10-Q 1 form10-q.htm
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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

 

QUARTERLY REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2023

 

TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE EXCHANGE ACT

 

For the transition period from ___________ to _____________

 

Commission File Number 000-56174

 

KID CASTLE EDUCATIONAL CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware   59-2549529
(State or other jurisdiction   (I.R.S. Employer
of incorporation or organization)   Identification No.)
     
370 Amapola Ave., Suite 200A, Torrance California   90501
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

 

310-895-1839

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: None

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: COMMON STOCK, $0.00001 PAR VALUE

 

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ☐ No ☒

 

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ☐ No ☒

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the past 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or, an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer”, “smaller reporting company”, and “emerging growth company”, in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer ☐   Accelerated filer ☐
Non-accelerated filer   Smaller reporting company
(Do not check if smaller reporting company)   Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐ No

 

As of September 30, 2023, there were 22,324,706 shares of the registrant’s common stock, $0.00001 par value per share, issued and outstanding.

 

 

 

 
 

 

KID CASTLE EDUCATIONAL CORPORATION

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I. – FINANCIAL INFORMATION  
   
Item 1. Financial Statements 1
   
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 26
   
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk 34
   
Item 4. Controls and Procedures 34
   
PART II. – OTHER INFORMATION  
   
Item 1. Legal Proceedings 36
   
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds 37
   
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities 37
   
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 37
   
Item 5. Other Information 37
   
Item 6. Exhibits 37
   
Signatures 38

 

i
 

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements

 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of September 30, 2023 (unaudited) and December 31, 2022 (audited) 2
   
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the three months ended September 30, 2023, and 2022 (unaudited) 3
   
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the three months ended September 30, 2023, and 2022 (unaudited) 4
   
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Deficit (Equity) as of September 30, 2023 (unaudited) 5
   
Notes to the condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited) 6

 

1
 

 

KID CASTLE EDUCATIONAL CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

  

September 30,

2023

  

December 31,

2022

 
ASSETS          
Current Assets:          
Cash and cash equivalents  $19,166   $64,434 
Investments - trading securities   2,882    143,198 
Total Current Assets   22,048    207,632 
           
Accrued Interest Receivable  $118,917   $85,375 
Investments - unrelated parties   30,000    30,000 
Fixed assets - net   58,101    101,081 
Notes Receivable Entrepreneurship Development   2,080,364    1,693,420 
Long term Notes Receivable - related parties   1,827,413    747,000 
Mortgage Notes Receivable - related parties   -    - 
Long term Investments - related parties   191,757    553,314 
Total assets   4,328,600    3,417,822 
           
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)          
Current Liabilities:          
Accrued expenses   2,400    2,400 
Marginal loan payable   -    - 
Total Current Liabilities  $2,400   $2,400 
           
Long-Term Liabilities:          
Notes payable - net of current portion  $662,756   $419,979 
Line of credit - related party, net of current portion   -    - 
Total Long-Term Liabilities   662,756    419,979 
Total Liabilities  $665,156   $422,379 
           
STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY          
Preferred stock, $.00001 par value, 1,000,000 shares authorized, 100,000 issued and outstanding as at September 30, 2023, and December 31, 2022  $10   $10 
Common Stock, $0.00001 par value, 1,000,000,000 shares authorized, 22,324,706 issued and outstanding as at September 30, 2023, and December 31, 2022.   223    223 
Additional paid in capital   7,638,427    7,638,427 
Accumulated deficit   (3,975,216)   (4,643,217)
           
Total Stockholders’ Equity  $3,663,444   $2,995,443 
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity   4,328,600    3,417,822 

 

The accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements

 

2
 

 

KID CASTLE EDUCATIONAL CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(Unaudited)

 

   2023   2022   2023   2022 
  

For the three months ended

September 30,

  

For the nine months ended

September 30,

 
   2023   2022   2023   2022 
Revenue:                
Entrepreneurship Development Initiative  $-   $985,033   $1,425,000   $3,760,033 
EDI Interest Income   -    36,083    33,541    114,416 
Principal transactions - Net   (18,791)   15,345    (322,963)   (590,318)
Total Revenue  $(18,791)   1,000,378    1,135,578    3,284,131 
                     
Cost of goods sold:                    
Entrepreneurship Development        442,063    258,671    871,090 
Total cost of goods sold   -    442,063    258,671    871,090 
Gross profit   (18,791)   558,315    876,907    2,413,041 
                     
Operating expenses:                    
General and administrative   32,235.00    72,729.00    100,036    212,941 
Professional fees   25,877.00    27,668.00    108,756    135,324 
Advertising and promotions   -    120.00    114    1,083 
Interest expense   -    -    -    38 
Total operating expenses   58,112    100,517    208,906    349,386 
Income (loss) from operations   (76,903)   457,798    668,001    2,063,655 
                     
Other Income                    
Dividends   -    -    -    - 
Unrealized gain (loss)   -    -    -    3,700 
Net Income   (76,903)   457,798    668,001    2,067,355 
                     
Earnings (loss) per Share: Basic and Diluted  $(0.0034)  $0.0205   $0.0299   $0.0926 
                     
Weighted Average Common Shares Outstanding: Basic and Diluted   22,324,706    22,324,706    22,324,706    22,324,706 

 

The accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements

 

3
 

 

KID CASTLE EDUCATIONAL CORPORATION

STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT

 

   Shares   Shares   Amount   Capital   Deficit   Total 
               Additional         
   Common   Preferred       Paid-In   Accumulated     
   Shares   Shares   Amount   Capital   Deficit   Total 
                         
Balance at December 31, 2008-  25,000,000 -  0   $8,592,138   $259,341   $(7,638,660)  $1,212,819 
Reverse Split in 2009-  (22,675,294)-  -    (8,590,445)   7,386,026    (12,708)   (1,217,127)
Balance at December 31, 2018-  2,324,706 -  0   $1,683   $7,645,367   $(7,651,368)  $(4,308)
Common stock issued issuance   20,000,000         200              200 
Preferred stock conversion   900,000,000         9,000              9,000 
Preferred shares issued        100,000    10              10 
Acquisitions             303    180,746         181,049 
Net (income) loss-  - -  -    -    -    (149,682)   (149,682)
Balance, December 31, 2019-  922,324,706 -  100,000   $11,210   $7,826,113   $(7,801,051)  $36,269 
Preferred shares issued        900,000    13    49,840         49,852 
                               
Net (income) loss-  - -  -    -    -    (82,980)   (82,980)
Balance, December 31, 2020-  922,324,706 -  1,000,000   $11,222   $7,873,783   $(7,879,875)  $3,141 
Common shares canceled   (900,000,000)   (100,000)   (10,999)             (9,001)
Acquisition & Dispositions                  (235,356)   263,381    28,025 
Net (income) loss-  - -  -    -    -    2,206,953    2,206,953 
Balance, December 31, 2021-  22,324,706 -  900,000   $223   $7,638,427   $(5,409,541)  $2,229,119 
                               
Dispositions Adjustment                       (1,652)   (1,652)
Net income-  - -  -    -    -    767,976    767,976 
Balance, December 31, 2022-  22,324,706 -  900,000   $223   $7,638,427   $(4,643,217)  $2,995,443 
                               
Net income-  - -  -    -    -    668,001    668,001 
                               
Balance, September 30, 2023-  22,324,706 -  900,000   $223   $7,638,427   $(3,975,216)  $3,663,444 

 

The accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements

 

4
 

 

KID CASTLE EDUCATIONAL CORPORATION

STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

Period Ended September 30, 2023, and 2022

 

   2023   2022 
   September 30, 
   2023   2022 
Cash Flows from Operating Activities:          
Net Income (Loss)  $668,001   $2,067,355 
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash used in operating activities:          
Inventory Asset:Trading Securities   140,316    242,148 
Other Accrued Liabilities   (33,542)   (59,747)
Depreciation   42,980    46,771 
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities   817,755    2,296,527 
           
Net Cash Flows from Investing Activities:          
Entrepreneurship Development   496,328    (3,511,371)
Crypto and Digital Assets        (34,000)
Long term Investments        (447,475)
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities   496,328    (3,992,846)
           
Net Cash Flows from Financing Activities          
Notes payable - related party   (166,764)   112,119 
Notes payable - Entrepreneurship Development   (1,435,364)   500,000 
Notes payable - Long Term   242,777    575,000 
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities   (1,359,351)   1,187,119 
           
Net increase (decrease) in cash:   (45,268)   (509,200)
Cash at the beginning of the period:   64,434    599,390 
Cash at the end of the period:  $19,166   $90,190 
           
Supplemental disclosures of cash flow information Cash paid during the period for:          
Cash paid for interest  $-   $- 
Cash paid for tax  $-   $- 

 

The accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements

 

5
 

 

KID CASTLE EDUCATIONAL CORPORATION

Notes to Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 1. NATURE OF OPERATIONS

 

Nature of Business

 

The Company and Nature of Business

 

Kid Castle Educational Corporation, a Delaware corporation, (“Kid Castle,” “the Company,” “We,” “KDCE,” “Us” or “Our’) operates and manages a portfolio of real estate properties, digital assets, and other in-demand properties. Kid Castle engages in rollup and consolidation of real estate, Biopharma and digital economy assets and operations.

 

Kid Castle was the result of a share exchange transaction, commonly referred to as a reverse merger, pursuant to which shareholders of an offshore operating company take control of a U.S. company that has no operations (commonly referred to as a shell company), and the offshore operating company becomes a subsidiary of the U.S. company. In KDCE case, the offshore company was Higoal Developments Ltd., which was the parent company of Kid Castle Internet Technologies Limited and Kid Castle Education Software Development Co. Limited, KDCE’s operating companies that run our English language instruction business. The U.S. or shell company, at the time of the share exchange, was King Ball International Technology Corporation.

 

Kid Castle used to be a Florida corporation until the company voluntarily dissolved its Florida registration with intention to simultaneously incorporate in Delaware and convert into a Delaware corporation. Although the company immediately finalized its registration effort to convert into a Delaware Corporation, the company’s registered agent who was supposed to submit the registration package to the Delaware Secretary of State for certification, failed to make a timely submission. Later in January 2019, when the company realized that the Delaware incorporation/registration package/process was never submitted to the Delaware Secretary of State nor completed in any other way or form, the Company went ahead and resubmitted the required registration package and was then formally re-incorporated in Delaware and convert into a Delaware corporation. Thus, the company was formally incorporated in Delaware and converted into a Delaware Corporation in January 2019.

 

The re-incorporation in Delaware, which occurred in January 2019, has placed at risk, voidable and unenforceable, all and any liabilities that may have accrued, including any material agreements the Company may have executed during the period between March 22, 2011, and January 2019. To the best of our knowledge, no such liabilities that were accrued and no material agreement were entered into by the company during the period between March 22, 2011, and January 2019. In addition, there could be penalties or legal liabilities that may have accrued as a result of conducting business from 2011 to 2019 without properly registering with any State. To the best of our knowledge, as at September 7, 2020, no such penalties or liabilities have accrued to the company as a result of conducting business from 2011 to 2019 without properly registering with any State. However, there is no guarantee that such penalties or liabilities would not accrue or arise in the future.

 

On October 21, 2019, pursuant to a stock purchase agreement dated October 2, 2019, Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc., a California corporation, purchased one (1) million shares of its preferred shares (one preferred share is convertible 1,000 share of common stocks) of the Company, representing 97.82% of our total issued and outstanding voting shares of common stock and preferred stock. Simultaneously with the purchase, the officers and directors of the Company resigned. Frank I Igwealor, Chairman and CEO, Secretary, Treasurer, and Director; Patience C Ogbozor, Director; and Dr. Solomon SK Mbagwu, MD, Director, were elected to replace them. Following the share sales to Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc., the purchaser converted 900,000 of the preferred shares for 900,000,000 shares of the Company’s current outstanding shares of common stock.

 

Following the consummation of the October 21, 2019 transactions, the Company decided to restart filing important information immediately. The Company used the Form 10-12(g) to register its common stock with the SEC.

 

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On September 15, 2020, Kid Castle Educational Corporation (the “Company”) entered into a stock purchase agreement with certain corporation related to our President and CEO with respect to the private placement of 900,000 shares of its preferred stock at a purchase price of $3 in cash and a transfer of 100% interest in, and control of Community Economic Development Capital, LLC (a California Limited Liability Company). The shares were issued to the investors without registration under the Securities Act of 1933 based upon exemptions from registration provided under Section 4(2) of the Act and Regulation D promulgated thereunder. The issuance did not involve any public offering; no general solicitation or general advertising was used in connection with the offering. Community Economic Development Capital is a specialty real estate holding company for specialized assets including, affordable housing, opportunity zones properties, medical real estate investments, related commercial facilities, industrial and commercial real estate, and other real estate related services.

 

Similarly, on September 16, 2020, as part of its purchase of unregistered securities from certain corporation related to our President and CEO, the Company, received $3.00 in cash and 1,000,000 shares of its preferred stock, and in exchange transferred 100% interest in, and control of Community Economic Development Capital, LLC (“CED Capital”), a California Limited Liability Company, and 97% of the issued and outstanding shares of Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc. (“CBDX”), to GiveMePower Corporation, a Nevada corporation. This transaction gave the Company 88% of the voting control of GiveMePower.

 

On April 21, 2021, the Company sold Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc. (“CBDX”), a California corporation, to Premier Information Management, Inc. for $1 in cash. As further consideration pursuant to the stated sales, CBDX returned Kid Castle Educational Inc., the parent Company of GMPW, the 100,000 shares of KDCE preferred stock and 900,000,000 shares of KDCE common stock that CBDX bought in October of 2019. Pursuant to the April 21, 2021 transaction, CBDX ceased from being a subsidiary of GMPW, effective April 1, 2021.

 

On December 30, 2021, in exchange for its 87% control block in GiveMePower Corporation, the Company received 100% stake in Alpharidge Capital LLC from GiveMePower, in a cashless transaction, resulting in each public company going its separate way as an independent company.

 

The consolidated financial statements of the Company therefore include the 12-months operating results of wholly owned subsidiaries of Alpharidge Capital LLC. (“Alpharidge”), and the balance sheet represent the financial position as at 09/30/2023 of the Company which excludes GiveMePower and its subsidiaries, but Alpharidge Capital LLC and other subsidiaries in which Kid Castle has a controlling voting interest and entities consolidated under the variable interest entities (“VIE”) provisions of ASC 810, “Consolidation” (“ASC 810”), after elimination of intercompany transactions and accounts.

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its subsidiaries, in which the Company has a controlling voting interest and entities consolidated under the variable interest entities (“VIE”) provisions of ASC 810, “Consolidation” (“ASC 810”). Inter-company balances and transactions have been eliminated upon consolidation.

 

ASC 810 requires that the investor with the controlling financial interest should consolidate the investee/affiliate. ASC 810-10 requires that an equity interest investor consolidates a VIE when it retains an investment in the entity, is considered a variable interest investor in the entity, and is the primary beneficiary of the entity. An investor in a VIE is a “variable interest beneficiary” when, per an arrangement’s governing documents, the investor will absorb a portion of the VIE’s expected losses or will receive a portion of the entity’s “residual returns.” The variable interest beneficiary retaining a controlling financial interest in the VIE is designated as its “primary beneficiary” and must consolidate the VIE. A variable interest beneficiary retains a “controlling financial interest” in a VIE when that beneficiary retains the power to direct the activities of the VIE that have the greatest influence over the VIE’s economic performance and retains an obligation to absorb the VIE’s significant losses or the right to receive benefits from the VIE that could potentially be significant to the VIE.

 

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NOTE 2. GOING CONCERN

 

Our financial statements are prepared using accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America applicable to a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and the liquidation of liabilities in the normal course of business. For the three months ended September 30, 2023, we reported revenue of $(18,791) and an accumulated deficit of $3,975,216 as of September 30, 2023. These conditions raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. The financial statements do not include any adjustments to reflect the possible future effects on the recoverability and classification of assets or the amounts and classification of liabilities that may result from the outcome of these uncertainties. Our ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon our ability to raise additional debt or equity funding to meet our ongoing operating expenses and ultimately in merging with another entity with experienced management and profitable operations. No assurances can be given that we will be successful in achieving these objectives.

 

NOTE 3. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The summary of significant accounting policies is presented to assist in the understanding of the financial statements. These policies conform to accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America and have been consistently applied. The Company has elected a calendar year of December 31 year-end.

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The Consolidated Financial Statements include the accounts of Kid Castle Educational Corporation and all of our controlled subsidiary companies. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated. Investments in business entities in which we do not have control, but we have the ability to exercise significant influence over operating and financial policies (generally 20% to 50% ownership) are accounted for using the equity method of accounting. Operating results of acquired businesses are included in the Consolidated Statements of Income from the date of acquisition. We consolidate variable interest entities if we have operational and financial control, and are deemed to be the >50.1% beneficiary of the profit and loss of the entity. Operating results for variable interest entities in which we are determined to be the primary beneficiary are included in the Consolidated Statements of Income from the date such determination is made. For convenience and ease of reference, we refer to the financial statement caption “Income before Income Taxes and Equity Income” as “pre-tax income” throughout the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

COVID-19 Risks, Impacts and Uncertainties

 

COVID-19 Risks, Impacts and Uncertainties —We are subject to the risks arising from COVID-19’s impacts on the residential real estate industry. Our management believes that these impacts, which include but are not limited to the following, could have a significant negative effect on our future financial position, results of operations, and cash flows: (i) prohibitions or limitations on in-person activities associated with residential real estate transactions; (ii) lack of consumer desire for in-person interactions and physical home tours; and (iii) deteriorating economic conditions, such as increased unemployment rates, recessionary conditions, lower yields on individuals’ investment portfolios, and more stringent mortgage financing conditions. In addition, we have considered the impacts and uncertainties of COVID-19 in our use of estimates in preparation of our consolidated financial statements. These estimates include, but are not limited to, likelihood of achieving performance conditions under performance-based equity awards, net realizable value of inventory, and the fair value of reporting units and goodwill for impairment.

 

From April 2020, following the government lockdown order, we asked all employees to begin to work from their homes and we also reduced the number of hours available to each of our employees by approximately by approximately 75%. These actions taken in response to the economic impact of COVID-19 on our business resulted in a reduction of productivity for the period ended September 30, 2023. All costs related to these actions are included in general and administrative expenses, as these costs were determined to be direct and incremental.

 

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Use of Estimates and Assumptions

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

We maintain cash balances in a non-interest-bearing account that currently does not exceed federally insured limits. For the purpose of the statements of cash flows, all highly liquid investments with a maturity of three months or less are considered to be cash equivalents. As of September 30, 2023, and December 31, 2022, we did maintain $19,166 and $64,434 balance of cash equivalents respectively.

 

Financial Instruments

 

The estimated fair values for financial instruments were determined at discrete points in time based on relevant market information. These estimates involved uncertainties and could not be determined with precision. The carrying amount of the our accounts payable and accruals, our accruals- related parties and loans – related parties approximate their fair values because of the short-term maturities of these instruments.

 

Fair Value Measurements:

 

ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures (“ASC 820”), provides a comprehensive framework for measuring fair value and expands disclosures which are required about fair value measurements. Specifically, ASC 820 sets forth a definition of fair value and establishes a hierarchy prioritizing the inputs to valuation techniques, giving the highest priority to quoted prices in active markets for identical assets and liabilities and the lowest priority to unobservable value inputs. ASC 820 defines the hierarchy as follows:

 

Level 1 – Quoted prices are available in active markets for identical assets or liabilities as of the reported date. The types of assets and liabilities included in Level 1 are highly liquid and actively traded instruments with quoted prices, such as equities listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

 

Level 2 – Pricing inputs are other than quoted prices in active markets but are either directly or indirectly observable as of the reported date. The types of assets and liabilities in Level 2 are typically either comparable to actively traded securities or contracts or priced with models using highly observable inputs.

 

Level 3 – Significant inputs to pricing that are unobservable as of the reporting date. The types of assets and liabilities included in Level 3 are those with inputs requiring significant management judgment or estimation, such as complex and subjective models and forecasts used to determine the fair value of financial transmission rights.

 

The availability of valuation techniques and observable inputs can vary from security to security and is affected by a wide variety of factors, including the type of security, whether the security is new and not yet established in the marketplace, and other characteristics particular to the transaction. To the extent that valuation is based on models or inputs that are less observable or unobservable in the market, the determination of fair value requires more judgment. Those estimated values do not necessarily represent the amounts that may be ultimately realized due to the occurrence of future circumstances that cannot be reasonably determined. Because of the inherent uncertainty of valuation, those estimated values may be materially higher or lower than the values that would have been used had a ready market for the securities existed. Accordingly, the degree of judgment exercised by the Company in determining fair value is greatest for securities categorized in Level 3. In certain cases, the inputs used to measure fair value may fall into different levels of the fair value hierarchy. In such cases, for disclosure purposes, the level in the fair value hierarchy within which the fair value measurement falls in its entirety is determined by the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement.

 

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Fair value is a market-based measure considered from the prospective of a market participant rather than an entity-specific measure. Therefore, even when market assumptions are not readily available, the Company’s own assumptions are set to reflect those that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability at the measurement date. The Company uses prices and inputs that are current as of the measurement date, including during periods of market dislocation. In periods of market dislocation, the observability of prices and inputs may be reduced for many securities. This condition could cause a security to be reclassified to a lower level within the fair value hierarchy.

 

The Company values its securities that are freely tradable and are listed on a national securities exchange or reported on the NASDAQ national market at their last sales price as of the last business day of the year. Changes in fair value is reflected in the Company’s statement of operations.

 

Many cash and over-the-counter (OTC) contracts have bid-and-ask prices that can be observed in the marketplace. Bid prices reflect the highest price that the marketplace participants are willing to pay for an asset. Ask prices represent the lowest price that the marketplace participants are willing to accept for an asset. For securities whose inputs are based on bid-ask prices, the Company’s policy for securities traded in the OTC markets and listed securities for which no sale was reported on that date are valued at their last reported “bid” price if held long, and last reported “asked” price if sold short. The Company considers these investments level 1 securities for active markets and level 2 securities for thinly traded markets.

 

Our financial instruments consist of accounts payable and accruals and our accruals- related parties. The carrying amount of the out accounts payable and accruals, accruals- related parties and loans – related parties approximate their fair values because of the short-term maturities of these instruments.

 

The table below describes the Company’s valuation of financial instruments using guidance from ASC 820-10:

 

Description  Level 1   Level 2   Level 3 
             
Investments – trading securities – September 30, 2023  $2,882   $      -   $      - 
                
Investments – trading securities – December 31, 2022  $143,198   $-   $- 

 

Investment – Trading Securities

 

All investment securities are classified as trading securities and are carried at fair value in accordance with ASC 320 Investments — Debt and Equity Securities. Investment transactions are recorded on a trade date basis. Realized gains or losses on sales of investments are based on the first-in, first-out or the specific identification method. Realized and unrealized gains or losses on investments are recorded in the statements of operations as realized and unrealized gains or losses as net revenue. All investment securities are held and transacted by the Company’s broker firm. The Company did not hold more than 4.9% of equity of the shares of any public companies as investments as of September 30, 2023.

 

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All investments that are listed on a securities exchange are valued at their last sales price on the primary securities exchange on which such securities are traded on such date. Securities that are not listed on any exchange but are traded over-the-counter are valued at the mean between the last “bid” and “ask” price for such security on such date. The Company does not have any investment securities for which market quotes are not readily available.

 

The Company’s trading securities are held by a third-party brokerage firm, and composed of publicly traded companies with readily available fair value which are quoted prices in active markets.

 

Investments

 

The Company makes certain strategic investments related to its business which are included in other assets in the condensed consolidated statements of financial condition. The Company accounts for these investments as follows:

 

  Under the equity method of accounting as required under FASB ASC Topic 323, “Investments – Equity Method and Joint Ventures.” These investments, including where the investee is a limited partnership or limited liability company, are recorded at the fair value amount of the Company’s initial investment and are adjusted each period for the Company’s share of the investee’s income or loss. Contributions paid to and distributions received from equity method investees are recorded as additions or reductions, respectively, to the respective investment balance.
  At fair value, if the investment in equity securities has a readily determinable fair value.
  At adjusted cost, if the investment does not have a readily determinable fair value. Adjusted cost represents the historical cost, less impairment if any. If the Company identifies observable price changes in orderly transactions for the identical or a similar investment of the same issuer, the Company measures the equity security at fair value as of the date that the observable transaction occurred in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 321, “Investments in Equity Securities.”

 

A judgmental aspect of accounting for investments is evaluating whether a decline in the value of an investment has occurred. The evaluation of impairment is dependent on specific quantitative and qualitative factors and circumstances surrounding an investment, including recurring operating losses, credit defaults and subsequent rounds of financing. Most of the Company’s equity investments do not have readily determinable market values. All investments are reviewed for changes in circumstances or occurrence of events that suggest the Company’s investment may not be recoverable. An impairment loss, if any, is recognized in the period the determination is made. For the year ended December 31, 2022, the Company carried on its balance sheet, Investments in the total amount of $1,869,748. Following the collapse of the Silicon Valley Bank, due to semi-permanent impairment of securities in its investment portfolio, the Company reviewed its investment portfolio and concluded that some of the Company’s investment may not be recoverable. Using a mark-to-market approach, the Company wrote down and reserved $1,316,237 of its investment portfolio, as impairment loss on it Investments portfolio. As at September 30, 2023, the portfolio has a net balance of $191,757.

 

Significant Transaction

 

Significant Transaction, also known as common control transactions occur frequently, particularly in the context of reorganizations, spinoffs, and initial public offerings. Common control transactions are generally accounted for by the receiving entity based on the nature of the transactions. For example, transactions involving the transfer of an asset (such as an unoccupied building) are accounted for by the receiving entity at the carrying value of the asset transferred on a prospective basis. Conversely, transactions involving the transfer of a business ordinarily will result in a change in reporting entity for the receiving entity and require retrospective combination of the entities for all periods presented using the historical cost basis of the parent.

 

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ASC 850 covers transactions and relationships with related parties. It applies to all reporting entities, including the separate financial statements of a subsidiary, as discussed in ASC 850-10-15-2. Identifying related party relationships and transactions requires a reporting entity to first determine whether a party meets the definition of a “related party.”

 

ASC 850-10-20 described related parties to include:

 

  a. Affiliates of the entity
  b. Entities for which investments in their equity securities would be required, absent the election of the fair value option under the Fair Value Option Subsection of Section 825-10-15, to be accounted for by the equity method by the investing entity
  c. Trusts for the benefit of employees, such as pension and profit-sharing trusts that are managed by or under the trusteeship of management
  d. Principal owners of the entity and members of their immediate families
  e. Management of the entity and members of their immediate families
  f. Other parties with which the entity may deal if one party controls or can significantly influence the management or operating policies of the other to an extent that one of the transacting parties might be prevented from fully pursuing its own separate interests
  g. Other parties that can significantly influence the management or operating policies of the transacting parties or that have an ownership interest in one of the transacting parties and can significantly influence the other to an extent that one or more of the transacting parties might be prevented from fully pursuing its own separate interests

 

The following definitions applies under ASC 850-10-20

 

Affiliate: A party that, directly or indirectly through one or more intermediaries, controls, is controlled by, or is under common control with an entity.

 

Control: The possession, direct or indirect, of the power to direct or cause the direction of the management and policies of an entity through ownership, by contract, or otherwise.

 

Immediate family: Family members who might control or influence a principal owner or a member of management, or who might be controlled or influenced by a principal owner or a member of management, because of the family relationship.

 

Management: Persons who are responsible for achieving the objectives of the entity and who have the authority to establish policies and make decisions by which those objectives are to be pursued. Management normally includes members of the board of directors, the chief executive officer, chief operating officer, vice presidents in charge of principal business functions (such as sales, administration, or finance), and other persons who perform similar policy making functions. Persons without formal titles also may be members of management.

 

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Principal owners: Owners of record or known beneficial owners of more than 10% of the voting interests of the entity.

 

FASB Statement No. 141 (EITF 02-5), in conjunction with SEC staff’s conclusions in EITF 02-5 stated that common control exists between (or among) separate entities in the following situations:

 

  An individual or enterprise holds more than 50% of the voting ownership interest of each entity.
  A group of shareholders holds more than 50% of the voting ownership interest of each entity, and contemporaneous written evidence of an agreement to vote a majority of the entities’ shares in concert exists.
  Immediate family members (married couples and their children, but not their grandchildren) hold more than 50% of the voting ownership interest of each entity (with no evidence that those family members will vote their shares in any way other than in concert). Entities may be owned in varying combinations among living siblings and their children. Those situations require careful consideration regarding the substance of the ownership and voting relationships.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2022, the Company recorded several significant transactions including loans from our officers, directors, and entities under the control or influence of our officers and directors.

 

Related Party Transactions:

 

A related party is generally defined as (i) any person that holds 10% or more of our membership interests including such person’s immediate families, (ii) our management, (iii) someone that directly or indirectly controls, is controlled by or is under common control with us, or (iv) anyone who can significantly influence our financial and operating decisions. A transaction is considered to be a related party transaction when there is a transfer of resources or obligations between related parties. Last fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, the Company sold nine of its EDI Notes and one Mortgage Note to Los Angeles Community Capital (LA Community Capital), a Company controlled by our President and CEO, in exchange for long-term debt owed to LA Community Capital and its affiliates. The EDI Notes were sold at their face (stated) amount without discount and the Mortgage Note was sold at face (stated) amount plus accrued interest. The EDI Notes have a total face amount of $2.2 million which is equivalent to the Mortgage Notes face amount of $2.2 million as of December 30, 2022, the date of the sale/purchase transaction.

 

Revenue, Assets and Liabilities of Consolidated Subsidiary and Financial Statement Relationship

 

Kid Castle Educational Corporation is 81.75% owned and controlled by Video River Networks, Inc. Because of the consolidated subsidiary relationship between these two public companies, the singular Revenue, Assets and Liabilities recognized and disclosed on the financial statements of Kid Castle Educational Corporation are also recognized and disclosed on the financial statements of Video River Networks, Inc. pursuant to ASC 810.

 

Leases:

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, “Leases” that requires for leases longer than one year, a lessee to recognize in the statement of financial condition a right-of-use asset, representing the right to use the underlying asset for the lease term, and a lease liability, representing the liability to make lease payments. The accounting update also requires that for finance leases, a lessee recognize interest expense on the lease liability, separately from the amortization of the right-of-use asset in the statements of earnings, while for operating leases, such amounts should be recognized as a combined expense. In addition, this accounting update requires expanded disclosures about the nature and terms of lease agreements. The Company has reviewed the new standard and does not expect it to have a material impact on the statement of financial condition or its net capital.

 

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Prior to January 1, 2019, the Company accounted for leases under Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) 840, Accounting for Leases. Effective from January 1, 2019, the Company adopted the guidance of ASC 842, Leases, which requires an entity to recognize a right-of-use asset and a lease liability for virtually all leases. On February 25, 2016, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), to increase transparency and comparability among organizations by recognizing lease assets and lease liabilities on the balance sheet and disclosing key information about leasing transactions. ASC 842 requires that lessees recognize right of use assets and lease liabilities calculated based on the present value of lease payments for all lease agreements with terms that are greater than twelve months. It requires for leases longer than one year, a lessee to recognize in the statement of financial condition a right·of·use asset, representing the right to use the underlying asset for the lease term, and a lease liability, representing the liability to make lease payments. ASC 842 distinguishes leases as either a finance lease or an operating lease that affects how the leases are measured and presented in the statement of operations and statement of cash flows. ASC 842 supersedes nearly all existing lease accounting guidance under GAAP issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) including ASC Topic 840, Leases.

 

The accounting update also requires that for finance leases, a lessee recognize interest expense on the lease liability, separately from the amortization of the right-of-use asset in the statements of earnings, while for operating leases, such amounts should be recognized as a combined expense. In addition, this accounting update requires expanded disclosures about the nature and terms of lease agreements.

 

The Company does not have operating and financing leases as of September 30, 2023. The adoption of ASC 842 did not materially impact our results of operations, cash flows, or presentation thereof. The Company has reviewed the new standard and does not expect it to have a material impact to the statement of financial condition or its net capital.

 

Income Taxes:

 

Under the asset and liability method prescribed within ASC 740, Income Taxes, the Company recognizes deferred tax assets and liabilities for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between financial statement carrying amounts of assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be realized or settled. The effect of a change in tax rates on deferred tax assets and liabilities is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. The realizability of deferred tax assets is assessed throughout the year and a valuation allowance is recorded, if necessary, to reduce net deferred tax assets to the amount more likely than not to be realized. Certain prior period deferred tax disclosures were reclassified to conform with current period presentation.

 

ASC 740 provides that a tax benefit from an uncertain tax position may be recognized when it is more likely than not that the position will be sustained upon examination, including resolutions of any related appeals or litigation processes, based on the technical merits of the position. ASC 740 also provides guidance on measurement, derecognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure, and transition.

 

The Company’s practice is to recognize interest accrued related to unrecognized tax benefits in interest expense and penalties in selling and administrative expense. as of September 30, 2023, the Company had no accrued interest or penalties on unrecognized tax benefits.

 

The provision for income taxes is computed using the asset and liability method, under which deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities, and for operating losses and tax credit carry-forwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using the currently enacted tax rates that apply to taxable income in effect for the years in which those tax assets are expected to be realized or settled. We record a valuation allowance to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount that is believed more likely than not to be realized.

 

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Uncertain Tax Positions:

 

We evaluate tax positions in a two-step process. We first determine whether it is more likely than not that a tax position will be sustained upon examination, based on the technical merits of the position. If a tax position meets the more-likely-than-not recognition threshold it is then measured to determine the amount of benefit to recognize in the financial statements. The tax position is measured as the largest amount of benefit that is greater than 50% likely of being realized upon ultimate settlement. We classify gross interest and penalties and unrecognized tax benefits that are not expected to result in payment or receipt of cash within one year as long-term liabilities in the financial statements.

 

Revenue Recognition:

 

The Company recognizes revenue in accordance with the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, which requires that five basic steps be followed to recognize revenue: (1) a legally enforceable contract that meets criteria standards as to composition and substance is identified; (2) performance obligations relating to provision of goods or services to the customer are identified; (3) the transaction price, with consideration given to any variable, noncash, or other relevant consideration, is determined; (4) the transaction price is allocated to the performance obligations; and (5) revenue is recognized when control of goods or services is transferred to the customer with consideration given, whether that control happens over time or not. Determination of criteria (3) and (4) are based on our management’s judgments regarding the fixed nature of the selling prices of the products and services delivered and the collectability of those amounts. The adoption of ASC 606 did not result in a change to the accounting for any of the in-scope revenue streams; as such, no cumulative effect adjustment was recorded.

 

The Company generates revenue primarily from: (1) the sale of homes/properties, (2) commissions and fees charged on each real estate services transaction closed by our lead agents or partner agents, and (3) sales of trading securities using its broker firm, TD Ameritrade less original purchase cost. Net trading revenues primarily consist of revenues from trading securities earned upon completion of trade, net of any trading fees. Trading is completed when earned and recognized at a point in time, on a trade-date basis, as the Company executes trades. The Company records trading revenue on a net basis, trading sales less original purchase cost. Net realized gains and losses from securities transactions are determined for federal income tax and financial reporting purposes on the first-in, first-out method and represent proceeds on disposition of investments less the cost basis of investments. Sales of real estate properties are recognized at the sales price/amount and the total cost (including cost of rehabilitation) associated with the property acquisition and rehabilitation are classified in Cost of Goods Sold (COGS).

 

Revenue Recognition – Sale of homes/properties,

 

This business segment produced zero revenue during the period ended September 30, 2023.

 

Revenue Recognition – Principal (securities) transactions

 

The Company records securities transactions and related revenue and expenses on a trade-date basis. Other income is recognized when earned.

 

Interest Income and Expense

 

The Company earns interest income and incurs interest expense primarily in connection with its electronic brokerage customer business and its securities lending activities, which are recorded on an accrual basis and are included in interest income and interest expense, respectively, in the condensed consolidated statements of comprehensive income.

 

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Principal Transactions

 

Principal transactions include gains and losses as a result of changes in the fair value of financial instruments owned, at fair value, financial instruments sold, but not yet purchased, at fair value, and other investments measured at fair value (i.e., unrealized gains and losses) and realized gains and losses related to the Company’s principal transactions. Included are net gains and losses on stocks, options, U.S. and foreign government securities, municipal securities, futures, foreign exchange, precious metals and other derivative instruments, which are reported on a net basis in other income in the condensed consolidated statements of comprehensive income. Dividends are integral to the valuation of stocks. Accordingly, dividend income and expense attributable to financial instruments owned, at fair value and financial instruments sold, but not yet purchased, at fair value, are reported on a net basis in other income in the condensed consolidated statements of comprehensive income.

 

During the three months ended September 30, 2023, the Company recognized net revenue $(18,791) from principal transaction.

 

Contract balances

 

Substantially all receivables from contracts with customers within the scope of Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) 606 Revenue from Contracts with Customers (ASC 606), are included in other assets on the condensed consolidated balance sheets.

 

Unsatisfied performance obligations

 

We do not have any unsatisfied performance obligations other than those that are subject to an elective practical expedient under ASC 606. The practical expedient applies to and is elected for contracts where we recognize revenue at the amount to which we have the right to invoice for services performed.

 

During the period ended September 30, 2023, the Company did not have any unsatisfied performance obligations (other than those that are subject to an elective practical expedient under ASC 606).

 

Revenue Recognition – Entrepreneurship Development

 

Under ASC 606, an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. FASB ASC 606-10-05-3 through 05-4 and 606-10-10-2 through 10-4. To achieve the core principle of ASC 606, an entity should take the following actions: Step 1: Identify the contract with a customer; Step 2: Identify the performance obligations in the contract; Step 3: Determine the transaction price; Step 4: Allocate the transaction price; and Step 5: Recognize revenue when or as the entity satisfies a performance obligation.

 

Revenue is recognized when a company satisfies a performance obligation by transferring a promised good or service to a customer (which is when the customer obtains control of that good or service). An entity should consider the terms of the contract and all relevant facts and circumstances when applying the revenue recognition standard. An entity should apply the revenue recognition standard, including the use of any practical expedients, consistently to contracts with similar characteristics and in similar circumstances.

 

As of September 30, 2023, our Entrepreneurship Development Revenue was derived from the sale of asset (control in Pubco) to the buyer who assumes control of the Pubco at the close of the sales transaction. A sale transaction could involve cash-only, cash and note, or note-only. For the contract that includes financing or convertible note, the seller evaluated the collectability of the transaction price, and the probability that the seller will collect the consideration. The seller addressed the risk of collectability by using a convertible note with very favorable conversion.

 

16
 

 

Determining whether a sale is to a customer: Per ASC 610-20-15-4(a), if the counterparty in the transaction is a customer and the assets being transferred are an output of the reporting entity’s ordinary activities, the transaction is within the scope of ASC 606. As stated in ASC 606, a customer is a party that has contracted with an entity to obtain goods or services that are an output of the reporting entity’s ordinary activities in exchange for consideration (e.g., a car manufacturer sells a car that it produced to a customer, a homebuilder sells a home that it developed to a customer).

 

Step 1: A sales contract/agreement (SPA) is used to consummate the sale. Buyer and seller signed the SPA and other collateral documents including the Notes and other documents designed to ensure collectability if the sale is cash-and-note or note-only. Where the sale was not an all-cash transaction, seller evaluated the collectibility of the transaction price, or the probability that the seller will collect the consideration.

 

Step 2: Identify the performance obligations in the contract. All performance obligations under the SPA must be completed prior to the close of the transaction. Our Entrepreneurship Development revenue was only recognized after all performance obligations had been performed or completed.

 

Step 3: Determine the transaction price. The transaction price for each sale recognized as EDI revenue was listed on the face of the contract.

 

Step 4: Allocate the transaction price. The transaction price is allocated based on the relative standalone selling price of each specific good or service promised to the customer. Since EDI revenue did not involve bundled services, rather EDI assets are accounted for as a standalone transaction, the total sale price is recognized immediately.

 

Step 5: Recognize revenue. Revenue is recognized as the seller satisfies a performance obligation by transferring control of the promised good or service to the customer. As of September 30, 2023, we recognized all EDI sales completed in the period because we satisfied the performance obligation by transferring control of the Pubco to the customer and made adequate provision for the collectability of the convertible notes.

 

Entrepreneurship Development revenues: Revenues and cost of revenues from pubco-control sales are recognized at the time each pubco-control is delivered and title and possession are transferred to the buyer. For the majority of our pubco-control closings, our performance obligation to deliver a control of the pubco is satisfied in less than one month from the date a binding sale agreement is signed. In certain circumstances where we have not completed the cleaning process to rid the pubco of legacy liabilities, we are not able to complete the sale under one month, and the sale may drag for up to 24 months to allow buyer and seller sufficient time to diligently complete the cleanup work. To the extent these separate performance obligations are not complete upon the home closing, we defer a portion of the pubco-control sales revenues related to these obligations and subsequently recognize the revenue upon completion of such obligations. As of September 30, 2023, the pubco-control sales revenues and related costs we deferred related to these obligations were immaterial. Our contract liabilities, consist of deposits received from customers for sold but undelivered pubco-control.

 

Sales Incentives: To promote sales of our Pubco-control, we may offer buyers’ agent sales incentives. These incentives vary by type of incentive and by amount on cash component of the transaction and on a Pubco-by-Pubco basis. Incentives are reflected as a reduction in pubco-control sales revenues. Incentives are recognized at the time the Pubco-control is delivered to the buyer and we receive the sales proceeds in either cash or notes.

 

Advertising Costs:

 

We expense advertising costs when advertisements occur.

 

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Concentrations of Credit Risk

 

The Company’s financial instruments that are exposed to concentrations of credit risk primarily consist of its cash and cash equivalents. The Company places its cash and cash equivalents with financial institutions of high credit worthiness. The Company maintains cash balances at financial institutions within the United States which are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) up to limits of approximately $250,000. The Company has not experienced any losses with regard to its bank accounts and believes it is not exposed to any risk of loss on its cash bank accounts. It is possible that at times, the company’s cash and cash equivalents with a particular financial institution may exceed any applicable government insurance limits. In such a situation, the Company’s management would assess the financial strength and credit worthiness of any parties to which it extends funds, and as such, it believes that any associated credit risk exposures would be addressed and mitigated.

 

Stock Based Compensation:

 

The cost of equity instruments issued to non-employees in return in accordance with ASC 505-50 “Equity-Based Payments to Non-Employees” for goods and services is measured by the fair value of the goods or services received or the measurement date fair value of the equity instruments issued, whichever is the more readily determinable. Measurement date for non-employees is the earlier of performance commitment date or the completion of services. The cost of employee services received in exchange for equity instruments is based on the grant date fair value of the equity instruments issued in accordance with ASC 718 “Compensation - Stock Compensation.”

 

NOTE 4. COMMITMENTS & CONTINGENCIES

 

Legal Proceedings

 

We were not subject to any legal proceedings as of September 30, 2023, and to the best of our knowledge, no legal proceedings are pending or threatened.

 

The Company’s principal executive office is located at 370 Amapola Ave., Suite 200A, Torrance, CA 90501. The space is a shared office space, which at the current time is suitable for the conduct of our business. The Company has no real property and do not presently owned any interests in real estate. As at September 30, 2023, the Company has spent a total of $0 on rent which was paid to sublet office space for the company operations.

 

From time to time, the Company may be involved in certain legal actions and claims arising in the normal course of business. Management is of the opinion that such matters will be resolved without material effect on the Company’s financial condition or results of operations.

 

Contractual Obligations

 

We were not subject to any contractual obligations as at September 30, 2023.

 

NOTE 5. NET PRINCIPAL TRANSACTIONS INCOME

 

The Company recognizes revenue in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. The Company’s net income from principal transactions primarily consists of revenues from sales of trading securities less original purchase cost (cost of sales). Net principal transactions income primarily consists of income from trading securities earned upon completion of trade, net of any trading fees. A trade is completed when earned and recognized at a point in time, on a trade-date basis, as the Company executes trades.

 

Net trading revenue consisted of the following:

 

January 1, 2023, to September 30, 2023  Total 
Net Revenue from sales of securities  $(322,963)
      
Net income from trading securities  $(322,963)

 

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NOTE 6. SALES – INVESTMENT PROPERTY

 

Due to the uncertainty related to the Real Estate Industry due to the ongoing Rate Hike by the US Fed Reserve, the company is holding off on its real estate acquisitions and dispositions program until more clarity is seen in the industry.

 

NOTE 7. LINE OF CREDIT / LOANS - RELATED PARTIES

 

The Company considers its founders, managing directors, employees, significant shareholders, and the portfolio Companies to be affiliates. In addition, companies controlled by any of the above named is also classified as affiliates.

 

Line of credit from related party consisted of the following:

 

  

September 30,

2023

  

December 31,

2022

 
May 20, 2020 (line of credit) Line of credit with maturity date of May 4, 2025 with 0% interest per annum with unpaid principal balance and accrued interest payable on the maturity date.   662,756    419,979 
Total Line of credit - related party   662,756    419,979 
Less: current portion   -    - 
Total Long-term Line of credit - related party  $662,756   $419,979 

 

Los Angeles Community Capital - $1,500,000 line of credit

 

On May 5, 2020, the Company amended its line of credit agreement to increase it to the amount of $1,500,000 with maturity date of May 4, 2025. The line of credit bears interest at 0% per annum and interest and unpaid principal balance is payable on the maturity date. The Company has an unused line of credit of $662,756 as of September 30, 2023.

 

NOTE 8. EARNINGS (LOSS) PER SHARE

 

Net Loss per Share Calculation:

 

Basic net loss per common share (“EPS”) is computed by dividing the loss available to common stockholders by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Dilutive earnings per share include the effect of any potentially dilutive debt or equity under the treasury stock method, if including such instruments is dilutive, assuming all dilutive potential common shares were issued. Dilutive loss per share excludes all potential common shares if their effect is anti-dilutive. The Company’s diluted earnings (loss) per share is the same as the basic earnings/loss per share for the period January 1, 2023, to September 30, 2023, as there are no potential shares outstanding that would have a dilutive effect.

 

19
 

 

  

Period ended

September 30,
2023

  

Period ended

September 30,
2022

 
Net income  $668,001    2,067,355 
           
Adjusted Net income attribution to stockholders  $668,001    2,067,355 
Weighted-average shares of common stock outstanding          
Basic and Diluted   22,324,706    22,324,706 
Net income per share          
Basic and Diluted  $0.0299    0.0926 

 

NOTE 9. INCOME TAXES

 

Deferred income taxes reflect the net tax effects of temporary differences between the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities for financial reporting purposes and the amounts used for income tax purposes. A full valuation allowance is established against all net deferred tax assets as of September 30, 2023, and December 31, 2022 based on estimates of recoverability. While the Company has optimistic plans for its business strategy, it determined that such a valuation allowance was necessary given the current and expected near term losses and the uncertainty with respect to its ability to generate sufficient profits from its business model.

 

We did not provide any current or deferred US federal income tax provision or benefit for any of the periods presented in these financial statements because we have accumulated substantial operating losses over the years. When it is more likely than not, that a tax asset cannot be realized through future income, we must record an allowance against any future potential future tax benefit. We have provided a full valuation allowance against the net deferred tax asset, consisting of net operating loss carry forwards, because management has determined that it is more likely than not that we will not earn income sufficient to realize the deferred tax assets during the carry forward periods.

 

The Company has not taken a tax position that, if challenged, would have a material effect on the financial statements as of September 30, 2023, and December 31, 2022 as defined under ASC 740, “Accounting for Income Taxes.” We did not recognize any adjustment to the liability for uncertain tax position and therefore did not record any adjustment to the beginning balance of the accumulated deficit on the balance sheet.

 

A reconciliation of the differences between the effective and statutory income tax rates for the period ended September 30, 2023, and December 31, 2022:

 

   Percent   30-Sep-23   31-Dec-22 
             
Federal statutory rates   21%  $(834,795)  $(975,076)
State income taxes   5%   (198,761)   (232,161)
Permanent differences   -0.5%   19,876    23,216 
Valuation allowance against net deferred tax assets   -25.5%   1,013,680    1,184,020 
Effective rate   0%  $-   $- 

 

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As at September 30, 2023, and December 31, 2022, the significant components of the deferred tax assets are summarized below:

 

   30-Sep-23   31-Dec-22 
Deferred income tax asset        
Net operation loss carryforwards   (3,975,216)   (4,643,217)
Total deferred income tax asset   1,033,556    1,207,236 
Less: valuation allowance   (1,033,556)   (1,207,236)
Total deferred income tax asset  $-   $- 

 

The Company has recorded as of September 30, 2023, and December 31, 2022, a valuation allowance of $1,033,556 and $1,207,236 respectively, as it believes that it is more likely than not that the deferred tax assets will not be realized in future years. Management has based its assessment on the Company’s lack of profitable operating history.

 

The valuation allowance $1,033,556 as at September 30, 2023 decreased by $173,680 compared to December 31, 2022 of $1,207,236. The Company conducts an analysis of its tax positions and has concluded that it has no uncertain tax positions as of September 30, 2023, and December 31, 2022. The Company has net operating loss carry-forwards of approximately $3,975,216. Such amounts are subject to IRS code section 382 limitations and expire in 2033.

 

NOTE 10. RECENTLY ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

 

Recently Issued Accounting Standards

 

ASU 2019-12 — In December 2019, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued ASU 2019- 12, Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes. The amendments in ASU 2019-12 simplify the accounting for income taxes by removing certain exceptions to the general principles in Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 740, Income Taxes. The amendments also improve consistent application of and simplify GAAP for other areas of Topic 740 by clarifying and amending existing guidance. ASU 2019-12 will be effective for the Company’s fiscal year beginning October 1, 2021, with early adoption permitted. The transition requirements are dependent upon each amendment within this update and will be applied either prospectively or retrospectively. The Company does not expect this ASU to have a material impact on its condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

ASU 2016-13 — In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments, which amends FASB ASC Topic 326, Financial Instruments - Credit Losses. In addition, in May 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-05, Targeted Transition Relief, which updates FASB ASU 2016-13. These ASUs require financial assets measured at amortized cost to be presented at the net amount to be collected and broadens the information, including forecasted information incorporating more timely information, that an entity must consider in developing its expected credit loss estimate for assets measured. These ASUs are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early application is permitted for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018. Most of our financial assets are excluded from the requirements of this standard as they are measured at fair value or are subject to other accounting standards. In addition, certain of our other financial assets are short-term in nature and therefore are not likely to be subject to significant credit losses beyond what is already recorded under current accounting standards. As a result, we currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

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In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, Disclosure Framework-Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurements, which amends FASB ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements. This ASU eliminates, modifies and adds various disclosure requirements for fair value measurements. This ASU is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Certain disclosures are required to be applied using a retrospective approach and others using a prospective approach. Early adoption is permitted. The various disclosure requirements being eliminated, modified or added are not significant to us. As a result, we currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-15, Customer’s Accounting for Implementation Costs Incurred in a Cloud Computing Arrangement That is a Service Contract, which amends FASB ASC Subtopic 350-40, Intangibles-Goodwill and Other-Internal-Use Software. This ASU adds certain disclosure requirements related to implementation costs incurred for internal-use software and cloud computing arrangements. The amendment aligns the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred in a hosting arrangement that is a service contract with the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred to develop or obtain internal-use software (and hosting arrangements that include an internal-use software license). This ASU is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within those fiscal years. The amendments in this ASU should be applied either using a retrospective or prospective approach. Early adoption is permitted. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In August 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-15 on “Presentation of Financial Statements Going Concern (Subtopic 205-40) – Disclosure of Uncertainties about an Entity’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern”. Currently, there is no guidance in U.S. GAAP about management’s responsibility to evaluate whether there is substantial doubt about an entity’s ability to continue as a going concern or to provide related footnote disclosures. The amendments in this update provide such guidance. In doing so, the amendments are intended to reduce diversity in the timing and content of footnote disclosures. The amendments require management to assess an entity’s ability to continue as a going concern by incorporating and expanding upon certain principles that are currently in U.S. auditing standards. Specifically, the amendments (1) provide a definition of the term substantial doubt, (2) require an evaluation every reporting period including interim periods, (3) provide principles for considering the mitigating effect of management’s plans, (4) require certain disclosures when substantial doubt is alleviated as a result of consideration of management’s plans, (5) require an express statement and other disclosures when substantial doubt is not alleviated, and (6) require an assessment for a period of one year after the date that the financial statements are issued (or available to be issued). The amendments in this update are effective for public and nonpublic entities for annual periods ending after December 15, 2016. Early adoption is permitted. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In January 2013, the FASB issued ASU No. 2013-01, “Balance Sheet (Topic 210): Clarifying the Scope of Disclosures about Offsetting Assets and Liabilities.” This ASU clarifies that the scope of ASU No. 2011-11, “Balance Sheet (Topic 210): Disclosures about Offsetting Assets and Liabilities.” applies only to derivatives, repurchase agreements and reverse purchase agreements, and securities borrowing and securities lending transactions that are either offset in accordance with specific criteria contained in FASB Accounting Standards Codification or subject to a master netting arrangement or similar agreement. The amendments in this ASU are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning on or after January 1, 2013. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In February 2013, the FASB issued ASU No. 2013-02, “Comprehensive Income (Topic 220): Reporting of Amounts Reclassified Out of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income.” The ASU adds new disclosure requirements for items reclassified out of accumulated other comprehensive income by component and their corresponding effect on net income. The ASU is effective for public entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2013. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

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In February 2013, the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, issued ASU No. 2013-04, “Liabilities (Topic 405): Obligations Resulting from Joint and Several Liability Arrangements for which the Total Amount of the Obligation Is Fixed at the Reporting Date.” This ASU addresses the recognition, measurement, and disclosure of certain obligations resulting from joint and several arrangements including debt arrangements, other contractual obligations, and settled litigation and judicial rulings. The ASU is effective for public entities for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2013. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In March 2013, the FASB issued ASU No. 2013-05, “Foreign Currency Matters (Topic 830): Parent’s Accounting for the Cumulative Translation Adjustment upon Derecognition of Certain Subsidiaries or Groups of Assets within a Foreign Entity or of an Investment in a Foreign Entity.” This ASU addresses the accounting for the cumulative translation adjustment when a parent either sells a part or all of its investment in a foreign entity or no longer holds a controlling financial interest in a subsidiary or group of assets that is a nonprofit activity or a business within a foreign entity. The guidance outlines the events when cumulative translation adjustments should be released into net income and is intended by FASB to eliminate some disparity in current accounting practice. This ASU is effective prospectively for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2013. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In March 2013, the FASB issued ASU 2013-07, “Presentation of Financial Statements (Topic 205): Liquidation Basis of Accounting.” The amendments require an entity to prepare its financial statements using the liquidation basis of accounting when liquidation is imminent. Liquidation is imminent when the likelihood is remote that the entity will return from liquidation and either (a) a plan for liquidation is approved by the person or persons with the authority to make such a plan effective and the likelihood is remote that the execution of the plan will be blocked by other parties or (b) a plan for liquidation is being imposed by other forces (for example, involuntary bankruptcy). If a plan for liquidation was specified in the entity’s governing documents from the entity’s inception (for example, limited-life entities), the entity should apply the liquidation basis of accounting only if the approved plan for liquidation differs from the plan for liquidation that was specified at the entity’s inception. The amendments require financial statements prepared using the liquidation basis of accounting to present relevant information about an entity’s expected resources in liquidation by measuring and presenting assets at the amount of the expected cash proceeds from liquidation. The entity should include in its presentation of assets any items it had not previously recognized under U.S. GAAP but that it expects to either sell in liquidation or use in settling liabilities (for example, trademarks). The amendments are effective for entities that determine liquidation is imminent during annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2013, and interim reporting periods therein. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

We have reviewed all the recently issued, but not yet effective, accounting pronouncements. Management does not believe that any recently issued, but not yet effective, accounting standards could have a material effect on the accompanying financial statements. As new accounting pronouncements are issued, we will adopt those that are applicable under the circumstances.

 

NOTE 11. INVESTMENT SECURITIES (TRADING)

 

The Company applied the fair value accounting treatment for trading securities per ASC 320, with unrealized gains and losses recorded in net income each period. Debt securities classified as trading should be measured at fair value in the currency in which the debt securities are denominated and remeasured into the investor’s functional currency using the spot exchange rate at the balance sheet date.

 

Trading securities are treated using the fair value method, whereby the value of the securities on the company’s balance sheet is equivalent to their current market value. These securities will be recorded in the current assets section under the Investment Securities account and will be offset in the shareholder’s equity section under the unrealized proceeds from sale of short-term investments” account. The Short-term Investments account amount represents the current market value of the securities, and the “Unrealized Proceeds From Sale of Short Term Investments” account represents the cash proceeds that the company would receive if it were to sell the investments at the end of the specified accounting period.

 

23
 

 

NOTE 12. REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS

 

Current Holdings of Real Estate Investments (Inventory):

 

As of September 30, 2023, the Company has $0.00 real estate investment holding inventory.

 

NOTE 13. MARGINAL LOAN PAYABLE

 

As of September 30, 2023, the Company has $0.00 marginal loan outstanding.

 

NOTE 14. RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

The managing member, CEO and director of the Company is involved in other business activities and may, in the future, become involved in other business opportunities. If a specific business opportunity becomes available, he may face a conflict in selecting between the Company and his other business interests. The Company is formulating a policy for the resolution of such conflicts.

 

The Company had the following related party transactions:

 

  Line of credit - On May 5, 2020, the Company entered into a line of credit agreement in the amount of $1,500,000 with Los Angeles Community Capital, which is owned and operated by Frank I. Igwealor, Chief Executive Officer of the Company. The maturity date of the line of credit is May 4, 2025. The line of credit bears interest at 0% per annum and interest and unpaid principal balance is payable on the maturity date. The Company has drawn $662,756 from the line of credit as of September 30, 2023.

 

On December 30, 2022, the Company sold nine of its EDI Notes and one Mortgage Note to Los Angeles Community Capital (LA Community Capital), a Company controlled by our President and CEO, in exchange for long-term debt owed to LA Community Capital and its affiliates. The EDI Notes were sold at their face (stated) amount without discount and the Mortgage Note was sold at face (stated) amount plus accrued interest. The EDI Notes have a total face amount of $3.5 million while the Mortgage Notes has a face amount of $2.2 million and accrued interest total of $0.11 million as of December 30, 2022, the date of the sale/purchase transaction.

 

The Company had the following related party investment transactions:

 

  Long term Investment – related parties: At numerous times during the year 2021, the Company acquired long-term equity positions in various company for which its subsidiary, Alpharidge Capital, LLC also acts or acted as court-appointed custodian. These equity consists of free-trading shares, and were capitalized at cost plus transaction cost, finance fees and other acquisition costs. as at September 30, 2023, the Company has $1,548,703 as Long term Investments - related parties. However, following the spectacular collapse of Silicon Valley Bank due to inflated valuation of assets on its book which had obviously decline in value beyond recoverability, the Company made a business judgment call to mark those securities to the fair market value as at September 30, 2023. The mark-to-market excise resulted in impairment charge of $1,316,434, which the Company acknowledged immediately because management believes that the value of those held to maturity securities have been impaired beyond recoverability.

 

The Company does not own any property. It currently shares a leased office with two other organizations that are affiliated to its principal shareholder at 370 Amapola Ave., Suite 200A, Torrance, California 90501. Its principal shareholder and seasonal staff use this location. The approximate cost of the shared office space varies between $650 and $850 per month

 

24
 

 

NOTE 15. MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS

 

On September 15, 2020, Kid Castle Educational Corporation (the “Company”) entered into a stock purchase agreement with certain corporation related to our President and CEO with respect to the private placement of 900,000 shares of its preferred stock at a purchase price of $3 in cash and a transfer of 100% interest in, and control of Community Economic Development Capital, LLC (a California Limited Liability Company). The shares were issued to the investors without registration under the Securities Act of 1933 based upon exemptions from registration provided under Section 4(2) of the Act and Regulation D promulgated thereunder. The issuances did not involve any public offering; no general solicitation or general advertising was used in connection with the offering. Community Economic Development Capital is a specialty real estate holding company for specialized assets including, affordable housing, opportunity zones properties, medical real estate investments, industrial and commercial real estate, and other real estate related services.

 

Similarly, on September 16, 2020, as part of its purchase of unregistered securities from certain corporation related to our President and CEO, the Company, received $3.00 in cash and 1,000,000 shares of its preferred stock, and in exchange transferred 100% interest in, and control of Community Economic Development Capital, LLC (“CED Capital”), a California Limited Liability Company, and 97% of the issued and outstanding shares of Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc. (“CBDX”), to GiveMePower Corporation, a Nevada corporation. This transaction gave the Company 88% of the voting control of GiveMePower. As at the time of this transaction, all four businesses involved in the transaction were controlled by Mr. Frank I Igwealor. Because both the buyer and seller in the above acquisitions were under the control of the same person, the transaction was classified as “common control transaction and therefore fall under “Transactions Between Entities Under Common Control” subsections of ASC 805-50. This transaction was therefore accounted for under the Consolidation Method using the variable interest entity (VIE) model wherein we consolidate all investees operating results if we expect to assume more than 50% of another entity’s expected losses or gains.

 

On April 21, 2021, the Company sold Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc. (“CBDX”), a California corporation, to Premier Information Management, Inc. for $1 in cash. As further consideration pursuant to the stated sales, CBDX returned Kid Castle Educational Inc., the parent Company of GMPW, the 100,000 shares of KDCE preferred stock and 900,000,000 shares of KDCE common stock that CBDX bought in October of 2019. Pursuant to the April 21, 2021 transaction, CBDX ceased from being a subsidiary of GMPW, effective April 1, 2021.

 

On December 30, 2021, in exchange for the 87% control block of GMPW, held by Kid Castle Educational Corporation, a subsidiary of Video River Networks, Inc. both of which are publicly traded companies with ticker symbols KDCE and NIHK respectively, the Company acquired Alpharidge Capital LLC from GMPW.

 

NOTE 16. SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

Preferred Stock

 

as of September 30, 2023, and December 31, 2022, we were authorized to issue 1,000,000 shares of preferred stock with a par value of $0.00001.

 

The Company has 100,000 shares of preferred stock were issued and outstanding as at September 30, 2023, and December 31, 2022.

 

Common Stock

 

The Company is authorized to issue 1,000,000,000 shares of common stock with a par value of $0.00001 as at September 30, 2023, and December 31, 2022.

 

Period ended September 30, 2023

 

The Company has issued 22,324,706 shares of our common stock to more than 54 shareholders as at September 30, 2023, compared to 22,324,706 shares December 31, 2022.

 

Warrants

 

No warrants were issued or outstanding as at September 30, 2023, and December 31, 2022 respectively.

 

Stock Options

 

The Company has never adopted a stock option plan and has never issued any stock options.

 

NOTE 17. SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

The Company evaluated subsequent events after September 30, 2023, through November 10, 2023, the date these financial statements were issued and has determined there have been no subsequent events for which disclosure is required.

 

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ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Forward-Looking Statements

 

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q (this “Quarterly Report”) contains forward-looking statements. The Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) encourages companies to disclose forward-looking information so that investors can better understand a company’s future prospects and make informed investment decisions. This Quarterly Report and other written and oral statements that we make from time to time contain such forward-looking statements that set out anticipated results based on management’s plans and assumptions regarding future events or performance. We have tried, wherever possible, to identify such statements by using words such as “anticipate,”“estimate,”“expect,”“project,”“intend,”“plan,”“believe,”“will” and similar expressions in connection with any discussion of future operating or financial performance. In particular, these include statements relating to future actions, future performance or results of current and anticipated sales efforts, expenses, the outcome of contingencies, such as legal proceedings, and financial results.

 

We caution that the factors described herein, and other factors could cause our actual results of operations and financial condition to differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statements we make and that investors should not place undue reliance on any such forward-looking statements. Further, any forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date on which such statement is made, and we undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after the date on which such statement is made or to reflect the occurrence of anticipated or unanticipated events or circumstances. New factors emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for us to predict all of such factors. Further, we cannot assess the impact of each such factor on our results of operations or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements.

 

General

 

The following discussion highlights Kid Castle results of operations and the principal factors that have affected our financial condition as well as our liquidity and capital resources for the periods described and provides information that management believes is relevant for an assessment and understanding of the statements of financial condition and results of operations presented herein. The following discussion and analysis are based on our audited Financial Report, which we have prepared in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles. You should read this discussion and analysis together with such financial statements and the related notes thereto.

 

Kid Castle Educational Corporation, a Delaware corporation, (“Kid Castle,” “the Company,” “We,” “KDCE,” “Us” or “Our’) operates and manages a portfolio of real estate properties, digital assets, and other in-demand properties. Kid Castle engages in rollup and consolidation of real estate, Biopharma and digital economy assets and operations.

 

The Company changed its CBD-focused business after selling Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc. in April 2021, to refocus on acquisition and management of businesses and assets in real estate, Biopharma and digital economy. As the subsidiary of Video River Networks, Inc. (NIHK), the Company’s business plan is to help NIHK to achieve its business plan. The Company therefore will focus on rolling up Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Robotics, and digital assets and businesses in North America.

 

Our vision is to acquire and rollup profitable Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Robotics, and digital assets across the United States of America. There is no guarantee that we could successfully make any acquisition or rollup. Our mission as stated above is only a guiding principle as we start our acquisition. We have never made any big acquisition prior to this moment. Although we have a theoretical picture of what our mission called for, none of our staff have ever done it previously.

 

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Our principal business objective is to maximize stockholder returns through a combination of (1) acquisition and rollup of profitable Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Robotics, and digital assets across the United States of America (2) sustainable long-term growth in cash flows from increased profits, which we hope to pass on to stockholders in the form of distributions, and (3) potential long-term appreciation in the value of our businesses through process optimization and financial engineering. However, because of COVID-19, we were unable to obtain the financing necessary to make the acquisition of the businesses we needed to acquire. There is no guarantee that we will be able to acquire one or more in the future. In addition, there is no guarantee that viable businesses would still be available to us to acquire in the future, or at reasonable price.

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The unaudited financial statements for the three and Nine months ended September 30, 2023, include a summary of our significant accounting policies and should be read in conjunction with the discussion below. In the opinion of management, all material adjustments necessary to present fairly the results of operations for such periods have been included in these audited financial statements. All such adjustments are of a normal recurring nature.

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its subsidiaries, in which the Company has a controlling voting interest and entities consolidated under the variable interest entities (“VIE”) provisions of ASC 810, “Consolidation” (“ASC 810”). Inter-company balances and transactions have been eliminated upon consolidation.

 

ASC 810 requires that the investor with the controlling financial interest should consolidate the investee/affiliate. ASC 810-10 requires that an equity interest investor consolidates a VIE when it retains an investment in the entity, is considered a variable interest investor in the entity, and is the primary beneficiary of the entity. An investor in a VIE is a “variable interest beneficiary” when, per an arrangement’s governing documents, the investor will absorb a portion of the VIE’s expected losses or will receive a portion of the entity’s “residual returns.” The variable interest beneficiary retaining a controlling financial interest in the VIE is designated as its “primary beneficiary” and must consolidate the VIE. A variable interest beneficiary retains a “controlling financial interest” in a VIE when that beneficiary retains the power to direct the activities of the VIE that have the greatest influence over the VIE’s economic performance and retains an obligation to absorb the VIE’s significant losses or the right to receive benefits from the VIE that could potentially be significant to the VIE.

 

The consolidated financial statements of the Company therefore include the three months operating results of the all wholly owned subsidiaries and the balance sheet represent the financial position as at September 30, 2023, of the Company includes Alpharidge Capital LLC and Others subsidiaries in which Kid Castle has a controlling voting interest and entities consolidated under the variable interest entities (“VIE”) provisions of ASC 810, “Consolidation” (“ASC 810”), after elimination of intercompany transactions and accounts.

 

Overview

 

Corporate History

 

On October 21, 2019, pursuant to a stock purchase agreement dated October 2, 2019, Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc., a California corporation, purchased one (1) million shares of its preferred shares (one preferred share is convertible 1,000 share of common stocks) of the Company, representing 97.82% of our total issued and outstanding voting shares of common stock and preferred stock. Simultaneously with the purchase, the officers and directors of the Company resigned. Frank I Igwealor, Chairman and CEO, Secretary, Treasurer, and Director; Patience C Ogbozor, Director; and Dr. Solomon SK Mbagwu, MD, Director, were elected to replace them. Following the share sales to Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc., the purchaser converted 900,000 of the preferred shares for 900,000,000 shares of the Company’s current outstanding shares of common stock.

 

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Following the consummation of the October 21, 2019 transactions, the Company decided to restart filing important information immediately. The Company used the Form 10-12(g) to register its common stock with the SEC.

 

On September 15, 2020, Kid Castle Educational Corporation (the “Company”) entered into a stock purchase agreement with certain corporation related to our President and CEO with respect to the private placement of 900,000 shares of its preferred stock at a purchase price of $3 in cash and a transfer of 100% interest in, and control of Community Economic Development Capital, LLC (a California Limited Liability Company). The shares were issued to the investors without registration under the Securities Act of 1933 based upon exemptions from registration provided under Section 4(2) of the Act and Regulation D promulgated thereunder. The issuances did not involve any public offering; no general solicitation or general advertising was used in connection with the offering. Community Economic Development Capital, is a specialty real estate holding company for specialized assets including, affordable housing, opportunity zones properties, medical real estate investments, related commercial facilities, industrial and commercial real estate, and other real estate related services.

 

Similarly, on September 16, 2020, as part of its purchase of unregistered securities from certain corporation related to our President and CEO, the Company, received $3.00 in cash and 1,000,000 shares of its preferred stock, and in exchange transferred 100% interest in, and control of Community Economic Development Capital, LLC (“CED Capital”), a California Limited Liability Company, and 97% of the issued and outstanding shares of Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc. (“CBDX”), to GiveMePower Corporation, a Nevada corporation. This transaction gave the Company 88% of the voting control of GiveMePower.

 

On April 21, 2021, the Company sold Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc. (“CBDX”), a California corporation, to Premier Information Management, Inc. for $1 in cash. As further consideration pursuant to the stated sales, CBDX returned Kid Castle Educational Inc., the parent Company of GMPW, the 100,000 shares of KDCE preferred stock and 900,000,000 shares of KDCE common stock that CBDX bought in October of 2019. Pursuant to the April 21, 2021 transaction, CBDX ceased from being a subsidiary of GMPW, effective April 1, 2021.

 

On December 30, 2021, in exchange for its 87% control block in GiveMePower Corporation, the Company received 100% stake in Alpharidge Capital LLC from GiveMePower, in a cashless transaction, resulting in each public company going its separate way and an independent company.

 

Strategy

 

As the subsidiary of Video River Networks, Inc. (NIHK), the Company’s business plan is to help NIHK to achieve its business plan. The Company therefore will focus on rolling up Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Robotics, and digital assets and businesses in North America.

 

Our vision is to acquire and rollup profitable Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Robotics, and digital assets across the United States of America. There is no guarantee that we could successfully make any acquisition or rollup. Our mission as stated above is only a guiding principle as we start our acquisition. We have never made any big acquisition prior to this moment. Although we have a theoretical picture of what our mission called for, none of our staff have ever done it previously.

 

Plan of Operations for the Next Twelve Months

 

Kid Castle will need approximately $1,500,000 to sustain operations for the next 12 months. Our plan is to achieve meaningful revenue from acquisitions of profitable rollup of Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Robotics, and digital assets businesses that meet our operating needs. However, we may not be able to increase our revenue sufficiently to meet these needs in time. It is also unlikely that we will be able to generate $1,500,000 in net income to satisfy all of our obligations and cover our operating cost for the next 12 months. Our ability to continue operations will be dependent upon the successfully long-term or permanent capital in the form of equity financing, the support of creditors and shareholders, and, ultimately, the achievement of profitable operations. There can be no assurances that we will be successful, which would in turn significantly affect our ability to be successful in our new business plan. If not, we will likely be required to reduce operations or liquidate assets. We will continue to evaluate our projected expenditure relative to our available cash and to seek additional means of financing in order to satisfy our working capital and other cash requirements.

 

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We intend to implement the following tasks within the next twelve months:

 

1. Month 1-3: Phase 1 (1-3 months in duration; $600,000 to $1 million in estimated fund receipt)
   
    a. Hire 2 business development manager and officer manager to implement our business plan.
       
    b. Acquire and consolidate stakes in the operations of at least two select Ai, Machine Learning, Robotics, and digital assets and biopharma businesses.
       
2. Month 3-6 Phase 2 (1-3 months in duration; cost control, process improvements, admin & management.).
   
    a. Integrate acquired business into the Company’s model – consolidate the operations of the businesses including integration of their accounting and finance systems, synchronization of their operating systems, and harmonization of their human resources functions.
       
    b. Complete and file quarterly reports and other required filings for the quarter
       
3. Month 6-9: Phase 3 (1-3 months in duration; $600,000 to $900,000 in estimated fund receipt)
   
    a. Identify and acquire complementary/similar businesses or assets in the target market
       
4. Month 9-12: Phase 4 (1-3 months duration; use acquired businesses’ free cash flow for more acquisitions)
   
    a. Run the businesses efficiently, giving employees a conducive and friendly workplace and add value to investors and shareholders by identifying and reducing excesses and also identifying and executing growth strategies
       
    b. Acquire more businesses that are below their book-value or undervalued businesses, restructure the businesses, and sell the businesses for profit or hold them for cash flow.
       
5. Operating expenses during the twelve months would be as follows:
   
    a. For the six months through March 31, 2024, we anticipate incurring general and other operating expenses of $388,000.
       
    b. For the six months through September 30, 2024, we anticipate incurring additional general and other operating expenses of $378,000.

 

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The execution of our current plan of operations requires us to raise significant additional capital immediately. If we are successful in raising capital through the sale of shares or borrowing, we believe that the Company will have sufficient cash resources to fund its plan of operations for the next twelve months.

 

If we are unable to do so, our ability to continue as a going concern will be in jeopardy, likely causing us to curtail and possibly cease operations.

 

We continually evaluate our plan of operations discussed above to determine the manner in which we can most effectively utilize our limited cash resources. The timing of completion of any aspect of our plan of operations is highly dependent upon the availability of cash to implement that aspect of the plan and other factors beyond our control. There is no assurance that we will successfully obtain the required capital or revenues, or, if obtained, that the amounts will be sufficient to fund our ongoing operations. The inability to secure additional capital would have a material adverse effect on us, including the possibility that we would have to sell or forego a portion or all of our assets or cease operations. If we discontinue our operations, we will not have sufficient funds to pay any amounts to our stockholders.

 

Even if we raise additional capital in the near future, if our current business plan is not successfully executed, our ability to fund our biopharmaceutical research and development, or our financial product deployment and services efforts would likely be seriously impaired. The ability of a biopharmaceutical research and development business and continuing operations is conditioned upon moving the development of products and services toward commercialization. If in the future we are not able to demonstrate adequate progress in the development and commercialization of our product, we will not be able to raise the capital we need to continue our business operations and business activities, and we will likely not have sufficient liquidity or cash resources to continue operating.

 

Because our working capital requirements depend upon numerous factors there can be no assurance that our current cash resources will be sufficient to fund our operations. At present, we have no committed external sources of capital, and do not expect any significant product revenues for the foreseeable future. Thus, we will require immediate additional financing to fund future operations. There can be no assurance, however, that we will be able to obtain funds on acceptable terms, if at all.

 

MERGERS AND ACQUISITION

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its subsidiaries, in which the Company has a controlling voting interest and entities consolidated under the variable interest entities (“VIE”) provisions of ASC 810, “Consolidation” (“ASC 810”). Inter-company balances and transactions have been eliminated upon consolidation.

 

We used the acquisition method of accounting (also known as business combination accounting) for acquisition of subsidiaries by the Group method to account for the purchase of businesses. The cost of the acquisition was measured as the fair value of the assets given, equity instruments issued, and liabilities incurred or assumed at the date of exchange.

 

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Competition

 

Our business is highly competitive. We are in direct competition with more established biopharmaceutical companies, private equity firms, private investors and management companies. Many management companies offer similar products and services for business rollups and consolidations. We may be at a substantial disadvantage to our competitors who have more capital than we do to carry out acquisition, operations and restructuring efforts. These competitors may have competitive advantages, such as greater name recognition, larger capital-base, marketing, research and acquisition resources, access to larger customer bases and channel partners, a longer operating history and lower labor and development costs, which may enable them to respond more quickly to new or emerging opportunities and changes in customer requirements or devote greater resources to the development, acquisition and promotion.

 

Increased competition could result in us failing to attract significant capital or maintaining it. If we are unable to compete successfully against current and future competitors, our business and financial condition may be harmed.

 

We hope to maintain our competitive advantage by keeping abreast of market dynamism that is face by our industry, and by utilizing the experience, knowledge, and expertise of our management team. Moreover, we believe that we distinguish ourselves in the ways our model envisaged transformation of businesses.

 

Government Regulation

 

Our activities currently are subject to no particular regulation by governmental agencies other than those routinely imposed on corporate businesses. However, we may be subject to the rules governing acquisition and disposition of businesses, real estate and personal properties in each of the State where we have our operations. We may also be subject to various state laws designed to protect buyers and sellers of businesses. We cannot predict the impact of future regulations on either us or our business model. Once we commence our biopharmaceutical operations, we would be subject to many regulations that apply to pharmaceutical and medical industry participants.

 

Intellectual Property

 

We currently have no patents, trademarks or other registered intellectual property. We do not consider the grant of patents, trademarks or other registered intellectual property essential to the success of our business.

 

Employees

 

We do not have a W-2 employee at present. Frank Ikechukwu Igwealor, our President, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, is our only full-time staff As of September 30, 2023, pending when we could formalize an employment contract for him. In addition to Mr. Igwealor, we have three part-time unpaid staff who help with bookkeeping and administrative chores. Most of our part-time staff, officers, and directors will devote their time as needed to our business and are expect to devote at least 15 hours per week to our business operations. We plan on formalizing employment contracts for those staff currently helping us without pay. Furthermore, in the immediate future, we intend to use independent contractors and consultants to assist in many aspects of our business on a as needed basis pending financial resources being available. We may use independent contractors and consultants once we receive sufficient funding to hire additional employees. Even then, we will principally rely on independent contractors for substantially all of our technical and marketing needs.

 

The Company has no written employment contract or agreement with any person. Currently, we are not actively seeking additional employees or engaging any consultants through a formal written agreement or contract. Services are provided on an as-needed basis to date. This may change in the event that we are able to secure financing through equity or loans to the Company. As our company grows, we expect to hire more full-time employees.

 

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Results of Operations

 

Three months ended September 30, 2023, as Compared to Three Months Ended September 30, 2022

 

Revenues — The Company recorded $(18,791) in revenue for the three months ended September 30, 2023, as compared to $1,000,378 for the same period of September 30, 2022. The decline in revenue was due to our decision to skip transactions in Real Estates “purchase-rehab-resell” program until a more conducive lending environment emerges in the near future.

 

Operating Expenses — Total operating expenses for the three months ended September 30, 2023 was $58,112 as compared to $100,517 in the same period of 2022, due to decreased operating activities, namely, the halt in our real estate operations, no consultants’ fees, during the period ended September 30, 2023.

 

Net Income — Net loss for three months ended September 30, 2023 was $76,903 as compared to Net Income of $457,789 for the three months ended September 30, 2022.

 

Nine months ended September 30, 2023, as Compared to Nine months ended September 30, 2022

 

Revenues — The Company recorded $1,135,578 in revenue for the Nine months ended September 30, 2023, as compared to $3,284,131 for the same period of September 30, 2022.

 

Operating Expenses —Total operating expenses for the Nine months ended September 30, 2023 was $208,906 as compared to $349,386 in the same period of 2022, due to decreased operating activities, namely, the halt in our real estate operations, no consultants’ fees, during the period ended September 30, 2023.

 

Net Income — Net income for Nine months ended September 30, 2023 was $668,001 as compared to Net Income of $2,067,355 for the Nine months ended September 30, 2022.

 

OCI - Unrealized Gain or Other Comprehensive Income for Nine months ended September 30, 2023 was $0, as compared to Unrealized gain of $3,700, for the Nine months ended September 30, 2022, which was a result of mark-to-market/fair value adjustment to Trading Securities for the period.

 

Financial Condition, Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

As of September 30, 2023, the Company had a working capital of $19,648, consisting of $19,166 in cash, $2,882 in Trading Securities, and $2,400 in short-term liabilities.

 

For the nine months period ended September 30, 2023, the Company generated $817,755 from operating activities, generated cash of $496,328 from investing activities, and used cash of $1,359,351 on financing activities, resulting in an decrease in total cash of $45,268 and a cash balance of $19,166 for the period. Compared to the nine months period ended September 30, 2022, when the Company generated $2,296,527 from operating activities, used cash of $3,992,846 on investing activities, and generated cash of $1,187,119 on financing activities, resulting in a decrease in total cash of $509,200 and a cash balance of $90,190 for the period.

 

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As of September 30, 2023, total stockholders’ equity was $3,663,444 compared to $2,995,443 as of December 31, 2022, accounting for the $668,001 net income for the period ended September 30, 2023.

 

As of September 30, 2023, the Company had a cash balance of $19,166 (i.e., cash is used to fund operations). The Company does believe our current cash balances will be sufficient to allow us to fund our operating plan for the next twelve months. However, our ability to continue as a going concern is still dependent on us obtaining adequate capital to fund operation or maintaining consecutive quarterly profitability. If we are unable to obtain adequate capital, or maintain consecutive quarterly profitability, we could be forced to cease operations or substantially curtail its drug development activities. These conditions could raise substantial doubt as to our ability to continue as a going concern. The accompanying financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded asset amounts and classification of liabilities should we be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

Our principal sources of liquidity are: (1) Crypto Currency Mining, (2) Real Estate Sales, and (3) Trading Securities. In the past, we have been generating cash from loans to us by our major shareholder. In order to be able to achieve our strategic goals, we need to further expand our business and implement our business plan. To continue to develop our business plan and generate sales, significant capital has been and will continue to be required. Management intends to fund future operations through private or public equity and/or debt offerings. We continue to engage in preliminary discussions with potential investors and broker-dealers, but no terms have been agreed upon. There can be no assurances, however, that additional funding will be available on terms acceptable to us, or at all. Any equity financing may be dilutive to existing shareholders. We do not currently have any contractual restrictions on our ability to incur debt and, accordingly, we could incur significant amounts of indebtedness to finance operations. Any such indebtedness could contain covenants which would restrict our operations.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

As of September 30, 2023, we did not engage in any off-balance sheet arrangements as defined in Item 303(a)(4) of Regulation S-K promulgated by the SEC under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The Company has no off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that is material to investors.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) requires estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities in the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. The SEC has defined a company’s critical accounting policies as the ones that are most important to the portrayal of the company’s financial condition and results of operations, and which require the company to make its most difficult and subjective judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates of matters that are inherently uncertain.

 

Based on this definition, we have identified the critical accounting policies and judgments addressed which are described in Note 2 to our condensed consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report. Although we believe that our estimates, assumptions and judgments are reasonable, they are based upon information presently available. Actual results may differ significantly from these estimates under different assumptions, judgments or conditions.

 

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Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.

 

Not required for smaller reporting companies.

 

We are exposed to market risk, including changes in certain interest rates. All of these market risks arise in the normal course of business, as we do not engage in speculative trading activities. We have not entered into derivative or hedging transactions to manage risk in connection with such fluctuations.

 

This analysis does not take into consideration the effect of changes in the level of overall economic activity on interest rate fluctuations.

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures.

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

As required by Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), Rule 13a-15(b), we have carried out an evaluation (the “Evaluation”), under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Interim Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our management, and the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures As of September 30, 2023. Based upon an evaluation of the effectiveness of disclosure controls and procedures, our Chief Executive Officer and Interim Chief Financial Officer has concluded that as of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report, our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) or 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act) were not effective because of the material weaknesses described below, in order to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed in our Exchange Act reports is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified by the rules and forms of the SEC and is accumulated and communicated to management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Interim Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure (see below for further discussion). We had neither the resources, nor the personnel, to provide an adequate control environment.

 

Due to our limited resources, the following material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting continued to exist at September 30, 2023:

 

  we do not have written documentation of our internal control policies and procedures. Written documentation of key internal controls over financial reporting is a requirement of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”);
     
  we do not have sufficient segregation of duties within accounting functions, which is a basic internal control. Due to our limited size and early-stage nature of operations, segregation of all conflicting duties may not always be possible and may not be economically feasible; however, to the extent possible, the initiation of transactions, the custody of assets and the recording of transactions should be performed by separate individuals;
     
  we do not have an independent audit committee of our Board of Directors;
     
  insufficient monitoring and review controls over the financial reporting closing process, including the lack of individuals with current knowledge of GAAP that led to the restatement of our previously issued financial statements; and
     
  we continue to outsource the functions of controller on an interim basis to assist us in implementing the necessary financial controls over the financial reporting and the utilization of internal management and staff to effectuate these controls.

 

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We believe that these material weaknesses primarily related, in part, to our lack of sufficient staff with appropriate training in GAAP and SEC rules and regulations with respect to financial reporting functions, and the lack of robust accounting systems, as well as the lack of sufficient resources to hire such staff and implement these accounting systems.

 

If and when our financial resources allow, we plan to take a number of actions to correct these material weaknesses including, but not limited to, establishing an audit committee of our Board of Directors comprised of three independent directors, hiring a full-time Chief Financial Officer, adding experienced accounting and financial personnel and retaining third-party consultants to review our internal controls and recommend improvements.

 

It should be noted that any system of controls, however well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable and not absolute assurance that the objectives of the system are met. In addition, the design of any control system is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of certain events. Because of these and other inherent limitations of control systems, there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions, regardless of how remote.

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

There were no material changes in our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a- 15(f) under the Exchange Act) that occurred As of September 30, 2023, that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

CEO and CFO Certifications

 

Exhibits 31.1 and 31.2 to this Quarterly Report are the Certifications of the Chief Executive Officer and the Interim Chief Financial Officer, respectively. These Certifications are required in accordance with Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (the “Section 302 Certifications”). This Item 4 of this Quarterly Report, which you are currently reading, is the information concerning the Evaluation referred to above and in the Section 302 Certifications and this information should be read in conjunction with the Section 302 Certifications for a more complete understanding of the topics presented.

 

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PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1. Legal Proceedings

 

There are no legal proceedings that have occurred within the past ten years concerning our directors or officers which involved a criminal conviction, a criminal proceeding, an administrative or civil proceeding limiting one’s participation in the securities or banking industries, or a finding of securities or commodities law violations.

 

From time to time, we may be involved in litigation relating to claims arising out of the operation of our business in the normal course of business. Other than as described below, as of the date of this Registration Statement we are not aware of potential dispute or pending litigation and are not currently involved in a litigation proceeding or governmental actions the outcome of which in management’s opinion would be material to our financial condition or results of operations. An adverse result in these or other matters may have, individually or in the aggregate, a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or operating results.

 

As of November 10, 2023, the date of this report, there was no material proceeding to which any of our directors, officers, affiliates or stockholders is a party adverse to us. During the past ten years, no present director, executive officer or person nominated to become a director or an executive officer of us:

 

(1) had a petition under the federal bankruptcy laws or any state insolvency law filed by or against, or a receiver, fiscal agent or similar officer appointed by a court for the business or property of such person, or any partnership in which he was a general partner at or within two years before the time of such filing, or any corporation or business association of which he was an executive officer at or within ten years before the time of such filing;

 

(2) was convicted in a criminal proceeding or subject to a pending criminal proceeding (excluding traffic violations and other minor offenses);

 

(3) was subject to any order, judgment, or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any court of competent jurisdiction, permanently or temporarily enjoining him from or otherwise limiting his involvement in any of the following activities:

 

i. acting as a futures commission merchant, introducing broker, commodity trading advisor commodity pool operator, floor broker, leverage transaction merchant, any other person regulated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, or an associated person of any of the foregoing, or as an investment adviser, underwriter, broker or dealer in securities, or as an affiliated person, director or employee of any investment company, bank, savings and loan association or insurance company, or engaging in or continuing any conduct or practice in connection with such activity;

 

ii. engaging in any type of business practice; or

 

iii. engaging in any activity in connection with the purchase or sale of any security or commodity or in connection with any violation of federal or state securities laws or federal commodities laws; or

 

(4) was the subject of any order, judgment or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of an federal or state authority barring, suspending or otherwise limiting for more than 60 days the right of such person to engage in any activity described in paragraph (3) (i), above, or to be associated with persons engaged in any such activity; or

 

(5) was found by a court of competent jurisdiction (in a civil action), the Securities and Exchange Commission or the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to have violated a federal or state securities or commodities law, and for which the judgment has not been reversed, suspended or vacated.

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ITEM 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

 

During the three months ended September 30, 2023, the Company issued 0 shares of its common stock.

 

Use of Proceeds of Registered Securities

 

Not applicable.

 

Purchases of Equity Securities by Us and Affiliated Purchasers

 

During the three months ended September 30, 2023, the Company has not purchased any equity securities nor have any officers or directors of the Company.

 

ITEM 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities

 

The Company is not aware of any defaults upon its senior securities.

 

ITEM 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 5. Other Information.

 

None.

 

ITEM 6. Exhibits

 

Exhibit    
Number   Description
     
31.1*   Certification of Principal Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.
     
31.2*   Certification of Principal Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.
     
32.1**   Certification of Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
     
101.INS*   XBRL Instance Document
101.SCH*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
101.CAL*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
101.DEF*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
101.LAB*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
101.PRE*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

 

* Filed herewith.
** Furnished herewith.

 

37
 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

  KID CASTLE EDUCATIONAL CORPORATION
   
Date: November 13, 2023 By: /s/ Frank I Igwealor
    Frank I Igwealor
    President, Chief Executive Officer and Interim Chief Financial Officer (Principal Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer and Principal Accounting Officer)

 

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