Company Quick10K Filing
Nevada Canyon Gold
Closing Price ($) Shares Out (MM) Market Cap ($MM)
$0.00 45 $6
10-K 2020-03-27 Annual: 2019-12-31
10-Q 2019-11-12 Quarter: 2019-09-30
10-Q 2019-08-13 Quarter: 2019-06-30
10-Q 2019-05-15 Quarter: 2019-03-31
10-K 2019-04-01 Annual: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-11-13 Quarter: 2018-09-30
10-Q 2018-07-30 Quarter: 2018-06-30
10-Q 2018-05-15 Quarter: 2018-03-31
10-K 2018-04-16 Annual: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-11-13 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-Q 2017-08-14 Quarter: 2017-06-30
10-Q 2017-05-15 Quarter: 2017-03-31
10-K 2017-03-21 Annual: 2016-12-31
10-Q 2016-11-14 Quarter: 2016-09-30
10-Q 2016-08-15 Quarter: 2016-06-30
10-Q 2016-05-11 Quarter: 2016-03-31
10-K 2016-03-15 Annual: 2015-12-31
10-Q 2015-11-13 Quarter: 2015-09-30
10-Q 2015-08-18 Quarter: 2015-06-30
10-Q 2015-05-18 Quarter: 2015-03-31
10-K 2015-03-30 Annual: 2014-12-31
10-Q 2014-11-17 Quarter: 2014-09-30
8-K 2018-07-12 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
NGLD 2019-12-31
Part I
Item 1. Description of Business
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 2. Properties
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Part II
Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6. Selected Financial Data
Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Conditions and Results of Operations
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Note 1 - Nature of Business
Note 2 - Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Note 3 - Related Party Transactions
Note 4 - Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities
Note 5 - Mineral Property Interests
Note 6 - Equity Investment
Note 7 - Notes and Advances Payable
Note 8 - Stockholders' Equity
Note 9 - Income Taxes
Note 10 - Subsequent Event
Item 9. Controls and Procedures
Item 9B. Other Information
Part III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11. Executive Compensation
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services
Part IV
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules
EX-31.1 ex31-1.htm
EX-32.1 ex32-1.htm

Nevada Canyon Gold Earnings 2019-12-31

NGLD 10K Annual Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

Comparables ($MM TTM)
Ticker M Cap Assets Liab Rev G Profit Net Inc EBITDA EV G Margin EV/EBITDA ROA
OPTI 6 0 0 -1 -1 -15 19.4 68,700,000%
VBIO 6 5 1 0 0 -13 -13 2 16% -0.1 -274%
SGSI 6 15 18 39 7 0 2 6 18% 2.5 0%
FGCO 6 2 0 4 4 -1 -1 6 98% -10.3 -61%
NGLD 6 3 1 0 0 1 1 6 5.0 43%
CDIF 6 1 5 2 1 -2 -2 7 27% -3.3 -195%
TXHD 6 0 0 1 1 -3 -3 6 96% -2.1 -621%
LOGX 6 0 8 0 0 -5 -3 8 0% -2.5 -18,131%
BTCS 6 1 1 0 0 -1 -1 6 -5.6 -165%
PBIO 6 2 10 2 1 -10 -6 6 39% -0.9 -447%

10-K 1 form10-k.htm

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

[X] ANNUAL REPORT under SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended: December 31, 2019

 

[  ] TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from ______ to ______

 

Commission File No. 333-196075

 

Nevada Canyon Gold Corp.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)

 

Nevada   46-5152859
(State or other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

 

316 California Avenue, Suite 543, Reno, NV 89509

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (888) 909-5548

 

Common Stock, $0.0001 par value per share   None
(Title of Each Class)   (Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered)

 

Securities registered under Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act: Common Stock, $0.0001 par value

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes [  ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act. Yes [  ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes [X] No [  ] [check “yes” if statement is accurate.]

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S−K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10−K or any amendment to this Form 10−K. [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, non-accelerated filer or a small. See definition of “large accelerated filer, accelerated filer and smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer [  ] Accelerated filer [  ] Non-accelerated filer [  ] Smaller reporting company [X]
    (Do not check if smaller reporting company)  

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes [  ] No [X]

 

State the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was sold, or the average bid and asked price of such common equity, as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter: $608,850 based on average of closing bid and ask for Nevada Canyon Gold Corp. shares on June 28, 2019.

 

The number of shares of the registrant’s common stock issued and outstanding as of March 26, 2020, was 44,550,000.

 

 

 

 
 

 

table of contents

 

PART I  
Item 1. Description of Business. 2
Item 1A. Risk Factors. 6
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments. 20
Item 2. Properties. 20
Item 3. Legal Proceedings. 20
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures. 20
PART II  
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities. 20
Item 6. Selected Financial Data. 21
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Conditions and Results of Operations. 21
Results of Operations 21
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements 24
Recent Accounting Pronouncements 24
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk. 24
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data. 24
Financial Statements 25
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm F-1
Balance Sheets F-2
Statements of Operations F-3
Statement of Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit) F-4
Statements of Cash Flow F-5
Notes to the Financial Statements F-6
Item 9. Controls and Procedures. 26
Item 9B. Other Information. 27
PART III  
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance. 27
Item 11. Executive Compensation 30
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters. 31
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence. 31
Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services. 31
PART IV  
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules. 32
CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO SECTION 302 (a) OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002  
CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO 18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350, AS ENACTED PURSUANT TO SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002  

 

 

 
 

 

CAUTIONARY NOTE ABOUT FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

The information contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K includes some statements that are not purely historical and that are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), and as such, may involve risks and uncertainties. These forward-looking statements relate to, among other things, expectations of the business environment in which we operate, perceived opportunities in the market and statements regarding our mission and vision. In addition, any statements that refer to projections, forecasts or other characterizations of future events or circumstances, including any underlying assumptions, are forward-looking statements. You can generally identify forward-looking statements as statements containing the words “anticipates,” “believes,” “continue,” “could,” “estimates,” “expects,” “intends,” “may,” “might,” “plans,” “possible,” “potential,” “predicts,” “projects,” “seeks,” “should,” “will,” “would” and similar expressions, or the negatives of such terms, but the absence of these words does not mean that a statement is not forward-looking.

 

Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results or outcomes to differ materially from those expressed in the forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements contained herein are based on various assumptions, many of which are based, in turn, upon further assumptions. Our expectations, beliefs and forward-looking statements are expressed in good faith on the basis of management’s views and assumptions as of the time the statements are made, but there can be no assurance that management’s expectations, beliefs or projections will result or be achieved or accomplished.

 

In addition to other factors and matters discussed elsewhere herein, the following are important factors that, in our view, could cause actual results to differ materially from those discussed in the forward-looking statements: technological advances, impact of competition, dependence on key personnel and the need to attract new management, effectiveness of cost and marketing efforts, acceptances of products, ability to expand markets and the availability of capital or other funding on terms satisfactory to us. We disclaim any obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof.

 

For a discussion of the risks, uncertainties, and assumptions that could affect our future events, developments or results, you should carefully review the “Risk Factors” set forth under “Item 1. Description of Business”. In light of these risks, uncertainties and assumptions, the future events, developments or results described by our forward-looking statements herein could turn to be materially different from those we discuss or imply.

 

 

 1  
 

 

PART I

 

Item 1. Description of Business

 

Organization

 

We were incorporated under the laws of the State of Nevada on February 27, 2014, with fiscal year end on December 31, under the original name Tech Foundry Ventures, Inc. On July 6, 2016, we changed our name to Nevada Canyon Gold Corp. On April 28, 2016, we split our common stock on a 10:1 basis without affecting the par value. All shares and per share amounts have been retroactively restated to account for the split.

 

We have never been party to any bankruptcy, receivership or similar proceeding, nor have we undergone any material reclassification, merger, consolidation, purchase or sale of a significant amount of assets not in the ordinary course of business.

 

We were a consulting service company, which provided management and consulting services to early and middle stage start-ups. We were engaged by our first client in June 2015. In December 2015, we changed our business to mineral exploration, when we acquired Nevada Canyon Gold Corporation, a privately held Nevada corporation.

 

Our principal business, executive and registered statutory office is located at 316 California Avenue, Suite 543, Reno, NV 89509 and our telephone number is (888) 909-5548, fax is (888) 909-1033 and email contact is info@nevadacanyongold.com. Our website address is www.nevadacanyongold.com.

 

Business

 

As of the date of this Annual report on Form 10-K, our mineral interests are represented by Lazy Claims Property and Loman Property.

 

Lazy Claims Property

 

On August 2, 2017, we entered into an exploration lease agreement (the “Lazy Claims Agreement”) with Tarsis Resources US Inc. (“Tarsis”), a Nevada corporation, to lease rights to three Lazy claims totaling 60 acres (the “Lazy Claims”). The term of the Lazy Claims Agreement is ten years and is subject to extension for an additional two consecutive 10-year terms. Full consideration of the Lazy Claims Agreement consists of the following: an initial cash payment of $1,000 to Tarsis, which we paid upon the execution of the Lazy Claims Agreement, with $2,000 payable to Tarsis on each subsequent anniversary of the effective date. We agreed to pay Tarsis a 2% production royalty (the “Lazy Claims Royalty”) based on the gross returns from the production and sale of minerals from the Lazy Claims Property. Should the Lazy Claims Royalty payments to Tarsis be in excess of $2,000 per year, we will not be required to pay a $2,000 annual minimum payment. As of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, we retain our leasing rights to the Lazy Claims.

 

Location and means of access

 

The Lazy Claims consist of three claims (60 acres) and are located within the Walker Lane shear zone, a 60-mile-wide structural corridor extending in a southeast direction from Reno, Nevada. The Project is located in Mineral County, Nevada, with year-round access and established infrastructure, 18 miles southeast of Hawthorne, NV via U.S. Highway 95.

 

Geology

 

The US Geological Survey has mapped the area and has published the results as Miscellaneous Field Studies maps, MF 1485 and MF 1486. Mapped units include Paleozoic metasediments, Mesozoic sediments and intrusions, and Cenozoic volcanic rocks and porphyry intrusions. Like most of the Walker Lane, the area has a strong system of N50W- trending, normal and strike-slip faults along with a series of generally NE-trending thrust faults. The area has seen prospecting since the late 1800’s and contains hundreds of prospect pits and adits that explore various styles of base and precious metal mineralization.

 

 2  
 

 

The published USGS geologic quadrangle map for the Pamlico mine area, (MF 1485, MF 1486, Oldow, 1985), shows the eastern portion of the Lazy Claims project area underlain by a thick, undivided sequence of folded and faulted Mesozoic and or Paleozoic volcanic and sedimentary rocks. The western portion of the project is underlain by Jurassic- to Triassic-age Sunrise and Gabbs Formations comprising interbedded limestones and calcareous mudstones. Locally, black Tertiary basalt caps the older rocks. The structural fabric is dominated by NW-trending, Walker Lane structures and by an older N70o E fabric, several phases of strongly altered and locally mineralized intrusive rocks as well as zones of jasperoids and strong silicification has been identified.

 

Mineralization

 

Previous work on the project has identified the following discrete zones of mineralization: (1) the Lazy Man gold zone which is a structurally-controlled, intrusion-related gold deposit that produced about 1,200 oz Au from NW-trending, high grade zones partially hosted by altered rhyolite dikes, (2) areas of strong vuggy silica alteration in both intrusive porphyritic rocks and volcanic agglomerates particularly in the footwall of the Lazy Man zone, (3) a large area of barite and copper mineralization with intense bleaching east of the gold zone, (4) strong copper showings to the southeast of the gold zone, (5) the Loman antimony mine to the southwest of the gold zone, (6) skarn zones to the west of the gold zone, (7) a large zone of strong IP response to the west of the gold zone, and (8) a pyrrhotite porphyry intrusion west of the gold zone.

 

Exploration History

 

The Lazy Claims cover several past-producing small-scale high-grade mines, altered and mineralized zones discovered by geological compilations and mapping of the historical workings, discovered by the previous exploration on the Project. The previous sampling on the project has revealed the presence of copper, bismuth, and antimony as well as pervasive lower grade gold mineralization, cut by vein structures (some previously mined) of higher grade gold. Previous induced polarization surveys also denoted the presence of significant coincident I.P. anomalies. Below is a summary of previous exploration of identified mineralized areas within the properties.

 

Lazy Man Mine

 

The main structure that the mine workings explore has an N35oW trend and dips about 60o to the southwest. The vein was discovered in 1933 by a local prospector. The mine is credited with historic production of about 1,200 ounces of gold from 2,800 feet (853 m) of underground workings. The three main shafts explore about 1,000 feet (304 m) of strike length on the vein, and the shafts extend to a maximum depth of 300 feet (91 m). The workings have been mapped and sampled in some detail by Congdon and Carey in 1974, and many multi-ounce gold values are noted in the remaining vein material. One 4.9 foot-long (1.5 m) sample from a cross cut on the 300 level contained 2.2 oz Au/ton (68.4g/t). The high-grade veins occur within a broader zone of intense quartz-sericite alteration, which has previously been mapped as rhyolite. Most of the mine dumps are composed of this “rhyolite”, and Congdon and Carey measured approximately 8,000 tons of this material containing from 0.09 to 0.21 oz Au/ton (3.07 to 7.1 g/t Au). Gold occurs in iron oxide-filled fractures along with druzy quartz veinlets, and there is occasionally visible gold. Detailed mapping around the old workings of the Lazy Man mine has delineated a zone of intense acid-leaching in intrusive porphyritic rocks and volcanic agglomerates primarily in the footwall of the vein. The rock now has a porous and vuggy appearance; this style of alteration is interpreted to be “Vuggy Silica” alteration that is typical of the upper levels of high-sulfidation ore deposits. Surrounding the vuggy silica zone is a zone of strong argillic alteration. Recent work has discovered previously unrecognized mineralized zones east of and parallel to the Lazy Man vein that contain silicified, brecciated outcrops assaying 2.26 g/t Au and 8,150 ppm As. These zones have been traced for over 1,200 feet (365 m) and are up to 60 feet (18 m) wide.

 

Exploration program

 

In 2019 we completed a portion of the Phase I exploration program on the Lazy Claims Property, which consisted of reconnaissance prospecting, geological mapping, surface trenching, and relocating historical workings. Completion of the Phase I program is scheduled for spring of 2020. Once completed, Phase I program will provide accurate modern data to assist in the planning of the Phase II drill program. The Phase II drill program is expected to begin later in 2020, following the completion of a ground-based geophysical survey and final compilation of all the Phase I results.

 

 3  
 

 

Loman Property

 

In December 2019 we acquired 27 unpatented mining claims for a total of $10,395 from a third-party (the “Loman Property”). As at the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, the Loman Property claims are being re-registered into the Company’s name.

 

Location and means of access

 

The Loman Property is located in Mineral County, Nevada, within the Walker Lane shear zone, a 60-mile-wide structural corridor extending in a southeast direction from Reno, Nevada, located 20 miles southeast of Hawthorne, Nevada, along U.S. Highway 95. The project has excellent year-round access and infrastructure within Mineral County, one of the most pro-mining counties in the pro-mining states and highest-grade gold districts of Nevada.

 

The Loman Property consists of 27 unpatented mining claims having a combined area of approximately 540 acres. The Loman Property covers several past producing small-scale high-grade gold and copper mines, altered and mineralized zones discovered by previous geological compilations and mapping of the historical workings. Historical sampling on the project has revealed the presence of copper, bismuth, and antimony as well as pervasive lower grade gold mineralization, cut by vein structures (some previously mined) of higher-grade gold. Previous geophysical surveys also denoted the presence of significant coincident I.P. and magnetic anomalies. These factors clearly demonstrate the potential of this relatively unexplored project for the discovery of gold mineralization.

 

The Loman Property is located near several past producing mines including the Bodie, Aurora, Borealis, Pamlico, Evening Star, Mabel, Mindoro and Camp Douglas Mines. Held by private interests for most of its history, the Loman Property remains very underexplored with a potential for new discoveries on several exploration targets with multiple zones.

 

Exploration program

 

We plan to begin Phase I of the exploration program in early 2020. Phase I will consist of reconnaissance prospecting, geological mapping, surface trenching, relocating historical workings and ground based geophysical surveying. This Phase I program will provide accurate modern data to assist in the planning of the Phase II drill program. Phase I is expected to last six to eight weeks, with Phase II expected to begin following the compilation of the Phase I results, later in 2020.

 

Past Projects: Garfield Flats Project

 

On June 7, 2017, we entered into an exploration lease and option to purchase agreement (the “Garfield Agreement”) with Goodsprings Development LLC (“Goodsprings”), a Nevada limited liability corporation on the Garfield Flats Project (the “Garfield Property”), which consisted of six Orsa Claims and six Lazy Claims totaling 240 acres located in sections 27 and 28 of T7N, R32E, Mineral County, Nevada about 18 miles southeast of the town of Hawthorne. The term of the Garfield Agreement was ten years and was subject to extension for two additional terms of ten years each.

 

In order to retain the rights to the exploration lease, we were required to pay a total of $115,000 in series of annual payments, and the vendor retained a 2% production royalty based on the gross smelter returns from the Garfield Property. At any time during the term of the Agreement, we had a right to acquire 100% ownership of the Garfield Property for a one-time payment of $300,000 (the “Purchase Price”).

 

During our Fiscal 2017, we staked an additional 69 Orsa Claims and 75 Lazy Claims, with a total paid cost of $54,152. These claims were added to the Garfield Flats Project.

 

 4  
 

 

On July 11, 2018, we entered into a definitive purchase agreement with Walker River Resources Corp. (“WRR”) for the sale of the Garfield Agreement. Full consideration for the Garfield Agreement consisted of a one-time cash payment of $55,000 (the “Cash Consideration”). In lieu of the Cash Consideration, WRR agreed to extinguish the $55,000 note payable the Company issued to WRR during its fiscal 2017. This transaction resulted in a loss from the sale of the mineral interest of $14,152.

 

Competition

 

The mineral exploration business is an extremely competitive industry. We are competing with many other exploration companies looking for minerals. We are one of the smallest exploration companies and a very small participant in the mineral exploration business. Being a junior mineral exploration company, we compete with other similar companies for financing and joint venture partners, and for resources such as professional geologists, camp staff, helicopters, and mineral exploration contractors and supplies. We do not represent a competitive presence in the industry.

 

Raw Materials

 

The raw materials for our exploration programs include camp equipment, hand exploration tools, sample bags, first aid supplies, groceries, and propane. All of these types of materials are readily available from a variety of local suppliers.

 

Dependence on Customers

 

As a junior exploration company, we have no customers.

 

Trademarks and Patents

 

We have no intellectual property such as patents or trademarks and, other than the obligations under the exploration lease agreement with Tarsis Resources US Inc., no royalty agreements or labor contracts.

 

Need For Any Government Approval of Principal Products or Services

 

Our exploration activities on our claims may require permits from the BLM and several other governmental agencies. We may be unable to obtain these permits in a timely manner, on reasonable terms, or at all. If we cannot obtain or maintain the necessary permits, or if there is a delay in receiving these permits, our timetable and business plan for exploration of our exploration claims will be adversely affected. Furthermore, the mining business is subject to various levels of government controls and regulations, which are supplemented and revised from time to time. We cannot predict what additional legislation or revisions might be proposed that could affect our business or when any proposals, if enacted, might become effective. Such changes, however, could require more operating capital and expenditures and could prevent or delay some of our operations.

 

The various levels of government controls and regulations address, among other things, the environmental impact of mining and mineral processing operations. For mining and processing, legislation and regulations in various jurisdictions establish performance standards, air and water quality emission standards and other design or operational requirements for various components of operations, including health and safety standards. Legislation and regulations also establish requirements for decommissioning, reclaiming and rehabilitating mining properties following the cessation of operations, and may require that some former mining properties be managed for long periods of time. As we are not mining or processing, and are unlikely to do so for some years, we have not investigated these regulations.

 

None of the exploration work that we have completed to date requires an environmental permit, however, we must ensure timely repair of any damage done to the land during exploration.

 

We believe that we are in substantial compliance with all material government controls and regulations on the Lazy Claims Property and on the Loman Property.

 

 5  
 

 

Research and Development

 

We have not spent any money on research and development activities.

 

Employees

 

At the present time, we do not have any employees other than our sole officer who devotes his time as needed to our business and expects to continue devoting approximately 10 hours per week in 2020.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

We are not involved in any legal proceedings nor are we aware of any pending or threatened litigation against us. Neither our sole officer nor our directors are party to any legal proceeding or litigation. None of our directors or our sole officer has been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor relating to securities or performance in corporate office.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors

 

We are subject to those financial risks generally associated with early-stage enterprises. Since we have sustained losses since inception, we will require financing to fund our development activities and to support our operations and will independently seek additional financing. However, we may be unable to obtain such financing. We are also subject to risk factors specific to our business strategy and the mining and exploration industry.

 

RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH OUR COMPANY AND INDUSTRY

 

The following are certain risk factors that could affect our business, financial position, results of operations or cash flows. These risk factors should be considered along with the forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K because these factors could cause our actual results or financial condition to differ materially from those projected in forward-looking statements. The following discussion is not an all-inclusive listing of risks, although we believe these are the more material risks that we face. If any of the following occur, our business, financial position, results of operations or cash flows could be negatively affected. We caution the reader to keep these risk factors in mind and refrain from attributing undue certainty to any forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this Annual Report.

 

We are a junior exploration company incorporated on February 27, 2014. We have a limited operating history upon which an evaluation of our future prospects can be made. As at December 31, 2019, we had a working capital deficit of $1,060,912, cash on hand of $367,201, and $547,211 in retained deficit. Our capital assets include an equity investment in WRR shares and warrants, which we can use as a source of additional cash inflow, should we decide to sell all or part of our investment. These details must be considered in light of the substantial risks, expenses, and difficulties encountered by new entrants into the mining and mineral exploration industry. Our ability to achieve and maintain profitability and positive cash flow is highly dependent upon a number of factors. Based upon current plans, we expect to incur losses in future periods as we incur expenses associated with our operations and exploration programs. Further, we cannot guarantee that we will be successful in realizing future revenues or in achieving or sustaining positive cash flow at any time in the future. Any such failure could result in the possible closure of our business or force us to seek additional capital through loans or additional sales of our equity securities to continue business operations, which would dilute the value of any shares.

 

As a public company, we will have to comply with numerous financial reporting and legal requirements, including those pertaining to audits and internal control. The cost of these compliance requirements could be significant. If we are unable to satisfy the costs in the normal course of business and/or through the issuance of our shares, we may not be able to continue as a going concern.

 

Our independent registered auditors’ report includes an explanatory paragraph stating that there is substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

 

Our auditor’s report for the year ended December 31, 2019, expresses an opinion that substantial doubt exists as to whether we can continue as an ongoing business. Moreover, our officers may be unable or unwilling to loan or advance us any funds. See “Audited Financial Statements – Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm”

 

 6  
 

 

We had generated a net income of $173,805 for the year ended December 31, 2019, of which $345,435 resulted from gain on fair value adjustment we recorded on our equity investment, and $232,676 was attributed to gain on sale of WRR shares. Our future is dependent upon our ability to obtain financing, to continue gainfully sell shares of WRR, and upon future profitable operations. In addition to selling part of our equity investment in WRR we may seek additional funds through private placements of our common stock which may result in substantial dilution to our existing shareholders. Our financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded assets, or the amounts of and classification of liabilities that might be necessary in the event we cannot continue in existence.

 

Key management personnel may leave us, which could adversely affect our ability to continue operations.

 

We are entirely dependent on the efforts of Jeffrey Cocks, our president, CEO, CFO, and director, and Michael Levine, a director. The loss of our officer and directors, or of other key personnel hired in the future, could have a material adverse effect on the business and its prospects. There is currently no employment contract by and between any officer/director and us. Also, there is no guarantee that replacement personnel, if any, will help us to operate profitably. They have been and continue to expect to be able to commit approximately 10 hours per week of their time, to the continued implementation of our business plan. If management is required to spend additional time with their outside employment, they may not have sufficient time to devote to us, and we would be unable to continue to implement our business plan resulting in the business failure.

 

We do not maintain key person life insurance on our officer and directors.

 

If we are unable to generate cash from our operations, we may sell our equity investment in WRR or obtain additional funding which may cause substantial dilution to our then existing shareholders.

 

As of December 31, 2019, we had $367,201 in cash on hand and $1,030,406 in equity investments. From April 2014 to December 31, 2019, our initial three shareholders have advanced us $142,232 to cover our working capital expenses. We have raised $85,000 in our initial public offering, $375,000 in private placement, and $16,164 through non-interest bearing advances payable on demand. If we are unable to develop our business or secure additional funds we will have no choice but to continue selling our equity investment in WRR, or our business would fail and our shares may be rendered worthless. To preserve our equity investment in WRR we may seek to obtain debt financing, which may result in substantial dilution to our then existing shareholders. There can also be no assurance that we will be able to successfully dispose of our equity investment in WRR to satisfy our operating needs. The inability to obtain additional capital will restrict our ability to grow and may reduce our ability to continue to conduct business operations. If we are unable to obtain additional financing, we will likely be required to curtail our business plans and possibly cease our operations.

 

General domestic and international economic conditions could have a material adverse effect on our operating results and common stock price and our ability to obtain additional financing.

 

As a result of the current economic downturn and macro-economic challenges currently affecting the economy of the United States and other parts of the world, some of the exploration programs that we may plan could suffer delays or postponement until the economy strengthens, which could in turn effect our ability to obtain additional financing. We anticipate our revenues to be derived from the sale of ore, which could suffer if customers are suffering from the economic downturn. During weak economic conditions, we may not experience any growth if we are unable to obtain financing to enable us to continue our planned operations.

 

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Because Jeffrey Cocks, our officer and director and Michael Levine, our director, reside outside of the United States, it may be difficult for an investor to enforce any right based on U.S. federal securities laws against Messrs. Cocks and Levine, or to enforce a judgment rendered by a United States court against Messrs. Cocks and Levine.

 

While our principal office and operations are located in the United States, Mr. Cocks, our officer and director and Mr. Levine, our director, are non-residents of the United States. Therefore, it may be difficult to effect service of process on Messrs. Cocks and Levine in the United States, and it may be difficult to enforce any judgment rendered against Messrs. Cocks and Levine. As a result, it may be difficult or impossible for an investor to bring an action against Messrs. Cocks and Levine in the event that an investor believes that such investor’s rights have been infringed under the U.S. securities laws, or otherwise. Even if an investor is successful in bringing an action of this kind, it is uncertain whether the laws of Canada may enable that investor to enforce a judgment against the assets of Messrs. Cocks and Levine. As a result, our shareholders may have more difficulty in protecting their interests through actions against our management, directors or major shareholders, compared to shareholders of a corporation whose officers and directors reside within the United States.

 

Our officer and directors may have conflicts in allocating their time to our business.

 

Our officer and directors are required to commit time to our affairs and, accordingly, may have conflicts of interest in allocating management time among various business activities including Mr. Cocks’ competing businesses. Mr. Levine’s current business in Canada is limited to music royalties, primarily the licensing of the rock group Triumph’s music rights; therefore, we do not believe that he presently has any conflicts with us. In the course of other business activities, they may become aware of business opportunities that may be appropriate for presentation to us, as well as the other entities with which they are affiliated. Messrs. Cocks and Levine have orally agreed that any business opportunities that they come across in the United States will be presented to our Company and that any opportunities that they come across in Canada will be made available to their other businesses.

 

We cannot provide assurances that our efforts to eliminate the potential impact of conflicts of interest will be effective.

 

We are subject to the periodic reporting requirements of the Exchange Act that will require us to incur audit fees and legal fees in connection with the preparation of such reports. These additional costs could reduce or eliminate our ability to earn a profit.

 

We are required to file periodic reports with the SEC pursuant to the Exchange Act and the rules and regulations promulgated thereunder. In order to comply with these requirements, our independent registered public accounting firm will have to review our financial statements on a quarterly basis and audit our financial statements on an annual basis. Moreover, our legal counsel will have to review and assist in the preparation of such reports. The costs charged by these professionals for such services cannot be accurately predicted at this time because factors such as the number and type of transactions that we engage in and the complexity of our reports cannot be determined at this time and will have a major effect on the amount of time to be spent by our auditors and attorneys. However, the incurrence of such costs will obviously be an expense to our operations and thus have a negative effect on our ability to meet our overhead requirements and earn a profit. We may be exposed to potential risks resulting from any new requirements under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. If we cannot provide reliable financial reports or prevent fraud, our business and operating results could be harmed, investors could lose confidence in our reported financial information, and the trading price of our common stock, if a market ever develops, could drop significantly.

 

Our internal controls may be inadequate, which could cause our financial reporting to be unreliable and lead to misinformation being disseminated to the public.

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. As defined in Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(f), internal control over financial reporting is a process designed by, or under the supervision of, the principal executive and principal financial officer and effected by the board of directors, management and other personnel, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and includes those policies and procedures that:

 

  pertain to the maintenance of records that in reasonable detail accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of our assets;

 

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  provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that our receipts and expenditures are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and/or our directors; and
     
  provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of our assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

 

Our internal controls may be inadequate or ineffective, which could cause our financial reporting to be unreliable and lead to misinformation being disseminated to the public. Investors relying upon this misinformation may make an uninformed investment decision.

 

Our board of directors has significant control over us, and we have not established committees comprised of independent directors.

 

We have only two directors one of whom holds all of our officer positions. Accordingly, we cannot establish board committees comprised of independent members to oversee functions like compensation or audit issues. In addition, since we only have two directors, they have significant control over all corporate issues. We do not have an audit or compensation committee comprised of independent directors. Our two directors performing these functions are not independent directors. Thus, there is a potential conflict in that our directors are also engaged in management and participate in decisions concerning management compensation and audit issues that may affect management performance.

 

Until we have a larger board of directors that would include some independent members, if ever, there will be limited oversight of our directors’ decisions and activities and little ability for minority shareholders to challenge or reverse those activities and decisions, even if they are not in the best interests of minority shareholders.

 

We are an “emerging growth company,” and we cannot be certain if the reduced reporting requirements applicable to emerging growth companies will make our common stock less attractive to investors.

 

As an “Emerging Growth Company” under The Jobs Act, we are permitted to rely on exemptions from certain disclosure requirements

 

We qualify as an “emerging growth company” under the JOBS Act. As a result, we are permitted to, and intend to, rely on exemptions from certain disclosure requirements. For so long as we are an emerging growth company, we will not be required to:

 

  have an auditor report on our internal controls over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act;
     
  provide an auditor attestation with respect to management’s report on the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting;
     
  comply with any requirement that may be adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board regarding mandatory audit firm rotation or a supplement to the auditor’s report providing additional information about the audit and the financial statements (i.e., an auditor discussion and analysis);
     
  submit certain executive compensation matters to shareholder advisory votes, such as “say-on-pay” and “say-on-frequency;” and
     
  disclose certain executive compensation related items such as the correlation between executive compensation and performance and comparisons of the Chief Executive’s compensation to median employee compensation.

 

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In addition, Section 107 of the JOBS Act also provides that an emerging growth company can take advantage of the extended transition period provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act for complying with new or revised accounting standards. In other words, an emerging growth company can delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. We have elected to take advantage of the benefits of this extended transition period. Our financial statements may therefore not be comparable to those of companies that comply with such new or revised accounting standards.

 

We will remain an “emerging growth company” for up to five years, or until the earliest of (i) the last day of the first fiscal year in which our total annual gross revenues exceed $1 billion, (ii) the date that we become a “large accelerated filer” as defined in Rule 12b-2 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, which would occur if the market value of our ordinary shares that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the last business day of our most recently completed second fiscal quarter or (iii) the date on which we have issued more than $1 billion in non-convertible debt during the preceding three year period. Even if we no longer qualify for the exemptions for an emerging growth company, we may still be, in certain circumstances, subject to scaled disclosure requirements as a smaller reporting company. For example, smaller reporting companies, like emerging growth companies, are not required to provide a compensation discussion and analysis under Item 402(b) of Regulation S-K or auditor attestation of internal controls over financial reporting.

 

Until such time, however, we cannot predict if investors will find our common stock less attractive because we may rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our common stock less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our common stock and our stock price may be more volatile.

 

Our mineral claims have no known reserves.

 

The probability of a mining claim having the necessary quantity and quality of ore to result in a profitable mining operation is uncertain and our claims, even with large investments by us, may never generate a profit.

 

We are dependent upon the successful exploration of our mining claims and the discovery of valuable mineralization on those claims for our success. Should we fail to locate economically extractable mineralization on our mineral claims, or enter into an agreement to option and sell our interests to mining production Company, we will have no revenue and our business will fail.

 

Mineral deposit estimates are imprecise and subject to error.

 

Mineral deposit estimation calculations, when made, may prove unreliable. Assumptions made regarding the supporting data may prove inaccurate and unforeseen events may lead to further inaccuracies. Sample variability, mining and processing adjustments, environmental changes, metal price fluctuations, and legal and regulatory changes are all factors that could lead to deviations from any original estimations. Our current mineral claims have no known ore reserves. Despite future investment in exploration activities, there is no guarantee we will locate a commercially viable ore deposit or reserve. Most exploration projects do not result in discovery of commercially viable and mineable ore deposits. With little capital available, we may have to limit our exploration efforts, which decrease the chances of finding a commercially viable ore body. Even if potentially promising mineralization is identified, we may not be able to put our claims into production due to many factors, including high extraction costs, low gold prices, or inadequate amount and reduced recovery rates. If the exploration activities do not suggest a commercially successful prospect we may have to abandon our plans to pursue efforts to develop the claims.

 

Our future exploratory operations may be adversely affected by future governmental and environmental regulations and permitting.

 

Environmental regulations may negatively affect the progression of operations and these regulations may become stricter in the future. In the U.S., all mining is regulated by Federal and State level government agencies. Obtaining licenses and permits from these agencies as well as an environmental impact study for each mining property must be completed before starting mining activities. These are expensive and affect the timing of operations. Pollution can be anticipated with mining activities. If we are unable to comply with current or future regulations, we may expose ourselves to fines, penalties and litigation that could cause our business to fail.

 

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Further, the laws, regulations, policies or current administrative practices of any government body, organization or regulatory agency in the U.S. or Nevada may be changed, applied or interpreted in a manner which will fundamentally alter our ability to carry on our business.

 

The actions, policies or regulations, or changes thereto, of any government body or regulatory agency, or other special interest groups, may have a detrimental effect on us. Any or all of these situations may have a negative impact on our ability to operate and/or our profitably.

 

We are subject to inherent mining hazards and risks that may result in future financial obligations.

 

Risks and hazards associated with the mining industry may adversely affect our operations such as, but not limited to, political and country risks, industrial accidents, labor disputes, inability to retain necessary personnel or equipment, environmental hazards, unexpected geologic formations, cave-ins, landslides, flooding and monsoons, fires, explosions, power outages, processing problems. Personal injury and death could result, as well as property damage, delays in mining, environmental damage, legal liability and monetary loss. We may not be able to obtain insurance to cover these risks at economically reasonable premiums. We do not carry any sort of insurance and may have difficulties obtaining such once operations start as insurance is generally sparse and cost prohibitive.

 

Our financial performance depends on the successful operation of our exploration activities, which are subject to various operational risks.

 

There is no assurance we will be successful in our mining exploration activities. Our financial performance depends on the successful operation of our future exploration activities. The cost of operation and maintenance, and the results of the proposed activities may be adversely affected by a variety of factors, including the following:

 

  regular and unexpected maintenance and replacement expenditures;
  shutdowns due to the breakdown or failure of our equipment;
  labor disputes;
  the presence of hazardous materials on our planned project sites;
  catastrophic events such as fires, explosions, earthquakes, landslides, floods, releases of hazardous materials, severe storms or similar occurrences affecting our proposed exploration activities; and
  unforeseen results and problems inherent in mining and exploration activities.

 

Any of these events could significantly increase the expenses incurred our planned and future exploration activities and could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, future results, and cash flow if any.

 

In addition, our exploration activities would be subject to substantial risks, including:

 

  unanticipated cost increases;
  shortages and inconsistent qualities of equipment, material, and labor;
  work stoppages;
  inability to obtain permits and other regulatory matters; and
  failure by key suppliers, component manufacturers, and vendors to timely and properly perform.

 

As all our mineral claims are in the early-exploration stage, there can be no assurance that we will identify commercially viable qualities and quantities of mineralization on the claims.

 

Exploration for mineralization is subject to a number of risk factors. Few properties that are explored are ultimately developed into producing mines. Our mineral claims are in the early-exploration stage and are without any identified economically extractable mineralization. We may not establish commercially viable quantities and qualities of economically extractable mineralization on our mineral claims and, even if we do, there is no guarantee that we will be able to interest a third-party mining company to enter into a business arrangement, e.g., option to purchase arrangement with us, which could cause our business to fail.

 

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Because we anticipate our operating expenses will increase prior to us earning revenues, we may never achieve profitability.

 

Prior to completion of the exploration stage, we anticipate incurring increased operating expenses without realizing any revenues, and therefore incur significant losses into the foreseeable future. We recognize that if we are unable to generate significant revenues from the exploration of our mineral claims, we will not be able to earn profits or continue future proposed operations, which will adversely affect us. There is no history upon which to base any assumption as to the likelihood that we will prove successful, and we can provide no assurance that we will generate any revenues or ever achieve profitability. If we are unsuccessful in addressing these risks, our business will most likely fail.

 

Because of the inherent dangers involved in mineral exploration, there is a risk that we may incur liability or damages as we conduct our business.

 

The search for valuable mineralization involves numerous hazards. As a result, we may become subject to liability for such hazards, including pollution, cave-ins and other hazards against which we cannot insure or against which we may elect not to insure. At the present time we do not have any coverage to insure against these hazards. The payment of such liabilities may have a material adverse effect on our financial position.

 

Our exploration activities will be adversely affected if our exploration costs are higher than anticipated.

 

If our exploration costs surpass our budgeted costs, we will not be able to carry out all of our planned exploration of the claims. Factors that could cause exploration costs to increase are: adverse weather conditions, difficult terrain, and shortages of qualified personnel, among others.

 

The price of gold is volatile and a decrease in gold prices could cause us to incur losses.

 

We will be exploring our claims primarily for gold. The profitability of gold exploration and production is directly related to the prevailing market price for gold. The market prices of metals, including the gold market, fluctuate significantly and are affected by a number of factors beyond our control, including, but not limited to, the rate of inflation, the exchange rate of the dollar to other currencies, interest rates, and global economic and political conditions. Price fluctuations in the gold market from the time exploration is undertaken and the time production can commence can significantly affect the profitability of a mine. Accordingly, we may begin to explore for gold at a time when the price of gold or other related mineral make such exploration economically feasible and, subsequently, incur losses because prices have decreased. Adverse fluctuations of metals market prices or the continued decline in the gold market, generally, may force us to curtail or cease our operations.

 

The costs of compliance with environmental laws and obtaining and maintaining environmental permits and governmental approvals required for construction and/or operation, which currently are significant, may increase in the future and could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, future results, and cash flow; any non-compliance with such laws or regulations may result in the imposition of liabilities which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, future results, and cash flow.

 

We are required to comply with numerous federal, state and local statutory and regulatory environmental standards and to maintain numerous environmental permits and governmental approvals required for construction and/or operation. Some of the environmental permits and governmental approvals that may be issued to us may contain conditions and restrictions, including restrictions or limits on emissions and discharges of pollutants and contaminants, or may have limited terms. If we fail to satisfy these conditions or comply with these restrictions, or with any statutory or regulatory environmental standards, we may become subject to regulatory enforcement action and the operation of the projects could be adversely affected or be subject to fines, penalties or additional costs. In addition, we may not be able to renew, maintain or obtain all environmental permits and governmental approvals required for the continued operation or further development of the projects.

 

Our operations are subject to permitting requirements which could require us to delay, suspend or terminate our operations on our exploration claims.

 

Our exploration activities on our claims may require permits from the BLM and several other governmental agencies. We may be unable to obtain these permits in a timely manner, on reasonable terms or at all. If we cannot obtain or maintain the necessary permits, or if there is a delay in receiving these permits, our timetable and business plan for exploration of our exploration claims will be adversely affected.

 

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Our exploration activities may not be commercially successful, which could lead us to abandon our plans to seek a mining production company to develop or purchase our exploration claims, and thereby lose the investment we made in our exploration claims.

 

Our long-term success depends on our ability to identify commercially viable and mineable mineralization deposits on our exploration claims that we can then, using our best business judgment, determine whether any such deposits can be developed into a commercially viable mining operation. Mineral exploration is highly speculative in nature, involves many risks and is frequently non-productive. These risks include unusual or unexpected geologic formations, and the inability to obtain suitable or adequate machinery, equipment or labor. The success of exploration is determined in part by the following factors:

 

  the identification of potential silver and/or gold mineralization based on evaluation of the host rock, alteration, structure, geochemistry and proper sampling;
  availability of government-granted operation permits;
  the quality of our management and our geological and technical expertise; and
  the capital available for exploration.

 

Substantial expenditures are required to establish proven and probable reserves through drilling and analysis, to develop metallurgical processes to extract metal, and to develop the mining and processing facilities and infrastructure at any site chosen for mining. Whether a mineral deposit will be commercially viable depends on a number of factors, which include, without limitation, the particular attributes of the deposit, such as size, grade and proximity to infrastructure; metal prices, which fluctuate widely; and government regulations, including, without limitation, regulations relating to prices, taxes, royalties, land tenure, land use, importing and exporting of minerals and environmental protection. We may invest significant capital and resources in exploration activities and abandon such investments if we are unable to identify commercially exploitable mineral deposits. The decision to abandon our mineral claims may have an adverse effect on the market value of our securities and our ability to raise future financing. We cannot assure you that we will discover or acquire any mineralized material in sufficient quantities on the Property to justify commercial operations, or that we will be able to find a mining operator who is willing and able to enter into a business venture with us.

 

A shortage of critical equipment, supplies, and resources could adversely affect our exploration activities.

 

We are dependent on the availability of certain equipment, supplies, and resources for us to carry out our mining exploration activities, including input commodities, drilling equipment and skilled labor. A shortage in the market for any of these factors could cause unanticipated cost increases and delays in delivery times, which could in turn adversely impact exploration schedules and costs.

 

Historical production on our mineral claims may not be indicative of the potential for future development.

 

Our mineral claims are not in commercial production, and, since acquiring our interests, we have never recorded any revenues from commercial production on the claims. The fact that there were limited historical mining operations in the mining district surrounding the mineral claims should not be relied upon as an indication that we will ever find commercially mineable quantities and qualities of extractable mineralization on our claims or have future successful commercial operations on our mineral claims. In fact, based on the reviewed information available to us, none of the historical mining operations were successful.

 

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If the development of one or more claims included in our claims portfolio is found to be economically feasible, such claims will be subject to all of the risks associated with establishing new mining operations.

 

If the development of one or more of our mining claims is found to be economically feasible, and we are unable to enter into a business arrangement with a mining company that engages in mining operations and production, such development will require obtaining permits and financing, and the construction and operation of mines, processing plants and related infrastructure. As a result, the project will be subject to all of the risks associated with establishing new mining operations, including:

 

  the timing and cost, which can be considerable, of the construction of mining and processing facilities and related infrastructure;
  the availability and cost of skilled labor, mining equipment and principal supplies needed for operations, including explosives, fuels, chemical reagents, water, power, equipment parts, and lubricants;
  the availability and cost of appropriate smelting and refining arrangements;
  the need to obtain necessary environmental and other governmental approvals and permits and the timing of the receipt of those approvals and permits;
  the availability of funds to finance construction and development activities;
  industrial accidents;
  mine failures, shaft failures or equipment failures;
  natural phenomena such as inclement weather conditions, floods, droughts, rock slides, and seismic activity;
  unusual or unexpected geological and metallurgic conditions;
  exchange rate and commodity price fluctuations;
  high rates of inflation;
  potential opposition from non-governmental organizations, environmental groups or local groups, which may delay or prevent development activities; and
  restrictions or regulations imposed by governmental or regulatory authorities.

 

The costs, timing, and complexities of developing the joint venture projects may be greater than anticipated. Cost estimates may increase significantly as more detailed engineering work is completed on a project. It is common in mining operations to experience unexpected costs, problems and delays during construction, development and mine start-up. We cannot provide assurance that activities will result in profitable mining operations at the mineral claim, or that we will derive financial benefits from such operations. Any one or more of the events identified above could have a material adverse effect on any revenues we may anticipate receiving from our mineral claims.

 

Our operations involve significant risks and hazards inherent to the mining industry.

 

Our exploration operations may involve the operation of large pieces of drilling and other heavy equipment. Hazards such as fire, explosion, floods, structural collapses, industrial accidents, unusual or unexpected geological conditions, ground control problems, cave-ins, flooding, and mechanical equipment failure are inherent risks in our operations. Hazards inherent to the mining industry can cause injuries or death to employees, contractors or other persons on our mineral claims, severe damage to and destruction of our property, plant and equipment and mineral claims, and contamination of, or damage to, the environment can result in the suspension of our exploration activities and any future development and production activities. While the Company aims to maintain best safety practices as part of our culture, safety measures implemented by us may not be successful in preventing or mitigating future accidents.

 

In addition, from time to time we may be subject to governmental investigations and claims and litigation filed on behalf of persons who are harmed while working on our mineral claims or otherwise in connection with our operations. To the extent that we are subject to personal injury or other claims or lawsuits in the future, it may not be possible to predict the ultimate outcome of these claims and lawsuits due to the nature of personal injury litigation. Similarly, if we are subject to governmental investigations or proceedings, we may incur significant penalties and fines, and enforcement actions against us could result in the closing of certain of our mining operations. If claims and lawsuits or governmental investigations or proceedings are ultimately resolved against us, they could have a material adverse effect on our financial performance, financial position and results of operations. Also, if we conduct mining operations on property without the appropriate licenses and approvals, we could incur liability or our operations could be suspended.

 

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The mining industry is very competitive.

 

The mining industry is very competitive. Much of our competition is from larger, established mining companies with greater liquidity, greater access to credit and other financial resources, newer or more efficient equipment, lower cost structures, more effective risk management policies and procedures and/or greater ability than us to withstand losses. Our competitors may be able to respond more quickly to new laws or regulations or emerging technologies, or devote greater resources to the expansion or efficiency of their operations than we can. In addition, current and potential competitors may make strategic acquisitions or establish cooperative relationships among themselves or with third parties. Accordingly, it is possible that new competitors or alliances among current and new competitors may emerge and gain significant market share to our detriment. We may not be able to compete successfully against current and future competitors, and any failure to do so could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

 

The title to some of our mineral claims may be uncertain or defective, thus risking the investment in such claims.

 

The mineral claims to which we have options to buy, and those we may acquire in the future, if any, may be subject to prior recorded and unrecorded agreements, transfers or claims, and other undetected defects, which may result in a defective title. A title defect on any of our mineral claims (or any portion thereof) could adversely affect our ability to mine the claims and/or process the minerals.

 

Title insurance is generally not available for mineral claims and our ability to ensure that we have obtained a secure claim to individual mineral claims or mining concessions may be severely constrained. We rely on title information and/or representations and warranties provided by our grantors. Any challenge to titles could result in litigation, insurance claims, and potential losses, delay the exploration and development of a claim and ultimately result in the loss of some or all of our interest in the claim. In addition, if we mine on a claim without the appropriate title, we could incur liability for such activities.

 

If we obtain insurance, it may not provide adequate coverage.

 

Our operations are subject to a number of risks and hazards including, but not limited to, adverse environmental conditions, industrial accidents, labor disputes, unusual or unexpected geological conditions, ground control problems, cave-ins, changes in the regulatory environment, metallurgical and other processing problems, mechanical equipment failure, facility performance problems, fires and natural phenomena such as inclement weather conditions, floods and earthquakes. These risks could result in damage to, or destruction of, our mineral claims or exploration equipment, personal injury or death, environmental damage, delays in exploration, increased exploration costs, asset write-downs, monetary losses, and legal liability.

 

We do not currently have insurance and do not have any plans to obtain insurance. Insurance against certain risks, including those related to environmental matters or other hazards resulting from exploration, is generally not available to us or to other companies within the mining industry. In addition, we do not carry business interruption insurance relating to our mineral claims. Accordingly, delays in returning to any future exploration could produce severe near-term impact on our business. Any losses from these events may result in significant costs that could have a material adverse effect on our financial performance, financial position and results of operations.

 

Changes in the market price of gold, silver and other metals, which in the past has fluctuated widely, will affect the profitability of our operations and financial condition.

 

Our profitability and long-term viability depend, in large part, upon the market price of gold, copper, silver and other metals and minerals which may be produced from our mineral claims, and from which we may derive revenues under any agreement we may enter into with a company that conducts mining operations on our claims. The market price of gold and other metals is volatile and is impacted by numerous factors beyond our control, including:

 

  sales by central banks and other holders, speculators and producers of gold and other metals in response to any of the below factors.
  the relative strength of the U.S. dollar and certain other currencies;
  interest rates;
  global or regional political, financial, or economic conditions;
  supply and demand for jewelry and industrial products containing metals; and
  expectations with respect to the rate of inflation;

 

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A material decrease in the market price of gold and other metals could affect the commercial viability of our mineral claims and any of our future anticipated development and production assumptions if any. Lower gold prices could also adversely affect our ability to finance future development of our mining claims, all of which would have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. There can be no assurance that the market price of gold and other metals will remain at current levels or that such prices will improve.

 

RISKS RELATED TO THE OWNERSHIP OF OUR SECURITIES

 

Participation is subject to risks of investing in micro-capitalization companies.

 

Micro capitalization companies generally have limited product lines, markets, market shares, and financial resources. The securities of such companies, if traded in the public market, may trade less frequently and in more limited volume than those of more established companies. Additionally, in recent years, the stock market has experienced a high degree of price and volume volatility for the securities of micro-capitalization companies. In particular, micro-capitalization companies that trade in the over-the-counter markets have experienced wide price fluctuations not necessarily related to the operating performance of such companies.

 

There has not been any established trading market for our common stock although our common stock is quoted on the OTC Link alternative trading system on the OTC Pink marketplace and we are eligible with the Depository Trust Company (“DTC”) to permit our shares to trade electronically. There can be no assurances as to whether

 

  (i) any market for our shares will develop;
  (ii) the prices at which our common stock will trade; or
  (iii) the extent to which investor interest in us will lead to the development of an active, liquid trading market. Active trading markets generally result in lower price volatility and more efficient execution of buy and sell orders for investors.

 

In addition, our common stock is unlikely to be followed by any market analysts, and there may be few institutions acting as market makers for our common stock. Either of these factors could adversely affect the liquidity and trading price of our common stock. Until our common stock is fully distributed and an orderly market develops in our common stock if ever, the price at which it trades is likely to fluctuate significantly. Prices for our common stock will be determined in the marketplace and may be influenced by many factors, including the depth and liquidity of the market for shares of our common stock, developments affecting our business, including the impact of the factors referred to elsewhere in these Risk Factors, investor perception of us and general economic and market conditions. No assurances can be given that an orderly or liquid market will ever develop for the shares of our common stock.

 

Because of the low price of our securities, many brokerage firms may not be willing to effect transactions in these securities. Purchasers of our securities should be aware that any market that develops in our stock would be subject to the penny stock restrictions.

 

Rule 3a51-1 of the Exchange Act establishes the definition of a “penny stock,” for purposes relevant to us, as any equity security that has a minimum bid price of less than $4.00 per share or with an exercise price of less than $4.00 per share, subject to a limited number of exceptions that are not available to us. It is likely that our shares will be considered to be penny stocks for the immediately foreseeable future. This classification severely and adversely affects any market liquidity for our common stock.

 

For any transaction involving a penny stock, unless exempt, the penny stock rules require that a broker or dealer approve a person’s account for transactions in penny stocks and the broker or dealer receive from the investor a written agreement to the transaction setting forth the identity and quantity of the penny stock to be purchased. In order to approve a person’s account for transactions in penny stocks, the broker or dealer must obtain financial information and investment experience and objectives of the person and make a reasonable determination that the transactions in penny stocks are suitable for that person and that that person has sufficient knowledge and experience in financial matters to be capable of evaluating the risks of transactions in penny stocks.

 

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The broker or dealer must also deliver, prior to any transaction in a penny stock, a disclosure schedule prepared by the SEC relating to the penny stock market, which, in highlight form, sets forth:

 

  the basis on which the broker or dealer made the suitability determination, and
     
  that the broker or dealer received a signed, written agreement from the investor prior to the transaction.

 

The disclosure also must be made about the risks of investing in penny stock in both public offerings and in secondary trading and commissions payable to both the broker-dealer and the registered representative, current quotations for the securities and the rights and remedies available to an investor in cases of fraud in penny stock transactions. Additionally, monthly statements have to be sent disclosing recent price information for the penny stock held in the account and information on the limited market in penny stocks.

 

Because of these regulations, broker-dealers may not wish to engage in the above-referenced necessary paperwork and disclosures and/or may encounter difficulties in their attempt to sell shares of our common stock, which may affect the ability of selling shareholders or other holders to sell their shares in any secondary market and have the effect of reducing the level of trading activity in any secondary market. These additional sales practice and disclosure requirements could impede the sale of our securities, if and when our securities become publicly traded.

 

In addition, the liquidity for our securities may decrease, with a corresponding decrease in the price of our securities. Our shares, in all probability, will be subject to such penny stock rules for the foreseeable future and our shareholders will, in all likelihood, find it difficult to sell their securities.

 

Our management believes that the market for penny stocks has suffered from patterns of fraud and abuse. Such patterns include:

 

  control of the market for the security by one or a few broker-dealers that are often related to the promoter or issuer;
  manipulation of prices through prearranged matching of purchases and sales and false and misleading press releases;
  “Boiler room” practices involving high pressure sales tactics and unrealistic price projections by sales persons;
  excessive and undisclosed bid-ask differentials and markups by selling broker-dealers; and
  wholesale dumping of the same securities by promoters and broker-dealers after prices have been manipulated to a desired level, along with the inevitable collapse of those prices with consequent investor losses.

 

Transfer of our common stock may also be restricted under the securities or securities regulations laws promulgated by various states and foreign jurisdictions, commonly referred to as “Blue Sky” laws. Absent compliance with such individual state laws, our common stock may not be traded in such jurisdictions. Because the securities registered hereunder have not been registered for resale under the blue sky laws of any state, the holders of such shares and persons who desire to purchase them in any trading market that might develop in the future, should be aware that there may be significant state blue sky law restrictions upon the ability of investors to sell the securities and of purchasers to purchase the securities. These restrictions prohibit the secondary trading of our common stock. We currently do not intend to and may not be able to qualify securities for resale in at least 17 states which do not offer manual exemptions (or may offer manual exemptions) and require shares to be qualified before they can be resold by our shareholders. Accordingly, investors should consider the secondary market for our securities to be a limited one.

 

Because insiders control our activities, they may cause us to act in a manner that is most beneficial to them and not to outside shareholders, which could cause us not to take actions that outside investors might view favorably and which could prevent or delay a change in control.

 

Our three founders together own 29,700,000 common shares representing 66.6% of the outstanding common stock and our officer and directors hold approximately 44.6% of our outstanding common stock. As a result, they effectively control all matters requiring director and stockholder approval, including the election of directors, and the approval of significant corporate transactions, such as mergers and related party transactions. These insiders also have the ability to delay or perhaps even block, by their ownership of our stock, an unsolicited tender offer. This concentration of ownership could have the effect of delaying, deterring or preventing a change in control of our company that you might view favorably.

 

 17  
 

 

The interests of shareholders may be hurt because we can issue shares of our common stock to individuals or entities that support existing management with such issuances serving to enhance existing management’s ability to maintain control of us.

 

Our directors have authority, without action or vote of the shareholders, to issue all or part of the authorized but unissued common shares. Such issuances may be issued to parties or entities committed to supporting existing management and the interests of existing management which may not be the same as the interests of other shareholders. Our ability to issue shares without shareholder approval serves to enhance existing management’s ability to maintain control of us.

 

Our articles of incorporation provide for indemnification of officers and directors at our expense and limit their liability that may result in a major cost to us and hurt the interests of our shareholders because corporate resources may be expended for the benefit of officers and/or directors.

 

Our Articles of Incorporation at Article Nine provides for indemnification as follows: “Every person who was or is a party to, or is threatened to be made a party to, or is involved in any action, suit, or proceeding, whether civil, criminal, administrative, or investigative, by reason of the fact that he, or a person of whom he is the legal representative, is or was a Director or Officer of the Corporation, or is or was serving at the request of the Corporation as a Director or Officer of another Corporation, or as its representative in a partnership, joint venture, trust, or other enterprise, shall be indemnified and held harmless to the fullest extent legally permissible under the laws of the State of Nevada from time to time against all expenses, liability, and loss (including attorneys’ fees judgments, fines, and amounts paid or to be paid in settlement) reasonably incurred or suffered by him in connection therewith. Such right of indemnification shall be a contract right, which may be enforced in any manner desired by such person. The expenses of Officers and Directors incurred in defending a civil or criminal action, suit, or proceeding must be paid by the Corporation as they are incurred and in advance of the final disposition of the action, suit, or proceeding, upon receipt of an undertaking by or on behalf of the Director or Officer to repay the amount if it is ultimately determined by a court of competent jurisdiction that he is not entitled to be indemnified by the Corporation. Such right of indemnification shall not be exclusive of any other right which such Directors, Officers, or representatives may have or hereafter acquire, and, without limiting the generality of such statement, they shall be entitled to their respective rights of indemnification under any bylaw, agreement, vote of Stockholders, provision of law, or otherwise, as well as their rights under this Article. Without limiting the application of the foregoing, the Stockholders or Board of Directors may adopt bylaws from time to time with respect to indemnification, to provide at all times the fullest indemnification permitted by the laws of the State of Nevada, and may cause the Corporation to purchase and maintain insurance on behalf of any person who is or was a Director or Officer of the Corporation, or is or was serving at the request of the Corporation as a Director or Officer of another Corporation, or as its representative in a partnership, joint venture, trust, or other enterprise against any liability asserted against such person and incurred in any such capacity or arising out of such status, whether or not the Corporation would have the power to indemnify such person. The indemnification provided in this Article shall continue as to a person who has ceased to be a Director, Officer, Employee, or Agent, and shall inure to the benefit of the heirs, executors, and administrators of such person.”

 

We have been advised that, in the opinion of the SEC, indemnification for liabilities arising under federal securities laws is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act of 1933 and is, therefore, unenforceable. In the event that a claim for indemnification for liabilities arising under federal securities laws, other than the payment by us of expenses incurred or paid by a director, officer or controlling person in the successful defense of any action, suit or proceeding, is asserted by a director, officer or controlling person in connection with our activities, we will (unless in the opinion of our counsel, the matter has been settled by controlling precedent) submit to a court of appropriate jurisdiction, the question whether indemnification by us is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and will be governed by the final adjudication of such issue. The legal process relating to this matter if it were to occur is likely to be very costly and may result in us receiving negative publicity, either of which factors is likely to materially reduce the market and price for our shares, if such a market develops.

 

 18  
 

 

We do not expect to pay cash dividends in the foreseeable future.

 

We have never paid cash dividends on our common stock. We do not expect to pay cash dividends on our common stock at any time in the foreseeable future. The future payment of dividends directly depends upon our future earnings, capital requirements, financial requirements and other factors that our directors will consider. Since we do not anticipate paying cash dividends on our common stock, return on your investment, if any, will depend solely on the increase, if any, in the market value of our common stock.

 

Because we are not subject to compliance with rules requiring the adoption of certain corporate governance measures, our stockholders have limited protection against interested director transactions, conflicts of interest and similar matters.

 

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as well as rule changes proposed and enacted by the SEC, the New York and American Stock Exchanges and the Nasdaq Stock Market, as a result of Sarbanes-Oxley, require the implementation of various measures relating to corporate governance. These measures are designed to enhance the integrity of corporate management and the securities markets and apply to securities that are listed on those exchanges or the Nasdaq Stock Market. Because we are not presently required to comply with many of the corporate governance provisions and because we chose to avoid incurring the substantial additional costs associated with such compliance any sooner than legally required, we have not yet adopted these measures.

 

Because our directors are not independent directors, we do not currently have independent audit or compensation committees. As a result, our directors have the ability, among other things, to determine their own level of compensation. Until we comply with such corporate governance measures, regardless of whether such compliance is required, the absence of such standards of corporate governance may leave our stockholders without protections against interested director transactions, conflicts of interest, if any, and similar matters and investors may be reluctant to provide us with funds necessary to expand our operations.

 

We intend to comply with all corporate governance measures relating to director independence as and when required. However, we may find it very difficult or be unable to attract and retain qualified officers, directors and members of board committees required to provide for our effective management as a result of Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. The enactment of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 has resulted in a series of rules and regulations by the SEC that increase responsibilities and liabilities of directors and executive officers. The perceived increased personal risk associated with these recent changes may make it costlier or deter qualified individuals from accepting these roles.

 

The access to information regarding our business may become limited because our obligations to file periodic reports with the SEC could be automatically suspended under certain circumstances.

 

We are subject to certain informational requirements of the Exchange Act, as amended and we will be required to file periodic reports (i.e., annual, quarterly and special reports) with the SEC which will be immediately available to the public for inspection and copying. These reporting obligations may (in our sole discretion) be automatically suspended under Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act if we have less than 300 shareholders and do not file a registration statement on Form 8A. If this occurs, we will no longer be obligated to file periodic reports with the SEC and the access to our business information would then be even more restricted. We will not be required to furnish proxy statements to security holders and our directors, officer and principal beneficial owners will not be required to report their beneficial ownership of securities to the SEC pursuant to Section 16 of the Exchange Act until we have both 500 or more security holders that are not accredited investors (or, alternatively, 2,000 or more total shareholders) and greater than $10 million in assets. This means that access to information regarding our business will be limited.

 

 19  
 

 

We will incur ongoing costs and expenses for SEC reporting and compliance; without revenue we may not be able to remain in compliance, making it difficult for investors to sell their shares, if at all.

 

In order for us to remain in compliance with the SEC reporting and compliance requirements we will require further funding to cover the cost of these filings, which could comprise a substantial portion of our available cash resources. If we are unable to generate sufficient revenues to remain in compliance, it may be difficult for our shareholders to resell any shares they may purchase, if at all.

 

For all of the foregoing reasons and others set forth herein, an investment in our securities in any market that may develop in the future involves a high degree of risk.

 

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

 

None.

 

Item 2. Properties

 

We hold no real property. Our executive, administrative and operating office is provided to us at no cost by our CEO and President, Mr. Cocks, and is located at 316 California Avenue, Suite 543, Reno, NV 89509. We do not have a written lease agreement with Mr. Cocks or with the property landlord. Our officer and directors will work remotely from Canada and intend to visit the Reno office every six weeks.

 

Item 3. Legal Proceedings

 

We are not a party to any legal proceedings.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

 

Not applicable.

 

PART II

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

Our common stock is quoted under the symbol NGLD on the OTC Link alternative trading system on the OTC Pink marketplace. Prior to January 26, 2015, our stock was quoted under the symbol TRYV. The table below presents the range of high and low bid quotes of our common stock for each quarter for the last two fiscal years as reported by the OTC Markets Group Inc. The bid prices represent inter-dealer quotations, without adjustments for retail mark-ups, markdowns or commissions and may not necessarily represent actual transactions.

 

High & Low Bids

 

Period ended

  High   Low   Source
December 31, 2019  $0.04   $0.03   OTC Markets Group Inc.
September 30, 2019  $0.06   $0.04   OTC Markets Group Inc.
June 30, 2019  $0.041   $0.041   OTC Markets Group Inc.
March 31, 2019  $0.057   $0.041   OTC Markets Group Inc.
December 31, 2018  $0.041   $0.041   OTC Markets Group Inc.
September 30, 2018  $0.041   $0.041   OTC Markets Group Inc.
June 30, 2018  $0.08   $0.04   OTC Markets Group Inc.
March 31, 2018  $0.10   $0.06   OTC Markets Group Inc.

 

Common Stock Currently Outstanding

 

As of March 26, 2020, we had 44,550,000 shares of our common stock outstanding.

 

 20  
 

 

Holders

 

As of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, we had 22 stockholders of record of our common stock.

 

Dividends

 

We have not declared any cash dividends on our common stock since our inception and do not anticipate paying any dividends in the foreseeable future. We plan to retain future earnings, if any, for use in our business. Any decisions as to future payments of dividends will depend on our earnings and financial position and such other facts, as our Director deems relevant.

 

Transfer Agent

 

Our independent stock transfer agent is Globex Transfer, LLC, with an address at 780 Deltona Blvd., Suite 202, Deltona, FL 32725; their phone number is (813) 344-4490.

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

 

None

 

Additional Information

 

Copies of our annual reports on Form 10−K, quarterly reports on Form 10−Q, current reports on Form 8−K, and any amendments to those reports, are available free of charge on the Internet at www.sec.gov. All statements made in any of our filings, including all forward-looking statements, are made as of the date of the document, in which the statement is included, and we do not assume or undertake any obligation to update any of those statements or documents unless we are required to do so by law.

 

Item 6. Selected Financial Data

 

Not required under Regulation S-K for “smaller reporting companies.”

 

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Conditions and Results of Operations

 

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

 

Certain statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K constitute “forward-looking statements”. These statements, identified by words such as “plan,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “should,” “expect” and similar expressions include our expectations and objectives regarding our future financial position, operating results and business strategy. These statements reflect the current views of management with respect to future events and are subject to risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, performance or achievements, or industry results, to be materially different from those described in the forward-looking statements. Such risks and uncertainties include those set forth under this caption “Management’s Discussion and Analysis” and elsewhere in this Form 10-K. We do not intend to update the forward-looking information to reflect actual results or changes in the factors affecting such forward-looking information. We advise you to carefully review the reports and documents we file from time to time with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”).

 

Results of Operations

 

General

 

The inclusion of supplementary analytical and related information herein may require us to make estimates and assumptions to enable us to fairly present, in all material respects, our analysis of trends and expectations with respect to our results of operations and financial position taken as a whole. Actual results may vary from the estimates and assumptions we make.

 

 21  
 

 

Results of Operation

 

   Years ended December 31,   Changes between 
   2019   2018   the periods 
Operating expenses               
Exploration expenses  $138,373   $122,511   $15,862 
General and administrative expenses   251,602    257,612    (6,010)
Professional fees   16,600    16,600    - 
Transfer agent and filing fees   8,159    13,387    (5,228)
Total operating expenses   (414,734)   (410,110)   4,624 
Other items               
Fair value gain (loss) on equity investments   345,435    (415,651)   761,086 
Realized gain on investments   232,676    -    232,676 
Loss on sale of mineral interest   -    (14,152)   14,152
Foreign exchange gain   5,310    -    5,310 
Interest income   5,118    -    5,118 
Net income (loss) before tax   173,805    (839,913)   1,013,718 
Deferred tax recovery   -    21,978    (21,978)
Net income (loss)  $173,805   $(817,935)  $991,740 

 

Revenues. Due to the exploration rather than the production nature of our business, we did not have any revenue associated with our business activities; furthermore, we do not expect to have significant operating revenue in the foreseeable future.

 

Operating expenses. Our operating expenses include exploration expenses, general and administrative expenses, professional fees and transfer agent and filing fees. During the year ended December 31, 2019, our operating expenses increased by $4,624, or 1.13%, to $414,734 for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to $410,110 for the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

The most significant year-to-date changes included the following:

 

  Our exploration expenses increased by $15,862 or 13%, to $138,373 for the year ended December 31, 2019. The increase was mainly associated with the Phase I exploration program on the Lazy Claims Property that we carried out during our Fiscal 2019 and with the exploration expenses to acquire Loman Property.
     
  General and administrative expenses decreased by $6,010 or 2%, to $251,602 for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared with $257,612 for the year ended December 31, 2018. The decrease was primarily attributable to a $5,000 decrease in consulting fees.
     
  Transfer agent and filing fees decreased by $5,228, or 39%, to $8,159 for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared with $13,387 for the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Other items. During the year ended December 31, 2019, we recognized $345,435 gain (2018 - $415,651 loss) on fair value of equity investments, which resulted from the revaluation of WRR Shares and WRR Warrants. The gain resulted mainly from the increase in market price of WRR’s common stock from CAD$0.06 per share at December 31, 2018, to CAD$0.085 per share at December 31, 2019, which was further increased by the fluctuation of exchange rates between the US and Canadian dollars. During the same period we recorded $232,676 gain on the sale of 5,242,000 WRR shares for net proceeds of $470,601 (CAD$622,186). We invested CAD$489,500 of the proceeds from the sales of WRR shares into high interest saving account with a major Canadian bank, which generated $5,118 in interest revenue. Since the funds held in the high interest savings account are held in Canadian dollars, during the year ended December 31, 2019, we recorded gain of $5,310 associated with fluctuations in foreign exchange rates. We did not have similar transactions during our Fiscal 2018.

 

 22  
 

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, we recorded $14,152 loss on sale of our Garfield Project to WRR.

 

Income tax. The sale of our 30% interest in the Lapon Canyon Project in exchange for 9,100,000 common shares of WRR and warrants to acquire an additional 11,900,000 common shares, which we effected during the year ended December 31, 2017, resulted in deferred tax expense of $358,228. During the year ended December 31, 2018, we recorded $21,978 as recovery of deferred tax liability associated with the decrease in the fair market value of WRR shares.

 

Net income (loss). At December 31, 2019, our net income was $173,805, as compared to net loss of $817,935 we incurred during the year ended December 31, 2018. The change in the net income resulted mainly from the sale of our equity investments in WRR, as well as unrealized gain on revaluation of the equity investments we continued to carry at December 31, 2019.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Working capital  December 31, 2019   December 31, 2018 
         
Current assets  $368,484   $2,884 
Current liabilities   1,429,396    1,119,696 
Working capital deficit  $(1,060,912)  $(1,116,812)

 

As of December 31, 2019, we had a cash balance of $367,201, of which $308,927 (CAD$401,235) were held in the high interest savings account and a working capital deficit of $1,060,912 with cash flows used in operations totaling $95,806 for the year then ended. During the year ended December 31, 2019, our operations were funded with $470,601 cash we generated from the sales of our equity investments, and to a smaller extent with $1,200 provided by our financing activities.

 

We did not generate sufficient cash flows from our operating activities to satisfy our cash requirements for the year ended December 31, 2019. There is no assurance that we will be able to generate sufficient cash from our operations to repay the amounts owing under these notes and advances payable, or to service our other debt obligations.

 

To provide us with the necessary capital to accomplish our plan of operation we intend to seek additional financing in the form of equity or debt. There can be no assurance that we will be successful in our efforts to raise additional capital. If we are unable to secure additional capital through equity or debt financing, we may choose to sell all or part of our investment in WRR.

 

Cash Flow

 

   Year Ended December 31, 
   2019   2018 
Cash flows used in operating activities  $(95,806)  $(31,444)
Cash flows provided by investing activities   460,206    - 
Cash flows provided by financing activities   1,200    30,064 
Net increase (decrease) in cash during the year  $365,600   $(1,380)

 

Net cash used in operating activities

 

Our net cash used in operating activities increased by $64,362, or 204.7%, to $95,806 for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared with $31,444 for the year ended December 31, 2018. During the year ended December 31, 2019, we used $404,306 to cover our cash operating costs; this use of cash was offset by increase in our accounts payable of $68,500, and by $240,000 increase in related party payables, which were associated with consulting fees we accrued to the companies controlled by Mr. Cocks and Mr. Levine.

 

 23  
 

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, our net cash used in operating activities decreased by $37,344, or 54%, to $31,444, compared with $68,788 for the year ended December 31, 2017. During the year ended December 31, 2018, we used $410,110 to cover our cash operating costs, this use of cash was offset by decrease in our prepaid expenses of $6,966, by increase in our accounts payable of $131,700, and by $240,000 increase in related party payables, which were associated with consulting fees we accrued to the companies controlled by Mr. Cocks and Mr. Levine.

 

Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash used by operating activities

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, we recognized $345,435 gain on revaluation of fair value of equity investments associated with WRR Shares and WRR Warrants which resulted from the fluctuation in share prices and foreign exchange rates, we also recorded $232,676 gain on sale of our equity investments.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, our operating expenses included $415,651 loss we recognized on revaluation of fair value of equity investments associated with WRR Shares and WRR Warrants we received in exchange for our 30% interest in Lapon Canyon Gold Property, $21,978 deferred tax recovery associated with the decrease in fair market value of WRR shares and warrants, and $14,152 loss on sale of our Garfield Project.

 

Net cash provided by investing activities

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, we generated $470,601 on the sale of 5,242,000 WRR Shares which was in part offset by $10,395 we used to acquire Loman Property claims.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, we did not have any investing transactions that would have affected our cash flows.

 

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, we received $1,100 from WRR and $100 from Mr. Cocks under non-interest-bearing advances to pay certain vendor payables.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, we received $10,000 from our director, $5,000 from our CEO and President, and $15,064 from an arm’s length party. These advances do not bear interest and are due on demand.

 

Going Concern

 

At December 31, 2019, we had a working capital deficit of $1,060,912 and cash on hand of $367,201, which is not sufficient to carry out our current plan of operation. Our capital assets include equity investment in WRR shares and warrants, which we can use as a source of additional cash inflow, should we decide to sell all or part of our investment. In addition, we are actively pursuing other means of financing our operations through additional equity and/or debt financing. There can be no assurance that we will be able to procure funds sufficient to support our day-to-day operations and exploration programs. If operating difficulties or other factors (many of which are beyond our control) delay our realization of revenues or cash flows from operations, we may be limited in our ability to pursue our business plan. Moreover, if our resources from obtaining additional capital or cash flows from operations, once we commence them, do not satisfy our operational needs or if unexpected expenses arise due to unanticipated pressures or if we decide to expand our business plan beyond its currently anticipated level or otherwise, we will require additional financing to fund our operations, in addition to anticipated cash generated from our operations. Additional financing might not be available on terms favorable to us, or at all. If adequate funds were not available or were not available on acceptable terms, our ability to fund our operations, take advantage of unanticipated opportunities, develop or enhance our business or otherwise respond to competitive pressures would be significantly limited. In a worst-case scenario, we might not be able to fund our operations or to remain in business, which could result in a total loss of our stockholders’ investment. If we raise additional funds through the issuance of equity or convertible debt securities, the percentage ownership of our stockholders would be reduced, and these newly issued securities might have rights, preferences or privileges senior to those of existing stockholders.

 

Impact of Inflation

 

We believe that inflation has had a negligible effect on operations over the past fiscal year.

 

Capital Expenditures

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, we spent $10,395 to acquire Loman Property claims.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

None.

 

Pronouncements

 

We have implemented all new accounting pronouncements that are in effect, and that may impact our financial statements and do not believe that there are any other new accounting pronouncements that have been issued that might have a material impact on our financial position or results of operations.

 

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

 

As a “smaller reporting company” as defined by Item 10 of Regulation S-K, we are not required to provide information required by this item.

 

Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

Our audited financial statements are set forth in this Annual Report beginning on page F-1.

 

 24  
 

 

NEVADA CANYON GOLD CORP.

 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

 

 25  
 

 

 

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

To the shareholders and the board of directors of Nevada Canyon Gold Corp.

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying balance sheets of Nevada Canyon Gold Corp. (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, the related statements of operations, stockholders’ equity (deficit) and cash flows for the years then ended and the related notes (collectively referred to as the “financial statements”). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the years then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Going Concern

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 1 to the financial statements, the Company has limited liquidity and has not completed its efforts to establish a source of revenue sufficient to cover operating costs over an extended period of time. These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans in this regard are described in Note 1. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. As part of our audits we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

/s/ DMCL  
DALE MATHESON CARR-HILTON LABONTE LLP  
CHARTERED PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTANTS  
 
We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2015.  
Vancouver, Canada  
March 26, 2020  

 

 

F-1

 

 

Nevada Canyon Gold Corp.

Balance Sheets

(Presented in US Dollars)

 

   December 31, 2019   December 31, 2018 
         
ASSETS          
Current Assets          
Cash  $367,201   $1,601 
Prepaid expenses   1,283    1,283 
    368,484    2,884 
           
Equity investment   1,030,406    922,896 
Mineral property interest   10,395    - 
TOTAL ASSETS  $1,409,285   $925,780 
           
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT          
Current Liabilities          
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities  $351,000   $282,500 
Related party payables   1,062,232    822,132 
Notes and advances payable   16,164    15,064 
Total liabilities   1,429,396    1,119,696 
           
Stockholders’ Deficit          
Preferred Stock: Authorized 10,000,000 preferred shares, $0.0001 par, none issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2019 and 2018   -    - 
Common Stock: Authorized 100,000,000 common shares, $0.0001 par, 44,550,000 issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2019 and 2018   4,455    4,455 
Additional paid-in capital   522,645    522,645 
Deficit   (547,211)   (721,016)
    (20,111)   (193,916)
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT  $1,409,285   $925,780 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

 

 F-2 
 

 

Nevada Canyon Gold Corp.

Statements of Operations

(Presented in US Dollars)

 

   For the year ended
December 31,
 
   2019   2018 
         
Operating expenses          
Exploration expenses  $138,373   $122,511 
General and administrative expenses   251,602    257,612 
Professional fees   16,600    16,600 
Transfer agent and filing fees   8,159    13,387 
    (414,734)   (410,110)
Other items          
Fair value gain (loss) on equity investments   345,435    (415,651)
Foreign exchange gain   5,310    - 
Interest income   5,118    - 
Loss on sale of mineral interest   -    (14,152)
Realized gain on disposal of equity investments    232,676    - 
Net income (loss) before income taxes   173,805    (839,913)
           
Income tax          
Deferred tax recovery   -    21,978 
Net income (loss)  $173,805   $(817,935)
           
           
Net income (loss) per common share - basic  $0.00   $(0.02)
Net income (loss) per common share - diluted  $0.00   $(0.02)
Weighted average number of common shares outstanding          
Basic and diluted   44,550,000    44,550,000 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

 

 F-3 
 

 

Nevada Canyon Gold Corp.

Statement of Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)

(Presented in US Dollars)

 

   Common Stock   Additional Paid-in   Accumulated   Other Comprehensive   Total
Stockholders’ Equity
 
   Shares   Amount   Capital   Deficit   Loss   (Deficit)  
Balance, December 31, 2017   44,550,000   $4,455   $522,645   $749,641   $(652,722)  $624,019 
                               
Reclassification of other comprehensive loss on adoption of ASU 2016-01   -    -    -    (652,722)   652,722    - 
Balance, January 1, 2018   44,550,000    4,455    522,645    96,919    -    624,019 
                               
Net loss for the year   -    -    -    (817,935)   -    (817,935)
Balance, December 31, 2018   44,550,000    4,455    522,645    (721,016)   -    (193,916)
                               
Net income for the year   -    -    -    173,805    -    173,805 
Balance, December 31, 2019   44,550,000   $4,455   $522,645   $(547,211)  $-   $(20,111)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

 

 F-4 
 

 

Nevada Canyon Gold Corp.

Statements of Cash Flow

(Presented in US Dollars)

 

   For the year ended
December 31,
 
   2019   2018 
OPERATING ACTIVITIES:          
Cash flows used in operating activities          
Net income (loss)  $173,805   $(817,935)
Adjustment to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash used by operating activities:          
Fair value (gain) loss on equity investments   (578,111)   415,651 
Deferred tax recovery   -    (21,978)
Loss on sale of mineral interest   -    14,152 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:          
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities   68,500    131,700 
Prepaid expenses   -    6,966 
Related party payables   240,000    240,000 
Net cash used by operating activities   (95,806)   (31,444)
           
INVESTING ACTIVITIES          
Acquisition of mineral property interest   (10,395)   - 
Sale of equity investments   470,601    - 
Net cash povided by investing activities   460,206    - 
           
FINANCING ACTIVITIES          
Advances from shareholders   100    15,000 
Advances payable   1,100    15,064 
Net cash provided by financing activities   1,200    30,064 
           
Net increase (decrease) in cash   365,600    (1,380)
Cash, beginning   1,601    2,981 
Cash, ending  $367,201   $1,601 
           
Supplemental cash flow information:          
Cash received (paid) for interest  $5,118   $- 
Cash paid for income taxes  $-   $- 
           
Significant non-cash transactions:          
Debt extinguished in exchange for mineral property  $-   $55,000 
Fair value (gain) loss on equity investments  $(345,435)  $415,651 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

 

 F-5 
 

 

NEVADA CANYON GOLD CORP.

Notes to the Financial Statements

For the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

NOTE 1 - NATURE OF BUSINESS

 

Nevada Canyon Gold Corp. (the “Company”) was incorporated under the laws of the state of Nevada on February 27, 2014. On July 6, 2016, the Company changed its name from Tech Foundry Ventures, Inc. to Nevada Canyon Gold Corp.

 

Going Concern

 

The Company’s financial statements are prepared using accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“US GAAP”) applicable to a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and liquidation of liabilities in the normal course of business. The Company has only recently begun its exploration operations and has not generated or realized any revenues from these business operations. The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern is dependent on the Company obtaining adequate capital to fund operating losses until it becomes profitable. If the Company is unable to obtain adequate capital, it could be forced to cease operations.

 

The outcome of these matters cannot be predicted with any certainty at this time and raises substantial doubt that the Company will be able to continue as a going concern. These financial statements do not include any adjustments to the amounts and classifications of assets and liabilities that may be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern. Management intends to obtain additional funding by borrowing funds, and/or a private placement of common stock.

 

NOTE 2 - SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of Presentation

 

These financial statements and related notes are presented in accordance with US GAAP, and are presented in United States dollars.

 

Use of Estimates and Assumptions

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with US GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect certain reported amounts and disclosures. Accordingly, actual results could differ from those estimates. The Company regularly evaluates estimates and assumptions related to the fair value of stock-based compensation, impairment of its interest in a mineral property, and deferred income tax asset valuation allowances. The Company bases its estimates and assumptions on current facts, historical experience and various other factors that it believes to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities and the accrual of costs and expenses that are not readily apparent from other sources. The actual results experienced by the Company may differ materially and adversely from the Company’s estimates. To the extent there are material differences between the estimates and the actual results, future results of operations will be affected.

 

Basis of Accounting

 

The Company’s financial statements are prepared using the accrual method of accounting, except for cash flow information.

 

Equity Investments

 

Equity investments are classified as available for sale and are stated at fair market value. Unrealized gains and losses are recognized in the Company’s statement of operations.

 

 F-6 
 

 

Income Taxes

 

Income tax expense is based on pre-tax financial accounting income. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. Deferred tax assets, including tax loss and credit carry forwards, and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. Deferred income tax expense represents the change during the period in the deferred tax assets and deferred tax liabilities. The components of the deferred tax assets and liabilities are individually classified as current and non-current based on their characteristics. Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance when, in the opinion of management, it is more likely than not some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.

 

Income/ Loss per Share

 

The Company’s basic income/loss per share is calculated by dividing its net income/loss available to common stockholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the period. The Company’s dilutive income/loss per share is calculated by dividing its net loss available to common shareholders by the diluted weighted average number of shares outstanding during the period. The diluted weighted average number of shares outstanding is the basic weighted number of shares adjusted for any potentially dilutive debt or equity.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The Company’s financial instruments include cash, equity investment, accounts payable, related party payables, and notes and advances payable. The carrying value of these financial instruments approximates their fair value based on their short-term nature. The Company is not exposed to significant interest, exchange or credit risk arising from these financial instruments.

 

The fair value hierarchy under US GAAP is based on the following three levels of inputs, of which the first two are considered observable and the last unobservable:

 

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities;
   
Level 2: Observable inputs other than Level I, quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active prices whose inputs are observable or whose significant value drivers are observable; and
   
Level 3: Assets and liabilities whose significant value drivers are unobservable by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities.

 

Certain assets and liabilities are measured at fair value on a nonrecurring basis; that is, the instruments are not measured at fair value on an ongoing basis but are subject to fair value adjustments only in certain circumstances (for example, when there is evidence of impairment). There were no assets or liabilities measured at fair value on a nonrecurring basis during the periods ended December 31, 2019 and 2018.

 

Cash and equity investment are measured at fair value using level 1 inputs.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

For equity awards, such as stock options, total compensation cost is based on the grant date fair value and for liability awards, such as stock appreciation rights, total compensation cost is based on the settlement value. The Company recognizes stock-based compensation expense for all awards over the service period required to earn the award, which is the shorter of the vesting period or the time period an employee becomes eligible to retain the award at retirement.

 

 F-7 
 

 

Mineral Property Interests

 

Costs of exploration and costs of carrying and retaining unproven properties are expensed as incurred. The Company considers mineral rights to be tangible assets and accordingly, the Company capitalizes certain costs related to the acquisition of mineral rights.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

The Company has implemented all new accounting pronouncements that are in effect and that may impact its financial statements and does not believe that there are any other new accounting pronouncements that have been issued that might have a material impact on its financial position or results of operations.

 

NOTE 3 – RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

Amounts due to related parties at December 31, 2019 and 2018:

 

   December 31, 2019   December 31, 2018 
Amounts due to the Chief Executive Officer (“CEO”) (a)  $170,232   $170,132 
Amounts due to a company controlled by the CEO (a)   360,000    240,000 
Amounts due to a director(a)   271,000    271,000 
Amounts due to a company controlled by the director (a)   240,000    120,000 
Advances due to a major shareholder(a)   21,000    21,000 
Related party payables  $1,062,232   $822,132 

 

(a) These amounts are non-interest bearing, unsecured and due on demand.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company accrued $120,000 in consulting fees payable to a company controlled by the CEO (2018 - $120,000) and $120,000 in consulting fees to a company controlled by a director of the Company (2018 - $120,000).

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company received $100 (2018 - $5,000) as a non-interest bearing advance from the Company’s CEO and $Nil (2018 - $10,000) as a non-interest bearing advance from the Company’s director.

 

NOTE 4 – ACCOUNTS PAYABLE AND ACCRUED LIABILITIES

 

   December 31, 2019   December 31, 2018 
Trade payables  $340,300   $272,700 
Accrued liabilities   10,700    9,800 
   $351,000   $282,500 

 

NOTE 5 – MINERAL PROPERTY INTERESTS

 

Lazy Claims

 

On August 2, 2017, the Company entered into an exploration lease agreement (the “Lazy Claims Agreement”) with Tarsis Resources US Inc. (“Tarsis”), a Nevada corporation, to lease the Lazy Claims, consisting of three claims. The term of the Lazy Claims Agreement is ten years, and is subject to extension for additional two consecutive 10-year terms. Full consideration of the Lazy Claims Agreement consists of the following: an initial cash payment of $1,000 to Tarsis, paid upon the execution of the Lazy Claims Agreement, with $2,000 payable to Tarsis on each subsequent anniversary of the effective date. The Company agreed to pay Tarsis a 2% production royalty (the “Lazy Claims Royalty”) based on the gross returns from the production and sale of minerals from the Lazy Claims. Should the Lazy Claims Royalty payments to Tarsis be in excess of $2,000 per year, the Company will not be required to pay a $2,000 annual minimum payment.

 

 F-8 
 

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company paid $2,541 (2018 - $2,511) for its mineral property interests in Lazy Claims, of which $2,000 (2018 - $2,000) represented annual minimum payment required under the Lazy Claims Agreement and $541 (2018 - $511) was associated with the annual mining claim fees paid to the Bureau of Land Management.

 

Loman Claims

 

In December 2019 the Company acquired 27 mining claims for a total of $10,395. The claims were acquired from a third-party by the Company. As at the date of these financial statements, the Loman Claims are being re-registered into the Company’s name.

 

NOTE 6 – EQUITY INVESTMENT

 

As at December 31, 2019, the Company’s equity investments consist of 3,858,000 common shares of Walker River Resources Corp. (“WRR”) and warrants to acquire an additional 11,900,000 common shares.

 

Each WRR Warrant is exercisable for a period of five years, expiring on July 18, 2022, without further consideration into one common share in the capital of WRR. The terms of the WRR Warrants contain a provision which prevents the Company to exercise any part of the WRR Warrants which would result in the Company owning 10% or more of the issued and outstanding shares of WRR. Because these warrants can be exercised for no further consideration they have been accounted for as being equivalent to shares and classified as available for sale.

 

At December 31, 2019, the fair market value of the equity investment was calculated to be $1,030,406 (2018 - $922,896) based on the market price of WRR common shares. During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company sold 5,242,000 WRR common shares for net proceeds of $470,601. The Company recorded a net realized gain of $232,676 on the sale of WRR shares (Note 10).

 

The revaluation of the equity investment in WRR resulted in $345,435 gain (2018 - $415,651 loss). The gain resulted from the increase of the market price of WRR’s common stock from CAD$0.06 per share at December 31, 2018, to CAD$0.085 per share at December 31, 2019, and further effected by fluctuation in foreign exchange rates between Canadian Dollar and the US Dollar; whereas the loss for the comparative period resulted from the decrease of the market price of WRR’s common stock from CAD$0.08 per share at December 31, 2017, to CAD$0.06 per share at December 31, 2018.

 

NOTE 7 – NOTES AND ADVANCES PAYABLE

 

At December 31, 2019, the Company’s liability associated with notes and advances payable consisted of $15,064 the Company received as an advance for its operating activities during the year ended December 31, 2018, and $1,100 the Company received from WRR as a payment of its vendor payable. The advances are non-interest bearing, unsecured and due on demand.

 

NOTE 8 – STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

The Company was formed with one class of common stock, $0.0001 par value and is authorized to issue 100,000,000 common shares and one class of preferred stock, $0.0001 par value and is authorized to issue 10,000,000 preferred shares. Voting rights are not cumulative and, therefore, the holders of more than 50% of the common stock could, if they chose to do so, elect all of the directors of the Company.

 

During the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company did not have any transactions that would have resulted in issuance of its shares.

 

 F-9 
 

 

NOTE 9 – INCOME TAXES

 

A reconciliation of the expected income tax expense to the actual income tax expense is as follows:

 

   2019   2018 
Net income (loss) before tax  $173,805   $ (839,913 )
Statutory tax rate   21%   21%
Expected income tax recovery at statutory rate   36,499     (176,382 )
Non-deductible expenditures   (67,026)   - 
Adjustments relating to previously filed tax returns   (4,602)   35,584 
Impact of change in future tax rates   -    (13,606)
Change in valuation allowance   35,129     132,426  
Total income tax expense (recovery)   $-   $(21,978)

 

The Company has the following deductible temporary differences:

 

   2019   2018 
Deferred income tax assets          
Marketable securities  $(82,765)  $(15,739)
Non-capital loss carry-forward   200,655    165,527 
Total deferred income tax assets   117,890    149,788 
Less: Valuation allowance   (117,890)   (149,788)
Net deferred income tax assets  $-   $- 

 

The Company has net operating losses of approximately $956,000 available to reduce future years’ taxable income. These losses may be carried forward indefinitely. Tax attributes are subject to review, and potential adjustment, by tax authorities.

 

NOTE 10 – SUBSEQUENT EVENT

 

Subsequent to December 31, 2019, the Company sold a portion of its equity investment for total gross proceeds of approximately USD$165,860 (CAD$220,380). In addition, the Company acquired an additional 10,000,000 shares of WRR on partial exercises of its WRR Warrants, leaving 1,900,000 warrants to be exercised in the future.

 

 F-10 
 

 

Item 9. Controls and Procedures

 

(a) Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures.

 

Disclosure controls and procedures are designed with an objective of ensuring that information required to be disclosed in our periodic reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, such as this Annual Report on Form 10-K, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified by the Securities and Exchange Commission. Disclosure controls are also designed with an objective of ensuring that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our chief executive officer, in order to allow timely consideration regarding required disclosures.

 

The evaluation of our disclosure controls by our principal executive officer included a review of the controls’ objectives and design, the operation of the controls, and the effect of the controls on the information presented in this Annual Report. Our management, including our chief executive officer, does not expect that disclosure controls can or will prevent or detect all errors and all fraud, if any. A control system, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Also, projections of any evaluation of the disclosure controls and procedures to future periods are subject to the risk that the disclosure controls and procedures may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

 

As of the end of the period covered by this report, we carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures, as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 as of the end of the period covered by this report. Based on that evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer has concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures as of December 31, 2019, were not effective in providing timely material information which is required to be included in our periodic reports filed with the SEC as of the end of the period covering this report and to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in reports that we file or submit under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms. There have been no material changes in our internal controls over financial reporting or in other factors that could materially affect, or are reasonably likely to affect, our internal controls over financial reporting for the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

(b) Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting for the Company in accordance with Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act. Our internal control over financial reporting is designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the (i) effectiveness and efficiency of operations, (ii) reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and (iii) compliance with applicable laws and regulations. Our internal controls framework is based on the criteria set forth in the Internal Control - Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO).

 

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

 

Based on an assessment of the Company’s internal control procedures over financial reporting for the year ended December 31, 2019, management believes that the internal control over financial reporting is not effective. We have identified current material weaknesses considering the nature and extent of our current operations and any risks or errors in financial reporting under current operations. In the view of management, the Company does not have adequate segregation of duties in the handling of its financial reporting due to a limited number of personnel.

 

This Annual Report does not include an attestation report of the Company’s registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management’s report was not subject to attestation by the Company’s registered public accounting firm pursuant to temporary rules of the SEC that permit the Company to provide only management’s report in this Annual Report.

 

 26 
 

 

(c) Changes in Internal Controls

 

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred for the year ended December 31, 2019, that had materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

Item 9B. Other Information

 

Subsequent to December 31, 2019, the Company sold a portion of its equity investment for total gross proceeds of approximately USD$165,860 (CAD$220,380). In addition, the Company acquired an additional 10,000,000 shares of WRR on partial exercise of its WRR Warrants, leaving 1,900,000 WRR Warrants to be exercised in the future.

 

PART III

 

Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 

Our directors serve until his or her successor is elected and qualified. Our directors elect our officers to a term of one (1) year and they serve until their successors are duly elected and qualified, or until they are removed from office. The board of directors has no nominating or compensation committees.

 

The name, age, and position of our present officer and directors are set forth below:

 

Name   Age   Title(s)
         
Jeffrey Cocks   57   Chairman, Chief Executive Officer, Principal Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Principal Financial Officer, Principal Accounting Officer and Secretary
         
Michael Levine   70   Director

 

The persons named above have held their offices/positions since February 28, 2014, and we expect them to hold their offices/positions at least until the next annual meeting of our shareholders.

 

Mr. Jeffrey Cocks, Chairman, President, Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Secretary

 

Jeffrey Cocks is our Chairman, Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, and Secretary and has served in that capacity since February 28, 2014. From August 1996 to the present, Mr. Cocks has served as the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of West Isle Ventures, Ltd., a Canadian company that provides consulting services to start-ups and other companies. Mr. Cocks also serves on the board of directors and audit committees of Lithium Energi Exploration Inc., and Edison Cobalt Corp. which are traded on the Toronto Stock Exchange. Mr. Cocks has over 25 years of experience in consulting, sales, marketing, product development and branding as well as corporate compliance in the executive offices including overseeing his company’s accounting, compliance and finance departments and as a director of several public companies in both the United States and Canada. Mr. Cocks holds a certificate from Simon Frasier University in its securities program.

 

Mr. Michael Levine, Director

 

Michael Levine is a Director and has served in this capacity since February 28, 2014. From July 2004 to the present, Mr. Levine has served as the Chairman and President of TML Entertainment, Inc., a company that specializes in the exploitation and marketing of musical copyrights. From 2007 to 2012, Mr. Levine served as a director and audit committee member of Knightscove Media Corp., a Canadian entertainment company that specialized in the distribution, acquisition, and creation of high-quality live-action feature films and television productions for the whole family. Mr. Levine has served as an officer and director of a number of public and private companies in the United States and Canada and has experience with U.S. and Canadian reporting companies. From 1975 to 1993, Mr. Levine was the keyboardist and bassist for the Canadian power rock trio, Triumph. Mr. Levine is credited with much of the group’s success and produced the band’s early recordings. Triumph earned 16 gold and 9 platinum sales awards in Canada and the United States. Mr. Levine is a member of the Canadian Music Hall of Fame and the Canadian Music Industry Hall of Fame.

 

 27 
 

 

Possible Potential Conflicts

 

Our common stock is quoted on the OTC Link alternative trading system on the OTC Pink marketplace, which does not have director independence requirements.

 

No member of management will be required by us to work on a full-time basis. Accordingly, certain conflicts of interest may arise between us and our officer and directors in that they may have other business interests in the future to which they devote their attention, and they may be expected to continue to do so although management time must also be devoted to our business. As a result, conflicts of interest may arise that can be resolved only through the exercise of such judgment as is consistent with each officer’s understanding of his fiduciary duties to us. In the course of other business activities, they may become aware of business opportunities that may be appropriate for presentation to us, as well as the other entities with which they are affiliated. As such, there may be conflicts of interest in determining to which entity a particular business opportunity should be presented. In an effort to reduce or minimize any conflicts, Messrs. Cocks and Levine have orally agreed that any opportunities that are presented to them in the United States will be directed to the Company and that any opportunities presented to them in Canada will be available for their other business interests.

 

We cannot provide assurances that our efforts to eliminate the potential impact of conflicts of interest will be effective.

 

Currently, we have two directors and an officer and will seek to add additional officer(s) and/or director(s) as and when the proper personnel is located, and terms of employment are mutually negotiated and agreed, and we have sufficient capital resources and cash flow to make such offers.

 

We cannot provide assurances that our efforts to eliminate the potential impact of conflicts of interest will be effective.

 

Code of Business Conduct and Ethics

 

On February 28, 2014, we adopted a Code of Ethics and Business Conduct which is applicable to our future employees and which also includes a Code of Ethics for our chief executive officer and principal financial officer and any persons performing similar functions. A code of ethics is a written standard designed to deter wrongdoing and to promote:

 

  honest and ethical conduct;
     
  full, fair, accurate, timely and understandable disclosure in regulatory filings and public statements;
     
  compliance with applicable laws, rules and regulations;
     
  the prompt reporting violation of the code; and
     
  accountability for adherence to the code.

 

A copy of our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics has been filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission as Exhibit 14.1 to our registration statement.

 

 28 
 

 

Board of Directors

 

Our directors hold office until the completion of their term of office, which is not longer than one year, or until a successor(s) have been elected. Currently, directors receive no compensation for their role as directors but may receive compensation for their role as officers.

 

Involvement in Certain Legal Proceedings

 

During the past ten years, no present director, executive officer or person nominated to become a director or an executive officer of us:

 

  (1) had a petition under the federal bankruptcy laws or any state insolvency law filed by or against, or a receiver, fiscal agent or similar officer appointed by a court for the business or property of such person, or any partnership in which he was a general partner at or within two years before the time of such filing, or any corporation or business association of which he was an executive officer at or within two years before the time of such filing;
     
  (2) was convicted in a criminal proceeding or subject to a pending criminal proceeding (excluding traffic violations and other minor offenses);

 

  (3) was subject to any order, judgment or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any court of competent jurisdiction, permanently or temporarily enjoining him from or otherwise limiting his involvement in any of the following activities:

 

  i. acting as a futures commission merchant, introducing broker, commodity trading advisor commodity pool operator, floor broker, leverage transaction merchant, any other person regulated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, or an associated person of any of the foregoing, or as an investment adviser, underwriter, broker or dealer in securities, or as an affiliated person, director or employee of any investment company, bank, savings and loan association or insurance company, or engaging in or continuing any conduct or practice in connection with such activity;
     
  ii. engaging in any type of business practice; or
     
  iii. engaging in any activity in connection with the purchase or sale of any security or commodity or in connection with any violation of federal or state securities laws or federal commodities laws; or

 

  (4) was the subject of any order, judgment or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of an federal or state authority barring, suspending or otherwise limiting for more than 60 days the right of such person to engage in any activity described in paragraph (3) (i), above, or to be associated with persons engaged in any such activity; or
     
  (5) was found by a court of competent jurisdiction (in a civil action), the Securities and Exchange Commission or the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to have violated a federal or state securities or commodities law, and for which the judgment has not been reversed, suspended or vacated.

 

Committees of the Board of Directors

 

Concurrent with having sufficient members and resources, our board of directors will establish an audit committee and a compensation committee. We believe that we will need a minimum of five directors to have effective committee systems. The audit committee will review the results and scope of the audit and other services provided by the independent auditors and review and evaluate the system of internal controls. The compensation committee will manage any stock option plan we may establish and review and recommend compensation arrangements for the officers. No final determination has yet been made as to the memberships of these committees or when we will have sufficient members to establish committees. See “Executive Compensation” hereinafter.

 

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We will reimburse all directors for any expenses incurred in attending directors’ meetings provided that we have the resources to pay these fees. We will consider applying for officers and directors’ liability insurance at such time when we have the resources to do so.

 

Compliance with Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act

 

Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act requires our executive officers and directors, and persons who beneficially own more than 10% of our equity securities (collectively, the “Reporting Persons”), to file reports of ownership and changes in ownership with the SEC. Under the SEC regulations, Reporting Persons are required to provide us with copies of all forms that they file pursuant to Section 16(a). To our knowledge, based solely upon review of the copies of such reports received or written representations from the reporting persons, we believe that during the period covered by this Annual Report, our directors, executive officers and persons who own more than 10% of our common stock complied with all Section 16(a) filing requirements.

 

Item 11. Executive Compensation

 

The following table shows, for the years ended December 31, 2019, and 2018, compensation awarded to, paid to, or earned by, our Chief Executive Officer (the “Named Executive Officer”) and directors.

 

SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE

 

Name and
principal
position
  Year   Salary
($)
   Bonus
($)
   Stock
Awards
($)
   Option
Awards
($)
   Non-Equity
Incentive
Plan
Compensation
($)
   Nonqualified
Deferred
Compensation
Earnings
($)
   All Other
Compensation
($)
   Total
($)
 
Jeffrey Cocks(1), CEO, CFO and    2019    -    -    -    -    -    -    120,000(2)   120,000 
Director   2018    -    -    -    -    -    -    120,000(2)   120,000 
                                              
Michael Levine(1),    2019    -    -    -    -    -    -    120,000(3)   120,000 
Director   2018    -    -    -    -    -    -    120,000(3)   120,000 

 

  (1) We have no formal employment arrangements with Mr. Cocks or Mr. Levine at this time. Mr. Cocks’ and Mr. Levine’s compensation has not been fixed or based on any percentage calculations.
  (2) During our fiscal 2019 we accrued $120,000 in consulting fees payable to a company controlled by Mr. Cocks (2018 - $120,000).
  (3) During our fiscal 2019, we accrued $120,000 in consulting fees payable to a company controlled by Mr. Levine (2018 - $120,000).

 

Grants of Plan-Based Awards

 

We currently do not have any equity compensation plans. Therefore, none of our named executive officers received any grants of stock, option awards or other plan-based awards for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018.

 

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End Table

 

None. We do not have any equity award compensation plans.

 

Director Compensation

 

Other than the compensation set out in the table above, we have not paid compensation to our directors.

 

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Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

 

The following table sets forth, as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, the total number of shares owned beneficially by our officer and directors, individually and as a group, and the present owners of 5% or more of our total outstanding shares. The shareholders listed below have direct ownership of their shares and possess sole voting and dispositive power with respect to the shares. As of March 26, 2020, we had 44,550,000 shares of common stock outstanding of which 29,700,000 was held by three shareholders. There are no pending or anticipated arrangements that may cause a change in control.

 

Title of Class  Name of Beneficial Owner  Amount of Beneficial Ownership   Nature of Beneficial Ownership 

Percent of

Class

 
Security Ownership of Management           
Common Stock  Jeffrey Cocks   9,950,000   direct   22.3%
Common Stock  Michael Levine   9,950,000   direct   22.3%
   All Officers and Directors
as a Group
   19,900,000       44.6%
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners (more than 5%)         
Common Stock  Jeffrey Cocks   9,950,000   direct   22.3%
Common Stock  Michael Levine   9,950,000   direct   22.3%
Common Stock  Ron Tattum(1)   9,800,000   beneficial   22.0%

 

(1) The shares are registered in the name of BCIM Management, LP, which Mr. Ron Tattum has control over.

 

Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

 

Our promoters are Mr. Cocks, our chairman, Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer and secretary, and Mr. Levine, our director.

 

Our office and mailing address is 316 California Avenue, Suite 543, Reno, NV 89509.

 

Our sole officer and directors are required to commit time to our affairs and, accordingly, may have conflicts of interest in allocating management time among various business activities. In the course of other business activities, they may become aware of business opportunities that may be appropriate for presentation to us, as well as the other entities with which they are affiliated. As such, there may be conflicts of interest in determining to which entity a particular business opportunity should be presented.

 

In an effort to resolve such potential conflicts of interest, our officers and directors have orally agreed that any opportunities that they are aware of independently or directly through their association with us (as opposed to disclosure to them of such business opportunities by management or consultants associated with other entities) would be presented by them solely to us.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, we received $100 advance from Mr. Cocks, our CEO, CFO, and a director. During the same period, we accrued $120,000 in consulting fees payable to a company controlled by Mr. Cocks.

During the year ended December 31, 2019, we accrued $120,000 in consulting fees payable to a company controlled by Mr. Levine.

Aside from the transactions noted above and in Item 11 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, we had no other related party transactions, or any other transactions or relationships required to be disclosed pursuant to Item 404 of Regulation S-K.

 

With regard to any future related party transaction, we plan to fully disclose any and all related party transactions, including, but not limited to, the following:

 

  disclose such transactions in prospectuses, where required;
  disclose in any and all filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, where required;
  obtain disinterested directors’ consent, where required; and
  obtain shareholder consent, where required.

 

Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services

 

During the last two fiscal years, the Company’s independent auditors have billed for their services as set forth below:

 

   December 31, 2019   December 31, 2018 
         
Audit fees  $14,500   $12,800 
Audit-related fees  $-   $- 
Tax fees  $1,200   $- 
All other fees  $-   $- 

 

Pre-Approval Policy

 

Our directors pre-approve all services provided by our auditors. Prior to the engagement of our auditor, for any non-audit or non-audit related services, our directors must conclude that such services are compatible with the independence of our auditors.

 

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PART IV

 

Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules

 

EXHIBITS

 

The following exhibits are filed as part of this Annual Repot on Form 10-K, pursuant to Item 601 of Regulation S-K.

 

Exhibit Number   Description of Exhibits
3.1   Articles of Incorporation (6)
3.1.1   Certificate of Correction to Articles of Incorporation (6)
3.1.2   Certificate of Amendment to Articles of Incorporation (5)
3.2   Bylaws (6)
14.1   Code of Ethics (6)
10.01.1   Definitive Agreement, dated December 17, 2015 (1)
10.01.2   Exploration and Option Agreement, dated September 15, 2015 (1)
10.02   Exploration Lease and Option to Purchase Agreement, dated June 7, 2017 (2)
10.03   Option Purchase Agreement, dated July 5, 2017 (3)
10.04   Exploration Lease Agreement, dated August 2, 2017 (4)
10.05   Definitive Purchase Agreement dated July 11, 2018 (7)
31.1   Certification of the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934*
32.1   Certification of the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C Section 1350 as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002*

 

 

 

101.INS   XBRL Instance Document*
101.SCH   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema*
101.CAL   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase*
101.DEF   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase*
101.LAB   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase*
101.PRE   XBRL Taxonomy Presentation Linkbase*

 

  (1) Incorporated by reference herein from the Form 8-K filed by the Company on December 22, 2015.
  (2) Incorporated by reference herein from the Form 8-K filed by the Company on June 8, 2017.
  (3) Incorporated by reference herein from the Form 8-K filed by the Company on July 7, 2017.
  (4) Incorporated by reference herein from the Form 8-K filed by the Company on August 7, 2017.
  (5) Incorporated by reference herein from the Form 10-K filed by the Company on March 15, 2016.
  (6) Incorporated by reference herein from the Form S-1 filed by the Company on May 19, 2014.
  (7) Incorporated by reference herein from the Form 8-K filed by the Company on July 12, 2018.
  * Filed herewith.

 

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

  NEVADA CANYON GOLD CORP.
   
March 26, 2020 /s/ Jeffrey A. Cocks
  Jeffrey A. Cocks
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
(Principal Executive Officer) and Chief Financial Officer
(Principal Accounting Officer)

 

In accordance with the Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

March 26, 2020 /s/ Jeffrey A. Cocks
  Jeffrey A. Cocks
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
(Principal Executive Officer) and Chief Financial Officer
(Principal Accounting Officer) and Director
   
March 26, 2020 /s/ Michael Levine
  Michael Levine
Director

 

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