, the fair values of financial assets that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis using the market or income approach are categorized as follows:
 
September 30, 2019
(Amounts in Thousands)
Level 1
 
Level 2
 
Level 3
 
Total
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash equivalents: Money market funds
$
51,443

 
$

 
$

 
$
51,443

Cash equivalents: Commercial paper

 
26,152

 

 
26,152

Available-for-sale securities: Secondary market certificates of deposit

 
8,792

 

 
8,792

Available-for-sale securities: Municipal bonds

 
883

 

 
883

Available-for-sale securities: U.S. Treasury and federal agencies

 
16,758

 

 
16,758

Trading Securities: Mutual funds in nonqualified SERP
12,038

 

 

 
12,038

Derivatives: Stock warrants

 

 
1,500

 
1,500

Total assets at fair value
$
63,481

 
$
52,585

 
$
1,500

 
$
117,566

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
June 30, 2019
(Amounts in Thousands)
Level 1
 
Level 2
 
Level 3
 
Total
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash equivalents: Money market funds
$
40,016

 
$

 
$

 
$
40,016

Cash equivalents: Commercial paper

 
29,408

 

 
29,408

Available-for-sale securities: Secondary market certificates of deposit

 
11,230

 

 
11,230

Available-for-sale securities: Municipal bonds

 
1,922

 

 
1,922

Available-for-sale securities: U.S. Treasury and federal agencies

 
19,919

 

 
19,919

Trading Securities: Mutual funds in nonqualified SERP
11,774

 

 

 
11,774

Derivatives: Stock warrants

 

 
1,500

 
1,500

Total assets at fair value
$
51,790

 
$
62,479

 
$
1,500

 
$
115,769

Liabilities
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Contingent earn-out liability

 

 
360

 
360

Total liabilities at fair value
$

 
$

 
$
360

 
$
360

The fair value of the contingent earn-out liability as of June 30, 2019 of $0.4 million was paid out during the quarter ended September 30, 2019, relating to fiscal year 2019 performance of D’style, an acquired business.
The nonqualified supplemental employee retirement plan (“SERP”) assets consist primarily of equity funds, balanced funds, target date funds, a bond fund, and a money market fund. The SERP investment assets are offset by a SERP liability which represents our obligation to distribute SERP funds to participants. See Note 13 - Investments in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for further information regarding the SERP.
Non-Recurring Fair Value Measurements:
Certain assets are measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis. These assets are not measured at fair value on an ongoing basis, but are subject to fair value adjustments when events or circumstances indicate a significant adverse effect on the fair value of the asset. Assets that are written down to fair value when impaired are not subsequently adjusted to fair value unless further impairment occurs.


19



Non-recurring Fair Value Adjustment
 
Level
 
Valuation Technique/Inputs Used
Impairment of Leases
 
3
 
Income - Based on a valuation model that measures the present value of remaining lease payments less estimated sublease income at a discount rate that captures the risk associated with the future cash flows.

During the first quarter of fiscal year 2020, due to ceasing use of four showrooms related to the Transformation Restructuring Plan, we recognized an impairment loss of $2.2 million to reduce the related asset groups to fair value. The impairment loss is included as a component of the Restructuring Expense line item on our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income. The asset groups used to calculate impairment included the right-of-use lease assets, leasehold improvements, and lease liabilities.
Financial Instruments Not Carried At Fair Value:
Financial instruments that are not reflected in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets at fair value that have carrying amounts which approximate fair value include the following:
Financial Instrument
 
Level
 
Valuation Technique/Inputs Used
Notes receivable
 
2
 
Market - Price approximated based on the assumed collection of receivables in the normal course of business, taking into account the customer’s non-performance risk.
Equity securities without readily determinable fair value
 
3
 
Cost minus impairment, if any, plus or minus changes resulting from observable price changes in orderly transactions for the identical or a similar investment of the same issuer. Impairment is assessed qualitatively.
On a periodic basis, but no less frequently than quarterly, the investment in equity securities without readily determinable fair value is qualitatively assessed for impairment when there are events or changes in circumstances that may have a significant adverse effect on the fair value of the investment. If a significant adverse effect on the fair value of the investment were to occur and was deemed to be other-than-temporary, the fair value of the investment would be estimated, and the amount by which the carrying value of the investment exceeds its fair value would be recorded as an impairment loss. See Note 13 - Investments in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for the carrying amount of this investment.
The carrying value of our cash deposit accounts, trade accounts receivable, trade accounts payable, customer deposits, and dividends payable approximates fair value due to the relatively short maturity and immaterial non-performance risk.
Note 13. Investments
Investment Portfolio:
Our investment portfolio consists of municipal bonds, certificates of deposit purchased in the secondary market, and U.S. Treasury and federal agency securities. Municipal bonds include general obligation bonds and revenue bonds, some of which are pre-refunded. U.S. Treasury securities represent Treasury Bills and Notes of the U.S. government. Federal agency securities represent debt securities of a U.S. government sponsored agency, and certain of these securities are callable. Our investment policy dictates that municipal bonds, U.S. Treasury and federal agency securities must be investment grade quality. Our secondary market certificates of deposit are classified as investment securities, being purchased in the secondary market through a broker and available to be sold in the secondary market. All certificates of deposit are FDIC insured.

20



Our investment portfolio is available for use in current operations, therefore investments are recorded within Current Assets in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. The contractual maturities of our investment portfolio were as follows (maturity dates for municipal bonds are based on pre-refunded dates and maturity dates for government agency securities are based on the first available call date, if applicable): 
 
September 30, 2019
(Amounts in Thousands)
Certificates of Deposit
 
Municipal Bonds
 
U.S. Treasury and Federal Agencies
Within one year
$
6,047

 
$
883

 
$
16,758

After one year through two years
2,745

 

 

Total Fair Value
$
8,792

 
$
883

 
$
16,758

All investments are classified as available-for-sale securities which are recorded at fair value. See Note 12 - Fair Value in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for more information on the fair value of available-for-sale securities. The amortized cost basis reflects the original purchase price, with discounts and premiums amortized over the life of the available-for-sale securities. Unrealized losses on available-for-sale securities are recognized in earnings when there is intent to sell or it is likely to be required to sell before recovery of the loss, or when the available-for-sale securities have incurred a credit loss. Otherwise, unrealized gains and losses are recorded net of the tax-related effect as a component of Shareholders’ Equity.
 
September 30, 2019
(Amounts in Thousands)
Certificates of Deposit
 
Municipal Bonds
 
U.S. Treasury and Federal Agencies
Amortized cost basis
$
8,792

 
$
883

 
$
16,734

Unrealized holding gains

 

 
24

Unrealized holding losses

 

 

Fair Value
$
8,792

 
$
883

 
$
16,758

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
June 30, 2019
(Amounts in Thousands)
Certificates of Deposit
 
Municipal Bonds
 
U.S. Treasury and Federal Agencies
Amortized cost basis
$
11,230

 
$
1,921

 
$
19,888

Unrealized holding gains

 
1

 
31

Unrealized holding losses

 

 

Fair Value
$
11,230

 
$
1,922

 
$
19,919

No investments were in a continuous unrealized loss position for greater than twelve months as of September 30, 2019. There were no realized gains or losses as a result of sales in the three months ended September 30, 2019 and September 30, 2018.
Supplemental Employee Retirement Plan Investments:
We maintain a self-directed supplemental employee retirement plan (“SERP”) in which executive employees are eligible to participate. The SERP utilizes a rabbi trust, and therefore assets in the SERP portfolio are subject to creditor claims in the event of bankruptcy. We recognize SERP investment assets on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets at current fair value. A SERP liability of the same amount is recorded on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets representing an obligation to distribute SERP funds to participants. The SERP investment assets are classified as trading, and accordingly, realized and unrealized gains and losses are recognized in the Other Income (Expense) section of the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income. Adjustments made to revalue the SERP liability are also recognized in income or expense as selling and administrative expenses and offset valuation adjustments on SERP investment assets. Net unrealized holding gains for the three months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 were, in thousands, $24 and $344, respectively.

21



SERP asset and liability balances were as follows:
(Amounts in Thousands)
September 30,
2019
 
June 30,
2019
SERP investments - current asset
$
3,104

 
$
3,087

SERP investments - other long-term asset
8,934

 
8,687

    Total SERP investments
$
12,038

 
$
11,774

 
 
 
 
SERP obligation - current liability
$
3,104

 
$
3,087

SERP obligation - other long-term liability
8,934

 
8,687

    Total SERP obligation
$
12,038

 
$
11,774

Equity securities without readily determinable fair value:
We hold a total investment of $2.0 million in a privately-held company, including $0.5 million in equity securities without readily determinable fair value. The investment in equity securities without readily determinable fair value is included in the Other Assets line of the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. See Note 12 - Fair Value in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for more information on the valuation of these securities. We do not hold a majority voting interest and are not the variable interest primary beneficiary of the privately-held company, thus consolidation is not required.

Note 14. Derivative Instruments
We hold a total investment of $2.0 million in a privately-held company, including $1.5 million in stock warrants. The investment in stock warrants is accounted for as a derivative instrument and is included in the Other Assets line of the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. The stock warrants are convertible into equity shares of the privately-held company upon achieving certain milestones. The value of the stock warrants will fluctuate primarily in relation to the value of the privately-held company's underlying securities, either providing an appreciation in value or potentially expiring with no value. During the quarter ended September 30, 2019, the change in fair value of the stock warrants was not significant. See Note 12 - Fair Value in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for more information on the valuation of these securities.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Note 15. Postemployment Benefits
Our domestic employees participate in severance plans which provide severance benefits to eligible employees meeting the plans’ qualifications, primarily for involuntary termination without cause.
The components of net periodic postemployment benefit cost applicable to our severance plans were as follows:
 
Three Months Ended
 
September 30
(Amounts in Thousands)
2019
 
2018
Service cost
$
126

 
$
127

Interest cost
19

 
23

Amortization of actuarial income
(88
)
 
(99
)
Net periodic benefit cost
$
57

 
$
51

The benefit cost in the above table includes only normal recurring levels of severance activity, as estimated using an actuarial method. Unusual or non-recurring severance actions, such as restructuring actions, are not estimable using actuarial methods and are expensed in accordance with the applicable U.S. GAAP.

22



Note 16. Stock Compensation
Stock-based compensation expense during the three months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, was $2.1 million and $1.9 million, respectively. The total income tax benefit for stock compensation arrangements was $0.6 million during the three months ended September 30, 2019, and $0.5 million during the three months ended September 30, 2018.
During fiscal year 2020, the following stock compensation was awarded to officers and other key employees and to members of the Board of Directors who are not employees. All awards were granted under the 2017 Stock Incentive Plan. For more information on stock compensation awards, refer to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2019.
Type of Award
 
Quarter Awarded
 
Targeted Shares or Units
 
Grant Date Fair Value (5)
Annual Performance Shares (1)
 
1st Quarter
 
34,305

 
$16.85
-
$16.93
Relative Total Shareholder Return Performance Units (2)
 
1st Quarter
 
28,080

 
$21.25
Restricted Share Units (3)
 
1st Quarter
 
188,588

 
$16.85
-
$17.24
Unrestricted Shares (4)
 
1st Quarter
 
9,091

 
$17.19
(1) Annual performance shares were awarded to officers and other key employees. The number of annual performance shares to be issued will be dependent upon the Company’s return on invested capital during fiscal year 2020, with a percentage payout ranging from 0% to 200% of the target number set forth above. The maximum number of shares that can be issued under these awards is 68,610. Annual performance shares vest on June 30, 2020.
(2) Performance units were awarded to key officers under the Company’s Relative Total Shareholder Return program. Vesting occurs at June 30, 2022. Participants will earn from 0% to 200% of the target award depending upon how the compound annual growth rate of Kimball International common stock ranks within the peer group at the end of the performance period. The maximum number of units that can be issued under these awards is 56,160.
(3) Restricted share units were awarded to officers and employees. Also, in connection with the redesign of the Company’s annual cash incentive plan certain employees were awarded time-based retention and performance-based transition units. The number of performance-based transition units to be issued will be dependent upon the Company’s EBITDA during fiscal year 2020, with a percentage payout ranging from 0% to 100% of the target. The maximum number of units that can be issued under the performance-based transition awards is 35,598. The Company also awarded performance-based transformation units that will earn from 0% to 100% of the target award depending upon the Company’s reduction of operating costs and EBITDA during fiscal year 2020. The maximum number of units that can be issued under the performance-based transformation award is 2,165. Vesting occurs at June 30, 2020, June 30, 2021, and June 30, 2022. Dividends accumulate over the vesting period for all awards except the time-based retention and performance-based transition awards.
(4) Unrestricted shares were awarded to non-employee members of the Board of Directors as consideration for service to Kimball International and do not have vesting periods, holding periods, restrictions on sale, or other restrictions.
(5) The grant date fair value of annual performance shares and restricted share units that do not receive dividends was based on the stock price at the date of the award, reduced by the present value of dividends normally paid over the vesting period which are not payable on outstanding annual performance share awards or certain restricted share unit awards. The grant date fair value of the Relative Total Shareholder Return awards was calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation. This valuation technique includes estimating the movement of stock prices and the effects of volatility, interest rates, and dividends. The grant date fair value of the restricted share units that receive dividends and unrestricted shares was based on the stock price at the date of the award.
Note 17. Variable Interest Entities
Our involvement with variable interest entities (“VIEs”) is limited to situations in which we are not the primary beneficiary as we lack the power to direct the activities that most significantly impact the VIE’s economic performance. Thus, consolidation is not required. Our involvement with VIEs consists of an investment in a privately-held company consisting of equity securities without readily determinable fair value and stock warrants, and notes receivable related to independent dealership financing.
The equity securities without readily determinable fair value and stock warrants were valued at $0.5 million and $1.5 million, respectively, at both September 30, 2019 and June 30, 2019 and were included in the Other Assets line of the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. For more information related to our investment in the privately-held company, see Note 12 - Fair Value in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.
The carrying value of the notes receivable for independent dealership financing were $1.0 million at both September 30, 2019 and June 30, 2019 and was included on the Receivables and Other Assets lines of our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.

23



We have no obligation to provide additional funding to the VIEs, and thus our exposure and risk of loss related to the VIEs is limited to the carrying value of the investment and notes receivable. Financial support provided by Kimball International to the VIEs was limited to the items discussed above during the quarter ended September 30, 2019.
Note 18. Credit Quality and Allowance for Credit Losses of Notes Receivable
We monitor credit quality and associated risks of notes receivable on an individual basis based on criteria such as financial stability of the party and collection experience in conjunction with general economic and market conditions. As of September 30, 2019 and June 30, 2019, we had no material past due outstanding notes receivable.
 
As of September 30, 2019
 
As of June 30, 2019
(Amounts in Thousands)
Unpaid Balance
 
Related Allowance
 
Receivable Net of Allowance
 
Unpaid Balance
 
Related Allowance
 
Receivable Net of Allowance
Independent Dealership Financing
$
1,022

 
$

 
$
1,022

 
$
1,010

 
$

 
$
1,010

Other Notes Receivable
122

 
122

 

 
122

 
122

 

Total
$
1,144

 
$
122

 
$
1,022

 
$
1,132

 
$
122

 
$
1,010


Note 19. Subsequent Event
On October 24, 2019, we entered into an amended and restated credit agreement (“Credit Agreement”) with JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as administrative agent. The Credit Agreement has a maturity date of October 24, 2024 and allows for up to $75 million in borrowings, with an option to increase the amount available for borrowing to $150 million at our request, subject to participating banks’ consent. We believe our principal sources of liquidity from available funds on hand, cash generated from operations, and the availability of borrowing under this Credit Agreement will be sufficient for the foreseeable future. There are currently no revolving loans outstanding under the Credit Agreement.
The revolving loans under the Credit Agreement may consist of, at our election, advances in U.S. dollars or advances in any other currency that is agreed to by the lenders. The proceeds of the revolving loans are to be used for general corporate purposes including acquisitions. A portion of the credit facility, not to exceed $10 million of the principal amount, will be available for the issuance of letters of credit. A commitment fee on the unused portion of principal amount of the credit facility is payable at a rate that ranges from 15.0 to 25.0 basis points per annum as determined by our ratio of consolidated total indebtedness to adjusted consolidated EBITDA.
The interest rate is dependent on the type of borrowings and will be one of the following two options:
the adjusted London Interbank Offered Rate (“Adjusted LIBO Rate” as defined in the Credit Agreement) in effect two business days prior to the advance (adjusted upwards to reflect bank reserve costs) for such interest period, plus the Eurocurrency Loans margin which can range from 100.0 to 175.0 basis points based on our ratio of consolidated total indebtedness to adjusted consolidated EBITDA; or    
the Alternate Base Rate, which is defined as the highest of the fluctuating rate per annum equal to the higher of
a.
prime rate as last quoted by The Wall Street Journal;
b.
1% per annum above the Adjusted LIBO rate; or
c.
1/2% per annum above the Federal Reserve Bank of New York;
plus the ABR Loans spread which can range from 0.0 to 75.0 basis points based on our ratio of consolidated total indebtedness to adjusted consolidated EBITDA.

24



Our financial covenants under the Credit Agreement require:
an adjusted leverage ratio of (a) consolidated total indebtedness minus unencumbered U.S. cash equivalents on hand in excess of $15,000,000 provided that the maximum subtraction shall not exceed $35,000,000 to (b) adjusted consolidated EBITDA, determined as of the end of each of its fiscal quarters for the then most recently ended four fiscal quarters, to not be greater than 3.0 to 1.0, and
a fixed charge coverage ratio of (a) the sum of (i) consolidated EBITDA, minus (ii) 50% of depreciation expense, minus (iii) taxes paid, minus (iv) dividends and distributions paid, minus if the Adjusted Leverage Ratio is greater than 1.00 to 1.00 for the then most-recently ended four fiscal quarter period, repurchase of Equity Interests to (b) the sum of (i) scheduled principal payments on indebtedness due and/or paid, plus (ii) interest expense, calculated on a consolidated basis in accordance with GAAP, for the trailing four quarters then ending, to not be less than 1.10 to 1.00.
The complete Credit Agreement was filed as Exhibit 10.1 to our Current Report on Form 8-K filed on October 30, 2019.

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Business Overview
For over 65 years, Kimball International, Inc. (the “Company,” “Kimball International,” “we,” “us,” or “our”) has created design- driven, innovative furnishings that have helped our customers shape spaces into places that bring possibility to life by enabling collaboration, discovery, wellness, and relaxation. We go to market through our family of brands: Kimball, National, Kimball Hospitality, David Edward, and D’style by Kimball Hospitality. Our values and integrity are demonstrated daily by embracing our purpose and guiding principles while fostering a culture of caring that establishes us as an employer of choice. We build success by nurturing long-term relationships with customers, employees, suppliers, shareholders and the communities in which we operate.
We closely monitor key indicators for the markets in which we compete. As reported by the Business and Institutional Furniture Manufacturer Association (“BIFMA”), the forecast by IHS Markit, a global information provider, as of October 2019 for the North American office furniture market, projects a year-over-year increase of 6.1% for calendar year 2019 and 2.2% for calendar year 2020. The forecast for two of the leading indicators for the hospitality furniture market in the August 2019 PwC Hospitality Directions U.S. report includes a projected increase in RevPAR (Revenue Per Available Room) of 1.1% for calendar year 2019 and 1.0% for calendar year 2020, while occupancy levels for calendar years 2019 and 2020 continue to hover at peak levels.
Management currently considers the following events, trends, and uncertainties to be most important to understanding our financial condition and operating performance:
‘Kimball International Connect’ Strategy - In May 2019, Kimball International introduced a comprehensive strategy to connect our purpose, our people, and our brands to drive growth and unlock the Company’s full potential. Kimball International Connect seeks to enable the power of our people and position our organization to engage at higher levels of collaboration and interdependence. We believe this strategy will successfully position us for the future and result in enhanced shareholder value over the long term. Our Kimball International Connect Strategy is comprised of four pillars:
Inspire Our People: Leveraging our legacy of a bold and entrepreneurial spirit, we are working to cultivate a high-performance, caring culture. We unveiled our new purpose to our employees on May 9, 2019 and are investing in our training, technology and systems to remain an employer of choice and a great place to work.
Build Our Capabilities: We are creating center-led functions, including finance, human resources, information technology and legal and are centralizing supply chain leadership to reduce duplication, deliver efficiencies, and drive consistency. We are also adopting ways of working to ensure the use of common best practices and approaches. To achieve our goals, we established a Program Management Office to oversee execution.
Fuel Our Future: We are driving lean throughout the organization, removing duplication at the business level, and infusing capital to accelerate efficiencies. Related to this, we are employing a more metrics-based approach and driving toward more formal standardized operating practices.
Accelerate Our Growth: We are continuing to advance new product development across our brands, selectively expanding our verticals and channels, including healthcare and e-commerce, and driving commercial excellence. We

25



believe by being our customers’ first choice for shaping places that bring collaboration, discovery, wellness and relaxation to life, we will capture greater market share.
Transformation Restructuring Plan - In June 2019, we announced a transformation restructuring plan that is expected to optimize resources for future growth, improve efficiency, and build capabilities across our organization. We believe the transformation restructuring plan will establish a more cost-efficient structure to better align our operations with our long-term strategic goals. The efforts are expected to generate annualized pre-tax savings of approximately $10.0 million when the transformation restructuring plan is fully implemented. We estimate pre-tax restructuring charges incurred through the end of fiscal year 2020 will be approximately $8.0 million to $9.0 million. The transformation restructuring plan includes the following:
Our overall manufacturing facility footprint is being reviewed to reduce excess capacity and gain efficiencies. We plan to exit a leased seating manufacturing facility in Martinsville, Virginia in the second half of fiscal year 2020 and are evaluating our production capabilities and capacity across our organization to identify additional opportunities.
The creation of center-led functions for finance, human resources, information technology and legal functions is expected to result in the standardization of processes and the elimination of duplication. In addition, we are centralizing our supply chain efforts to maximize supplier value and plan to drive more efficient practices and operations within our logistics function.
Kimball brand selling resources are being reallocated to higher-growth markets. We also ceased use of our four leased furniture showrooms across our brands during the first quarter of fiscal year 2020 and recognized impairment of the lease and associated leasehold improvements.
On October 26, 2018, we acquired substantially all of the assets and assumed certain specified limited liabilities of David Edward Furniture, Inc. (“David Edward”), which is headquartered in Baltimore, Maryland. David Edward is a premier designer and manufacturer of contract furniture, sold in the healthcare, corporate, education, and premium hospitality markets. David Edward products are sold primarily in the North American market. David Edward’s products are generally specified by architects and designers, represented through a network of independent representatives, and sold through authorized furniture dealerships. The David Edward product portfolio consists of classic and contemporary designs, focused primarily in the seating, tables, and ancillary furniture categories. In conjunction with the asset acquisition, we leased two existing David Edward production facilities in Baltimore, Maryland and Red Lion, Pennsylvania. See Note 4 - Acquisition in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.
We expect commodity prices to moderate, but we will continue to be exposed to fluctuations in transportation costs, which vary based upon freight carrier capacity and fuel prices. We utilize both steel and aluminum in our products, most of which is sourced domestically. The U.S. originally imposed tariffs of 25% on steel and 10% on aluminum imported from several countries effective June 2018. The government expanded its list of products subject to tariffs to include furniture products, parts, and components at a 10% rate effective September 2018, increasing to a 25% rate effective June 2019. The U.S. government continues to evaluate the ongoing need for tariffs, and if further tariffs are assessed the landed cost of our products could increase materially, which would reduce our net income if we are unable to mitigate the additional cost. We are actively striving to offset increases in the cost of these materials through supplier negotiations, global sourcing initiatives, product re-engineering and parts standardization, and price increases on our products.
Due to the contract and project nature of furniture markets, fluctuation in the demand for our products and variation in the gross margin on those projects is inherent to our business, which in turn impacts our operating results. Effective management of our manufacturing capacity is and will continue to be critical to our success. See below for further details regarding current sales and open order trends.
We expect to continue to invest in capital expenditures prudently, including potential acquisitions, that would enhance our capabilities and diversification while providing an opportunity for growth and improved profitability.
We have a strong focus on cost control and closely monitor market changes and our liquidity in order to proactively adjust our operating costs, discretionary capital spending, and dividend levels as needed. Managing working capital in conjunction with fluctuating demand levels is likewise key.
We continue to maintain a strong balance sheet. Our short-term liquidity available, represented as cash, cash equivalents, and short-term investments plus the unused amount of our credit facility, was $134.9 million at September 30, 2019.

26



Financial Overview
 
At or for the
Three Months Ended
 
 
 
September 30
 
 
(Amounts in Millions)
2019
 
2018
 
% Change
Net Sales
$
201.5

 
$
194.1

 
4
%
Organic Net Sales*
197.5

 
194.1

 
2
%
Gross Profit
70.4

 
65.9

 
7
%
Selling and Administrative Expenses
50.9

 
52.2

 
(2
%)
Restructuring Expense
4.4

 

 


Operating Income
15.1

 
13.7

 
10
%
Operating Income %
7.5
%
 
7.1
%
 


Adjusted Operating Income *
$
19.7

 
$
15.1

 
30
%
Adjusted Operating Income % *
9.8
%
 
7.8
%
 
 
Net Income
$
11.4

 
$
10.9

 
5
%
Net Income as a Percentage of Net Sales
5.7
%
 
5.6
%
 
 
Adjusted Net Income *
14.7

 
11.7

 
26
%
Diluted Earnings Per Share
$
0.31

 
$
0.29

 
 
Adjusted Diluted Earnings Per Share *
$
0.40

 
$
0.31

 
 
Return on Invested Capital **
51.0
%
 
42.6
%
 
 
Adjusted EBITDA *
$
23.8

 
$
19.2

 
24
%
Adjusted EBITDA as a Percentage of Net Sales *
11.8
%
 
9.9
%
 
 
Open Orders **
$
150.4

 
$
151.8

 
(1
%)
* Items indicated represent Non-GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles) measurements.
** Items indicated represent Key Performance Indicators.
See the “Non-GAAP Financial Measures and Other Key Performance Indicators” section below.
Net Sales by End Vertical Market
 
 
 
 
 
 
Three Months Ended

 
 
September 30

 
(Amounts in Millions)
2019
 
2018

% Change
Commercial
$
55.3

 
$
56.6

 
(2
%)
Education
34.7


34.6


%
Finance
17.2


18.2


(5
%)
Government
18.6


17.1


9
%
Healthcare
28.9


24.4


18
%
Hospitality
46.8