Company Quick10K Filing
Quick10K
One Liberty Properties
Closing Price ($) Shares Out (MM) Market Cap ($MM)
$27.07 20 $530
10-K 2018-12-31 Annual: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-09-30 Quarter: 2018-09-30
10-Q 2018-06-30 Quarter: 2018-06-30
10-Q 2018-03-31 Quarter: 2018-03-31
10-K 2017-12-31 Annual: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-09-30 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-Q 2017-06-30 Quarter: 2017-06-30
10-Q 2017-03-31 Quarter: 2017-03-31
10-K 2016-12-31 Annual: 2016-12-31
10-Q 2016-09-30 Quarter: 2016-09-30
10-Q 2016-06-30 Quarter: 2016-06-30
10-Q 2016-03-31 Quarter: 2016-03-31
10-K 2015-12-31 Annual: 2015-12-31
10-Q 2015-09-30 Quarter: 2015-09-30
10-Q 2015-06-30 Quarter: 2015-06-30
10-Q 2015-03-31 Quarter: 2015-03-31
10-K 2014-12-31 Annual: 2014-12-31
10-Q 2014-09-30 Quarter: 2014-09-30
10-Q 2014-06-30 Quarter: 2014-06-30
10-Q 2014-03-31 Quarter: 2014-03-31
10-K 2013-12-31 Annual: 2013-12-31
8-K 2019-03-18 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-12-04 Other Events
8-K 2018-11-08 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-09-28 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-06 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-06-13 Shareholder Vote
8-K 2018-06-01 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-05-03 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-03-13 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2017-11-07 Regulation FD, Exhibits
EC Ecopetrol 42,430
AZPN Aspen Technology 7,660
LOPE Grand Canyon Education 5,770
PSTG Pure Storage 5,600
TX Ternium 5,520
SNHY Sun Hydraulics 1,600
DOVA Dova Pharmaceuticals 242
MSCG Managed Futures Premier Graham 0
EWLU Merion 0
TFLG Trafalgar Resources 0
OLP 2018-12-31
Part I
Item 1. Business.
Item 1A. Risk Factors.
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.
Item 2. Properties.
Item 3. Legal Proceedings.
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.
Part II
Item 5. Market for The Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.
Item 6. Selected Financial Data.
Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure.
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures.
Item 9B. Other Information.
Part III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance.
Item 11. Executive Compensation.
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters.
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.
Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services.
Part IV
Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules.
Item 16. Form 10-K Summary
Note 1-Organization and Background
Note 2-Significant Accounting Policies
Note 3-Earnings per Common Share
Note 4-Real Estate Investments and Minimum Future Rentals
Note 5-Sales of Properties
Note 6-Allowance for Doubtful Accounts and Bad Debt Expense
Note 7-Variable Interest Entities, Contingent Liabilities and Consolidated Joint Ventures
Note 8-Investment in Unconsolidated Joint Ventures
Note 9-Debt Obligations
Note 10-Fair Value Measurements
Note 11-Related Party Transactions
Note 12-Stockholders' Equity
Note 13-Commitments and Contingencies
Note 14-Income Taxes
Note 15-Subsequent Events
Note 16-Quarterly Financial Data (Unaudited):
Note 1-Depreciation Is Provided Over The Estimated Useful Lives of The Buildings and Improvements, Which Range From 3 To 40 Years.
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EX-31.2 a2238024zex-31_2.htm
EX-32.1 a2238024zex-32_1.htm
EX-32.2 a2238024zex-32_2.htm

One Liberty Properties Earnings 2018-12-31

OLP 10K Annual Report

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
PART IV

Table of Contents


UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

ý   ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018

Or

o

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission File Number 001-09279

ONE LIBERTY PROPERTIES, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

MARYLAND
(State or other jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
  13-3147497
(I.R.S. employer
Identification No.)

60 Cutter Mill Road, Great Neck, New York
(Address of principal executive offices)

 

11021
(Zip Code)

Registrant's telephone number, including area code: (516) 466-3100

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class   Name of exchange on which registered
Common Stock, par value $1.00 per share   New York Stock Exchange

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: NONE

         Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes o    No ý

         Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act. Yes o    No ý

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ý    No o

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes ý    No o

         Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. o

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a small reporting company or an emerging growth company. See definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer," "small reporting company" and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer o   Accelerated filer ý   Non-accelerated filer o   Smaller reporting company ý

Emerging growth company o

         If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o

         Indicate by check mark whether registrant is a shell company (defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes o    No ý

         As of June 30, 2018 (the last business day of the registrant's most recently completed second quarter), the aggregate market value of all common equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant, computed by reference to the price at which common equity was last sold on said date, was approximately $398 million.

         As of March 1, 2019, the registrant had 19,589,220 shares of common stock outstanding.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

         Portions of the proxy statement for the 2019 annual meeting of stockholders of One Liberty Properties, Inc., to be filed pursuant to Regulation 14A not later than April 30, 2019, are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

   


Table of Contents


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Form 10-K

Item No.
   
  Page(s)  

PART I

 

 

       

1.

 

Business

    1  

1A.

 

Risk Factors

    8  

1B.

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

    20  

2.

 

Properties

    20  

3.

 

Legal Proceedings

    26  

4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

    26  

PART II

 

 

       

5.

 

Market for the Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

    27  

6.

 

Selected Financial Data

    27  

7.

 

Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

    31  

7A.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

    46  

8.

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

    47  

9.

 

Changes In and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

    47  

9A.

 

Controls and Procedures

    47  

9B.

 

Other Information

    48  

PART III

 

 

       

10.

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

    51  

11.

 

Executive Compensation

    52  

12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

    52  

13.

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

    52  

14.

 

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

    52  

PART IV

 

 

       

15.

 

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

    53  

16.

 

Form 10-K Summary

    55  

Signatures

    56  

Table of Contents


PART I

Item 1.    Business.

General

        We are a self-administered and self-managed real estate investment trust, also known as a REIT. We were incorporated in Maryland on December 20, 1982. We acquire, own and manage a geographically diversified portfolio consisting primarily of industrial, retail, restaurant, health and fitness and theater properties, many of which are subject to long-term leases. Most of our leases are "net leases" under which the tenant, directly or indirectly, is responsible for paying the real estate taxes, insurance and ordinary maintenance and repairs of the property. As of December 31, 2018, we own 119 properties and participate in joint ventures that own four properties. These 123 properties are located in 30 states and have an aggregate of approximately 10.4 million square feet (including an aggregate of approximately 373,000 square feet at properties owned by our joint ventures).

        As of December 31, 2018:

    our 2019 contractual rental income (as described in "–Our Tenants") is $69.4 million;

    the occupancy rate of our properties is 99.2% based on square footage;

    the weighted average remaining term of our mortgage debt is 8.7 years and the weighted average interest rate thereon is 4.26%; and

    the weighted average remaining term of the leases generating our 2019 contractual rental income is 7.7 years.

2018 Highlights and Recent Developments

        In 2018:

    our rental income, net, increased by $2.1 million, or 3.1%, from 2017.

    we acquired eight industrial properties for an aggregate purchase price of $79.5 million. The acquired properties account for $5.6 million, or 8.1%, of our 2019 contractual rental income.

    we sold three properties for a net gain on sale of real estate of $5.3 million. The properties sold accounted for 3.0% and 4.7% of 2018 and 2017 rental income, net, respectively.

    unconsolidated joint ventures in which we have 50% equity interest sold a (i) property and (ii) land parcel and the building thereon—our 50% share of the aggregate gains from these sales was $2.1 million, which is included in equity in earnings from sale of unconsolidated joint venture properties.

    we obtained proceeds of $61.7 million from mortgage financings, including $14.7 million of refinanced amounts.

    we raised net proceeds of approximately $3.1 million from the issuance of 126,300 shares of common stock pursuant to our at-the-market equity offering program.

        In the narrative portion of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, except as otherwise indicated:

    the information with respect to our consolidated joint ventures is generally described as if such ventures are our wholly owned subsidiaries and information with respect to unconsolidated joint ventures is generally separately described,

    (i) all references to joint ventures refer to unconsolidated joint ventures, (ii) all interest rates with respect to debt give effect to the related interest rate derivative, if any, (iii) amounts reflected as debt reflect the gross debt owed, without deducting deferred financing costs,

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      (iv) references to industrial properties include properties (a) a portion of which may be used for office purposes and (b) that are used for distribution, warehouse and flex purposes and (v) all calculations of occupancy rate reflect our assisted living facility in Round Rock, Texas as occupied.

    2019 contractual rental income derived from multiple properties leased pursuant to a master lease is allocated among such properties based on management's estimate of the appropriate allocations.

Acquisition Strategies

        We seek to acquire properties throughout the United States that have locations, demographics and other investment attributes that we believe to be attractive. We believe that long-term leases provide a predictable income stream over the term of the lease, making fluctuations in market rental rates and in real estate values less significant to achieving our overall investment objectives. Our primary goal is to acquire single-tenant properties that are subject to long-term net leases that include periodic contractual rental increases or rent increases based on increases in the consumer price index. Periodic contractual rental increases provide reliable increases in future rent payments and rent increases based on the consumer price index provide protection against inflation. Historically, long-term leases have made it easier for us to obtain longer-term, fixed-rate mortgage financing with principal amortization, thereby moderating the interest rate risk associated with financing or refinancing our property portfolio and reducing the outstanding principal balance over time. We may, however, acquire a property that is subject to a short-term lease when we believe the property represents a favorable opportunity for generating additional income from its re-lease or has significant residual value. Although the acquisition of single-tenant properties subject to net leases is the focus of our investment strategy, we also consider investments in, among other things, (i) properties that can be re-positioned or re-developed, (ii) community shopping centers anchored by national or regional tenants and (iii) properties ground leased to operators of multi-family properties. We pay substantially all the operating expenses at community shopping centers, a significant portion of which is reimbursed by tenants pursuant to their leases.

        Generally, we hold the properties we acquire for an extended period of time. Our investment criteria are intended to identify properties from which increased asset value and overall return can be realized from an extended period of ownership. Although our investment criteria favor an extended period of ownership, we will dispose of a property if we regard the disposition of the property as an opportunity to realize the overall value of the property sooner or to avoid future risks by achieving a determinable return from the property.

        Historically, a significant portion of our portfolio generated rental income from retail properties. We are sensitive to the risks facing the retail industry and have been addressing our exposure thereto by seeking to acquire industrial properties (including warehouse and distribution facilities) and properties that capitalize on e-commerce activities, and by being especially selective in acquiring retail properties. As a result, retail properties generated 41.9%, 43.3%, and 46.1%, of rental income, net, in 2018, 2017, and 2016, respectively.

        We identify properties through the network of contacts of our senior management and our affiliates, which contacts include real estate brokers, private equity firms, banks and law firms. In addition, we attend industry conferences and engage in direct solicitations.

        Our charter documents do not limit the number of properties in which we may invest, the amount or percentage of our assets that may be invested in any specific property or property type, or the concentration of investments in any region in the United States. We do not intend to acquire properties located outside of the United States. We will continue to form entities to acquire interests in real

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properties, either alone or with other investors, and we may acquire interests in joint ventures or other entities that own real property.

        It is our policy, and the policy of our affiliated entities, that any investment opportunity presented to us or to any of our affiliated entities that involves the acquisition of a net leased property, a ground lease (other than a ground lease of a multi-family property) or a community shopping center, will first be offered to us and may not be pursued by any of our affiliated entities unless we decline the opportunity. Further, to the extent our affiliates are unable or unwilling to pursue an acquisition of a multi-family property (including a ground lease of a multi-family property), we may pursue such transaction if it meets our investment objectives.

Investment Evaluation

        In evaluating potential investments, we consider, among other criteria, the following:

    the current and projected cash flow of the property;

    the estimated return on equity to us;

    an evaluation of the property and improvements, given its location and use;

    local demographics (population and rental trends);

    the terms of tenant leases, including co-tenancy provisions and the relationship between current rents and market rents;

    the potential to finance or refinance the property;

    an evaluation of the credit quality of the tenant;

    the projected residual value of the property;

    the ability of a tenant, if a net leased property, or major tenants, if a multi-tenant property, to meet operational needs and lease obligations;

    potential for income and capital appreciation;

    occupancy of and demand for similar properties in the market area; and

    alternate uses or tenants for the property.

Our Business Objective

        Our business objective is to maintain and increase, over time, the cash available for distribution to our stockholders by:

    identifying opportunistic and strategic property acquisitions consistent with our portfolio and our acquisition strategies;

    obtaining mortgage indebtedness (including refinancings) on favorable terms and maintaining access to capital to finance property acquisitions; and

    monitoring and maintaining our portfolio, including tenant negotiations and lease amendments with tenants that are renewing, expanding or having financial difficulty; and

    managing our portfolio effectively, including opportunistic and strategic property sales.

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Typical Property Attributes

        As of December 31, 2018, the properties in our portfolio have the following attributes:

    Net leases.  Most of our leases are net leases under which the tenant is typically responsible for real estate taxes, insurance and ordinary maintenance and repairs. We believe that investments in net leased properties offer reasonably predictable returns.

    Long-term leases.  Many of our leases are long-term leases. The weighted average remaining term of our leases is 7.7 years. Leases representing approximately 28.3% of our 2019 contractual rental income expire between 2024 and 2027 and leases representing approximately 31.7% of our 2019 contractual rental income expire in 2028 and thereafter.

    Scheduled rent increases.  Leases representing approximately 75.8% of our 2019 contractual rental income provide for either periodic contractual rent increases or a rent increase based on the consumer price index.

Our Tenants

        The following table sets forth information about the diversification of our tenants by industry sector as of December 31, 2018:

Type of Property
  Number of
Tenants
  Number of
Properties
  2019 Contractual
Rental Income(1)
  Percentage of
2019 Contractual
Rental Income
 

Industrial

    38     36   $ 31,979,462     46.1  

Retail—General

    57     35     14,242,453     20.5  

Retail—Furniture(2)

    3     14     6,115,766     8.8  

Restaurant

    10     16     3,412,938     4.9  

Health & Fitness

    1     3     3,102,126     4.5  

Retail—Supermarket

    3     3     2,878,515     4.2  

Theater

    1     2     2,228,385     3.2  

Retail—Office Supply(3)

    1     6     2,162,930     3.1  

Other

    4     4     3,282,632     4.7  

    118     119   $ 69,405,207     100.0  

(1)
Our 2019 contractual rental income represents, after giving effect to any abatements, concessions or adjustments, the base rent payable to us in 2019 under leases in effect at December 31, 2018 (including $522,000 payable in 2019 by our Kmart tenant in Clemmons, NC which filed for bankruptcy protection). Excluded from 2019 contractual rental income is an aggregate of $3.7 million comprised of $900,000 of straight-line rent, $991,000 of amortization of intangibles, $349,000 of rent paid in January and February 2019 by our assisted living facility in Round Rock, Texas which filed for bankruptcy protection in December 2018, and $1.5 million representing our share of the base rent payable in 2019 to our unconsolidated joint ventures.

(2)
Eleven properties are net leased to Haverty Furniture Companies, Inc., which we refer to as Haverty Furniture, pursuant to a master lease covering all such properties.

(3)
Includes six properties which are net leased to Office Depot pursuant to six separate leases. Five of the Office Depot leases contain cross-default provisions.

        Many of our tenants (including franchisees of national chains) operate on a national basis including, among others, Advanced Auto, Applebees, Burlington Coat Factory, CarMax, the City of New York, CVS, Famous Footwear, FedEx, Ferguson Enterprises, LA Fitness, L-3, Marshalls, Northern Tool, Office Depot, PetSmart, Regal Cinemas, Ross Stores, Shutterfly, TGI Friday's, The Toro

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Company, Walgreens, Wendy's and Whole Foods, and some of our tenants operate on a regional basis, including Haverty Furniture and Giant Food Stores.

Our Leases

        Most of our leases are net leases under which the tenant, in addition to its rental obligation, typically is responsible, directly or indirectly for expenses attributable to the operation of the property, such as real estate taxes and assessments, insurance and ordinary maintenance and repairs. The tenant is also generally responsible for maintaining the property and for restoration following a casualty or partial condemnation. The tenant is typically obligated to indemnify us for claims arising from the property and is responsible for maintaining insurance coverage for the property it leases and naming us an additional insured. Under some net leases, we are responsible for structural repairs, including foundation and slab, roof repair or replacement and restoration following a casualty event, and at several properties we are responsible for certain expenses related to the operation and maintenance of the property.

        Generally, our leases provide for contractual rent increases periodically throughout the term of the lease or for rent increases pursuant to a formula based on the consumer price index. Some leases provide for minimum rents supplemented by additional payments based on sales derived from the property subject to the lease (i.e., percentage rent). Percentage rent from (i) two properties contributed $122,000 to 2018 rental income and (ii) four properties contributed $263,000 to 2017 rental income.

        Generally, our strategy is to acquire properties that are subject to existing long-term leases or to enter into long-term leases with our tenants. Our leases generally provide the tenant with one or more renewal options.

        The following table sets forth scheduled expirations of leases at our properties as of December 31, 2018:

Year of Lease Expiration(1)
  Number of
Expiring
Leases
  Approximate
Square
Footage
Subject to
Expiring
Leases
  2019 Contractual
Rental Income
Under Expiring
Leases
  Percentage of
2019 Contractual
Rental Income
Represented by
Expiring Leases
 

2019(2)

    4     192,755   $ 581,660     0.8  

2020

    12     117,624     1,731,466     2.5  

2021

    17     465,810     3,334,050     4.8  

2022

    24     2,106,914     14,173,580     20.4  

2023

    21     1,153,338     7,959,345     11.5  

2024

    12     697,039     3,848,833     5.5  

2025

    10     360,402     4,627,526     6.7  

2026

    11     551,229     5,287,305     7.6  

2027

    9     1,002,919     5,864,939     8.5  

2028 and thereafter

    35     3,306,718     21,996,503     31.7  

    155     9,954,748   $ 69,405,207     100.0  

(1)
Lease expirations assume tenants do not exercise existing renewal options.

(2)
Does not give effect to a tenant's exercise, in January 2019, of a five-year renewal option with respect to 98,059 square feet providing for approximately $326,000 of additional base rent in 2019.

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Financing, Re-Renting and Disposition of Our Properties

        Our revolving credit facility provides us with a source of funds that may be used to acquire properties, payoff existing mortgages, and to a more limited extent, invest in joint ventures, implement property improvements and for working capital purposes. Net proceeds received from the sale, financing or refinancing of properties are generally required to be used to repay amounts outstanding under our facility. See "Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources—Credit Facility".

        We mortgage specific properties on a non-recourse basis, subject to the standard carve-outs described under "Item 2. Properties—Mortgage Debt", to enhance the return on our investment in a specific property. The proceeds of mortgage loans may be used for property acquisitions, investments in joint ventures or other entities that own real property, to reduce bank debt and for working capital purposes.

        With respect to properties we acquire on a free and clear basis, we usually seek to obtain long-term fixed-rate mortgage financing, when available at acceptable terms, shortly after the acquisition of such property to avoid the risk of movement of interest rates and fluctuating supply and demand in the mortgage markets. We also will acquire a property that is subject to (and will assume) a fixed-rate mortgage. Substantially all of our mortgages provide for amortization of part of the principal balance during the term, thereby reducing the refinancing risk at maturity. Some of our properties may be financed on a cross-defaulted or cross-collateralized basis, and we may collateralize a single financing with more than one property.

        After termination or expiration of any lease relating to any of our properties, we will seek to re-rent or sell such property in a manner that will maximize the return to us, considering, among other factors, the income potential and market value of such property. We acquire properties for long-term investment for income purposes and do not typically engage in the turnover of investments. We will consider the sale of a property if a sale appears advantageous in view of our investment objectives. If there is a substantial tax gain, we may seek to enter into a tax deferred transaction and reinvest the proceeds in another property. Cash realized from the sale of properties, net of required payoffs of the related mortgage debt, if any, required paydowns of our credit facility, and distributions to stockholders, is available for general working capital purposes and the acquisition of additional properties.

Our Joint Ventures

        As of December 31, 2018, we own a 50% equity interest in four joint ventures that own four retail properties with approximately 373,000 square feet of space. At December 31, 2018, our investment in these joint ventures was approximately $10.9 million and the occupancy rate at these properties based on square footage, was 59.3%. See "Item 2. Properties" for information about, among other things, the occupancy rate at our joint venture properties.

        Based on the leases in effect at December 31, 2018, we anticipate that our share of the base rent payable in 2019 to our joint ventures is approximately $1.5 million. Our multi-tenant community shopping center located in Manahawkin, New Jersey is expected to contribute 87.4% of the aggregate base rent payable by all of our joint ventures in 2019. Leases with respect to 17.9%, 29.1% and 53.0% of the aggregate base rent payable to all of our joint ventures in 2019 is payable pursuant to leases expiring from 2019 to 2020, from 2021 to 2022, and thereafter, respectively. See "Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Challenges Facing Certain Tenants and Properties" for information regarding our Manahawkin, New Jersey joint venture.

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Competition

        We face competition for the acquisition of properties from a variety of investors, including domestic and foreign corporations and real estate companies, financial institutions, insurance companies, pension funds, investment funds, other REITs and individuals, many of which have significant advantages over us, including a larger, more diverse group of properties and greater financial (including access to debt on more favorable terms) and other resources than we have.

Our Structure

        Nine employees, including Patrick J. Callan, Jr., our president and chief executive officer, Lawrence G. Ricketts, Jr., our executive vice president and chief operating officer, Justin Clair, a vice president, Benjamin Bolanos, a vice president, Karen Dunleavy, vice president-financial and four other employees, devote all of their business time to us. Our other executive, administrative, legal, accounting and clerical personnel provide their services to us on a part-time basis, which services generally are provided pursuant to the compensation and services agreement described below.

        We entered into a compensation and services agreement with Majestic Property Management Corp. effective as of January 1, 2007. Majestic Property is wholly owned by our vice chairman of the board and it provides compensation to certain of our executive officers. Pursuant to this agreement, we pay Majestic Property for providing us with the services of executive, administrative, legal, accounting, clerical and property management personnel, as well as property acquisition, sale and lease consulting and brokerage services, consulting services with respect to mortgage financings and construction supervisory services (collectively, the "Services").The amount we pay Majestic Property for the Services is approved each year by the compensation and/or audit committees of our board of directors, and the independent directors.

        In 2018, pursuant to the compensation and services agreement, we paid Majestic Property approximately $2.7 million plus $216,000 for our share of all direct office expenses, including rent, telephone, postage, computer services, supplies and internet usage. Included in the $2.7 million is $1.2 million for property management services—the amount for the property management services is based on 1.5% and 2.0% of the rental payments (including tenant reimbursements) actually received by us from net lease tenants and operating lease tenants, respectively. We do not pay Majestic Property with respect to properties managed by third parties. Based on our portfolio of properties at December 31, 2018, we estimate that the property management fee in 2019 will be approximately $1.2 million.

        We believe that the compensation and services agreement allows us to benefit from (i) access to, and from the services of, a group of senior executives with significant knowledge and experience in the real estate industry and our company, (ii) other individuals who perform services on our behalf, and (iii) general economies of scale. If not for this agreement, we believe that a company of our size would not have access to the skills and expertise of these executives at the cost that we have incurred and will incur in the future. For a description of the background of our management, please see the information under the heading "Executive Officers" in Part I of this Annual Report. See Note 12 to our consolidated financial statements for information regarding equity awards to individuals performing services on our behalf pursuant to the compensation and services agreement.

Additional Information

        Additional information about us can be found at our website located at www.onelibertyproperties.com. We make available, free of charge, on or through our website, annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the SEC. The SEC maintains an internet site (http://www.sec.gov) that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC.

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Forward-Looking Statements

        This Annual Report on Form 10-K, together with other statements and information publicly disseminated by us, contains certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. We intend such forward-looking statements to be covered by the safe harbor provision for forward-looking statements contained in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and include this statement for purposes of complying with these safe harbor provisions. Forward-looking statements, which are based on certain assumptions and describe our future plans, strategies and expectations, are generally identifiable by use of the words "may," "will," "could," "believe," "expect," "intend," "anticipate," "estimate," "project," or similar expressions or variations thereof. You should not rely on forward-looking statements since they involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which are, in some cases, beyond our control and which could materially affect actual results, performance or achievements. Factors which may cause actual results to differ materially from current expectations include, but are not limited to:

    the financial condition of our tenants and the performance of their lease obligations;

    general economic and business conditions, including those currently affecting our nation's economy and real estate markets;

    the availability of and costs associated with sources of liquidity;

    general and local real estate conditions, including any changes in the value of our real estate;

    compliance with credit facility covenants;

    increased competition for leasing of vacant space due to current economic conditions;

    changes in governmental laws and regulations relating to real estate and related investments;

    the level and volatility of interest rates;

    competition in our industry; and

    the other risks described under Item 1A. Risk Factors.

        Any or all of our forward-looking statements in this report and in any other public statements we make may turn out to be incorrect. Actual results may differ from our forward-looking statements because of inaccurate assumptions we might make or because of the occurrence of known or unknown risks and uncertainties. Many factors mentioned in the discussion below will be important in determining future results. Consequently, no forward-looking statement can be guaranteed and you are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward- looking statements. Actual future results may vary materially.

        Except as may be required under the United States federal securities laws, we undertake no obligation to publicly update our forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. You are advised, however, to consult any further disclosures we make in our reports that are filed with or furnished to the SEC.

Item 1A.    Risk Factors.

        Set forth below is a discussion of certain risks affecting our business. The categorization of risks set forth below is meant to help you better understand the risks facing our business and is not intended to limit your consideration of the possible effects of these risks to the listed categories. Any adverse effects arising from the realization of any of the risks discussed, including our financial condition and results of operations, may, and likely will, adversely affect many aspects of our business. In addition to the other

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information contained or incorporated by reference in this Form 10-K, readers should carefully consider the following risk factors:

Risks Related to Our Business

If we are unable to re-rent properties upon the expiration of our leases or if our tenants default or seek bankruptcy protection, our rental income will be reduced and we would incur additional costs.

        Substantially all of our rental income is derived from rent paid by our tenants. From 2019 through 2021, leases with respect to 33 tenants that account for 8.1% of our 2019 contractual rental income, expire, and from 2022 through 2023, leases with respect to 45 tenants that account for 31.9% of our 2019 contractual rental income, expire. If our tenants, and in particular, our significant tenants, (i) do not renew their leases upon the expiration of same, (ii) default on their obligations or (iii) seek rent relief, lease renegotiation or other accommodations, our revenues could decline and, in certain cases, co-tenancy provisions may be triggered possibly allowing other tenants at the same property to reduce their rental payments or terminate their leases. At the same time, we would remain responsible for the payment of the mortgage obligations with respect to the related properties and would become responsible for the operating expenses related to these properties, including, among other things, real estate taxes, maintenance and insurance. We estimate that the aggregate carrying expense (including mortgage interest expense) in 2019 for properties and tenants facing significant challenges (i.e., our assisted living facility in Round Rock, Texas, a property tenanted by Kmart in Clemmons, North Carolina, and a vacant retail property in Crystal Lake, Illinois), is approximately $1.7 million, but may exceed such sum. In addition, we may incur expenses in enforcing our rights as landlord. Even if we find replacement tenants (which we may be constrained in accomplishing with respect to our assisted living facility in Round Rock, Texas by competing facilities in such market and regulatory requirements mandating that such facilities be operated by specially licensed operators) or re-negotiate leases with current tenants, the terms of the new or renegotiated leases, including the cost of required renovations or concessions to tenants, or the expense of the reconfiguration of a tenant's space, may be less favorable than current lease terms and could reduce the amount of cash available to meet expenses and pay dividends. If tenants facing financial difficulties default on their obligation to pay rent or do not renew their leases at lease expiration, our results of operations and financial condition may be adversely affected. See "Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition or Results of Operations—Challenges Facing Certain Tenants and Properties."

Traditional retail tenants account for 36.6% of our 2019 contractual rental income and the competition that such tenants face from e-commerce retail sales could adversely affect our business.

        Approximately 36.6% of our 2019 contractual rental income is derived from retail tenants, including 8.8% from tenants engaged in retail furniture (i.e., Haverty Furniture accounts for 7.0% of 2019 contractual rental income) and 3.1% from tenants engaged in office supply activities (i.e., Office Depot accounts for 3.1% of 2019 contractual rental income). Our retail tenants face increasing competition from e-commerce retailers. These retailers may be able to provide customers with better pricing and the ease and comfort of shopping from their home or office. E-commerce sales have been obtaining an increasing percentage of retail sales over the past few years and this trend is expected to continue. The continued growth of e-commerce sales could decrease the need for traditional retail outlets and reduce retailers' space and property requirements. This could adversely impact our ability to rent space at our retail properties and increase competition for retail tenants thereby reducing the rent we would receive at these properties and adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

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Approximately 22.7% of our 2019 contractual rental income is derived from five tenants. The default, financial distress or failure of any of these tenants could significantly reduce our revenues.

        Haverty Furniture, LA Fitness, Northern Tool, L-3 Technologies and Ferguson Enterprises account for approximately 7.0%, 4.5%, 4.1%, 3.8% and 3.4%, respectively, of our 2019 contractual rental income. The default, financial distress or bankruptcy of any of these tenants could cause interruptions in the receipt of, or the loss of, a significant amount of rental income and would require us to pay operating expenses (including real estate taxes) currently paid by the tenant. This could also result in the vacancy of the property or properties occupied by the defaulting tenant, which would significantly reduce our rental revenues and net income until the re-rental of the property or properties, and could decrease the ultimate sale value of the property.

If we are unable to refinance our mortgage loans at maturity, we may be forced to sell properties at disadvantageous terms, which would result in the loss of revenues and in a decline in the value of our portfolio.

        We had, as of December 31, 2018, $423.1 million in mortgage debt outstanding, all of which is non-recourse (subject to standard carve-outs) and our ratio of mortgage debt to total assets was 54.2%. As of December 31, 2018, our Manahawkin, New Jersey joint venture had $23.9 million in mortgage indebtedness (all of which is non-recourse, subject to standard carve-outs). The risks associated with our mortgage debt (including the Manahawkin, New Jersey mortgage debt), includes the risk that cash flow from properties securing the indebtedness and our available cash and cash equivalents will be insufficient to meet required payments of principal and interest.

        Generally, only a portion of the principal of our mortgage indebtedness will be repaid prior to or at maturity and we do not plan to retain sufficient cash to repay such indebtedness at maturity. Accordingly, to meet these obligations if they cannot be refinanced at maturity, we will have to use funds available under our credit facility, if any, and our available cash and cash equivalents to pay our mortgage debt or seek to raise funds through the financing of unencumbered properties, sale of properties or the issuance of additional equity. From 2019 through 2023, approximately $139.3 million of our mortgage debt matures—specifically, $16.0 million in 2019, $13.8 million in 2020, $22.7 million in 2021, $45.8 million in 2022 and $41.0 million in 2023. If we are unsuccessful in refinancing or extending existing mortgage indebtedness or financing unencumbered properties, selling properties on favorable terms or raising additional equity, our cash flow will not be sufficient to repay all maturing mortgage debt when payments become due, and we (or this joint venture) may be forced to dispose of properties on disadvantageous terms or convey properties secured by mortgages to the mortgagees, which would lower our revenues and the value of our portfolio.

        We may find that the value of a property could be less than the mortgage secured by such property. We may also have to decide whether we should refinance or pay off a mortgage on a property at which the mortgage matures prior to lease expiration and the tenant may not renew the lease. In these types of situations, after evaluating various factors, including among other things, the tenant's competitive position in the applicable submarket, our and our tenant's estimates of its prospects, consideration of alternative uses and opportunities to re-purpose or re-let the property, we may seek to renegotiate the terms of the mortgage, or to the extent that the loan is non-recourse and the terms of the mortgage cannot be satisfactorily renegotiated, forfeit the property by conveying it to the mortgagee and writing off our investment.

Declines in the value of our properties could result in impairment charges.

        If we are presented with indications of impairment in the value of a particular property or group of properties, we will be required to evaluate any such property or properties. If we determine that any of our properties at which indicators of impairment exist have a fair market value below the net book

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value of such property, we will be required to recognize an impairment charge for the difference between the fair value and the book value during the quarter in which we make such determination; such impairment charges may then increase in subsequent quarters. This evaluation may lead us to write off any straight-line rent receivable and lease intangible balances recorded with respect to such property. In addition, we may incur losses from time to time if we dispose of properties for sales prices that are less than our book value.

The concentration of our properties in certain states may make our revenues and the value of our portfolio vulnerable to adverse changes in local economic conditions.

        Many of the properties we own are located in the same or a limited number of geographic regions. Approximately 39.5% of our 2019 contractual rental income is derived from properties located in five states—New York (8.7%), Texas (8.6%), South Carolina (8.4%), Pennsylvania (7.8%) and North Carolina (6.0%). As a result, a decline in the economic conditions in these states or in regions where our properties may be concentrated in the future, may have an adverse effect on the rental and occupancy rates for, and the property values of, these properties, which could lead to a reduction of our rental income and/or impairment charges.

Our portfolio of properties is concentrated in the industrial and retail real estate sectors, and our business would be adversely affected by an economic downturn in either of such sectors.

        Approximately 36.6% and 46.1% of our 2019 contractual rental income is derived from retail and industrial tenants, respectively, and we are vulnerable to economic declines that negatively impact these sectors of the economy, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations, liquidity and financial condition.

If our credit facility is not renewed, interest rates increase or credit markets tighten, it may be more difficult for us to secure financing, which may limit our ability to finance or refinance our real estate properties, reduce the number of properties we can acquire, sell certain properties, and decrease our stock price.

        Our credit facility expires December 31, 2019. Among other things, we depend on the facility to allow us to acquire properties on an accelerated basis (thereby potentially making our offer to purchase a property more attractive than offers from competitors), without the delays that may be associated with traditional mortgage financing. We can provide no assurance that such facility will be renewed or that if renewed, that the terms thereof will not be less favorable that the terms of the current facility. If this facility is not renewed on terms acceptable to us, our liquidity and capital resource position may be adversely impacted.

        An increase in interest rates could reduce the amount investors are willing to pay for our common stock. Because REIT stocks are often perceived as high-yield investments, investors may perceive less relative benefit to owning REIT stocks as interest rates and the yield on government treasuries and other bonds increase.

        Increases in interest rates or reduced access to credit markets may make it difficult for us to obtain financing, refinance mortgage debt, limit the mortgage debt available on properties we wish to acquire and limit the properties we can acquire. Even in the event that we are able to secure mortgage debt on, or otherwise finance our real estate properties, due to increased costs associated with securing financing and other factors beyond our control, we may be unable to refinance the entire outstanding loan balance or be subject to unfavorable terms (such as higher loan fees, interest rates and periodic payments) if we do refinance the loan balance. In addition, an increase in interest rates could decrease the amount third parties are willing to pay for our assets, thereby limiting our ability to reposition our portfolio promptly in response to changes in economic or other conditions.

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        While interest rates have been at historically low levels the past several years, they have become increasingly volatile. During the three years ended December 31, 2018, the interest rate on the 10-year treasury note ranged from 1.37% to 3.24%. If we are required to refinance mortgage debt that matures over the next several years at higher interest rates than such mortgage debt currently bears, the funds available for dividends may be reduced. The following table sets forth, as of December 31, 2018, the principal balance of the mortgage payments due at maturity on our properties and the weighted average interest rate thereon (dollars in thousands):

Year
  Principal
Balances
Due at
Maturity
  Weighted Average
Interest Rate
Percentage
 

2019

  $ 3,485     3.88  

2020

         

2021

    8,463     4.13  

2022

    31,539     3.92  

2023

    28,190     4.79  

2024 and thereafter

    209,648     4.17  

        We manage a substantial portion of our exposure to interest rate risk by accessing debt with staggered maturities, obtaining fixed rate mortgage debt and through the use of interest rate swap agreements. However, no amount of hedging activity can fully insulate us from the risks associated with changes in interest rates. Swap agreements involve risk, including that counterparties may fail to honor their obligations under these arrangements, and that these arrangements may cause us to pay higher interest rates on our debt obligations than would otherwise be the case. Failure to hedge effectively against interest rate risk could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

If our borrowings increase, the risk of default on our repayment obligations and our debt service requirements will also increase.

        The terms of our revolving credit facility limit our ability to incur indebtedness, including limiting the total indebtedness that we may incur to an amount equal to 70% of the total value (as defined in the credit facility) of our properties. (At December 31, 2018, such total indebtedness was 49.4% of the total value of our properties). Increased leverage could result in increased risk of default on our payment obligations related to borrowings and in an increase in debt service requirements, which could reduce our net income and the amount of cash available to meet expenses and to pay dividends.

If a significant number of our tenants default or fail to renew expiring leases, or we take impairment charges against our properties, a breach of our revolving credit facility could occur.

        Our revolving credit facility includes covenants that require us to maintain certain financial ratios and comply with other requirements. If our tenants default under their leases with us or fail to renew expiring leases, generally accepted accounting principles may require us to recognize impairment charges against our properties, and our financial position could be adversely affected causing us to be in breach of the financial covenants contained in our credit facility.

        Failure to meet interest and other payment obligations under our revolving credit facility or a breach by us of the covenants to maintain the financial ratios would place us in default under our credit facility, and, if the banks called a default and required us to repay the full amount outstanding under the credit facility, we might be required to rapidly dispose of our properties, which could have an adverse impact on the amounts we receive on such disposition. If we are unable to dispose of our properties in a timely fashion to the satisfaction of the banks, the banks could foreclose on that portion of our collateral pledged to the banks, which could result in the disposition of our properties at below

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market values. The disposition of our properties at below our carrying value would adversely affect our net income, reduce our stockholders' equity and adversely affect our ability to pay dividends.

The re-development of a multi-tenant community shopping center located in Manahawkin, New Jersey owned by an unconsolidated joint venture may be unsuccessful or fail to meet our expectations.

        An unconsolidated joint venture in which we are a 50% partner is re-developing a multi-tenant community shopping center located in Manahawkin, New Jersey, and which we refer to as the Manahawkin Property. We anticipate that this project will be completed in stages through 2022 and that our share of the capital expenditures required in connection therewith may range from $10 million to $15 million. This re-development project may be unsuccessful or fail to meet our expectations due to a variety of risks and uncertainties including:

    the joint venture's inability to obtain all necessary zoning and other required governmental permits and authorizations on a timely basis,

    a decrease in cash flow from the property as the joint venture relocates tenants or choose not to renew leases at the property,

    occupancy rates and rents at the re-developed property may not meet the expected levels and could be insufficient to make the property profitable,

    the inability to complete the project on schedule, or at all, as a result of factors, many of which are beyond the joint venture's control, including weather, labor conditions and material shortages,

    development and construction costs of the project may exceed the joint venture's estimates,

    we or our joint venture partner may not have sufficient resources to fund the project, and

    fluctuations in local and regional economic conditions due to the time lag between commencement and completion of the project.

        See "Item 2. Properties" and "Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" for further information about the Manahawkin Property.

Certain of our net leases and our ground leases require us to pay property related expenses that are not the obligations of our tenants.

        Under the terms of substantially all of our net leases, in addition to satisfying their rent obligations, our tenants are responsible for the payment of real estate taxes, insurance and ordinary maintenance and repairs. However, under the provisions of certain net and ground leases, we are required to pay some expenses, such as the costs of environmental liabilities, roof and structural repairs, insurance premiums, certain non-structural repairs and maintenance. If our properties incur significant expenses that must be paid by us under the terms of our leases, our business, financial condition and results of operations will be adversely affected and the amount of cash available to meet expenses and pay dividends may be reduced.

Uninsured and underinsured losses may affect the revenues generated by, the value of, and the return from a property affected by a casualty or other claim.

        Most all of our tenants obtain, for our benefit, comprehensive insurance covering our properties in amounts that are intended to be sufficient to provide for the replacement of the improvements at each property. However, the amount of insurance coverage maintained for any property may be insufficient (i) to pay the full replacement cost of the improvements at the property following a casualty event or (ii) if coverage is provided pursuant to a blanket policy and the tenant's other properties are subject to

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insurance claims. In addition, the rent loss coverage under the policy may not extend for the full period of time that a tenant may be entitled to a rent abatement as a result of, or that may be required to complete restoration following, a casualty event In addition, there are certain types of losses, such as those arising from earthquakes, floods, hurricanes and terrorist attacks, that may be uninsurable or that may not be economically insurable. Changes in zoning, building codes and ordinances, environmental considerations and other factors also may make it impossible or impracticable for us to use insurance proceeds to replace damaged or destroyed improvements at a property. If restoration is not or cannot be completed to the extent, or within the period of time, specified in certain of our leases, the tenant may have the right to terminate the lease. If any of these or similar events occur, it may reduce our revenues, the value of, or our return from, an affected property.

Our revenues and the value of our portfolio are affected by a number of factors that affect investments in leased real estate generally.

        We are subject to the general risks of investing in leased real estate. These include the non-performance of lease obligations by tenants, leasehold improvements that will be costly or difficult to remove should it become necessary to re-rent the leased space for other uses, covenants in certain retail leases that limit the types of tenants to which available space can be rented (which may limit demand or reduce the rents realized on re-renting), rights to terminate leases due to co-tenancy provisions(i.e., a tenant's right to reduce their rent or terminate their lease if certain key tenants vacate a property), events of casualty or condemnation affecting the leased space or the property or due to interruption of the tenant's quiet enjoyment of the leased premises, obligations of a landlord to restore the leased premises or the property following events of casualty or condemnation, adverse changes in economic conditions and local conditions (e.g., changing demographics, retailing trends and traffic patterns), declines in rental rates, changes in the supply and price of quality properties and the market supply and demand of competing properties, the impact of environmental laws, security concerns, prepayment penalties applicable under mortgage financings, changes in tax, zoning, building code, fire safety and other laws and regulations, the type of insurance coverage available, and changes in the type, capacity and sophistication of building systems. The occurrence of any of these events could adversely impact our results of operations, liquidity and financial condition.

Real estate investments are relatively illiquid and their values may decline.

        Real estate investments are relatively illiquid. Therefore, we will be limited in our ability to reconfigure our real estate portfolio in response to economic changes. We may encounter difficulty in disposing of properties when tenants vacate either at the expiration of the applicable lease or otherwise. If we decide to sell any of our properties, our ability to sell these properties and the prices we receive on their sale may be affected by many factors, including the number of potential buyers, the number of competing properties on the market and other market conditions, as well as whether the property is leased and if it is leased, the terms of the lease. As a result, we may be unable to sell our properties for an extended period of time without incurring a loss, which would adversely affect our results of operations, liquidity and financial condition.

We have been, and in the future will be, subject to significant competition and we may not be able to compete successfully for investments.

        We have been, and in the future will be, subject to significant competition for attractive investment opportunities from other real estate investors, many of which have greater financial resources than us, including publicly-traded REITs, non-traded REITs, insurance companies, commercial and investment banking firms, private institutional funds, hedge funds, private equity funds and other investors. We may not be able to compete successfully for investments. If we pay higher prices for investments, our returns may be lower and the value of our assets may not increase or may decrease significantly below

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the amount we paid for such assets. If such events occur, we may experience lower returns on our investments.

We cannot assure you of our ability to pay dividends in the future.

        We intend to pay quarterly dividends and to make distributions to our stockholders in amounts such that all or substantially all of our ordinary taxable income in each year is distributed. This, along with other factors, will enable us to qualify for the tax benefits accorded to a REIT under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, which we refer to as the Code. We have not established a minimum dividend payment level and our ability to pay dividends may be adversely affected by the risk factors described in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. All distributions will be made at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend on our earnings (including taxable income), our financial condition, maintenance of our REIT status and such other factors as our board of directors may deem relevant from time to time.

If we reduce our dividend, the market value of our common stock may decline.

        The level of our common stock dividend is established by our board of directors from time to time based on a variety of factors, including our cash available for distribution, funds from operations, adjusted funds from operations and maintenance of our REIT status. Various factors could cause our board of directors to decrease our dividend level, including insufficient income to cover our dividends, tenant defaults or bankruptcies resulting in a material reduction in our funds from operations or a material loss resulting from an adverse change in the value of one or more of our properties. If our board of directors determines to reduce our common stock dividend, the market value of our common stock could be adversely affected.

Our current and future investments in joint ventures could be adversely affected by the lack of sole decision making authority, reliance on joint venture partners' financial condition or insurance coverage, disputes that may arise between our joint venture partners and us and our reliance on one significant joint venture partner.

        A number of properties in which we have an interest are owned through consolidated and unconsolidated joint ventures. We may continue to acquire properties through joint ventures and/or contribute some of our properties to joint ventures. Investments in joint ventures may, under certain circumstances, involve risks not present when a third party is not involved, including the possibility that joint venture partners might file for bankruptcy protection, fail to fund their share of required capital contributions or obtain insurance coverage pursuant to a blanket policy as a result of which claims with respect to other properties covered by such policy and in which we have no interest could reduce or eliminate the coverage available with respect to the joint venture properties. Further, joint venture partners may have conflicting business interests or goals, and as a result there is the potential risk of impasses on decisions, such as a sale and the timing thereof. Any disputes that may arise between joint venture partners and us may result in litigation or arbitration that would increase our expenses and prevent our officers and/or directors from focusing their time and effort on our business. Consequently, actions by or disputes with joint venture partners might result in subjecting properties owned by the joint venture to additional risk. With respect to our (i) consolidated joint ventures, we own, with two joint venture partners and their respective affiliates, five properties that account for 5.4% of 2019 contractual rental income, and (ii) unconsolidated joint ventures, we own, with two joint venture partners and their affiliates, four properties which account for our $1.5 million share of 2019 base rent payable. We may be adversely affected if we are unable to maintain a satisfactory working relationship with these joint venture partners or if any of these partners becomes financially distressed.

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Compliance with environmental regulations and associated costs could adversely affect our results of operations and liquidity.

        Under various federal, state and local laws, ordinances and regulations, an owner or operator of real property may be required to investigate and clean up hazardous or toxic substances or petroleum product releases at the property and may be held liable to a governmental entity or to third parties for property damage and for investigation and cleanup costs incurred in connection with contamination. The cost of investigation, remediation or removal of hazardous or toxic substances may be substantial, and the presence of such substances, or the failure to properly remediate a property, may adversely affect our ability to sell or rent the property or to borrow money using the property as collateral. In connection with our ownership, operation and management of real properties, we may be considered an owner or operator of the properties and, therefore, potentially liable for removal or remediation costs, as well as certain other related costs, including governmental fines and liability for injuries to persons and property, not only with respect to properties we own now or may acquire, but also with respect to properties we have owned in the past.

        We cannot provide any assurance that existing environmental studies with respect to any of our properties reveal all potential environmental liabilities, that any prior owner of a property did not create any material environmental condition not known to us, or that a material environmental condition does not otherwise exist, or may not exist in the future, as to any one or more of our properties. If a material environmental condition does in fact exist, or exists in the future, the remediation costs could have a material adverse impact upon our results of operations, liquidity and financial condition.

Compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act could be costly.

        Under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, all public accommodations must meet Federal requirements for access and use by disabled persons. A determination that our properties do not comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act could result in liability for both governmental fines and damages. If we are required to make unanticipated major modifications to any of our properties to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act, which are determined not to be the responsibility of our tenants, we could incur unanticipated expenses that could have an adverse impact upon our results of operations, liquidity and financial condition.

Our senior management and other key personnel are critical to our business and our future success depends on our ability to retain them.

        We depend on the services of Matthew J. Gould, chairman of our board of directors, Fredric H. Gould, vice chairman of our board of directors, Patrick J. Callan, Jr., our president and chief executive officer, Lawrence G. Ricketts, Jr., our executive vice president and chief operating officer, David W. Kalish, our senior vice president and chief financial officer and Karen Dunleavy, our vice president—financial, and other members of our senior management to carry out our business and investment strategies. Only three of our most senior executive officers, Messrs. Callan and Ricketts, and Ms. Dunleavy, devote all of their business time to us. The remainder of our senior management provides services to us on a part-time, as-needed basis. The loss of the services of any of our senior management or other key personnel, the inability or failure of the members of senior management providing services to us on a part-time basis to devote sufficient time or attention to our activities or our inability to recruit and retain qualified personnel in the future, could impair our ability to carry out our business and investment strategies.

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Our transactions with affiliated entities involve conflicts of interest.

        From time to time we have entered into transactions with persons and entities affiliated with us and with certain of our officers and directors. Such transactions involve a potential conflict of interest, and entail a risk that we could have obtained more favorable terms if we had entered into such transaction with an unaffiliated third party. Our policy for transactions with affiliates is to have these transactions approved by our audit committee. We entered into a compensation and services agreement with Majestic Property effective as of January 1, 2007. Majestic Property is wholly-owned by the vice chairman of our board of directors and it provides compensation to certain of our part-time senior executive officers and other individuals performing services on our behalf. Pursuant to the compensation and services agreement, we pay an annual fee to Majestic Property which provides us with the services of all affiliated executive, administrative, legal, accounting and clerical personnel that we use on a part time basis, as well as property management services, property acquisition, sales and leasing and mortgage brokerage services. In 2018, pursuant to the compensation and services agreement, we paid Majestic Property a fee of $2.7 million and an additional $216,000 for our share of all direct office expenses, including rent, telephone, postage, computer services, supplies, and internet usage. We also obtain our property insurance in conjunction with Gould Investors L.P., our affiliate, and in 2018, reimbursed Gould Investors $912,000 for our share of the insurance premiums paid by Gould Investors. Gould Investors beneficially owns approximately 9.2% of our outstanding common stock and certain of our senior executive officers are also executive officers of the managing general partner of Gould Investors. See Note 11 of our consolidated financial statements for information regarding equity awards to individuals performing services on our behalf pursuant to the compensation and services agreement.

The failure of any bank in which we deposit our funds could have an adverse impact on our financial condition.

        We have diversified our cash and cash equivalents between several banking institutions in an attempt to minimize exposure to any one of these entities. However, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation only insures accounts in amounts up to $250,000 per depositor per insured bank. We currently have cash and cash equivalents deposited in certain financial institutions significantly in excess of federally insured levels. If any of the banking institutions in which we have deposited funds ultimately fails, we may lose our deposits over $250,000. The loss of our deposits may have an adverse effect on our financial condition.

Breaches of information technology systems could materially harm our business and reputation.

        We collect and retain on information technology systems, certain financial, personal and other sensitive information provided by third parties, including tenants, vendors and employees. We also rely on information technology systems for the collection and distribution of funds. There can be no assurance that we will be able to prevent unauthorized access to sensitive information or the unauthorized distribution of funds. Any loss of this information or unauthorized distribution of funds as a result of a breach of information technology systems may result in loss of funds to which we are entitled, legal liability and costs (including damages and penalties), as well as damage to our reputation, that could materially and adversely affect our business.

We are dependent on third party software for our billing and financial reporting processes.

        We are dependent on third party software, and in particular Yardi's property management software, for generating tenant invoices and financial reports. If the software fails (including a failure resulting from such parties unwillingness or inability to maintain or upgrade the functionality of the software), our ability to bill tenants and prepare financial reports could be impaired which would adversely affect our business.

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The potential phasing out of LIBOR after 2021 may affect our financial results.

        The authority regulating LIBOR has announced that it intends to stop compelling banks to submit rates for the calculation of LIBOR after 2021. It is not possible to predict the effect of these changes or the establishment of alternative reference rates. Any changes in the manner in which LIBOR is calculated or the implementation of an alternative rate to succeed LIBOR, may result in a sudden or prolonged increase or decrease in the reported LIBOR rates. If that were to occur, the levels of interest payments we incur and interest payments we receive may change. In addition, although certain of our LIBOR based obligations and investments provide for alternative methods of calculating the interest rate if LIBOR is not reported, uncertainty as to the extent and manner of future changes may result in interest rates and/or payments that are higher than, lower than or that do not otherwise correlate over time with the interest rates and/or payments that would have been made on our obligations if LIBOR rate was available in its current form.

Risks Related to the REIT Industry

Legislative or regulatory tax changes could have an adverse effect on us.

        There are a number of issues associated with an investment in a REIT that are related to the Federal income tax laws, including, but not limited to, the consequences of our failing to continue to qualify as a REIT. At any time, the Federal income tax laws governing REITs or the administrative interpretations of those laws may be amended or modified. Any new laws or interpretations may take effect retroactively and could adversely affect us or our stockholders.

        On December 22, 2017, Pub. L. No. 15-97 (informally known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the "Act")) was enacted. The Act makes significant changes to the Code, including changes that impact REITs and their stockholders, among others. In particular, the Act reduces the maximum corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%. By reducing the corporate tax rate, it is possible that the Act will reduce the relative attractiveness to investors (as compared with potential alternative investments) of the generally single level of taxation on REIT distributions. However, the Act also made certain changes to the Code which are generally advantageous to REITs and their stockholders. For instance, for tax years beginning before January 1, 2026, the Act permits up to a 20% deduction for individuals, trusts, and estates with respect to their receipt of "qualified REIT dividends", which are dividends from a REIT that are not capital gain dividends and are not qualified dividend income. These changes generally result in an effective maximum U.S. federal income tax rate on such dividends of 29.6%, if the deduction is allowed in full. Key provisions of the Act that could impact us and the market price of our shares include the following:

    temporarily reducing individual U.S. federal income tax rates on ordinary income, the highest individual U.S. federal income tax rate was reduced from 39.6% to 37% (through tax years beginning before January 1, 2026)

    eliminating miscellaneous itemized deductions and limiting state and local tax deductions;

    reducing the maximum corporate income tax rate from 35% to 21%, which reduces, but does not eliminate, the competitive advantage that REITs enjoy relative to non-REIT corporations;

    permitting individuals, trusts and estates (subject to certain limitations) to deduct up to 20% of certain pass-through business income, including, as noted above, dividends received by our stockholders that are not designated by us as capital gain dividends or qualified dividend income, which will generally result in an effective maximum U.S. federal income tax rate of 29.6% on such dividends, if the deduction is allowed in full (through tax years beginning before January 1, 2026);

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    reducing the highest rate of withholding with respect to our distributions to non-U.S. stockholders that are treated as attributable to gains from the sale or exchange of U.S. real property interests from 35% to 21%;

    limiting our deduction for net operating losses to 80% of taxable income (prior to the application of the dividends paid deduction), where taxable income is determined without regarding to the net operating loss deduction itself, and generally eliminating net operating loss carrybacks and allowing unused net operating losses to be carried forward indefinitely;

    expanding the ability of businesses to deduct the cost of certain purchases of property in the year in which such property is purchased; and

    eliminating the corporate alternative minimum tax.

        In addition to the foregoing, the Act may impact our tenants, the real estate market, and the overall economy, which may have an effect on us. It is not possible to state with certainty at this time the effect of the Act on us and on an investment in our shares.

Failure to qualify as a REIT could result in material adverse tax consequences and could significantly reduce cash available for distributions.

        We operate so as to qualify as a REIT under the Code. Qualification as a REIT involves the application of technical and complex legal provisions for which there are limited judicial and administrative interpretations. The determination of various factual matters and circumstances not entirely within our control may affect our ability to qualify as a REIT. In addition, no assurance can be given that legislation, new regulations, administrative interpretations or court decisions will not significantly change the tax laws with respect to qualification as a REIT or the federal income tax consequences of such qualification. If we fail to quality as a REIT, we will be subject to federal, certain additional state and local income tax (including any applicable alternative minimum tax) on our taxable income at regular corporate rates and would not be allowed a deduction in computing our taxable income for amounts distributed to stockholders. In addition, unless entitled to relief under certain statutory provisions, we would be disqualified from treatment as a REIT for the four taxable years following the year during which qualification is lost. The additional tax would reduce significantly our net income and the cash available to pay dividends.

We are subject to certain distribution requirements that may result in our having to borrow funds at unfavorable rates.

        To obtain the favorable tax treatment associated with being a REIT, we generally are required, among other things, to distribute to our stockholders at least 90% of our ordinary taxable income (subject to certain adjustments) each year. To the extent that we satisfy these distribution requirements, but distribute less than 100% of our taxable income we will be subject to Federal and state corporate tax on our undistributed taxable income.

        As a result of differences in timing between the receipt of income and the payment of expenses, and the inclusion of such income and the deduction of such expenses in arriving at taxable income, and the effect of nondeductible capital expenditures, the creation of reserves and the timing of required debt service (including amortization) payments, we may need to borrow funds in order to make the distributions necessary to retain the tax benefits associated with qualifying as a REIT, even if we believe that then prevailing market conditions are not generally favorable for such borrowings. Such borrowings could reduce our net income and the cash available to pay dividends.

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Compliance with REIT requirements may hinder our ability to maximize profits.

        In order to qualify as a REIT for Federal income tax purposes, we must continually satisfy tests concerning, among other things, our sources of income, the amounts we distribute to our stockholders and the ownership of our stock. We may also be required to make distributions to stockholders at disadvantageous times or when we do not have funds readily available for distribution. Accordingly, compliance with REIT requirements may hinder our ability to operate solely on the basis of maximizing profits.

        In order to qualify as a REIT, we must also ensure that at the end of each calendar quarter, at least 75% of the value of our assets consists of cash, cash items, government securities and real estate assets. Any investment in securities cannot include more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of any one issuer or more than 10% of the total value of the outstanding securities of any one issuer. In addition, no more than 5% of the value of our assets can consist of the securities of any one issuer, other than a qualified REIT security. If we fail to comply with these requirements, we must dispose of such portion of these securities in excess of these percentages within 30 days after the end of the calendar quarter in order to avoid losing our REIT status and suffering adverse tax consequences. This requirement could cause us to dispose of assets for consideration that is less than their true value and could lead to an adverse impact on our results of operations and financial condition.

Item 1B.    Unresolved Staff Comments.

        None.

Item 2.    Properties.

        As of December 31, 2018, we own 119 properties with an aggregate net book value of $705.5 million. Our occupancy rate, based on square footage, was 99.2% and 99.6% as of December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

        We also participate in joint ventures that own four properties and at December 31, 2018, our investment in these unconsolidated joint ventures is $10.9 million. The occupancy rate of our joint venture properties, based on square footage, was 59.3% and 97.6% as of December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. The decrease in the occupancy rate is due primarily to the expiration in November 2018 of the Kmart lease at the Manahawkin Property—Kmart had leased 33% of the square footage at the Manahawkin Property. See "—Properties Owned by Joint Ventures", "—Mortgage Debt" and "Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" for further information about the Manahawkin Property, including information about the related mortgage debt and re-development activities.

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Our Properties

        The following table details, as of December 31, 2018, certain information about our properties:

Location
  Type of Property   Percentage
of 2019
Contractual
Rental Income
  Approximate
Square Footage
of Building
  2019
Contractual
Rental Income
per Square Foot
 

Fort Mill, SC

  Industrial     4.1     701,595   $ 4.08  

Hauppauge, NY

  Industrial     3.8     201,614     12.92  

Baltimore, MD

  Industrial     3.4     367,000     6.39  

Royersford, PA(1)

  Retail—Supermarket     3.2     194,600     11.48  

Lebanon, TN

  Industrial     2.9     540,200     3.78  

El Paso, TX

  Industrial     2.6     419,821     4.34  

West Hartford, CT

  Retail—Supermarket     2.2     47,174     32.97  

Littleton, CO(2)

  Retail     2.2     101,617     16.11  

Greensboro, NC

  Theater     2.2     61,213     24.75  

Delport, MO(3)

  Industrial     2.1     339,094     4.28  

Secaucus, NJ

  Health & Fitness     2.0     44,863     30.40  

El Paso, TX(4)

  Retail     1.9     110,179     12.50  

Wheaton, IL(5)

  Land     1.8     300,104     4.18  

McCalla, AL

  Industrial     1.8     294,000     4.26  

Brooklyn, NY

  Office     1.8     66,000     18.87  

Knoxville, TN

  Retail     1.7     35,330     32.84  

Fort Mill, SC

  Industrial     1.6     303,188     3.76  

Joppa, MD

  Industrial     1.6     258,710     4.16  

Ankeny, IA(3)

  Industrial     1.5     208,234     5.04  

Moorestown, NJ(3)

  Industrial     1.5     219,881     4.63  

Pittston, PA

  Industrial     1.4     249,600     3.82  

Tucker, GA

  Health & Fitness     1.4     58,800     16.16  

Englewood, CO

  Industrial     1.3     63,882     14.56  

Pennsburg, PA(3)

  Industrial     1.3     291,203     3.04  

Saco, ME

  Industrial     1.2     131,400     6.12  

St. Louis Park, MN(3)

  Industrial     1.1     131,710     6.07  

Hamilton, OH

  Health & Fitness     1.1     38,000     20.75  

Beachwood, OH(5)

  Land     1.1     349,999     2.24  

Cedar Park, TX

  Retail—Furniture     1.1     50,810     14.71  

Bakersfield, CA

  Industrial     1.0     218,116     3.36  

Green Park, MO

  Industrial     1.0     119,680     6.02  

Columbus, OH

  Retail—Furniture     1.0     96,924     7.40  

Indianapolis, IN

  Theater     1.0     57,688     12.37  

Indianapolis, IN

  Industrial     1.0     125,622     5.45  

Lake Charles, LA(6)

  Retail     1.0     54,229     12.41  

Ronkonkoma, NY(3)

  Industrial     1.0     90,599     7.42  

Greenville, SC(7)

  Industrial     0.9     142,200     4.56  

Columbus, OH

  Industrial     0.9     105,191     6.02  

Ft. Myers, FL

  Retail     0.9     29,993     20.17  

Huntersville, NC

  Industrial     0.9     78,319     7.68  

Memphis, TN

  Industrial     0.8     224,749     2.61  

Kennesaw, GA

  Retail     0.8     32,138     17.90  

Champaign, IL(3)

  Retail     0.8     50,530     11.19  

Wichita, KS

  Retail—Furniture     0.8     88,108     6.35  

Chicago, IL

  Retail—Office Supply     0.8     23,939     22.16  

New Hope, MN

  Industrial     0.8     122,461     4.33  

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Location
  Type of Property   Percentage
of 2019
Contractual
Rental Income
  Approximate
Square Footage
of Building
  2019
Contractual
Rental Income
per Square Foot
 

Melville, NY

  Industrial     0.8     51,351     10.26  

Clemmons, NC(8)

  Retail     0.7     96,725     5.40  

Moorestown, NJ

  Industrial     0.7     64,000     7.61  

Tyler, TX

  Retail—Furniture     0.7     72,000     6.75  

Fayetteville, GA

  Retail—Furniture     0.7     65,951     6.97  

Louisville, KY

  Industrial     0.7     125,370     3.60  

Onalaska, WI

  Retail     0.6     63,919     7.00  

Cary, NC

  Retail—Office Supply     0.6     33,490     13.29  

New Hyde Park, NY

  Industrial     0.6     38,000     11.32  

Greenville, SC

  Industrial     0.6     88,800     4.81  

Philadelphia, PA

  Retail—Supermarket     0.6     57,653     7.28  

Houston, TX

  Retail     0.6     25,005     16.70  

Plymouth, MN

  Industrial     0.6     82,565     4.95  

Richmond, VA

  Retail—Furniture     0.6     38,788     10.53  

Amarillo, TX

  Retail—Furniture     0.6     72,027     5.64  

Deptford, NJ

  Retail     0.6     25,358     15.90  

Highland Ranch, CO(3)

  Retail     0.6     42,920     9.39  

Virginia Beach, VA

  Retail—Furniture     0.6     58,937     6.82  

Lexington, KY

  Retail—Furniture     0.5     30,173     12.48  

Eugene, OR

  Retail—Office Supply     0.5     24,978     14.88  

Duluth, GA

  Retail—Furniture     0.5     50,260     7.29  

Newark, DE

  Retail     0.5     23,547     15.40  

Woodbury, MN

  Retail     0.5     49,406     7.21  

Newport, VA

  Retail—Furniture     0.5     49,865     7.09  

El Paso, TX

  Retail—Office Supply     0.5     25,000     13.81  

Houston, TX

  Retail     0.5     20,087     16.00  

Durham, NC

  Industrial     0.5     46,181     6.95  

Greensboro, NC

  Retail     0.4     12,950     23.00  

Selden, NY

  Retail     0.4     14,555     20.00  

Athens, GA(9)

  Retail     0.4     41,280     6.98  

Somerville, MA

  Retail     0.4     12,054     23.23  

Gurnee, IL

  Retail—Furniture     0.4     22,768     12.21  

Bluffton, SC

  Retail—Furniture     0.4     35,011     7.92  

Naples, FL

  Retail—Furniture     0.4     15,912     17.43  

Carrollton, GA

  Restaurant     0.4     6,012     44.42  

Pinellas Park, FL

  Health & Fitness     0.4     53,064     5.03  

Hauppauge, NY

  Restaurant     0.4     7,000     36.65  

Cartersville, GA

  Restaurant     0.4     5,635     44.72  

Hyannis, MA

  Retail     0.3     9,750     25.28  

Richmond, VA

  Restaurant     0.3     9,367     25.38  

Greensboro, NC

  Restaurant     0.3     6,655     35.57  

Greenville, SC(10)

  Industrial     0.3     128,000     2.22  

West Hartford, CT(11)

  Retail—Supermarket     0.3         0.00  

Myrtle Beach, SC

  Restaurant     0.3     6,734     31.68  

Kennesaw, GA

  Restaurant     0.3     4,051     51.06  

Everett, MA

  Retail     0.3     18,572     11.08  

Bolingbrook, IL

  Retail     0.3     33,111     6.10  

Concord, NC

  Restaurant     0.3     4,749     42.04  

Cape Girardeau, MO

  Retail     0.3     13,502     14.71  

Lawrenceville, GA

  Restaurant     0.3     4,025     49.25  

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Location
  Type of Property   Percentage
of 2019
Contractual
Rental Income
  Approximate
Square Footage
of Building
  2019
Contractual
Rental Income
per Square Foot
 

Miamisburg, OH

  Industrial     0.3     35,707     5.48  

Marston, MA

  Retail     0.3     8,775     21.00  

Indianapolis, IN

  Restaurant     0.3     12,820     14.14  

Monroeville, PA

  Retail     0.2     6,051     25.30  

Reading, PA

  Restaurant     0.2     2,754     53.04  

Reading, PA

  Restaurant     0.2     2,551     55.89  

West Palm Beach, FL

  Industrial     0.2     10,361     13.70  

Gettysburg, PA

  Restaurant     0.2     2,944     44.29  

Hanover, PA

  Restaurant     0.2     2,702     47.67  

Palmyra, PA

  Restaurant     0.2     2,798     45.32  

Trexlertown, PA

  Restaurant     0.2     3,004     41.36  

Cuyahoga Falls, OH

  Retail     0.2     6,796     17.21  

South Euclid, OH

  Retail     0.2     11,672     9.94  

Hilliard, OH

  Retail     0.2     6,751     15.55  

Lawrence, KS

  Retail     0.2     8,600     12.21  

Port Clinton, OH

  Retail     0.1     6,749     15.19  

Seattle, WA

  Retail     0.1     3,053     26.06  

Rosenberg, TX

  Retail     0.1     8,000     8.79  

Louisville, KY

  Industrial     0.1     9,642     4.14  

Batavia, NY(12)

  Retail     0.0     23,483     0.50  

Round Rock, TX(13)

  Assisted Living Facility     0.0     87,560     0.00  

Crystal Lake, IL(14)

  Retail     0.0     32,446     0.00  

Houston, TX(15)

  Retail     0.0     12,000     0.00  

        100.0     10,034,639        

(1)
This property, a community shopping center, is leased to eleven tenants. Contractual rental income per square foot excludes 3,850 vacant square feet. Approximately 27.9% of the square footage is leased to a supermarket.

(2)
This property, a community shopping center, is leased to 27 tenants. Contractual rental income per square foot excludes 5,200 vacant square feet.

(3)
This property has two tenants.

(4)
This property has four tenants. Contractual rental income per square foot excludes 2,395 vacant square feet.

(5)
This property is ground leased to a multi-unit apartment complex owner/operator. Reflects contingent rent that may be received subject to the satisfaction of performance requirements. See Note 7 of our consolidated financial statements and with respect to the Beachwood, OH property, see also "Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Challenges Facing Certain Tenants and Properties."

(6)
This property has three tenants. Approximately 43.4% of the square footage is leased to a retail office supply operator.

(7)
This property has three tenants.

(8)
In October 2018, this tenant filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. See "Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Challenges Facing Certain Tenants and Properties."

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(9)
This property has two tenants. Approximately 48.4% of the square footage is leased to a retail office supply operator.

(10)
This property has two tenants. Contractual rental income excludes 24,000 vacant square feet. We entered into a lease with respect to such vacant space with a current tenant at this property and estimate that the base rent payable in 2019 with respect to this vacancy is approximately $74,000.

(11)
This property provides additional parking for the W. Hartford, CT, retail supermarket.

(12)
Base rent increases to $6.00 per square foot in December 2019.

(13)
In December 2018, the tenant filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and in February 2019, the bankruptcy court confirmed the tenant's/debtor's rejection of the lease. Excludes $349,000 of rent received for January and February, 2019. See "Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Challenges Facing Certain Tenants and Properties."

(14)
This property was operated as an hhgregg retail store. The tenant filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, rejected the lease and in May 2017, vacated the property. At December 31, 2018, the property is vacant.

(15)
Party City vacated this property at lease expiration in November 2018. At December 31, 2018, this property is vacant.

Properties Owned by Joint Ventures

        The following table sets forth, as of December 31, 2018, information about the properties owned by joint ventures in which we are a venture partner:

Location
  Type of
Property
  Percentage of
Base Rent Payable
in 2019
Contributed by
the Applicable
Joint Venture(1)
  Approximate
Square Footage
of Building
  2019
Base Rent
per Square Foot
 

Manahawkin, NJ(2)

  Retail     87.4     319,349   $ 15.78  

Savannah, GA

  Retail     10.0     45,973     6.55  

Savannah, GA(3)

  Retail     1.8          

Savannah, GA

  Retail     0.8     7,959     3.16  

        100.0     373,281        

(1)
Represents the base rent payable in 2019 with respect to such joint venture property, expressed as a percentage of the aggregate base rent payable in 2019 with respect to all of our joint venture properties.

(2)
This property, a community shopping center, is leased to 21 tenants. Base rent per square foot excludes 151,965 vacant square feet.

(3)
This property provides parking for a restaurant.

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    Geographic Concentration

        As of December 31, 2018, the 119 properties owned by us are located in 30 states. The following table sets forth information, presented by state, related to our properties as of December 31, 2018:

State
  Number of
Properties
  2019
Contractual
Rental
Income
  Percentage of
2019
Contractual
Rental
Income
  Approximate
Building
Square Feet
 

New York

    8     6,038,996     8.7     492,602  

Texas

    11     5,962,602     8.6     902,489  

South Carolina

    7     5,800,353     8.4     1,405,528  

Pennsylvania

    11     5,402,970     7.8     815,860  

North Carolina

    8     4,138,583     6.0     340,282  

Tennessee

    3     3,788,797     5.5     800,279  

Georgia

    9     3,563,543     5.1     268,152  

Ohio

    9     3,558,217     5.1     657,789  

Maryland

    2     3,423,902     4.9     625,710  

New Jersey

    4     3,271,867     4.7     354,102  

Colorado

    3     2,886,116     4.2     208,419  

Illinois

    6     2,829,869     4.1     462,898  

Missouri

    3     2,370,523     3.4     472,276  

Minnesota

    4     2,094,652     3.0     386,142  

Connecticut

    2     1,779,365     2.6     47,174  

Indiana

    3     1,579,609     2.3     196,130  

Virginia

    4     1,401,879     2.0     156,957  

Florida

    4     1,290,991     1.9     109,330  

Alabama

    1     1,252,921     1.8     294,000  

Iowa

    1     1,049,103     1.5     208,234  

Massachusetts

    4     916,657     1.3     49,151  

Kentucky

    3     867,880     1.2     165,185  

Maine

    1     803,670     1.2     131,400  

California

    1     733,260     1.0     218,116  

Louisiana

    1     672,951     1.0     54,229  

Kansas

    2     664,617     0.9     96,708  

Other

    4     1,261,314     1.8     115,497  

    119   $ 69,405,207     100.0     10,034,639  

        The following table sets forth information, presented by state, related to the properties owned by our joint ventures as of December 31, 2018:

State
  Number of
Properties
  Our Share
of the
Base Rent
Payable in 2019
to these
Joint Ventures
  Approximate
Building
Square Feet
 

New Jersey

    1   $ 1,320,325     319,349  

Georgia

    3     190,544     53,932  

    4   $ 1,510,869     373,281  

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Mortgage Debt

        At December 31, 2018, we had:

    70 first mortgages secured by 87 of our 119 properties; and

    $423.1 million of mortgage debt outstanding with a weighted average interest rate of 4.26% and a weighted average remaining term to maturity of approximately 8.7 years. Substantially all of such mortgage debt bears fixed interest at rates ranging from 3.02% to 5.88% and contains prepayment penalties.

        The following table sets forth scheduled principal mortgage payments due on our properties as of December 31, 2018 (dollars in thousands):

YEAR
  PRINCIPAL
PAYMENTS DUE
 

2019

  $ 15,969  

2020

    13,777  

2021

    22,704  

2022

    45,823  

2023

    40,952  

Thereafter

    283,871  

Total

  $ 423,096  

        At December 31, 2018, the first mortgage on the Manahawkin Property, the only joint venture property with mortgage debt, had an outstanding principal balance of $23.9 million, carries an annual interest rate of 4% and matures in July 2025. This mortgage contains a prepayment penalty. The following table sets forth the scheduled principal mortgage payments due for this property as of December 31, 2018 (dollars in thousands):

YEAR
  PRINCIPAL
PAYMENTS DUE
 

2019

  $ 711  

2020

    740  

2021

    770  

2022

    802  

2023

    835  

Thereafter

    20,016  

Total

  $ 23,874  

        The mortgages on our properties (including properties owned by joint ventures) are generally non-recourse, subject to standard carve-outs. The term "standard carve-outs" refers to recourse items to an otherwise non-recourse mortgage and are customary to mortgage financing. While carve-outs vary from lender to lender and transaction to transaction, the carve-outs may include, among other things, voluntary bankruptcy filings, environmental liabilities, the sale, financing or encumbrance of the property in violation of loan documents, damage to property as a result of intentional misconduct or gross negligence, failure to pay valid taxes and other claims which could create liens on property and the conversion of security deposits, insurance proceeds or condemnation awards.

Item 3.    Legal Proceedings.

        Not applicable.

Item 4.    Mine Safety Disclosures.

        Not applicable.

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Part II

Item 5.    Market for the Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

        Our common stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol "OLP." As of March 13, 2019, there were approximately 380 holders of record of our common stock.

        We qualify as a REIT for Federal income tax purposes. In order to maintain that status, we are required to distribute to our stockholders at least 90% of our annual ordinary taxable income. The amount and timing of future distributions will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend upon our financial condition, earnings, business plan, cash flow and other factors. We intend to make distributions in an amount at least equal to that necessary for us to maintain our status as a real estate investment trust for Federal income tax purposes.

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

        We did not repurchase any shares of our outstanding common stock in 2018.

Equity Compensation Plan Information

        As of December 31, 2018, the only equity compensation plan under which equity compensation may be awarded is our 2016 Incentive Plan, which was approved by our stockholders in June 2016. This plan permits us to grant stock options, restricted stock, restricted stock units and performance based awards to our employees, officers, directors, consultants and other eligible participants. The following table provides information as of December 31, 2018 about shares of our common stock that may be issued upon the exercise of options, warrants and rights under our 2016 Incentive Plan:

Plan Category
  Number of
securities
to be issued
upon exercise
of outstanding
options, warrants
and rights(1)
  Weighted-average
exercise price
of outstanding
options,
warrants
and rights
  Number of
securities
remaining available
for future issuance
under equity
compensation
plans (excluding
securities
reflected in
column(a))(2)
 
 
  (a)
  (b)
  (c)
 

Equity compensation plans approved by security holders

    152,500         162,900  

Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders

             

Total

    152,500         162,900  

(1)
Represents an aggregate of up to 152,500 shares of common stock issuable pursuant to restricted stock units. On each of June 30, 2020 and 2021, 76,250 shares of common stock underlying these units vest, if and to the extent specified performance (i.e., average annual return on capital) and/or market (i.e., average annual total stockholder return) conditions are satisfied by such dates.

(2)
After giving effect to 150,050 shares of restricted stock granted January 10, 2019 pursuant to our 2016 Incentive Plan.

Item 6.    Selected Financial Data.

        The following table sets forth on a historical basis our selected financial data. This information should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and "Item 7. Management's

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Discussion and Analysis of Financial Conditions and Results of Operations" appearing elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 
  As of and for the Year Ended December 31,
(Dollars in thousands, except per share data)
 
 
  2018   2017   2016   2015   2014  

OPERATING DATA

                               

Total revenues

  $ 79,126 (1) $ 75,916   $ 70,588   $ 65,711 (1) $ 60,477 (1)

Gain on sale of real estate, net

    5,262     9,837     10,087     5,392     10,180  

Operating income

    36,330     41,803     41,780     38,045     40,424  

Equity in earnings of unconsolidated joint ventures

    1,304     826     1,005     412     533  

Equity in earnings from sale of unconsolidated JV properties

    2,057                  

Net income attributable to One Liberty Properties, Inc. 

    20,665     24,147     24,422     20,517     22,116  

Weighted average number of common shares outstanding:

                               

Basic

    18,575     17,944     16,768     15,971     15,563  

Diluted

    18,588     18,047     16,882     16,079     15,663  

Net income per common share—basic

  $ 1.05   $ 1.29   $ 1.40   $ 1.23   $ 1.37  

Net income per common share—diluted

  $ 1.05   $ 1.28   $ 1.39   $ 1.22   $ 1.37  

Cash distributions declared per share of common stock

  $ 1.80   $ 1.74   $ 1.66   $ 1.58   $ 1.50  

BALANCE SHEET DATA

                               

Real estate investments, net

  $ 705,459   $ 666,374   $ 651,213   $ 562,257   $ 504,850  

Unamortized intangible lease assets, net

    26,541     30,525     32,645     28,978     27,387  

Investment in unconsolidated joint ventures

    10,857     10,723     10,833     11,350     4,907  

Cash and cash equivalents

    15,204     13,766     17,420     12,736     20,344  

Total assets

    780,912     742,586     733,445     646,499     587,162  

Mortgages payable, net of deferred financing costs

    418,798     393,157     394,898     331,055     288,868  

Due under line of credit, net of deferred financing costs

    29,688     8,776     9,064     17,744     13,154  

Unamortized intangible lease liabilities, net

    14,013     17,551     19,280     14,521     10,463  

Total liabilities

    482,317     444,084     441,518     384,073     331,258  

Total equity

    298,595     298,502     291,927     262,426     255,904  

OTHER DATA(2)

                               

Funds from operations

  $ 38,879   $ 36,193   $ 33,256   $ 32,717   $ 28,248  

Funds from operations per common share:

                               

Basic

  $ 2.02   $ 1.95   $ 1.91   $ 1.98   $ 1.76  

Diluted

  $ 2.02   $ 1.94   $ 1.90   $ 1.97   $ 1.75  

Adjusted funds from operations

  $ 41,059   $ 39,065   $ 34,848   $ 31,997   $ 29,703  

Adjusted funds from operations per common share:

                               

Basic

  $ 2.14   $ 2.10   $ 2.01   $ 1.94   $ 1.85  

Diluted

  $ 2.13   $ 2.09   $ 1.99   $ 1.92   $ 1.84  

(1)
Includes lease termination fees of $372,000, $2.9 million and $1.3 million for 2018, 2015 and 2014, respectively.

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(2)
See "—Funds from Operations and Adjusted Funds from Operations" for a discussion of the limitations on such data and a reconciliation of such data to our financial information presented in accordance with GAAP.

Funds from Operations and Adjusted Funds from Operations

        We compute funds from operations, or FFO, in accordance with the "White Paper on Funds From Operations" issued by the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts ("NAREIT") and NAREIT's related guidance. FFO is defined in the White Paper as net income (computed in accordance with generally accepting accounting principles), excluding gains (or losses) from sales of property, plus real estate depreciation and amortization (including amortization of deferred leasing costs), plus impairment write-downs of depreciable real estate and after adjustments for unconsolidated partnerships and joint ventures. Adjustments for unconsolidated partnerships and joint ventures will be calculated to reflect funds from operations on the same basis. In computing FFO, we do not add back to net income the amortization of costs in connection with our financing activities or depreciation of non-real estate assets. We compute adjusted funds from operations, or AFFO, by adjusting from FFO for our straight-line rent accruals and amortization of lease intangibles, deducting lease termination fees and gain on extinguishment of debt and adding back amortization of restricted stock compensation, amortization of costs in connection with our financing activities (including our share of our unconsolidated joint ventures) and debt prepayment costs. Since the NAREIT White Paper does not provide guidelines for computing AFFO, the computation of AFFO may vary from one REIT to another.

        We believe that FFO and AFFO are useful and standard supplemental measures of the operating performance for equity REITs and are used frequently by securities analysts, investors and other interested parties in evaluating equity REITs, many of which present FFO and AFFO when reporting their operating results. FFO and AFFO are intended to exclude GAAP historical cost depreciation and amortization of real estate assets, which assumes that the value of real estate assets diminish predictability over time. In fact, real estate values have historically risen and fallen with market conditions. As a result, we believe that FFO and AFFO provide a performance measure that when compared year over year, should reflect the impact to operations from trends in occupancy rates, rental rates, operating costs, interest costs and other matters without the inclusion of depreciation and amortization, providing a perspective that may not be necessarily apparent from net income. We also consider FFO and AFFO to be useful to us in evaluating potential property acquisitions.

        FFO and AFFO do not represent net income or cash flows from operations as defined by GAAP. FFO and AFFO and should not be considered to be an alternative to net income as a reliable measure of our operating performance; nor should FFO and AFFO be considered an alternative to cash flows from operating, investing or financing activities (as defined by GAAP) as measures of liquidity. FFO and AFFO do not measure whether cash flow is sufficient to fund all of our cash needs, including principal amortization, capital improvements and distributions to stockholders.

        Management recognizes that there are limitations in the use of FFO and AFFO. In evaluating our performance, management is careful to examine GAAP measures such as net income and cash flows from operating, investing and financing activities.

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        The table below provides a reconciliation of net income in accordance with GAAP to FFO and AFFO for each of the indicated years (dollars in thousands):

 
  2018   2017   2016   2015   2014  

GAAP net income attributable to One Liberty Properties, Inc

  $ 20,665   $ 24,147   $ 24,422   $ 20,517   $ 22,116  

Add: depreciation and amortization of properties

    23,792     20,674     17,865     16,150     14,494  

Add: our share of depreciation and amortization of unconsolidated joint ventures

    709     872     893     634     374  

Add: impairment loss

        153             1,093  

Add: amortization of deferred leasing costs

    363     319     299     234     168  

Add: Federal excise tax relating to gain on sale

            6     174     302  

Deduct: gain on sale of real estate, net

    (5,262 )   (9,837 )   (10,087 )   (5,392 )   (10,180 )

Deduct: purchase price fair value adjustment

                (960 )    

Deduct: equity in earnings from sale of unconsolidated joint venture properties

    (2,057 )                

Adjustments for non-controlling interests

    669     (135 )   (142 )   1,360     (119 )

NAREIT funds from operations applicable to common stock

    38,879     36,193     33,256     32,717     28,248  

Deduct: straight-line rent accruals and amortization of lease intangibles

    (1,491 )   (1,329 )   (2,991 )   (1,605 )   (1,756 )

(Deduct) add: our share of straight-line rent accruals and amortization of lease intangibles of unconsolidated joint ventures

    (539 )   36     49     7     (1 )

Deduct: lease termination fee income

    (372 )           (2,886 )   (1,269 )

Add: amortization of restricted stock compensation

    3,510     3,133     2,983     2,334     1,833  

Add: prepayment costs on debt

            577     568     1,581  

Add: amortization and write-off of deferred financing costs

    985     977     904     1,023     1,038  

Add: our share of amortization and write-off of deferred financing costs of unconsolidated joint ventures

    45     25     25     23     17  

Adjustments for non-controlling interests

    42     30     45     (184 )   12  

Adjusted funds from operations applicable to common stock

  $ 41,059   $ 39,065   $ 34,848   $ 31,997   $ 29,703  

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        The table below provides a reconciliation of net income per common share (on a diluted basis) in accordance with GAAP to FFO and AFFO:

 
  2018   2017   2016   2015   2014  

GAAP net income attributable to One Liberty Properties, Inc

  $ 1.05   $ 1.28   $ 1.39   $ 1.22   $ 1.37  

Add: depreciation and amortization of properties

    1.24     1.12     1.02     .98     .90  

Add: our share of depreciation and amortization of unconsolidated joint ventures

    .04     .05     .05     .04     .02  

Add: impairment loss

        .01             .07  

Add: amortization of deferred leasing costs

    .02     .02     .02     .02     .01  

Add: Federal excise tax relating to gain on sale

                .01     .02  

Deduct: gain on sale of real estate

    (.27 )   (.53 )   (.57 )   (.32 )   (.63 )

Deduct: purchase price fair value adjustment

                (.06 )    

Deduct: equity in earnings from sale of unconsolidated joint venture properties

    (.10 )                

Adjustments for non-controlling interests

    .04     (.01 )   (.01 )   .08     (.01 )

NAREIT funds from operations per share of common stock

    2.02     1.94     1.90     1.97     1.75  

Deduct: straight-line rent accruals and amortization of lease intangibles

    (.07 )   (.07 )   (.16 )   (.10 )   (.10 )

Deduct: our share of straight-line rent accruals and amortization of lease intangibles of unconsolidated joint ventures

    (.03 )                

Deduct: lease termination fee income

    (.02 )           (.17 )   (.08 )

Add: amortization of restricted stock compensation

    .18     .17     .17     .14     .11  

Add: prepayment costs on debt

            .03     .03     .10  

Add: amortization and write-off of deferred financing costs

    .05     .05     .05     .06     .06  

Add: our share of amortization and write-off of deferred financing costs of unconsolidated joint ventures

                     

Adjustments for non-controlling interests

                (.01 )    

Adjusted funds from operations per share of common stock

  $ 2.13   $ 2.09   $ 1.99   $ 1.92   $ 1.84  

Item 7.    Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

Overview

        We are a self-administered and self-managed real estate investment trust. We are focused on acquiring, owning and managing a geographically diversified portfolio of industrial, retail (including furniture stores and supermarkets), restaurant, health and fitness and theater properties, many of which are subject to long-term leases. Most of our leases are "net leases" under which the tenant, directly or indirectly, is responsible for paying the real estate taxes, insurance and ordinary maintenance and repairs of the property. As of December 31, 2018, we own 119 properties and our joint ventures own four properties. These 123 properties are located in 30 states.

        We face a variety of risks and challenges in our business. As more fully described under "Item 1A. Risk Factors", we, among other things, face the possibility we will not be able to acquire accretive properties on acceptable terms, lease our properties on terms favorable to us or at all, our tenants may not be able to pay their rental and other obligations and we may not be able to renew or re-let, on acceptable terms, leases that are expiring or otherwise terminating.

        We seek to manage the risk of our real property portfolio and the related financing arrangements by diversifying among types of properties, industries, locations, tenants, scheduled lease expirations,

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mortgage maturities and lenders, and by seeking to minimize our exposure to interest rate fluctuations. As a result, as of December 31, 2018:

    our 2019 contractual rental income is derived from the following property types: 46.1% from industrial, 36.6% from retail, 4.9% from restaurant, 4.5% from health and fitness, 3.2% from theater and 4.7% from other properties,

    there are no states with properties that account for more than 8.7% of 2019 contractual rental income,

    no tenant accounts for more than 7.0% of 2019 contractual rental income,

    through 2027, there are only two years in which the percentage of our contractual rental income represented by expiring leases exceeds 10% of our 2019 contractual rental income (i.e., 20.4% in 2022 and 11.5% in 2023)—approximately 31.7% of our 2019 contractual rental income is represented by leases expiring in 2028 and thereafter,

    after giving effect to interest rate swap agreements, substantially all of our mortgage debt bears interest at fixed rates,

    until 2022, not more than 6% of our total scheduled principal mortgage payments is due in any year, and

    there are seven different counterparties to our portfolio of interest rate swaps: three counterparties, rated A- or better by a national rating agency, account for 69.9%, or $82.0 million, of the notional value of our swaps; and two counterparties, rated BB or better by a national rating agency, account for 23.0%, or $26.9 million, of the notional value of such swaps.

        We monitor the risk of tenant non-payments through a variety of approaches tailored to the applicable situation. Generally, based on our assessment of the credit risk posed by our tenants, we monitor a tenant's financial condition through one or more of the following actions: reviewing tenant financial statements or other financial information, obtaining other tenant related information, regular contact with tenant's representatives, tenant credit checks and regular management reviews of our tenants. We may sell a property if the tenant's financial condition is unsatisfactory.

        In acquiring properties, we balance an evaluation of the terms of the leases and the credit of the existing tenants with a fundamental analysis of the real estate to be acquired, which analysis takes into account, among other things, the estimated value of the property, local demographics and the ability to re-rent or dispose of the property on favorable terms upon lease expiration or early termination.

        We are sensitive to the risks facing the retail industry as a result of the growth of e-commerce. We are addressing our exposure to the retail industry by seeking to acquire industrial properties that we believe capitalize on e-commerce activities, such as e-commerce distribution and warehousing facilities, and by being especially selective in acquiring retail properties. As a result, retail properties generated 41.9%, 43.3%, and 46.1% of rental income, net, in 2018, 2017, and 2016, respectively, and industrial properties generated 39.1%, 34.1%, and 30.8% of rental income, net, in 2018, 2017, and 2016, respectively.

2018 Highlights

        In 2018:

    our rental income, net, increased by $2.1 million, or 3.1%, from 2017.

    we acquired eight industrial properties for an aggregate purchase price of $79.5 million. The acquired properties account for $5.6 million, or 8.1%, of our 2019 contractual rental income.

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    we sold three properties for a net gain on sale of real estate of $5.3 million. The properties sold accounted for 3.0% and 4.7% of 2018 and 2017 rental income net, respectively.

    unconsolidated joint ventures in which we have 50% equity interest sold a (i) property and (ii) land parcel and a building thereon—our 50% share of the aggregate gains from these sales was $2.1 million, which is included in equity in earnings from sale of unconsolidated joint venture properties.

    we obtained proceeds of $61.7 million from mortgage financings, including $14.7 million of refinanced amounts.

    we raised net proceeds of approximately $3.1 million from the issuance of 126,300 shares of common stock pursuant to our at-the-market equity offering program.

Challenges Facing Certain Tenants and Properties

        We describe below certain risks and uncertainties associated with tenants and properties that are experiencing financial or other challenges.

        In December 2018, PM Management-Round Rock AL, LLC, the tenant at our assisted living facility in Round Rock, Texas, and its parent, Senior Care Centers, LLC, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Northern District of Texas. This property accounted for $353,000, or less than 1.0%, of 2018 rental income (after giving effect to the write-off described below) and $2.2 million, or 3.2%, of 2017 rental income. In 2018, we wrote-off $4.9 million with respect to this property, including a $2.7 million write-off of tenant origination costs to depreciation and amortization expense, and a $1.4 million write-off against rental income of the balance of the tenant's unbilled rent receivable. At December 31, 2018, the net book value and mortgage debt associated with this property were $16.1 million and $13.5 million, respectively. In 2017 and 2018, this tenant paid $2 million and $1.7 million of base rent, respectively, and in 2019, this tenant paid $349,000, representing the base rent owed for January and February 2019. We estimate that the carrying costs (including mortgage interest expense) for this property in 2019 may exceed $1.2 million. Harden Healthcare, LLC and Senior Care Centers, LLC guaranteed the payment and performance of the obligations under this lease. We sued the guarantors but cannot provide any assurance that we will obtain any recovery therefrom. We are seeking a replacement operator licensed to manage this facility (a "Licensed Operator"). If we do not engage such an operator, we may attempt to sell or re-lease the property. Our ability to sell or re-lease this property is constrained by competing facilities in such market and state regulatory requirements mandating that assisted living facilities be operated by a Licensed Operator.

        A multi-family complex, which we refer to as The Vue, which ground leases from us the underlying land located in Beachwood, Ohio, experienced a significant decrease in its operating cash flow in 2018 due to a decrease in the property's occupancy rate. The occupancy rate, which at December 31, 2018 was 72.1%, declined during 2018 due to a casualty loss the impact of which was compounded by competition from recently constructed residential buildings. Accordingly, effective October 1, 2018, (i) we and the owner/operator of The Vue entered into a lease amendment which, among other things, reduced the annual base rent payable in 2019 pursuant to the ground lease to $783,000 (from an annual base rent of $1.6 million in 2018) which increases in stages to approximately $1.3 million beginning April 2021 and (ii) the owner/operator deposited $600,000 in escrow to secure the payment of the rent payable from October 2018 through July 2019. The owner/operator also raised $2 million in equity from its members to support the operations at the property. The Vue accounted for $1.5 million, or 2.2%, of 2017 rental income, $1.4 million, or 2.0%, of 2018 rental income, and accounts for $783,000, or 1.1%, of 2019 contractual rental income. At December 31, 2018 (i) there are no unbilled rent receivables, intangibles or tenant origination costs associated with this property and (ii) the net book value of our land subject to this ground lease is $13.9 million and is subordinate to $67.4 million

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of mortgage debt incurred by the owner/operator. Unlike most of our tenancies, the owner/operator is responsible for the property's current monthly mortgage interest payments of approximately $228,000—the interest only period with respect to such mortgage expires August 2020. See "—Off Balance Sheet Arrangements" and Note 7 to our consolidated financial statements.

        In October 2018, Kmart Corp. filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York. Our Kmart property located in Clemmons, North Carolina, accounted for $601,000 or 0.9%, and $699,000, or 1.0%, of rental income for 2017 and 2018, respectively, and at December 31, 2018, the net book value, intangible lease liability and mortgage debt associated with this property was $5.2 million, $1.0 million and $1.9 million, respectively. There are no tenant origination costs or unbilled rent receivables associated with this property. As of March 13, 2019, the lease has not been rejected and remains in effect. Though the tenant has paid rent through March 2019, no assurance can be given that it will continue to do so. We estimate that in 2019 the carrying costs (including mortgage interest expense) associated with this property are approximately $262,000.

        A retail property located in Crystal Lake, Illinois has been vacant for the past two years. At December 31, 2018, the mortgage debt on the property was $ 1.6 million, and we estimate that in 2019, the carrying costs (including mortgage interest expense) with respect to this property are approximately $239,000.

        We decided, as contemplated by our disclosures earlier in 2018, to pursue a re-development of the Manahawkin Property, which is owned by an unconsolidated joint venture in which we have a 50% equity interest. We estimate that our share of the annual base rent to be generated at this property will be reduced to approximately $1.3 million in 2019 from approximately $1.8 million in 2018 (as adjusted for the write-off of certain accounts receivable and an intangible lease liability) as a result of (i) our re-development efforts, which may necessitate that we relocate or not renew certain tenants and (ii) Kmart, a former anchor tenant at this property which leased 33% of the square footage, vacating the property at lease expiration in November 2018. We believe that during the re-development period, cash flow from the operations at this property will cover the property's carrying costs and debt service obligations. See "—Liquidity and Capital Resources."

        We may be adversely affected if, among other things, (i) any of these tenants reduce, defer, or do not pay the rent payments due us or do not pay the operating expenses of the property for which they are responsible, (ii) if the owner/operator of the The Vue fails to pay required mortgage payments when due, (iii) we sell our interest in any of these properties when they are in distress, (iv) our interests in these properties are foreclosed upon, or (v) we are required to take write-offs (other than those already taken with respect to the assisted living facility or impairment charges with respect to these properties.

Comparison of Years Ended December 31, 2018 and 2017

Revenues

        The following table compares total revenues for the periods indicated:

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
 
 
  Increase
(Decrease)
   
 
(Dollars in thousands)
  2018   2017   % Change  

Rental income, net

  $ 70,298   $ 68,244   $ 2,054     3.0  

Tenant reimbursements

    8,456     7,672     784     10.2  

Lease termination fee

    372         372     n/a  

Total revenues

  $ 79,126   $ 75,916   $ 3,210     4.2  

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        Rental income, net.    The increase is due to:

    $1.6 million from properties acquired in 2017,

    $1.5 million from properties acquired in 2018, and

    $279,000 of a net increase from same store properties (i.e., the properties owned for the entirety of the periods being presented).

      Same store rental income increased on a gross basis by $2.3 million in 2018—the components of the increase are:

      $804,000 from the non-cash write-off to rental income of a lease intangible liability in connection with the Savers' Buyout described in "Lease termination fee" below,

      $724,000 of rental income from two properties that were vacant for all or a portion of 2017,

      $613,000 from two properties (i.e., L-3—Hauppauge, New York and Huttig—Saco, Maine) which were improved and/or expanded, and

      $115,000 from an increase in the rental rate payable at our Wheaton, IL property.

      The gross increase in rental income at same store properties was offset by $2.0 million due to:

      with respect to the assisted living facility, the (i) $1.4 million write-off against rental income representing the balance of the unbilled rent receivable and (ii) $344,000 write-off of November and December 2018 rent,

      the $141,000 decrease in percentage rent, and

      the $114,000 rent reduction at The Vue.

        Offsetting the increase in rental income, net, are decreases of:

    $1.1 million representing the 2017 rental income from properties sold during 2018, and

    $328,000 representing the 2017 rental income from properties sold during 2017.

        We estimate that rental income in 2019 from the properties acquired in 2018 will be approximately $6.4 million.

        Tenant reimbursements.    Real estate tax and operating expense reimbursements increased due to reimbursements of approximately $399,000 and $186,000 from properties acquired in 2017 and 2018, respectively. Reimbursements at same store properties increased by $481,000. Tenant reimbursements generally relate to real estate expenses incurred in the same period. The increase in reimbursements was offset by $282,000 from the sale of our Fort Bend, Texas property.

        Lease termination fee.    In 2018, we received a lease termination fee of $372,000 in connection with the buyout of the lease with Savers for a retail property located in Colorado, which we refer to as the "Savers' Buyout", and re-leased the property simultaneously with the lease termination. There was no such fee in 2017.

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Operating Expenses

        The following table compares operating expenses for the periods indicated:

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
 
 
  Increase
(Decrease)
   
 
(Dollars in thousands)
  2018   2017   % Change  

Operating expenses:

                         

Depreciation and amortization

  $ 24,155   $ 20,993   $ 3,162     15.1  

General and administrative

    11,937     11,279     658     5.8  

Real estate expenses

    11,288     10,736     552     5.1  

Federal excise and state taxes

    370     481     (111 )   (23.1 )

Leasehold rent

    308     308          

Impairment loss

        153     (153 )   (100.0 )

Total operating expenses

  $ 48,058   $ 43,950   $ 4,108     9.3  

        Depreciation and amortization.    The increase is due primarily to increases of:

    $3.2 million write-off of tenant origination costs in connection with the assisted living facility ($2.7 million) and Saver's Buyout ($430,000),

    $1.2 million depreciation and amortization expense on the properties acquired in 2018 and 2017 (including $498,000 from properties acquired in 2018), and

    $309,000 from improvements at several properties.

        The increase was offset by $1.1 million due to the sales of properties in 2018 and 2017 (including $189,000 from properties sold in 2018) and the inclusion, in 2017, of a $219,000 write-off of tenant origination costs at a vacant property formerly tenanted by hhgregg—Crystal Lake, Illinois.

        We estimate that in 2019, depreciation and amortization from the properties acquired in 2018 will be approximately $2.4 million. This expense for these properties in 2018 was $498,000.

        General and administrative.    The increase is due primarily to increases of:

    $314,000 in non-cash compensation expense related to the restricted stock units awarded in 2018 and 2017;

    $229,000 in non-cash compensation expense due to the increase in the number, and higher fair value, of the shares of restricted stock granted in 2018 in comparison to the awards granted in 2013; and

    $220,000 in compensation expense primarily due to higher compensation levels.

        The increase was offset by the inclusion in 2017 of $166,000 of non-cash expense related to the accelerated vesting of restricted stock awards due to the retirement of a non-management director.

        Real estate expenses.    The increase is due primarily to increases of:

    $836,000 from several same store properties—a substantial portion of these expenses are rebilled to tenants and included in Tenant reimbursements,

    $553,000 from properties acquired in 2018 and 2017 (including $191,000 from properties acquired in 2018), and

    $380,000 related to our assisted living facility (including $330,000 of 2018 real estate taxes the tenant was scheduled to pay in early 2019).

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        The increase was offset by:

    a $606,000 decrease related to properties sold during 2018 and 2017 (including $269,000 from properties sold in 2018),

    the inclusion in the 2017 period of $426,000 for two vacant properties that were re-tenanted subsequent to September 30, 2017, and

    the inclusion in the 2017 period of $185,000 litigation expense and other professional fees related to a property.

        Impairment loss.    In 2017, we recorded an impairment loss of $153,000 with respect to our property formerly tenanted by Joe's Crab Shack, which was sold in November 2017. There was no similar loss in 2018.

Gain on sale of real estate, net

        The following table compares gain on sale of real estate, net:

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
 
 
  Increase
(Decrease)
   
 
(Dollars in thousands)
  2018   2017   % Change  

Gain on sale of real estate, net

  $ 5,262   $ 9,837   ($ 4,575 )   (46.5 )

        The gain in 2018 was realized from the sales of our Fort Bend, Texas property (a $2.4 million gain) and Lakemoor, Illinois property (a $4.6 million gain) offset by a $1.7 million loss on the December 2018 sale of the property tenanted by Shopko and located in Lincoln, Nebraska. The gain in 2017 was realized from the sales of the Greenwood Village, Colorado property, the Kohl's property in Kansas City, Missouri, and the former hhgregg property in Niles, Illinois.

Other Income and Expenses

        The following table compares other income and expenses for the periods indicated:

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
 
 
  Increase
(Decrease)
   
 
(Dollars in thousands)
  2018   2017   % Change  

Other income and expenses:

                         

Equity in earnings of unconsolidated joint ventures

  $ 1,304   $ 826   $ 478     57.9  

Equity in earnings from sale of unconsolidated joint venture properties

    2,057         2,057     n/a  

Other income

    720     407     313     76.9  

Interest:

                         

Expense

    (17,862 )   (17,810 )   52     0.3  

Amortization and write-off of deferred financing costs

    (985 )   (977 )   8     0.8  

        Equity in earnings of unconsolidated joint ventures.    The increase is due to a $550,000 write-off of an intangible lease liability in connection with the expiration of the Kmart lease at the Manahawkin Property and $110,000 from the termination of an interest rate derivative in connection with the July 31, 2018 sale of a property in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The Milwaukee, Wisconsin property contributed $287,000 and $316,000 in 2018 and 2017, respectively, to equity in income of unconsolidated joint ventures.

        Equity in earnings from sale of unconsolidated joint venture properties.    The results for 2018 include a $2.0 million gain from the sale of the Milwaukee, Wisconsin property.

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        Other income.    Other income in 2018 includes $395,000 from the early termination of an interest rate derivative in connection with a refinancing transaction and a non-recurring $298,000 consulting fee. Other income in 2017 includes $243,000 paid to us by a former tenant in connection with the resolution of a dispute and $74,000 that we received for easements on a property sold in 2017.

        Interest expense.    The following table summarizes interest expense for the periods indicated:

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
 
 
  Increase
(Decrease)
   
 
(Dollars in thousands)
  2018   2017   % Change  

Interest expense:

                         

Credit facility interest

  $ 668   $ 478   $ 190     39.7  

Mortgage interest

    17,194     17,332     (138 )   (0.8 )

Total

  $ 17,862   $ 17,810   $ 52     0.3  

    Credit facility interest

        The increase in 2018 is due to the $3.1 million increase in the weighted average balance outstanding under the facility and a 86 basis point increase in the weighted average interest rate (from 2.87% to 3.73%) due to the increase in the one month LIBOR rate.

    Mortgage interest

        The following table reflects the average interest rate on the average principal amount of outstanding mortgage debt during the applicable year:

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
 
 
  Increase
(Decrease)
   
 
(Dollars in thousands)
  2018   2017   % Change  

Average interest rate on mortgage debt

    4.26 %   4.31 %   (0.05 )   (1.2 )

Average principal amount of mortgage debt

  $ 404,035   $ 399,086   $ 4,949     1.2  

        In 2018, we financed (including financings effectuated in connection with acquisitions) or refinanced $61.7 million of gross mortgage debt (including $14.7 million of refinanced amounts) with an average interest rate of approximately 4.4%. Mortgage interest expense in 2017 includes $118,000 related to the payoff of a mortgage and early termination of the related interest rate derivative in connection with the July 2017 sale of the Kohl's—Kansas City, Missouri property.

        We estimate that in 2019, the mortgage interest expense associated with the properties acquired in 2018 will be approximately $701,000 for the three of the eight acquired properties that at December 31, 2018, had mortgage debt. Interest expense for these three properties in 2018 was $233,000.

Comparison of Years Ended December 31, 2017 and 2016

Revenues

        The following table compares total revenues for the periods indicated:

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
 
 
  Increase
(Decrease)
   
 
(Dollars in thousands)
  2017   2016   % Change  

Rental income, net

  $ 68,244   $ 64,164   $ 4,080     6.4  

Tenant reimbursements

    7,672     6,424     1,248     19.4  

Total revenues

  $ 75,916   $ 70,588   $ 5,328     7.5  

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        Rental income, net.    The increase is due to:

    $5.2 million from properties acquired in 2016,

    $1.6 million from properties acquired in 2017,

    $267,000 of rental income from a tenant whose lease commenced April 1, 2016 at our Joppa, Maryland property, and

    $201,000 of annual percentage rent income received from three tenants.

        Offsetting the increases are decreases of:

    $1.2 million representing the 2016 rental income from properties sold during 2016,

    $1.3 million representing the 2016 rental income from properties sold during 2017,

    $496,000 representing the 2016 rental income from a property formerly tenanted by Quality Bakery, which lease expired November 2016, and is now re-tenanted, and

    $277,000 relating to a property formerly tenanted by hhgregg (that is vacant) and a property formerly tenanted by Payless ShoeSource (that has re-leased).

        Tenant reimbursements.    Real estate tax and operating expense reimbursements increased due primarily to reimbursements of approximately $855,000 and $377,000 from properties acquired in 2016 and 2017, respectively. Tenant reimbursements generally relate to real estate expenses incurred in the same period.

Operating Expenses

        The following table compares operating expenses for the periods indicated:

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
 
 
  Increase
(Decrease)
   
 
(Dollars in thousands)
  2017   2016   % Change  

Operating expenses:

                         

Depreciation and amortization

  $ 20,993   $ 18,164   $ 2,829     15.6  

General and administrative

    11,279     10,693     586     5.5  

Real estate expenses

    10,736     8,931     1,805     20.2  

Real estate acquisition costs

        596     (596 )   (100.0 )

Federal excise and state taxes

    481     203     278     136.9  

Leasehold rent

    308     308          

Impairment loss

    153         153     n/a  

Total operating expenses

  $ 43,950   $ 38,895   $ 5,055     13.0  

        Depreciation and amortization.    The increase is due primarily to increases of: (i) $1.6 million and $761,000 of depreciation and amortization expense on the properties acquired in 2016 and 2017, respectively, and (ii) an aggregate $884,000 of write-offs of tenant origination costs related to the hhgregg and Joe's Crab Shack properties. The increase was offset by $433,000 due to the sales of properties in 2016 and 2017.

        General and administrative.    The increase is due primarily to increases of: (i) $278,000 in compensation expense primarily due to higher compensation levels; (ii) $166,000 in non-cash compensation expense related to the accelerated vesting of restricted stock due to the retirement of a non-management director; and (iii) $142,000 of miscellaneous expenses.

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        Real estate expenses.    The increase is due primarily to an increase of $1.3 million from properties acquired in 2016 and 2017; substantially all these expenses are rebilled to tenants and are included in Tenant reimbursements. Also contributing to the increase are: (i) $435,000 related to properties formerly tenanted by Quality Bakery and hhgregg-Crystal Lake, Illinois; and (ii) $245,000 related to the hhgregg-Niles, Illinois property that we sold. The increase was offset by a decrease of $197,000 of expenses related to the vacant property formerly tenanted by Sports Authority, which was sold in May 2017.

        Real estate acquisition costs.    The expense in 2016 primarily relates to properties purchased that year. As a result of the adoption of ASU 2017-01 in January 2017, asset acquisition costs of $387,000 in 2017 were capitalized to the related real estate assets.

        Federal excise and state taxes.    The increase primarily relates to an annual state franchise tax resulting from the 2016 and 2017 purchase of two properties located in Tennessee.

        Impairment loss.    In 2017, we recorded an impairment loss of $153,000 with respect to our property formerly tenanted by Joe's Crab Shack, which was sold in November 2017. There was no similar loss in the prior year.

Gain on sale of real estate, net

        The following table compares gain on sale of real estate, net:

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
 
 
  Increase
(Decrease)
   
 
(Dollars in thousands)
  2017   2016   % Change  

Gain on sale of real estate, net

  $ 9,837   $ 10,087   $ (250 )   (2.5 )

        The gain in 2017 was realized from the sales of the Greenwood Village, Colorado property, the Kohl's property in Kansas City, Missouri, and the former hhgregg property in Niles, Illinois.

Other Income and Expenses

        The following table compares other income and expenses for the periods indicated:

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
 
 
  Increase
(Decrease)
   
 
(Dollars in thousands)
  2017   2016   % Change  

Other income and expenses:

                         

Equity in earnings of unconsolidated joint ventures

  $ 826   $ 1,005   $ (179 )   (17.8 )

Prepayment costs on debt

        (577 )   (577 )   (100.0 )

Other income

    407     435     (28 )   (6.4 )

Interest:

                         

Expense

    (17,810 )   (17,258 )   552     3.2  

Amortization and write-off of deferred financing costs

    (977 )   (904 )   73     8.1  

        Equity in earnings of unconsolidated joint ventures.    The 2016 income includes our 50% share, or $146,000, of income obtained for permanent utility easements granted at two properties. There was no such income during 2017.

        Prepayment costs on debt.    These costs were incurred in connection with the property sales and the payoff, prior to the stated maturity, of the related mortgage debt in 2016, primarily relating to the sales of several properties.

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        Other income.    Other income in 2017 includes $243,000 paid to us by a former tenant in connection with the resolution of a dispute and $74,000 that we received for easements on a property sold in 2017. Other income in 2016 includes $356,000 that we received for such easements.

        Interest expense.    The following table summarizes interest expense for the periods indicated:

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
 
 
  Increase
(Decrease)
   
 
(Dollars in thousands)
  2017   2016   % Change  

Interest expense:

                         

Credit facility interest

  $ 478   $ 590   $ (112 )   (19.0 )

Mortgage interest

    17,332     16,668     664     4.0  

Total

  $ 17,810   $ 17,258   $ 552     3.2  

    Credit facility interest

        The decrease in 2017 is due to the $11.2 million decrease in the weighted average balance outstanding under our line of credit. The decrease was offset by an increase of 64 basis points in the weighted average interest rate due to the increase in the one month LIBOR rate and an increase of $81,000 in the unused facility fee primarily resulting from the $25.0 million increase in our borrowing capacity under the facility.

    Mortgage interest

        The following table reflects the average interest rate on the average principal amount of outstanding mortgage debt during the applicable year:

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
 
 
  Increase
(Decrease)
   
 
(Dollars in thousands)
  2017   2016   % Change  

Average interest rate on mortgage debt

    4.31 %   4.61 %   (.30 )%   (6.5 )

Average principal amount of mortgage debt

  $ 399,086   $ 361,645   $ 37,441     10.4  

        The increase is due primarily to the increase in the average principal amount of mortgage debt outstanding, offset by a decrease in the average interest rate on outstanding mortgage debt. The increase in the average balance outstanding is due substantially to mortgage debt of $72.9 million incurred in connection with properties acquired in 2016 and 2017 and the financing or refinancing of $51.5 million of mortgage debt, net of refinanced amounts, in connection with properties acquired prior to 2016. The decrease in the average interest rate is due to the financing (including financings effectuated in connection with acquisitions) or refinancing in 2017 and 2016 of $158.8 million of gross mortgage debt (including $34.4 million of refinanced amounts) with an average interest rate of approximately 3.7%.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

        Our sources of liquidity and capital include cash flow from operations, cash and cash equivalents, borrowings under our revolving credit facility, refinancing existing mortgage loans, obtaining mortgage loans secured by our unencumbered properties, issuance of our equity securities and property sales. In 2018, we obtained $47.1 million of proceeds from mortgage financings, net of $14.7 million of refinanced amounts, and $3.1 million of net proceeds from the sale of our common stock pursuant to our at-the-market equity offering program. Our available liquidity at March 8, 2019 was approximately $94.7 million, including approximately $7.2 million of cash and cash equivalents (net of the credit

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facility's required $3.0 million deposit maintenance balance) and, subject to borrowing base requirements, up to $87.5 million available under our revolving credit facility.

    Liquidity and Financing

        We expect to meet our (i) operating cash requirements (including debt service and anticipated dividend payments) principally from cash flow from operations and (ii) remaining capital requirements of $791,000 for building expansion and improvements at our property tenanted by L-3, located in Hauppauge, New York, from cash flow from operations, our available cash and cash equivalents, proceeds from the sale of our common stock and, to the extent permitted, our credit facility. We and our joint venture partner are also pursuing a significant re-development of the Manahawkin Property—we estimate that our share of the capital expenditures required in connection with such re-development will range from $10 million to $15 million and anticipate that such expenditures will be funded from the foregoing sources.

        The following table sets forth, as of December 31, 2018, information with respect to our mortgage debt that is payable from January 2019 through December 31, 2021 (excluding the mortgage debt of our unconsolidated joint ventures):

(Dollars in thousands)
  2019   2020   2021   Total  

Amortization payments

  $ 12,484   $ 13,777   $ 14,241   $ 40,502  

Principal due at maturity

    3,485         8,463     11,948  

Total

  $ 15,969   $ 13,777   $ 22,704   $ 52,450  

        At December 31, 2018, an unconsolidated joint venture had a first mortgage on its property (i.e., the Manahawkin Property) with an outstanding balance approximately $23.9 million, bearing interest at 4% per annum and maturing in July 2025.

        We intend to make debt amortization payments from operating cash flow and, though no assurance can be given that we will be successful in this regard, generally intend to refinance, extend or payoff the mortgage loans which mature in 2019 through 2021. We intend to repay the amounts not refinanced or extended from our existing funds and sources of funds, including our available cash, proceeds from the sale of our common stock and our credit facility (to the extent available).

        We continually seek to refinance existing mortgage loans on terms we deem acceptable to generate additional liquidity. Additionally, in the normal course of our business, we sell properties when we determine that it is in our best interests, which also generates additional liquidity. Further, since each of our encumbered properties is subject to a non-recourse mortgage (with standard carve-outs), if our in-house evaluation of the market value of such property is less than the principal balance outstanding on the mortgage loan, we may determine to convey, in certain circumstances, such property to the mortgagee in order to terminate our mortgage obligations, including payment of interest, principal and real estate taxes, with respect to such property.

        Typically, we utilize funds from our credit facility to acquire a property and, thereafter secure long-term, fixed rate mortgage debt on such property. We apply the proceeds from the mortgage loan to repay borrowings under the credit facility, thus providing us with the ability to re-borrow under the credit facility for the acquisition of additional properties.

    Credit Facility

        Subject to borrowing base requirements, we can borrow up to $100.0 million pursuant to our revolving credit facility which is available to us for the acquisition of commercial real estate, repayment of mortgage debt, property improvements and general working capital purposes; provided, that if used

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for property improvements and working capital purposes, the amount outstanding for such purposes will not exceed the lesser of $15.0 million and 15% of the borrowing base and if used for working capital purposes, will not exceed $10.0 million. The facility matures December 31, 2019 and bears interest equal to the one month LIBOR rate plus the applicable margin. The applicable margin ranges from 175 basis points if our ratio of total debt to total value (as calculated pursuant to the facility) is equal to or less than 50%, increasing to a maximum of 300 basis points if such ratio is greater than 65%. The applicable margin was 175 basis points for 2017 and 2018. There is an unused facility fee of 0.25% per annum on the difference between the outstanding loan balance and $100.0 million. The credit facility requires the maintenance of $3.0 million in average deposit balances. For 2018, the weighted average interest rate on the facility was approximately 3.73% and as of March 11, 2019, the rate on the facility was 4.24%.

        The terms of our revolving credit facility include certain restrictions and covenants which limit, among other things, the incurrence of liens, and which require compliance with financial ratios relating to, among other things, the minimum amount of tangible net worth, the minimum amount of debt service coverage, the minimum amount of fixed charge coverage, the maximum amount of debt to value, the minimum level of net income, certain investment limitations and the minimum value of unencumbered properties and the number of such properties. Net proceeds received from the sale, financing or refinancing of properties are generally required to be used to repay amounts outstanding under our credit facility. At December 31, 2018, we were in compliance in all material respects with the covenants under this facility.

Contractual Obligations

        The following sets forth our contractual obligations as of December 31, 2018:

 
  Payment due by period  
(Dollars in thousands)
  Less than
1 Year
  1 - 3 Years   4 - 5 Years   More than
5 Years
  Total  

Contractual Obligations

                               

Mortgages payable—interest and amortization

  $ 30,629   $ 61,840   $ 55,379   $ 119,634   $ 267,482  

Mortgages payable—balances due at maturity

    3,485     8,463     59,729     209,648     281,325  

Credit facility(1)

    30,000                 30,000  

Purchase obligations(2)

    4,228     6,136     5,966         16,330  

Total

  $ 68,342   $ 76,439   $ 121,074   $ 329,282   $ 595,137  

(1)
Represents the amount outstanding at December 31, 2018. We may borrow up to $100.0 million under such facility. The facility expires December 31, 2019.

(2)
Assumes that (i) $3.0 million will be payable annually during the next five years pursuant to the compensation and services agreement and (ii) $791,000 will be spent in 2019 with respect to the remaining contractually required building expansion and tenant improvements at the L-3, Hauppauge, New York property. Excludes an estimated $10 million to $15 million anticipated to be expended in connection with the re-development of the Manahawkin Property, which we expect will be completed in stages through 2022.

        As of December 31, 2018, we had $423 million of mortgage debt outstanding (excluding mortgage indebtedness of our unconsolidated joint ventures), all of which is non-recourse (subject to standard carve-outs). We expect that mortgage interest and amortization payments (excluding repayments of principal at maturity) of approximately $92.5 million due through 2021 will be paid primarily from cash generated from our operations. We anticipate that principal balances due at maturity through 2021 of $11.9 million will be paid primarily from cash and cash equivalents and mortgage financings and

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refinancings. If we are unsuccessful in refinancing our existing indebtedness or financing our unencumbered properties, our cash flow, funds available under our credit facility and available cash, if any, may not be sufficient to repay all debt obligations when payments become due, and we may need to issue additional equity, obtain long or short-term debt, or dispose of properties on unfavorable terms.

    Cash Distribution Policy

        We have elected to be taxed as a REIT under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. Accordingly, to qualify as a REIT, we must, among other things, meet a number of organizational and operational requirements, including a requirement that we distribute currently at least 90% of our ordinary taxable income to our stockholders. It is our current intention to comply with these requirements and maintain our REIT status. As a REIT, we generally will not be subject to corporate federal, state or local income taxes on taxable income we distribute currently (in accordance with the Internal Revenue Code and applicable regulations) to our stockholders. If we fail to qualify as a REIT in any taxable year, we will be subject to federal, state and local income taxes at regular corporate rates and may not be able to qualify as a REIT for four subsequent tax years. Even if we qualify for federal taxation as a REIT, we may be subject to certain state and local taxes on our income and to federal income taxes on our undistributed taxable income (i.e., taxable income not distributed in the amounts and in the time frames prescribed by the Internal Revenue Code and applicable regulations thereunder) and are subject to Federal excise taxes on our undistributed taxable income.

        It is our intention to pay to our stockholders within the time periods prescribed by the Internal Revenue Code no less than 90%, and, if possible, 100% of our annual taxable income, including taxable gains from the sale of real estate. It will continue to be our policy to make sufficient distributions to stockholders in order for us to maintain our REIT status under the Internal Revenue Code.

        Our board of directors reviews the dividend policy regularly to determine if any changes to our dividend should be made.

    Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

        We are not a party to any off-balance sheet arrangements other than with respect to land parcels owned by us and located in Wheaton, Illinois and Beachwood, Ohio. These parcels are improved by multi-family complexes and we ground leased the parcels to the owner/operators of such complexes. These ground leases generated $2.6 million of rental income, net, during 2018, excluding $800,000 generated from our Lakemoor, Illinois property which was sold in September 2018. At December 31, 2018, our maximum exposure to loss with respect to these properties is $24.4 million, representing the carrying value of the land; our leasehold positions are subordinate to an aggregate of $106.9 million of mortgage debt incurred by our tenants, the owner/operators of the multi-family complexes. These owner/operators are affiliated with one another. We do not believe that this type of off-balance sheet arrangement has been or will be material to our liquidity and capital resource positions. See Notes 5 and 7 to our consolidated financial statements for additional information regarding these arrangements.

    Critical Accounting Policies

        Our significant accounting policies are more fully described in Note 2 to our consolidated financial statements. Certain of our accounting policies are particularly important to an understanding of our financial position and results of operations and require the application of significant judgment by our management; as a result they are subject to a degree of uncertainty. These critical accounting policies include the following, discussed below.

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    Purchase Accounting for Acquisition of Real Estate

        The fair value of real estate acquired is allocated to acquired tangible assets, consisting of land and building, and identified intangible assets and liabilities, consisting of the value of above-market and below-market leases and other value of in-place leases based in each case on their fair values. The fair value of the tangible assets of an acquired property (which includes land, building and building improvements) is determined by valuing the property as if it were vacant, and the "as-if-vacant" value is then allocated to land, building and building improvements based on our determination of relative fair values of these assets. We assess fair value of the lease intangibles based on estimated cash flow projections that utilize appropriate discount rates and available market information. The fair values associated with below-market rental renewal options are determined based on our experience and the relevant facts and circumstances that existed at the time of the acquisitions. The portion of the values of the leases associated with below-market renewal options that we deem likely to be exercised are amortized to rental income over the respective renewal periods. The allocation made by us may have a positive or negative effect on net income and may have an effect on the assets and liabilities on the balance sheet.

    Revenues

        Our revenues, which are substantially derived from rental income, include rental income that our tenants pay in accordance with the terms of their respective leases reported on a straight-line basis over the non-cancellable term of each lease. Since many of our leases provide for rental increases at specified intervals, straight-line basis accounting requires us to record as an asset and include in revenues, unbilled rent receivables which we will only receive if the tenant makes all rent payments required through the expiration of the term of the lease. Accordingly, our management must determine, in its judgment, that the unbilled rent receivable applicable to each specific tenant is collectible. We review unbilled rent receivables on a quarterly basis and take into consideration the tenant's payment history and the financial condition of the tenant. In the event that the collectability of an unbilled rent receivable is in doubt, we are required to take a reserve against the receivable or a direct write-off of the receivable, which has an adverse effect on net income for the year in which the reserve or direct write-off is taken, and will decrease total assets and stockholders' equity.

    Carrying Value of Real Estate Portfolio

        We review our real estate portfolio on a quarterly basis to ascertain if there are any indicators of impairment to the value of any of our real estate assets, including deferred costs and intangibles, to determine if there is any need for an impairment charge. In reviewing the portfolio, we examine the type of asset, the current financial statements or other available financial information of the tenant, the economic situation in the area in which the asset is located, the economic situation in the industry in which the tenant is involved and the timeliness of the payments made by the tenant under its lease, as well as any current correspondence that may have been had with the tenant, including property inspection reports. For each real estate asset owned for which indicators of impairment exist, we perform a recoverability test by comparing the sum of the estimated undiscounted future cash flows attributable to the asset to its carrying amount. If the undiscounted cash flows are less than the asset's carrying amount, an impairment loss is recorded to the extent that the estimated fair value is less than the asset's carrying amount. The estimated fair value is determined using a discounted cash flow model of the expected future cash flows through the useful life of the property. Real estate assets that are expected to be disposed of are valued at the lower of carrying amount or fair value less costs to sell on an individual asset basis. We generally do not obtain any independent appraisals in determining value but rely on our own analysis and valuations. Any impairment charge taken with respect to any part of our real estate portfolio will reduce our net income and reduce assets and stockholders' equity to the

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extent of the amount of any impairment charge, but it will not affect our cash flow or our distributions until such time as we dispose of the property.

Item 7A.    Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.

        Our primary market risk exposure is the effect of changes in interest rates on the interest cost of draws on our revolving variable rate credit facility and the effect of changes in the fair value of our interest rate swap agreements. Interest rates are highly sensitive to many factors, including governmental monetary and tax policies, domestic and international economic and political considerations and other factors beyond our control.

        We use interest rate swaps to limit interest rate risk on variable rate mortgages. These swaps are used for hedging purposes-not for speculation. We do not enter into interest rate swaps for trading purposes. At December 31, 2018, our aggregate liability in the event of the early termination of our swaps was $554,000.

        At December 31, 2018, we had 27 interest rate swap agreements outstanding. The fair market value of the interest rate swaps is dependent upon existing market interest rates and swap spreads, which change over time. As of December 31, 2018, if there had been an increase of 100 basis points in forward interest rates, the fair market value of the interest rate swaps would have increased by approximately $5.3 million and the net unrealized gain on derivative instruments would have increased by $5.3 million. If there were a decrease of 100 basis points in forward interest rates, the fair market value of the interest rate swaps would have decreased by approximately $5.7 million and the net unrealized gain on derivative instruments would have decreased by $5.7 million. These changes would not have any impact on our net income or cash.

        Our mortgage debt, after giving effect to the interest rate swap agreements, bears interest at fixed rates and accordingly, the effect of changes in interest rates would not impact the amount of interest expense that we incur under these mortgages.

        Our variable rate credit facility is sensitive to interest rate changes. At December 31, 2018, a 100 basis point increase of the interest rate on this facility would increase our related interest costs by approximately $300,000 per year and a 100 basis point decrease of the interest rate would decrease our related interest costs by approximately $300,000 per year.

        The fair market value of our long-term debt is estimated based on discounting future cash flows at interest rates that our management believes reflect the risks associated with long term debt of similar risk and duration.

        The following table sets forth our debt obligations by scheduled principal cash flow payments and maturity date, weighted average interest rates and estimated fair market value at December 31, 2018:

 
  For the Year Ended December 31,  
(Dollars in thousands)
  2019   2020   2021   2022   2023   Thereafter   Total   Fair
Market
Value
 

Fixed rate:

                                                 

Long-term debt

  $ 15,969   $ 13,777   $ 22,704   $ 45,823   $ 40,952   $ 283,871   $ 423,096   $ 420,396  

Weighted average interest rate

    4.27 %   4.38 %   4.29 %   4.07 %   4.66 %   4.22 %   4.26 %   4.41 %

Variable rate:

                                                 

Long-term debt(1)

  $ 30,000                       $ 30,000      

(1)
Our credit facility matures on December 31, 2019 and bears interest at the 30 day LIBOR rate plus the applicable margin. The applicable margin varies based on the ratio of total debt to total

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    value. See "Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Conditions and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources—Credit Facility."

Item 8.    Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.

        This information appears in Item 15(a) of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and is incorporated into this Item 8 by reference thereto.

Item 9.    Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure.

        Not applicable.

Item 9A.    Controls and Procedures.

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

        A review and evaluation was performed by our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as such term is defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act") as of the end of the period covered by this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Based on that review and evaluation, the CEO and CFO have concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures, as designed and implemented as of December 31, 2018, were effective.

Changes in Internal Controls over Financial Reporting

        There have been no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting, as defined in in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) promulgated under the Exchange Act, that occurred during the three months ended December 31, 2018 that materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal controls over financial reporting.

Management's Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

        Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. Internal control over financial reporting is defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) promulgated under the Exchange Act as a process designed by, or under the supervision of, a company's principal executive and principal financial officers and effected by a company's board, management and other personnel to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with GAAP and includes those policies and procedures that:

    pertain to the maintenance of records that in reasonable detail accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of a company;

    provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with GAAP, and that receipts and expenditures of a company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of a company; and

    provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of a company's assets that could have a material effect on the financial transactions.

        Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the

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risks that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

        Our management, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2018. In making this assessment, our management used criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission in Internal Control—Integrated Framework (2013).

        Based on its assessment, our management concluded that, as of December 31, 2018, our internal control over financial reporting was effective based on those criteria.

        Our independent registered public accounting firm, Ernst & Young LLP, have issued a report on management's assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting. This report appears on page F-2 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Item 9B.    Other Information.

Adoption of 2019 Incentive Plan

        In March 2019, our board of directors adopted, subject to stockholder approval, the 2019 Incentive Plan. This plan permits us to grant: (i) stock options, restricted stock, restricted stock units, performance share awards and any one or more of the foregoing, up to a maximum of 750,000 shares; and (ii) cash settled dividend equivalent rights in tandem with the grant of certain awards.

Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

        The following discussion supplements and updates the discussion (the "Prior Discussion") contained in our prospectus dated May 10, 2017 under the heading "Federal Income Tax Considerations" and supersedes the Prior Discussion to the extent the discussion below is inconsistent with the Prior Discussion. The Prior Discussion and the discussion below (collectively referred to as the "Tax Discussion") are subject to the qualifications set forth therein and below. The tax treatment of holders of our common stock will vary depending upon the holder's particular situation, and the Tax Discussion addresses only holders that hold securities as a capital asset and does not deal with all aspects of taxation that may be relevant to particular holders in light of their personal investment or tax circumstances. The Tax Discussion also does not deal with all aspects of taxation that may be relevant to certain types of holders, to which special provisions of the federal income tax laws apply, including:

    dealers in securities or currencies;

    traders in securities that elect to use a mark-to-market method of accounting for their securities holdings;

    banks and other financial institutions;

    tax-exempt organizations;

    certain insurance companies;

    persons liable for the alternative minimum tax;

    persons that hold securities as a hedge against interest rate or currency risks or as part of a straddle or conversion transaction;

    non-U.S. individuals and foreign corporations; and

    holders whose functional currency is not the U.S. dollar.

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        The statements in the Tax Discussion are based on the Code, its legislative history, current and proposed regulations under the Code, published rulings and court decisions. This summary describes the provisions of these sources of law only as they are currently in effect. All of these sources of law may change at any time, and any change in the law may apply retroactively. We cannot assure you that new laws, interpretations of law or court decisions, any of which may take effect retroactively, will not cause any statement in this discussion to be inaccurate.

        As supplemented and updated by this summary, and by the discussion in any applicable prospectus supplement, investors should review the discussion in the prospectus under the heading "Federal Income Tax Considerations" for a more detailed summary of the federal income tax consequences of the purchase, ownership, and disposition of our securities and our election to be subject to federal income tax as a REIT.

        PROSPECTIVE INVESTORS SHOULD CONSULT THEIR TAX ADVISORS REGARDING THE U.S. FEDERAL, STATE, LOCAL, FOREIGN AND OTHER TAX CONSEQUENCES OF THE ACQUISITION, OWNERSHIP, AND DISPOSITION OF OUR SECURITIES.

Enactment of Tax Act

        On December 22, 2017, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which we refer to as the "Tax Act", was enacted. The Tax Act made major changes to the Code, including a number of provisions of the Code that may affect the taxation of REITs and the holders of their securities. The most significant of these provisions are described below. The individual and collective impact of these changes on REITs and their security holders is uncertain and may not become evident for some period of time. Prospective investors should consult their tax advisors regarding the implications of the Tax Act on their investment.

Revised Individual Tax Rates and Deductions

        The Tax Act adjusted the tax brackets and reduced the top federal income tax rate for individuals from 39.6% to 37%. In addition, numerous deductions were eliminated or limited, including the deduction for state and local taxes being limited to $10,000 per year. These individual income tax changes are generally effective beginning in 2018, but without further legislation, they will sunset after 2025.

Pass-Through Business Income Tax Rate Lowered through Deduction

        Under the Tax Act, individuals, trusts, and estates generally may deduct 20% of "qualified business income" (generally, domestic trade or business income other than certain investment items) of a partnership, S corporation, or sole proprietorship. In addition, "qualified REIT dividends" (i.e., REIT dividends other than capital gain dividends and portions of REIT dividends designated as qualified dividend income eligible for capital gain tax rates) and certain other income items are eligible for the deduction. The deduction, however, is subject to complex limitations to its availability. As with the other individual income tax changes, the provisions related to the deduction are effective beginning in 2018, but without further legislation, they will sunset after 2025.

Graduated Corporate Tax Rates Replaced With Single Rate; Elimination of Corporate Alternative Minimum Tax

        The Tax Act eliminated graduated corporate income tax rates with a maximum rate of 35% and replaced them with a single corporate income tax rate of 21%, and reduced the dividends received deduction for certain corporate subsidiaries. The 21% rate may also apply to (i) our net income for any taxable period in which we fail to qualify as a REIT, or (ii) our net income from nonqualifying assets during a period in which we fail to satisfy the REIT asset test but otherwise qualify as a REIT. The Tax

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Act also permanently eliminated the corporate alternative minimum tax. These provisions are effective beginning in 2018.

Net Operating Loss Modifications

        The Tax Act limited the net operating loss ("NOL") deduction to 80% of taxable income (before the deduction). The Tax Act also generally eliminated NOL carrybacks for individuals and non-REIT corporations (NOL carrybacks did not apply to REITs under prior law) but allows indefinite NOL carryforwards. The new NOL rules apply beginning in 2018.

Limitations on Interest Deductibility

        The Tax Act limits the net interest expense deduction of a business to 30% of the sum of adjusted taxable income, business interest, and certain other amounts. The Tax Act allows a real property trade or business to elect out of such limitation so long as it uses the alternative depreciation system which lengthens the depreciation recovery period with respect to certain property. The limitation with respect to the net interest expense deduction applies beginning in 2018.

Withholding Rate Reduced

        The Tax Act reduced the highest rate of withholding with respect to distributions to non-U.S. holders that are treated as attributable to gains from the sale or exchange of U.S. real property interests from 35% to 21%. These provisions are effective beginning in 2018.

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PART III

Item 10.    Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance.

        Apart from certain information concerning our executive officers which is set forth in Part I of this Annual Report, additional information required by this Item 10 shall be included in our proxy statement for our 2019 annual meeting of stockholders, to be filed with the SEC not later than April 30, 2019, and is incorporated herein by reference.

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

        Set forth below is a list of our executive officers whose terms expire at our 2019 annual board of directors' meeting. The business history of our officers, who are also directors, will be provided in our proxy statement to be filed pursuant to Regulation 14A not later than April 30, 2019.

NAME
  AGE   POSITION WITH THE COMPANY
Matthew J. Gould*     59   Chairman of the Board
Fredric H. Gould*     83   Vice Chairman of the Board
Patrick J. Callan, Jr.      56   President, Chief Executive Officer and Director
Lawrence G. Ricketts, Jr.      42   Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer
Jeffrey A. Gould*     53   Senior Vice President and Director
David W. Kalish**     71   Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Mark H. Lundy     56   Senior Vice President and Secretary
Israel Rosenzweig     71   Senior Vice President
Karen Dunleavy     60   Vice President, Financial
Alysa Block     58   Treasurer
Richard M. Figueroa     51   Vice President and Assistant Secretary
Isaac Kalish**     43   Vice President and Assistant Treasurer
Justin Clair     36   Vice President
Benjamin Bolanos     28   Vice President

*
Matthew J. Gould and Jeffrey A. Gould are Fredric H. Gould's sons.

**
Isaac Kalish is David W. Kalish's son.

        Lawrence G. Ricketts, Jr.    Mr. Ricketts has been our Chief Operating Officer since 2008, Vice President from 1999 through 2006 and Executive Vice President since 2006.

        David W. Kalish.    Mr. Kalish has served as our Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer since 1990 and as Senior Vice President, Finance of BRT Apartments Corp. since 1998. Since 1990, he has served as Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of the managing general partner of Gould Investors L.P., a master limited partnership involved primarily in the ownership and operation of a diversified portfolio of real estate assets. Mr. Kalish is a certified public accountant.

        Mark H. Lundy.    Mr. Lundy has served as our Secretary since 1993, as our Vice President since 2000 and as our Senior Vice President since 2006. Mr. Lundy has been a Vice President of BRT Apartments Corp. from 1993 to 2006, its Senior Vice President since 2006, a Vice President of the managing general partner of Gould Investors from 1990 through 2012 and its President and Chief Operating Officer since 2013. He is an attorney admitted to practice in New York and the District of Columbia.

        Israel Rosenzweig.    Mr. Rosenzweig has served as our Senior Vice President since 1997, as Chairman of the Board of Directors of BRT Apartments Corp. since 2013, as Vice Chairman of its

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Board of Directors from 2012 through 2013, and as its Senior Vice President from 1998 through 2012. He has been a Vice President of the managing general partner of Gould Investors since 1997.

        Karen Dunleavy.    Ms. Dunleavy has been our Vice President, Financial since 1994. She served as Treasurer of the managing general partner of Gould Investors from 1986 through 2013. Ms. Dunleavy is a certified public accountant.

        Alysa Block.    Ms. Block has been our Treasurer since 2007, and served as Assistant Treasurer from 1997 to 2007. Ms. Block has also served as the Treasurer of BRT Apartments Corp. from 2008 through 2013, and served as its Assistant Treasurer from 1997 to 2008.

        Richard M. Figueroa.    Mr. Figueroa has served as our Vice President and Assistant Secretary since 2001, as Vice President and Assistant Secretary of BRT Apartments Corp. since 2002 and as Vice President of the managing general partner of Gould Investors since 1999. Mr. Figueroa is an attorney admitted to practice in New York.

        Isaac Kalish.    Mr. Kalish has served as our Vice President since 2013, Assistant Treasurer since 2007, as Assistant Treasurer of the managing general partner of Gould Investors from 2012 through 2013, as Treasurer from 2013, as Vice President and Treasurer of BRT Apartments Corp. since 2013, and as its Assistant Treasurer from 2009 through 2013. Mr. Kalish is a certified public accountant.

        Justin Clair.    Mr. Clair has been employed by us since 2006, served as Assistant Vice President from 2010 through 2014 and as Vice President since 2014.

        Benjamin Bolanos.    Mr. Bolanos has been employed by us since 2012 and has served as Vice President since June 2018.

Item 11.    Executive Compensation.

        The information concerning our executive compensation required by this Item 11 shall be included in our proxy statement for our 2019 annual meeting of stockholders, to be filed with the SEC not later than April 30, 2019, and is incorporated herein by reference.

Item 12.    Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters.

        The information concerning our beneficial owners and management required by this Item 12 shall be included in our proxy statement for our 2019 annual meeting of stockholders, to be filed with the SEC not later than April 30, 2019 and is incorporated herein by reference.

Item 13.    Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.

        The information concerning certain relationships, related transactions and director independence required by this Item 13 shall be included in our proxy statement for our 2019 annual meeting of stockholders, to be filed with the SEC not later than April 30, 2019 and is incorporated herein by reference.

Item 14.    Principal Accountant Fees and Services.

        The information concerning our principal accounting fees required by this Item 14 shall be included in our proxy statement for our 2019 annual meeting of stockholders, to be filed with the SEC not later than April 30, 2019 and is incorporated herein by reference.

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PART IV

Item 15.    Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules.

(a)
Documents filed as part of this Report:

(1)
The following financial statements of the Company are included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K:

    (2)
    Financial Statement Schedules:

        All other schedules are omitted because they are not applicable or the required information is shown in the consolidated financial statements or the notes thereto.

(b)
Exhibits:
  1.1   Equity Offering Sales Agreement, dated May 10, 2017 by and between One Liberty Properties, Inc. and Deutsche Bank Securities, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 1.1 to our Current Report on Form 8-K filed on May 10, 2017).

 

3.1

 

Articles of Amendment and Restatement of One Liberty Properties, Inc., dated July 20, 2004 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2004).

 

3.2

 

Articles of Amendment to Restated Articles of Incorporation of One Liberty Properties, Inc. filed with the State of Assessments and Taxation of Maryland on June 17, 2005 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2005).

 

3.3

 

Articles of Amendment to Restated Ar