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Manchester United
20-F 2019-06-30 Annual: 2019-06-30
20-F 2018-06-30 Annual: 2018-06-30
20-F 2017-06-30 Annual: 2017-06-30
20-F 2016-06-30 Annual: 2016-06-30
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MANU 2019-06-30
Item 17 o Item 18 o
Part I
Item 1. Identity of Directors, Senior Management and Advisers
Item 2. Offer Statistics and Expected Timetable
Item 3. Key Information
Item 4. Information on The Company
Item 4A. Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects
Item 6. Directors, Senior Management and Employees
Item 7. Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions
Item 8. Financial Information
Item 9. The Offer and Listing
Item 10. Additional Information
Item 11. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 12. Description of Securities Other Than Equity Securities
Part II
Item 13. Defaults, Dividend Arrearages and Delinquencies
Item 14. Material Modifications To The Rights of Security Holders and Use of Proceeds
Item 15. Controls and Procedures
Item 16A. Audit Committee Financial Expert
Item 16B. Code of Ethics
Item 16C. Principal Accountant Fees and Services
Item 16D. Exemptions From The Listing Standards for Audit Committees
Item 16E. Purchases of Equity Securities By The Issuer
Item 16F. Change in Registrant's Certifying Accountant
Item 16G. Corporate Governance
Item 16H. Mine Safety Disclosure
Part III
Item 17. Financial Statements
Item 18. Financial Statements
Item 19. Exhibits
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Manchester United Earnings 2019-06-30

MANU 20F Annual Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

20-F 1 a2239626z20-f.htm 20-F

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Index to Consolidated financial statements

Table of Contents


UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549



FORM 20-F



(Mark One)    

o

 

REGISTRATION STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OR (g) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

OR

ý

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended 30 June 2019

OR

o

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

OR

o

 

SHELL COMPANY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission File Number 001-35627

MANCHESTER UNITED plc
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

Not Applicable
(Translation of Company's name into English)

Cayman Islands
(Jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

Sir Matt Busby Way, Old Trafford,
Manchester, England, M16 0RA
(Address of principal executive offices)

Edward Woodward
Executive Vice Chairman
Sir Matt Busby Way, Old Trafford,
Manchester, England, M16 0RA Telephone No. 011 44 (0) 161 868 8000
E-mail: ir@manutd.co.uk
(Name, Telephone, E-mail and/or Facsimile number and Address of Company Contact Person)

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act.

Title of each class   Trading symbol(s)   Name of each exchange on which registered
Class A ordinary shares, par value $0.0005 per share   MANU   New York Stock Exchange

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act.

None

Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act.

None

            Indicate the number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer's classes of capital or common stock as of the close of the period covered by the annual report.

40,570,967 Class A ordinary shares
124,000,000 Class B ordinary shares

            Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes o    No ý

            If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Yes o    No ý

            Note—Checking the box above will not relieve any registrant required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 from their obligations under those Sections.

            Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ý    No o

            Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes ý    No o

            Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or an emerging growth company. See definition of "large accelerated filer", "accelerated filer", and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

Large accelerated filer o   Accelerated filer ý   Non-accelerated filer o   Emerging Growth Company o

            If an emerging growth company that prepares its financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards† provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o

            † The term "new or revised financial accounting standard" refers to any update issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board to its Accounting Standards Codification after April 5, 2012.

            Indicate by check mark which basis of accounting the registrant has used to prepare the financial statements included in this filing:

U.S. GAAP o   International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board ý   Other o

            If "Other" has been checked in response to the previous question, indicate by check mark which financial statement item the registrant has elected to follow.

Item 17 o    Item 18 o

            If this is an annual report, indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o    No ý

   


Table of Contents


TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
   
  Page  

GENERAL INFORMATION

    ii  

PRESENTATION OF FINANCIAL AND OTHER DATA

    ii  

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

    ii  

MARKET AND INDUSTRY DATA

    iv  

PART I

 

 

       

ITEM 1.

 

IDENTITY OF DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND ADVISERS

    1  

ITEM 2.

 

OFFER STATISTICS AND EXPECTED TIMETABLE

    1  

ITEM 3.

 

KEY INFORMATION

    1  

ITEM 4.

 

INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY

    31  

ITEM 4A.

 

UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

    61  

ITEM 5.

 

OPERATING AND FINANCIAL REVIEW AND PROSPECTS

    61  

ITEM 6.

 

DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEES

    82  

ITEM 7.

 

MAJOR SHAREHOLDERS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

    92  

ITEM 8.

 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

    95  

ITEM 9.

 

THE OFFER AND LISTING

    96  

ITEM 10.

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

    96  

ITEM 11.

 

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

    103  

ITEM 12.

 

DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES OTHER THAN EQUITY SECURITIES

    104  

PART II

 

 

       

ITEM 13.

 

DEFAULTS, DIVIDEND ARREARAGES AND DELINQUENCIES

    105  

ITEM 14.

 

MATERIAL MODIFICATIONS TO THE RIGHTS OF SECURITY HOLDERS AND USE OF PROCEEDS

    105  

ITEM 15.

 

CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

    105  

ITEM 16A.

 

AUDIT COMMITTEE FINANCIAL EXPERT

    106  

ITEM 16B.

 

CODE OF ETHICS

    106  

ITEM 16C.

 

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

    106  

ITEM 16D.

 

EXEMPTIONS FROM THE LISTING STANDARDS FOR AUDIT COMMITTEES

    107  

ITEM 16E.

 

PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES BY THE ISSUER

    107  

ITEM 16F.

 

CHANGE IN REGISTRANT'S CERTIFYING ACCOUNTANT

    107  

ITEM 16G.

 

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    107  

ITEM 16H.

 

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE

    108  

PART III

 

 

       

ITEM 17.

 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

    109  

ITEM 18.

 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

    109  

ITEM 19.

 

EXHIBITS

    109  

MANCHESTER UNITED PLC GROUP HISTORICAL FINANCIAL INFORMATION

       

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GENERAL INFORMATION

        In this annual report on Form 20-F ("Annual Report") references to "Manchester United," "the Company," "our Company," "our business," "we," "us" and "our" are, as the context requires, to Manchester United plc together with its consolidated subsidiaries as a consolidated entity.

        Throughout this Form 20-F, we refer to the following football leagues and cups:

    the English Premier League (the "Premier League");

    the Emirates FA Cup (the "FA Cup");

    the English Football League Cup (the "EFL Cup");

    the Union of European Football Associations Champions League (the "Champions League"); and

    the Union of European Football Associations Europa League (the "Europa League").

        The term "Matchday" refers to all domestic and European football match day activities from Manchester United men's games at Old Trafford, the Manchester United football stadium, along with receipts for domestic cup (such as the EFL Cup and the FA Cup) games not played at Old Trafford plus receipts from Manchester United women's home games. Fees for arranging other events at the stadium are also included as Matchday revenue.


PRESENTATION OF FINANCIAL AND OTHER DATA

        We report under International Financial Reporting Standards ("IFRS"), as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (the "IASB"), and IFRS Interpretations Committee interpretations. None of the financial statements were prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States.

        All references in this Annual Report to (i) "pounds sterling," "pence," "p" or "£" are to the currency of the United Kingdom, (ii) "US dollar," "USD" or "$" are to the currency of the United States, and (iii) "Euro" or "€" are to the currency introduced at the start of the third stage of European economic and monetary union pursuant to the treaty establishing the European Community, as amended.


FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

        This Annual Report contains estimates and forward-looking statements. Our estimates and forward-looking statements are mainly based on our current expectations and estimates of future events and trends, which affect or may affect our businesses and operations. Although we believe that these estimates and forward-looking statements are based upon reasonable assumptions, they are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties and are made in light of information currently available to us. Many important factors, in addition to the factors described in this Annual Report, may adversely affect our results as indicated in forward-looking statements. You should read this Annual Report completely and with the understanding that our actual future results may be materially different and worse from what we expect.

        All statements other than statements of historical fact are forward-looking statements. The words "may," "might," "will," "could," "would," "should," "expect," "plan," "anticipate," "intend," "seek," "believe," "estimate," "predict," "potential," "continue," "contemplate," "possible" and similar words are intended to identify estimates and forward-looking statements.

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        Our estimates and forward-looking statements may be influenced by various factors, including without limitation:

    our dependence on the performance and popularity of our men's first team;

    maintaining, enhancing and protecting our brand and reputation in order to expand our follower and sponsorship base;

    our reliance on European competitions as a source of future income;

    the negotiation and pricing of key media contracts outside our control;

    actions taken by other Premier League clubs that are contrary to our interests;

    the potential impact of the United Kingdom's decision to exit from the European Union (the "EU") on the movement of players or other regulations;

    our ability to attract and retain key personnel, including players, in an increasingly competitive market with increasing salaries and transfer fees;

    our ability to execute a digital media strategy that generates the revenue we anticipate;

    our ability to meet growth expectations and properly manage such anticipated growth;

    our ability to maintain, train and build an effective international sales and marketing infrastructure, and manage the risks associated with such an expansion;

    our ability to renew or replace key commercial agreements on similar or better terms, or attract new sponsors;

    our ability to protect ourselves from cyber-attack on our IT systems which could compromise our IT operational capability;

    our exposure to credit related losses in connection with key media, commercial and transfer contracts;

    our relationship with the various leagues to which we belong and the application of their respective rules and regulations;

    our relationship with merchandising, licensing, sponsor and other commercial partners;

    maintaining our match attendance at Old Trafford;

    our exposure to increased competition, both in football and the various commercial markets in which we do business;

    any natural disasters, terrorist incidents or other events beyond our control that adversely affect our operations;

    the effect of adverse economic conditions on our operations;

    uncertainty with regard to exchange rates, our tax rate and our cash flow;

    our ability to adequately protect against media piracy and identity theft of our follower account information;

    our exposure to the effects of seasonality in our business;

    the effect of our indebtedness on our financial health and competitive position;

    our ability to compete in our industry and with innovation by our competitors;

iii


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    estimates and estimate methodologies used in preparing our consolidated financial statements; and

    the future trading prices of our Class A ordinary shares and the impact of securities analysts' reports on these prices.

        Other sections of this Annual Report include additional factors that could adversely impact our business and financial performance, principally "Item 3. Key Information—D. Risk Factors." Moreover, we operate in an evolving environment. New risk factors and uncertainties emerge from time to time and it is not possible for our management to predict all risk factors and uncertainties, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements. Therefore, you are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. We qualify all of our forward-looking statements by these cautionary statements. Except as required by law, we undertake no obligation to update or revise publicly any forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, after the date on which the statements are made or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events.


MARKET AND INDUSTRY DATA

        This Annual Report contains industry, market, and competitive position data that are based on the industry publications and studies conducted by third parties listed below as well as our own internal estimates and research. These industry publications and third-party studies generally state that the information that they contain has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, although they do not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of such information. While we believe that each of these publications and third-party studies is reliable, we have not independently verified the market and industry data obtained from these third-party sources. While we believe our internal research is reliable and the definition of our market and industry are appropriate, neither such research nor these definitions have been verified by any independent source.

        References to our "1.1 billion fans and followers" are based on a survey conducted by Kantar (a division of WPP plc) in 2019 and paid for by us. As in the survey conducted by Kantar , we define the term "fans" as those individuals who answered survey questions, unprompted, with the answer that Manchester United was their favorite football team in the world and the term "followers" as those individuals who answered survey questions, unprompted, with the answer that Manchester United is a football team that they proactively follow in addition to their favorite football team. For example, we and Kantar included in the definition of "follower" a respondent who watched live Manchester United matches, followed highlights coverage or read or talked about Manchester United regularly.

        This internet-based survey was conducted during the first six months of 2019 and included over 54,000 respondents across 39 countries. It repeated a similar 2011 survey, also conducted by Kantar, to ensure comparability of approach, methodology and results. The survey included questions on:

    demographics, age, gender and socio-economic background;

    viewership of Manchester United matches, social media following and engagement;

    relationship, awareness and attitudes to commercial partners; and

    interest in Manchester United products, including merchandise.

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        The survey indicated that Manchester United has 1.1 billion combined fans and followers worldwide, comprised of 467 million fans and 635 million followers (compared to 277 million and 382 million, respectively, in 2011), including:

    a total of 731.7 million fans and followers in the Asia Pacific region (compared to 324.7 million in 2011);

    a total of 296.1 million fans and followers in Europe, the Middle East and Africa (compared to 262.9 million in 2011); and

    a total of 74 million fans and followers in the Americas (compared to 71.7 million in 2011).

        We expect there to be differences in the level of engagement with our brand between followers and fans, as defined in the survey. We have not identified any practical way to measure these differences in consumer behavior and any references to our fans and followers should be viewed in that light.

        To calculate the number of fans and followers from the approximately 54,000 responses, Kantar applied assumptions based on third-party data sets covering certain factors including population size, country specific characteristics such as wealth and GDP per capita, and affinity for sports and media penetration. They then extrapolated the results to the rest of the world, representing an extrapolated adult population of 5 billion people. However, while Kantar believes the extrapolation methodology was robust and consistent with consumer research practices, as with all surveys, there are inherent limitations in extrapolating survey results to a larger population than those actually surveyed. As a result of these limitations, our number of followers and fans may be significantly less or significantly more than the extrapolated survey results. Kantar's extrapolated results also accounted for non-internet users. To do so, Kantar had to make assumptions about the preferences and behaviors of non-internet users in those countries surveyed. For surveyed markets with especially low internet penetration these assumptions reduced the number of our followers in those countries and there is no guarantee that the assumptions applied are accurate. Survey results also account only for claimed consumer behavior rather than actual consumer behavior and as a result, survey results may not reflect real consumer behavior with respect to football or the consumption of our content and products. The Kantar survey indicates that the information that it contains has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, although they do not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of such information. While we believe that the survey results are reliable, we have not independently verified the data contained in the survey.

        In addition to the survey conducted by Kantar, this Annual Report references the following industry publications and third-party studies:

    television viewership data compiled by futures sports + entertainment—Mediabrands International Limited for the 2018/19 season (the "Futures Data"); and

    a paper published by AT Kearney, Inc. in 2014 entitled "Winning in the Business of Sports" ("AT Kearney").

v


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PART I

ITEM 1.    IDENTITY OF DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND ADVISERS

        Not applicable.

ITEM 2.    OFFER STATISTICS AND EXPECTED TIMETABLE

        Not applicable.

ITEM 3.    KEY INFORMATION

A.    SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

        We prepare our consolidated financial statements in accordance with IFRS as issued by the IASB. We adopted IFRS 15 "Revenue from contracts with customers" with effect from 1 July 2018. The implementation of IFRS 15 had a cumulative material impact on our financial statements as at 1 July 2018 and consequently prior year amounts have been restated. The selected consolidated financial data (including statement of profit or loss data, other data and balance sheet data) presented as of and for the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018, 2017, 2016 and 2015 has been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements (as restated) and the notes thereto (our audited consolidated financial statements as of and for the years ended 30 June 2016 and 2015 are not included in this Annual Report). Our historical results for any prior period are not necessarily indicative of results expected in any future period.

        The selected historical financial information presented in the tables below should be read in conjunction with, and is qualified in its entirety by reference to, our audited consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. The audited consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes as of and for the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017 have been included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

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Table of Contents

        Unless otherwise specified, all financial information included in this Annual Report has been stated in pounds sterling.

 
  Year ended 30 June  
 
  2019   Restated(1)
2018
  Restated(1)
2017
  Restated(1)
2016
  Restated(1)
2015
 
 
  (£'000, unless otherwise indicated)
 

Statement of profit or loss data:

                               

Revenue from contracts with customers

    627,122     589,758     581,254     515,694     395,812  

Analyzed as:

                               

Commercial revenue

    275,093     275,835     275,521     268,667     197,565  

Broadcasting revenue

    241,210     204,137     194,098     140,440     107,664  

Matchday revenue

    110,819     109,786     111,635     106,587     90,583  

Operating expenses—before exceptional items

    (583,337 )   (562,089 )   (516,068 )   (421,574 )   (384,843 )

Analyzed as:

                               

Employee benefit expenses

    (332,356 )   (295,935 )   (263,464 )   (232,242 )   (202,561 )

Other operating expenses

    (108,977 )   (117,019 )   (117,942 )   (91,244 )   (72,271 )

Depreciation and impairment

    (12,850 )   (10,755 )   (10,228 )   (10,079 )   (10,324 )

Amortization

    (129,154 )   (138,380 )   (124,434 )   (88,009 )   (99,687 )

Operating expenses—exceptional items

    (19,599 )   (1,917 )   4,753     (15,135 )   (2,336 )

Total operating expenses

    (602,936 )   (564,006 )   (511,315 )   (436,709 )   (387,179 )

Operating profit before profit/(loss) on disposal of intangible assets

    24,186     25,752     69,939     78,985     8,633  

Profit/(loss) on disposal of intangible assets

    25,799     18,119     10,926     (9,786 )   23,649  

Operating profit

    49,985     43,871     80,865     69,199     32,282  

Finance costs

    (25,470 )   (24,233 )   (25,013 )   (20,459 )   (35,419 )

Finance income

    2,961     6,195     736     442     204  

Net finance costs

    (22,509 )   (18,038 )   (24,277 )   (20,017 )   (35,215 )

Profit/(loss) before income tax

    27,476     25,833     56,588     49,182     (2,933 )

Income tax (expense)/credit(2)

    (8,595 )   (63,462 )   (17,379 )   (12,584 )   2,450  

Profit/(loss) for the year(2)

    18,881     (37,629 )   39,209     36,598     (483 )

Weighted average number of ordinary shares (thousands)

    164,526     164,195     164,025     163,890     163,795  

Diluted weighted average number of ordinary shares (thousands)(3)

    164,666     164,610     164,448     164,319     163,795  

Basic earnings/(loss) per share (pence)(2)

    11.48     (22.92 )   23.90     22.33     (0.29 )

Diluted earnings/(loss) per share (pence)(2)/(3)

    11.47     (22.92 )   23.84     22.27     (0.29 )

(1)
Comparative amounts have been restated—see note 33 to our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report for further details.

(2)
The US federal corporate income tax rate reduced from 35% to 21% following the substantive enactment of US tax reform on 22 December 2017. This necessitated a re-measurement of the existing US deferred tax position in the period to 31 December 2017. As a result, the tax expense for the year ended 30 June 2018 included a non-cash tax accounting write off of £49.0 million. Accordingly, this resulted in a loss for the year ended 30 June 2018 and basic and diluted loss per share.

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(3)
For the years ended 30 June 2018 and 30 June 2015, potential ordinary shares are anti-dilutive, as their inclusion in the diluted loss per share calculation would reduce the loss per share, and hence have been excluded. For the years ended 30 June 2019, 2017 and 2016, potential ordinary shares have been treated as dilutive, as their inclusion in the diluted earnings per share calculation decreases earnings per share.
 
  Year ended 30 June  
 
  2019   Restated(1)
2018
  Restated(1)
2017
  Restated(1)
2016
  Restated(1)
2015
 
 
  (£'000, unless otherwise indicated)
 

Other data:

                               

Commercial revenue

    275,093     275,835     275,521     268,667     197,565  

Analyzed as:

                               

Sponsorship revenue

    173,010     172,982     171,530     171,329     165,913  

Retail, merchandising, apparel & products licensing revenue

    102,083     102,853     103,991     97,338     31,652  

Adjusted EBITDA(4)

    185,789     176,804     199,848     192,208     120,980  

Dividends declared per share ($)

    0.18     0.18     0.18     0.18      

Dividends declared per share (£ equivalent)

    0.14     0.13     0.14     0.12      

 

 
  As of 30 June  
 
  2019   Restated(1)
2018
  Restated(1)
2017
  Restated(1)
2016
  Restated(1)
2015
 
 
  (£'000)
 

Balance sheet data:

                               

Cash and cash equivalents

    307,637     242,022     290,267     229,194     155,752  

Total assets

    1,496,525     1,545,744     1,533,652     1,451,385     1,301,174  

Total liabilities

    1,081,323     1,118,640     1,053,565     991,006     821,462  

Total equity

    415,202     427,104     480,087     460,379     479,712  

 

 
  Season  
 
  2019   2018   2017   2016   2015  

Home games played:

                               

Premier League

    19     19     19     19     19  

European Games

    5     4     7     6      

Domestic Cups

    2     3     5     4     2  

Away games played:

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

Premier League

    19     19     19     19     19  

European Games

    5     5     8     6      

Domestic Cups

    3     6     5     5     4  

Total games played:

                               

Premier League

    38     38     38     38     38  

European Games

    10     9     15     12      

Domestic Cups

    5     9     10     9     6  

(1)
Comparative amounts have been restated—see note 33 to our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report for further details.
(4)
We define Adjusted EBITDA as profit/(loss) for the year before depreciation and impairment, amortization, (profit)/loss on disposal of intangible assets, exceptional items, net finance costs, and tax. Adjusted EBITDA is a non-IFRS measure and not a uniformly or legally defined financial

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    measure. Adjusted EBITDA is not a substitute for IFRS measures in assessing our overall financial performance. Because Adjusted EBITDA is not a measurement determined in accordance with IFRS, and is susceptible to varying calculations, Adjusted EBITDA may not be comparable to other similarly titled measures presented by other companies. Adjusted EBITDA is included in this Annual Report because it is a measure of our operating performance and we believe that Adjusted EBITDA is useful to investors because it is frequently used by securities analysts, investors and other interested parties in their evaluation of the operating performance of companies in industries similar to ours. We also believe Adjusted EBITDA is useful to our management and investors as a measure of comparative operating performance from year to year and among companies as it is reflective of changes in pricing decisions, cost controls and other factors that affect operating performance, and it removes the effect of our asset base (primarily depreciation, impairment and amortization), material volatile items (primarily (profit)/loss on disposal of intangible assets and exceptional items), capital structure (primarily finance costs), and items outside the control of our management (primarily taxes). Our management also uses Adjusted EBITDA for planning purposes, including the preparation of our annual operating budget and financial projections. Adjusted EBITDA has limitations as an analytical tool, and you should not consider it in isolation, or as a substitute for an analysis of our results as reported under IFRS as issued by the IASB.

    The following is a reconciliation of profit/(loss) for the years presented to Adjusted EBITDA:

 
  Year ended 30 June  
 
  2019   Restated(1)
2018
  Restated(1)
2017
  Restated(1)
2016
  Restated(1)
2015
 
 
  (£'000)
 

Profit/(loss) for the year

    18,881     (37,629 )   39,209     36,598     (483 )

Adjustments:

                               

Tax expense/(credit)

    8,595     63,462     17,379     12,584     (2,450 )

Net finance costs

    22,509     18,038     24,277     20,017     35,215  

(Profit)/loss on disposal of intangible assets

    (25,799 )   (18,119 )   (10,926 )   9,786     (23,649 )

Exceptional items(5)

    19,599     1,917     (4,753 )   15,135     2,336  

Amortization

    129,154     138,380     124,434     88,009     99,687  

Depreciation and impairment

    12,850     10,755     10,228     10,079     10,324  

Adjusted EBITDA

    185,789     176,804     199,848     192,208     120,980  

(1)
Comparative amounts have been restated—see note 33 to our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report for further details.
(5)
See notes 2.8 and 6 to our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report for more information.

B.    CAPITALIZATION AND INDEBTEDNESS

        Not applicable.

C.    REASONS FOR THE OFFER AND USE OF PROCEEDS

        Not applicable.

D.    RISK FACTORS

        Investment in our Class A ordinary shares involves a high degree of risk. We expect to be exposed to some or all of the risks described below in our future operations. Any of the risk factors described below, as well as additional risks of which we are not currently aware, could affect our business operations and have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition, cash flow and prospects and cause the value of our shares to decline. Moreover, if and to the extent that any of the risks described below materialize, they may occur in combination with other risks which would compound the adverse effect of such risks on our business, results of operations, financial condition, cash flow and prospects.

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Risks Related to Our Business

If we are unable to maintain and enhance our brand and reputation, particularly in new markets, or if events occur that damage our brand and reputation, our ability to expand our follower base, sponsors, and commercial partners or to sell significant quantities of our products may be impaired.

        The success of our business depends on the value and strength of our brand and reputation. Our brand and reputation are also integral to the implementation of our strategies for expanding our follower base, sponsors and commercial partners. To be successful in the future we believe we must preserve, grow and leverage the value of our brand across all of our revenue streams. For instance, we have in the past experienced, and we expect that in the future we will continue to receive, a high degree of media coverage. Unfavorable publicity regarding our men's first team's performance in league and cup competitions or their behavior off the field, our ability to attract and retain certain players and coaching staff or actions by or changes in our ownership, could negatively affect our brand and reputation. Failure to respond effectively to negative publicity could also further erode our brand and reputation. In addition, events in the football industry, even if unrelated to us, may negatively affect our brand or reputation. As a result, the size, engagement and loyalty of our follower base and the demand for our products may decline. Damage to our brand or reputation or loss of our followers' commitment for any of these reasons could impair our ability to expand our follower base, sponsors and commercial partners or our ability to sell significant quantities of our products, which would result in decreased revenue across our revenue streams and have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow, as well as require additional resources to rebuild our brand and reputation.

        In addition, maintaining and enhancing our brand and reputation may require us to make substantial investments. We cannot assure you that such investments will be successful. Failure to successfully maintain and enhance the Manchester United brand or our reputation or excessive or unsuccessful expenses in connection with this effort could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow.

Our business is dependent upon our ability to attract and retain key personnel, including players.

        We are highly dependent on members of our management, coaching staff and our players. Competition for talented players and staff is, and will continue to be, intense. Our ability to attract and retain the highest quality players for our men's first team and youth academy, as well as coaching staff, is critical to our men's first team's success in league and cup competitions, increasing popularity and, consequently, critical to our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow. Our success and many achievements over the last twenty years does not necessarily mean that we will continue to be successful in the future, whether as a result of changes in player personnel, coaching staff or otherwise. A downturn in the performance of our men's first team could adversely affect our ability to attract and retain coaches and players. Further, in March 2017, the government of the United Kingdom (the "UK") initiated the formal process of withdrawing from the EU, which could result in changes to European regulations relating to the movement of players between the UK and the EU. In addition, our popularity in certain countries or regions may depend, at least in part, on fielding certain players from those countries or regions. While we enter into employment contracts with each of our key personnel with the aim of securing their services for the term of the contract, the retention of their services for the full term of the contract cannot be guaranteed due to possible contract disputes or approaches by other clubs. Our failure to attract and retain key personnel could have a negative impact on our ability to effectively manage and grow our business.

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We are dependent upon the performance and popularity of our men's first team.

        Our revenue streams are driven by the performance and popularity of our men's first team. Significant sources of our revenue are the result of historically strong performances in English domestic and European competitions, specifically the Premier League, the FA Cup, the EFL Cup, the Champions League and the Europa League. Our revenue varies significantly depending on our men's first team's participation and performance in these competitions. Our men's first team's performance can affect all four of our revenue streams:

    sponsorship revenue through sponsorship relationships;

    retail, merchandising, apparel & product licensing revenue through product sales;

    Broadcasting revenue through the frequency of appearances, performance based share of league broadcasting revenue, Champions League/Europe League distributions and MUTV distribution through linear and digital platforms; and

    Matchday revenue through ticket sales.

        Our men's first team currently plays in the Premier League, the top football league in England. Our performance in the Premier League directly affects, and a weak performance in the Premier League could adversely affect, our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow. For example, our revenue from the sale of products, media rights, tickets and hospitality would fall considerably if our men's first team were relegated from, or otherwise ceased to play in, the Premier League, the Champions League or the Europa League.

        We cannot ensure that our men's first team will be successful in the Premier League or in the other leagues and tournaments in which it plays. Relegation from the Premier League or a general decline in the success of our men's first team, particularly in consecutive seasons, would negatively affect our ability to attract or retain talented players and coaching staff, as well as supporters, sponsors and other commercial partners, which would have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow.

It may not be possible to renew or replace key commercial agreements on similar or better terms, or attract new sponsors.

        Our Commercial revenue for each of the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017 represented 43.8%, 46.8% and 47.4% of our total revenue, respectively. The substantial majority of our Commercial revenue is generated from commercial agreements with our sponsors, and these agreements have finite terms. When these contracts do expire, we may not be able to renew or replace them with contracts on similar or better terms or at all. Our most important commercial contracts include contracts with global, regional and supplier sponsors representing industries including financial services, airline, spirits, automotive, entertainment centers, hotels, betting and kitchen and bathroom fixtures and generators, which typically have contract terms of two to five years.

        If we fail to renew or replace these key commercial agreements on similar or better terms, we could experience a material reduction in our Commercial revenue. Such a reduction could have a material adverse effect on our overall revenue and our ability to continue to compete with the top football clubs in England and Europe.

        As part of our business plan, we intend to continue to grow our commercial portfolio by developing and expanding our geographic and product categorized approach, which will include partnering with additional sponsors. We may not be able to successfully execute our business plan in promoting our brand to attract new sponsors. We cannot assure you that we will be successful in implementing our business plan or that our Commercial revenue will continue to grow at the same rate as it has in the past or at all. Any of these events could negatively affect our ability to achieve our

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development and commercialization goals, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow.

Negotiation and pricing of key media contracts are outside our control and those contracts may change in the future.

        For each of the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017, 60.6%, 74.2% and 74.0% of our Broadcasting revenue, respectively, was generated from the media rights for Premier League matches, and 34.5%, 18.8% and 20.5% of our Broadcasting revenue, respectively, was generated from the media rights for UEFA matches. Contracts for these media rights and certain other revenue for those competitions (both domestically and internationally) are negotiated collectively by the Premier League and the Union of European Football Associations ("UEFA") respectively. We are not a party to the contracts negotiated by the Premier League and UEFA. Further, we do not participate in and therefore do not have any direct influence on the outcome of contract negotiations. As a result, we may be subject to media rights contracts with media distributors with whom we may not otherwise contract or media rights contracts that are not as favorable to us as we might otherwise be able to negotiate individually with media distributors. Furthermore, the limited number of media distributors bidding for Premier League and UEFA club competition media rights may result in reduced prices paid for those rights and, as a result, a decline in revenue received from media contracts.

        In addition, although an agreement has been reached for the sale of Premier League domestic broadcasting rights through the end of the 2021/22 football season and for the sale of UEFA club competition broadcasting rights through the end of the 2020/21 football season, future agreements may not maintain our current level of Broadcasting revenue.

        Future intervention by the European Commission ("EC"), the EU Court of Justice ("EUCJ"), UK authorities, or other competent authorities and courts having jurisdiction may also have a negative effect on our revenue from media rights in the European Economic Area ("EEA"). Enforcement of competition laws and changes to copyright regimes may require changes to sales models that could negatively affect the amount which copyright holders, such as the Premier League, are able to derive from the exploitation of rights within the EU. As a result, our Broadcasting revenue from the sale of those rights could decrease.

        It is likely that there will be future regulatory intervention by the EC relating to the grant of exclusive licenses of content on a territorial basis within the EEA insofar as they prohibit or limit the cross-border provision by satellite or internet transmission of retail pay-TV services in response to unsolicited demand (so-called "passive sales"). In the cases of the Premier League & others vs. QC Leisure & Others / Karen Murphy vs. Media Protection Services, the EUCJ ruled that EU free movement rules prevented enforcement of national laws to prevent importation and sale of decoding devices marketed in other Member States. It is an open question whether this finding is confined to broadcasting by satellite. The EUCJ held further that EU competition rules prohibit any agreement designed to guarantee absolute territorial exclusivity by restricting passive sales within the EU (i.e. by obliging broadcasters not to meet unsolicited demand for decoding devices enabling access to the right holder's protected subject-matter with a view to their use outside the territory covered by the license agreement).

        Subsequently, in January 2014 the EC launched a competition investigation into exclusive licensing arrangements between US Studios and various platforms in Europe (the major platform in each of the five largest Member States). In July 2015, the EC issued a Statement of Objections in Case COMP/40023—Cross-border access to pay-TV setting out its preliminary view that certain provisions in the license agreements between the studios and Sky UK would eliminate cross-border competition and constitute a violation of EU competition rules. According to the EC, these provisions require Sky UK to block or limit access to films through geo-blocking its online services or through its satellite pay-TV

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services to consumers outside of the UK and Ireland (and thus prevent Sky UK from responding to passive sales requests). The EC is carrying out parallel investigations into cross-border access to pay-TV services in France, Italy, Germany and Spain. Studios and platforms argue that EU law does not preclude enforcement of their copyright and that the restrictions are necessary to ensure adequate financing of content creation because content value varies considerably across Member States.

        On 22 April 2016, the EC announced that Paramount, while not agreeing with the concerns expressed in the Statement of Objections, had offered to settle the case by offering a series of commitments, including an undertaking not to enter into pay-TV agreements that prohibit their licensees from responding to passive sales requests. The commitments cover both linear pay-TV services and (when covered by the broadcaster's licenses) subscription video-on-demand services. The EC accepted these commitments on 27 July 2016. On 8 December 2016, the French TV broadcaster Groupe Canal + brought an action seeking annulment of the EC's decision to accept the commitments. On 12 December 2018, the EU General Court dismissed the appeal and upheld the EC decision as lawful in identifying competition concerns and finding the commitments suitable to resolve them. Shortly before and on the same and following day of the General Court's judgment, Disney, NBC Universal, Sony Pictures, Warner Bros. and Sky also offered commitments, which the EC accepted on 7 March 2019 and closed the investigation. The commitments foresee that the restrictive clauses will not be applied nor re-introduced in the film licensing contracts, without prejudice to the studios' rights under copyright law or the Portability Regulation. On 15 February 2019, Canal + appealed the General Court's judgment before the EUCJ and on 19 June 2019, it also appealed before the General Court the EC decision accepting the commitments by Sky and four Hollywood studios; both cases are pending. While these investigations have targeted film content, any future decision is very likely to be applicable to any pay-TV content, including sport.

        In addition to this regulatory action, the EU as part of its Digital Single Market ("DSM") strategy adopted on 8 June 2017 the Portability Regulation, which is designed to enable consumers to access their content services while travelling across Europe. The Portability Regulation became applicable on 20 March 2018. The EU has also adopted a regulation on unjustified geo-blocking, which became applicable on 3 December 2018. Copyright protected content is excluded but the EC must review and report on the exclusion by 23 March 2020. This may lead to proposals for inclusion of content protected by copyright and neighbouring rights.

        As part of the DSM initiative, the EC has also sought to modernize EU copyright rules to allow for wider access to online content across the EU, including by extending rights clearance mechanisms in the Satellite and Cable Directive. The EC published its proposal for a Regulation on Online Transmissions on 14 September 2016, which in particular contains the proposal that the country of origin principle be extended to online broadcast services. In practice, this would mean that licenses for simulcast and catch-up rights, for example, for the UK would be construed as covering the entire EEA (as long as the UK remains subject to EU law). The European Parliament and the Council have both agreed to turn the draft Regulation on Online Transmissions into a Directive and to include substantial amendments limiting the country of origin principle. As a result, the country of origin principle will apply to radio broadcasts, but not to television broadcasts of sports events. In parallel, the revised Copyright Directive has inter alia strengthened the position of rights owners by making online platforms responsible for taking certain actions against user-uploaded content which violates copyright. Both Directives were adopted in April 2019 and Member States have 24 months from their publication to transpose them into national law.

        Finally, also as part of the DSM initiative, the European Parliament and the Council adopted on 6 November 2018, a revision of the Audiovisual Media Services Directive and Member States have 21 months from its entering into force to transpose it into national law. This Directive applies to traditional TV broadcasters, with the revision inter alia extending the scope for some provisions to also

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cover video-sharing platforms. The revision has not affected Article 14 on the possibility of national measures ensuring the non-exclusive broadcast of events of major importance for society.

European competitions cannot be relied upon as a source of income.

        Qualification for the Champions League is largely dependent upon our men's first team's performance in the Premier League and, in some circumstances, the Champions League or Europa League in the previous season. Qualification for the Champions League cannot, therefore, be guaranteed. Failure to qualify for the Champions League would result in a material reduction in revenue for each season in which our men's first team did not participate. To help mitigate this impact the majority of playing contracts for our men's first team include step-ups in remuneration which are contingent on participation in the group stage of the Champions League. As a result of our men's first team performance during the 2018/19 season, our men's first team will not participate in the 2019/20 Champions League but will participate in the 2019/20 Europa League. Inclusive of Broadcasting revenue, prize money and Matchday revenue, our combined Broadcasting and Matchday revenue from participation in European competitions was £93.1 million, £45.9 million and £48.5 million for each of the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

        In addition, our participation in the Champions League or Europa League may be influenced by factors beyond our control. For example, the number of places in each European competition available to the clubs of each national football association in Europe can vary from year to year based on a ranking system. If the performance of English clubs in Europe declines, the number of places in each European competition available to English clubs may decline and it may be more difficult for our men's first team to qualify for European competition in future seasons. Further, the rules governing qualification for European competitions (whether at the European or national level) may change and make it more difficult for our men's first team to qualify for European competition in future seasons.

        We are a founder member and our Executive Vice Chairman has a seat on the executive board of the European Club Association ("ECA"), an independent organization set up to work with football governing bodies to protect and promote the interests of football clubs at the European level.

        On 26 August 2016, following consultation between UEFA, the ECA and other stakeholders, UEFA announced certain changes to the format of the Champions League and Europa League which took place with effect from 2018/19 and are in place for the full three-year cycle through to 2020/21. The key changes related to the access list for both competitions and the methodology for financial distributions. With respect to the Champions League, the top four clubs from the four top-ranked national associations (of which England is currently one) qualify automatically for the group stage of the Champions League. With respect to the financial distribution methodology, in addition to the previous three-pillar system (starting fee, performance fees and market pool), UEFA introduced a fourth pillar being the individual club coefficient. The individual club coefficient is determined by reference to past performance in UEFA club competitions over a ten-year period with additional points for historical winners of UEFA club competitions.

        In addition, a new subsidiary company, UEFA Club Competitions SA, was established by UEFA to advise and make recommendations to UEFA on strategic business matters and opportunities concerning club competitions. Half of the administration board is appointed by UEFA and the other half by the ECA. Our Executive Vice Chairman is one of the members of the board.

        Moreover, because of the prestige associated with participating in the European competitions, particularly the Champions League, failure to qualify for any European competition, particularly for consecutive seasons, could negatively affect our ability to attract and retain talented players and coaching staff, as well as supporters, sponsors and other commercial partners. Failure to participate in the Champions League for two or more consecutive seasons would also reduce annual payments under the agreement with adidas by 30% of the applicable payment for the year in which the second or other

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consecutive season of non-participation falls. Any one or more of these events could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operation, financial condition and cash flow.

Our business depends in part on relationships with certain third parties.

        We consider the development of our commercial assets to be central to our ongoing business plan and a driver of future growth. For example, our current contract with adidas that began with the 2015/16 season provides them with certain global technical sponsorship and dual-branded licensing rights. While we expect to be able to continue to execute our business plan in the future with the support of adidas, we remain subject to these contractual provisions and our business plan could be negatively impacted by non-compliance or poor execution of our strategy by adidas. Further, any interruption in our ability to obtain the services of adidas or other third parties or deterioration in their performance could negatively impact this portion of our operations. Furthermore, if our arrangement with adidas is terminated or modified against our interest, we may not be able to find alternative solutions for this portion of our business on a timely basis or on terms favorable to us or at all.

        In the future, we may enter into additional arrangements permitting third parties to use our brand and trademarks. Although we take steps to carefully select our partners, such arrangements may not be successful. Our partners may fail to fulfil their obligations under their agreements or have interests that differ from or conflict with our own. For example, we are dependent on our sponsors and commercial partners to effectively implement quality controls over products using our brand and/or trademarks. The inability of such sponsors and commercial partners to meet our quality standards could negatively affect consumer confidence in the quality and value of our brand, which could result in lower product sales. Any one or more of these events could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operation, financial condition and cash flow.

We are exposed to credit related losses in the event of non-performance by counterparties to Premier League and UEFA media contracts as well as our key commercial and transfer contracts.

        We derive the substantial majority of our Broadcasting revenue from media contracts negotiated by the Premier League and UEFA with media distributors, and although the Premier League obtains guarantees to support certain of its media contracts, typically in the form of letters of credit issued by commercial banks, it remains our single largest credit exposure. We derive our Commercial and sponsorship revenue from certain corporate sponsors, including global, regional and supplier sponsors (which includes new businesses operating in emerging markets) in respect of which we may manage our credit risk by seeking advance payments, installments and/or bank guarantees where appropriate. The substantial majority of this revenue is derived from a limited number of sources. During the year ended 30 June 2019, those sources that represented greater than 10% of our total revenue were:

    Premier League: 24.1% of our total revenue

    UEFA: 13.3% of our total revenue

    adidas: 12.6% of our total revenue

        We are also exposed to other football clubs globally for the payment of transfer fees on players. Depending on the transaction, some of these fees are paid to us in installments. We try to manage our credit risk with respect to those clubs by requiring payments in advance or, in the case of payments on installment, requiring bank guarantees on such payments in certain circumstances. However, we cannot ensure these efforts will eliminate our credit exposure to other clubs. A change in credit quality at one of the media broadcasters for the Premier League or UEFA, one of our sponsors or a club to whom we have sold a player can increase the risk that such counterparty is unable or unwilling to pay amounts owed to us. The failure of a major television broadcaster for the Premier League or UEFA club competitions to pay outstanding amounts owed to its respective league or the failure of one of our

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key sponsors or a club to pay outstanding amounts owed to us could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow.

Matchday revenue from our supporters is a significant portion of overall revenue.

        A significant amount of our revenue derives from ticket sales and other Matchday revenue for our men's first team matches at Old Trafford and our share of gate receipts from domestic cup matches. In particular, the revenue generated from ticket sales and other Matchday revenue at Old Trafford will be highly dependent on the continued attendance at matches of our individual and corporate supporters as well as the number of home matches we play each season. During each of the 2018/19, 2017/18 and 2016/17 seasons, we played 26, 26 and 31 home matches, respectively, and our Matchday revenue was £110.8 million, £109.8 million and £111.6 million for the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Match attendance is influenced by a number of factors, some of which are partly or wholly outside of our control. These factors include the success of our men's first team, broadcasting coverage and general economic conditions in the United Kingdom, which affect personal disposable income and corporate marketing and hospitality budgets. A reduction in Matchday attendance could have a material adverse effect on our Matchday revenue and our overall business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow.

The markets in which we operate are highly competitive, both within Europe and internationally, and increased competition could cause our profitability to decline.

        We face competition from other football clubs in England and Europe. In the Premier League, investment from wealthy team owners has led to teams with deep financial backing that are able to acquire top players and coaching staff, which could result in improved performance from those teams in domestic and European competitions. As the Premier League continues to grow in popularity, the interest of wealthy potential owners may increase, leading to additional clubs substantially improving their financial position. Competition from European clubs also remains strong. Despite the adoption of the UEFA financial fair play initiative, a set of financial monitoring rules on clubs participating in the Champions League and Europa League, and the Premier League Profitability and Sustainability Rules, a similar set of rules monitoring Premier League clubs, European and Premier League football clubs are spending substantial sums on transfer fees and player salaries. Competition from inside and outside the Premier League has led to higher salaries for our players as well as increased competition on the field. The increase in competition could result in our men's first team finishing lower in the Premier League than we have in the past and jeopardizing our qualification for or results in European competitions. Competition within England could also cause our men's first team to fail to advance in the FA Cup and EFL Cup.

        In addition, from a commercial perspective, we actively compete across many different industries and within many different markets. We believe our primary sources of competition, both in Europe and internationally, include, but are not limited to:

    other businesses seeking corporate sponsorships and commercial partners such as sports teams, other entertainment events and television and digital media outlets;

    providers of sports apparel and equipment seeking retail, merchandising, apparel & product licensing opportunities;

    digital content providers seeking consumer attention and leisure time, advertiser income and consumer e-commerce activity;

    other types of television programming seeking access to broadcasters and advertiser income; and

    alternative forms of corporate hospitality and live entertainment for the sale of matchday tickets such as other live sports events, concerts, festivals, theater and similar events.

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        All of the above forms of competition could have a material adverse effect on any of our four revenue streams and our overall business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow.

A cyber-attack on or disruption to our IT systems or other systems utilized in our operations could compromise our operations, adversely impact our reputation and subject us to liability.

        As a high-profile brand we are susceptible to the risk of a cyber-attack on our IT systems or other third-party systems utilized in our operations. In recent years, the computer systems of an increasing number of companies and other organizations have been the subject of attacks by cyber criminals, activists and other parties (internal and external). Though we seek to protect ourselves by putting processes in place that are designed to prevent such attacks and regularly monitor alerts and updates from leading cyber security vendors and trusted authorities, our IT systems and other third-party systems utilized in our operations may still be vulnerable to external or internal security breaches, acts of vandalism, computer viruses and other forms of cyber-attack. Any such attack could disable the information technology systems we use or depend on to operate our business and give rise to the loss of significant amounts of personal data or other sensitive information, potentially subjecting us to criminal or civil sanctions or other liability. See "—We are subject to governmental regulation and other legal obligations related to privacy, data protection, data security and safeguarding. Our actual or perceived failure to comply with such obligations could harm our business." Similarly, any disruption to or failures in our IT systems or other third-party systems utilized in our operations could have an adverse impact on our ability to operate our business and lead to reputational damage. Any of these events could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow. Furthermore, as attempted attacks continue to evolve in scope and sophistication, we may incur significant costs in modifying or enhancing our IT security systems and processes in an attempt to defend against such attacks. There can be no assurance, however, that any security systems or processes we currently have in place or that we may implement in the future will be successful in preventing or mitigating the harm from such attacks.

We are subject to special rules and regulations regarding insolvency and bankruptcy.

        We are subject to, among other things, special insolvency or bankruptcy-related rules of the Premier League and the Football Association (the "FA"). Those rules empower the Premier League board to direct certain payments otherwise due to us to the FA and its members, associate members and affiliates, certain other English football leagues and certain other entities if it is reasonably satisfied that we have failed to pay certain creditors including other football clubs, the Premier League and the Football League.

        If we experience financial difficulty, we could also face sanctions under the Premier League rules, including suspension from the Premier League, European competitions, the FA Cup and certain other competitions, the deduction of league points from us in the Premier League or Football League and loss of control of player registrations. For example, the Premier League could prevent us from playing, thereby cutting off our income from ticket sales and putting many of our other sources of revenue at risk. Any of these events could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operation, financial condition, or cash flow, as well as our ability to meet our financial obligations.

Premier League voting rules may allow other clubs to take action contrary to our interests.

        The Premier League is governed by its 20 club shareholders with most rule changes requiring the support of a minimum of 14 of the clubs. This allows a minority of clubs to block changes they view as unfavorable to their interests. In addition, it allows a concerted majority of the clubs to pass rules that may be disadvantageous to the remaining six clubs. As one of the larger clubs in the Premier League in terms of revenue and follower base, we can exert some influence on the rulemaking process, however, our interests may not always align with the majority of clubs and it may be difficult for us to effect

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changes that are advantageous to us. At the same time, it is possible that other clubs may take action that we view as contrary to our interests. If the Premier League clubs pass rules that limit our ability to operate our business as we have planned or otherwise affect the payments made to us, we may be unable to achieve our goals and strategies or increase our revenue.

Our digital media strategy is unproven and may not generate the revenue we anticipate.

        We maintain contact with, and provide entertainment to, our global follower base through a number of digital and other media channels, including the internet, mobile services and applications, and social media. While we have attracted a significant number of followers to our digital media assets, including our website, the associated future revenue and income potential is uncertain. You should consider our business and prospects in light of the challenges, risks and difficulties we may encounter in this new and rapidly evolving market, including:

    our digital media strategy requiring us to provide offerings such as video on demand and highlights that have not previously been a substantial part of our business;

    our ability to retain our current global follower base, build our follower base and increase engagement with our followers through our digital media assets;

    our ability to enhance the content offered through our digital media assets and increase our subscriber base;

    our ability to effectively generate revenue from interaction with our followers through our digital media assets;

    our ability to attract new sponsors and advertisers, retain existing sponsors and advertisers and demonstrate that our digital media assets will deliver value to them;

    our ability to develop our digital media assets in a cost effective manner and operate our digital media services profitably and securely;

    our ability to identify and capitalize on new digital media business opportunities; and

    our ability to compete with other sports and other media for users' time.

        In addition, as we expand our digital and other media channels, including the internet, mobile services and applications, and social media, revenue from our other business sectors may decrease, including our Broadcasting revenue. Moreover, the increase in subscriber base in some of these digital and other media channels may limit the growth of the subscriber base and popularity of other channels. Failure to successfully address these risks and difficulties could affect our overall business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flow, liquidity and prospects.

Serious injuries to or losses of playing staff may affect our performance, and therefore our results of operations and financial condition.

        Injuries to members of the playing staff, particularly if career-threatening or career-ending, could have a detrimental effect on our business. Such injuries could have a negative effect upon our men's first team's performance and may also result in a loss of the income that would otherwise have resulted from a transfer of that player's registration. In addition, depending on the circumstances, we may write down the carrying value of a player on our balance sheet and record an impairment charge in our operating expenses to reflect any losses resulting from career-threatening or career-ending injuries to that player. Our strategy is to maintain a squad of men's first team players sufficient to mitigate the risk of player injuries. However, this strategy may not be sufficient to mitigate all financial losses in the event of an injury, and as a result such injury may affect the performance of our men's first team, and therefore our business, results of operations financial condition and cash flow.

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Inability to renew our insurance policies could expose us to significant losses.

        We insure against the accidental death (including death by natural causes) or permanent disablement (resulting in an inability to continue their playing career with Manchester United and/or any other club in one of the top five European leagues) of certain members of our men's first team, although typically not at such player's full market value. Such insurance also excludes incidents which occur while playing matches or training. We also have catastrophe coverage in the event of an incident (such as travel or terrorist related incidents) that results in the death or permanent disablement of multiple members of our men's first team playing squad. We also carry non-player related insurance typical for our business (including liability, property damage, business interruption and terrorism insurance). When any of our insurance policies expire, it may not be possible to renew them on the same terms, or at all. In such circumstances, some of our businesses and/or assets may be uninsured. If any of these uninsured businesses or assets were to suffer damage, we could suffer a financial loss. Our most valuable tangible asset is Old Trafford. An inability to renew insurance policies covering our players, Old Trafford, the Aon Training Complex or other valuable assets could expose us to significant losses.

        In addition to the above, for the period ending 31 December 2022, the Fédération Internationale de Football Association ("FIFA") has confirmed that it will provide insurance coverage for loss of wages (temporary disablement), subject to a maximum period of 365 days and a cap of €7.5 million per claim, paid by the club to our players who are injured while playing for their senior national team in a match played under the FIFA international match calendar. Neither FIFA nor national football associations are obliged to provide death or permanent disablement insurance coverage for players while on international duty. These terms are subject to review when the policy is due for renewal.

Our international expansion and operations in foreign markets expose us to risks associated with international sales and operations.

        We intend to continue to expand internationally and operate in select foreign markets. Managing a global organization is difficult, time consuming and expensive. Our inexperience in operating the club's businesses globally increases the risk that any future international expansion efforts that we may undertake will not be successful. In addition, conducting international operations subjects us to risks such as the lack of familiarity with and unexpected changes in foreign regulatory requirements; difficulties in managing and staffing international operations; fluctuations in foreign exchange rates; potentially adverse tax consequences, including foreign value added tax systems, and restrictions on repatriation of earnings; the burdens of complying with a wide variety of foreign laws and legal standards; increased financial accounting and reporting burdens and complexities; the lack of strong intellectual property regimes and political, social and economic instability abroad. Operating in international markets also requires significant management attention and financial resources. The investment and additional resources required to establish operations and manage growth in other countries may not produce desired levels of revenue or profitability.

        In many foreign countries, particularly in certain developing economies, it is not uncommon to encounter business practices that are prohibited by certain regulations, such as the UK Bribery Act 2010, the US Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and similar laws. Although we and our subsidiaries have undertaken compliance efforts with respect to these laws, our employees, contractors and agents, as well as those companies to which we outsource certain of our business operations, may take actions in violation of such policies and procedures. Any such violation, even if prohibited by our or our subsidiaries' policies and procedures or the law, could have a material adverse effect on our reputation, results of operations, financial condition and the price of our Class A ordinary shares.

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Fluctuations in exchange rates may adversely affect our results of operations.

        Our functional and reporting currency is pounds sterling and substantially all of our costs are denominated in pounds sterling. However, Broadcasting revenue from our participation in UEFA club competitions, as well as certain other revenue, is generated in Euros. We also occasionally enter into transfer agreements, commercial partner agreements and other contracts which are payable in Euros. In addition, we have US dollar foreign exchange exposure relating to our secured term loan facility and senior secured notes as well as Commercial revenue from certain sponsors. We hedge the foreign exchange risk on our future US dollar revenues using a portion of our US dollar denominated secured term loan facility and senior secured notes as the hedging instrument. While we incurred a foreign exchange loss in our statement of profit or loss on our unhedged US dollar denominated secured term loan facility and senior secured notes of £2.7 million for the year ended 30 June 2019, we recorded a gain of £5.0 million and £1.8 million for the years ended 30 June 2018 and 2017, respectively. For the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017 approximately 13.3%, 6.5% and 7.0% of our total revenue was generated in Euros, respectively, and approximately 19.2%, 20.7% and 21.3% of our total revenue was generated in US dollars, respectively. We may also enter into foreign exchange contracts to hedge a portion of this transactional exposure. We offset the value of our non-sterling revenue and the value of the corresponding hedge before including such amounts in our overall revenue. Our results of operations have in the past and will in the future fluctuate due to movements in exchange rates.

Failure to adequately protect our intellectual property and curb the sale of counterfeit merchandise could injure our brand.

        Like other popular brands, we are susceptible to instances of brand infringement (such as counterfeiting and other unauthorized uses of our intellectual property rights). We seek to protect our brand assets by ensuring that we own and control certain intellectual property rights in and to those assets and, where appropriate, by enforcing those intellectual property rights. For example, we own the copyright in our logo, and our logo and trade name are registered as trademarks (or are the subject of applications for registration) in a number of jurisdictions in Europe, Asia Pacific, Africa, North America and South America. However, it is not possible to detect all instances of brand infringement. Additionally, where instances of brand infringement are detected, we cannot guarantee that such instances will be prevented as there may be legal or factual circumstances which give rise to uncertainty as to the validity, scope and enforceability of our intellectual property rights in the brand assets. Furthermore, the laws of certain countries in which we license our brand and conduct operations, particularly those in Asia may not offer the same level of protection to intellectual property rights holders as those in the United Kingdom, the rest of Europe and the United States, or the time required to enforce our intellectual property rights under these legal regimes may be lengthy and delay recovery. For example, the unauthorized use of intellectual property is common and widespread in Asia and enforcement of intellectual property rights by local regulatory agencies is inconsistent. If we were to fail or be unable to secure, protect, maintain and/or enforce the intellectual property rights which vest in our brand assets, then we could lose our exclusive right to exploit such brand assets. Infringement of our trademark, copyright and other intellectual property rights could have an adverse effect on our business. We also license our intellectual property rights to third parties. In an effort to protect our brand, we enter into licensing agreements with these third parties which govern the use of our intellectual property and which require our licensees to abide by quality control standards with respect to such use. Although we make efforts to police our licensees' use of our intellectual property, we cannot assure you that these efforts will be sufficient to ensure their compliance. The failure of our licensees to comply with the terms of their licenses could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow.

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We are subject to governmental regulation and other legal obligations related to privacy, data protection, data security and safeguarding. Our actual or perceived failure to comply with such obligations could harm our business.

        We are subject to diverse laws and regulations relating to data privacy and security, including, in the EEA, Regulation 2016/679, known as the General Data Protection Regulation (the "GDPR"). New global privacy rules are being enacted and existing ones are being updated and strengthened. We are likely to be required to expend significant capital and other resources to ensure ongoing compliance with these laws and regulations. Claims that we have violated individuals' privacy rights or breached our data protection obligations, even if we are not found liable, could be expensive and time-consuming to defend and could result in adverse publicity that could harm our business.

        We collect and process personal data from our followers, customers, members, suppliers, business contacts and employees as part of the operation of our business (including online merchandising), and therefore we must comply with data protection and privacy laws in the United Kingdom and, in certain situations, other jurisdictions where our followers reside. The United Kingdom enacted a new Data Protection Act 2018, which implemented the GDPR and imposes more stringent operational requirements for controllers of personal data, including, for example, higher standards for obtaining consent from individuals to process their personal data (including, in certain circumstances for marketing and other follower engagement), more robust disclosures to individuals and a strengthened individual data rights regime, shortened timelines for data breach notifications, limitations on retention of information, and additional obligations when we contract third-party processors in connection with the processing of personal data. In addition, we are exposed to the risk that the personal data we control could be wrongfully accessed and/or used, whether by employees, followers or other third parties, or otherwise lost or disclosed or processed in breach of data protection regulations. If we or any of the third-party service providers on which we rely fail to process such personal data in a lawful or secure manner or if any theft or loss of personal data were to occur, we could face liability under data protection laws, and we may be subject to litigation, regulatory investigations, enforcement notices requiring us to change the way we use personal data and/or fines of up to 20 million Euros or up to 4% of the total worldwide annual turnover of the preceding financial year, whichever is higher. In addition to statutory enforcement and other administrative penalties, a personal data breach can lead to compensation claims by affected individuals, negative publicity and a potential loss of business.

        In addition, the departure of the United Kingdom from the EU could also lead to further legislative and regulatory changes by the planned exit date of October 2019. It remains unclear how the UK data protection laws or regulations will develop in the medium to longer term and how data transfer to the United Kingdom from the EU will be regulated, especially if the United Kingdom leaves the EU without a deal. However, the United Kingdom has transposed the GDPR into domestic law with the Data Protection Act 2018 which will remain in force, even if and when the United Kingdom leaves the EU.

        In recent years, US and European lawmakers and regulators have expressed concern over electronic marketing and the use of third-party cookies, web beacons and similar technology for online behavioral advertising. In the EU, marketing is defined broadly to include any promotional material and the rules specifically on e-marketing are currently set out in the ePrivacy Directive which will be replaced by a new ePrivacy Regulation. While the ePrivacy Regulation was originally intended to be adopted on 25 May 2018 (alongside the GDPR), it is still going through the European legislative process and commentators now expect it to be adopted during 2020. The current draft of the ePrivacy Regulation imposes strict opt-in e-marketing rules with limited exceptions to business to business communications and significantly increases fining powers to the same levels as GDPR. Regulation of cookies and web beacons may lead to broader restrictions on our online activities, including efforts to understand followers' internet usage and promote ourselves to them.

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        We are also subject to legislation associated with child protection, adult protection, safeguarding and the rights of children. We aim to operate in compliance with the guiding principles of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child ("UNCRC") which sets out the civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights of every child, regardless of their race, religion or abilities.

        Both in the UK and internationally there have been increases in disclosures of institutional sexual abuse, most notably by the Football Association (England), US Gymnastics (USA) and Oxfam (Haiti/UK), where the outcome has been significant fines, reductions in funding and sponsorship, and substantial media reputational damage along with a lack of trust in those organizations. We are required to demonstrate to government and regulatory bodies our processes and systems to demonstrate what proactive steps we take to ensure the safety and wellbeing of children and adults at risk in our duty of care, as well as managing any civil liability or other claims by individuals against historical abuse disclosures.

        We collect, process and retain personal data associated with safeguarding cases and criminal records in order to take steps to safeguard children and adults at risk, and create a safer culture for them to thrive and for staff/volunteers to work within, in accordance with legal and regulatory requirements. Safeguarding legislation is in flux with the key focus that the welfare of the child and/or adult at risk is paramount. Failure to maintain compliance with these changes could harm our business.

Piracy and illegal live streaming may adversely impact our Broadcasting revenue.

        For each of the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017, Broadcasting revenue constituted 38.5%, 34.6% and 33.4%, respectively, of our total revenue. Our Broadcasting revenue is principally generated by the broadcasting of our matches on pay and free-to-air television channels as well as content delivered over the internet and through our own television channel, MUTV. In recent years, piracy and illegal live streaming of subscription content over the internet has caused, and is continuing to cause, lost revenue to media distributors showing our matches. For example, the Premier League previously initiated litigation against Google and YouTube for facilitating piracy and illegal streaming of subscription content. While this litigation matter has been settled there can be no guarantee that this or similar actions will prevent or limit future piracy or illegal streaming of subscription content. If these trends increase or continue unabated, they could pose a risk to subscription television services. The result could be a reduction in the value of our share of football broadcasting rights and of our online and MUTV services, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow.

Changes in consumer viewing habits and the emergence of new content distribution platforms could adversely affect our business.

        The manner in which consumers view televised sporting events is changing rapidly with the emergence of alternative distribution platforms. Digital cable, internet and wireless content providers are continuing to improve technologies, content offerings, user interface, and business models that allow consumers to access video-on-demand or internet-based tools with interactive capabilities including start, stop and rewind. Such developments may impact the profitability or effectiveness of our existing media contracts and strategy, including our television channel, MUTV. If we are unsuccessful in adapting our licensing practices and/or media platforms as consumer viewing habits change, our viewership levels (whether on traditional or new platforms), our Broadcasting revenue and/or the value of our advertising and sponsorship contracts may decrease, which could have a material adverse effect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

        In addition, even if we are able to successfully adapt, we will be subject to risks associated with these alternative distribution platforms. Delivery of video programming over the internet is done through a series of carriers, and any point of failure in this distribution chain may disrupt or degrade

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the quality of our services. Service disruption or degradation for any reason, including as a result of a cyber-attack, natural disaster or other failure in our or a third-party's IT systems, could diminish the overall attractiveness of our services to subscribers, causing us to lose subscribers and/or credit subscribers affected by such disruption, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Our operating results may fluctuate due to seasonality.

        Our operating results are subject to seasonal variation, limiting the overall comparability and predictability of interim financial periods. The seasonality of our operating results is primarily attributable to the number of games played in each financial period and therefore Matchday and Broadcasting revenue recognized. Similarly, certain of our costs derive from hosting games at Old Trafford, and these costs will also vary based on the number of games played in the period. We have historically generated higher revenue in the second and third quarters of our fiscal year. Our business might be affected by our men's first team reaching the later stages of European and domestic competitions, which would generate significant additional Broadcasting and Matchday revenue during the fourth quarter of our fiscal years. Our cash flow may also vary among interim periods due to the timing of significant payments from major commercial and player transfer agreements. As a result, our interim results and any quarterly financial information that we publish should not be viewed as an indicator of our performance for the fiscal year.

We are subject to tax in multiple jurisdictions, and changes in tax laws (or in the interpretations thereof) in the United States or in other jurisdictions could have an adverse effect on us.

        Although we are incorporated as a Cayman Islands exempted company, we report as a US domestic corporation for US federal income tax purposes and we are subject to US federal corporate income tax (currently at a statutory rate of 21%) on our worldwide income.

        In addition, we are subject to income and other taxes in various other jurisdictions. The amount of tax we pay is subject to our interpretation and application of tax laws in jurisdictions in which we operate. Changes in current or future laws or regulations, or the imposition of new or changed tax laws or regulations or new related interpretations by taxing authorities in the US or foreign jurisdictions, could adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow.

        In particular, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the "TCJA") resulted in multiple amendments to US federal tax law resulting in significant changes to, and uncertainty with respect to, tax legislation, regulation and government policy. See "—The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act could adversely affect our business and financial condition."

We establish tax provisions, where appropriate, on the basis of amounts expected to be paid to (and recovered from) tax authorities and, as a result, changes in tax laws (or in the interpretations thereof) could have an adverse effect on us.

        Tax is calculated on the basis of the tax laws enacted or substantively enacted at the reporting date in the countries where we operate and generate taxable income. We establish provisions where appropriate on the basis of amounts expected to be paid to (or recovered from) the tax authorities. From time to time we are involved in discussions with tax authorities in relation to ongoing tax matters and, where appropriate, provisions are made based on our assessment of each case. We are currently in active discussions with UK tax authorities over a number of tax areas in relation to arrangements with players and players' representatives. It is possible that in the future, as a result of these discussions, as well as discussions that UK tax authorities are holding with other stakeholders within the football industry, interpretations of applicable rules will be challenged, which could result in liabilities in relation to these matters. The future income tax expense or credit may be higher or lower than

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estimates made when we determined whether it was appropriate to record a provision and the amount to be recorded. Furthermore, changes in the legislative framework or applicable tax case law (or in the interpretation thereof) could adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act could adversely affect our business and financial condition.

        The TCJA significantly revised the US Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the "Code"). The TCJA, among other things, contained significant changes to US federal corporate income taxation, including reduction of the corporate income tax rate from a top marginal rate of 35% to a flat rate of 21%, limitation of the tax deduction for interest expense to 30% of adjusted earnings (except for certain small businesses), limitation of the deduction for net operating losses to 80% of current year taxable income and elimination of net operating loss carrybacks elimination of US tax on foreign earnings of controlled foreign corporations (subject to certain important exceptions), immediate deductions for certain new investments instead of deductions for depreciation and impairment expense over time, and modifying or repealing many business deductions and credits. Notwithstanding the reduction in the corporate income tax rate, the overall impact of the TCJA is uncertain and our business and financial condition could be adversely affected. In addition, it is uncertain if and to what extent various states will conform to the newly enacted federal tax law. The impact of the TCJA on holders of our shares is also uncertain and could be adverse. We urge our shareholders to consult with their legal and tax advisors with respect to this legislation and the potential tax consequences of investing in or holding our shares.

Business interruptions due to natural disasters, terrorist incidents and other events could adversely affect us and Old Trafford.

        Our operations can be subject to natural disasters, terrorist incidents and other events beyond our control, such as earthquakes, fires, power failures, telecommunication losses and acts of war. Such events, whether natural or manmade, could cause severe destruction or interruption to our operations, and as a result, our business could suffer serious harm. Our men's first team regularly tours the world for promotional matches, visiting various countries with a history of terrorism and civil unrest, and as a result, we and our players could be potential targets of terrorism when visiting such countries. In addition, any prolonged business interruption at Old Trafford could cause a decline in Matchday revenue. Our business interruption insurance only covers some, but not all, of these potential events, and even for those events that are covered, it may not be sufficient to compensate us fully for losses or damages that may occur as a result of such events, including, for example, loss of market share and diminution of our brand, reputation and client loyalty. Any one or more of these events could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operation, financial condition or cash flow.

If we fail to properly manage our anticipated growth, our business could suffer.

        The planned growth of our commercial operations may place a significant strain on our management and on our operational and financial resources and systems. To manage growth effectively, we will need to maintain a system of management controls and attract and retain qualified personnel, as well as, develop, train and manage management-level and other employees. Failure to manage our growth effectively could cause us to over-invest or under-invest in infrastructure, and result in losses or weaknesses in our infrastructure, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow. Any failure by us to manage our growth effectively could have a negative effect on our ability to achieve our development and commercialization goals and strategies.

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Risks Related to Our Industry

An economic downturn and adverse economic conditions may harm our business.

        An economic downturn and adverse conditions in the United Kingdom and global markets may negatively affect our operations in the future. Our Matchday and Broadcasting revenue in part depend on personal disposable income and corporate marketing and hospitality budgets. Further, our Commercial and sponsorship revenue are contingent upon the expenditures of businesses across a wide range of industries, and if these industries were to cut costs in response to an economic downturn, our revenue may similarly decline. Weak economic conditions could also cause a reduction in our Commercial and sponsorship revenue, as well as our Broadcasting and Matchday revenue, each of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow.

The departure of the United Kingdom from the European Union may adversely affect our operations and financial results.

        In June 2016, a majority of voters in the UK elected to withdraw from the EU in a national referendum and, in March 2017, the UK government formally initiated the process of withdrawing from the EU, commonly referred to as "Brexit." The terms of any withdrawal are complex and subject to an ongoing negotiation between the UK and the EU for which the result and timing remain unclear. There is significant uncertainty about the future relationship between the UK and the EU in the event of a withdrawal, particularly in light of the possibility that an immediate, so-called "no deal" withdrawal could occur without a negotiated agreement.

        These developments, or the perception that any of them could occur, have had and may continue to have a material adverse effect on global economic conditions and the stability of global financial markets, and could significantly reduce global market liquidity and restrict the ability of key market participants to operate in certain financial markets. Asset valuations, currency exchange rates and credit ratings have been and may continue to be especially subject to increased market volatility. Lack of clarity about future UK laws and regulations as the UK determines which EU laws to replace or replicate in the event of withdrawal could decrease foreign direct investment in the UK, increase costs, depress economic activity and restrict our access to capital. If the UK and the EU are unable to negotiate acceptable withdrawal terms or if other EU member states pursue withdrawal, barrier-free access between the UK and other EU member states or among the European economic area overall could be diminished or eliminated. Any of these factors could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition, cash flow and the price of our Class A ordinary shares.

        Furthermore, although it is unknown what the terms of the UK's future relationship with the EU, if any, will be, or which EU laws the UK will replace or replicate in the event of withdrawal, it is possible that there will be greater restrictions on imports and exports between the UK and EU member states, greater restrictions on the movement of players between the UK and EU member states, and other increased regulatory complexities. In particular, FIFA rules currently prohibit the international transfer of players under the age of 18 subject to certain limited exceptions, including an exception that permits the transfer of players between the ages of 16 and 18 within the territory of the EU or the EEA (subject to the satisfaction of certain conditions). Should the UK cease to be a part of the EU and the EEA, we will no longer be able to rely on this exception. Any of the changes described above may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow and our ability to continue to compete with the top football clubs in Europe.

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An increase in the relative size of salaries or transfer costs could adversely affect our business.

        Our success depends on our ability to attract and retain the highest quality players and coaching staff. As a result, we are obliged to pay salaries generally comparable to our main competitors in England and Europe. Any increase in salaries may adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow.

        Other factors that affect player salaries, such as changes in personal tax rates, changes to the treatment of income or other changes to taxation in the United Kingdom and the relative strength of pounds sterling, may make it more difficult to attract top players and coaching staff from Europe or elsewhere or require us to pay higher salaries to compensate for higher taxes or less favorable exchange rates. In addition, if our revenue falls and salaries remain stable (for example, as a result of fixed player or coaching staff salaries over a long period) or increase, our results of operations would be materially adversely affected.

        An increase in transfer fees would require us to pay more than expected for the acquisition of players' registrations in the future. In addition, certain players' transfer values may diminish after we acquire them, and we may sell those players for transfer fees below their net book value, resulting in a loss on disposal of players' registrations. Net transfer costs could also increase if levies imposed by FIFA, the Premier League or any other organization in respect of the transfer of players' registrations were to increase.

        We remain committed to attracting and retaining the highest quality players and key football management staff for our men's first team. Our average annual net registrations capital expenditure over the last 5 years has been £115.0 million and we continue to expect it to vary significantly from period to period. We may explore new player acquisitions in connection with future transfer periods that may materially increase the amount of our net capital expenditure on intangible assets. As part of any material increase in net capital expenditure on intangible assets, we may also experience a material increase in our expenditure for player salaries. The actual amount of cash we use on player acquisitions will also depend, in part, on the amount of any cash we receive as a result of the sale of any players. Any increase in net capital expenditure on intangible assets compared to historic levels will also result in an increase in amortization expenses in future periods.

UEFA, Premier League and FIFA regulations could negatively affect our business.

        As the primary governing body of European football, UEFA continually evaluates the dynamics in the football industry and considers changes to the regulatory framework governing European football clubs. As an example, clubs participating in the Champions League and Europa League competitions are subject to the UEFA Club Licensing and Financial Fair Play regulations ("FFP regulations"). Breaches in the rules may result in, among other things, withholding of prize money, bans on registering new players for UEFA club competitions and ultimately disqualification from UEFA club competitions. Amongst other things, these rules are intended to discourage clubs from continually operating at a loss and to ensure that clubs settle their football, staff and tax creditors on time. Breaches of FFP regulations, for example, where relevant costs (which includes all wage costs and the amortization of player capital expenditures, but excludes depreciation of tangible fixed assets, youth development, women's team and community expenditure) exceed revenues on a cumulative basis over a three-year period, or serious delays in settling creditors, have resulted in clubs being punished by way of significant fines and even exclusion from UEFA club competitions.

        The Premier League also operates under regulations that aim to promote sustainability through profitability. The Profitability and Sustainability Rules contain a break-even test, similar to that in UEFA's FFP regulations. Our most recent submission was based on the fiscal years ended 30 June 2018 and 2017 and provided a positive result. Wide-ranging sanctions, including significant fines, player transfer restrictions and Premier League points deduction, may be imposed by the Premier League for

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a breach of these regulations. The short-term regulations introduced by the Premier League in season 2013/14 which limited the annual increase in aggregate player remuneration unless such increases are funded by additional revenue from sources other than Premier League broadcasting revenue ended in the 2018/19 season and will not be in place for the new Premier League broadcasting cycle from 2019/20 season onwards.

        There is a risk that application of the FFP regulations and Premier League Profitability and Sustainability Rules could have a material adverse effect on the performance of our men's first team and our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow.

        The club is also bound by FIFA and Premier League regulations in respect of the status and transfer of players' registrations across all age groups internationally and domestically. Sanctions for significant non-compliance or breaches could include restrictions on incoming player transfers and monetary fines, which could have a material adverse effect on the performance of our men's first team and our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow.

We could be negatively affected by current and other future Premier League, FA, UEFA or FIFA regulations.

        Future changes to the Premier League, FA, UEFA, FIFA or other regulations may adversely affect our results of operations. These regulations could cover various aspects of our business, such as the format of competitions, the eligibility of players, the operation of the transfer market and the distribution of Broadcasting revenue. FIFA is currently going through a process of reforming the regulations which govern the transfer of player registrations, including: (a) how clubs involved in the training of a professional player are compensated for their contribution to the development of that player when that player's registration is transferred from one club to another; (b) the transfer of players on a temporary basis (so-called player loans); and (c) the activities and remuneration of intermediaries (so-called football agents) with respect to player transfers. It is possible that this regulatory reform will impact our ability to acquire players and/or increase our costs with respect to the recruitment and retention of players. In addition, changes are being considered to address the financial sustainability of clubs such as more robust ownership rules and tests in relation to board directors and significant shareholders. In particular, changes to football regulations designed to promote competition could have a significant impact on our business. Such changes could include changes to the distribution of broadcasting income, changes to the relegation structure of English football and restrictions on player spending. In addition, rules designed to promote the development of local players, such as the Home Grown Player Rule, which requires each Premier League club to include at least eight "home grown" (i.e. players that have been registered for at least three seasons at an English or Welsh club between the ages of 16 and 21) players in their squads, could limit our ability to select players. Any of these changes could make it more difficult for us to acquire top quality players and, therefore, adversely affect the performance of our men's first team.

        Changes in the format of the league and cup competitions in which our men's first team plays, or might in the future play, could have a negative impact on our results of operations. In addition, in the event that new competitions are introduced to replace existing competitions (for example, a European league), our results of operations may be negatively affected.

There could be a decline in our popularity or the popularity of football.

        There can be no assurance that football will retain its popularity as a sport around the world and its status in the United Kingdom as the so-called "national game," together with the associated levels of media coverage. In addition, we could suffer a decline in popularity. Any decline in popularity could result in lower ticket sales, Broadcasting revenue, sponsorship revenue, a reduction in the value of our players or our brand, or a decline in the value of our securities, including our Class A ordinary shares.

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Any one of these events or a combination of such events could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow.

Risk Related to Our Indebtedness

Our indebtedness could adversely affect our financial health and competitive position.

        As of 30 June 2019, we had total indebtedness of £511.2 million. Our indebtedness increases the risk that we may be unable to generate cash sufficient to pay amounts due in respect of our indebtedness. It could also have effects on our business. For example, it could:

    limit our ability to pay dividends;

    increase our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions;

    require us to dedicate a material portion of our cash flow from operations to make payments on our indebtedness, thereby reducing the availability of our cash flow to fund the hiring and retention of players and coaching staff, working capital, capital expenditures and other general corporate purposes;

    limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the football industry;

    affect our ability to compete for players and coaching staff; and

    limit our ability to borrow additional funds.

        In addition, our revolving facility, our secured term loan facility and the note purchase agreement governing the senior secured notes contain, and any agreements evidencing or governing other future indebtedness may contain, certain restrictive covenants that will limit our ability to engage in certain activities that are in our long-term best interests (see "—Our indebtedness may restrict our ability to pursue our business strategies" below). We have not previously breached and are not in breach of any of the covenants under any of these facilities; however our failure to comply with those covenants could result in an event of default which, if not cured or waived, could result in the acceleration of all of our indebtedness.

To service our indebtedness, we require cash, and our ability to generate cash is subject to many factors beyond our control.

        Our ability to make payments on and to refinance our indebtedness and to fund planned capital expenditures will depend on our ability to generate cash in the future. This, to a certain extent, is subject to the performance and popularity of our men's first team as well as general economic, financial, competitive, regulatory and other factors that are beyond our control.

        We cannot assure you that our business will generate sufficient cash flow from operations or that future borrowings will be available to us in an amount sufficient to enable us to pay our indebtedness or to fund our other liquidity needs. We may need to refinance all or a portion of our indebtedness on or before maturity. We cannot assure you that we will be able to refinance any of our indebtedness on commercially reasonable terms or at all. Failure to refinance our indebtedness on terms we believe to be acceptable could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flow.

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Our indebtedness may restrict our ability to pursue our business strategies.

        Our revolving facility, our secured term loan facility and the note purchase agreement governing the senior secured notes limit our ability, among other things, to:

    incur additional indebtedness;

    pay dividends or make other distributions or repurchase or redeem our shares;

    make investments;

    sell assets, including capital stock of restricted subsidiaries;

    enter into agreements restricting our subsidiaries' ability to pay dividends;

    consolidate, merge, sell or otherwise dispose of all or substantially all of our assets;

    enter into sale and leaseback transactions;

    enter into transactions with our affiliates; and

    incur liens.

        Our ability to comply with these covenants and restrictions may be affected by events beyond our control. If we breach any of these covenants or restrictions, we could be in default under our revolving facility, our secured term loan facility and the note purchase agreement governing the senior secured notes. This would permit the lending banks under our revolving facility and our secured term loan facility to take certain actions, including declaring all amounts that we have borrowed under our revolving facility, secured term loan facility and other indebtedness to be due and payable, together with accrued and unpaid interest. This would also result in an event of default under the note purchase agreement governing the senior secured notes. Furthermore, lending banks could refuse to extend further credit under the revolving facility. If the debt under our revolving facility, our secured term loan facility, the note purchase agreement governing the senior secured notes or any other material financing arrangement that we enter into were to be accelerated, our assets, in particular liquid assets, may be insufficient to repay our indebtedness. The occurrence of any of these events could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our variable rate indebtedness subjects us to interest rate risk, which could cause our debt service obligations to increase significantly, as well as risks related to the phasing out of LIBOR.

        We are subject to interest rate risk in connection with borrowings under our revolving facility and our secured term loan facility, which bear interest at variable rates. Interest rate changes could impact the amount of our interest payments, and accordingly, our future earnings and cash flow, assuming other factors are held constant. We have entered into an interest rate swap related to a portion of our secured term loan facility that involves the exchange of floating for fixed rate interest payments in order to reduce interest rate volatility. As of 30 June 2019, we had £176.9 million of variable rate indebtedness outstanding under our secured term loan facility. We cannot assure you that any hedging activities entered into by us will be effective in fully mitigating our interest rate risk from our variable rate indebtedness.

        In addition, the London Inter-bank Offered Rate ("LIBOR") and certain other interest "benchmarks" may be subject to regulatory guidance and/or reform that could cause interest rates under our current and future debt agreements to perform differently than in the past or cause other unanticipated consequences. The United Kingdom's Financial Conduct Authority, which regulates LIBOR, has announced that it intends to stop encouraging or requiring banks to submit LIBOR rates after 2021, and it is unclear if LIBOR will cease to exist or if new methods of calculating LIBOR will evolve. While the agreements governing our revolving facility and our secured term loan facility provide

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for an alternate method of calculating our interest rates in the event that a LIBOR rate is unavailable, if LIBOR ceases to exist or if the methods of calculating LIBOR change from their current form, there may be adverse impacts on the financial markets generally and interest rates on borrowings under our revolving facility and our secured term loan facility may be materially adversely affected.

Risks Related to Ownership of Our Class A Ordinary Shares

Because of their increased voting rights, the holders of our Class B shares will be able to exert control over us and our significant corporate decisions.

        Trusts and other entities controlled by six lineal descendants of Mr. Malcolm Glazer collectively own 7.44% of our issued and outstanding Class A ordinary shares and all of our issued and outstanding Class B ordinary shares, representing 97.07% of the voting power of our outstanding capital stock. See "Item 7. Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions—A. Major Shareholders." Each Class A ordinary share is entitled to one vote per share and is not convertible into any other class of shares. Each Class B ordinary share is entitled to 10 votes per share and is convertible into one Class A ordinary share at any time. In addition, our Class B ordinary shares will automatically convert into Class A ordinary shares upon certain transfers and other events, including upon the date when holders of all Class B ordinary shares cease to hold Class B ordinary shares representing at least 10% of the total number of Class A and Class B ordinary shares outstanding. For special resolutions, which require the vote of two-thirds of the votes cast, at any time that Class B ordinary shares remain outstanding, the voting power permitted to be exercised by the holders of the Class B ordinary shares will be weighted such that the Class B ordinary shares shall represent, in the aggregate, 67% of the voting power of all shareholders. As a result, the holders of our Class B shares will be able to exert a significant degree of influence or actual control over our management and affairs and control all matters submitted to our shareholders for approval, including the election and removal of directors and any merger, consolidation, or sale of all or substantially all of our assets. The interests of the holders of our Class B shares might not coincide with the interests of the other shareholders. This concentration of voting power in our Class B shares may harm the value of our Class A ordinary shares, among other things:

    delaying, deferring or preventing a change in control of our Company;

    impeding a merger, consolidation, takeover or other business combination involving our Company; or

    causing us to enter into transactions or agreements that are not in the best interests of all shareholders.

As a foreign private issuer within the meaning of the New York Stock Exchange's corporate governance rules, we are permitted to, and we do, rely on exemptions from certain of the New York Stock Exchange corporate governance standards, including the requirement that a majority of our board of directors consist of independent directors. Our reliance on such exemptions may afford less protection to holders of our Class A ordinary shares.

        The New York Stock Exchange's corporate governance rules require listed companies to have, among other things, a majority of independent board members and independent director oversight of executive compensation, nomination of directors and corporate governance matters. As a foreign private issuer, we are permitted to, and we do, follow home country practice in lieu of the above requirements. As long as we rely on the foreign private issuer exemption to certain of the New York Stock Exchange corporate governance standards, a majority of the directors on our board of directors are not required to be independent directors, our remuneration committee is not required to be comprised entirely of independent directors and we are not required to have a nominating and corporate governance committee. Therefore, our board of directors' approach to governance may be

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different from that of a board of directors consisting of a majority of independent directors, and, as a result, the management oversight of our Company may be more limited than if we were subject to all of the New York Stock Exchange corporate governance standards.

        Accordingly, our shareholders do not have the same protection afforded to shareholders of companies that are subject to all of the New York Stock Exchange corporate governance standards, and the ability of our independent directors to influence our business policies and affairs may be reduced.

The obligations associated with being a public company require significant resources and management attention.

        As a public company in the United States, we incur legal, accounting and other expenses that we did not previously incur as a private company. We are subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"), and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the "Sarbanes-Oxley Act"), the listing requirements of the New York Stock Exchange and other applicable securities rules and regulations. Compliance with these rules and regulations increases our legal and financial compliance costs, make some activities more difficult, time-consuming or costly and increases demand on our systems and resources. The Exchange Act requires that we file annual and current reports with respect to our business, financial condition and results of operations. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires, among other things, that we establish and maintain effective internal control over financial reporting and requires our independent registered public accounting firm to attest to the effectiveness of such internal control. Even if our management concludes that our internal controls over financial reporting are effective, our independent registered public accounting firm may decline to attest to our management's assessment or may issue a report that is qualified if it is not satisfied with our internal controls or the level at which such controls are documented, designed, operated or reviewed, or if it interprets the relevant requirements differently from us. Failure to comply with Section 404 could subject us to regulatory scrutiny and sanctions, impair our ability to generate revenue, cause investors to lose confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports and negatively affect our share price.

        Furthermore, the demands of being a public company may divert management's attention from implementing our growth strategy, which could prevent us from improving our business, financial condition and results of operations. We have made, and will continue to make, changes to our internal controls and procedures for financial reporting and accounting systems to continue to meet our reporting obligations as a public company. However, the measures we have taken, and will continue to take, may not be sufficient to satisfy our obligations as a public company. In addition, these rules and regulations increase our legal and financial compliance costs and make some activities more time-consuming and costly. For example, these rules and regulations make it more difficult and more expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance, and we may be required to incur substantial costs to maintain the same or similar coverage. These additional obligations could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flow.

        In addition, changing laws, regulations and standards relating to corporate governance and public disclosure are creating uncertainty for public companies, increasing legal and financial compliance costs and making some activities more time consuming. These laws, regulations and standards are subject to varying interpretations, in many cases due to their lack of specificity, and, as a result, their application in practice may evolve over time as new guidance is provided by regulatory and governing bodies. This could result in continuing uncertainty regarding compliance matters and higher costs necessitated by ongoing revisions to disclosure and governance practices. We intend to invest resources to comply with evolving laws, regulations and standards, and this investment may result in increased general and administrative expenses and a diversion of management's time and attention from revenue-generating activities to compliance activities. If our efforts to comply with new laws, regulations and standards differ from the activities intended by regulatory or governing bodies due to ambiguities related to their

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application and practice, regulatory authorities may initiate legal proceedings against us and our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flow could be adversely affected.

We may lose our foreign private issuer status in the future, which could result in significant additional costs and expenses.

        We are a "foreign private issuer," as such term is defined in Rule 405 under the Securities Act, and therefore, we are not required to comply with all the periodic disclosure and current reporting requirements of the Exchange Act and related rules and regulations. Under Rule 405, the determination of foreign private issuer status is made annually on the last business day of an issuer's most recently completed second fiscal quarter and, accordingly, the next determination will be made with respect to us on 31 December 2019.

        In the future, we would lose our foreign private issuer status if a majority of our shareholders, directors or management are US citizens or residents and we fail to meet additional requirements necessary to avoid loss of foreign private issuer status. Although we have elected to comply with certain US regulatory provisions, our loss of foreign private issuer status would make such provisions mandatory. The regulatory and compliance costs to us under US securities laws as a US domestic issuer may be significantly higher. If we are not a foreign private issuer, we will be required to file periodic reports and registration statements on US domestic issuer forms with the US Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC"), which are more detailed and extensive than the forms available to a foreign private issuer. For example, the annual report on Form 10-K requires domestic issuers to disclose executive compensation information on an individual basis with specific disclosure regarding the domestic compensation philosophy, objectives, annual total compensation (base salary, bonus, equity compensation) and potential payments in connection with change in control, retirement, death or disability, while the annual report on Form 20-F permits foreign private issuers to disclose compensation information on an aggregate basis. We will also have to mandatorily comply with US federal proxy requirements, and our officers, directors and principal shareholders will become subject to the short-swing profit disclosure and recovery provisions of Section 16 of the Exchange Act. We may also be required to modify certain of our policies to comply with good governance practices associated with US domestic issuers. Such conversion and modifications will involve additional costs. In addition, we may lose our ability to rely upon exemptions from certain corporate governance requirements on US stock exchanges that are available to foreign private issuers.

Anti-takeover provisions in our organizational documents and Cayman Islands law may discourage or prevent a change of control, even if an acquisition would be beneficial to our shareholders, which could depress the price of our Class A ordinary shares and prevent attempts by our shareholders to replace or remove our current management.

        Our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association contain provisions that may discourage unsolicited takeover proposals that shareholders may consider to be in their best interests. In particular, our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association permit our board of directors to issue preference shares from time to time, with such rights and preferences as they consider appropriate. Our board of directors could also authorize the issuance of preference shares with terms and conditions and under circumstances that could have an effect of discouraging a takeover or other transaction. We are also subject to certain provisions under Cayman Islands law which could delay or prevent a change of control. In particular, any merger, consolidation or amalgamation of the Company would require the active consent of our board of directors. Our board of directors may be appointed or removed by the holders of the majority of the voting power of our ordinary shares (which is controlled by the holders of our Class B ordinary shares). Together these provisions may make more difficult the removal of management and may discourage transactions that otherwise could involve payment of a premium over prevailing market prices for our Class A ordinary shares.

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The price of our Class A ordinary shares might fluctuate significantly, and you could lose all or part of your investment.

        Volatility in the market price of our Class A ordinary shares may prevent investors from being able to sell their Class A ordinary shares at or above the price they paid for such shares. The trading price of our Class A ordinary shares may be volatile and subject to wide price fluctuations in response to various factors, including:

    performance of our men's first team;

    the overall performance of the equity markets;

    industry related regulatory developments;

    issuance of new or changed securities analysts' reports or recommendations;

    additions or departures of key personnel;

    investor perceptions of us and the football industry, changes in accounting standards, policies, guidance, interpretations or principles;

    sale of our Class A ordinary shares by us, our principal shareholders or members of our management;

    general economic conditions;

    changes in interest rates; and

    availability of capital.

        These and other factors might cause the market price of our Class A ordinary shares to fluctuate substantially, which might limit or prevent investors from readily selling their Class A ordinary shares and may otherwise negatively affect the liquidity of our Class A ordinary shares. In addition, in recent years, the stock market has experienced significant price and volume fluctuations. This volatility has had a significant impact on the market price of securities issued by many companies across many industries. The changes frequently appear to occur without regard to the operating performance of the affected companies. Accordingly, the price of our Class A ordinary shares could fluctuate based upon factors that have little or nothing to do with our Company, and these fluctuations could materially reduce our share price. Securities class action litigation has often been instituted against companies following periods of volatility in the overall market and in the market price of a company's securities. This litigation, if instituted against us, could result in substantial costs, divert our management's attention and resources, and harm our business, operating results and financial condition.

Future sales of our Class A ordinary shares, or the perception in the public markets that these sales may occur, may depress our stock price.

        Sales of substantial amounts of our Class A ordinary shares, or the perception that these sales could occur, could adversely affect the price of our Class A ordinary shares and could impair our ability to raise capital through the sale of additional shares. As of 23 September 2019 we had 40,570,967 Class A ordinary shares outstanding. The Class A ordinary shares are freely tradable without restriction under the Securities Act, except for any of our Class A ordinary shares that may be held or acquired by our directors, executive officers and other affiliates, as that term is defined in the Securities Act, which will be restricted securities under the Securities Act. Restricted securities may not be sold in the public market unless the sale is registered under the Securities Act or an exemption from registration is available.

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        All of our Class A ordinary shares outstanding as of the date of this Annual Report may be sold in the public market by existing shareholders, subject to applicable Rule 144 volume limitations and other limitations imposed under federal securities laws.

        In the future, we may also issue our securities if we need to raise capital in connection with a capital raise or acquisition. The amount of our Class A ordinary shares issued in connection with a capital raise or acquisition could constitute a material portion of our then-outstanding Class A ordinary shares.

Our ability to pay regular dividends is subject to restrictions in our revolving facility, our secured term loan facility, the note purchase agreement governing the senior secured notes, results of operations, distributable reserves and solvency requirements; our Class A ordinary shares have no guaranteed dividends and holders of our Class A ordinary shares have no recourse if dividends are not declared.

        In fiscal year 2019, we paid two semi-annual cash dividends on our Class A ordinary shares and Class B ordinary shares of $0.09 per share. Dividends paid in the year ended 30 June 2019 amounted to $29.6 million ($0.18 per share), the pounds sterling equivalent of which was £23.3 million (£0.14 per share). We expect to continue paying regular dividends to our Class A ordinary shareholders and Class B ordinary shareholders. The declaration and payment of any future dividends, however, will be at the sole discretion of our board of directors or a committee thereof and will depend upon our results of operations, financial condition, distributable reserves, contractual restrictions, restrictions imposed by applicable law, capital requirements and other factors our board of directors (or such committee thereof) deems relevant. Furthermore, neither our Class A ordinary shares nor our Class B ordinary shares have any guaranteed dividends and holders of our Class A ordinary shares and holders of our Class B ordinary shares have no recourse if dividends are not declared. Our ability to pay dividends on the Class A ordinary shares and Class B ordinary shares is limited by our revolving facility, our secured term loan facility and the note purchase agreement governing the senior secured notes, which contain restricted payment covenants. The restricted payment covenants allow dividends in certain circumstances, including to the extent dividends do not exceed 50% of the cumulative consolidated net income of Red Football Limited and its restricted subsidiaries, provided there is no event of default and Red Football Limited is able to meet the principal and interest payments on its debt under a fixed charge coverage test. Our ability to pay dividends may be further restricted by the terms of any of our future debt or preferred securities. Additionally, because we are a holding company, our ability to pay dividends on our Class A ordinary shares and Class B ordinary shares is limited by restrictions on the ability of our subsidiaries to pay dividends or make distributions to us, including restrictions under the terms of the agreements governing our indebtedness. As a consequence of these limitations and restrictions, we may not be able to make, or may have to reduce or eliminate, the payment of dividends on our Class A ordinary shares. Accordingly, you may have to sell some or all of your Class A ordinary shares after price appreciation in order to generate cash flow from your investment. You may not receive a gain on your investment when you sell your Class A ordinary shares and you may lose the entire amount of the investment. Additionally, any change in the level of our dividends or the suspension of the payment thereof could adversely affect the market price of our Class A ordinary shares. See "Item 8. Financial Information—A. Consolidated Financial Statements and Other Financial Information—Dividend Policy."

The rules of the Premier League and our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association impose certain limitations on shareholders' ability to invest in more than one football club.

        The rules of the Premier League prohibit any person who holds an interest of 10% or more of the total voting rights exercisable in a Premier League or English Football League ("EFL") football club from holding an interest in voting rights exercisable in any other Premier League football club or EFL football club. As a result, our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association prohibit

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the acquisition of (i) 10% or more of our Class A ordinary shares if they hold any interest in voting rights exercisable in another Premier League football club and (ii) any Class A ordinary shares if they hold an interest of 10% or more of the total voting rights exercisable in another Premier League football club. In addition, under our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association, if any shareholder is determined by us, at our absolute discretion, to be holding any Class A ordinary shares in violation of this rule or the rules of certain other relevant governing bodies, we have the right to repurchase shares from such person or direct that shareholder to transfer those shares to another person.

Exchange rate fluctuations may adversely affect the foreign exchange value of the Class A ordinary shares and any dividends.

        Our Class A ordinary shares are quoted in US dollars on the New York Stock Exchange. Our financial statements are prepared in pounds sterling. Fluctuations in the exchange rate between the pounds sterling and the US dollar will affect, among other matters, the US dollar value of the Class A ordinary shares and of any dividends.

The rights afforded to shareholders are governed by the laws of the Cayman Islands.

        Our corporate affairs and the rights afforded to shareholders are governed by our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association and by the Companies Law (as amended) of the Cayman Islands (the "Companies Law") and common law of the Cayman Islands, and these rights differ in certain respects from the rights of shareholders in typical US corporations. In particular, the laws of the Cayman Islands relating to the protection of the interests of minority shareholders differ in some respects from those established under statutes or judicial precedent in existence in the United States. The laws of the Cayman Island provide only limited circumstances under which shareholders of companies may bring derivative actions and (except in limited circumstances) do not afford appraisal rights to dissenting shareholders in the form typically available to shareholders of a US corporation other than in limited circumstances in relation to certain mergers. A summary of Cayman Islands law on the protection of minority shareholders is set out in "Item 10. Additional Information—B. Memorandum and Articles of Association and Other Share Information."

We report as a US domestic corporation for US federal corporate income tax purposes.

        As discussed more fully under "Item 10. Additional Information—E. Taxation," due to the circumstances of our formation and the application of Section 7874 of the Code, we report as a US domestic corporation for all purposes of the Code. As a result, we are subject to US federal income tax on our worldwide income. In addition, if we pay dividends to a Non-US Holder, as defined in the discussion "Item 10. Additional Information—E. Taxation," we will be required to withhold US federal income tax at the rate of 30%, or such lower rate as may be provided in an applicable income tax treaty. Each investor should consult its own tax adviser regarding the US federal income tax position of the Company and the tax consequences of holding the Class A ordinary shares.

Withholding under the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act may apply to our dividends and gross proceeds from the sale or other disposition of our Class A ordinary shares.

        Under legislation incorporating provisions referred to as the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act ("FATCA"), a 30% withholding tax will generally apply to certain types of payments, including US source dividends and (subject to the proposed US Treasury Regulations discussed below) gross proceeds from the disposition of equity securities that produce US source dividends, made to "foreign financial institutions" (as defined under those rules) and certain other non-US entities, unless such foreign financial institutions or other entities comply with requirements under FATCA or are otherwise exempt from such requirements. Because we report as a US domestic corporation for all purposes of

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the Code, including for purposes of FATCA, our dividends and (subject to the proposed US Treasury Regulations discussed below) gross proceeds from the sale or other disposition of our Class A ordinary shares paid to a foreign financial institution or other non-US entity may be subject to potential withholding under FATCA. Under the applicable US Treasury Regulations and administrative guidance, withholding under FATCA generally applies to payments of dividends on our Class A ordinary shares. While withholding under FATCA would have also applied to payments of gross proceeds from the sale or other disposition of stock on or after 1 January 2019, recently proposed Treasury Regulations eliminate FATCA withholding on payments of gross proceeds entirely. Taxpayers generally may rely on these proposed Treasury Regulations until final Treasury Regulations are issued.

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports or publish unfavorable research about our business, our stock price and trading volume could decline.

        The trading market for our Class A ordinary shares depends in part on the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us, our business or our industry. If one or more of the analysts who covers us downgrades our stock, our share price will likely decline. If one or more of these analysts ceases to cover us or fails to publish regular reports on us, interest in the purchase of our Class A ordinary shares could decrease, which could cause our stock price or trading volume to decline.

It may be difficult to enforce a US judgment against us, our directors and officers and certain experts named in this Annual Report outside the United States, or to assert US securities law claims outside of the United States.

        The majority of our directors and executive officers are not residents of the United States, and the majority of our assets and the assets of these persons are located outside the United States. As a result, it may be difficult or impossible for investors to effect service of process upon us within the United States or other jurisdictions, including judgments predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the federal securities laws of the United States. Additionally, it may be difficult to assert US securities law claims in actions originally instituted outside of the United States. Foreign courts may refuse to hear a US securities law claim because foreign courts may not be the most appropriate forums in which to bring such a claim. Even if a foreign court agrees to hear a claim, it may determine that the law of the jurisdiction in which the foreign court resides, and not US law, is applicable to the claim. Further, if US law is found to be applicable, the content of applicable US law must be proved as a fact, which can be a time-consuming and costly process, and certain matters of procedure would still be governed by the law of the jurisdiction in which the foreign court resides.

        In particular, investors should be aware that there is uncertainty as to whether the courts of the Cayman Islands would recognize and enforce judgments of United States courts obtained against us or our directors or management as well as against the selling shareholder predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the securities laws of the United States or any state in the United States or entertain original actions brought in the Cayman Islands courts against us or our directors or officers as well as against the selling shareholder predicated upon the securities laws of the United States or any state in the United States. As a result of the difficulty associated with enforcing a judgment against us, you may not be able to collect any damages awarded by either a US or foreign court.

ITEM 4.    INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY

Our Company—Manchester United

        Manchester United Ltd., an exempted company with limited liability incorporated under the Companies Law (as amended) of the Cayman Islands, was incorporated on 30 April 2012. On 8 August 2012, Manchester United Ltd. changed its legal name to Manchester United plc. The principal executive office address is Sir Matt Busby Way, Old Trafford, Manchester M16 0RA, United Kingdom.

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        The SEC maintains an Internet website that contains reports, proxy statements and other information about issuers, like us, that file electronically with the SEC. The address of that site is www.sec.gov . We also make available on our website, free of charge, our annual reports on Form 20-F and the text of our reports on Form 6-K, including any amendments to these reports, as well as certain other SEC filings, as soon as reasonably practicable after they are electronically filed with or furnished to the SEC. Our website address is https://ir.manutd.com/. The information contained on our website is not incorporated by reference in this document.

        We are one of the most popular and successful sports teams in the world, playing one of the most popular spectator sports on Earth. Through our 141-year heritage we have won 66 trophies, including a record 20 English league titles, enabling us to develop what we believe is one of the world's leading sports brands and a global community of 1.1 billion fans and followers. Our large, passionate community provides us with a worldwide platform to generate significant revenue from multiple sources, including sponsorship, merchandising, product licensing, broadcasting and matchday. We attract leading global companies such as adidas, Aon, General Motors (Chevrolet) and Kohler that want access and exposure to our community of followers and association with our brand.

        Our global community of followers engages with us in a variety of ways:

    Premier League games at our home stadium, Old Trafford, have been virtually sold out since the 1997/98 season. In the 2018/19 season, our 26 home games were attended by a cumulative audience of over 1.9 million.

    We undertake exhibition games and promotional tours on a global basis, enabling our worldwide followers to see our team play. These games are in addition to our competitive matches and take place during the summer months or during gaps in the football season. Over the last 6 years, we have played 29 exhibition games in Australia, China, Ireland, Norway, Singapore, Sweden and the United States (where in 2014, we set a US attendance record for a football match with 109,318 fans at Michigan stadium).

    Our customer relationship management ("CRM") database, a proprietary data repository that includes contact and transactional details of followers and customers around the globe, enables us to analyze and better understand prospects and customers to drive revenues. As of 30 June 2019, the CRM database holds in excess of 36.1 million records. In the last twelve months we have improved the quality of our data which will deliver an optimal approach for understanding and engaging with our fans. We are now in the final stage of implementing a new CRM data warehouse and marketing automation platform which will allow us to integrate data from multiple untapped sources, to drive a deeper understanding of our fans behavior and preferences. We believe this will allow us to deliver a personalized experience with our fans which we believe will improve engagement and drive revenue. The new platform will also allow us to identify obsolete records and better consolidate and accurately understand the relationships between multiple CRM database records.

    As of 30 June 2019, we also had more than 152.7 million total social connections. Last year we reported a year end figure of 154.7 million total social connections, however, this figure included two social platforms which have now closed down, Google+ and Tencent Weibo. Restating prior year figures for the closure of these platforms, we had 142.7 million connections as of 30 June 2018. Total social connections include the following:

    We have a very popular brand page on Facebook with approximately 73.3 million connections as of 30 June 2019. In comparison, each of the New York Yankees and Dallas Cowboys had just under 8.6 million Facebook connections as of 30 June 2019. Furthermore, we have more Facebook connections than the official pages of NBA, NFL, NHL and MLB

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        combined and we are the most followed Facebook page registered in the United Kingdom according to www.socialbakers.com.

      As of 30 June 2019, our Twitter accounts had more than 22.4 million followers, an increase of 7.0% from 30 June 2018.

      We have over 29.5 million followers on Instagram, an increase of 33.2% on the prior year. We continue to be the most-followed and most-engaged Premier League club on the platform.

      In February 2018, we launched our first official YouTube channel. According to YouTube, we reached one million subscribers faster than any other sports channel. As of 30 June 2019, our YouTube channel had over 1.7 million subscribers.

      We also have a significant presence on Chinese social media, with over 9.4 million followers on Sina Weibo—topping all other sports clubs on the platform. In July 2019, we launched a Chinese language mobile application.

      In May 2018, we launched our new website (www.manutd.com) and in August 2018, we launched our first free global mobile application, which reached number one in the App Store's sports category download charts in 91 markets around the world and was top ten within the sports category in 147 markets. The free global mobile application has monthly active users in over 230 global markets.

      We have expanded the reach of our in house television network, MUTV, by launching a direct to consumer ("D2C") proposition on iOS, Android, AppleTV, Roku, Amazon Fire and Xbox. Our linear television network continues to be the most subscribed football channel in the UK.

    During the 2018/19 season, according to Futures Data, our games generated a cumulative audience reach of over 3.5 billion viewers; thus on a per game basis our 53 games attracted an average cumulative audience reach of almost 68 million.

    We have one of the strongest online global brands providing us with significant opportunities to further engage with our followers and develop our media assets and revenue streams.

Our Business Model and Revenue Drivers

        We operate and manage our business as a single reporting segment—the operation of professional sports teams. However, we review our revenue through three principal sectors—Commercial, Broadcasting and Matchday.

    Commercial:  Within the Commercial revenue sector, we monetize our global brand via two revenue streams: sponsorship and retail, merchandising, apparel & product licensing.

    Sponsorship:  We monetize the value of our global brand and community of followers through marketing and sponsorship relationships with leading international and regional companies around the globe. To better leverage the strength of our brand, we have developed a segmentation sponsorship strategy. Our sponsorship revenue was £173.0 million, £173.0 million and £171.5 million for each of the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

    Retail, Merchandising, Apparel & Product Licensing:  We market and sell sports apparel, training and leisure wear and other clothing featuring the Manchester United brand on a global basis. In addition, we also sell other licensed products, from coffee mugs to bed spreads, featuring the Manchester United brand and trademarks. These products are distributed through Manchester United branded retail centers and e-commerce platforms, as well as our partners' wholesale distribution channels. Our retail, merchandising, apparel & product licensing

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      revenue was £102.1 million, £102.8 million and £104.0 million for each of the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

      Our Commercial revenue was £275.1 million, £275.8 million and £275.5 million for each of the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

      Our other two revenue sectors, Broadcasting and Matchday, provide predictable cash flow and global media exposure that enables us to continue to invest in the success of the teams and expand our brand.

    Broadcasting:  We benefit from the distribution of live football content directly from the revenue we receive and indirectly through increased global exposure for our commercial partners. Broadcasting revenue is derived from the global television rights relating to the Premier League, UEFA club competitions and other competitions. In addition, our wholly-owned global television channel, MUTV, delivers Manchester United programming to territories around the world. In addition to our broadcasting channel we also launched a D2C subscription mobile application in season 2016/17 which, as of 30 June 2019, was available in over 167 territories. In addition, for our 2018 pre-season tour we also launched on four 'Connected TV' platforms to enable our fans to watch and subscribe to our content on more platforms, namely Amazon Fire, Apple TV, Roku and Xbox. Broadcasting revenue including, in some cases, prize money received by us in respect of various competitions, will vary from year to year as a result of variability in the amount of available prize money and the performance of our men's first team in such competitions. Our Broadcasting revenue was £241.2 million, £204.2 million and £194.1 million for each of the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

    Matchday:  We believe Old Trafford is one of the world's iconic sports venues. It currently seats 74,140 and is the largest football club stadium in the UK. We have averaged over 99% of attendance capacity for our Premier League matches in each of the last 21 years. Matchday revenue will vary from year to year as a result of the number of home games played and the performance of our men's first team in various competitions. Our Matchday revenue was £110.8 million, £109.8 million and £111.6 million for each of the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

        Total revenue for the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017 was £627.1 million, £589.8 million and £581.3 million, respectively.

Our Competitive Strengths

        We believe our key competitive strengths are:

    One of the most successful sports teams in the world:  Founded in 1878, Manchester United is one of the most successful sports teams in the world—playing one of the world's most popular spectator sports. We have won 66 trophies in nine different leagues, competitions and cups since 1908. Our ongoing success is supported by our highly developed football infrastructure and global scouting network.

    A globally recognized brand with a large, worldwide following:  Our 141-year history, our success and the global popularity of our sport have enabled us to become, we believe, one of the world's most recognizable brands. We enjoy the support of our worldwide community of 1.1 billion fans and followers. The composition of our follower base is far reaching and diverse, transcending cultures, geographies, languages and socio-demographic groups, and we believe the strength of our brand goes beyond the world of sports.

    Ability to successfully monetize our brand:  The popularity and quality of our globally recognized brand make us an attractive marketing partner for companies around the world. Our community

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      of followers is strong in emerging markets, especially in certain regions of Asia, which enables us to deliver media exposure and growth to our partners in these markets.

    Well established marketing infrastructure driving Commercial revenue growth:  We have a large global team dedicated to the development and monetization of our brand and to the sourcing of new revenue opportunities. The team has considerable experience and expertise in sponsorship sales, customer relationship management, marketing execution, advertising support and brand development. In addition, we have developed an increasing range of case studies, covering multiple sponsorship categories and geographies, which in combination with our many years' experience enables us to demonstrate and deliver an effective set of marketing capabilities to our partners on a global and regional basis. Our team is dedicated to the development and monetization of our brand and to the sourcing of new revenue opportunities.

    Sought-after content capitalizing on the proliferation of digital and social media:  We produce content that is followed year-round by our global community of fans and followers. Our content distribution channels are international and diverse, and we actively adopt new media channels to enhance the accessibility and reach of our content. We believe our ability to generate proprietary and exclusive content, which we distribute on our own global platforms as well as via popular third-party social media platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, Sina Weibo and others, constitute an ongoing growth opportunity. According to a third-party analytics firm our global free mobile application was the most downloaded football club mobile application of the last 12 months. Following the successful D2C launch of MUTV on iOS, Android, and MUTV.com last season, and building on the global success of its linear distribution, in July 2018 we launched MUTV applications on 'connected TV' platforms—namely, AppleTV, Roku, Amazon Fire and Xbox. This gives our fans the ability to watch MUTV from the comfort of their living room, without a cable subscription. Existing subscribers to the MUTV mobile application and web platforms can access these new platforms for free via a universal login feature which allows the same credentials to be used across several devices. This continued expansion provides MUTV access to a new demographic of the club's fan base. Recent figures show that connected TV usage is highest amongst millennials (18-34 year-olds), representing a growing trend of younger audiences accessing programming on over the top ("OTT") platforms in place of traditional linear television.

    Seasoned management team and committed ownership:  Our senior management has considerable experience and expertise in the football, commercial, media and finance industries.

Our Strategy

        We aim to increase our revenue and profitability by expanding our high growth businesses that leverage our brand, global community and marketing infrastructure. The key elements of our strategy are:

    Continue to invest in our team, facilities and other brand enhancing initiatives:  Dating back to our first league championship in 1908 through present day, where we have earned a record number of English League titles, we have enjoyed a rich tradition of football excellence. We believe our many years of on field success coupled with an iconic stadium and high level of fan engagement has driven our leading global brand. We are well positioned to continue reinvesting our free cash flow in brand enhancing initiatives. Our brand begins with strong on-field performance, and we remain committed to attracting and retaining the highest quality players for our first teams and coaching staff. To maintain our high standard of performance we will continue to invest in our team. We will also continue to invest in our facilities, including the Old Trafford Stadium, to maintain the quality of service, enhance the fan experience and drive their high level of engagement and loyalty. We have undertaken several initiatives at Old Trafford to enhance our

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      Matchday fan experience, revenue and profitability including restructuring the composition of our stadium, with a particular emphasis on developing premium seating and hospitality facilities. Our commitment to the fan experience has resulted in strong fan loyalty with over 1.9 million cumulative annual attendance and over 99% average attendance for all of our Premier League games since the 1997/98 season. Furthermore, we continue to invest in several other areas including our digital media assets and emerging markets to grow our global fan base and increase our ability to engage with our fans in multiple ways. We remain committed to investing in our team, our facilities and other initiatives to continue our many years of success and enhance our brand globally. We expect these initiatives will continue to be key drivers of our sales, profit and leading brand recognition going forward.

    Expand our portfolio of sponsors:  We are well-positioned to continue to secure sponsorships with leading brands. We have historically implemented a proactive approach to identifying, securing and supporting sponsors, including expanding our sponsorship team to bolster our analytical capabilities and effectiveness. During fiscal year 2019, we announced eight new regional and global sponsorship partnerships, the replacement of one global partnership, a conversion of one regional sponsorship to a global partnership as well as extensions to five global partnerships and three regional partnerships.

    Further develop our retail, merchandising, apparel & product licensing business:  Currently, we have a 10-year agreement with adidas with respect to our global technical sponsorship and dual-branded licensing rights, which began on 1 August 2015. The agreement with adidas does not include the rights with respect to mono-branded licensing rights or the right to create and operate Manchester United branded soccer schools, physical retail channels and e-commerce retail channels. In the future, we plan to invest to expand our portfolio of product licensees to enhance the range of product offerings available to our followers. Additionally, we may also seek to refine how we segment the different elements of this business. We may also increase our focus on developing these rights more proactively, alone or with other partners.

    Exploit digital media opportunities:  The rapid shift of media consumption towards internet, mobile and social media platforms presents us with multiple growth opportunities and new revenue streams. Our digital media platforms, applications and social media channels, are expected to become one of the primary methods by which we engage and transact with our fans around the world. We continue to evolve our media team's capability to address these opportunities. Moreover, since 2013, we have wholly owned MUTV ensuring that we have both a greater degree of control over the production, distribution and quality of our proprietary content and better insight into how to evolve our digital media strategy as we continue to develop and roll out carefully targeted new products and services.

      In the 2016/17 season we developed and launched a D2C subscription mobile application on iOS, Android, and MUTV.com, which enabled our fans to watch our live men's first team tour matches live, our academy team matches live, as well as exclusively produced original productions and interviews with players and our team manager. This application has enabled us to directly access new overseas territories and, for the first time in the UK and Ireland, fans can watch our MUTV channel through their web browser without a cable or satellite subscription.

      Following the successful D2C launch of MUTV, and building on the global success of our linear distribution, in July 2018, we launched MUTV applications on 'connected TV' platforms—namely, AppleTV, Roku, Amazon Fire and Xbox. This gives our fans the ability to watch MUTV from the comfort of their living room, without a cable subscription. This continued expansion provides MUTV access to a new demographic of the club's fan base. Recent figures show that connected TV usage is highest amongst millennials (18-34 year-olds), representing a growing

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      trend of younger audiences accessing programming on OTT platforms and services in place of traditional linear television.

      In May 2018 we updated our website www.manutd.com. The new website provides a cleaner design for our fans to navigate through our content. We believe the new website also provides commercial benefits for our business with greater e-commerce opportunities and more digital inventory for our commercial partners to benefit from. Ahead of the commencement of the 2018/19 season we launched our first free global mobile application. The proliferation of mobile devices has resulted in a need for our content to be consumed 'on the go' and in real time. We believe that this mobile application will build upon the aforementioned benefits of the new website and increase the distribution of our content. Since launch, we have reached number one in the App Store's sports category download charts in 91 markets around the world, top ten within the sports category in 147 markets and currently have active users in over 230 global markets.

      In addition to developing our own digital properties, we intend to leverage third-party media platforms and other social media as a means of further engaging with our fans and creating a source of traffic for our digital media assets. Our digital media offerings are in the early stages of development and present opportunities for future growth.

    Enhance the reach and distribution of our broadcasting rights:  We are well-positioned to benefit from any increased value and related growth in club distributions associated with the Premier League, the Champions League and other competitions. In February 2018, the Premier League announced that it had sold five out of seven UK live television rights packages, for the three seasons commencing with the 2019/20 season, to Sky Sports and BT Sport, for a combined value of £4.5 billion over the three-year cycle. In June 2018, the Premier League further announced that it had sold the remaining two packages to BT Sport and Amazon Prime Video, a new entrant to Premier League UK broadcasting contracts. The overall value generated from the sale of the seven packages has not been publicly disclosed. This follows the previous deal, which represented an increase of over 70% on the rights for the three seasons commencing with the 2013/14 season and represented the largest UK TV rights deal ever signed. In addition, the Premier League has indicated that the international broadcasting rights agreed for the three-year cycle commencing in the 2019/20 season are a 30% uplift on the previous three-year cycle. The Premier League also announced a change to the distribution method for international broadcasting rights commencing with the 2019/20 season. International broadcast monies have previously been split equally among Premier League clubs. From 2019/20, clubs will continue to share equally an inflation-adjusted amount on the previous three-year cycle, with any additional amounts distributed based on league finishing position at the end of the season. In the new cycle, the ratio between the maximum and minimum a club can receive from the Premier League in a season is capped at 1.8:1. The maximum the first placed club can receive is 1.8 times the amount of the twentieth placed club.

      The current UEFA club competition's three-year media rights agreement which commenced in the 2018/19 season is worth €3.2 billion per season, marking an increase of 33% on the previous contract. We believe these new contracts underline the continuing demand for, and popularity of, live sports content and football in particular. Unlike other television programming, the unpredictable outcomes of live sports ensures that individuals consume sports programming in real time and in full, resulting in higher audiences and increased interest from television broadcasters and advertisers.

      Furthermore, MUTV, our global broadcasting platform, delivers Manchester United programming to territories around the world. We plan to continue to expand the distribution of MUTV supported by improving the quality of its content and its production capabilities.

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    Diversify revenue and improve margins:  We aim to increase the revenue and operating margins of our business as we further expand our high growth commercial businesses, including sponsorship, retail, merchandising and licensing.

Our Market Opportunity

        We believe that we are one of the world's most recognizable global brands with a community of 1.1 billion fans and followers. Manchester United is at the forefront of live football, which is a key component of the global sports market.

        Other markets driving our business include the global advertising market, the global pay television market and the global apparel market.

        While our business represents only a small portion of our addressable markets and may not grow at a corresponding rate, we believe our global reach and access to emerging markets position us for continued growth.

Our Men's Team's History

        Founded in 1878 as Newton Heath L&YR Football Club, our club has operated for over 141 years. The team first entered the English First Division, then the highest league in English football, for the start of the 1892/93 season. Our club name changed to Manchester United Football Club in 1902, and we won the first of our 20 English League titles in 1908. In 1910, we moved to Old Trafford, our current stadium.

        In the late 1940s, we returned to on-field success, winning the FA Cup in 1948 and finishing within the top four league positions during each of the first five seasons immediately following the Second World War. During the 1950s, we continued our on-field success under the leadership of manager Sir Matt Busby, who built a popular and famous team based on youth players known as the "Busby Babes."

        In February 1958, an airplane crash resulted in the death of eight of our men's first team players. Global support and tributes followed this disaster as Busby galvanized the team around such popular players as George Best, Bobby Charlton and Denis Law. Rebuilding of the club culminated with a victory in the 1968 European Cup final, becoming the first English club to win this title.

        This storied history preceded the highly successful modern era of Manchester United which began in earnest in 1986 when the club appointed Sir Alex Ferguson as manager, and in 1990 we won the FA Cup and began a long period of sustained success winning the Premier League title a record 13 times. In total, we have won a record 20 English League titles, 12 FA Cups, 5 EFL Cups, 3 European/Champions League Cups, 1 European Europa League Cup, and 1 FIFA Club World Cup, making us one of the most successful clubs in England.

        At the end of the 2012/13 season, Sir Alex Ferguson retired as team manager. Sir Alex remains a key member of the club as he is a director of Manchester United FC.

        Our current team manager, Ole Gunnar Solskjaer, was appointed on 28 March 2019 on a three-year contract. Solskjaer scored 126 goals in 366 appearances for our men's first team between 1996 and 2007 and also managed the club's reserve team until the end of 2010.

        Since the inception of the Premier League in 1992, our club has enjoyed consistent success and growth with popular players such as Bryan Robson, Ryan Giggs, Eric Cantona, David Beckham, Paul Scholes, Cristiano Ronaldo and Wayne Rooney. The popularity of these players, our distinguished tradition and history, and the on-field success of our men's first team have allowed us to expand the club into a global brand with an international follower base.

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        Our Old Trafford stadium, commonly known as "The Theatre of Dreams," was originally opened on 19 February 1910 with a capacity of approximately 80,000. During the Second World War, Old Trafford was used by the military as a depot, and on 11 March 1941 was heavily damaged by a German bombing raid. The stadium was rebuilt following the war and reopened on 24 August 1949. The addition of floodlighting, permitting evening matches, was completed in 1957 and a project to cover the stands with roofs was completed in 1959. After a series of additions during the 1960s, 1970s and early 1980s, capacity at Old Trafford reached 56,385 in 1985. The conversion of the stadium to an all-seater reduced capacity to approximately 44,000 by 1992, the lowest in its history. Thereafter, we began to expand capacity throughout the stadium, bringing capacity to approximately 58,000 by 1996, approximately 68,000 by 2000, and over 74,000 in 2006. Current capacity at Old Trafford is 74,140.

        The following chart shows the historical success of our men's first team by trophies won:


TROPHIES WON

Premier League/Football League
Division One
    FA Charity/Community Shield  
1908     1965     1997     2007     1908     1967     1996     2011  
1911     1967     1999     2008     1911     1977     1997     2013  
1952     1993     2000     2009     1952     1983     2003     2016  
1956     1994     2001     2011     1956     1990     2007        
1957     1996     2003     2013     1957     1993     2008        
                        1965     1994     2010        
FA Cup     EFL/Football League Cup  
1909     1977     1990     1999           1992     2010        
1948     1983     1994     2004           2006     2017        
1963     1985     1996     2016           2009              
European Cup/Champions League     Europa League  
1968     1999     2008           2017  
FIFA Club World Cup     UEFA Super Cup  
2008     1991  
European Cup Winners' Cup     Intercontinental Cup  
1991     1999
 

Industry Overview

        Football is one of the most popular spectator sports on Earth and global follower interest has enabled the sport to commercialize its activities through sponsorship, retail, merchandising, apparel & product licensing, broadcasting, and matchday. As a consequence, football constitutes a significant portion of the overall global sports industry, according to AT Kearney.

        Football's growth and increasing popularity is primarily a product of consumer demand for and interest in live sports, whether viewed in person at the venue or through television and digital media. The sport's revenue growth has been driven by the appetite among consumers, advertisers and media distributors for access to and association with these live sports events, in particular those featuring globally recognized teams.

        The major football leagues and clubs in England, Germany, Spain, Italy and France have established themselves as the leading global entities due to their history as well as their highly developed television and advertising markets, according to AT Kearney. The combination of historical success and media development in the core European markets has helped to drive revenue, which in turn enables those leagues to attract the best players in the world, further strengthening their appeal to followers.

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        As television and digital media such as broadband internet and mobile extend their reach globally, the availability of and access to live games and other content of the leading European leagues has increased and live games are now viewed worldwide. In addition, advances in new technology continue to both improve the television and digital media user experience and the effectiveness of sponsorships and advertising on these platforms. These trends further strengthen the commercial benefit of associating with football for media distributors and advertisers and increase the global opportunities for the sport.

League Structure

        Manchester United is a member of the English Premier League, the top league in the UK, which has been, for a long time, and continues to be, one of the elite leagues in the world.

        The Premier League is a private company wholly-owned by its 20 member clubs, with responsibility for the competition, its Rule Book, the centralized broadcasting rights and other commercial rights. The Premier League works proactively with the member clubs and other football authorities domestically and internationally including the Football Association, UEFA and FIFA. Each member club is an independent shareholder of the Premier League and works within the rules of football defined by the various governing bodies.

Governing Bodies

        Manchester United operates under three different levels of governing bodies, ranging from worldwide to continental to national jurisdiction.

        FIFA is the international governing body of football around the world. Headquartered in Zurich, Switzerland, FIFA is responsible for the regulation, promotion and development of football worldwide. All football played at any level must abide by the Laws of the Game, as set forth by FIFA. FIFA's rules and regulations are decided by the International Football Association Board ("IFAB") and reviewed on an annual basis. FIFA also sets the international fixture calendar which, along with European and domestic cup dates, takes precedence over the domestic football league.

        UEFA is a competition organizer and is responsible for the organization and regulation of cross-border football in Europe. UEFA is primarily known for its European club competitions, the Champions League and the Europa League. Currently the Premier League gets four teams into the Champions League and another three into the Europa League. The representative structures for UEFA are primarily national association-based with the FA representing English football on numerous committees.

        The FA is the national governing body for football in England and is responsible for sanctioning competition Rule Books, including the Premier League's, and regulating on-field matters. The FA also organizes the FA Cup competition, in which the 20 Premier League member clubs participate. The FA is a special shareholder of the Premier League that has the ability to exercise a vote on certain specific issues, but has no role in the day-to-day running of the league. Each year the Premier League submits its rules to the FA for approval and sanction. For the Premier League, the FA ensures that throughout the season the Laws of the Game are applied on the field by officials, clubs and players including on-and off-field discipline. The FA is also involved in refereeing, youth development and the UK's largest sports charity, the Football Foundation.

Our Football Operations

        Our football operations are primarily comprised of the following activities: our men's first team, our youth academy, our global scouting networks, our women's team and other operations such as our sport science, medical and fitness operations at the Aon Training Complex.

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Men's first team

        Our men's first team plays professional football in the Premier League, domestic cup competitions in England including the FA Cup and EFL Cup and, subject to qualifying, international cup competitions, including the Champions League.

        Our men's first team is led by our manager, supported by an assistant manager and a club secretary, who in turn are supported by a team of over 160 individuals, including coaches and scouts for our men's first team and youth academy, medical and physiotherapy staff, sports science and performance and match analysis staff.

        We have 62 players under contract of whom 34 have made an appearance for our men's first team. The remaining players may play for the youth academy teams but are being developed such that they may make it to a starting position on our men's first team or the first team of other clubs. This structure has been put in place with the aim of developing some of the world's best football players and maximizing our men's first team's chances of winning games, leagues and tournaments.

        Domestic transfers of players between football clubs are governed by the Premier League Rules and the FA Rules, which allow a professional player to enter into a contract with and be registered to play for any club, and to receive a signing-on fee in connection with such contract. Players are permitted to move to another club during the term of their contract if both clubs agree on such transfer. In such circumstances a compensation fee may be payable by the transferee club. FIFA Regulations on the Status and Transfer of Players (the "FIFA Regulations") govern international transfers of players between clubs and may require the transferee club to distribute 5% of any compensation fee to the clubs that trained the relevant player. In addition, a 5% levy on any such compensation fee would also be payable to the Premier League. The transferor club in an international transfer may also be entitled to receive payment of "training compensation" under the FIFA Regulations when certain conditions are met. If an out-of-contract player (i.e. a player whose contract with a club has expired or has been terminated) wishes to play for another club, the player's former club will only be entitled to a compensation fee in a domestic transfer, or a payment of training compensation under the FIFA Regulations in an international transfer, if certain conditions are satisfied, including conditions regarding the player's age and requiring the former club to offer the player a new contract on terms which are no less favorable than his current contract. Subject to limited exceptions, transfers of professional players may only take place during one of the "transfer windows," which for the Premier League is the month of January and the period beginning on the day following the last Premier League match of the season and ending on the Thursday immediately prior to the first Premier League match of the following season.

        Our players enter into contracts with us that follow a prescribed model based on FA and Premier League Limited rules. Players on our men's first team typically also enter into an image rights agreement with us, which grants us enhanced rights and protections with respect to use of their image. Our men's first team players generally enter into contracts of between two and five years' duration.

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        As of 6 September 2019, our men's first team(1) was comprised of the following players:

Player
  Position   Nationality   Age   Apps(2)   Caps(3)  

David de Gea

  Goalkeeper   Spanish     28     366     39  

Lee Grant

  Goalkeeper   English     36     1     0  

Dean Henderson(4)

  Goalkeeper   English     22     0     0  

Joel Castro Pereira

  Goalkeeper   Portuguese     23     3     0  

Sergio Romero

  Goalkeeper   Argentinian     32     44     96  

Eric Bailly

  Defender   Ivorian     25     74     32  

Diogo Dalot

  Defender   Portuguese     20     23     0  

Timothy Fosu-Mensah

  Defender   Dutch     21     21     3  

Phil Jones

  Defender   English     27     216     27  

Victor Lindelof

  Defender   Swedish     25     73     29  

Harry Maguire

  Defender   English     26     4     20  

Marcos Rojo

  Defender   Argentinian     29     113     59  

Luke Shaw

  Defender   English     24     109     8  

Chris Smalling(4)

  Defender   English     29     323     31  

Axel Tuanzebe

  Defender   English     21     8     0  

Aaron Wan-Bissaka

  Defender   English     21     4     0  

Ashley Young

  Defender   English     34     205     39  

Frederico Rodrigues de Paula Santos (Fred)

  Midfielder   Brazilian     26     25     9  

James Garner

  Midfielder   English     18     1     0  

Angel Gomes

  Midfielder   English     19     4     0  

Daniel James

  Midfielder   Welsh     21     4     4  

Jesse Lingard

  Midfielder   English     26     171     24  

Scott McTominay

  Midfielder   English     22     51     9  

Juan Mata

  Midfielder   Spanish     31     222     41  

Nemanja Matic

  Midfielder   Serbian     31     88     46  

Andreas Pereira

  Midfielder   Brazilian     23     38     1  

Paul Pogba

  Midfielder   French     26     146     67  

Tahith Chong

  Forward   Dutch     19     4     0  

Mason Greenwood

  Forward   English     17     8     0  

Anthony Martial

  Forward   French     23     177     18  

Marcus Rashford

  Forward   English     21     174     32  

Alexis Sanchez(4)

  Forward   Chilean     30     45     130  

(1)
The table includes all men's first team players as of 6 September 2019.

(2)
Apps means appearances for our men's first team through 6 September 2019.

(3)
Caps means appearances for senior national football team through 6 September 2019.

(4)
Currently out on loan at other clubs.

Youth academy

        Our youth academy is a rich source of new talent for our men's first team as well as a means of developing players that may be sold to generate transfer income. The aim of our youth academy is to create a flow of talent from the youth teams up to our men's first team, thereby saving us the expense of purchasing those players in the transfer market. Our youth academy has allowed us to have a home grown player in every game for the last eighty years. Players in our youth academy may be loaned to other clubs in order to develop and gain first team experience with those other clubs and enhance their transfer value. Players from our youth academy who do not make it into our men's first team

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frequently achieve a place at another professional football club, thereby generating income from player loans and transfer fees. As a result, our youth academy has developed more players in the top two tiers of English football than any other.

        Our youth academy program consists of 10 junior teams ranging from under 9s to under 23's. Each team consists of 15 to 30 players, each of whom takes part in an age specific elite player development and games program during the season.

Scouting network

        Together with our youth academy, our scouting system is another source of our football talent. Through our scouting system, we recruit players for both our men's first team and youth academy. Our scouting system consists of a professional network of staff who scout in general and for specific positions and age groups.

        Our scouting system was traditionally oriented towards the United Kingdom, but our focus has increasingly shifted toward a more international approach in order to identify and attract football players from the broadest talent pool possible.

Women's team

        Manchester United Women's Football Club was founded in May 2018 and has just been promoted to the English Women's Super League (the top tier in England) after winning the English Women's Championship in their first season. Led by manager Casey Stoney, our aim is to develop a team capable of competing at the highest level in the women's game which has a core consisting of players who have graduated from our long-established and highly successful Manchester United Girls' Regional Talent Club and offer academy players a clear route to top level football within the club.

Training facilities

        We have invested significant resources into developing a performance center which contains advanced sports and science equipment. We have highly experienced training staff working at the performance center, where we provide physiotherapy, bio-mechanical analysis and nutritional guidance to our players as part of our drive to ensure that each player is able to achieve peak physical condition. We believe the quality of our performance center differentiates our club from many of our competitors.

        We spent approximately £3.1 million in the year ended 30 June 2019 in connection with further updating our training facility, the Aon Training Complex.

Revenue Sectors

Commercial

        Within the Commercial revenue sector, we monetize our brand via two revenue streams: sponsorship; and retail, merchandising, apparel & product licensing. The primary source of revenue in this sector comes from sponsorship, which allows highly diverse and global companies to partner with Manchester United, regionally or internationally, in order to realize sponsorship benefits and associate themselves with our brand.

Sponsorship

        Our sponsorship agreements are negotiated directly by our commercial team. Our sponsors are granted various rights, which can include:

    rights in respect of our brand, logo and other intellectual property;

    rights in respect of our player and manager imagery;

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    exposure on our television platform, MUTV;

    exposure on our website and mobile application;

    exposure on our club branded social media channels;

    exposure on digital perimeter advertising boards at Old Trafford;

    exposure on interview backdrops; and

    the right to administer promotions targeted at customers whose details are stored on our CRM database.

        Any use of our intellectual property rights by sponsors is under license. However, we retain the ownership rights to our intellectual property.

Sponsorship development and strategy

        We pursue our sponsorship deals through a developed infrastructure for commercial activities. We have a dedicated sales team that focuses on developing commercial opportunities and sourcing new sponsors. We target potential sponsors we believe will benefit from association with our brand and have the necessary financial resources to support an integrated marketing relationship. By cultivating strong relationships with our sponsors, we generate significant revenue and leverage our sponsors co-branded marketing strategies to further grow our brand. We are successful in executing a geographic and product categorized approach to selling our sponsorship rights.

        We offer category exclusivity on a global basis to companies within particular industries, such as airline, beverage, logistics and hotels. We also offer sponsorship exclusivity within a particular geography for certain industries, such as dietary and nutrition supplements.

        In seeking any individual partnership, we aim to establish an indicative value for that sponsorship based on the prospective sponsor's industry and marketing objectives. We will only pursue a sponsorship if we believe it reflects the value we deliver. Our current strategy is to focus more closely on larger, established global brands rather than regional partnerships.

        We believe that certain key sectors play an active role in sports sponsorship. We have sponsors in a number of these sectors and we believe that there is significant potential to expand this platform by selectively targeting companies within the remaining sectors and by growing revenue in existing sectors through additional sponsorship arrangements. High growth markets such as Asia, which we expect to be a key focus for many of our prospective sponsors, are an important element of our sponsorship efforts.

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Our sponsors

        The following graph shows our annual sponsorship revenue for each of the last five fiscal years:


Sponsorship Revenue

GRAPHIC


Note: Sponsorship revenue does not include revenue generated from our agreements with Nike (which was in effect through the end of July 2015) and adidas.

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        The table below highlights some of our global and regional sponsors as of 1 July 2019:

Sponsor
  Type of sponsorship   Product category
Aeroflot   Global sponsor   Commercial airline
Aon   Global sponsor (training kit)   Business/professional advisory services
Apollo Tyres   Global sponsor   Tyres
Canon Medical Systems   Global sponsor   Medical scanners
Chivas   Global sponsor   Spirits
Concha y Toro   Global sponsor   Wine
Deezer   Global sponsor   Music streaming
DHL   Global sponsor   Logistics
General Motors (Chevrolet)   Global sponsor (shirt)   Automobiles
Harves   Global sponsor   Entertainment centres
HCL   Global sponsor   Digital platform development
Kohler   Global sponsor (sleeve)   Kitchen and bathroom fixtures and generators
Konami   Global sponsor   Football computer games
Marriott   Global sponsor   Hotels
Maui Jim   Global sponsor   Eyewear
Melitta   Global sponsor   Coffee
Mlily   Global sponsor   Mattresses and pillows
Spectrum (Remington)   Global sponsor   Electronic grooming
Swissquote   Global sponsor   Forex & online trading platforms
True Religion   Global sponsor   Denim clothing
Cho-A-Pharm   Regional sponsor   Pharmaceuticals
Chi   Regional sponsor   Consumer goods
Hong Kong Jockey Club   Regional sponsor   Racecourses and private members' clubs
IVC Nutrition   Regional sponsor   Dietary supplements
Manda   Regional sponsor   Nutritional supplements
Science in Sport (SiS)   Regional sponsor   Sports nutrition
Thomas Cook   Regional sponsor   Holiday tour provider

Shirt sponsor

        Our current shirt sponsor is General Motors (Chevrolet). The shirt sponsorship agreement began in the 2014/15 season and runs through to the end of the 2020/21 season, with total fees payable of approximately $559 million. We received approximately $18.6 million in each of the 2012/13 and 2013/14 seasons relating to pre-sponsorship support and exposure, with the remaining $521.8 million to be received and recognized over seven years through to the end of the 2020/21 season. The shirt sponsorship agreement gives each party typical termination rights for a contract of this nature in respect of a material breach.

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        The following chart shows the dramatic growth in shirt sponsorships revenue since 2000:


Average Annual Payments Under
Recent Shirt Sponsorship Contracts

GRAPHIC


Note: The Aon and Chevrolet shirt sponsorship agreements do not include sponsorship rights for our training kit. The Chevrolet annual payment does not include pre-sponsorship payments and assumes a £:$ exchange rate of 1.2718 as of 30 June 2019.

Shirt sleeve sponsor

        Kohler is the first shirt sleeve partner for both our men's and women's teams with the agreement beginning in the 2018/19 season and running through to the end of the 2022/23 season. Our agreement with them includes joint participation on game day activities, innovative improvements to club facilities, global sustainability and social responsibility projects and other partner collaborations with Manchester United fans and Kohler customers and associates.

Training facilities partner and training kit partner

        Our training facilities at Carrington are sponsored by Aon and are named the Aon Training Complex. Aon are also our training kit partner, and our agreement with them provides that our players and coaching staff wear adidas-branded training kits with Aon advertising at all domestic matches, as well as during training sessions. The agreement with Aon runs through to the end of the 2020/21 season.

Global, regional and supplier sponsors

        In addition to revenue from our shirt sponsor, training kit partner and training facilities partner, we generated a further £86.3 million in the year ended 30 June 2019 from other global, regional and other sponsors. The length of these sponsorship deals is generally between two and five years. The majority of these sponsorship deals have minimum revenue guarantees and some have additional revenue sharing arrangements.

        Global sponsors are granted certain marketing and promotion rights with respect to our brand and intellectual property as well as exposure on our media, such as digital perimeter boards at Old Trafford, MUTV and our website. These rights are granted on a global basis and are exclusive by category. Regional sponsors are granted certain marketing and promotion rights and media exposure, however,

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these rights are granted for a limited number of territories. Regional sponsors are able to use the rights in their designated territory on an exclusive basis, however they are not granted global category exclusivity.

Financial services affinity sponsorship

        There is a significant growth opportunity to further develop Manchester United branded financial services products. These financial services products include credit cards and debit cards. We believe there are key commercial opportunities with credit and debit cards, which are particularly attractive as credit and debit cards also serve as a means of follower expression and loyalty. Depending on the product category, we pursue affinity agreements on a territory specific or regional basis. Examples of our financial services affinity sponsors include Banco Invex (Mexico), Emirates NBD Bank (UAE), ICICI (India), Maybank Group (Malaysia), National Bank of Egypt (Egypt), Ping An (China), PT Danamon (Indonesia), Santander (Norway), and Virgin Money (England).

Exhibition games and promotional tours

        We conduct exhibition games and promotional tours on a global basis. Our promotional tours enable us to engage with our followers, support the marketing objectives of our sponsors and extend the reach of our brand in strategic markets. The tour matches are broadcast and/or streamed live to subscribers of MUTV. These promotional tours are in addition to our competitive matches and take place during the summer months or during gaps in the football season. Over the last 6 years, we played 29 exhibition games in Australia, China, Ireland, Norway, Singapore, Sweden and the United States (where in 2014, we set a US attendance record for a football match with 109,318 fans at Michigan stadium).

        We normally receive a guaranteed fee for such tours. We also generate revenue from tour sponsorship opportunities sold to existing and new partners. During the 2018/19 season, our promotional exhibition games and promotional tours generated £11.3 million of revenue (excluding any related sponsorship revenue). We believe promotional tours represent a growth opportunity as we continue to play exhibition games around the world.

Commercial income from the Premier League

        In addition to revenue from contracts that we negotiate ourselves, we receive revenue from commercial arrangements negotiated collectively by the Premier League on behalf of its member teams. Income from these commercial contracts negotiated by the Premier League is shared equally between the clubs that are to be in the Premier League for the season to which the income relates. Our pro rata income received from the other commercial contracts negotiated by the Premier League is not material to the Company's results of operations.

Retail, Merchandising, Apparel & Product Licensing

        Unlike American teams in the NFL, MLB and NHL, Manchester United retains full control of the use and monetization of its intellectual property rights worldwide in the areas of retail, merchandising, apparel & product licensing.

        Our retail, merchandising, apparel & product licensing business includes the sale of sports apparel, training and leisure wear and other clothing featuring Manchester United brands as well as other licensed products from high fashion and luxury watches to children's toys and household items such as mugs and bedspreads. These products are distributed on a global basis through Manchester United branded retail stores and e-commerce platform, as well as through our partners' wholesale distribution channels.

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        We have a 10-year agreement with adidas with respect to our global technical sponsorship and dual-branded licensing rights, which began on 1 August 2015. The minimum guarantee payable by adidas over the term of the agreement is equal to £750 million, subject to certain adjustments. Payments due in a particular year may increase if our men's first team wins the Premier League, FA Cup or Champions League, or decrease if our men's first team fails to participate in the Champions League for two or more consecutive seasons, with the maximum possible increase being £4 million per year and the maximum possible reduction being 30% of the applicable payment for the year in which the second or other consecutive season of non-participation falls. If the men's first team fails to participate in the Champions League for two or more consecutive seasons, then the reduction is applied as from the year in which the second consecutive season of non-participation falls. In the event of a reduction in any year due to the failure to participate in the Champions League for two or more consecutive seasons, the payments revert back to the original terms upon the men's first team participating again in the Champions League. Any increase or decrease in a particular year would have the effect of increasing or decreasing the minimum guarantee amount of £750 million payable over the 10-year term of the agreement.

        The minimum guarantee from adidas does not include the rights with respect to mono-branded licensing rights or the right to create and operate Manchester United branded soccer schools, physical retail channels and e-commerce retail channels, which rights may generate additional revenue for the club. We may also benefit from additional royalty payments upon exceeding a threshold of sales.

        The agreement with adidas is subject to reciprocal termination provisions in respect of material breach and insolvency. adidas may reduce the applicable payments for a year by 50% if the men's first team is not participating in the English Premier League during that year. In addition, adidas may terminate the agreement by giving one full-season's notice if the men's first team is relegated from the English Premier League or if it is otherwise determined that the men's first team shall not be participating in the Premier League or the top English league.

        The Manchester United match jerseys and training wear collections are completely redesigned for each season by adidas. The annual launch of the new jerseys is always a much-anticipated day for our global community of followers. The result is a robust adidas collection apparel business.

        In addition to our adidas collection, we have a number of premium brands utilizing Manchester United intellectual property for the creation of dual-branded merchandise, where we receive a royalty payment and a sponsorship fee from the partner.

Retail

        We operate our flagship retail store at the Old Trafford stadium, which trades year round, and not just on matchdays. In addition to the Old Trafford store, we have a Manchester United branded retail location in Macau (which is operated under franchise by a third-party licensee).

        We have agreed a long term strategic partnership with Harves Entertainment Group for the creation of a series of Manchester United Experience Centers in China. Each venue will feature interactive and immersive experiences, using state-of the-art technology to bring Manchester United to life in this market. The first of these centers are scheduled to open in Beijing, Shanghai, and Shenyang by the end of 2020, with each venue including a restaurant and a club retail store.

Merchandising & product licensing

        We grant product licenses across a wide range of Manchester United products which are highly sought after by our followers around the world. Under our product licensing agreements, we receive royalties from the sales of specific Manchester United branded products. Under some product licensing agreements, we receive a minimum guaranteed payment from the licensee. The majority of licensees

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are granted on a non-exclusive rights basis for specific product categories, within a specific country or geographic region.

E-commerce

        We currently have arrangements in place whereby Fanatics has been granted separate licenses to use our brand and/or trademarks to operate the official online store, branded as "United Direct", in the United States and the rest of the world. The online store sells a range of Manchester United branded merchandise including official replica kit and other clothing from adidas. In addition, the online store offers a broad range of other apparel, equipment such as balls, luggage and other accessories, homewares such as bedroom, kitchen and bathroom accessories, and collectibles, souvenirs and other gifts. We currently receive a percentage of net sales from the online store as a royalty payment.

        We believe there is a significant opportunity for us to expand our e-commerce capabilities through improved leverage of our digital media platform, and focusing on delivering a tailored digital shopping experience at a regional level. Specifically, we intend to improve our ability to offer targeted merchandise to our followers, complemented by more efficient fulfilment mechanics, including product delivery, availability and payment methods.

Broadcasting

Central Media

        We benefit from the distribution and broadcasting of live football content directly from the revenue we receive and indirectly through increased global exposure for our commercial partners. Broadcasting revenue is derived from the centrally negotiated domestic and international television and radio rights to the Premier League, the Champions League and other competitions. In addition, our wholly-owned global television channel, MUTV, delivers Manchester United programming to territories around the world.

        The Premier League and UEFA negotiate their own media rights contracts independently of the participating clubs. In respect of the Premier League, media agreements are typically three years in duration and are centrally negotiated and entered into with media distributors by the Premier League on behalf of the member clubs. Under the agreements, Broadcasting revenue for each season is typically shared between the clubs that are to be in the Premier League for that season and a part-share for the clubs that were relegated from the Premier League in the previous four seasons. After certain deductions approved by the Premier League (for example, donations to "grass roots" football development and other causes), the income from the sale of the domestic broadcasting rights is allocated to the current and relegated clubs according to a formula based on, among other things, finishing position in the league and the number of live television appearances. Under the current Premier League broadcasting cycle, revenue from the sale of the rights to televise Premier League matches internationally by overseas broadcasters and radio is shared equally between the current clubs and a part-share for the clubs that were relegated from the Premier League in the previous four seasons. Under the new Premier League broadcasting cycle commencing with the 2019/20 season, there will be a change to the distribution mechanism of international broadcasting rights whereby any increase on the current deal above a specified amount will be allocated to the current clubs according to a formula based upon finishing position in the league.

        In the Champions League and Europa League, media agreements are also typically three years in duration and are collectively negotiated and entered into by UEFA on behalf of the participating clubs. Each club receives a fixed amount for qualifying for the group stage plus bonuses based on performance. Further fixed amounts are received for participation in the knock-out rounds; round of 32 (Europa League only), round of 16, quarter-final, and semi-final. The runner-up and winner of the

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competition also earn additional amounts. For the current three-year agreement (which commenced in the 2018/19 season) amounts are distributed as follows:

 
  Champions
League ("UCL")
  Europa
League ("UEL")
 
 
  €'million
  €'million
 

Bonus for group stage participation (UCL—32 teams; UEL—48 teams)

  15.25   2.92  

Bonus for each group stage win (maximum 6)

  2.70   0.57  

Bonus for each group stage draw(1)

  0.90   0.19  

Bonus for group runners-up

    N/A   0.50  

Bonus for group winners

    N/A   1.00  

Bonus for round of 32 participation

    N/A   0.50  

Bonus for round of 16 participation

  9.50   1.10  

Bonus for quarter-final participation

  10.50   1.50  

Bonus for semi-final participation

  12.00   2.40  

Runner-up bonus (inclusive of ticketing revenue share)

  15.00   4.50  

Winner bonus (inclusive of ticketing revenue share)

  19.00   8.50  

Maximum total of the above

  82.45   21.34  

(1)
In the event of a draw, the non-distributed balance will be aggregated and split among the clubs that won matches at the group stage in proportion to the number of matches won.

        In August of each season, the previous season's Champions League winner and Europa League winner will play in the UEFA Super Cup where each team can expect to receive a further €3.5 million participation fee, with the winner receiving an additional €1.0 million.

        In addition to the above fixed amounts, UEFA allocates monies to a market pool which is also distributed to clubs who reach the group-stage and beyond. Further, with effect from the three-year cycle 2018/19 to 2020/21, UEFA introduced the coefficient ranking. The total market pool for the Champions League is €292 million per annum and the total coefficient ranking allocation is €585 million per annum (giving a combined total of €877 million per annum) and the total market pool for the Europa League is €168 million per annum and the total coefficient ranking allocation is €84 million per annum (giving a combined total of €252 million per annum).

        The individual club coefficient is determined by reference to past performance in UEFA club competitions over a ten-year period with additional points for historical winners of UEFA club competitions. On the basis of these parameters, a ranking has been established. The total Champions League amount of €585.05 million is divided into 'coefficient shares', with each share worth €1.108 million. The lowest-ranked team will receive one share (€1.108 million). One share will be added to every rank and so the highest-ranked team will receive 32 shares (€35.46 million). The total Europa League amount of €84 million is divided into 'coefficient shares', with each share worth €71,430. The lowest-ranked team will receive one share (€71,430). One share will be added to every rank and so the highest-ranked team will receive 48 shares (€3.42 million).

        The market pool for each country is calculated based on the proportional value of its broadcasting agreements with UEFA relative to the total value of broadcasting agreements from all countries represented at the group stage. 50% of each country market pool is distributed to its group-stage representatives based on each club's domestic performance in the previous season. For the Champions League this is based on league finishing position. For the Europa League this is based on league finishing position and potentially both domestic cup competitions (the winners of the FA Cup, if

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participating in the Europa League, earn the highest share). Any club which qualifies for the Champions League group-stage by virtue of winning the Europa League in the previous season (such as ourselves in 2016/17) does not receive a distribution of the 50% market pool based on domestic performance in the previous season.

        The remaining 50% of the market pool is distributed as follows:

    for the Champions League, based on the number of games played in the current competition relative to teams from the same country. The English market pool for the 2018/19 competition was approximately €69 million. This amount can vary from season to season subject to the composition of the 32 clubs taking part in the group stage.

    for the Europa League, split across each round of the competition (40% to the group stage, 20% to the round of 32, 16% to the round of 16, 12% to the quarter-finals, 8% to the semi-finals and 4% to the final) which is distributed to teams who participate in the relevant round based on the proportional value of the country broadcasting rights relative to the value of all broadcasting agreements for countries represented at each stage.

        Broadcasting revenue including, in some cases, prize money received by us in respect of various competitions, will vary from year to year as a result of variability in the amount of available prize money and the performance of our men's first team in such competitions.

Digital media

        Our website, www.manutd.com, is published in 7 languages and is available globally. We use our website, which incorporates e-commerce services and venue microsites (United Events, Exec Club, Foundation, Matchday VIP), to communicate with our followers, promote the Manchester United brand and provide a platform for our sponsors to reach a global audience. Our newly launched website is designed with a mobile first approach, with content including exclusive articles, real-time match updates, live blogging capabilities, social integration and sharing capabilities, improved search and discoverability, content recommendations, fan polls, voting trivia and statistics.

        The proliferation of digital television, broadband internet, smartphones, mobile applications and social media globally provides our business with many opportunities to extend the reach of our content. Specifically, we intend to use our digital media platforms to generate value through extended sponsor positioning, driving e-commerce, and direct-to-consumer opportunities, including selling premium services such as video and exclusive content subscriptions. We will also continue to leverage our digital media platform to generate customer data and information as well as follower profiles of commercial value to us, our sponsors and our media partners. We believe that in the future, digital media will be one of the primary means through which we engage and interact with our follower base.

Content and localization

        Our digital media properties are an increasingly important means through which we engage with our international fan base. In the United Kingdom, coverage of Manchester United and the Premier League is prevalent in print, television and digital media. We believe we face less competition in international markets for Manchester United coverage and can therefore attract and retain a greater portion of our followers to our own digital media offering. To take advantage of that opportunity, we will increasingly seek to develop additional premium, localized and exclusive content to enhance the proposition for our followers, members and paid subscribers around the world.

        Our followers generally prefer to consume our content in their language and context. We believe we can effectively deliver tailored services to our followers globally through various language offerings, geographic targeting and personalized content. We currently have international language websites in English, Spanish, French, Arabic, Simplified Chinese, Korean and Japanese. On our social channels we

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have international language feeds in English, Spanish, Arabic, Simplified Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Malay and Thai. This enables us to engage with our followers in their native language and to produce content that is specific to each region.

Mobile services and applications

        There has been a significant increase in the prevalence of broadband and video-enabled mobile devices in recent years. Mobile devices running the iOS or Android operating system enable consumers to browse the internet, watch video, share content, access dedicated applications and conduct e-commerce. As a consequence we are seeing the majority of our followers now accessing our website and digital content via their mobile devices.

        At the start of the 2018/19 season we launched our first free global mobile application. This application has been developed in conjunction with our new website which will provide benefits to our fans, through a cleaner and easier to navigate interface. Since the launch of the mobile application, according to third-party analytic firms, our mobile application is the number one downloaded football club mobile application globally. We believe our mobile application also provides significant benefits to our business through better e-commerce functionality and more digital inventory for our commercial partners to benefit from. We believe our focus on our owned and operated products will lead to an improved customer experience via the mining of owned data, which will lead to more personalization and a more engaged fan base, as users spend more time on our platforms and return regularly.

        In the 2016/17 season we launched the MUTV channel on MUTV.com. This enabled fans to purchase MUTV on a subscription basis for the first time without an existing satellite or cable subscription. We launched a free content section allowing all fans access to our exclusive programming, with subscribers then having access to our full range of programming, including both on demand and linear experiences around full match commentary for all Premier League, Champions League and domestic cup matches, as well as live tour matches and coverage. Subscribers can also view pre- and post-match analysis for all matches by club legends, exclusive interviews with the team manager and men's first team players, award winning documentaries, celebrity features, and live broadcasts of academy team matches and more recently women's team matches.

        We intend to continue developing multi-platform mobile sites and mobile applications that will facilitate access for our followers to our content across a range of devices and carriers in order to meet global demand.

Video on demand

        The proliferation of broadband internet and mobile access also allows us to offer video on demand to our followers around the world. Through our new website, official club mobile application and the MUTV D2C applications, we provide live video and video on demand to our followers in a variety of formats and commercial models. Some video on demand content is free to all users, some content is only accessible upon registration and some content, as in the case of live pre-season tour matches, is available on a subscription basis.

        Depending on the market, going forward we may offer video on demand services via our media partners as part of a comprehensive suite of content rights, as well as on a direct-to-consumer basis.

Social media

        With a global fan base, we believe there is a significant opportunity to leverage the capabilities of social media platforms to augment our relationships with our followers around the world. By establishing an official presence on these platforms, we believe we will be able to deepen the

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connections with our follower base and improve our ability to market and sell products and services to our followers.

        As of 30 June 2019 we had over 152.7 million social connections including approximately 73.3 million connections on our Facebook page, over 29.5 million followers on Instagram and over 22.4 million followers to our Twitter accounts. For the 2018/19 season we generated over 915 million interactions on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

        We use our social footprint as a means to communicate news and other club updates, engage with our followers, identify active followers, solicit feedback from our users, tailor future digital media offerings and enhance the overall follower experience.

        We intend to continue to expand our reach through new and different social media and mobile chat platforms by launching additional Manchester United branded presences on global platforms as well as regional and language-specific platforms.

        We believe this continuous expansion will enable us to broaden the reach of our brand and the content we produce, enhance our engagement with followers in many of our key international and emerging markets as well as opening up a new demographic of fans.

        While there is no guarantee that our social connections will continue to grow at comparable rates in the future, we believe the combination of platforms on which we have an official presence will provide an increasing source of traffic to our club branded digital media services and e-commerce properties, enhance our ability to convert users into customers through video and exclusive content subscriptions and e-commerce, and continue to provide extensive positioning opportunities for our partners.

Customer relationship management

        One of our ongoing strategic objectives is to further develop our understanding of and deepen the relationships with our fans and followers. We operate a CRM database in order to better understand the size, location, demographics and characteristics of our fan and follower base on an aggregated basis. We believe our CRM database enables us to more effectively deliver targeted communications to our fan base which ultimately leads to upsell opportunities through our product and service offerings such as digital subscription services, merchandise and tickets. A deep understanding of our follower base is also valuable to sponsors and media partners who seek to access specific customer categories with targeted and relevant advertising.

MUTV

        MUTV is our wholly-owned global television channel and is broadcast in numerous countries. MUTV broadcasts a wide variety of content which is compelling to our global community of followers, including live first team football from our pre-season tours, academy and women's team live football, club news, game highlights, and exclusive "behind the scenes" coverage of our club.

        Depending on the market, we may offer MUTV as a single product to television distributors for distribution to our fans on a linear television basis or directly to our fans on a D2C basis which allows them to subscribe directly to the club via our OTT offering. MUTV is currently available in 172 markets globally.

        For example, in our domestic territory, the United Kingdom, MUTV is offered to consumers through the Sky and Virgin Media distribution platforms and on a D2C basis via a subscription to MUTV.com. In July 2019 we also launched our MUTV mobile application on iOS and GooglePlay App stores and 'Connected TV' applications on platforms such as Roku, Amazon Fire, AppleTV and Xbox.

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        Outside the United Kingdom, we offer MUTV through distribution partners as part of a suite of media rights, which can be purchased on a bundled or selective basis, and can include certain promotional rights, and via the OTT offerings (both on mobile and Connected TVs).

        MUTV features a range of content, the primary categories of which are:

    highlights from games and other time-delayed game footage (including full matches), both of which are subject to certain holdback periods under the agreements between media distributors, the participating clubs and the Premier League and UEFA;

    live coverage of promotional tours and exhibition games;

    lifestyle programming and other "behind the scenes" content profiling the club, our history, our manager and our players;

    live coverage of women's team games;

    live coverage of academy and youth games;

    live 'Managers Press Conference' before relevant men's first team fixtures; and

    various other award winning shows and documentaries.

Matchday

        Our stadium, which we fully own, is called Old Trafford and is known as "The Theatre of Dreams." We believe Old Trafford is one of the most famous and historic stadiums in the world. Football followers travel from all over the world to attend a match at Old Trafford, which is the largest football club stadium in the United Kingdom, with a capacity of 74,140. In the 2018/19 season, the club's 26 home games were attended by a cumulative audience of over 1.9 million. The stadium has approximately 8,000 executive club seats, including 149 luxury boxes, 24 restaurants and 4 sports bars.

        We have one of the highest capacity utilizations among English clubs, with an average attendance for our home Premier League matches of over 99% for each season since the 1997/98 season. The substantial majority of our tickets are sold to both general admission and executive season ticket holders, the majority of whom pay for all their tickets in advance of the first game of the season.

        Other Matchday revenue includes matchday catering (including the sale of hospitality packages, food and drink), event parking, program sales as well as membership and travel, Manchester United Museum revenue and a share of the ticket revenue from away matches in domestic cup competitions. Matchday revenue also includes revenue from other events hosted at Old Trafford, including other sporting events (including the annual Rugby Super League Grand Final), music concerts and entertainment events.

        We operate a membership program for our supporters. Individuals who become official members have the opportunity to apply for tickets to all home matches. Adult official members pay £35 per season to join the program while persons over the age of 65 and under the age of 18 receive a discount. At the end of the 2018/19 season we had over 254,000 members, a 15.2% increase compared to the previous season.

        The Manchester United Museum is located within Old Trafford. It chronicles Manchester United's 141-year history and houses the club's most precious artifacts and trophies. In 2018/19, approximately 319,000 people visited the Manchester United Museum, making it the most visited football club museum in the United Kingdom.

        We have frozen general admission season ticket prices for an eighth consecutive season ahead of the 2019/20 season to support fans in attending our games. We aim to maximize ticket revenue by enhancing the mix of experiences available at each game and by providing a range of options from

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general admission tickets to multi-seat facilities and hospitality suites. In particular, we have recently increased overall Matchday revenue by restructuring the composition of our stadium, with an emphasis on developing hospitality facilities which sell at a higher price and improve our margins. As part of this effort, we have invested in new and refurbished multi-seat hospitality suites as well as improvements to our single-seat facilities. We expect our enhancements to our hospitality facilities to continue to be a key driver of our profit from Matchday sales going forward.

UEFA Club Licensing and Financial Fair Play Regulations

        UEFA oversees the FFP regulations, which are intended to ensure the financial self-sufficiency and sustainability of football clubs by discouraging them from continually operating at a loss, introduce more discipline and rationality on club finances, ensure that clubs settle their liabilities on a timely basis and encouraging long term investment in youth development and sporting infrastructure.

        The FFP regulations contain a "break-even" rule aimed at encouraging football clubs to operate on the basis of their own revenue. Therefore, owner investments of equity will be allowed only within the acceptable deviation thresholds, as described below. In addition, the FFP regulations provide that football clubs who are granted a UEFA license by their national association, based largely on physical infrastructure and personnel criteria set out by UEFA, and who then qualify for a UEFA club competition based on sporting grounds, will then be required to comply with a "monitoring" process. The monitoring process involves the submission of certain financial information (a break-even test and payables analysis) to the Club Financial Control Body ("CFCB"). The CFCB is part of UEFA's Organs for the Administration of Justice and comprises a team of independent financial and legal experts. The CFCB will review financial submissions and decide what sanctions, if any, to apply to non-compliant clubs. Any appeal must be made directly to the Court of Arbitration for Sport. Potential sanctions for non-compliance with the FFP regulations include a reprimand/warning, withholding of prize money, fines, prohibition on registering new players for UEFA club competitions and ultimately exclusion from UEFA club competitions.

        The monitoring process includes so called 'breach indicators' which if in existence trigger additional reporting requirements to UEFA such as accelerated reporting of audited financial information and projections for the competition season and future seasons. Breach indicators include an auditor going concern qualification, a worsening balance sheet net liabilities position, a break-even deficit in any individual year and sustainable debt and player transfer balance indicators. The sustainable debt indicator is triggered if debt at the reporting date is greater than €30 million and greater than seven times the average of relevant earnings (as defined by UEFA). The player transfer balance indicator is triggered if a club incurs a deficit on net player transfers in excess of €100 million in any transfer window within the license season.

        Ahead of registration for UEFA club competitions for the 2019/20 season we submitted our payables analysis and break-even assessment under the FFP regulations. The break-even test result, initially assessed on the cumulative sum of the financial information for the two years ended 30 June 2018 (but which would have been extended to the cumulative sum of the financial information for the three years ended 30 June 2019 should there have been any breach indicators) was positive (i.e. a surplus). The payables analysis is carried out at 30 June prior to the competition season and is required in respect of payments to other clubs for transfer fees, payments to staff including players and football staff and payments to tax authorities. UEFA has already imposed sanctions on clubs who have breached the Licensing and FFP regulations, ranging from monetary fines, restrictions on wages and first team squad size and limitation on transfer expenditures, to exclusion from UEFA club competitions.

        With respect to the break-even assessment, a club must demonstrate that its relevant "football" income is equal to or exceeds its "football" expenses. The permitted level of deficit is limited over the three-year assessment period to just €5 million, although a larger deficit of up to €30 million is

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permitted provided it is reduced to the €5 million acceptable deviation by equity contributions from equity participants and/or related parties. Any club which exceeds the €30 million limit will automatically be in breach of the break-even rule, unless it has sufficient surpluses in the two years prior to the assessment period, irrespective of any equity contributions.

        European clubs reported the highest operating profits in history in 2016/17. European clubs have now generated more than £4 billion in operating profits over the last five years compared with operating losses of more than £1 billion in the years 2008 - 2012. This would suggest that the UEFA Licensing and Financial Fair Play Regulations are achieving their objectives.

        In 2015, UEFA announced some changes to the FFP regulations aimed primarily at clubs undergoing a business restructuring. Instead of breaching the FFP regulations and being subject to sanctions, the amended regulations enable clubs to voluntarily approach the CFCB with a business plan which demonstrates how they are going to remedy their short-term breach of FFP regulations and achieve break-even compliance over a four-year time period. If the business plan is approved by the CFCB the club would not be subject to sanctions for the restructuring year which results in a breach of the FFP regulations.

        We support and operate within the financial fair play regulations, and do not believe it will adversely impact our ability to continue to attract some of the best players in the coming years.

Premier League Short Term Costs Controls and Profitability and Sustainability Rules

        In 2013, the Premier League agreed to adopt Short Term Cost Controls ("STCC") and Profitability and Sustainability Rules. The STCC were introduced for an initial period of three seasons ending in 2015/16 but were then extended for a further three seasons through the 2018/19 season. The STCC placed certain limitations on annual player wage cost increases. The STCC have now ended and will no longer be in place from the 2019/20 season.

        The Premier League Profitability and Sustainability Rules were introduced during the 2015/16 season, implementing a break-even rule similar to the break-even test of the UEFA Club Licensing and Financial Fair Play Regulations and aimed at encouraging Premier League clubs to operate within their means. Potential sanctions for non-compliance with the profitability and sustainability regulations include significant fines, player transfer restrictions and Premier League points deduction.

        Our most recent break-even assessment under the Premier League Profitability and Sustainability Rules was submitted in March 2019, based on our fiscal year 2017 and fiscal year 2018 audited financial statements. The break-even test is based on a club's audited pre-tax earnings. If the break-even test results are positive, no further action is required until the next break-even test. If the initial test is negative, a club is re-tested, using the UEFA definition of "adjusted earnings before tax," which allows credit for depreciation of tangible fixed assets and expenditure on youth development and community programs. If these second test results are negative by £15 million or less, no further action is required. If a club's losses exceed £15 million but are not more than £105 million, the club's ownership must provide secure funding to avoid sanctions. If these results are negative by more than £105 million, regardless of ownership funding, Premier League sanctions will apply. Our break-even test result submitted in March 2019 was positive.

        As with the UEFA Club Licensing and Financial Fair Play Regulations, we support and operate within the Premier League Profitability and Sustainability Rules, and do not believe it will adversely impact our ability to continue to attract some of the best players in the coming years.

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Social Responsibility

The Manchester United Foundation

        We are committed to a wide-ranging corporate social responsibility program through Manchester United Foundation (the "Foundation"). The associated charity of Manchester United, the Foundation uses football to engage and inspire young people to build a better life for themselves and unite the communities in which they live. Dedicated staff deliver football coaching, educational programs and personal development, providing young people with opportunities to change their lives for the better. The Foundation has partnerships with over 20 high schools across Greater Manchester, in which full-time coaches are based to work with the pupils, feeder primary schools and within the local community to build lasting relationships. Other initiatives, such as Street Reds evening football sessions, girls development provision, and the Inclusive Reds disability program, provide free football, alternative activities, qualifications and work experience opportunities to young people across Greater Manchester. The Foundation fulfils all charitable activity for Manchester United, including promotion of Sir Bobby Charlton's charity, Find A Better Way (finding innovative solutions to create a landmine-free world), and managing the club's long-term partnership with global children's organization Unicef. The United for Unicef partnership is the longest running of its kind and since the start of the partnership in 1999 has had a positive impact on the lives of over 4 million children across the globe.

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion

        We are committed to equality, diversity and inclusion throughout all areas of the club and in 2016 we launched #allredallequal; the club's own equality campaign. There are a number of initiatives that have contributed to #allredallequal, including the club working towards achieving the Premier League Equality Standard Advanced Level, being the only club to be a member of Stonewall's TeamPride Coalition, becoming the first club to sign the UK Government's Social Mobility Pledge (outlining our commitment to accessing and progressing talent from all backgrounds) and a number of internal engagement activities being delivered by the club's Employee Inclusion Networks.

        In April 2019, we launched our RED initiative, demonstrating our stance against all forms of discrimination taking place on and off the pitch, with a particular focus on social media. The campaign, which featured first team players from both our men's and women's teams showed their reactions to a number of discriminatory and offensive messages and their stance against such behaviors within football and wider society.

Sustainability

        We recognize the need to move towards a more sustainable economy. We have taken steps to reduce the amount of waste we produce and divert all operational waste away from landfills. We also aim to minimize the use of non-renewable materials, improve our recycling rates and use more recycled materials. We have achieved the Carbon Trust Standard, which recognizes organizations that take a best practice approach to measuring and managing their environmental impacts, and through our Reds Go Green initiative we will continue to build on our carbon and renewable energy strategy to improve our performance further. We have also achieved the Gold Standard in Green Tourism Business Certification, which recognizes the commitment of tourism businesses that are actively working to become more sustainable.

Intellectual Property

        We consider intellectual property to be important to the operation of our business and critical to driving growth in our Commercial revenue, particularly with respect to sponsorship revenue. Certain of our commercial partners have rights to use our intellectual property. In order to protect our brand we

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generally have contractual rights to approve uses of our intellectual property by our commercial partners.

        We consider our brand to be a key business asset and therefore have a portfolio of Manchester United related registered trademarks and trademark applications. The historic emphasis has been on seeking and maintaining trademark registrations for the words "Manchester United" and the club crest but that emphasis was then extended to cover the devil device and the words "MUTV" and "Man Utd". We also actively procure copyright protection and copyright ownership of materials such as literary works, logos, photographic images and audio visual footage.

        Enforcement of our trademark rights is important in maintaining the value of the Manchester United brand. There are numerous instances of third parties infringing our trademarks, for example, through the manufacture and sale of counterfeit products. While it would be cost-prohibitive to take action in all instances, our aim is to consistently reduce the number of Manchester United related trademark infringements by carrying out coordinated, cost-effective enforcement action on a global basis following investigation of suspected trademark infringements. Enforcement action takes a variety of forms. In the United Kingdom, we work with enforcement authorities such as trading standards and customs authorities to seize counterfeit goods and to stop the activities of unauthorized sellers. Overseas enforcement action is taken by approved lawyers and investigators. Those lawyers and investigators are instructed to work with, where feasible, representatives of other football clubs and brands that are experiencing similar issues within the relevant country in order that our enforcement action costs can be minimized as far as possible. We also work with the Premier League in respect of infringements that affect multiple Premier League clubs, in particular in Asia. We also take direct legal action against infringers, for example, by issuing cease and desist letters or seeking compensation when we consider that it is appropriate to do so.

        In relation to materials for which copyright protection is available (such as literary works, logos, photographic images and audio visual footage), our current practice is generally to secure copyright ownership where possible and appropriate. For example, where we are working with third parties and copyright protected materials are being created, we generally try to secure an assignment of the relevant copyright as part of the commercial contract. However, it is not always possible to secure copyright ownership. For example, in the case of audio visual footage relating to football competitions, copyright will generally vest in the competition organizer and any exploitation by Manchester United Football Club of such footage will be the subject of a license from the competition organizer.

        As part of our ongoing investment into intellectual property, we have implemented a program to detect intellectual property infringement in a digital environment and which facilitates taking action against infringers.

Competition

        From a business perspective, we compete across a wide variety of industries and within many different markets. We believe our primary sources of competition include, but are not limited to:

    Football clubs:  We compete against other football clubs in the Premier League for match attendance and Matchday revenue. We compete against football clubs around Europe and the rest of the world to attract the best players and coaches in the global transfer and football staff markets.

    Television media:  We receive media income primarily from the Premier League and UEFA media contracts, each of which is collectively negotiated. Further details of such arrangements are set out in the section headed "—Revenue Sectors—Broadcasting." On a collective level, and in respect of those media rights we retain, we compete against other types of television

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      programming for broadcaster attention and advertiser income both domestically and in other markets around the world.

    Digital media:  We compete against other digital content providers for consumer attention and leisure time, advertiser income and consumer e-commerce activity.

    Merchandise and apparel:  We compete against other providers of sports apparel and equipment.

    Sponsorship:  As a result of the international recognition and quality of our brand, we compete against many different outlets for corporate sponsorship and advertising income, including other sports and other sports teams, other entertainment and events, television and other traditional and digital media outlets.

    Live entertainment:  We compete against alternative forms of live entertainment for the sale of matchday tickets, including other live sports, concerts, festivals, theatre and similar events.

        As a result, we do not believe there is any single market for which we have a well-defined group of competitors.

Real Property

        We own or lease property dedicated to our football and other operations. The most significant of our real properties is Old Trafford. The following table sets out our key owned and leased properties. In connection with our revolving facility, our secured term loan facility and the senior secured notes, several of our owned properties, including Old Trafford are encumbered with land charges as security for all obligations under those agreements, although the Manchester International Freight Terminal and the Aon Training Complex are not encumbered.

Key properties and locations
  Primary function   Owned/leased   Area  
 
   
   
  (approx. m2)
 

Old Trafford Football Stadium, Manchester

  Football stadium   Owned (freehold)     205,000  

Aon Training Complex, Carrington, Trafford

  Football training facility   Owned (freehold)     440,000  

Littleton Road Training Ground, Salford

  Football training facility   Owned (freehold)     84,000  

The Cliff, Lower Broughton Road, Salford

  Football training facility   Owned (freehold)     28,000  

Manchester International Freight Terminal, Westinghouse Road Trafford Park, Manchester

  Investment properties   Leased (through March 2071)     107,000  

Land and buildings at Wharfside, Trafford Park, Manchester

  Investment properties   Owned (freehold)     27,100  

Land and buildings on the southwest side of Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester

  Offices and Car Parking   Owned (freehold)     23,000  

Land and buildings at Canalside, Trafford Park, Manchester

  Investment properties   Owned (freehold)     10,800  

Land and buildings at Castlemore Retail Park, Trafford Park, Manchester

  Investment properties   Owned (freehold)     3,969  

Office space, Chester Road, Manchester

  Offices   Leased (through November 2020)     1,176  

Office space, central London

  Offices   Leased (through March 2021)     1,100  

Office space, Washington, D.C., United States

  Offices   Leased (through February 2020)     658  

Office space, Maryland, United States

  Offices   Leased (through May 2024)     653  

        The above properties are owned or leased by Manchester United Football Club Limited or Manchester United Limited, apart from Castlemore Retail Park and Manchester International Freight Terminal which are owned or leased by Alderley Urban Investments Limited.

Legal Proceedings

        We are involved in various routine legal proceedings incident to the ordinary course of our business. We believe that the outcome of all pending legal proceedings, in the aggregate, will not have

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a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or operating results. Further, we believe that the probability of any material losses arising from these legal proceedings is remote.

Subsidiaries

        Our directly or indirectly wholly-owned principal subsidiaries are: Red Football Finance Limited, Red Football Holdings Limited, Red Football Shareholder Limited, Red Football Joint Venture Limited, Red Football Limited, Red Football Junior Limited, Manchester United Limited, Alderley Urban Investments Limited, Manchester United Commercial Enterprises (Ireland) Limited, Manchester United Football Club Limited, Manchester United Women's Football Club Limited, Manchester United Interactive Limited, MU Commercial Holdings Limited, MU Commercial Holdings Junior Limited, MU Finance Limited, MU RAML Limited, MUTV Limited and RAML USA LLC. All of the above are incorporated and operate in England and Wales, with the exception of Red Football Finance Limited which is incorporated in the Cayman Islands, Manchester United Commercial Enterprises (Ireland) Limited which is incorporated in Ireland and RAML USA LLC which is incorporated in the state of Delaware in the United States.

Customers

        Our top five customers represented 61.1%, 58.9% and 59.2% of our total revenue in each of the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Our top five customers in the year ended 30 June 2019 were the Premier League, UEFA, adidas, General Motors (Chevrolet), and Aon. See "Item 3.D. Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Business—. We are exposed to credit related losses in the event of non-performance by counterparties to Premier League and UEFA media contracts as well as our key commercial and transfer contracts." Our top customer was the Premier League, who represented 24.1%, 26.4% and 25.4% of our total revenue in each of the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Our second largest customer was UEFA, who represented 13.3%, <10% and <10% of our total revenue in each of the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017.

ITEM 4A.    UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

        None.

ITEM 5.    OPERATING AND FINANCIAL REVIEW AND PROSPECTS

        The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and notes included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

Overview

        We are one of the most popular and successful sports teams in the world, playing one of the most popular spectator sports on Earth. Through our 141-year heritage we have won 66 trophies, including a record 20 English league titles, enabling us to develop what we believe is one of the world's leading sports brands and a global community of 1.1 billion fans and followers. Our large, passionate community provides Manchester United with a worldwide platform to generate significant revenue from multiple sources, including sponsorship, merchandising, product licensing, broadcasting and matchday. We attract leading global companies such as adidas, Aon, General Motors (Chevrolet) and Kohler that want access and exposure to our community of followers and association with our brand.

How We Generate Revenue

        We operate and manage our business as a single reporting segment—the operation of professional sports teams. We review our revenue through three principal sectors—Commercial, Broadcasting and

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Matchday—and within the Commercial revenue sector, we have two revenue streams which monetize our global brand: sponsorship revenue; and retail, merchandising, apparel & product licensing revenue.

Revenue Drivers

Commercial

        Commercial revenue is derived from sponsors and commercial partners. We generate our Commercial revenue with low fixed costs and small incremental costs for each additional sponsor, making our commercial operations a relatively high margin and scalable part of our business and a driver of growth for our overall profitability. Total Commercial revenue for the year ended 30 June 2019 was £275.1 million.

Sponsorship

        We monetize the value of our global brand and community of followers through sponsorship relationships with leading international and regional companies around the globe. To better capitalize on the strength of our brand, we have developed a segmentation sponsorship strategy. See "Item 4. Information on the Company—Revenue Sectors—Commercial—Sponsorship—Our Sponsors" for some of our global and regional sponsors as at 1 July 2019.

        A partnership with Manchester United provides corporations with the ability to associate themselves with the highly popular Manchester United brand and a global marketing platform to quickly and effectively amplify their brand and message to their potential customers.

        Our current shirt sponsor is General Motors (Chevrolet). The shirt sponsorship agreement began in the 2014/15 season and runs through to the end of the 2020/21 season, with total fees payable of approximately $559 million. We received approximately $18.6 million in each of the 2012/13 and 2013/14 seasons relating to pre-sponsorship support and exposure, with the remaining $521.8 million to be received and recognized over seven years through to the end of the 2020/21 season.

        Our current training facilities and training kit partner is Aon.

        Total sponsorship revenue for the year ended 30 June 2019 was £173.0 million.

Retail, Merchandising, Apparel & Product Licensing

        Our retail, merchandising, apparel & product licensing business includes the sale of sports apparel, training and leisure wear and other clothing featuring the Manchester United brand as well as other licensed products from coffee mugs to bedspreads. These products are distributed on a global basis through Manchester United branded retail stores and e-commerce platform, as well as through our partners' wholesale distribution channels.

        We have a 10-year agreement with adidas with respect to our global technical sponsorship and dual-branded licensing rights, which began on 1 August 2015. See "Item 4. Information on the Company—Revenue Sectors—Commercial—Retail, Merchandising, Apparel & Product Licensing" above for additional information regarding our agreement with adidas.

        Total retail, merchandising, apparel & product licensing revenue for the year ended 30 June 2019 was £102.1 million.

Broadcasting

        We benefit from the distribution of live football content directly from the revenue we receive and indirectly through increased global exposure for our commercial partners. Broadcasting revenue is derived from our share of the global broadcasting rights relating to the Premier League, Champions

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League and other competitions. The growing popularity of the Premier League and Champions League in international markets and the associated increases in media rights values have been major drivers of the increase in our overall Broadcasting revenue in recent years.

        The Premier League's domestic broadcasting rights contract for its live domestic rights with Sky Sports and BT Sport for the seasons 2016/17 to 2018/19 just ended and was worth £5.136 billion. The deal marked a significant increase of over 70% on the previous contract and represented the largest UK TV rights deal ever signed. The value of the Premier League's international broadcasting rights contract for the seasons 2016/17 through to 2018/19 also increased significantly to £3.2 billion, which represented an increase of over 40% on the previous contract. In February 2018, the Premier League announced that it had sold five out of seven UK live television rights packages, for the three seasons commencing with the 2019/20 season, to Sky Sports and BT Sport, for a combined value of £4.5 billion. In June 2018, the Premier League further announced that it had sold the remaining two packages to BT Sport and Amazon Prime Video, a new entrant to Premier League UK broadcasting contracts. The overall value generated from the sale of the seven packages has not been publicly disclosed. In addition, the Premier League has indicated that the international broadcasting rights agreed for the three-year cycle commencing in the 2019/20 season are a 30% uplift on the previous three-year cycle. The Premier League also announced a change to the distribution method for international broadcasting rights commencing with the 2019/20 season. International broadcast monies have previously been split equally among Premier League clubs. From 2019/20, clubs will continue to share equally based on the amount from the previous three-year cycle (plus an amount for inflation) but any increase on such amounts will be distributed based on league finishing position at the end of the season. In the new cycle, the ratio of the highest total amount of Premier League distributions paid to a club compared to the lowest amount paid to a club in a single season is capped at 1.8:1 (compared to the previous cap which was 1.6:1).

        Our share of the revenue under the Premier League broadcasting rights contract amounted to £146.3 million, £151.6 million and £143.5 million for the 2018/19, 2017/18 and 2016/17 seasons, respectively, and our share of the revenue from broadcasting rights for UEFA club competitions amounted to £83.1 million, £38.3 million and £39.5 million for the 2018/19, 2017/18and 2016/17 seasons, respectively.

        Our participation in the Premier League and Champions League or Europa League (and consequently, our receipt of the revenue generated by these broadcasting contracts) is predicated on the success of our men's first team, and if our men's first team fails to qualify for these UEFA club competitions or is relegated from the Premier League in any given season, our Broadcasting revenue for that and subsequent fiscal years will be adversely impacted, partially offset by lower operating expenses.

        In addition, MUTV delivers Manchester United programming and other content to territories around the world. MUTV generated total revenue of £10.1 million, £10.7 million and £9.0 million for each of the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Total Broadcasting revenue for the year ended 30 June 2019 was £241.2 million.

Matchday

        Matchday revenue is a function of the number of games played at Old Trafford, the size and seating composition of Old Trafford, attendance at our matches and the prices of tickets and hospitality sales. A significant driver of Matchday revenue is the number of home games we play at Old Trafford, which is based on 19 Premier League matches and any additional matches resulting from the success of our men's first team in the FA Cup, EFL Cup and UEFA club competitions. Our participation in the Premier League and UEFA club competitions (and consequently, our receipt of the revenue generated by these matches) is predicated on the success of our men's first team, and if our men's first team fails

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to qualify for UEFA club competitions or is relegated from the Premier League in any given season, our Matchday revenue for that and subsequent fiscal years will be adversely impacted, partially offset by lower resulting expenses. Average attendance for our home Premier League matches has been over 99% for each season since the 1997/98 season, with strong attendance for UEFA club competitions, FA Cup and EFL Cup matches. Total Matchday revenue for the year ended 30 June 2019 was £110.8 million.

Other Factors That Affect Our Financial Performance

Employee benefit expenses

        Player and staff compensation comprise the majority of our operating costs. Of our total operating costs, player costs, which consist of salaries, bonuses, benefits and national insurance contributions are the primary component. Compensation to non-player staff, which includes our manager and coaching staff, also accounts for a significant portion. Competition from top clubs in the Premier League and Europe has resulted in increases in player and manager salaries, forcing clubs to spend an increasing amount on player and staff compensation, and we expect this trend to continue. In addition, as our commercial operations grow, we expect our headcount and related expenses to increase as well.

Other operating expenses

        Our other operating expenses include certain variable costs such as matchday catering, policing, security stewarding and cleaning at Old Trafford, visitor gateshare for domestic cups, and costs related to the delivery on media and commercial sponsorship contracts. Other operating expenses also include certain fixed costs, such as operating lease costs and property costs, maintenance, human resources, training and developments costs, and professional fees.

Amortization, depreciation and impairment

        We amortize the capitalized costs associated with the acquisition of players' and key football management staff registrations. These costs are amortized over the period of the employment contract agreed with a player/key football management staff. If a player or key football management staff extends his contract prior to the end of the pre-existing period of employment, the remaining unamortized portion of the acquisition cost is amortized over the period of the new contract. Changes in amortization of the costs of players' and key football management staff registrations from year to year and period to period reflect additional fees paid for the acquisition of players and key football management staff, the impact of contract extensions and the disposal of registrations. As such, increased players' and key football management staff registration costs in any period could cause higher amortization in that period and in future periods and have a negative impact on our results of operations. Moreover, to the extent that the player and key football management staff registration costs vary from period to period, this may drive variability in our results of operations. We also amortize the capitalized costs associated with the acquisition of other intangible assets over their estimated useful lives, which is typically between 3 and 10 years.

        Depreciation primarily reflects a straight-line depreciation on investments made in property, plant and equipment. Depreciation over the periods under review results primarily from the depreciation of Old Trafford, including incremental improvements made to Old Trafford each season.

        Impairment charges arise when an asset's carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount. Assets are tested for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstance indicate that the carrying amount may not be recoverable.

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Exceptional items

        Exceptional operating costs are those costs that in management's judgment need to be separately disclosed by virtue of their size, nature or incidence in order to provide a proper understanding of our results of operations and financial condition.

Profit/(loss) on disposal of intangible assets

        We recognize profits or losses on the disposal of intangible assets (primarily players' registrations) in our statement of profit or loss. Acquisitions and disposals of players are discretionary and we make transfer decisions based upon the requirements of our first teams and the overall availability of players. These requirements and the availability of players, and resulting profits or losses on disposals, may vary from period to period, contributing to variability in our results of operations between periods.

Finance costs

        A key component of our expenses during each of the past three fiscal years has been interest costs. We expect interest expense to continue to be a significant component of our expenses. See "Item 5.B. Liquidity and Capital Resources—Indebtedness."

Taxes

        During each of the three years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017, our principal operating subsidiaries were tax residents in the UK. During the same years, we were subject to a weighted UK statutory tax rate of 19.0%, 19.0% and 19.75%, respectively.

        Although we are organized as a Cayman Islands exempted company, we report as a US domestic corporation for US federal income tax purposes. As a result, our worldwide income is also subject to US taxes at the US statutory rate (currently 21%). The US federal corporate income tax rate reduced from 35% to 21% following the substantive enactment of US tax reform on 22 December 2017 (the "TCJA"). We expect to utilize a credit in the United States for the UK taxes paid and therefore we do not expect to be double taxed on our income. We expect our future cash tax rate to align more closely with the US statutory rate of 21%.

        We may also be subject to US state and local income (franchise) taxes based generally upon where we are doing business. These tax rates vary by jurisdiction and the tax base. Generally, state and local taxes are deductible for US federal income tax purposes. Furthermore, because most of our subsidiaries are disregarded from their owner for US federal income tax purposes, we are not able to control the timing of much of our US federal income tax exposure. In calculating our liability for US federal income tax, however, certain of our deductible expenses are higher than the amount of those same expenses under UK corporation tax rules, owing to differences in the relevant rules of the two jurisdictions and the related difference in the opening book versus tax basis of our assets and liabilities. Finally, our UK tax liability can be credited against our US federal income tax liabilities, subject to US rules and limitations. Nevertheless, over time we expect to pay slightly higher amounts of tax than had we remained solely liable to tax in the United Kingdom.

Seasonality

        We experience seasonality in our revenue and cash flow, limiting the overall comparability and predictability of interim financial periods. In any given interim period, our total revenue can vary based on the number of games played in that period, which affects the amount of Matchday and Broadcasting revenue recognized. Similarly, certain of our costs derive from hosting games at Old Trafford, and these costs will also vary based on the number of games played in the period. We historically recognize the most revenue in our second and third fiscal quarters due to the scheduling of matches. However, a

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strong performance by our men's first team in UEFA club competitions and domestic cups could result in significant additional Broadcasting and Matchday revenue, and consequently we may also recognize the most revenue in our fourth fiscal quarter in those years. Our cash flow may also vary among interim periods due to the timing of significant payments from major commercial agreements. As such, though we report interim results of operations for our first, second and third fiscal quarters, in managing our business, setting goals and assessing performance we focus primarily on our full-year results of operations rather than our interim results of operations.

A.    OPERATING RESULTS

        The following table shows selected audited consolidated statement of profit or loss data for the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017.

 
  Year ended 30 June  
 
  2019   Restated(1)
2018
  Restated(1)
2017
 
 
  (£'000)
 

Statement of profit or loss data

                   

Revenue

    627,122     589,758     581,254  

Analyzed as:

                   

Commercial revenue

    275,093     275,835     275,521  

Broadcasting revenue

    241,210     204,137     194,098  

Matchday revenue

    110,819     109,786     111,635  

Operating expenses—before exceptional items

    (583,337 )   (562,089 )   (516,068 )

Analyzed as:

                   

Employee benefit expenses

    (332,356 )   (295,935 )   (263,464 )

Other operating expenses

    (108,977 )   (117,019 )   (117,942 )

Depreciation and impairment

    (12,850 )   (10,755 )   (10,228 )

Amortization

    (129,154 )   (138,380 )   (124,434 )

Operating expenses—exceptional items

    (19,599 )   (1,917 )   4,753  

Total operating expenses

    (602,936 )   (564,006 )   (511,315 )

Operating profit before profit on disposal of intangible assets

    24,186     25,752     69,939  

Profit on disposal of intangible assets

    25,799     18,119     10,926  

Operating profit

    49,985     43,871     80,865  

Finance costs

    (25,470 )   (24,233 )   (25,013 )

Finance income

    2,961     6,195     736  

Net finance costs

    (22,509 )   (18,038 )   (24,277 )

Profit before income tax

    27,476     25,833     56,588  

Income tax expense

    (8,595 )   (63,462 )   (17,379 )

Profit/(loss) for the year

    18,881     (37,629 )   39,209  

(1)
Comparative amounts have been restated following the adoption of IFRS 15—see note 33 to our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report for further details.

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Year Ended 30 June 2019 as Compared to the Year Ended 30 June 2018

 
  Year ended
30 June
   
 
 
  2019   Restated(1)
2018
  % Change
2019 over 2018
 
 
  (in £ millions)
   
 

Revenue

    627.1     589.8     6.3 %

Commercial revenue

    275.1     275.8     (0.3 )%

Broadcasting revenue

    241.2     204.2     18.1 %

Matchday revenue

    110.8     109.8     0.9 %

Total operating expenses

    (602.9 )   (564.0 )   6.9 %

Employee benefit expenses

    (332.3 )   (296.0 )   12.3 %

Other operating expenses

    (109.0 )   (117.0 )   (6.8 )%

Depreciation and impairment

    (12.8 )   (10.7 )   19.6 %

Amortization

    (129.2 )   (138.4 )   (6.6 )%

Exceptional items

    (19.6 )   (1.9 )   931.6 %

Profit on disposal of intangible assets

    25.8     18.1     42.5 %

Net finance costs

    (22.5 )   (18.1 )   24.3 %

Tax expense

    (8.6 )   (63.4 )   (86.4 )%

(1)
Comparative amounts have been restated following the adoption of IFRS 15—see note 33 to our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report for further details.

Revenue

        Total revenue for the year ended 30 June 2019 was £627.1 million, an increase of £37.3 million, or 6.3%, compared to the year ended 30 June 2018, as a result of an increase in revenue in our broadcasting and matchday sectors and a decrease in revenue in our commercial sector, as described below.

Commercial revenue

        Commercial revenue for the year ended 30 June 2019 was £275.1 million, a decrease of £0.7 million, or 0.3%, over the year ended 30 June 2018.

    Sponsorship revenue for the year ended 30 June 2019 was £173.0 million, consistent with the year ended 30 June 2018, reflecting lower tour revenue as a result of a shorter summer tour, offset by an increase in underlying sponsorship revenues.

    Retail, merchandising, apparel & product licensing revenue for the year ended 30 June 2019 was £102.1 million, a decrease of £0.7 million, or 0.7%, over the year ended 30 June 2018.

Broadcasting revenue

        Broadcasting revenue for the year ended 30 June 2019 was £241.2 million, an increase of £37.0 million, or 18.1%, over the year ended 30 June 2018, primarily due to the new UEFA Champions League broadcasting rights agreement.

Matchday revenue

        Matchday revenue for the year ended 30 June 2019 was £110.8 million, an increase of £1.0 million, or 0.9%, over the year ended 30 June 2018.

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Total operating expenses

        Total operating expenses (defined as employee benefit expenses, other operating expenses, depreciation and impairment, amortization and exceptional items) for the year ended 30 June 2019 were £602.9 million, an increase of £38.9 million, or 6.9%, over the year ended 30 June 2018.

Employee benefit expenses

        Employee benefit expenses for the year ended 30 June 2019 were £332.3 million, an increase of £36.3 million, or 12.3%, over the year ended 30 June 2018, primarily due to investment in the first team playing squad.

Other operating expenses

        Other operating expenses for the year ended 30 June 2019 were £109.0 million, a decrease of £8.0 million, or 6.8%, over the year ended 30 June 2018, in part due to a shorter summer tour and reduced domestic cup related costs.

Depreciation and impairment

        Depreciation and impairment for the year ended 30 June 2019 amounted to £12.8 million, an increase of £2.1 million, or 19.6%, over the year ended 30 June 2018.

Amortization

        Amortization, primarily of registrations, for the year ended 30 June 2019 was £129.2 million, a decrease of £9.2 million, or 6.6%, over the year ended 30 June 2018. The unamortized balance of registrations as of 30 June 2019 was £338.8 million, of which £124.6 million is expected to be amortized in the year ending 30 June 2020. The remaining balance is expected to be amortized over the four years ending 30 June 2024. This does not take into account player acquisitions after 30 June 2019, which would have the effect of increasing the amortization expense in future periods, nor does it consider player departures subsequent to 30 June 2019, which would have the effect of decreasing future amortization charges. Furthermore, any contract renegotiations would also impact future charges.

Exceptional items

        Exceptional items for the year ended 30 June 2019 were a cost of £19.6 million, relating to compensation to the former manager of the men's first team and certain members of the coaching staff for loss of office. Exceptional items for the year ended 30 June 2018 were a cost of £1.9 million, relating to the present value of the additional contributions we are expected to pay to remedy the increased deficit of the Football League pension scheme pursuant to the latest actuarial triennial valuation at 31 August 2017.

Profit on disposal of intangible assets

        Profit on disposal of intangible assets for the year ended 30 June 2019 was £25.8 million, compared to a profit of £18.1 million for the year ended 30 June 2018. The profit on disposal of intangible assets for the year ended 30 June 2019 primarily related to the disposals of Blind (Ajax), Johnstone (West Bromwich Albion) and Fellaini (Shandong Luneng). The profit on disposal of intangible assets for the year ended 30 June 2018 primarily related to the disposal of Januzaj (Real Sociedad) and sell-on fees relating to former players.

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Net finance costs

        Net finance costs for the year ended 30 June 2019 were £22.5 million, an increase of £4.4 million, or 24.3%, over the year ended 30 June 2018. The increase was due to unrealized foreign exchange losses on unhedged USD borrowings.

Tax

        The tax expense for the year ended 30 June 2019 was £8.6 million, compared to £63.4 million for the year ended 30 June 2018. The prior year expense included a non-cash, tax accounting write-off of £49.0 million following the substantive enactment of US tax reform on 22 December 2017. The non-cash write-off was primarily due to the reduction in the US federal corporate income tax rate from 35% to 21%, which necessitated re-measurement of the then existing US deferred tax position in the period to 31 December 2017.

Year Ended 30 June 2018 as Compared to the Year Ended 30 June 2017

 
  Year ended 30 June    
 
 
  Restated(1)
2018
  Restated(1)
2017
  % Change
2018 over 2017
 
 
  (in £ millions)
   
 

Revenue

    589.8     581.2     1.5 %

Commercial revenue

    275.8     275.5     0.1 %

Broadcasting revenue

    204.2     194.1     5.2 %

Matchday revenue

    109.8     111.6     (1.6 )%

Total operating expenses

    (564.0 )   (511.3 )   10.3 %

Employee benefit expenses

    (296.0 )   (263.5 )   12.3 %

Other operating expenses

    (117.0 )   (117.9 )   (0.8 )%

Depreciation

    (10.7 )   (10.3 )   3.9 %

Amortization

    (138.4 )   (124.4 )   11.3 %

Exceptional items

    (1.9 )   4.8      

Profit on disposal of intangible assets

    18.1     10.9     66.1 %

Net finance costs

    (18.1 )   (24.3 )   (25.5 )%

Tax expense

    (63.4 )   (17.3 )   266.5 %

(1)
Amounts have been restated following the adoption of IFRS 15—see note 33 to our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report for further details.

Revenue

        Total revenue for the year ended 30 June 2018 was £589.8 million, an increase of £8.6 million, or 1.5%, compared to the year ended 30 June 2017, as a result of an increase in revenue in our commercial and broadcasting sectors and a decrease in revenue in our matchday sector, as described below.

Commercial revenue

        Commercial revenue for the year ended 30 June 2018 was £275.8 million, an increase of £0.3 million, or 0.1%, over the year ended 30 June 2017.

    Sponsorship revenue for the year ended 30 June 2018 was £172.9 million, an increase of £1.4 million, or 0.8%, over the year ended 30 June 2017.

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    Retail, merchandising, apparel & product licensing revenue for the year ended 30 June 2018 was £102.9 million, a decrease of £1.1 million, or 1.1%, over the year ended 30 June 2017.

Broadcasting revenue

        Broadcasting revenue for the year ended 30 June 2018 was £204.2 million, an increase of £10.1 million, or 5.2%, over the year ended 30 June 2017, primarily due to finishing runners-up in the Premier League compared to sixth in the prior year.

Matchday revenue

        Matchday revenue for the year ended 30 June 2018 was £109.8 million, a decrease of £1.8 million, or 1.6%, over the year ended 30 June 2017.

Total operating expenses

        Total operating expenses (defined as employee benefit expenses, other operating expenses, depreciation, amortization and exceptional items) for the year ended 30 June 2018 were £564.0 million, an increase of £52.7 million, or 10.3%, over the year ended 30 June 2017.

Employee benefit expenses

        Employee benefit expenses for the year ended 30 June 2018 were £296.0 million, an increase of £32.5 million, or 12.3%, over the year ended 30 June 2017, primarily due to player salary uplifts related to participation in the UEFA Champions League.

Other operating expenses

        Other operating expenses for the year ended 30 June 2018 were £117.0 million, a decrease of £0.9 million, or 0.8%, over the year ended 30 June 2017.

Depreciation

        Depreciation for the year ended 30 June 2018 amounted to £10.7 million, an increase of £0.4 million, or 3.9%, over the year ended 30 June 2017.

Amortization

        Amortization, primarily of registrations, for the year ended 30 June 2018 was £138.4 million, an increase of £14.0 million, or 11.3%, over the year ended 30 June 2017. The increase in amortization was primarily due to player acquisitions during fiscal year 2017. The unamortized balance of registrations as of 30 June 2018 was £369.5 million, of which £138.5 million is expected to be amortized in the year ending 30 June 2019. The remaining balance is expected to be amortized over the four years ending 30 June 2023. This does not take into account player acquisitions after 30 June 2018, which would have the effect of increasing the amortization expense in future periods, nor does it consider player departures subsequent to 30 June 2018, which would have the effect of decreasing future amortization charges. Furthermore, any contract renegotiations would also impact future charges.

Exceptional items

        Exceptional items for the year ended 30 June 2018 were a cost of £1.9 million, relating to the present value of the additional contributions we are expected to pay to remedy the increased deficit of the Football League pension scheme pursuant to the latest actuarial triennial valuation at 31 August 2017. Exceptional items for the year ended 30 June 2017 were a credit of £4.8 million, relating to a

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reversal of a player registration impairment charge for a player who was re-established as a member of the men's first team squad.

Profit on disposal of intangible assets

        Profit on disposal of intangible assets for the year ended 30 June 2018 was £18.1 million, compared to a profit of £10.9 million for the year ended 30 June 2017. The profit on disposal of intangible assets for the year ended 30 June 2018 primarily related to the disposal of Januzaj (Real Sociedad) and sell-on fees relating to former players. The profit on disposal of intangible assets for the year ended 30 June 2017 primarily related to the disposals of McNair (Sunderland), Schneiderlin (Everton) and Schweinsteiger (Chicago Fire).

Net finance costs

        Net finance costs for the year ended 30 June 2018 were £18.1 million, a decrease of £6.2 million, or 25.5%, over the year ended 30 June 2017. The decrease was primarily due to unrealized foreign exchange gains on unhedged USD borrowings.

Tax

        The tax expense for the year ended 30 June 2018 was £63.4 million, compared to £17.3 million for the year ended 30 June 2017. The expense for the year ended 30 June 2018 included a non-cash, tax accounting write-off of £49.0 million following the substantive enactment of US tax reform on 22 December 2017. The non-cash write-off was primarily due to the reduction in the US federal corporate income tax rate from 35% to 21%, which necessitated re-measurement of the then existing US deferred tax position in the period to 31 December 2017.

Critical Accounting Estimates and Judgments

        The preparation of our financial information requires management to make estimates, judgments and assumptions concerning the future. Estimates, judgments and assumptions are continually evaluated and are based on historical experience and other factors, including expectations of future events that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. The resulting accounting estimates will, by definition, seldom equal the related actual results.

        For a summary of all of our significant accounting policies, see note 2 to our audited consolidated financial statements as of and for the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017 included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

        We believe that the following accounting policies reflect the most critical estimates, judgments and assumptions and are significant to the consolidated financial statements.

Recognition of revenue

Commercial

        Commercial revenue (whether settled in cash or value in kind) comprises revenue receivable from the exploitation of the Manchester United brand through sponsorship and other commercial agreements, including minimum guaranteed revenue, revenue receivable from retailing Manchester United branded merchandise in the UK and licensing the manufacture, distribution and sale of such goods globally, and fees for the Manchester United men's first team undertaking tours.

        Minimum guaranteed revenue is recognized over the term of the sponsorship agreement in line with the performance obligations included within the contract and based on the sponsorship benefits enjoyed by the individual sponsor. In instances where the sponsorship rights remain the same over the

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duration of the contract, revenue is recognized as performance obligations are satisfied evenly over time (i.e. on a straight-line basis).

        The minimum guarantee payable by adidas over the term of our agreement with them is equal to £750 million, subject to certain adjustments. Payments due in a particular year may increase if our men's first team wins certain competitions or decrease if our men's first team fails to participate in the Champions League for two or more consecutive seasons, with the reduction being 30% of the applicable payment for the year in which the second or other consecutive season of non-participation falls. In the event of a reduction in any year due to the failure to participate in the Champions League for two or more consecutive seasons, the payments revert back to the original terms upon the men's first team participating again in the Champions League. Any increase or decrease in a particular year would have the effect of increasing or decreasing the minimum guarantee amount of £750 million payable over the term of the agreement. A critical estimate in future financial years therefore will be management's assessment as to whether or not our men's first team is likely to fail to participate in the Champions League for two or more consecutive seasons during the term of the agreement. Such assessments of future participation may differ from actual participation, which could result in a difference in the revenue recognized in a given year.

Broadcasting and Matchday

        For our accounting policies relating to Broadcasting revenue and Matchday revenue, which management does not consider to involve critical estimates and judgments, see notes 4.3(ii) and (iii) to our audited consolidated financial statements as of and for the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017 included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

Fair value and impairment of intangible assets—registrations

        The costs associated with the acquisition of players' and key football management staff registrations are capitalized as intangible assets at the fair value of the consideration payable, including an estimate of the fair value of any contingent consideration. Subsequent reassessments of the amount of contingent consideration payable are also included in the cost of the individual's registration. The estimate of the fair value of the contingent consideration payable requires management to assess the likelihood of specific performance conditions being met which would trigger the payment of the contingent consideration such as the number of player appearances. This assessment is carried out on an individual basis. Costs associated with the acquisition of players' and key football management staff registrations include transfer fees, Premier League levy fees, agents' fees and other directly attributable costs. These costs are amortized over the period covered by the individual's contract. To the extent that an individual's contract is extended, the remaining book value is amortized over the remaining revised contract life.

Recognition of deferred tax assets

        We recognize deferred tax effects of temporary differences between the financial statement carrying amounts and the tax basis of our assets and liabilities.

        Deferred tax assets are recognized only to the extent that it is probable that the associated deductions will be available for use against future profits and that there will be sufficient future taxable profit available against which the temporary differences can be utilized, provided the asset can be reliably quantified. In estimating future taxable profit, management use "base case" approved forecasts which incorporate a number of assumptions, including a prudent level of future uncontracted revenue in the forecast period. In arriving at a judgment in relation to the recognition of deferred tax assets, management considers the regulations applicable to tax and advice on their interpretation. Future taxable income may be higher or lower than estimates made when determining whether it is

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appropriate to record a tax asset and the amount to be recorded. Furthermore, changes in the legislative framework or applicable tax case law may result in management reassessing the recognition of deferred tax assets in future periods.

B.    LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

        Our primary cash requirements stem from the payment of transfer fees for the acquisition of players' registrations, capital expenditure for the improvement of facilities at Old Trafford and the Aon Training Complex, payment of interest on our borrowings, employee benefit expenses, other operating expenses and dividends on our Class A ordinary shares and Class B ordinary shares. Historically, we have met these cash requirements through a combination of operating cash flow and proceeds from transfer fees from the sale of players' registrations. Our existing borrowings primarily consist of our secured term loan facility and our senior secured notes. Additionally, although we have not needed to draw any borrowings under our revolving facility since 2009, we have no intention of retiring our revolving facility and may draw on it in the future in order to satisfy our working capital requirements. We manage our cash flow interest rate risk where considered appropriate using interest rate swaps. Such interest rate swaps have the economic effect of converting a portion of variable rate borrowings from floating to fixed rates. We have US dollar borrowings that we use to hedge our US dollar commercial revenue exposure. See "—Indebtedness" below. We continue to evaluate our financing options and may, from time to time, take advantage of opportunities to repurchase or refinance all or a portion of our existing indebtedness to the extent such opportunities arise.

        In fiscal year 2019, we paid a regular semi-annual cash dividend on our Class A ordinary shares and Class B ordinary shares of $0.09 per share. We expect to continue paying regular semi-annual dividends to our Class A ordinary shareholders and Class B ordinary shareholders out of our operating cash flows. The declaration and payment of any future dividends, however, will be at the sole discretion of our board of directors or a committee thereof, and our expectations and policies regarding dividends are subject to change as our business needs, capital requirements or market conditions change.

        Our business generates a significant amount of cash from our matchday revenues and commercial contractual arrangements at or near the beginning of our fiscal year, with a steady flow of other cash received throughout the fiscal year. In addition, we generate a significant amount of our cash through advance receipts, including season tickets (which include general admission season tickets and seasonal hospitality tickets), most of which are received prior to the end of June for the following season. Our Broadcasting revenue from the Premier League and UEFA are paid periodically throughout the season, with primary payments made in late summer, December, January and the end of the football season. Our sponsorship and other commercial revenue tends to be paid either quarterly or annually in advance. However, while we typically have a high cash balance at the beginning of each fiscal year, this is largely attributable to deferred revenue, the majority of which falls under current liabilities in the consolidated balance sheet, and this deferred revenue is unwound through the statement of profit or loss over the course of the fiscal year. Over the course of a year, we use our cash on hand to pay employee benefit expenses, other operating expenses, interest payments and other liabilities as they become due. This typically results in negative working capital movement at certain times during the year. In the event it ever became necessary to access additional operating cash, we also have access to cash through our revolving facility. As of 30 June 2019, we had no borrowings under our revolving facility.

        Pursuant to our contract with adidas, which began on 1 August 2015, the minimum guarantee payable by adidas over the 10-year term of the agreement is equal to £750 million, subject to certain adjustments. See "Item 4. Information on the Company—Revenue Sectors—Commercial—Retail, Merchandising, Apparel & Product Licensing" above for additional information regarding our agreement with adidas.

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        We also maintain a mixture of long-term debt and capacity under our revolving facility in order to ensure that we have sufficient funds available for short-term working capital requirements and for investment in the playing squad and other capital projects.

        Our cost base is more evenly spread throughout the fiscal year than our cash inflows. Employee benefit expenses and fixed costs constitute the majority of our cash outflows and are generally paid evenly throughout the 12 months of the fiscal year.

        In addition, transfer windows for acquiring and disposing of registrations occur in January and the summer. During these periods, we may require additional cash to meet our acquisition needs for new players and we may generate additional cash through the sale of existing registrations. Depending on the terms of the agreement, transfer fees may be paid or received by us in multiple installments, resulting in deferred cash paid or received. Although we have not historically drawn on our revolving facility during the summer transfer window, if we seek to acquire players with values substantially in excess of the values of players we seek to sell, we may be required to draw on our revolving facility to meet our cash needs.

        Acquisition and disposal of registrations also affects our trade receivables and payables, which affects our overall working capital. Our trade receivables include accrued revenue from sponsors as well as transfer fees receivable from other football clubs, whereas our trade payables include transfer fees and other associated costs in relation to the acquisition of registrations.

Capital expenditures at Old Trafford

        Our stadium, Old Trafford, remains one of our key assets and a significant part of the overall experience we provide to our followers. Old Trafford has been our home stadium since 1910 and has undergone significant changes over the years. To maintain the quality of service, enhance the fan experience and increase matchday revenue, we continually invest in the refurbishment and regeneration of Old Trafford. Following a substantial development prior to the 2006/07 season, we expanded seating capacity at Old Trafford from approximately 68,000 to 74,140. In addition, we have continued to invest in improving hospitality suites and catering facilities through refurbishment programs.

        We record these investments as capital expenditures. Capital expenditure at Old Trafford was £8.5 million, £6.3 million and £3.5 million for the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

        In addition, we spent approximately £3.1 million, £4.0 million and £5.4 million for the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively in connection with updating and expanding the Aon Training Complex, our training facility.

        We are also in the process of carrying out improvements at Old Trafford relating to the provision for supporters with disabilities. This follows consultation with organizations such as the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) and Manchester United Disabled Supporters' Association (MUDSA) and includes the creation of new accessible viewing areas for disabled supporters.

Digital Media capital expenditure

        We intend to continue investing in our digital media assets, including our website, mobile application and digital media capabilities.

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Net intangible asset—registrations capital expenditure

        Our average net intangible asset—registrations capital expenditure over the last 5 years has been a cash outflow of £115.0 million per fiscal year. However, net intangible asset—registrations capital expenditure has varied significantly from period to period, as shown in the table below, and while we expect that trend to continue, competition for talented players may force clubs to spend increasing amounts on player registration fees. We may explore new player acquisitions in connection with future transfer periods that may materially increase the amount of our net intangible asset—registrations capital expenditure. Actual cash used or generated from net intangible asset—registrations capital expenditure is recorded on our statement of cash flow under net cash outflow or inflow from investing activities.


Last 5 Years Net Intangible Asset—Registrations Capital Expenditure(1)

GRAPHIC


(1)
The net intangible asset—registrations capital expenditure data presented is the sum of all cash used for purchases of intangible assets—registrations and all cash generated from sales of intangible assets—registrations.

Working Capital

        Our directors confirmed that, as of the date of this Annual Report, after taking into account our current cash and cash equivalents and our anticipated cash flow from operating and financing activities, we believe that we have sufficient working capital for our present requirements.

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Cash Flow

        The following table summarizes our cash flows for the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017:

 
  Year ended 30 June  
 
  2019   2018   2017  
 
  (in £ millions)
 

Cash flow from operating activities

                   

Cash generated from operations

    263.6     119.6     251.7  

Interest paid

    (19.0 )   (18.9 )   (19.5 )

Interest received

    2.9     1.2     0.7  

Tax paid

    (2.7 )   (6.7 )   (5.2 )

Net cash inflow from operating activities

    244.8     95.2     227.7  

Cash flow from investing activities

                   

Payments for property, plant and equipment

    (13.7 )   (13.2 )   (8.4 )

Payments for investment properties

    (12.4 )       (0.6 )

Payments for intangible assets

    (178.2 )   (155.0 )   (193.8 )

Proceeds from sale of intangible assets

    43.0     46.9     51.8  

Net cash outflow from investing activities

    (161.3 )   (121.3 )   (151.0 )

Cash flow from financing activities

                   

Repayment of borrowings

    (3.8 )   (0.4 )   (0.4 )

Dividends paid

    (23.3 )   (22.0 )   (23.3 )

Net cash outflow from financing activities

    (27.1 )   (22.4 )   (23.7 )

Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents(1)

    56.4     (48.5 )   53.0  

(1)
Excludes the effects of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents.

Net cash inflow from operating activities

        Net cash inflow from operations represents our operating results and net movements in our working capital. Our working capital is generally impacted by the timing of cash received from the sale of tickets and hospitality and other matchday revenues, broadcasting revenue from the Premier League and UEFA and commercial revenue. Cash generated from operations for the year ended 30 June 2019 was £263.6 million, an increase of £144.0 million from £119.6 million for the year ended 30 June 2018, primarily due to timing of cash receipts of commercial contractual agreements. Net cash inflow from operations for the year ended 30 June 2017 was £251.7 million.

        Additional changes in net cash inflow from operating activities generally reflect our finance costs. We currently pay fixed rates of interest on our senior secured notes and variable rates of interest on our secured term loan facility. We use interest rate swaps to manage the cash flow interest rate risk. Such swaps have the economic effect of converting a portion of interest from variable rates to a fixed rate. Draw-downs from our revolving facility, if any, are also subject to variable rates of interest.

        Interest paid was £19.0 million for the year ended 30 June 2019, an increase of £0.1 million compared to £18.9 million for the year ended 30 June 2018. Interest on our senior secured notes is normally paid semi-annually, at the beginning of August and at the beginning of February. Interest paid for the year ended 30 June 2017 was £19.5 million.

        Net cash inflow from operating activities was £244.8 million for the year ended 30 June 2019, an increase of £149.6 million compared to £95.2 million for the year ended 30 June 2018. Net cash inflow from operating activities for the year ended 30 June 2017 was £227.7 million.

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Net cash outflow from investing activities

        Capital expenditure for the acquisition of intangible assets as well as for improvements to property, principally at Old Trafford and the Aon Training Complex, are funded through cash inflow from operations, proceeds from the sale of intangible assets and, if necessary, from our revolving facility. Capital expenditure on the acquisition, disposal and trading of intangible assets tends to vary significantly from year to year depending on the requirements of our men's first team, overall availability of players, our assessment of their relative value and competitive demand for players from other clubs. By contrast, capital expenditure on the purchase of property, plant and equipment tends to remain relatively stable as we continue to make improvements at Old Trafford and the Aon Training Complex.

        Net cash outflow from investing activities for the year ended 30 June 2019 was £161.3 million, an increase of £40.0 million from £121.3 million for the year ended 30 June 2018. Net cash outflow from investing activities for the year ended 30 June 2017 was £151.0 million.

        For the year ended 30 June 2019, net capital expenditure on property, plant and equipment and investment properties was £13.7 million, an increase of £0.5 million from net expenditure of £13.2 million for the year ended 30 June 2018. Net capital expenditure on property, plant and equipment for the year ended 30 June 2017 was £9.0 million.

        For the year ended 30 June 2019, net capital expenditure on investment properties was £12.4 million compared to £nil for the year ended 30 June 2018. Net capital expenditure on investment properties for the year ended 30 June 2017 was £0.6 million.

        For the year ended 30 June 2019, net capital expenditure on intangible assets was £135.2 million, an increase of £27.1 million from net expenditure of £108.1 million for the year ended 30 June 2018. Net capital expenditure for the year ended 30 June 2019 was mainly comprised of payments made for the acquisitions of Pogba, Fred, Lukaku and Dalot.

        Net capital expenditure for the year ended 30 June 2018 was mainly comprised of payments made for the acquisitions of Lindelof, Lukaku, Matic, Mkhitaryan and Pogba, less payments received relating to the disposal of Depay, Di Maria and Schneiderlin.

        Net capital expenditure on intangible assets for the year ended 30 June 2017 was £142.0 million and was mainly comprised of payments made for the acquisitions of Pogba, Mkhitaryan, Martial and Di Maria, less payments received relating to the disposal of Di Maria and Schneiderlin.

Net cash outflow from financing activities

        Net cash outflow from financing activities for the year ended 30 June 2019 was £27.1 million, an increase of £4.7 million compared to £22.4 million for the year ended 30 June 2018. During the year ended 30 June 2019, we repaid the remaining balance of a secured bank loan amounting to £3.8 million and paid two semi-annual dividends amounting to £23.3 million in the aggregate.

        During the year ended 30 June 2018, we repaid borrowings of £0.4 million relating to a secured bank loan and paid two semi-annual dividends amounting to £22.0 million in the aggregate.

        Net cash outflow from financing activities for the year ended 30 June 2017 was £23.7 million. During the year ended 30 June 2017, we repaid borrowings of £0.4 million relating to a secured bank loan and paid two semi-annual dividends amounting to £23.3 million in the aggregate.

Indebtedness

        Our primary sources of indebtedness consist of our senior secured notes, our secured term loan facility and our revolving credit facility. As part of the security for our senior secured notes, our

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secured term loan facility and our revolving facility, substantially all of our assets are subject to liens and mortgages.

Description of principal indebtedness

Senior secured notes

        Our wholly-owned subsidiary, Manchester United Football Club Limited, issued $425 million in aggregate principal amount of 3.79% senior secured notes (which we refer to throughout this Annual Report as the "senior secured notes"). As of 30 June 2019 the sterling equivalent of £330.8 million (net of unamortized issue costs of £3.4 million) was outstanding. The outstanding principal amount was $425.0 million. The senior secured notes mature on 25 June 2027.

        The senior secured notes are guaranteed by Red Football Limited, Red Football Junior Limited, Manchester United Limited and MU Finance Limited and secured against substantially all of the assets of those entities and Manchester United Football Club Limited. These entities are wholly-owned subsidiaries of Manchester United plc.

        The note purchase agreement governing the senior secured notes contains a financial maintenance covenant requiring us to maintain consolidated profit/(loss) for the period before depreciation, amortization of, and profit/(loss) on disposal of, intangible assets, exceptional items, net finance costs, and tax ("EBITDA") of not less than £65 million for each 12 month testing period. We are able to claim certain dispensations from complying with the consolidated EBITDA floor up to twice (in non-consecutive financial years) during the life of the senior secured notes if we fail to qualify for the first round group stages (or its equivalent from time to time) of the Champions League. The covenant is tested on a quarterly basis and we were in compliance with the covenant for each quarter throughout the financial year.

        The note purchase agreement governing the senior secured notes contains events of default typical for securities of this type, as well as customary covenants and restrictions on the activities of Red Football Limited and each of Red Football Limited's subsidiaries, including, but not limited to, the incurrence of additional indebtedness; dividends or distributions in respect of capital stock or certain other restricted payments or investments; entering into agreements that restrict distributions from restricted subsidiaries; the sale or disposal of assets, including capital stock of restricted subsidiaries; transactions with affiliates; the incurrence of liens; and mergers, consolidations or the sale of substantially all of Red Football Limited's assets. The covenants in the note purchase agreement governing the senior secured notes are subject to certain thresholds and exceptions described in the note purchase agreement governing the senior secured notes.

        The senior secured notes may be redeemed in part, in an amount not less than 5% of the aggregate principal amount of the senior secured notes then outstanding, or in full, at any time at 100% of the principal amount plus a "make-whole" premium of an amount equal to the discounted value (based on the US Treasury rate) of the remaining interest payments due on the senior secured notes up to 25 June 2027.

Secured term loan facility

        Our wholly-owned subsidiary, Manchester United Football Club Limited, has a secured term loan facility with Bank of America Merrill Lynch International Designated Activity Company as lender. As of 30 June 2019 the sterling equivalent of £175.0 million (net of unamortized issue costs of £1.9 million) was outstanding. The outstanding principal amount was $225.0 million. The remaining balance of the secured term loan facility is repayable on 6 August 2029, although we have the option to repay the secured term loan facility at any time before then.

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        Loans under the secured term loan facility bear interest at a rate per annum equal to US dollar LIBOR (provided that if the rate is less than zero, LIBOR shall be deemed to be zero) plus the applicable margin. The applicable margin, if no event of default has occurred and is continuing, means the following:

Total net leverage ratio (as defined in the secured term loan facility agreement)
  Margin %
(per annum)
 

Greater than 3.5

    1.75  

Greater than 2.0 but less than or equal to 3.5

    1.50  

Less than or equal to 2.0

    1.25  

        While any event of default is continuing, the applicable margin shall be the highest level set forth above.

        Our secured term loan facility is guaranteed by Red Football Limited, Red Football Junior Limited, Manchester United Limited, MU Finance Limited and Manchester United Football Club Limited and secured against substantially all of the assets of those entities. These entities are wholly-owned subsidiaries of Manchester United plc.

        The secured term loan facility contains a financial maintenance covenant requiring us to maintain consolidated profit/(loss) for the period before depreciation, amortization of, and profit/(loss) on disposal of, intangible assets, exceptional items, net finance costs, and tax ("EBITDA") of not less than £65 million for each 12 month testing period. We are able to claim certain dispensations from complying with the consolidated EBITDA floor up to twice (in non-consecutive financial years) during the life of the secured term loan facility if we fail to qualify for the first round group stages (or its equivalent from time to time) of the Champions League. The covenant is tested on a quarterly basis and we were in compliance with the covenant for each quarter throughout the financial year.

        Our secured term loan facility contains events of default typical in facilities of this type, as well as typical covenants including restrictions on incurring additional indebtedness, paying dividends or making other distributions or repurchasing or redeeming our stock, selling assets, including capital stock of restricted subsidiaries, entering into agreements restricting our subsidiaries' ability to pay dividends, consolidating, merging, selling or otherwise disposing of all or substantially all of our assets, entering into sale and leaseback transactions, entering into transactions with our affiliates and incurring liens. Certain events of default and covenants in the secured term loan facility are subject to certain thresholds and exceptions described in the agreement governing the secured term loan facility.

Revolving facility

        Our revolving facilities agreement allows Manchester United Football Club Limited (or any direct or indirect subsidiary of Red Football Limited that becomes a borrower thereunder) to borrow up to £125 million, plus (subject to certain conditions) the ability to draw-down a further £25 million by way of incremental facilities, from a syndicate of lenders with Bank of America Merrill Lynch International Designated Activity Company as agent and security trustee. As of 30 June 2019, we had no outstanding borrowings and had £125 million (exclusive of capacity under the incremental facilities) in borrowing capacity under our revolving facility agreement.

        Our revolving facility is scheduled to expire on 4 April 2025 (although it may be possible for any subsequent incremental facility thereunder to expire after this date). Any amount still outstanding at that time will be due in full immediately on the applicable expiry date.

        Subject to certain conditions, we may voluntarily prepay and/or permanently cancel all or part of the available commitments under the revolving facility by giving not less than three business days' prior notice to the Agent under the facility. Any loan drawn under the revolving facility is required to be

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repaid on the last day of each of its interest periods. Amounts repaid may (subject to the terms of the revolving facilities agreement) be re-borrowed.

        Loans under the revolving facility bear interest at a rate per annum equal to LIBOR (or in relation to a loan in euros, EURIBOR) (provided that if that rate is less than zero, LIBOR or, as the case may be, EURIBOR, shall be deemed to be zero) plus the applicable margin.

        The applicable margin, if no event of default has occurred and is continuing, means the following:

Total net leverage ratio (as defined in the revolving facilities agreement)
  Margin %
(per annum)
 

Greater than 3.5

    1.75  

Greater than 2.0 but less than or equal to 3.5

    1.50  

Less than or equal to 2.0

    1.25  

        While any default is continuing, the applicable margin shall be the highest level set forth above.

        A commitment fee is payable on the available but undrawn amount of the revolving facility, at a rate equal to 40% per annum of the applicable margin.

        Our revolving facility is guaranteed by Red Football Limited, Red Football Junior Limited, Manchester United Limited, MU Finance Limited and Manchester United Football Club Limited and secured against substantially all of the assets of those entities. These entities are wholly-owned subsidiaries of Manchester United plc.

        In addition to the general covenants described below, the revolving facility contains a financial maintenance covenant requiring us to maintain consolidated EBITDA of not less than £65 million for each 12 month testing period. We are able to claim certain dispensations from complying with the consolidated EBITDA floor up to twice (in non-consecutive financial years) during the life of the revolving facility if we fail to qualify for the first round group stages (or its equivalent from time to time) of the Champions League. In addition, in the event that the financial covenant is not complied with, such non-compliance may also be cured with the cash proceeds of additional shareholder funding or subordinated shareholder funding no later than the end of the period 20 business days following the earlier of the date on which the compliance certificate setting out the calculations in respect of the relevant covenant determination is required to be delivered and the date on which it is delivered under the terms of the revolving facilities agreement, and no equity cures may be made in consecutive financial quarters or on more than four occasions over the life of the revolving facility.

        Our revolving facility contains events of default typical in facilities of this type, as well as typical covenants including restrictions on incurring additional indebtedness, paying dividends or making other distributions or repurchasing or redeeming our stock, making investments, selling assets, including capital stock of restricted subsidiaries, entering into agreements restricting our subsidiaries' ability to pay dividends, consolidating, merging, selling or otherwise disposing of all or substantially all of our assets, entering into sale and leaseback transactions, entering into transactions with our affiliates and incurring liens. Certain events of default and covenants in the revolving facility are subject to certain thresholds and exceptions described in the agreement governing the revolving facility.

        As of 30 June 2019, we were in compliance with all covenants in relation to indebtedness.

C.    RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, PATENTS AND LICENSES, ETC.

        We do not conduct research and development activities.

D.    TREND INFORMATION

        Other than as disclosed elsewhere in this Annual Report, we are not aware of any trends, uncertainties, demands, commitments or events since 30 June 2019 that are reasonably likely to have a

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material adverse effect on our revenues, income, profitability, liquidity or capital resources, or that would cause the disclosed financial information to be not necessarily indicative of future operating results or financial conditions.

E.    OFF BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS

Transfer fees payable

        Under the terms of certain contracts with other football clubs in respect of player transfers, additional amounts would be payable by us if certain specific performance conditions are met. As noted above, we estimate the fair value of any contingent consideration at the date of acquisition based on the probability of conditions being met and monitor this on an ongoing basis. The maximum additional amount that could be payable as of 30 June 2019 is £74.3 million.

Transfer fees receivable

        Similarly, under the terms of contracts with other football clubs for player transfers, additional amounts would be payable to us if certain specific performance conditions are met. In accordance with the recognition criteria for contingent assets, such amounts are only disclosed by the Company when probable and recognized when virtually certain. As of 30 June 2019, we believe receipt of £0.7 million to be probable.

Other commitments

        In the ordinary course of business, we enter into operating lease commitments and capital commitments. These transactions are recognized in the consolidated financial statements in accordance with IFRS, as issued by the IASB, and are more fully disclosed therein.

        As of 30 June 2019, we had not entered into any other off-balance sheet transactions.

F.     CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS

        The following table summarizes our contractual obligations as of 30 June 2019:

 
  Less than
1 year
  1-3 years   3-5 years   More than
five years
  Total
contractual
cash flows(1)
  Total per
consolidated
financial
statements
 
 
  £'000
  £'000
  £'000
  £'000
  £'000
  £'000
 

Long-term debt obligations(2)

    19,024     38,048     38,048     555,441     650,561     511,232  

Operating lease obligations(3)

    1,956     1,668     679     3,785     8,088      

Purchase obligations(4)

    225,566     74,892     6,307         306,765     295,714  

Total

    246,546     114,608     45,034     559,226     965,414     806,946  

(1)
Total contractual cash flows reflect contractual non-derivative financial obligations including interest, operating lease payments, purchase order commitments and capital commitments and therefore differs from the carrying amounts in our consolidated financial statements.

(2)
As of 30 June 2019, we had $225.0 million of our secured term loan facility outstanding and $425.0 million of our senior secured notes outstanding.

(3)
We enter into operating leases in the normal course of business. Most lease arrangements provide us with the option to renew the leases at defined terms. The future operating lease obligations would change if we were to exercise these options, or if we were to enter into additional new operating leases. See note 29.2 to our audited consolidated financial statements as of and for the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017 included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

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(4)
Purchase obligations include current and non-current obligations related to the acquisition of registrations, purchase order commitments and capital commitments. Purchase obligations do not include contingent transfer fees of £74.3 million which are potentially payable by us if certain specific performance conditions are met.

        Except as disclosed above and in notes 28 to our audited consolidated financial statements as of and for the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017 included elsewhere in this Annual Report, as of 30 June 2019, we did not have any material contingent liabilities or guarantees.

G.    SAFE HARBOR

        See the Section entitled "Forward-Looking Statements" at the beginning of this Annual Report.

ITEM 6.    DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEES

A.    DIRECTORS AND SENIOR MANAGEMENT

        The following table lists each of our current executive officers and directors and their respective ages and positions as of the date of this Annual Report.

Name
  Age   Position
Avram Glazer     58   Executive Co-Chairman and Director
Joel Glazer     52   Executive Co-Chairman and Director
Edward Woodward     47   Executive Vice Chairman and Director
Richard Arnold     48   Group Managing Director and Director
Cliff Baty     49   Chief Financial Officer and Director
Kevin Glazer     57   Director
Bryan Glazer     54   Director
Darcie Glazer Kassewitz     51   Director
Edward Glazer     49   Director
Robert Leitão     56   Independent Director
Manu Sawhney     52   Independent Director
John Hooks     63   Independent Director

        The following is a brief biography of each of our executive officers and directors:

        Avram Glazer, aged 58, is Executive Co-Chairman and a Director of the Company. He is currently a director of Red Football Limited and Co-Chairman of Manchester United Limited. Mr. Glazer served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Zapata Corporation, a US public company from March 1995 to July 2009 and Chairman of the board of Zapata Corporation from March 2002 to July 2009. Mr. Glazer received a business degree from Washington University in St. Louis in 1982. He received a law degree from American University, Washington College of Law in 1985.

        Joel Glazer, aged 52, is Executive Co-Chairman and a Director of the Company. He is currently a director of Red Football Limited and Co-Chairman of Manchester United Limited. Mr. Glazer is Co-Chairman of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Mr. Glazer is a member of the NFL Finance, International and Media Committees. Mr. Glazer graduated from American University in Washington, D.C., in 1989 with a bachelor's degree.

        Edward Woodward, aged 47, is Executive Vice Chairman and a Director of the Company. He was appointed to our board of directors on 30 April 2012 and is currently Executive Vice Chairman of Manchester United Limited, having been elected to its board of directors in February 2008. In 2015, he was elected to the board of directors of the European Club Association (ECA)—the sole independent body directly representing football clubs at a European level. He is also a director of UCC SA which is the joint venture between UEFA and ECA which facilitates the direct involvement of the ECA in the

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running of the Champions League and Europa League. Mr. Woodward represents the club at meetings of the English Premier League's shareholders. On joining the club in 2005 he initially managed the capital structure of the group and advised on the overall financial business plan. In 2007 he assumed responsibility for the commercial and media operations and developed and implemented a new overall commercial strategy for the Club. This resulted in a new structured approach to commercializing the brand, including developing the sponsorship strategy. Mr. Woodward formerly worked as a senior investment banker within J.P. Morgan's international mergers and acquisitions team between 1999 and 2005. Prior to joining J.P. Morgan, Mr. Woodward worked for PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP in the Accounting and Tax Advisory department between 1993 and 1999. He received a Bachelor of Science degree in physics from Bristol University in 1993 and qualified for his Chartered Accountancy in 1996.

        Richard Arnold, aged 48, is the Group Managing Director and a Director of the Company. In his capacity as Group Managing Director, Mr. Arnold oversees all commercial and operational aspects of the Company. Mr. Arnold also serves as Chairman of the Manchester United Foundation. In his previous role as Commercial Director (until 30 June 2013) he was responsible for the management and growth of the Company's sponsorship business, retail, merchandising, apparel & product licensing business, and digital media business. In this capacity he was nominated for SportBusiness International's Sports innovator of the year list in 2011. In both 2017 and 2018, Mr. Arnold has been named as an LGBT+ Executive Ally by the charity OUTstanding in recognition of the work he has done to progress LGBT+ inclusion at Manchester United for employees and supporters. Mr. Arnold was previously Deputy Managing Director of InterVoice Ltd responsible for the international channel sales and marketing division of InterVoice Inc., a NASDAQ listed technology company, between 2002 and 2007. He was nominated as a finalist for Young Director of the Year by the United Kingdom Institute of Directors in 2004 and 2005. Prior to InterVoice, he worked at Global Crossing Europe Ltd, a company in the technology sector, on its restructure between 1999 and 2002. Prior to this he was a senior manager in the telecommunications and media practice at PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP from 1993 to 1999, including working on the privatization of the Saudi Telecommunications Corporation and the Initial Public Offering of Orange in the United Kingdom. He received an honors Bachelor of Science degree in biology from Bristol University in 1993 and received his Chartered Accountancy qualification in 1996.

        Cliff Baty, aged 49, is the Company's Chief Financial Officer and a Director of the Company. He was appointed to our board of directors on 14 December 2017. He is responsible for managing all aspects of financial reporting and financial control of the Company. Mr. Baty joined Manchester United in 2016. Prior to joining the Company, Mr. Baty served as Chief Financial Officer and member of the board of directors of Sportech plc, a leading pool betting operator and technology supplier, from 2013 to 2016. Prior to Sportech, he worked at Ladbrokes plc from 2006 to 2013 in a number of senior finance roles including Finance Director of its eGaming and International businesses, as well as Ladbrokes businesses in Spain, Italy and South Africa. Before that he was Group Financial Controller of Hilton Group plc from 2004 to 2006. He qualified as a Chartered Accountant with Ernst & Young, where he worked for 10 years. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Chemistry from Oriel College, Oxford University in 1992.

        Kevin Glazer, aged 57, is a Director of the Company. He is currently a director of Red Football Limited and a director of Manchester United Limited. He is currently a director of Red Football Limited and a director of Manchester United Limited. He is currently the Chief Executive Officer of Glazer Properties. Mr. Glazer graduated from Ithaca College in 1984 with a Bachelor of Arts degree.

        Bryan Glazer, aged 54, is a Director of the Company. He is currently a director of Red Football Limited and Manchester United Limited. He is the Co-Chairman of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and also serves on the NFL's Media O & O Committee. Mr. Glazer serves on the board of directors of the Glazer Children's Museum. He received a bachelor's degree from the American University in Washington, D.C., in 1986 and received his law degree from Whittier College School of Law in 1989.

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        Darcie Glazer Kassewitz, aged 51, is a Director of the Company. She is currently a director of Red Football Limited. Ms. Glazer Kassewitz is the President of the Glazer Family Foundation. She graduated cum laude from the American University in 1990 and received a law degree in 1993 from Suffolk Law School.

        Edward Glazer, aged 49, is a Director of the Company. He is currently a director of Red Football Limited. He is Co-Chairman of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and CEO of US Property Trust.

        Robert Leitão, aged 56, is an Independent Director of the Company. He is joint Managing Partner, Co-Chairman of the Group Executive Committee, and Head of Global Advisory, at Rothschild & Co. Since joining Rothschild & Co as a Director in 1998, Mr. Leitão was appointed Managing Director in 2000, Head of Mergers and Acquisitions in 2001, Head of UK Global Advisory in 2008, and has been a member of the Group Executive Committee since 2010. He was appointed Head of Global Advisory, worldwide, in 2013, and a Managing Partner of Rothschild & Co in 2016. Prior to joining Rothschild & Co, Mr. Leitão was a Director of UK Head of M&A at Morgan Grenfell & Co. Limited. He graduated with a degree in Engineering from Imperial College London in 1984, and qualified as a Chartered Accountant with KPMG in 1987. Mr. Leitão is also Chairman of the Trustees of the not-for-profit digital charity box, Pennies Foundation.

        Manu Sawhney, aged 52, is an Independent Director of the Company. With over 27 years of rich experience in the Asian media, entertainment and consumer products industry, Mr. Sawhney currently serves as the Chief Executive Officer of the International Cricket Council (ICC). ICC is the global governing body for the sport of cricket representing 105 members, the ICC governs and administrates the game and is responsible for the staging of major international tournaments including the ICC Men's World Cup and Women's World Cup and the ICC Men's and Women's T20 World Cups as well as all associated qualifying events. The ICC presides over the ICC Code of Conduct which sets the professional standards of discipline for international cricket, playing conditions, bowling reviews and other ICC regulations and appoints match officials. Mr. Sawhney prior to this role served as the Chief Executive Officer of the Singapore Sports Hub, one of the largest sporting Public-Private Partnerships in the world, and the city-state's premier sporting, lifestyle and entertainment destination. Mr. Sawhney previously served as the Managing Director of ESPN STAR Sports (ESS), a 50:50 joint venture for Asia between ESPN and News Corp, and reported directly to the board of directors. He was responsible for the overall business leadership and P&L of the company across 24 countries in Asia. Mr. Sawhney led ESS's growth and expansion across multiple platforms in various markets across Asia including business expansion in Taiwan, start-up of a new joint venture in South Korea, consolidation of business in China and securing long term strategic partnerships in India, Malaysia, Indonesia and Singapore. Prior to heading ESS's Asia operations, Mr. Sawhney served as the Executive Vice President of Programming/Event Management/Marketing/ Network Presentation, wherein he negotiated and secured various multi-year renewals of key global and regional rights & affiliate deals. Mr. Sawhney also previously served as the Managing Director of ESS's South Asia business based out of India. Before joining ESS, Mr. Sawhney worked for 3 years with ITC Global Holdings based out of Vietnam and India. Mr. Sawhney holds a Bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering from the Birla Institute of Technology & Science, Pilani, India, and received his Masters in International Business from the Indian Institute of Foreign Trade, New Delhi, India. Mr. Sawhney also served on the Steering Committee of the 28th South East Asian Games and is a member of the Young Presidents Organisation (YPO).

        John Hooks, aged 63, is an Independent Director of the Company. He has been in the luxury fashion industry for over 35 years and has held positions in some of the sector's most influential companies. After graduating from Oxford University, he entered the fashion industry through Gruppo Finanziario Tessile (GFT) in Turin, Italy. For three years he was the commercial director for the prêt-à-porter collection of Valentino. From 1988 to 1994, based in Hong Kong, he was responsible for the establishment of GFT's regional subsidiaries in Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Australia

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as well as in mainland China (in 1988, the first major foreign fashion company to establish a direct presence in that country). From 1995 to 2000 he was Commercial and Regional Director of Jil Sander in Hamburg, Germany. In 2000, Mr. Hooks joined Giorgio Armani as Group Commercial and Marketing Director, considerably expanding the company's global wholesale and retail network. He was subsequently appointed Deputy Chairman of the Giorgio Armani Group. From 2011 to 2014, he was Group President of Ralph Lauren Europe and Middle East. Mr. Hooks currently works as an independent consultant. He is also a senior adviser to McKinsey & Company and is on the board of Miroglio Fashion S.r.l.

Family Relationships

        Our Executive Co-Chairmen and directors Avram Glazer and Joel Glazer, and directors Bryan Glazer, Kevin Glazer, Darcie Glazer Kassewitz and Edward Glazer are siblings.

Arrangements or Understandings

        None of our executive officers or directors have any arrangement or understanding with our principal shareholders, customers, suppliers or other persons pursuant to which such executive officer or director was selected as an executive officer or director.

B.    COMPENSATION

        We set out below the amount of compensation paid and benefits in kind provided by us or our subsidiaries to our directors and members of the executive management for services in all capacities to our Company or our subsidiaries for the 2019 fiscal year, as well as the amount contributed by our Company or our subsidiaries to retirement benefit plans for our directors and members of the executive management board.

Directors and Executive Management Compensation

        The compensation for each member of our executive management is comprised of the following elements: base salary, bonus, contractual benefits and pension contributions. The total amount of compensation (including share-based payments) paid or payable and benefits in kind provided to the members of our board of directors and our executive management employees for the fiscal year 2019 was £10,729,000. We do not currently maintain any bonus or profit-sharing plan for the benefit of the members of our executive management, however, certain members of our executive management are eligible to receive annual bonuses (including share-based awards) pursuant to the terms of their service agreements. The total amount set aside or accrued by us to provide pension, retirement or similar benefits to our directors and our executive management employees with respect to the fiscal year 2019 was £20,000.

Employment or Service Agreements

        We have entered into written employment or service agreements with each of the members of our executive management, which agreements provide, among other things, for benefits upon a termination of employment. In order to align the interests of our executive management with our shareholders, members of our executive management are eligible to receive annual share-based awards (or cash and share-based awards) pursuant to our 2012 Equity Incentive Award Plan (the "Equity Plan"). The amount of the awards will generally be subject to the discretion of our board of directors and our remuneration committee. In order to encourage retention, the awards are eligible to become vested over a multi-year period following the date of grant. In connection with their receipt of the awards, each member of our executive management will agree to hold a minimum of that number of Class A ordinary shares with a value equal to such member's annual salary for so long as such member is employed by us.

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        We have not entered into written employment or service agreements with our outside directors, including any member of the Glazer family. However, we may in the future enter into employment or services agreements with such individuals, the terms of which may provide for, among other things, cash or equity based compensation and benefits.

Share-Based Compensation Awards

        We currently have one share-based compensation award plan, namely the 2012 Equity Incentive Award Plan, established in 2012 (the "Equity Plan").

The Equity Plan

        The principal purpose of the Equity Plan is to attract, retain and motivate selected employees, consultants and non-employee directors through the granting of share-based and cash-based compensation awards. The principal features of the Equity Plan are summarized below.

        During the year ended 30 June 2019, certain directors and members of executive management were awarded Class A ordinary shares, pursuant to the Equity Plan. These shares are subject to varying vesting schedules over a multi-year period. The fair value of these shares was the quoted market price on the date of award. Details of the share awards outstanding and therefore potentially issuable as new shares are as follows:

 
  Number of Class A
ordinary shares
 

Outstanding at beginning of the year

    83,153  

Awarded during the year

    55,976  

Vested during the year

    (44,577 )

Outstanding at the end of the year

    94,552  

        The fair value of shares awarded during the year was $18.30 (£14.34) per share.

Share reserve

        Under the Equity Plan, 16,000,000 Class A ordinary shares are reserved for issuance pursuant to a variety of share-based compensation awards, including share options, share appreciation rights, or SARs, restricted share awards, restricted share unit awards, deferred share awards, deferred share unit awards, dividend equivalent awards, share payment awards and other share-based awards. Of these reserved shares, assuming the above outstanding share awards fully vest, 15,059,727 shares remain available for issuance as of 23 September 2019.

Administration

        The remuneration committee of our board of directors (or other committee as our board of directors may appoint) administers the Equity Plan unless our board of directors assumes authority for administration. Subject to the terms and conditions of the Equity Plan, the administrator has the authority to select the persons to whom awards are to be made, determines the types of awards to be granted, the number of shares to be subject to awards and the terms and conditions of awards, and makes all other determinations and can take all other actions necessary or advisable for the administration of the Equity Plan. The administrator is also authorized to adopt, amend or rescind rules relating to the administration of the Equity Plan. Our board of directors has the authority at all times to remove the remuneration committee (or other applicable committee) as the administrator and reinstate itself as the authority to administer the Equity Plan.

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Eligibility

        The Equity Plan provides that share options, share appreciation rights ("SARs"), restricted shares and all other awards may be granted to individuals who will then be our non-employee directors, officers, employees or consultants or the non-employee directors, officers, employees or consultants of certain of our subsidiaries.

Awards

        The Equity Plan provides that the administrator may grant or issue share options, SARs, restricted shares, restricted share units, deferred shares, deferred share units, dividend equivalents, share payments and other share-based awards, or any combination thereof. Each award will be set forth in a separate agreement with the person receiving the award and will indicate the type, terms and conditions of the award.

    Share Options provide for the right to purchase Class A ordinary shares at a specified price, and usually will become exercisable (at the discretion of the administrator) in one or more installments after the grant date, subject to the participant's continued employment or service with us and/or subject to the satisfaction of corporate performance targets and/or individual performance targets established by the administrator.

    Restricted Shares may be granted to any eligible individual selected by the administrator and are made subject to such restrictions as may be determined by the administrator. Restricted shares, typically, are forfeited for no consideration or repurchased by us at the original purchase price (if applicable) if the conditions or restrictions on vesting are not met. The Equity Plan provides that restricted shares generally may not be sold or otherwise transferred until the applicable restrictions are removed or expire. Recipients of restricted shares, unlike recipients of share options, have voting rights and have the right to receive dividends, if any, prior to the time when the restrictions lapse; however, extraordinary dividends will generally be placed in escrow, and will not be released until the restrictions are removed or expire.

    Restricted Share Units may be awarded to any eligible individual selected by the administrator, typically without payment of consideration, but subject to vesting conditions based on continued employment or service or on performance criteria established by the administrator. The Equity Plan provides that, like restricted shares, restricted share units may not be sold, or otherwise transferred or hypothecated, until vesting conditions are removed or expire. Unlike restricted shares, Class A ordinary shares underlying restricted share units are not issued until the restricted share units have vested, and recipients of restricted share units generally have no voting or dividend rights prior to the time when vesting conditions are satisfied and the Class A ordinary shares are issued.

    Deferred Share Awards represent the right to receive Class A ordinary shares on a future date. The Equity Plan provides that deferred shares may not be sold or otherwise hypothecated or transferred until issued. Deferred shares are not issued until the deferred share award has vested, and recipients of deferred shares generally have no voting or dividend rights prior to the time when the vesting conditions are satisfied and the Class A ordinary shares are issued. Deferred share awards generally will be forfeited, and the underlying Class A ordinary shares of deferred shares will not be issued, if the applicable vesting conditions and other restrictions are not met.

    Deferred Share Unit Awards may be awarded to any eligible individual selected by the administrator, typically without payment of consideration, but subject to vesting conditions based on continued employment or service or on performance criteria established by the administrator. Each deferred share unit award entitles the holder thereof to receive one share of our Class A

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      ordinary shares on the date the deferred share unit becomes vested or upon a specified settlement date thereafter. The Equity Plan provides that, like deferred shares, deferred share units may not be sold or otherwise hypothecated or transferred until vesting conditions are removed or expire. Unlike deferred shares, deferred share units may provide that Class A ordinary shares in respect of underlying deferred share units will not be issued until a specified date or event following the vesting date. Recipients of deferred share units generally have no voting or dividend rights prior to the time when the vesting conditions are satisfied and the Class A ordinary shares underlying the award have been issued to the holder.

    Share Appreciation Rights, or SARs, may be granted in the administrator's discretion separately or in connection with share options or other awards. SARs granted in connection with share options or other awards typically provide for payments to the holder based upon increases in the price of our Class A ordinary shares over a set exercise price. There are no restrictions specified in the Equity Plan on the exercise of SARs or the amount of gain realizable therefrom, although the Equity Plan provides that restrictions may be imposed by the administrator in the SAR agreements. SARs under the Equity Plan may be settled in cash or Class A ordinary shares, or in a combination of both, at the election of the administrator.

    Dividend Equivalents represent the value of the dividends, if any, per Class A ordinary share paid by us, calculated with reference to the number of Class A ordinary shares covered by the award. The Equity Plan provides that dividend equivalents may be settled in cash or Class A ordinary shares and at such times as determined by the administrator.

    Share Payments are payments made to employees, consultants or non-employee directors in the form of Class A ordinary shares or an option or other right to purchase Class A ordinary shares. Share payments may be made as part of a bonus, deferred compensation or other arrangement and may be subject to a vesting schedule, including vesting upon the attainment of performance criteria, in which case the share payment will not be made until the vesting criteria have been satisfied. Share payments may be made in lieu of cash compensation that would otherwise be payable to the employee, consultant or non-employee director or share payments may be made as a bonus payment in addition to compensation otherwise payable to such individuals.

Change in control

        The Equity Plan provides that the administrator may, in its discretion, provide that awards issued under the Equity Plan are subject to acceleration, cash-out, termination, assumption, substitution or conversion of such awards in the event of a change in control or certain other unusual or nonrecurring events or transactions. In addition, the administrator also has complete discretion to structure one or more awards under the Equity Plan to provide that such awards become vested and exercisable or payable on an accelerated basis in the event such awards are assumed or replaced with equivalent awards but the individual's service with us or the acquiring entity is subsequently terminated within a designated period following the change in control event. A change in control event under the Equity Plan is generally defined as a merger, consolidation, reorganization or business combination in which we are involved, directly or indirectly (other than a merger, consolidation, reorganization or business combination which results in our outstanding voting securities immediately before the transaction continuing to represent a majority of the voting power of the acquiring company's outstanding voting securities) after which a person or group (other than our existing equity-holders) beneficially owns more than 50% of the outstanding voting securities of the surviving entity immediately after the transaction, or the sale, exchange or transfer of all or substantially all of our assets.

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Adjustments of awards

        In the event of any stock dividend, stock split, combination or exchange of shares, merger, consolidation, spin-off, recapitalization, distribution of our assets to shareholders (other than normal cash dividends) or any other corporate event affecting the number of outstanding Class A ordinary shares in our capital or the share price of our Class A ordinary shares that would require adjustments to the Equity Plan or any awards under the Equity Plan in order to prevent the dilution or enlargement of the potential benefits intended to be made available thereunder, the Equity Plan provides that the administrator may make equitable adjustments, as determined in its discretion, to the aggregate number and type of shares subject to the Equity Plan, the number and kind of shares subject to outstanding awards and the terms and conditions of outstanding awards (including, without limitation, any applicable performance targets or criteria with respect to such awards), and the grant or exercise price per share of any outstanding awards under the Equity Plan.

Amendment and termination

        The Equity Plan provides that our board of directors or the remuneration committee (with the approval of the board of directors) may terminate, amend or modify the Equity Plan at any time and from time to time. However, the Equity Plan generally requires us to obtain shareholder approval to the extent required by applicable law, rule or regulation (including any applicable stock exchange law), including in connection with any amendments to increase the number of shares available under the Equity Plan (other than in connection with certain corporate events, as described above).

Securities laws

        The Equity Plan is designed to comply with all applicable provisions of the Securities Act and the Exchange Act and, to the extent applicable, any and all regulations and rules promulgated by the SEC thereunder. The Equity Plan is administered, and stock options will be granted and may be exercised, only in such a manner as to conform to such laws, rules and regulations. On 13 August 2012, we filed with the SEC a registration statement on Form S-8 covering Class A ordinary shares issuable under the Equity Plan.

UK Subplan

        Our board of directors approved the 2012 UK Company Share Option UK Sub-Plan on 10 September 2013. This is a sub-plan to the Equity Plan which allows for the grant of stock options in a tax efficient manner to employees who are UK residents. It derives its powers and authority from the Equity Plan and does not create any enhanced or additional rights. This sub-plan does not increase the share reserve under the Equity Plan.

C.    BOARD PRACTICES

Board of directors

        We currently have 12 directors, three of whom are independent directors, on our board of directors. Any director on our board may be removed by way of an ordinary resolution of shareholders or by our shareholders holding a majority of the voting power of our outstanding ordinary shares by notice in writing to the Company. Any vacancies on our board of directors or additions to the existing board of directors can be filled by our shareholders holding a majority of the voting power of our outstanding ordinary shares by notice in writing to the Company. Each of our directors holds office until he resigns or is removed from office as discussed above.

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Committees of the Board of directors and Corporate Governance

        Our board of directors has established an audit committee and a remuneration committee. The composition and responsibilities of each committee are described below. Members will serve on these committees until their resignation or until otherwise determined by our board of directors. In the future, our board of directors may establish other committees, as it deems appropriate, to assist with its responsibilities.

Audit committee

        Our audit committee consists of Messrs. Robert Leitão, Manu Sawhney and John Hooks. Our board of directors determined that Messrs. Robert Leitão, Manu Sawhney and John Hooks satisfy the "independence" requirements set forth in Rule 10A-3 under the Exchange Act. Mr. Robert Leitão acts as chairman of our audit committee and satisfies the criteria of an audit committee financial expert as set forth under the applicable rules of the Exchange Act. A copy of our audit committee charter is available on our website. The inclusion of our website in this Annual Report does not include or incorporate by reference the information on our website into this Annual Report. The audit committee oversees our accounting and financial reporting processes and the audits of our financial statements. The audit committee is responsible for, among other things:

    selecting our independent registered public accounting firm and pre-approving all auditing and non-auditing services permitted to be performed by our independent registered public accounting firm;

    reviewing with our independent registered public accounting firm any audit issues or difficulties and management's response;

    discussing the annual audited financial statements with management and our independent registered public accounting firm;

    reviewing major issues as to the adequacy of our internal controls and any special audit steps adopted in light of significant control deficiencies;

    annually reviewing and reassessing the adequacy of our audit committee charter;

    such other matters that are specifically delegated to our audit committee by our board of directors from time to time; and

    meeting separately and periodically with management, our internal auditors and our independent registered public accounting firm.

Remuneration committee

        Our remuneration committee consists of Messrs. Joel Glazer, Avram Glazer and Robert Leitão. Mr. Joel Glazer is the chairman of our remuneration committee. A copy of our remuneration committee charter is available on our website. The inclusion of our website in this Annual Report does not include or incorporate by reference the information on our website into this Annual Report. The remuneration committee is responsible for, among other things:

    determining the levels of remuneration for each of our executive officers and directors; however, no member of the remuneration committee will participate in decisions relating to his or her remuneration;

    establishing and reviewing the objectives of our management compensation programs and compensation policies;

    reviewing and approving corporate goals and objectives relevant to the remuneration of senior management, including annual and long-term performance goals and objectives;

    evaluating the performance of members of senior management and recommending and monitoring the remuneration of members of senior management; and

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    reviewing, approving and recommending the adoption of any equity-based or non-equity based compensation plan for our employees or consultants and administering such plan.

        We have availed ourselves of certain exemptions afforded to foreign private issuers under New York Stock Exchange rules, which exempt us from the requirement that we have a remuneration committee composed entirely of independent directors.

D.    EMPLOYEES

Employees

        The average monthly number of employees during the years ended 30 June 2019, 2018 and 2017, including directors, was as follows:

 
  2019
Number
  2018
Number
  2017
Number
 

Average number of employees:

                   

Football—men's and women's players

    104