Company Quick10K Filing
Odyssey Group
Closing Price ($) Shares Out (MM) Market Cap ($MM)
$0.00 69 $-0
10-Q 2019-12-06 Quarter: 2019-10-31
10-K 2019-10-23 Annual: 2019-07-31
10-Q 2019-06-07 Quarter: 2019-04-30
10-Q 2019-03-14 Quarter: 2019-01-31
10-Q 2019-03-13 Quarter: 2018-10-31
10-K 2018-12-12 Annual: 2018-07-31
10-Q 2018-08-07 Quarter: 2018-04-30
10-Q 2018-05-30 Quarter: 2018-01-31
10-Q 2017-12-20 Quarter: 2017-10-31
10-K 2017-11-14 Annual: 2017-07-31
10-Q 2017-06-21 Quarter: 2017-04-30
10-Q 2017-03-23 Quarter: 2017-01-31
10-Q 2016-12-20 Quarter: 2016-10-31
10-K 2016-11-02 Annual: 2016-07-31
10-Q 2016-06-16 Quarter: 2016-04-30
10-Q 2016-03-15 Quarter: 2016-01-31
10-Q 2015-12-22 Quarter: 2015-10-31
10-K 2015-12-01 Annual: 2015-07-31
8-K 2019-10-23 Officers
8-K 2019-09-20 Officers
8-K 2019-08-28 Officers
8-K 2019-06-28 Enter Agreement
8-K 2019-06-08 Enter Agreement
8-K 2019-06-05 Enter Agreement
8-K 2019-05-31 Enter Agreement
8-K 2019-02-08 Enter Agreement
ODYY 2019-10-31
Part I Financial Information
Item 1. Financial Statements
Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.
Item 4. Controls and Procedures
Part II Other Information
Item 1. Legal Proceedings
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 2. Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities
Item 3. Default on Senior Securities
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Item 5. Other Information
Item 6. Exhibits
EX-31.1 ody_10q-ex3101.htm
EX-31.2 ody_10q-ex3102.htm
EX-32 ody_10q-ex032.htm

Odyssey Group Earnings 2019-10-31

ODYY 10Q Quarterly Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

Comparables ($MM TTM)
Ticker M Cap Assets Liab Rev G Profit Net Inc EBITDA EV G Margin EV/EBITDA ROA
YAPPA 0 0 0 0 -2 -2 -0 0.0 -42,647%
LGTG 6 7 4 0 0 1 -1 0% -0.9 7%
CWI2 1,594 907 364 0 2 91 732 0% 8.0 0%
ODYY 0 1 0 0 -0 -0 -0 0.0 -1,325%
BNO 94 3 -39 0 1 1 -89 -0% -82.7 1%
FSTJ 0 0 0 0 -0 -0 -0 0.1 -1,768%
DQWS 0 0 0 0 -0 -0 -0 21% 0.2 -180%
JCG 1,709 3,044 2,523 826 -141 -41 1 33% -0.0 -8%
GQM 183 71 66 22 -3 13 4 33% 0.3 -1%
FHLBD 74,518 70,700 0 0 221 1,739 -52 -0.0 0%

10-Q 1 ody_10q-103119.htm FORM 10-Q

 

Table of Contents

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

_________________________________

 

Form 10-Q 

_________________________________

(Mark One)

 

x        QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended October 31, 2019

or

¨        TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from            to             .

 

Commission File No. 333-200785

____________________________________

 

Odyssey Group International, Inc.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)

____________________________________

     
Nevada   47-1022125

(State or Other Jurisdiction of

Incorporation or Organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

2372 Morse Avenue

Irvine, CA 92614

(619) 832-2900

(Address and Telephone Number, Including Area Code, of Registrant’s Principal Executive Offices)

____________________________________

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: None

 

 

Title of each Class Trading Symbol Name of each exchange on which registered
N/A N/A N/A

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer”, “smaller reporting company”, and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one)

 

  Large accelerated filer  o Accelerated filer  o
  Non-accelerated filer  o Smaller reporting company  x
  Emerging growth company  o  

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ¨    No  x

 

86,990,400 shares of common stock, par value $.001 per share, outstanding as of December 6, 2019.

 

 

 

   

 

 

ODYSSEY GROUP INTERNATIONAL, INC.

FORM 10-Q

For the Quarter Ended October 31, 2019

 

INDEX

 

 

 

 

 

 2 

 

 

PART I FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements

 

Odyssey Group International, Inc.

Balance Sheets

 

   31-Oct-19   31-Jul-19 
   (Unaudited)     
Assets          
Current assets:          
Cash and cash equivalents  $102,320   $167,095 
Prepaid expenses   219,856    302,833 
Loan receivable       50,000 
Total current assets   322,176    519,928 
Property and equipment, net   1,379    1,517 
Intangible assets, net   22,590,225    23,139,570 
Total assets  $22,913,780   $23,661,015 
Liabilities and Stockholders' Equity (Deficiency)          
Current liabilities:          
Accounts payable  $48,774   $47,743 
Accrued wages   270,534    297,547 
Contingent liability   144,000    144,000 
Notes payable, including accrued interest   893,375    784,913 
Total liabilities   1,356,683    1,274,203 
Stockholders' equity (deficiency):          
Preferred stock, $.001 par value; 100,000,000 shares authorized, no shares issued or outstanding        
Common stock, $.001 par value; 500,000,000 shares authorized with 86,990,400 and 86,990,400 issued and outstanding   86,990    86,990 
Additional paid-in capital   24,954,866    23,821,124 
Deficit   (3,484,759)   (1,521,302)
Total stockholders’ equity (deficiency)   21,557,097    22,386,812 
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity (deficiency)  $22,913,780   $23,661,015 

  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

 

 3 

 

 

 

Odyssey Group International, Inc.

Statements of Operations

(Unaudited)

 

   Three Months Ended 
   October 31, 
   2019   2018 
         
Revenues  $   $ 
           
Costs of goods sold        
           
Gross profit        
           
General and administrative expense   1,873,662    52,404 
           
Loss from operations   (1,873,662)   (52,404)
           
Interest expense   89,795    17,092 
Net loss  $(1,963,457)  $(69,496)
           
Basic net loss per share:  $(0.02)  $(0.00)
           
Weighted average number of shares   86,990,400    61,414,000 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

 

 

 

 4 

 

 

Odyssey Group International, Inc.

Statements of Stockholders’ Equity (Deficiency)

(Unaudited)

 

 

   Three Months Ended 
   October 31, 
   2019   2018 
         
Common stock and paid-in capital          
Balance, beginning of period  $23,908,114   $253,500 
Common stock issued for services   1,048,312     
Warrants and beneficial conversion feature issued in connection with convertible notes   85,430     
Balance, end of period   25,041,856    253,500 
           
Retained earnings          
Balance, beginning of period   (1,521,302)   (1,072,876)
Net loss   (1,963,457)   (69,496)
Balance, end of period   (3,484,759)   (1,142,372)
           
Total stockholders’ equity (deficiency)  $21,557,097   $(888,872)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

 

 

 5 

 

 

Odyssey Group International, Inc.

Statement of Cash Flows

(Unaudited)

 

 

   Three Months Ended 
   October 31, 
   2019   2018 
         
Operating activities          
Net loss  $(1,963,457)  $(69,496)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:          
Depreciation and amortization expense   549,483    2,638 
Amortization of beneficial conversion feature related to convertible notes   70,309     
Stock based payment expense for consulting and compensation   1,131,290     
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:          
Increase and decrease in accounts payable   1,031    (3,619)
Decrease and increase in accrued wages   (27,013)   30,000 
Increase in accrued interest   23,582    17,092 
Increase in consulting fees charged to notes payable       5,000 
Net cash used in operating activities   (214,775)   (18,385)
           
Financing activities          
Proceeds from note payable   150,000    19,000 
Net cash provided by financing activities   150,000    19,000 
           
Net change in cash and cash equivalents   (64,775)   615 
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period   167,095    390 
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period  $102,320   $1,005 
           
Noncash Investing and Financing Activities          
Beneficial conversion feature related to convertible notes  $85,430   $ 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

 

 

 6 

 

  

Odyssey Group International, Inc.

Notes to Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

 

The accompanying financial information of Odyssey Group International, Inc. as of and for the period ended October 31, 2019, has been prepared pursuant to the rules and regulations of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) applicable to interim financial information and is unaudited. Accordingly, certain information normally included in annual financial statements prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) has been condensed and/or omitted. The results for the interim period are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year. In the opinion of management, the accompanying unaudited interim financial statements contain all necessary adjustments, consisting only of those of a recurring nature, and disclosures to present fairly our financial position and the results of our operations and cash flows for the periods presented. These unaudited interim financial statements should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and the related notes thereto included in our Form 10-K for the year ended July 31, 2019, filed with the SEC on October 23, 2019.

 

1. Nature of Operations

 

The corporate mission is to create or acquire distinct assets, intellectual property, and technologies with an emphasis on acquisition targets that generate positive cash flow. Our business model is to develop or acquire medical related products, engage third parties to manufacture such products and then distribute the products through various distribution channels, including third parties. The Company has significant assets in three different life saving technologies; the CardioMap® heart monitoring and screening device, the Save a Life choking rescue device and a unique neurosteroid drug compound intended to treat rare brain disorders. We intend to acquire other technologies and assets and plan to be a trans-disciplinary product development company involved in the discovery, development and commercialization of products and technologies that may be applied over various medical markets. We plan to license, improve and/or develop our products and identify and select distribution channels. We intend to establish agreements with distributors to get products to market quickly as well as to undertake and engage in our own direct marketing efforts. We will determine the most effective method of distribution for each unique product that we include in our portfolio. We will engage third party research and development firms who specialize in the creation of our products to assist us in the development of our own products and we will apply for trademarks and patents once we have developed proprietary products.

 

We are not currently selling or marketing any products, as our products are in late stage development and Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") clearance or approval to market our products will be required in order to sell in the United States.

 

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Use of estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP generally requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Basis of accounting

 

The Company has not elected to adopt the option available under GAAP to measure any of its eligible financial instruments or other items at fair value. Accordingly, the Company measures all of its assets and liabilities on the historical cost basis of accounting unless otherwise required by GAAP.

 

Accounts receivable

 

Accounts receivable are carried at their estimated collectible value, net of an appropriate allowance for doubtful accounts, which is adjusted as necessary based primarily on management's evaluation of customers' past credit history and known or estimated current financial condition, the Company's relationship with the customer, current economic conditions, the historical results of, and recent trends in, the Company's collection efforts. The Company manages credit risk by evaluating the credit worthiness of significant customers prior to extending credit and thereafter. Accordingly, accounts receivable and the related allowance are evaluated periodically for collectability.

 

 

 

 7 

 

 

Property and equipment, net

 

Property and equipment is stated at cost less accumulated depreciation. Depreciation is recorded on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives of the assets. For each the three months ended October 31, 2019, and 2018, the Company recognized depreciation expense of $138.

 

Beneficial Conversion Feature of convertible notes payable

 

The Beneficial Conversion Feature ("BCF") of a convertible note is normally characterized as the convertible portion or feature of certain notes payable that provide a rate of conversion that is below market value or in-the-money when issued. The Company records a BCF related to the issuance of a convertible note when issued and also records the estimated fair value of any warrants issued with those convertible notes. Beneficial conversion features that are contingent upon the occurrence of a future event are recorded upon the occurrence of the event.

 

The BCF of a convertible note is measured by allocating a portion of the note's proceeds to the warrants, if applicable, and as a reduction of the carrying amount of the convertible note equal to the intrinsic value of the conversion feature, both of which are credited to additional paid-in-capital. The value of the proceeds received from a convertible note is then allocated between the conversion features and warrants on an allocated fair value basis. The allocated fair value is recorded in the financial statements as a debt discount (premium) from the face amount of the note and such discount is amortized over the expected term of the convertible note (or to the conversion date of the note, if sooner) and is charged to interest expense.

 

Net loss per share

 

Basic net loss per share is calculated by dividing the net loss by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding for the period, without consideration for common stock equivalents. No fully diluted loss per share is presented, because it would be anti-dilutive.

 

Revenue recognition

 

The Company recognizes revenue when control is transferred to the customer. For products sold through direct sales representatives, control is transferred upon shipment or upon delivery, based on the contract terms and legal requirements. Payment terms vary depending on the country of sale, type of customer, and type of product. If a contract contains more than one performance obligation, the transaction price is allocated to each performance obligation based on relative standalone selling price. Shipping and handling is treated as a fulfillment activity rather than a promised service, and therefore, is not considered a performance obligation. Taxes assessed by a governmental authority that are both imposed on, and concurrent with, a specific revenue producing transaction and collected by the Company from customers (for example, sales, use, value added, and some excise taxes) are not included in revenue. For contracts that have an original duration of one year or less, the Company uses the practical expedient applicable to such contracts and does not adjust the transaction price for the time value of money. We are not currently selling or marketing any products, as our products are in late stage development and FDA clearance to market our products will be required in order to sell in the United States.

 

3. Impact of New Accounting Pronouncements

 

Changes to GAAP are established by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”), in the form of Accounting Standards Updates (“ASUs”), to the FASB’s Accounting Standards Codification. The Company considers the applicability and impact of all ASUs.

 

The FASB issued ASU 2017-11, Earnings Per Share (Topic 260) effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018. The amendments update the change in the classification analysis of certain equity-linked financial instruments (or embedded features) with down round features. When determining whether certain financial instruments should be classified as liabilities or equity instruments, a down round feature no longer precludes equity classification when assessing whether the instrument is indexed to an entity’s own stock. The amendments also clarify existing disclosure requirements for equity-classified instruments. This new guidance is effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018 and interim periods, with early adoption permitted. The Company adopted the standard as of August 1, 2019, which did not have a material impact on the Company’s financial statements and disclosures.

 

 

 

 8 

 

 

The FASB issued ASU 2017-09, Compensation-Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Scope of Modification Accounting, effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017 adopting this standard on its consolidated financial statements. The ASU amends the scope of modification accounting for share-based payment arrangements, provides guidance on the types of changes to the terms or conditions of share-based payment awards to which an entity would be required to apply modification accounting. The new guidance will allow companies to make certain changes to awards without accounting for them as modifications. It does not change the accounting for modifications. The new guidance will be applied prospectively to awards modified on or after the adoption date. This new guidance is effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018. The Company adopted the standard as of August 1, 2019, which did not have a material impact on the Company’s financial statements and disclosures.

 

The FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), which is intended to increase transparency and comparability among organizations by recognizing lease assets and lease liabilities on the balance sheet and disclosing key information about leasing arrangements.  The guidance requires lessees and lessors to recognize and measure leases at the beginning of the earliest period presented using a modified retrospective approach. ASU 2016-02 is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those annual periods, with early adoption permitted. The Company adopted the standard as of August 1, 2019, which did not have a material impact on the Company’s financial statements and disclosures.

 

4. Intangible Assets – Patent and Distribution Rights

 

FASB ASC 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, establishes a framework for measuring fair value. That framework provides a fair value hierarchy that prioritizes the inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets and liabilities (Level 1 measurements) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3 measurements). The three levels of the fair value hierarchy under FASB ASC 820 are described as follows: 

 

Level 1 – Observable inputs, such as unadjusted quoted prices in active markets, for substantially identical assets and liabilities. 

 

Level 2 – Observable inputs other than quoted prices within Level 1 for similar assets and liabilities. These include quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets, quoted prices for identical assets and liabilities in markets that are not active, or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data.  If the asset or liability has a specified or contractual term, the input must be observable for substantially the full term of the asset or liability. 

 

Level 3 – Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity, generally requiring a significant amount of judgment by management.  The assets or liabilities fair value measurement level within the fair value hierarchy is based on the lowest level.  

 

The methods described above may produce a fair value calculation that may not be indicative of net realizable value or reflective of future fair values. Further, although the Company believes its valuation methods are appropriate and consistent with other market participants, the use of different methodologies or assumptions to determine the fair value of certain financial instruments could result in a different fair value measurement at the reporting date. 

 

The Company purchased distribution rights to sell and distribute a new technology, CardioMap®, which is an advanced technology for early non-invasive testing for heart disease. The product distribution rights are amortized over the life of the underlying patent. The acquisition cost of $18.75 million (Level 2) is valued at the fair market value of $1.25 per share for the stock granted on the date of acquisition.  For the three months ended October 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company recognized amortization expense of $461,066 and $0, respectively.

 

The Company acquired the intellectual property, know-how and patents for an anti-choking, life-saving medical device from Dr. James De Luca (“De Luca”), inventor and Murdock Capital Partners (“MCP”). The asset is valued at $675,400 (Level 2), which includes the fair market value of $1.25 per share for the stock granted on the date of acquisition, as well as stock options granted valued at $0.84 per share based upon the Black-Scholes valuation model and a onetime cash payment totaling $250,000 that will be paid upon FDA clearance of the product. The payment is recorded as a contingent liability and, based upon an independent valuation of the patents (Level 3), at October 31, 2019, the Company determined payment has a fair market value of $144,000. The intellectual property, know-how and patents are being amortized over the life of the patents. For the three months ended October 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company recognized amortization expense of $17,789 and $0, respectively.

 

 

 

 9 

 

 

The Company acquired the patented chemical compound for a neurosteroid as part of the joint venture agreement with Prevacus, Inc. The acquisition cost of $3.73 million (Level 2) is being amortized over the life of the patent. The asset is valued at the fair market value of $1.25 per share for the stock granted on the date of acquisition. The patents are being amortized over the life of the patents. For the three months ended October 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company recognized amortization expense of $67,991 and $0, respectively.

 

For the quarter ended October 31, 2019 the gross carrying amount of the intangible assets totaled $23,205,400 and accumulated amortization totaled $615,175 for a net amount of $22,590,225. Amortization expense recognized for the quarter ended October 31, 2019 and 2018 is $549,345 and $2,500, respectively. Patents are amortized over their useful lives with the weighted average years remaining of 10.46 with no residual value. Amortization is as follows over the next five years and thereafter:

 

For the quarter ending October 31, 2019     Patents  
Year 1     $ 2,039,003  
Year 2       2,034,003  
Year 3       2,029,003  
Year 4       2,029,003  
Year 5       2,029,003  
Thereafter     $ 12,430,212  

 

5. Notes Payable

 

As of October 31, 2019, the Company has a note payable that is subject to periodic payments that come due based on sales. The note fully matures in January 2020, bears interest at 12.5% annually, and the remaining unpaid balance is convertible upon maturity at the holder’s option into shares of common stock at a conversion price fixed at $0.01 per share. As of October 31, 2019, the note has a balance of $765,705. Because the conversion feature does not meet the criteria for characterization as a beneficial conversion feature, no portion of the proceeds from the issuance of the note was accounted for as attributable to the conversion feature. This note was amended on February 1, 2018, where the debt holder agreed to convert portions of its loan pari passu with any new investment raise of $500,000 or more. Furthermore, the debt holder was issued a common stock warrant for 4 million shares at $0.25 per share with an expiration date of 90 days after the issuance, as consideration to the debt holder to agree to begin to convert portions of its loan to common stock pari passu with a new offering raise of investment at a minimum of $500,000. As of October 31, 2019, these warrants expired.

 

As of October 31, 2019, the Company has four additional convertible debt notes outstanding. The notes bear interest at 7.0% annually and the entire outstanding principal amount, together with accrued interest shall become due and payable on the date that is one (1) year from the date of issuance, unless before such date, is converted into shares of capital stock of the Company. At the option of the holder, the principal amount of the notes and any accrued interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a conversion price of $1.00 per share or at a 10% discount to the closing price on the day of conversion, but not lower than $0.50 per share. At maturity, and subject to a trickle out agreement, the Company shall have the right to either pay off the loan and any interest accrued or convert the loan amount and any interest into shares of common stock. The debt holders were issued a common stock warrant equal to 10% of the note with a price of $1.50 per share and a term for one year from the investment date. At October 31, 2019, the notes have a balance of $127,670. Because the conversion feature met the criteria for characterization as a beneficial conversion feature, a portion of the proceeds, including warrants, of which $228,361 from the issuance of the notes are accounted for as attributable to the conversion feature.

 

6. Fair Value Measurements 

 

The carrying values of cash, the note receivable, and notes payable approximate their estimated fair values because of the short-term nature of these instruments.

 

7. Common Stock 

 

On January 9, 2019, Vivakor, Inc. (“Vivakor”) gave written notice to the Company effecting a conversion of $25,314 of convertible debt into 2,531,400 shares of Common Stock of the Company, issued to Vivakor pursuant to the Master Revolving Note, dated as of January 4, 2017, and amended as of February 1, 2018, by and between the Company and Vivakor.

 

 

 

 10 

 

 

On April 17, 2019, the Company entered into an agreement for consulting services to be provided through April 2020. The Company granted the consultant 100,000 shares of the Company’s common stock.

 

On May 22, 2019, the Company entered into employment agreements for two part-time employees. The Company granted the employees 10,000 shares each of the Company’s common stock.

 

On March 22, 2019, April 17, 2019, June 1, 2019, and July 26, 2019, the Company entered into agreements for consulting services for the next 12 months. The Company granted the consultants a total of 305,000 shares of the Company’s common stock.

 

On June 27, 2019, Odyssey entered into a Definitive Agreement with Prevacus to form a Joint Venture relating to the development of a neurosteroid for treating two orphan disorders, ALS and Niemann Picks disease. Prevacus will contribute to the JV, the chemical compound and Odyssey will be responsible for funding the JV through Phase One clinical trials. The JV company will own the patents. Each party will own the JV company equally. In addition to the JV, the two companies have entered into a share exchange agreement whereby Prevacus will receive three million shares of Odyssey common stock and Odyssey will receive one million shares of Prevacus stock. The chemical compound for the neurosteroid being developed has issued patents, and as consideration for the patented compound, Odyssey issued Prevacus two million shares of its common stock. As part of the Agreement, Dr. Jacob Vanlandingham Ph.D., CEO of Prevacus, was issued one million shares of the Company’s common stock. The Company allocated 984,000 shares to the acquisition of the patent and 20,000 shares were allocated to Dr. Vanlandingham as a Director of the Company.

 

On June 27, 2019, Odyssey entered into a Definitive Agreement with Dr. James De Luca, inventor and Murdock Capital Partners, advisors to De Luca, to acquire the intellectual property, know-how and patents for a life-saving medical device currently in development. The Company acquired intellectual property rights, namely, United States Letters Patent No. 7,559,921, entitled “Device for Removing a Lodged Mass” which issued on July 14, 2009 and which was reissued on June 2, 2015 and received U.S. Reissue Patent No. Re 45,535 and United States Patent Number 8,454,624 also entitled “Device for Removing a Lodged Mass” which was issued on June 4, 2013. As consideration for the patent and intellectual property, the Company granted stock options totaling 600,000 shares of the Company’s stock, vesting on certain milestones. The options will be split between De Luca and MCP. The Company also granted De Luca, 20,000 common shares. A onetime cash payment totaling $250,000 will be paid to Deluca and MCP upon FDA clearance of the product. The payment is recorded as a contingent liability and, based upon an independent valuation of the patents, at October 31, 2019, the payment has a fair market value of $144,000.

 

8. Stock Based Compensation

 

We have not adopted any equity compensation plans. We have entered into an individual compensation plan for Mr. Redmond, for which Mr. Redmond has been granted stock options of 15 million shares at $0.25 per share. The options vest upon achieving the following milestones: 5 million options vest upon each milestone, when the Company obtains revenue of $5 million, $10 million and $15 million. Mr. Redmond cannot sell any of the above stock options for two years from the effective date of the employment agreement or until the Company reaches $10 million in annual revenue, whichever occurs first. The stock option vesting accelerates and becomes immediately exercisable upon the sale, merger or any transaction resulting in the majority (more than 50%) of the Company stock being obtained. The Company has not recorded any expense, as we have not determined that it is probable that the milestones will be achieved.

 

On August 15, 2019, the Company amended its agreement with its financial consultant to included monthly payments of $5,000 and 200,000 stock options to be granted stock in accordance with the mutual agreement of the Board’s compensation committee. As of October 31, 2019, the stock options have not been issued.

 

On August 20, 2019, the Company entered into a consulting agreement for research and development associated with the CardioMap®. The consultant will receive monthly payments of $5,000 and 2.0 million stock options, vesting upon certain milestone achievements.

 

On August 28, 2019, Mr. Jeff Conroy joined the Board of Odyssey as an independent director. On September 20, 2019, Mr. Jerry Casey joined the Board of Odyssey as an independent director. On October 23, 2019, Mr. John Gandolfo joined the Board of Odyssey as an independent director and has been elected chair of the audit committee. All Directors are compensated with stock in accordance with the mutual agreement of the Board’s compensation committee. As of October 31, 2019, the Company recognized $1,050,813 in board expense.

 

 

 

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9. Income Taxes 

 

We expect to file income tax returns in the U.S. federal jurisdiction and various state jurisdictions in which we operate and are currently not under examination. As of October 31, 2019, and July 31, 2019, the Company had net deferred tax assets of $672,573 and $260,247 consisting of net operating loss carryforwards that expire in 2035 net of an effective offsetting valuation allowance of 100%. Our effective tax rate for the three months ended October 31, 2019 and 2018 was 21%. The Company has established the valuation allowance because due to substantial uncertainty as to the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern (Note 10), it is more likely than not at this time that the deferred tax assets will not be realized within the carryforward period.

 

10. Going Concern 

 

We have a deficit of $3,484,759 as of October 31, 2019. For the foreseeable future, we expect to experience continuing operating losses and negative cash flows from operations as our management executes our current business plan. The cash available at October 31, 2019, of $102,320, may not provide enough working capital to meet our current operating expenses through December 6, 2020, as we continue to accrue overhead expenses. We will need to raise additional capital through a debt financing or equity offering to meet our operating and capital needs. There can be no assurance, however, that we will be successful in our fundraising efforts or that additional funds will be available on acceptable terms, if at all.

 

If we are unable to raise additional capital by December 6, 2020, we will adjust our current business plan. Due to our lack of additional committed capital, recurring losses, negative cash flow and accumulated deficit, there is substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. 

 

11. Related Party Transactions

 

The Company has a common officer with Green Energy Alternatives, Inc. As of October 31, 2019, and 2018, Green Energy Alternatives, Inc. held 5.3 million shares of the Company’s common stock.

 

12. Subsequent Events

 

We have evaluated subsequent events and, except for the transaction described below, there were no other events relative to the financial statements that require additional disclosure.

 

On November 25, 2019, the Company was upgraded by the OTC Markets from the OTC Over the Counter Pink Sheets to the OTCQB® Venture Market. The OTCQB® is for entrepreneurial and development stage U.S. and international companies and will allow access for the Company’s stock to be traded.

 

The Company entered into a corporate development, investor relations and advisory agreement. The agreement is for twelve (12) months commencing on December 1, 2019 and provides for a monthly cash fee, provided the Company has sufficient funds to pay. Fees will accrue until the Company has $250,000, and then all accrued compensation will be paid. Upon mutual agreement, the accrued cash fee may be converted into equity at an agreed upon price per share. In addition, the Company will issue 200,000 shares of common stock, 50,000 shares vesting quarterly, beginning December 1, 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This Form 10-Q contains forward-looking statements that involve substantial risks and uncertainties. All statements, other than statements of historical fact, included in this report regarding our strategy, future operations, future financial position, future revenues, projected costs, prospects and plans and objectives of management are forward-looking statements. The words “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “expects,” “intends,” “may,” “plans,” “projects,” “will,” “would” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements, although not all forward-looking statements contain these identifying words.

 

We have based these forward-looking statements on our current expectations and projections about future events. Although we believe that the expectations underlying our forward-looking statements are reasonable, these expectations may prove to be incorrect, and all of these statements are subject to risks and uncertainties. Therefore, you should not place undue reliance on our forward-looking statements. We have included important risks and uncertainties in the cautionary statements included in this report, particularly the section titled “Risk Factors” incorporated by reference herein. We believe these risks and uncertainties could cause actual results or events to differ materially from the forward-looking statements that we make. Should one or more of these risks and uncertainties materialize, or should underlying assumptions, projections or expectations prove incorrect, actual results, performance or financial condition may vary materially and adversely from those anticipated, estimated or expected. Our forward-looking statements do not reflect the potential impact of future acquisitions, mergers, dispositions, joint ventures or investments that we may make. We do not assume any obligation to update any of the forward-looking statements contained herein, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law. In the light of these risks and uncertainties, the forward-looking events and circumstances discussed in this report may not occur, and actual results could differ materially from those anticipated or implied in the forward-looking statements.

 

Overview

 

We have a deficit of $3,484,759 as of October 31, 2019. For the foreseeable future, we expect to experience continuing operating losses and negative cash flows from operations as our management executes our current business plan. The cash of $102,320 available at October 31, 2019, may not provide enough working capital to meet our current operating expenses through December 6, 2020, as we continue to accrue overhead expenses. We will need to raise additional capital through a debt financing or equity offering to meet our operating and capital needs. There can be no assurance, however, that we will be successful in our fundraising efforts or that additional funds will be available on acceptable terms, if at all.

 

If we are unable to raise additional capital by December 6, 2020, we will adjust our current business plan. Due to our lack of additional committed capital, recurring losses, negative cash flow and accumulated deficit, there is substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern.

 

Going Concern

 

Substantial doubt exists as to our ability to continue as a going concern based on the fact that we do not have adequate working capital to finance our day-to-day operations. The Company has not realized any revenues for the quarters ended October 31, 2019 and 2018. The Company has an operating deficit of $3,484,759 as of October 31, 2019. The operating deficit indicates substantial uncertainty about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans include engaging in further research and development and raising additional capital in the short term to fund such activities through sales of its common stock. Management’s ability to implement its plans and continue as a going concern may be dependent upon raising additional capital. Our continued existence depends on the success of our efforts to raise additional capital necessary to meet our obligations as they come due and to obtain sufficient capital to execute our business plan. We may obtain capital primarily through issuances of debt or equity or entering into collaborative arrangements with corporate partners. There can be no assurance that we will be successful in completing additional financing or collaboration transactions or, if financing is available, that it can be obtained on commercially reasonable terms. If we are not able to obtain the additional financing on a timely basis, we may be required to further scale down or perhaps even cease the operation of our business. The issuance of additional equity securities by us could result in a significant dilution in the equity interests of our current stockholders. Obtaining commercial loans, assuming those loans would be available, will increase our liabilities and future cash commitments. Our financial statements do not include adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

 

 

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Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

There are no critical accounting policies or estimates reflected in the accompanying financial statements. Reference is made to the Company’s significant (but not critical) accounting policies set forth in Note 2 to the accompanying financial statements.

 

Results of Operations

 

The Company does not currently sell or market any products. The Company will commence actively marketing products after the products and drugs in development have been FDA cleared or approved, but there can be no assurance, however, that we will be successful in obtaining FDA clearance or approval for our products.

  

For the three months ended October 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company did not have sales. We are not currently selling or marketing any products, as our products are in late stage development and FDA clearance or approval to market our products will be required in order to sell in the United States.

 

Costs of Goods Sold

 

Our cost of goods sold consists primarily of the amounts paid to a third-party manufacturer for the products we purchase for resale.

 

The Company did not have sales for the three months ended October 31, 2019 and 2018, and accordingly, there were no cost of goods sold for the respective periods.

 

Gross Profit and Gross Margin

 

For the three months ended October 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company had no gross profit or gross margin.

  

Operating Expenses

 

Our operating expenses consist primarily of general and administrative expenses, which include salaries, stock-based compensation expense and legal and professional fees associated with the costs for services or employees in finance, accounting, sales, administrative activities and the formation and compliance of a public company. 

 

Overall operating expenses increased by $1,821,258 or 3,475.42%, from $52,404 for the three months ended October 31, 2018, to $1,873,662,for the three months ended October 31, 2019. The increase was primarily due to an increase in board stock expense of $1,050,813, amortization expense of $546,845, consulting fees of $132,107, research and development, marketing general administrative expenses of $86,777.

 

Interest Expense

 

Interest expense was $89,795 for the three months ended October 31, 2019 compared to interest expense of $17,092 for the three months ended October 31, 2018. The increase in interest expense for the three months ended October 31, is attributed to the increased balance of notes payable due and the amortization of debt discounts.

   

Net Loss

 

Net loss increased $1,893,962 or 2725.30% from a loss of $69,496 for the three months ended October 31, 2018, to a net loss of $1,963,457 for the three months ended October 31, 2019, primarily as a result of the increased operating expense of $1,821,258 and interest expense of $72,703.

 

 

 

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Cash Flows

 

The following table sets forth the primary sources and uses of cash and cash equivalents for the quarters ended October 31, 2019 and 2018 as presented below:

 

   

Three Months Ended

October 31,

 
    2019     2018  
             
Net cash used in operating activities   $ (214,775 )   $ (18,385 )
Net cash provided by financing activities   $ 150,000     $ 19,000  

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

To date we have financed our operations primarily through debt financing and limited sales of our common stock. In 2018 and 2019, we increased our borrowings on notes payable to fund operations. As of October 31, 2019, and July 31, 2019, the notes have a balance of $893,375 and $784,913, respectively. As of October 31, 2019, we had cash of $102,320. We do not believe that such cash is sufficient to sustain operations through the next 12 months. Therefore, we anticipate that we will need to raise additional capital through debt or equity financings.

 

As of October 31, 2019, the Company has a note payable that is subject to periodic payments that come due based on sales. The note fully matures in January 2020, bears interest at 12.5% annually, and the remaining unpaid balance is convertible upon maturity at the holder’s option into shares of common stock at a conversion price fixed at $0.01 per share. As of October 31, 2019, the note has a balance of $765,705. Because the conversion feature does not meet the criteria for characterization as a beneficial conversion feature, no portion of the proceeds from the issuance of the note was accounted for as attributable to the conversion feature. This note was amended on February 1, 2018, where the debt holder agreed to convert portions of its loan pari passu with any new investment raise of $500,000 or more. Furthermore, the debt holder was issued a common stock warrant for 4 million shares at $0.25 per share with an expiration date of 90 days after the issuance, as consideration to the debt holder to agree to begin to convert portions of its loan to common stock pari passu with a new offering raise of investment at a minimum of $500,000. As of October 31, 2019, these warrants expired.

 

As of October 31, 2019, the Company has four additional convertible debt notes outstanding. The notes bear interest at 7.0% annually and the entire outstanding principal amount, together with accrued interest shall become due and payable on the date that is one (1) year from the date of issuance, unless before such date, is converted into shares of capital stock of the Company. At the option of the holder, the principal amount of the notes and any accrued interest may be converted into shares of common stock at a conversion price of $1.00 per share or at a 10% discount to the closing price on the day of conversion, but not lower than $0.50 per share. At maturity, and subject to a trickle out agreement, the Company shall have the right to either pay off the loan and any interest accrued or convert the loan amount and any interest into shares of common stock. The debt holders were issued a common stock warrant equal to 10% of the note with a price of $1.50 per share and a term for one year from the investment date. At October 31, 2019, the notes have a balance of $127,670. Because the conversion feature met the criteria for characterization as a beneficial conversion feature, a portion of the proceeds, including warrants, of $228,362 from the issuance of the notes are accounted for as attributable to the conversion feature.

 

Our ability to continue to access capital could be affected adversely by various factors, including general market and other economic conditions, interest rates, the perception of our potential future earnings and cash distributions, any unwillingness on the part of lenders to make loans to us and any deterioration in the financial position of lenders that might make them unable to meet their obligations to us. If these conditions continue and we cannot raise funds through a public or private debt financing, or an equity offering, our ability to grow our business may be negatively affected. In such case, our Company may need to suspend the creation of new products until market conditions improve.

 

 

 

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Inflation

 

Inflation generally will cause suppliers to increase their rates. In connection with such rate increases, we may or may not be able to increase our pricing to consumers. Inflation could cause both our investment and cost of goods sold to increase, thereby lowering our return on investment and depressing our gross margins.

 

Off Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

Our company has no material off balance sheet arrangements.

 

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.

 

We are a smaller reporting company and are not required to provide information under this item.

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

Under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our principal executive officer and the principal financial officer, we have conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures, as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as of the end of the period covered by this report.  Based on that evaluation and considering the material weakness in internal control over financial reporting reported in Item 9A of the Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended July 31, 2019, the Company’s principal executive officer and principal financial officer, concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of October 31, 2019.

 

As previously reported in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended July 31, 2019 management identified the following material weaknesses in internal control over financial reporting:

 

Insufficient Resources: We have an inadequate number of personnel with requisite expertise in the key functional areas of finance and accounting.

 

Inadequate Segregation of Duties: We have an inadequate number of personnel to properly implement control procedures.

 

Lack of Audit Committee: We did not have a functioning audit committee, resulting in lack of independent oversight in the establishment and monitoring of required internal controls and procedures.

 

In light of the material weakness described above, as of October 31, 2019, prior to the filing of this Form 10-Q for the period ended October 31, 2019, management determined that key quarterly controls were performed timely and also performed additional procedures, including validating the completeness and accuracy of the underlying data used to support the amounts reported in the quarterly financial statements. These control activities and additional procedures have allowed us to conclude that, notwithstanding the material weaknesses, the financial statements in this Form 10-Q fairly present, in all material respects, our financial position, results of operations, and cash flows for the periods presented in conformity with United States GAAP.

 

We are committed to improving the internal controls and will (1) continue to use third party specialists to address shortfalls in staffing and to assist the Company with accounting and finance responsibilities, (2) increase the frequency of independent reconciliations of significant accounts, which will mitigate the lack of segregation of duties until there are sufficient personnel, and (3) we have formed an audit committee, which is in the process of evaluating our system of internal controls.

 

Except as described above, there have been no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the three months ended October 31, 2019 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

 

 

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PART II OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings

 

Our company is not a party to any legal proceeding.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors

 

An investment in our common stock is highly speculative, involves a high degree of risk and should be made only by investors who can afford a complete loss. You should carefully consider the following risk factors, together with the other information in this report, including our financial statements and the related notes, before you decide to buy our common stock. If any of the following risks actually occurs, then our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially adversely affected, the trading of our common stock could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment therein.

 

In addition to the other information set forth in this report, you should carefully consider the factors discussed in Part I, Item 1A, “Risk Factors” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended July 31, 2019, which factors could materially affect our business, financial condition, liquidity or future results. There have been no material changes to the risk factors described in the “Risk Factors” section in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended July 31, 2019, as so updated. The risks described in our reports on Forms 10-K and 10-Q are not the only risks facing our company. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently deem to be immaterial also may materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, liquidity, future results or prospects.

 

An investment in our common stock is highly speculative, involves a high degree of risk and should be made only by investors who can afford a complete loss. You should carefully consider the following risk factors, together with the other information in this report, including our financial statements and the related notes, before you decide to buy our common stock. If any of the following risks actually occurs, then our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially adversely affected, the trading of our common stock could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment therein.

 

Risks Relating to our Business 

 

Our success depends on the viability of our business model, which is unproven and may be unfeasible.

 

Our revenue and income potential are unproven, and the business model of Odyssey is new. Our new business model is based on a variety of assumptions based on a growing trend in the Health Care Systems in the United States and many other countries, where we are seeing a movement towards preventative medicine that is directly decreasing general health care costs. The CardioMap®, through its screening and predictive values, is a tool that might be implemented in this preventative approach. Considering heart disease-caused deaths are still the number one cause of death and one of the most important health care costs factors, the CardioMap® device has potential value in any medical practice. Once cleared, it could be an ideal device allowing insurance companies to cut costs through early diagnostic and preventative care. These assumptions may not reflect the business and market conditions we actually face. As a result, our operating results could differ materially from those projected under our business model, and our business model may prove to be unprofitable.

 

The Save a Life choking rescue device is in the early prototype stage and is un-proven for commercial use. Further development is required, and the final product will require FDA clearance.

 

The drug compound being developed by Prevacus under the joint venture with the Company is in its early stage. The drug will require extensive testing and clinical trials before it is commercialized. There is no guarantee that the drug will be approved for commercial use.

 

 

 

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Our limited operating history creates substantial uncertainty about future results.

 

We have limited operating history and operations on which to base expectations regarding our future results and performance. To succeed, we must do most, if not all, of the following:

 

  · raise corporate equity to support our operating costs and to have sufficient funds to develop, market and sell our products;
     
  · locate strategic licensing and commercialization partners;
     
  · obtain proper regulatory clearances domestically and abroad;
     
  · attract, integrate, retain and motivate qualified management and sales personnel;
     
  · successfully execute our business strategies;
     
  · respond appropriately and timely to competitive developments; and
     
  · develop, enhance, promote and carefully manage our corporate identity.

 

Our business will suffer if we are unable to accomplish these and other important business objectives. We are uncertain as to when, or whether, we will fully implement our contemplated business plan and strategy or become profitable. See Note 10 of the Notes to the Financial Statements.

 

We may have difficulty raising additional capital, which could deprive us of the resources necessary to implement our business plan, which would adversely affect our business, results of operation and financial condition.

 

We expect to continue devoting significant capital resources to fund research and development and marketing. In order to support the initiatives envisioned in our business plan, we will need to raise additional funds through the sale of assets, public or private debt or equity financing, collaborative relationships or other arrangements. If our operations expand faster or at a higher rate than currently anticipated, we may require additional capital sooner than we expect. We are unable to provide any assurance or guarantee that additional capital will be available when needed by our company or that such capital will be available under terms acceptable to our company or on a timely basis.

 

Our ability to raise additional financing depends on many factors beyond our control, including the state of capital markets, the market price of our common stock and the development or prospects for development of competitive products by others. Because our common stock is not listed on a major stock market, many investors may not be willing or allowed to purchase it or may demand steep discounts. If additional funds are raised through the issuance of equity, convertible debt or similar securities of our company, the percentage of ownership of our company by our company’s stockholders will be reduced, our company’s stockholders may experience additional dilution upon conversion, and such securities may have rights or preferences senior to those of our common stock. The preferential rights granted to the providers of such additional financing may include preferential rights to payments of dividends, super voting rights, a liquidation preference, protective provisions preventing certain corporate actions without the consent of the fund providers, or a combination thereof. We are unable to provide any assurance that additional financing will be available on terms favorable to us or at all.

 

If adequate funds are not available or are not available on acceptable terms, our ability to fund our expansion, take advantage of potential opportunities, would be limited significantly. We will also scale back or delay implementation of research and development of new products. Thus, the unavailability of capital could harm substantially our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

 

 

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The capital requirements necessary to implement our business plan initiatives could pose additional risks to our business and stockholders.

 

We require additional debt or equity financing to implement our business plan and marketing strategy. Since the terms and availability of such financing depend to a large degree on general economic conditions and third parties over which we have no control, we can give no assurance that we will obtain the needed financing or that we will obtain such financing on attractive terms. In addition, our ability to obtain financing depends on a number of other factors, many of which also are beyond our control, such as interest rates and national and local economic conditions. If the cost of obtaining needed financing is too high or the terms of such financing otherwise are unacceptable in relation to the strategic opportunity we are presented with, then we may decide to forego that opportunity. Additional indebtedness could increase our leverage and make us more vulnerable to economic downturns and may limit our ability to withstand competitive pressures. Additional equity financing could result in dilution to our stockholders.

 

Failure to implement our business strategy could adversely affect our operations.

 

Our financial position, liquidity and results of operations depend on our management’s ability to execute our business strategy. Key factors involved in the execution of the business strategy include:

 

  · obtaining the required regulatory clearances from the FDA;

 

  · successful sales through indirect sales distribution;

 

  · achieving the desired cost of goods on inventory;

 

  · continued investment in technology to support operating efficiency; and

 

  · continued access to significant funding and liquidity sources.

 

Our failure or inability to execute any element of our business strategy could materially adversely affect our financial position, liquidity and results of operations. 

 

Our inability to attract, train and retain additional qualified personnel may harm our business and impede the implementation of our business strategy.

 

We need to attract, integrate, motivate and retain a significant number of additional personnel in 2019 and beyond. Competition for these individuals in our industry and geographic region is intense, and we may be unable to attract, assimilate or retain such highly qualified personnel in the future. Our business cannot continue to grow if we are unable to attract such qualified personnel. Our failure to attract and retain highly trained personnel that are essential to our business may limit our growth rate, which would harm our business and impede the implementation of our business strategy.

 

Our failure to defend the Company from infringement litigation.

 

The Company could be subject to potential infringement actions. The Company's business is "Patent intensive", requiring the Company to constantly search for patented technologies that are not already used by competitors. Any claims for infringement, with or without merit and whether based on allegations that its technology or its intellectual property claims infringe upon the rights of others, could subject the Company to costly litigation and the diversion of financial and human resources, regardless of the ultimate resolution of the claim. If these claims are successful, the Company may be required to modify its products or services and pay financial damages or to attempt to negotiate with third parties for licensing.

 

Our inability to maintain sufficient product liability insurance.

 

The Company may incur product liability for products sold through its distribution chain. Consumers may sue if products sold through its distribution chain or are purchased through the Company-operated websites are defective or injure the user. This type of claim could require the Company to spend significant time and money in litigation or to pay significant damages. At this time the Company carries no product liability insurance. As a result, any legal claims, whether or not successful, could seriously damage its reputation and business.

 

 

 

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Our products are subject to substantial federal and state regulations.

 

The Company's research and development activities and the manufacturing and marketing of the Company's products are subject to the laws, regulations, and guidelines and, in some cases, regulatory approvals of governmental authorities in the United States and other countries in which the products are or will be marketed. Specifically, in the United States, the FDA regulates, among other areas, new medical device approvals, prescription drugs and clinical trials of new products and to establish the proper labeling, safety and efficacy of these products and the accuracy of certain marketing claims.

 

We anticipate significant growth in our business, and any inability to manage such growth could harm our business.

 

Our success will depend, in part, on our ability to manage effectively our growth and expansion. We plan to expand our business significantly. Any growth in or expansion of our business is likely to continue to place a significant strain on our management and administrative resources, infrastructure and systems. In order to succeed, we will need to continue to implement management information systems and improve our operating, administrative, financial and accounting systems and controls. We also will need to train new employees and maintain close coordination among our executive, accounting, finance and operations organizations. These processes are time consuming and expensive, will increase management responsibilities and will divert management attention. Our inability or failure to manage our growth and expansion effectively could harm substantially our business and adversely affect our operating results and financial condition.

 

Our inability to retain and properly insure against the loss of the services of our executive officers and other key personnel may harm our business and impede the implementation of our business strategy.

 

Our future success depends significantly on the skills and efforts of Joseph Michael Redmond, President, CEO and Director and possibly other key personnel. The loss of the services of any of these individuals could harm our business and operations. In addition, we have not obtained key person life insurance on any of our key employees. If any of our executive officers or key employees left or was seriously injured and unable to work and we were unable to find a qualified replacement and/or to obtain adequate compensation for such loss, we may be unable to manage our business, which could harm our operating results and financial condition.

 

Our inability to attract, train and retain additional qualified personnel may harm our business and impede the implementation of our business strategy.

 

Once our business begins to grow, we will need to attract, integrate, motivate and retain a significant number of additional administrative and sales personnel. Competition for these individuals in our industry and geographic region is intense, and we may be unable to attract, assimilate or retain such highly qualified personnel in the future. Our business cannot continue to grow if we are unable to attract such qualified personnel. Our failure to attract and retain highly trained personnel that are essential to our business may limit our growth rate, which would harm our business and impede the implementation of our business strategy.

 

We may indemnify our directors and officers against liability to us and our stockholders, and such indemnification could increase our operating costs.

 

Our bylaws allow us to indemnify our directors and officers against claims associated with carrying out the duties of their offices. Our bylaws also allow us to reimburse them for the costs of certain legal defenses. Insofar as indemnification for liabilities arising under the Securities Act of 1933 may be permitted to our directors, officers or control persons, we have been advised by the SEC that such indemnification is against public policy and is therefore unenforceable.

 

Since our directors and officers are aware that they may be indemnified for carrying out the duties of their offices, they may be less motivated to meet the standards required by law to properly carry out such duties, which could increase our operating costs. Further, if our directors and officers file a claim against us for indemnification, the associated expenses also could increase our operating costs.

 

 

 

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There are substantial inherent risks in attempting to commercialize newly developed products, and, as a result, we may not be able to successfully develop new products.

 

The Company plans to conduct research and development of products in the health and wellness field. However, commercial feasibility and acceptance of such product candidates are unknown. Scientific research and development requires significant amounts of capital and takes an extremely long time to reach commercial viability, if at all. During the research and development process, we may experience technological barriers that we may be unable to overcome. Because of these uncertainties, it is possible that some of our future product candidates never will be successfully developed. If we are unable to successfully develop new products, we may be unable to generate new revenue sources or build a sustainable or profitable business.

 

We will need to achieve commercial acceptance of our products to generate revenues and achieve profitability.

 

Superior competitive products may be introduced, or customer needs may change, which would diminish or extinguish the uses for our products. We cannot predict when significant commercial market acceptance for our products will develop, if at all, and we cannot reliably estimate the projected size of any such potential market. If markets fail to accept our products, then we may not be able to generate revenues from them. Our revenue growth and achievement of profitability will depend substantially on our ability to introduce new products accepted by customers. If we are unable to cost-effectively achieve acceptance of our products by customers, or if our products do not achieve wide market acceptance, then our business will be materially and adversely affected.

 

We expect to rely on third parties for the worldwide marketing and distribution of our product candidates, who may not be successful in selling our products.

 

We currently do not have adequate resources to market and distribute any of our products worldwide and expect to engage third party marketing and distribution companies to perform these tasks. While we believe that distribution partners will be available, we cannot assure you that the distribution partners, if any, will succeed in marketing our products on a global basis. We may not be able to maintain satisfactory arrangements with our marketing and distribution partners, who may not devote adequate resources to selling our products. If this happens, we may not be able to successfully market our products, which would decrease or eliminate our ability to generate revenues.

 

Our products may be displaced by superior products developed by third parties.

 

The health and wellness industry is constantly undergoing rapid and significant change. Third parties may succeed in developing or marketing products that are more effective than those developed or marketed by us or that would make our products obsolete or non-competitive. Additionally, researchers could develop new procedures and medications that replace or reduce the use of our products. Accordingly, our success will depend, in part, on our ability to respond quickly to medical and technological changes through the development and introduction of new products. We may not have the resources to do this. If our products become obsolete and our efforts to develop new products do not result in commercially successful products, then our sales and revenues will decline.

 

We may incur material product liability claims, which could increase our costs and harm our financial condition and operating results.

 

Our products consist of a device to diagnose heart ailments. Our products could malfunction . As a marketer of a medical device used on the human body, we may be subjected to various product liability claims, including that the products contain defective parts, the products include inadequate instructions as to their uses or the products include inadequate warnings concerning side effects and interactions with other substances. It is possible that widespread product liability claims could increase our costs and adversely affect our revenues and operating income. Moreover, liability claims arising from a serious adverse event may increase our costs through higher insurance premiums and deductibles and may make it more difficult to secure adequate insurance coverage in the future. In addition, our product liability insurance may fail to cover future product liability claims, thereby requiring us to pay substantial monetary damages and adversely affecting our business.

 

 

 

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Risks Relating to Investors

 

Our management has broad discretion regarding the use proceeds.

 

We intend to use the proceeds from any offering for general corporate purposes, including working capital, capital expenditures, product enhancements, product development and regulatory filings to the FDA and to begin initial marketing efforts. In any case, we will have broad discretion over how we use these proceeds.

 

Investors may experience dilution in the value of the shares of common stock.

 

We anticipate offering common stock or preferred stock in offerings which could cause further dilution.

 

If our business is unsuccessful, our stockholders may lose their entire investment.

 

Although our stockholders will not be bound by or be personally liable for our expenses, liabilities or obligations beyond their total original investments in our common stock, if we suffer a deficiency in funds with which to satisfy our obligations, our stockholders as a whole may lose their entire investment in our company.

 

Your ownership will be diluted by future issuances of capital stock.

 

Our business strategy requires us to raise additional equity capital through the sale of common stock or preferred stock. Your percentage of ownership will become diluted as we issue new shares of stock. Stockholders have no rights to buy additional shares of stock in the event we issue new shares of stock, known as preemptive rights. We may issue common stock, convertible debt or common stock pursuant to a public offering or a private placement, upon exercise of warrants or options, or to sellers of properties we directly or indirectly acquire instead of, or in addition to, cash consideration. Investors purchasing common stock in the Offering who do not participate in any future stock issues will experience dilution in the percentage of the issued and outstanding stock they own.

 

Our common stock is deemed to be a “penny stock,” which may make it more difficult for investors to sell their shares due to suitability requirements 

 

Our common stock is deemed to be a "penny stock" as that term is defined in Rule 3a51-1 promulgated under the 1934 Act, as amended. This classification reduces the potential market for our common stock by reducing the number of potential investors. This would be detrimental to the development of active trading in our stock and make it more difficult for investors in our common stock to sell shares to third parties or to otherwise dispose of them. This could also cause our stock price to decline or impede any increase in price. Penny stocks are stocks:

 

  · with a price of less than $5.00 per share;

 

  · that are not traded on a "recognized" national exchange; or

 

  · in issuers with net tangible assets less than $2 million (if the issuer has been in continuous operation for at least three years) or $10 million (if in continuous operation for less than three years), or with average revenues of less than $6 million for the last three years.

 

A limited number of stockholders collectively own a significant portion of our common shares and may act, or prevent corporate actions, to the detriment of other stockholders.

 

A limited number of stockholders, including our founders and members of the Board of Directors and our management, currently own a significant portion of our outstanding common shares. Accordingly, these stockholders may, if they act together, exercise significant influence over all matters requiring stockholder approval, including the election of a majority of our directors and the determination of significant corporate actions. This concentration could also have the effect of delaying or preventing a change in control that could otherwise be beneficial to our stockholders.

 

 

 

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The sale of shares of our common stock could cause the price of our common stock to decline.

 

Depending on market liquidity at the time, a sale of shares covered by such registration statement at any given time could cause the trading price of our common stock to decline. The sale of a substantial number of shares of our common stock under such registration statement, or the anticipation of such a sale, could make it more difficult for us to sell equity or equity-related securities in the future at a time and at a price that we otherwise might desire to affect such sales.

 

A low market price would severely limit the potential market for our common stock.

 

Our common stock may trade at a price below $5.00 per share, subjecting trading in the stock to certain SEC rules requiring additional disclosures by broker-dealers. These rules generally apply to any non-NASDAQ equity security that has a market price share of less than $5.00 per share, subject to certain exceptions (a “penny stock”). Such rules require the delivery, before any penny stock transaction, of a disclosure schedule explaining the penny stock market and the risks associated therewith and impose various sales practice requirements on broker-dealers who sell penny stocks to persons other than established customers and institutional or wealthy investors. For these types of transactions, the broker-dealer must make a special suitability determination for the purchaser and have received the purchaser’s written consent to the transaction before the sale. The broker-dealer also must disclose the commissions payable to the broker-dealer, current bid and offer quotations for the penny stock, and, if the broker-dealer is the sole market maker, the broker-dealer must disclose this fact and the broker-dealer’s presumed control over the market. Such information must be provided to the customer orally or in writing before or with the written confirmation of trade sent to the customer. Monthly statements must be sent disclosing recent price information for the penny stock held in the account and information on the limited market in penny stocks. The additional burdens imposed on broker-dealers by such requirements could discourage broker-dealers from effecting transactions in our common stock.

 

If applicable, FINRA sales practice requirements could limit a stockholder’s ability to buy and sell our stock.

 

In addition to the penny stock rules promulgated by the SEC, which are discussed in the immediately preceding risk factor, FINRA rules (which would apply to our common stock in the event that our common stock ultimately becomes traded over the counter via the OTC Electronic Bulletin Board) require that, in recommending an investment to a customer, a broker-dealer must have reasonable grounds for believing that the investment is suitable for that customer. Under these FINRA rules, before recommending speculative low-priced securities to their non-institutional customers, broker-dealers must make reasonable efforts to obtain information about the customer’s financial status, tax status, investment objectives and other information. Under interpretations of these rules, FINRA believes that there is a high probability that speculative low-priced securities will not be suitable for at least some customers. If these FINRA rules were to apply to our common stock, such application would make it more difficult for broker-dealers to recommend that their customers buy our common stock, which could limit the ability to buy and sell our common stock and have an adverse effect on the market value for our shares of common stock.

 

An investor’s ability to trade our common stock may be limited by trading volume.

 

A consistently active trading market for our common stock may not occur on a national stock exchange or an automated quotation system. A limited trading volume may prevent our stockholders from selling shares at such times or in such amounts as they otherwise may desire.

  

Our company has a concentration of stock ownership and control, which may have the effect of delaying, preventing or deterring a change of control.

 

Our common stock ownership is highly concentrated. Through ownership of shares of our common stock, nine stockholders collectively own beneficially more than 81% of our total outstanding shares of common stock. As a result of this concentrated ownership of our common stock, our nine stockholders may be able to exert significant control over all matters requiring stockholder approval, including the election of directors and approval of mergers and other significant corporate transactions. This concentration of ownership may have the effect of delaying, preventing or deterring a change in control of our company. It also could deprive our stockholders of an opportunity to receive a premium for their shares as part of a sale of our company, and it may affect the market price of our common stock.

 

 

 

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We have not voluntarily implemented various corporate governance measures, in the absence of which, stockholders may have more limited protections against interested director transactions, conflicts of interest and similar matters.

 

Federal legislation, including the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, has resulted in the adoption of various corporate governance measures designed to promote the integrity of corporate management and the securities markets. Some of these measures have been adopted in response to legal requirements. Others have been adopted by companies in response to the requirements of national securities exchanges, on which their securities are listed. Among the corporate governance measures that are required under the rules of national securities exchanges and NASDAQ are those that address board of directors’ independence, audit committee oversight and the adoption of a code of ethics. While our board of directors has adopted a Code of Ethics and an Audit Committee Charter, we have not yet adopted any of the other corporate governance measures, and, since our securities are not currently listed on a national securities exchange or NASDAQ, we are not currently required to do so. In the event that our common stock becomes listed, we will be required to adopt these other corporate governance measures, and we intend to do so. It is possible that if we were to adopt some or all of these corporate governance measures, stockholders would benefit from somewhat greater assurances that internal corporate decisions were being made by disinterested directors and that policies had been implemented to define responsible conduct. For example, in the absence of audit, nominating and compensation committees comprised of at least a majority of independent directors, decisions concerning matters such as compensation packages to our senior officers and recommendations for director nominees may be made by a majority of directors who have an interest in the outcome of the matters being decided. Prospective investors should bear in mind our current lack of corporate governance measures in formulating their investment decisions.

 

Our Articles of Incorporation provide that certain proceedings may only be instituted in the District Courts of Nevada, which may prevent or delay such proceedings and will increase the costs to enforce shareholder rights.

 

Our Articles of Incorporation provide that the following actions and proceedings may only be brought in the courts located in the State of Nevada: (i) derivative actions brought on behalf of the company, (ii) any action asserting breach of fiduciary duty by the directors or officers, (iii) any action brought under the Business Associations, Securities and Commodities statutes of the State of Nevada, and (iv) actions asserting a claim under the internal affairs doctrine. No court has determined that such provisions are enforceable in Nevada, and we may be forced to defend proceedings brought in other states if such provision is ruled unenforceable. If enforceable, claims covered by this provision may be maintained in the courts of the State of Nevada only if such courts have personal jurisdiction over the defendants. If the State of Nevada does not have personal jurisdiction over any named defendant, this provision may have the effect of preventing the prosecution of any claim. Additionally, because shareholders may initiate such actions only in the State of Nevada, shareholders will be required to incur additional costs and expense such as engaging legal counsel authorized to practice in Nevada. Moreover, the laws of the State of Nevada may be more favorable to us or our management than the laws of the state in which any shareholder resides.

 

Because we will not pay dividends in the foreseeable future, stockholders will only benefit from owning common stock if it appreciates.

 

We have never paid dividends on our common stock, and we do not intend to do so in the foreseeable future. We intend to retain any future earnings to finance our growth. Accordingly, any potential investor who anticipates the need for current dividends from his investment should not purchase our common stock.

 

Item 2. Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

 

None.

 

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

None.

 

 

 

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Item 3. Default on Senior Securities

 

Not applicable.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

 

Not applicable.

 

Item 5. Other Information

 

Not applicable.

 

Item 6. Exhibits

 

Exhibit Number   Exhibit Description
31.1*   Rule 13(a)-14(a)/15(d)-14(a) Certification of Chief Executive Officer
31.2*   Rule 13(a)-14(a)/15(d)-14(a) Certification of Chief Financial Officer
32*   Section 1350 Certification of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer
101.INS*   XBRL Instances Document
101.SCH*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
101.CAL*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
101.DEF*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
101.LAB*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
101.PRE*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

 

*  Filed herewith.

  

 

 

 

 

 

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this Report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized, as of December 6, 2019.

 

 
     
  ODYSSEY GROUP INTERNATIONAL, INC.
     
  By:    /s/ Joseph Michael Redmond
    Joseph Michael Redmond
    Chief Executive Officer, President and Director
    (Principal Executive Officer)
     

 

In accordance with the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

Signature   Title   Date
         
/s/ Joseph Michael Redmond   Chief Executive Officer, President, Director   December 6, 2019
Joseph Michael Redmond   (Principal Executive Officer)    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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