Company Quick10K Filing
Quick10K
Preaxia Health Care Payment Systems
10-Q 2019-08-31 Quarter: 2019-08-31
10-K 2019-05-31 Annual: 2019-05-31
10-Q 2019-02-28 Quarter: 2019-02-28
10-Q 2018-11-30 Quarter: 2018-11-30
10-Q 2018-08-31 Quarter: 2018-08-31
10-K 2018-05-31 Annual: 2018-05-31
10-Q 2018-02-28 Quarter: 2018-02-28
10-Q 2017-11-30 Quarter: 2017-11-30
10-Q 2017-08-31 Quarter: 2017-08-31
10-K 2017-05-31 Annual: 2017-05-31
10-Q 2017-02-28 Quarter: 2017-02-28
10-Q 2016-11-30 Quarter: 2016-11-30
10-Q 2016-08-31 Quarter: 2016-08-31
10-K 2016-05-31 Annual: 2016-05-31
10-Q 2016-02-29 Quarter: 2016-02-29
10-Q 2015-11-30 Quarter: 2015-11-30
10-Q 2015-08-31 Quarter: 2015-08-31
10-K 2015-05-31 Annual: 2015-05-31
10-Q 2015-02-28 Quarter: 2015-02-28
10-Q 2014-11-30 Quarter: 2014-11-30
10-Q 2014-08-31 Quarter: 2014-08-31
10-K 2014-05-31 Annual: 2014-05-31
10-Q 2014-02-28 Quarter: 2014-02-28
10-Q 2013-08-31 Quarter: 2013-08-31
10-Q 2013-08-31 Quarter: 2013-08-31
10-K 2013-05-31 Annual: 2013-05-31
10-Q 2013-02-28 Quarter: 2013-02-28
10-Q 2012-11-30 Quarter: 2012-11-30
10-Q 2012-08-31 Quarter: 2012-08-31
8-K 2018-06-01 Officers
ALFA Alfacourse 383
MEC Mayville Engineering 260
EDGW Edgewater Technology 81
MOBQ Mobiquity Technologies 61
MJNE MJ Holdings 27
AUSI Aura Systems 21
FCE Forest City Realty Trust 0
BKGMF Bankguam Holding 0
FHLBI Federal Home Loan Bank of Indianapolis 0
VNUE VNUE 0
PAXH 2019-08-31
Part I - Financial Information
Item 1. Financial Statements
Note 1 - Organization and Description of Business
Note 2 - Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Note 3 - Recent Accounting Pronouncements
Note 4 - Related Party Transactions
Note 5 - Stockholders' Deficit
Note 6 - Contingencies and Commitments
Note 7 - Subsequent Events
Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 4. Controls and Procedures.
Part II - Other Information
Item 1. Legal Proceedings
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Item 5. Other Information
Item 6. Exhibits
EX-31 ex31.htm
EX-32 ex32.htm

Preaxia Health Care Payment Systems Earnings 2019-08-31

PAXH 10Q Quarterly Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

10-Q 1 paxh83119q.htm FORM 10-Q

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

 

[X] QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended August 31, 2019

 

or

 

[  ] TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from __________ to ______________

 

Commission File Number:  000-52365

 

PREAXIA HEALTH CARE PAYMENT SYSTEMS INC.

 (Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada 20-4395271
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization) (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

PO Box 34075 Westbrook PO, 1610-37th Street S.W., Calgary, Alberta T3C 3W2

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

 

(403) 850-4120

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class Trading Symbol(s) Name of each exchange on which registered
None None N/A

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

Common Stock, $0.001 par value
(Title of class)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes [X]  No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).

Yes [X] No [ ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 1 

 

 

Large accelerated filer [   ]   Accelerated filer [   ]
Non-accelerated filer [X]   Smaller reporting company [X]
Emerging growth company [   ]      

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. [   ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.)  Yes [  ]  No [X]

 

APPLICABLE ONLY TO ISSUERS INVOLVED IN BANKRUPTCY

PROCEEDINGS DURING THE PRECEDING FIVE YEARS:

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant filed all documents and reports required to be filed by Section 12, 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 subsequent to the distribution of securities under a plan confirmed by a court.    

Yes [  ]  No [  ]

 

APPLICABLE ONLY TO CORPORATE ISSUERS

 

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date.

 

As of September 30, 2019 the registrant had 19,667,698 outstanding shares of Common Stock.

 

 

 

PREAXIA HEALTH CARE PAYMENT SYSTEMS INC.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION 3
ITEM 1.   FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 3
ITEM 2.  MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS 4
ITEM 3.  QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK 10
ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES 10
PART II – OTHER INFORMATION 11
ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS 11
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS 11
ITEM 2.  UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS 11
ITEM 3.  DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES 11
ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES 11
ITEM 5.  OTHER INFORMATION 11
ITEM 6.   EXHIBITS 12
SIGNATURES 13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 2 

 

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1.   FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles for interim financial information and with the instructions for Form 10-Q and Article 210 8-03 of Regulation S-X.  Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by generally accepted accounting principles for complete financial statements.  In the opinion of management, all adjustments considered necessary for a fair presentation have been included.  All such adjustments are of a normal recurring nature.  Operating results for the three month period ended August 31, 2019 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the fiscal year ending May 31, 2020.  For further information refer to the consolidated financial statements and footnotes thereto included in Preaxia’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended May 31, 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

  Page
   
Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements  
   
Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of August 31, 2019 and May 31, 2019 F-1
   
Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss for the three months ended August 31, 2019 and 2018 F-2
   
Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statement of Stockholders’ Deficit for the three months ended August 31, 2019 and 2018 F-3
   
Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the three months ended August 31, 2019 and 2018 F-4
   
Notes to Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements F-5
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 3 

 

 

PREAXIA HEALTHCARE PAYMENT SYSTEMS INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(Unaudited)

   August 31,
2019
  May 31,
2019
ASSETS          
           
Current assets          
Cash  $6,430   $17,939 
Total current assets   6,430    17,939 
           
Total assets  $6,430   $17,939 
           
LIABILITIES          
           
Current liabilities          
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities  $145,373   $134,436 
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities - related party   266,533    239,836 
Loans payable - shareholders   132,902    132,902 
Liability for unissued shares   126,967    126,967 
Convertible note payable - related party   1,058,760    1,058,760 
Total current liabilities   1,730,535    1,692,901 
           
Total liabilities   1,730,535    1,692,901 
           
Commitments and Contingencies   —      —   
           
STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT          
           
Capital Stock, $0.001 par value, 75,000,000 shares of common stock authorized          
19,667,698 and 19,667,698 common shares issued and outstanding at August 31, 2019 and May 31, 2019, respectively
   19,668    19,668 
Additional paid-in capital   2,605,336    2,605,336 
Accumulated other comprehensive income   57,197    57,197 
Accumulated deficit   (4,406,306)   (4,357,163)
Total stockholders' deficit   (1,724,105)   (1,674,962)
           
Total liabilities and stockholders' deficit  $6,430   $17,939 
           
See Accompanying Notes to the Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

 

 F-1 

 

 

PREAXIA HEALTHCARE PAYMENT SYSTEMS INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS AND COMPREHENSIVE LOSS
(Unaudited)

 

           
    Three months ended August 31, 
    2019    2018 
           
Revenue  $—     $—   
           
Operating expenses          
Consulting   30,000    31,144 
Professional   9,699    7,014 
Office and administration   5,871    9,538 
Research and development   3,573    7,648 
Total expenses   49,143    55,344 
           
Loss from operations   (49,143)   (55,344)
           
Net loss and comprehensive loss  $(49,143)  $(55,344)
           
Net loss per share - basic and diluted  $(0.00)  $(0.00)
           
Weighted average number of common shares outstanding - basic and diluted   19,667,698    19,667,698 
           
See Accompanying Notes to the Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

 F-2 

 

PREAXIA HEALTHCARE PAYMENT SYSTEMS INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT
(Unaudited)
                   
    Common Stock    Additional    Accumulated Other         Total 
    Shares    Amount    Paid-in Capital    Comprehensive Income    Accumulated Deficit    Stockholders' Deficit 
Balance, May 31, 2018   19,567,698   $19,568   $2,555,436   $57,197   $(4,159,364)  $(1,527,163)
                               
Net loss and comprehensive loss   —      —      —      —      (55,344)   (55,344)
                               
Balance, August 31, 2018   19,567,698   $19,568   $2,555,436   $57,197   $(4,214,708)  $(1,582,507)
                               
    Common Stock    Additional    Accumulated Other         Total 
    Shares    Amount    Paid-in Capital    Comprehensive Income    Accumulated Deficit    Stockholders' Deficit 
Balance, May 31, 2019   19,667,698   $19,668   $2,605,336   $57,197   $(4,357,163)  $(1,674,962)
                               
Net loss and comprehensive loss   —      —      —      —      (49,143)   (49,143)
                               
Balance, August 31, 2019   19,667,698   $19,668   $2,605,336   $57,197   $(4,406,306)  $(1,724,105)
                               
See Accompanying Notes to the Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

 F-3 

 

 

PREAXIA HEALTHCARE PAYMENT SYSTEMS INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Unaudited)

           
    Three months ended August 31, 
    2019    2018 
Cash flows from operating activities          
Net loss  $(49,143)  $(55,344)
 Change in operating assets and liabilities          
Increase in accounts payable - related party   30,000    30,000 
Increase in accounts payable and accrued liabilities   10,937    (3,447)
Cash flows used in operating activities   (8,206)   (28,791)
Cash flows provided by (used in) investing activities   —      —   
           
Cash flow from financing activities          
Advances - related party   1,220    5,762 
Repayment of advances - related party   (4,523)   (6,772)
Proceeds from loans payable - shareholder   —      25,244 
Net cash provided by financing activities   (3,303)   24,234 
           
Net change in cash   (11,509)   (4,557)
           
Cash, beginning of the period   17,939    7,608 
           
Cash, end of the period  $6,430   $3,051 
           
Supplemental Disclosure:          
Cash paid for income taxes  $—     $—   
Cash paid for interest  $—     $—   
           
See Accompanying Notes to the Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

 F-4 

 

PREAXIA HEALTH CARE PAYMENT SYSTEMS INC.

NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

August 31, 2019

 

Note 1 – Organization and Description of Business

 

PreAxia Health Care Payment Systems Inc. (the “Company” or “PreAxia”) was incorporated on April 3, 2000 in the State of Nevada. On May 31, 2005 the Company acquired all of the outstanding stock of Tiempo de Mexico Ltd. (“Tiempo”) in exchange for 5,000,000 shares of the common stock of the Company with a par value of $0.001. The Company had no operations prior to the date of the aforementioned acquisition.

The business objective of the Company is the development, distribution, marketing and sale of health care payment processing services and products.

The Company has not yet realized any revenues from its planned operations. 

The operations of the Company are expected to be primarily undertaken by PreAxia Health Care Payment Ltd. (“PreAxia Payment”), incorporated pursuant to the laws of the Province of Alberta on November 26, 2015.

 

PreAxia Payment is in the process of developing an online access system creating a health spending account that will facilitate card payment and processing services to third-party administrators, insurance companies and others.

 

Note 2 – Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Basis of presentation

 

The unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements of the Company for the three months ended August 31, 2019 and 2018 have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America for interim financial information and pursuant to the requirements for reporting on Form 10-Q and Regulation S-K. Accordingly, they do not include all the information and footnotes required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America for complete financial statements. However, such information reflects all adjustments (consisting solely of normal recurring adjustments), which are, in the opinion of management, necessary for the fair presentation of the financial position and the results of operations. Results shown for interim periods are not necessarily indicative of the results to be obtained for a full fiscal year. The balance sheet information as of May 31, 2019 was derived from the audited financial statements included in the Company's financial statements as of and for the fiscal year ended May 31, 2019 included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) on August 27, 2019. These financial statements should be read in conjunction with that report.

 

 Principles of Consolidation

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiaries (i) PreAxia Health Care Payment Systems Inc., incorporated pursuant to the laws of the Province of Alberta on January 28, 2008 (ii) PreAxia Canada Inc., incorporated pursuant to the laws of the Province of Alberta on January 28, 2008 and (iii) PreAxia Health Care Payment Ltd., incorporated pursuant to the laws of the Province of Alberta on November 26, 2015 (collectively, the “Subsidiaries”). All inter-company accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

Going Concern

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming the Company will continue as a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. During the three months ended August 31, 2019, the Company incurred a net loss of $49,143 and used cash in operating activities of $8,206 and at August 31, 2019, had a stockholders’ deficit of $1,724,105. These factors, among others, raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern within one year of the date that the consolidated financial statements are issued. The Company’s consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty should we be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

 F-5 

 

The Company’s ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon its ability to develop additional sources of capital and to ultimately achieve profitable operations. Currently, the Company does not have significant cash or other material assets, nor does it have operations or a source of revenue sufficient to cover its operating costs and allow it to continue as a going concern. The Company’s officers or principal shareholders have committed to making advances or loans to pay for certain legal, accounting, and administrative costs.

 

The Company hopes to be able to attract suitable investors for our business plan, which will not require us to use our cash. No assurance can be given that any future financing will be available or, if available, that it will be on terms that are satisfactory to the Company. Even if the Company is able to obtain additional financing, it may contain undue restrictions on our operations, in the case of debt financing or cause substantial dilution for our stockholders, in the case of equity financing.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid debt instruments with an original maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents.

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of the Company's consolidated financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in these consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. Although these estimates are based on management’s knowledge of current events and actions that our company may undertake in the future, actual results could differ from those estimates.

Foreign Currency Translation

 

The functional currency of the Company is the United States dollar. The functional currency of the Subsidiaries is the Canadian dollar. Assets and liabilities in the accompanying consolidated financial statements are translated into United States dollars at the exchange rate in effect at the balance sheet date and capital accounts are translated at historical rates. Income statement accounts are translated at the average rates of exchange prevailing during the period. Translation adjustments arising from the use of differing exchange rates from period to period are included in the accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) account in stockholders’ deficit.

Transactions undertaken in currencies other than the functional currency of the entity are translated using the exchange rate in effect as of the transaction date. Any transaction exchange gains and losses are included in the statement of operations and comprehensive loss.

The Company's reporting currency is the U.S. dollar. All transactions initiated in Canadian Dollars are translated into U.S. dollars in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification ("ASC") 830-30, "Translation of Financial Statements," as follows: 

i)       assets and liabilities are translated at the closing rate at the date of the balance sheet of 1.00 US Dollar=1.3317 Canadian Dollars (August 31, 2019), 1.00 USD Dollar=0.8226 GBP, and 1.00 US Dollar = 1.3531 Canadian Dollars (May 31, 2019);

ii)       income and expenses are translated at average exchange rates for three months ended August 31, 2019 of 1.00 US Dollar = 1.3219 Canadian Dollars and 1.00 US Dollar = 1.3098 Canadian Dollars (August 31, 2018);

iii)       all resulting exchange differences are recognized as other comprehensive income, a separate component of equity. The exchange differences during the three months ended August 31, 2019 and 2018 were insignificant and no amounts have been recorded.

 F-6 

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The Company defines fair value as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. Management uses a fair value hierarchy that distinguishes between (1) market participant assumptions developed based on market data obtained from independent sources (observable inputs) and (2) an entity’s own assumptions about market participant assumptions developed based on the best information available in the circumstances (unobservable inputs). The fair value hierarchy consists of three broad levels, which gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (Level 1) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3). The three levels of the fair value hierarchy are described below:

  Level 1 - Unadjusted quoted prices in active markets that are accessible at the measurement date for identical, unrestricted assets or liabilities.

 

  Level 2 - Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly, including quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets; quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active; inputs other than quoted prices that are observable for the asset or liability (e.g., interest rates); and inputs that are derived principally from or corroborated by observable market data by correlation or other means.

 

  Level 3 - Inputs that are both significant to the fair value measurement and unobservable.

 

Fair value estimates discussed herein are based upon certain market assumptions and pertinent information available to management as of August 31, 2019 and May 31, 2019. The carrying amounts of current assets and current liabilities approximate their fair value because of the relatively short period of time between the origination of these instruments and their expected realization.

 

Net Income (Loss) Per Share

 

Net income (loss) per share of common stock is computed by dividing the net loss by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period. The Company has 10,587,600 shares of potential common stock equivalents for convertible note payable – related party outstanding as of August 31, 2019 and 2018, which have been excluded from the loss per share computation as their effect would have been anti-dilutive.

 

Research and Development Costs

 

During the three months ended August 31, 2019, and 2018, we expended $3,573 and $7,648 on research and development.

Software Development Costs

The Company accounts for software development costs in accordance with several accounting pronouncements, including FASB ASC 730, Research and Development, FASB ASC 350-40, Internal-Use Software, FASB 985-20, Costs of Computer Software to be Sold, Leased, or Marketed and FASB ASC 350-50, Website Development Costs.

Costs incurred during the period of planning and design, prior to the period determining technological feasibility, for all software developed for use internal and external, has been charged to operations in the period incurred as research and development costs.  Additionally, costs incurred after determination of readiness for market have been expensed as research and development.

The Company will capitalize certain costs in the development of our proprietary software (computer software to be sold, leased or licensed) for the period after technological feasibility was determined and prior to our marketing and initial sales.

Website development costs are capitalized under the same criteria as our marketed software.  

Impairment of Long-lived Assets

 F-7 

 

Long-lived assets such as property, equipment and identifiable intangibles are reviewed for impairment whenever facts and circumstances indicate that the carrying value may not be recoverable.  When required, impairment losses on assets to be held and used are recognized based on the fair value of the asset.  The fair value is determined based on estimates of future cash flows, market value of similar assets, if available, or independent appraisals, if required.  If the carrying amount of the long-lived asset is not recoverable from its undiscounted cash flows, an impairment loss is recognized for the difference between the carrying amount and fair value of the asset.  When fair values are not available, the Company estimates fair value using the expected future cash flows discounted at a rate commensurate with the risk associated with the recovery of the assets.  We did not recognize any impairment losses for any periods presented.

Commitments and Contingencies

 

The Company follows subtopic 450-20 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification to report accounting for contingencies.  Liabilities for loss contingencies arising from claims, assessments, litigation, fines and penalties and other sources are recorded when it is probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of the assessment can be reasonably estimated.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

In accordance with ASC 606, revenue is recognized when a customer obtains control of promised goods or services. The amount of revenue recognized reflects the consideration to which we expect to be entitled to receive in exchange for these goods or services. The provisions of ASC 606 include a five-step process by which we determine revenue recognition, depicting the transfer of goods or services to customers in amounts reflecting the payment to which we expect to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. ASC 606 requires us to apply the following steps: (1) identify the contract with the customer; (2) identify the performance obligations in the contract; (3) determine the transaction price; (4) allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract; and (5) recognize revenue when, or as, we satisfy the performance obligation.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company follows Section 740-10-30 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification, which requires recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been included in the financial statements or tax returns.  Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are based on the differences between the financial statement and tax bases of assets and liabilities using enacted tax rates in effect for the fiscal year in which the differences are expected to reverse.  Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance to the extent management concludes it is more likely than not that the assets will not be realized.  Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the fiscal years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled.  The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in the Statements of Income and Comprehensive Income in the period that includes the enactment date.

 

The Company adopted section 740-10-25 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“Section 740-10-25”) with regards to uncertain income tax positions.  Section 740-10-25 addresses the determination of whether tax benefits claimed or expected to be claimed on a tax return should be recorded in the financial statements. Under Section 740-10-25, the Company may recognize the tax benefit from an uncertain tax position only if it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained on examination by the taxing authorities, based on the technical merits of the position.  The tax benefits recognized in the financial statements from such a position should be measured based on the largest benefit that has a greater than fifty percent (50%) likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement. Section 740-10-25 also provides guidance on de-recognition, classification, interest and penalties on income taxes, accounting in interim periods and requires increased disclosures.  The Company had no material adjustments to its liabilities for unrecognized income tax benefits according to the provisions of Section 740-10-25.

  

Note 3 – Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

The Company reviews new accounting standards as issued or updated. No new standards or updates had any material effect on these consolidated financial statements. The accounting pronouncements issued subsequent to the date of these consolidated financial statements that were considered significant by management were evaluated for the potential effect on these consolidated financial statements. Management does not believe any of the subsequent pronouncements will have a material effect on these consolidated financial statements as presented.

 F-8 

 

 

Note 4 Related Party Transactions

 

Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities - Related Parties

 

During the three months ended August 31, 2019 and 2018, Tom Zapatinas, the Chief Executive Officer and Director of the Company, earned $30,000 and $30,000, respectively, for consulting services provided to the Company. Unpaid consulting services is included in accounts payable and accrued liabilities – related party on the consolidated balance sheets.

 

During the three months ended August 31, 2019 and 2018, Tom Zapatinas, the Chief Executive Officer and a Director of the Company, advanced the Company $1,220 and $5,762, respectively, in cash and was repaid $4,523 and $6,772, respectively.

 

As of August 31, 2019 and May 31, 2019, accounts payable and accrued liabilities – related party of $266,533 and $239,836, respectively, is due to Tom Zapatinas, the Chief Executive Officer and a Director of the Company.

 

Loans Payable – Shareholders

 

As of August 31, 2019 and May 31, 2019, loans payable - shareholders are $132,902 and $132,902, respectively. Loans payable – shareholders are unsecured, non-interest bearing and due on demand.

 

Convertible Note Payable – Related Party

 

As of August 31, 2019 and May 31, 2019, convertible note payable - related party of $1,058,760 is due to Tom Zapatinas, the Chief Executive Officer and a Director of the Company. The Note is non-interest bearing, unsecured, payable on demand and convertible in whole or in part into shares of common stock of the Company at a conversion price of $0.10 per share, which equates to 10,587,600 shares.

 

Note 5 – Stockholders’ Deficit

 

Common Stock

 

Common Stock, par value of $0.001 per share; 75,000,000 shares authorized: 19,667,698 and 19,667,698 shares issued and outstanding at August 31, 2019 and May 31, 2019, respectively. Holders of Common Stock have one vote per share of Common Stock held.

 

Note 6 – Contingencies and Commitments

From time to time the Company may be a party to litigation matters involving claims against the Company.  Management believes that there are no current matters that would have a material effect on the Company’s financial position or results of operations. 

 

The Company does not have long-term commitments for equipment purchases or leases. The Company does not lease office space as the CEO operates the business from his personal residence.

 

Note 7 – Subsequent Events

 

The Company has evaluated all subsequent events through the date these financial statements were issued and no subsequent events occurred that required disclosure.

 

 

 F-9 

 

ITEM 2.  MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

This quarterly report contains forward-looking statements relating to future events or our future financial performance.  In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “should,” “intends,” “expects,” “plans,” “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “potential,” or “continue” or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology.  These statements are only predictions and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause our or our industry's actual results, levels of activity or performance to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity or performance expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements.

 

Such factors include, among others, the following: international, national and local general economic and market conditions; demographic changes; the ability of PreAxia to sustain, manage or forecast its growth; the ability of PreAxia to successfully make and integrate acquisitions; raw material costs and availability; new product development and introduction; existing government regulations and changes in, or failure to comply with government regulations; adverse publicity; competition; the loss of significant customers or suppliers; fluctuations and difficulty in forecasting operating results; changes in business strategy or development plans; business disruptions; the ability to attract and retain qualified personnel; the ability to protect technology; and other factors referenced in this and previous filings.

 

Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity or performance.  Except as required by applicable law, including the securities laws of the United States, we do not intend to update any of the forward-looking statements to conform these statements to actual results.

 

Given these uncertainties, readers of this Form 10-Q and investors are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements.  PreAxia disclaims any obligation to update any such factors or to publicly announce the result of any revisions to any of the forward-looking statements contained herein to reflect future events or developments, except as required by applicable law, including the securities laws of the United States.

 

All amounts stated herein are in US dollars unless otherwise indicated.

 

The management’s discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our condensed consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”).  The following discussion of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with our audited consolidated financial statements for the year ended May 31, 2019, together with notes thereto.  As used in this quarterly report, the terms “we,” “us,” “our,” “PreAxia” and the “Company” means PreAxia Health Care Payment Systems Inc. and its wholly-owned subsidiaries, unless the context clearly requires otherwise.

  

General Overview

 

Corporate Overview

PreAxia Health Care Payment Systems Inc. (the “Company” or “PreAxia”) was incorporated on April 3, 2000 in the State of Nevada.

The Company primarily undertakes its operations through its wholly-owned subsidiary, PreAxia Health Care Payment Limited (“PreAxia Payment”). PreAxia Payment was incorporated pursuant to the laws of the Province of Alberta on November 26, 2015.

General Overview

 

PreAxia Payment is a company which intends to deliver a comprehensive suite of solutions and services directed at the emerging health payment market, specifically the opportunities tied to the growth of health spending accounts (“HSA”). There is a rapid shift in healthcare traditional payment models to consumer-directed healthcare that is creating significant opportunities for financial services and insurance industries to deliver new dynamic products to this emerging market.

 4 

 

Spawned by the need to address escalating health care costs, changes in the regulatory environment and the growing consumer desire for greater participation in the management of their health benefits, the boundaries between health care and the financial services industries are becoming increasingly blurred. With the trend towards self-directed health payment solutions and the growing demand for faster, easier and more convenient benefit services, the insurance and benefits industries are banking on HSA medical payments being their next big growth conduit. Studies suggest that HSAs in the US reached $61.7 billion in assets and 26.0 million consumers in 2019, an increase of 20% of assets over the prior period. The Canadian market for health benefits is estimated at more than $30 Billion of which HSAs are estimated to have gain a 10% share. This coupled with the continued growth of the Canadian group insurance industry illustrates the emerging opportunity for innovative health payment services. We intend to initially launch our products in Canada. We believe that Canadian businesses are embracing a new healthcare financing vehicle to provide greater value to employees, increase profitability and get more return from their investment. We intend to provide them with services to capture this market opportunity.

Description of Health Spending Account (“HSA”)

An HSA is a uniquely designed account established exclusively and specifically for the purpose of health care spending. An employer deposits funds into a special account for the employee. These funds can be used to pay for eligible medical and related health care expenses for the employee and their dependents. HSAs provide employers and employees with greater control in both the amount of funds invested and how these funds are used.

 

Services and infrastructure provided by PreAxia enable organizations and individuals to eliminate all paper involved in the management of these accounts and benefit through savings in time and money.

 

The PreAxia platform for processing and managing accounts, including cardholder and customer account management, reconciliation and financial settlement, and customer reporting is fully operational.

 

Over time, the company will evaluate opportunities for forms of virtual banking and PayPal-type services. One opportunity seen as particularly relevant to the health care market is to offer instant issuing services that enable corporations to issue and fund Pre-Paid Interac or credit card services to beneficiaries in real time. If implemented, the beneficiary will most likely select a personal identification number (“PIN”) using a PIN and card activation terminal, thus gaining instant access to funds that can be reloaded. This consideration would require development of software systems for the issuing of health payment cards and financial transaction processing services that would be fully managed by a data center.

 

Matching of consumers in need of health care products or services with providers is another area PreAxia intends to evaluate. Consumers managing their health care dollars through an online system will find convenience in seeking out health care professionals and services through the same system.

Distribution Methods and Marketing Strategy

PreAxia operates on a Cloud Computing Platform that makes it accessible to anyone with a personal computer and Internet access. The preliminary market for PreAxia’s HSA Management Solution is small and medium sized companies that are not currently well served by the current group benefits model. The financial benefits of the PreAxia business model, however, are also relevant to larger employers and we believe that these larger employers will migrate to the PreAxia product over time.

PreAxia’s marketing strategy is to promote its existing platform direct to consumers and businesses, and to the groups that most need access to it; independent brokers, financial advisors and small to medium sized businesses. Brokers should see PreAxia as a superior method of promoting and supporting HSAs that allow them to earn above average commission rates on invested funds. Financial advisors should see PreAxia in a similar way as brokers except that there is the additional benefit of tax reduction. Small to medium sized businesses, which are expected to drive the growth in business, should see PreAxia as offering financial savings to the company and to employees by offering personal health care benefits through an HSA, along with the same conveniences they have come to expect from other services they currently utilize over the Internet. It is expected that the group benefits market will subsequently follow as they too realize the advantages of PreAxia over their current HSA offerings. PreAxia has begun and will continue to seek opportunities with lead customers and alliance partners to establish reference-able, high-profile implementations and market-leading, early-adopter firms for further developing innovative products and services. The Company intends to design solutions targeted towards corporate financial management, financial risk, audit management and cash management while targeting product/service management as a support to financial management.

 5 

 

We anticipate that the prime target for services will be small to medium sized organizations that are not adequately served by the current insurance and group benefits offerings. These organizations should realize significant benefits in both cost and time savings by utilization of PreAxia technology while providing their employees with an increased level of benefits.

PreAxia intends to achieve service volume and the associated economies of scale through marketing directly to select target customers that provide the necessary transaction volumes, through market specific channel partners and through an education based public relations strategy geared to the small to mid-sized employers including the brokers and financial advisors utilized by these businesses. The channel strategy is supported in the solution design, as multiple channel partners may require custom pricing and compensation.

It is our Company’s intention that brokers and financial advisors will aggressively promote their PreAxia supported HSA offerings due to the quality of product, higher margins and because of the non-competitive relationship with PreAxia.

PreAxia has identified the following “channels” through which it will target prime end market customers:

  Independent brokers that sell, or desire to sell, Health Spending Accounts

 

  Financial advisors who manage funds and advise on tax saving strategies for individuals and corporations

 

  Accountants and bookkeepers who regularly advise businesses on financial and operational matters

 

  Benefits managers/adjudicators, including insurance, health or outsourced government benefits processors that manage benefits disbursement

 

  Issuer banks, including partner banks that enable the issuance of Health Cards and/or sell insurance products

 

  Application providers, including software manufacturers selling into the target vertical markets

 

  Professional services, including consulting, development and implementation companies serving the target vertical markets
 6 

 

PreAxia intends to establish several key customer reference accounts, channel marketing partners and technology alliances. These corporate relationships are relevant to advancing our company’s goals in 2019 and beyond for achieving a prime position in the Canadian marketplace and establishing a solid service foundation.

Competitive Business Conditions and our Company’s Competitive Position in the Industry and Methods of Competition

PreAxia intends to offer a combination of products and services in its solution. However, there are other providers of components or versions of the Health Spending Accounts in the marketplace. Our approach is to provide a high value added and robust capability within specific target markets, rather than the “one size fits all” and mass volume approach of the larger companies in the Canadian and international market. This is consistent with the PreAxia platform which has been designed for expansion in the United States and internationally. The following are some of the leading providers of products and services that are or may be potential competitors in PreAxia’s target markets:

 

·Benecaid has become a leading provider of Health Spending Accounts in Canada by offering an easy to understand product through brokers and also directly through the company.

 

·Olympia Benefits has become a leading provider of Health Spending Accounts in Canada by offering a “Cost Plus” version of HSAs that has become popular in the marketplace.

 

·QuickCard is a provider of Health Spending Accounts and group insurance products. They are partially differentiated from competitors by virtue of a “credit type card” that is used to pay for qualified health products and services.

 

·        League, which operates in Canada and the US, offers a range of health benefit services including Health Spending Accounts.

 

·Most major insurance companies offer some version of HSAs to their customers.

 

·Many brokers have created HSA products for their clients.

 

·Many accounting and financial services firms have created their own HSA products to offer to their clients.

 

US and International Markets

 

·HealthEquity, a publicly listed company offering HSAs in the USA, manages over $1.7 billion in deposits. It is one of the largest dedicated health account custodians in the USA and serves more than 1.4 million accounts owned by individuals at more than 24,000 companies across the country.

 

·HSA Bank, a division of Webster Bank, offers Health Spending Accounts and related offerings to the consumer-directed healthcare industry.

 

·Fidelity Investments offers a Health Spending Account to businesses as a means of controlling costs while providing employee health benefits.

 

Intellectual Property and Patent Protection

 

At present, PreAxia does not have any pending or registered patents or any trademarks.

 

Plan of Operation

Over the next twelve months, we plan to:

 

  (a) Raise additional capital to execute our business plans;
     
 7 

 

 

  (b) Penetrate the health care processing markets in Canada, the United States and worldwide, by continuing to develop innovative health care processing products and services;
     
  (c) Build up a network of strategic alliances with several types of health insurance companies, governments and other alliances in various vertical markets, and;
     
  (d) Fill the positions of senior management sales, administrative and engineering positions.

 

 

 Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

As of August 31, 2019, PreAxia’s cash balance was $6,430 compared to $17,939 as of May 31, 2019.  Our Company will be required to raise capital to fund our operations.  PreAxia’s cash on hand is currently its only source of liquidity.  PreAxia had a working capital deficit of $1,724,105 as of August 31, 2019 compared with a working capital deficit of $1,674,962 as of May 31, 2019.  

 

Our ability to meet our financial liabilities and commitments is primarily dependent upon the continued issuance of equity to new stockholders and our ability to achieve and maintain profitable operations.  PreAxia's cash and cash equivalents will not be sufficient to meet its working capital requirements for the next twelve-month period.   We will not initially have any cash flow from operating activities as we are in the startup stage.   We project that we will require an estimated $3,150,000 over the next twelve-month period to fund our working capital deficit of approximately $1,700,000 plus an additional $1,450,000 to complete our business plan. The Company plans to raise the capital required to satisfy our immediate short-term needs and additional capital required to meet our estimated funding requirements for the next twelve months primarily through the private placement of our equity securities or by way of loans or such other means as PreAxia may determine.  

 

There are no assurances that we will be able to obtain funds required for our continued operations.  There can be no assurance that additional financing will be available to us when needed or, if available, that it can be obtained on commercially reasonable terms.  If we are not able to obtain the additional financing on a timely basis, we will not be able to meet our other obligations as they become due and we will be forced to scale down or perhaps even cease the operation of our business.

 

There is substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern as the continuation of our business is dependent upon obtaining further long-term financing, successful and sufficient market acceptance of our products and achieving a profitable level of operations.  The issuance of additional equity securities by us could result in a significant dilution in the equity interests of our current stockholders.  Obtaining commercial loans, assuming those loans would be available, will increase our liabilities and future cash commitments.

 

Our working capital (deficit) as of August 31, 2019 compared to May 31, 2019 is summarized as follows:

 

Working Capital

  

August 31,

2019

 

May 31,

2019

       
Current Assets  $6,430   $17,939 
Current Liabilities   (1,730,535)   (1,692,901)
Working Capital (deficit)  $(1,724,105)  $(1,674,962)

 

The increase in our working capital deficit of $49,143 was primarily due to an increase in our accounts payable - related party and an increase in accounts payable and accrued liabilities.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We have no off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that is material to stockholders.

 8 

 

Results of Operations – Three Months Ended August 31, 2019 and 2018

 

The following summary of our results of operations should be read in conjunction with our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements for the three months ended August 31, 2019.

 

For the three month period ended August 31, 2019 and 2018

 

Our operating results for the three month period ended August 31, 2019 compared to the three month period ended August 31, 2018 are described below:

 

Revenue

 

We have not earned any revenues since our inception and we do not anticipate earning revenues until such time as we have completed the development of our Health Card software and obtained new customers.

  

Expenses

 

Our operating loss for the three months period ended August 31, 2019 was $49,143 compared to $55,344 for the three months period ended August 31, 2018. The decrease in loss of $6,201 for the three month period ending August 31, 2019 is due to a decrease in consulting fees of $1,144, an increase in professional fees of $2,685, a decrease in research and development of $4,075 and a decrease of $3,667 in office and administration fees.

  

Consulting Fees

 

During the three months ended August 31, 2019 and 2018, Tom Zapatinas, the Chief Executive Officer and Director of the Company, earned $30,000 and $30,000, respectively, for consulting services provided to the Company.

 

Research and Development

 

Research and development expenses during the three month period ended August 31, 2019 decreased by $4,075 as web updates and platform development were being completed in the previous year.

 

Wages and Benefits

 

There were no wages and benefits during the three months period ended August 31, 2019 or August 31, 2018.

 

Office and Administration

 

Office and administration expenses decreased by $3,667 for the period ended August 31, 2019 due to a decrease in travel expenses.

  

Professional Fees

 

Professional fees during the three months ended August 31, 2019 increased by $2,685 due to the timing of our annual audit.

 

Interest Expense

 

Interest expense is $0 for the three months ended August 31, 2019 and 2018 because accounts payable and accrued liabilities – related party, convertible note payable – related party and loans payable – shareholders are non-interest bearing.

 

 

 

 9 

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

We have identified certain accounting policies, described below, that are the most important to the portrayal of our current financial condition and results of operations.

 

Revenue recognition

 

In accordance with ASC 606, revenue is recognized when a customer obtains control of promised goods or services. The amount of revenue recognized reflects the consideration to which we expect to be entitled to receive in exchange for these goods or services. The provisions of ASC 606 include a five-step process by which we determine revenue recognition, depicting the transfer of goods or services to customers in amounts reflecting the payment to which we expect to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. ASC 606 requires us to apply the following steps: (1) identify the contract with the customer; (2) identify the performance obligations in the contract; (3) determine the transaction price; (4) allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract; and (5) recognize revenue when, or as, we satisfy the performance obligation.

 

Software Development Costs

The Company accounts for software development costs in accordance with several accounting pronouncements, including FASB ASC 730, Research and Development, FASB ASC 350-40, Internal-Use Software, FASB 985-20, Costs of Computer Software to be Sold, Leased, or Marketed and FASB ASC 350-50, Website Development Costs.

 

Costs incurred during the period of planning and design, prior to the period determining technological feasibility, for all software developed for use internal and external, has been charged to operations in the period incurred as research and development costs.  Additionally, costs incurred after determination of readiness for market have been expensed as research and development.

 

ITEM 3.  QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

Not applicable.

  

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES.

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

Management, evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures, as defined under Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(e). Based upon this evaluation, the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that, as of August 31, 2019, the disclosure controls and procedures were not effective.

Disclosure controls and procedures are the controls and other procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our Company’s Exchange Act reports is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities Exchange Commission’s rules and forms.

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

There have been no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting that occurred during the three month period ended August 31, 2019 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal controls over financial reporting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 10 

 

PART II – OTHER INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

We know of no material pending legal proceedings to which our company or subsidiary is a party or of which any of our property is the subject. In addition, we do not know of any such proceedings contemplated by any governmental authorities.

 

We know of no material proceedings in which any director, officer or affiliate of our company, or any registered or beneficial stockholder of our company, or any associate of any such director, officer, affiliate, or stockholder is a party adverse to our company or subsidiary or has a material interest adverse to our company or subsidiary.

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

Not applicable to smaller reporting companies.

 

ITEM 2.  UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS

 

During the quarter ended August 31, 2019 the Company did not issue shares of capital stock.

  

ITEM 3.  DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES

 

None.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 5.  OTHER INFORMATION

 

None.

 

 11 

 

ITEM 6.   EXHIBITS

 

Exhibit Number   Description
3.1   Articles of Incorporation (Incorporated by reference to the Exhibits filed with the Form SB-2 filed with the SEC on March 16, 2006)
3.2   Certificate of Amendment to Articles of Incorporation (Incorporated by reference to the Exhibits filed with Schedule 14C on November 14, 2008)
3.3   Bylaws (Incorporated by reference to the Exhibits filed with the Form SB-2 filed with the SEC on March 16, 2006)
3.4   Amended Bylaws (Incorporated by reference to the Exhibits filed with the Form SB-2 filed with the SEC on March 16, 2006)
10.3   Acquisition Agreement dated April 22, 2008 (Incorporated by reference to the Exhibits filed with the Form 8-K on May 19, 2008)
10.4   Promissory note dated June 1, 2011 issued to Macleod Projects Inc. (Incorporated by reference to the Exhibits filed with the annual report on Form 10-K  for the year ended May 31, 2011 filed with the SEC on October 21, 2011)
10.5   Promissory note dated August 5, 2011 issued to Macleod Projects Inc. (Incorporated by reference to the Exhibits filed with the annual report on Form 10-K  for the year ended May 31, 2011 filed with the SEC on October 21, 2011)
31.1*   Section 302 Certification of Principal Executive Officer
32.1*   Certification Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350 as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
101.INS*   XBRL INSTANCE DOCUMENT
101.SCH*   XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION SCHEMA
101.CAL*   XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION CALCULATION LINKBASE
101.DEF*   XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION DEFINITION LINKBASE
101.LAB*   XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION LABEL LINKBASE
101.PRE*   XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION PRESENTATION LINKBASE

 

* Filed herewith.

 

 

 12 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

PREAXIA HEALTH CARE PAYMENT SYSTEMS INC.

 

By:  /s/Tom Zapatinas                                                                           

Name: Tom Zapatinas

Title:   President, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer

(Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer)

Date: September 30, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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