Company Quick10K Filing
Playa Hotels & Resorts
Closing Price ($) Shares Out (MM) Market Cap ($MM)
$0.00 131 $1,001
10-K 2020-02-27 Annual: 2019-12-31
10-Q 2019-11-06 Quarter: 2019-09-30
10-Q 2019-08-06 Quarter: 2019-06-30
10-Q 2019-05-07 Quarter: 2019-03-31
10-K 2019-02-28 Annual: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-11-06 Quarter: 2018-09-30
10-Q 2018-08-06 Quarter: 2018-06-30
10-Q 2018-05-07 Quarter: 2018-03-31
10-K 2018-03-01 Annual: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-11-07 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-Q 2017-08-04 Quarter: 2017-06-30
10-Q 2017-05-08 Quarter: 2017-03-31
8-K 2020-03-19 Officers, Amend Bylaw, Exhibits
8-K 2020-02-27 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-12-16 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2019-11-06 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-09-19 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2019-08-06 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-06-24 Officers
8-K 2019-05-16 Officers, Shareholder Vote, Exhibits
8-K 2019-05-07 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-02-28 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-12-28 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2018-12-17 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-11-06 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-09-17 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-09-12 Officers
8-K 2018-08-06 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-07-09 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-06-07 Enter Agreement, Off-BS Arrangement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-05-31 Enter Agreement, M&A, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-05-10 Amend Bylaw, Shareholder Vote, Exhibits
8-K 2018-05-07 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-03-27 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-03-21 Other Events
8-K 2018-03-01 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-02-26 Enter Agreement, Sale of Shares, Regulation FD, Exhibits
PLYA 2019-12-31
Part I
Item 1. Business.
Item 1A. Risk Factors.
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.
Item 2. Properties.
Item 3. Legal Proceedings.
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.
Part II
Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.
Item 6. Selected Financial Data.
Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Note 1. Organization, Operations and Basis of Presentation
Note 2. Significant Accounting Policies
Note 3. Revenue
Note 4. Business Combinations
Note 5. Property and Equipment
Note 6. Income Taxes
Note 7. Related Party Transactions
Note 8. Commitments and Contingencies
Note 9. Leases
Note 10. Ordinary Shares
Note 11. Warrants
Note 12. Share-Based Compensation
Note 13. Preferred Shares
Note 14. Earnings per Share
Note 15. Debt
Note 16. Derivative Financial Instruments
Note 17. Fair Value of Financial Instruments
Note 18. Employee Benefit Plan
Note 19. Other Balance Sheet Items
Note 20. Segment Information
Note 21. Quarterly Financial Information (Unaudited)
Note 22. Subsequent Events
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure.
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures.
Item 9B. Other Information.
Part III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance.
Item 11. Executive Compensation.
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters.
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services.
Part IV
Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules.
Item 16. Form 10-K Summary.
EX-4.1 ye19-exhibit41.htm
EX-21.1 ye19-exhibit211.htm
EX-23.1 ye19-exhibit231.htm
EX-31.1 ye19-exhibit311.htm
EX-31.2 ye19-exhibit312.htm
EX-32.1 ye19-exhibit321.htm
EX-32.2 ye19-exhibit322.htm

Playa Hotels & Resorts Earnings 2019-12-31

PLYA 10K Annual Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

Comparables ($MM TTM)
Ticker M Cap Assets Liab Rev G Profit Net Inc EBITDA EV G Margin EV/EBITDA ROA
MSC 4,101 2,999 2,614 271 -202 41 1,676 10% 40.9 -5%
EAGL 1,058 608 467 245 115 6 74 1,465 47% 19.7 1%
PLYA 1,027 2,144 1,320 644 0 -1 115 1,987 0% 17.3 -0%
MCRI 774 565 232 247 41 33 50 745 17% 14.9 6%
CNTY 259 340 153 197 0 4 19 285 0% 15.1 1%
CVEO 229 1,011 505 493 32 -41 59 614 6% 10.4 -4%
RLH 161 288 122 88 0 -10 5 195 0% 37.8 -4%
DDE 83 161 46 180 0 -0 7 72 0% 11.0 -0%
SKIS 71 389 293 187 0 1 37 270 0% 7.3 0%
CLUB 47 814 900 351 0 -15 24 208 0% 8.7 -2%

Document
false--12-31FY20190001692412 0.0100P15Y10.771000000.100.1050000000050000000013049473413096767113044012600.0325000000P1Y000.0050P50YP12YP18YP5YP4YP7YP3YP5YP3YP3Y0.33330.33330.333354608184609500 0001692412 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 2019-06-30 0001692412 2020-02-21 0001692412 2019-12-31 0001692412 2018-12-31 0001692412 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:ManagementFeesMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelPackageMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelNonPackageMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:CostReimbursementsMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelNonPackageMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:CostReimbursementsMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:CostReimbursementsMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelPackageMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelPackageMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelNonPackageMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:ManagementFeesMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:ManagementFeesMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedOtherComprehensiveIncomeMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:CommonStockMember 2016-12-31 0001692412 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:CommonStockMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedOtherComprehensiveIncomeMember 2016-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:CommonStockMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:TreasuryStockMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:TreasuryStockMember 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:CommonStockMember 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:TreasuryStockMember 2016-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:CommonStockMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember 2016-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedOtherComprehensiveIncomeMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:CommonStockMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:CommonStockMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:TreasuryStockMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedOtherComprehensiveIncomeMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 2016-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedOtherComprehensiveIncomeMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:TreasuryStockMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:TreasuryStockMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:TreasuryStockMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedOtherComprehensiveIncomeMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedOtherComprehensiveIncomeMember 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AdditionalPaidInCapitalMember 2016-12-31 0001692412 country:DO 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2019-07-02 2019-12-31 0001692412 country:DO 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 country:DO 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2019-07-01 2019-07-01 0001692412 us-gaap:AccountingStandardsUpdate201602Member us-gaap:RetainedEarningsMember 2019-01-01 0001692412 plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2019-10-01 2019-10-01 0001692412 srt:MaximumMember us-gaap:BuildingMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 srt:MaximumMember us-gaap:FurnitureAndFixturesMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 srt:MinimumMember us-gaap:FurnitureAndFixturesMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 srt:MinimumMember us-gaap:MachineryAndEquipmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 srt:MinimumMember us-gaap:BuildingMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 srt:MaximumMember us-gaap:MachineryAndEquipmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelPackageMember plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelPackageMember plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelPackageMember plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelNonPackageMember plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:CorporateAndReconcilingItemsMember plya:HotelNonPackageMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:CorporateAndReconcilingItemsMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelNonPackageMember plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:CostReimbursementsMember plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:CorporateAndReconcilingItemsMember plya:HotelPackageMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelPackageMember plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:CorporateAndReconcilingItemsMember plya:CostReimbursementsMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:ManagementFeesMember plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:ManagementFeesMember plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:ManagementFeesMember plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelNonPackageMember plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:CorporateAndReconcilingItemsMember plya:ManagementFeesMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelNonPackageMember plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:ManagementFeesMember plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:CostReimbursementsMember plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:CostReimbursementsMember plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:CostReimbursementsMember plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelPackageMember plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelPackageMember plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelNonPackageMember plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:CorporateAndReconcilingItemsMember plya:HotelNonPackageMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelPackageMember plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelNonPackageMember plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelNonPackageMember plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:CorporateAndReconcilingItemsMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:ManagementFeesMember plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelNonPackageMember plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:ManagementFeesMember plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:CorporateAndReconcilingItemsMember plya:ManagementFeesMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:CorporateAndReconcilingItemsMember plya:HotelPackageMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:ManagementFeesMember plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelPackageMember plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:ManagementFeesMember plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelPackageMember plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:ManagementFeesMember plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:CorporateAndReconcilingItemsMember plya:HotelNonPackageMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelNonPackageMember plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelNonPackageMember plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:CostReimbursementsMember plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:CostReimbursementsMember plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:ManagementFeesMember plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelPackageMember plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:ManagementFeesMember plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelNonPackageMember plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:CorporateAndReconcilingItemsMember plya:CostReimbursementsMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelPackageMember plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:CostReimbursementsMember plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelNonPackageMember plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:CorporateAndReconcilingItemsMember plya:ManagementFeesMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:CorporateAndReconcilingItemsMember plya:HotelPackageMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:HotelPackageMember plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:CostReimbursementsMember plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:ManagementFeesMember plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:CorporateAndReconcilingItemsMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:SagicorAssetsMember 2018-06-01 2018-06-01 0001692412 plya:SagicorAssetsMember plya:ManagementContractMember 2018-06-01 2018-06-01 0001692412 plya:SecondAmendedandRestatedCreditAgreementMember us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:JewelGrandeMontegoBayOneoftheTowersinMultiTowerCondominiumandSpaMember plya:SagicorAssetsMember 2018-06-01 2018-06-01 0001692412 plya:RecapitalizationMergerMember 2017-03-12 2017-03-12 0001692412 plya:SagicorAssetsMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:SagicorAssetsMember 2018-06-01 0001692412 us-gaap:CommonStockMember 2015-12-31 0001692412 srt:RestatementAdjustmentMember plya:SagicorAssetsMember 2018-06-01 0001692412 srt:ScenarioPreviouslyReportedMember plya:SagicorAssetsMember 2018-06-01 0001692412 srt:RestatementAdjustmentMember plya:SagicorAssetsMember 2018-06-01 2018-06-01 0001692412 srt:ScenarioPreviouslyReportedMember plya:SagicorAssetsMember 2018-06-01 2018-06-01 0001692412 plya:SagicorAssetsMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:SagicorAssetsMember 2018-06-02 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:SagicorAssetsMember us-gaap:CommonStockMember 2018-06-01 2018-06-01 0001692412 plya:SagicorAssetsMember us-gaap:CommonStockMember 2018-06-01 0001692412 us-gaap:LandBuildingsAndImprovementsMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:MachineryAndEquipmentMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:ConstructionInProgressMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:ConstructionInProgressMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:MachineryAndEquipmentMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:FurnitureAndFixturesMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:LandBuildingsAndImprovementsMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:FurnitureAndFixturesMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:LandMember 2017-07-12 2017-07-12 0001692412 us-gaap:ValuationAllowanceOfDeferredTaxAssetsMember 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:ValuationAllowanceOfDeferredTaxAssetsMember 2016-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:ValuationAllowanceOfDeferredTaxAssetsMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:ValuationAllowanceOfDeferredTaxAssetsMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:ValuationAllowanceOfDeferredTaxAssetsMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:ValuationAllowanceOfDeferredTaxAssetsMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:ValuationAllowanceOfDeferredTaxAssetsMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 country:NL 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 country:NL 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 country:DO us-gaap:ForeignCountryMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 country:NL us-gaap:ForeignCountryMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:PlayaRomanaMarB.V.Member country:DO 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 country:US us-gaap:DomesticCountryMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 country:NL us-gaap:ForeignCountryMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 country:JM us-gaap:ForeignCountryMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 country:MX us-gaap:ForeignCountryMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 country:MX us-gaap:ForeignCountryMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 country:JM us-gaap:ForeignCountryMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 country:US us-gaap:DomesticCountryMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 country:DO us-gaap:ForeignCountryMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:PlayaDominicanResortsB.V.Member country:DO 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:HyattandRealShareholderMember plya:DividendsonPreferredSharesMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:HyattMember plya:FranchiseFeesMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:LeasePaymentsMember srt:ChiefExecutiveOfficerMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:HyattMember plya:FranchiseFeesMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:HyattandRealShareholderMember plya:DividendsonPreferredSharesMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:RealShareholderMember plya:DeferredConsiderationAccretionMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:SagicorMember plya:InsurancePremiumsMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:RealShareholderMember plya:DeferredConsiderationAccretionMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:SabreMember plya:BookingandCallCenterServicesMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:SabreMember plya:BookingandCallCenterServicesMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:SagicorMember plya:CostReimbursementsMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:RealShareholderMember plya:DeferredConsiderationAccretionMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:SagicorMember plya:CostReimbursementsMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:RealShareholderMember plya:InterestExpenseonRelatedPartyDebtMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:LeasePaymentsMember srt:ChiefExecutiveOfficerMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:SagicorMember plya:InsurancePremiumsMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:RealShareholderMember plya:InterestExpenseonRelatedPartyDebtMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:LeasePaymentsMember srt:ChiefExecutiveOfficerMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:HyattandRealShareholderMember plya:DividendsonPreferredSharesMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:RealShareholderMember plya:InterestExpenseonRelatedPartyDebtMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:SabreMember plya:BookingandCallCenterServicesMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:SagicorMember plya:CostReimbursementsMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:SagicorMember plya:InsurancePremiumsMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:HyattMember plya:FranchiseFeesMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:RecapitalizationMergerMember us-gaap:PrincipalOwnerMember 2017-03-12 2017-03-12 0001692412 plya:RecapitalizationMergerMember us-gaap:PrincipalOwnerMember 2017-03-12 0001692412 plya:RealShareholderMember plya:RecapitalizationMergerMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2017-03-12 0001692412 plya:SagicorMember plya:AdvanceDepositsandCreditCardCollectionsPaidtoIncorrectEntityFollowingAcquisitionMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:RealShareholderMember plya:RecapitalizationMergerMember srt:AffiliatedEntityMember 2017-03-12 2017-03-12 0001692412 plya:LeasePaymentsMember plya:AffiliateofRelatedPartyMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:ForeignCountryMember us-gaap:TaxAndCustomsAdministrationNetherlandsMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:ForeignCountryMember us-gaap:TaxAndCustomsAdministrationNetherlandsMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:ForeignCountryMember us-gaap:TaxAndCustomsAdministrationNetherlandsMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AccountingStandardsUpdate201602Member 2019-01-01 0001692412 srt:MaximumMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 srt:MinimumMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 2019-10-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:WarrantsOrdinarySharesMember 2017-06-23 2017-06-23 0001692412 plya:WarrantsOrdinarySharesMember 2017-05-22 0001692412 srt:DirectorMember 2017-12-28 2017-12-28 0001692412 us-gaap:RestrictedStockUnitsRSUMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 2018-12-14 0001692412 us-gaap:RestrictedStockMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:WarrantsOrdinarySharesMember 2017-07-17 2017-07-17 0001692412 plya:RecapitalizationMergerMember us-gaap:CommonStockMember 2017-03-12 2017-03-12 0001692412 plya:EarnoutWarrantsMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:EarnoutWarrantsMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:EarnoutWarrantsMember us-gaap:CommonStockMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:EarnoutWarrantsMember 2018-08-08 2018-08-08 0001692412 us-gaap:PerformanceSharesMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 2019-05-16 0001692412 srt:MinimumMember us-gaap:PerformanceSharesMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 2017-03-10 0001692412 us-gaap:PerformanceSharesMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 srt:MaximumMember us-gaap:PerformanceSharesMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 srt:MaximumMember plya:EmployeesandExecutivesMember plya:RestrictedStockandRestrictedStockUnitsRSUsMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:RestrictedStockandRestrictedStockUnitsRSUsMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:EmployeesandExecutivesMember us-gaap:RestrictedStockUnitsRSUMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:EmployeesandExecutivesMember plya:RestrictedStockandRestrictedStockUnitsRSUsWithFiveYearVestingPeriodMember us-gaap:ShareBasedCompensationAwardTrancheOneMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:EmployeesandExecutivesMember plya:RestrictedStockandRestrictedStockUnitsRSUsWithFiveYearVestingPeriodMember us-gaap:ShareBasedCompensationAwardTrancheThreeMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:EmployeesandExecutivesMember plya:RestrictedStockandRestrictedStockUnitsRSUsWithFiveYearVestingPeriodMember us-gaap:ShareBasedCompensationAwardTrancheTwoMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:RestrictedStockandRestrictedStockUnitsRSUsMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:RestrictedStockandRestrictedStockUnitsRSUsMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:RestrictedStockandRestrictedStockUnitsRSUsMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:PerformanceSharesPerformanceConditionMember 2019-09-19 2019-09-19 0001692412 plya:PerformanceSharesPerformanceConditionMember 2019-01-02 2019-01-02 0001692412 plya:PerformanceSharesPerformanceConditionMember 2017-05-26 2017-05-26 0001692412 plya:PerformanceSharesPerformanceConditionMember 2018-01-02 2018-01-02 0001692412 plya:PerformanceSharesMarketConditionMember 2018-01-02 2018-01-02 0001692412 plya:PerformanceSharesMarketConditionMember 2019-01-02 2019-01-02 0001692412 plya:PerformanceSharesMarketConditionMember 2019-09-19 2019-09-19 0001692412 plya:PerformanceSharesMarketConditionMember 2017-05-26 2017-05-26 0001692412 us-gaap:PerformanceSharesMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:PerformanceSharesMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:PerformanceSharesMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:RestrictedStockandRestrictedStockUnitsRSUsMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:EmployeesandExecutivesMember plya:RestrictedStockandRestrictedStockUnitsRSUsWithThreeYearVestingPeriodMember us-gaap:ShareBasedCompensationAwardTrancheThreeMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:EmployeesandExecutivesMember plya:RestrictedStockandRestrictedStockUnitsRSUsWithThreeYearVestingPeriodMember us-gaap:ShareBasedCompensationAwardTrancheTwoMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:EmployeesandExecutivesMember plya:RestrictedStockandRestrictedStockUnitsRSUsWithThreeYearVestingPeriodMember us-gaap:ShareBasedCompensationAwardTrancheOneMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 srt:MinimumMember plya:EmployeesandExecutivesMember plya:RestrictedStockandRestrictedStockUnitsRSUsMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:EmployeesandExecutivesMember plya:RestrictedStockandRestrictedStockUnitsRSUsWithThreeYearVestingPeriodMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:EmployeesandExecutivesMember plya:RestrictedStockandRestrictedStockUnitsRSUsWithFiveYearVestingPeriodMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:RecapitalizationMergerMember 2017-03-12 0001692412 plya:RestrictedStockandRestrictedStockUnitsRSUsMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:PerformanceSharesMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:RestrictedStockandRestrictedStockUnitsRSUsMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:ConvertiblePreferredStockMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:EarnoutWarrantsMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:PerformanceSharesMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:PerformanceSharesMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:EarnoutWarrantsMember 2017-12-31 0001692412 plya:RestrictedStockandRestrictedStockUnitsRSUsMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:RevolvingCreditFacilityMember us-gaap:LineOfCreditMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:RevolvingCreditFacilityMember us-gaap:LineOfCreditMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:SecondAmendedandRestatedCreditAgreementMember us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember us-gaap:BaseRateMember 2018-06-07 2018-06-07 0001692412 plya:SecondAmendedandRestatedCreditAgreementMember us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember 2018-06-07 2018-06-07 0001692412 us-gaap:RevolvingCreditFacilityMember us-gaap:LineOfCreditMember 2017-04-27 0001692412 us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember us-gaap:LondonInterbankOfferedRateLIBORMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:InterestRateSwapMember 2018-03-29 0001692412 us-gaap:RevolvingCreditFacilityMember plya:ThirdAmendedandRestatedSeniorSecuredCreditFacilityMember us-gaap:LineOfCreditMember 2019-03-19 0001692412 srt:MaximumMember us-gaap:RevolvingCreditFacilityMember us-gaap:LineOfCreditMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember 2018-03-29 0001692412 us-gaap:RevolvingCreditFacilityMember plya:ThirdAmendedandRestatedSeniorSecuredCreditFacilityMember us-gaap:LineOfCreditMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:RevolvingCreditFacilityMember us-gaap:LineOfCreditMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:SecondAmendedandRestatedCreditAgreementMember us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember us-gaap:LondonInterbankOfferedRateLIBORMember 2018-06-07 2018-06-07 0001692412 srt:MinimumMember us-gaap:RevolvingCreditFacilityMember us-gaap:LineOfCreditMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:IncrementalTermLoanMember us-gaap:SeniorNotesMember us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:RevolvingCreditFacilityMember us-gaap:LineOfCreditMember us-gaap:LondonInterbankOfferedRateLIBORMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:SecondAmendedandRestatedCreditAgreementMember us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember 2018-06-07 0001692412 plya:SeniorNotesDue2020Member us-gaap:SeniorNotesMember 2017-04-27 0001692412 plya:IncrementalTermLoanMember us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember us-gaap:LondonInterbankOfferedRateLIBORMember 2017-12-06 2017-12-06 0001692412 plya:AmendedandRestatedSeniorSecuredCreditFacilityMember us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember 2017-04-27 0001692412 plya:IncrementalTermLoanMember us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember 2017-12-06 0001692412 us-gaap:RevolvingCreditFacilityMember us-gaap:LineOfCreditMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:AmendedandRestatedSeniorSecuredCreditFacilityMember us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember us-gaap:LondonInterbankOfferedRateLIBORMember 2017-12-06 2017-12-06 0001692412 us-gaap:DerivativeFinancialInstrumentsLiabilitiesMember us-gaap:InterestRateSwapMember us-gaap:DesignatedAsHedgingInstrumentMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:DerivativeFinancialInstrumentsLiabilitiesMember us-gaap:InterestRateSwapMember us-gaap:DesignatedAsHedgingInstrumentMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:InterestRateSwapOneMember 2018-03-29 0001692412 plya:InterestRateSwapTwoMember 2018-03-29 0001692412 us-gaap:InterestRateSwapMember us-gaap:InterestExpenseMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:InterestRateSwapMember us-gaap:InterestExpenseMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:InterestRateSwapMember us-gaap:InterestExpenseMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:DerivativeFinancialInstrumentsLiabilitiesMember us-gaap:InterestRateSwapMember us-gaap:NondesignatedMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:DerivativeFinancialInstrumentsLiabilitiesMember us-gaap:InterestRateSwapMember us-gaap:NondesignatedMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedNetGainLossFromDesignatedOrQualifyingCashFlowHedgesMember 2018-04-01 2018-06-30 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedNetGainLossFromDesignatedOrQualifyingCashFlowHedgesMember 2018-10-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedNetGainLossFromDesignatedOrQualifyingCashFlowHedgesMember 2017-04-01 2017-06-30 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedNetGainLossFromDesignatedOrQualifyingCashFlowHedgesMember 2018-01-01 2018-03-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedGainLossNetCashFlowHedgeParentMember 2019-07-01 2019-09-30 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedGainLossNetCashFlowHedgeParentMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedNetGainLossFromDesignatedOrQualifyingCashFlowHedgesMember 2018-07-01 2018-09-30 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedNetGainLossFromDesignatedOrQualifyingCashFlowHedgesMember 2016-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedNetGainLossFromDesignatedOrQualifyingCashFlowHedgesMember 2017-07-01 2017-09-30 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedGainLossNetCashFlowHedgeParentMember 2019-04-01 2019-06-30 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedNetGainLossFromDesignatedOrQualifyingCashFlowHedgesMember 2017-10-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedGainLossNetCashFlowHedgeParentMember 2019-01-01 2019-03-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedNetGainLossFromDesignatedOrQualifyingCashFlowHedgesMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedNetGainLossFromDesignatedOrQualifyingCashFlowHedgesMember 2017-01-01 2017-03-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedGainLossNetCashFlowHedgeParentMember 2019-10-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedGainLossNetCashFlowHedgeParentMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:AccumulatedNetGainLossFromDesignatedOrQualifyingCashFlowHedgesMember 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel3Member us-gaap:EstimateOfFairValueFairValueDisclosureMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel1Member us-gaap:EstimateOfFairValueFairValueDisclosureMember us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel3Member us-gaap:EstimateOfFairValueFairValueDisclosureMember us-gaap:LineOfCreditMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:CarryingReportedAmountFairValueDisclosureMember us-gaap:LineOfCreditMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:CarryingReportedAmountFairValueDisclosureMember us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel1Member us-gaap:EstimateOfFairValueFairValueDisclosureMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel2Member us-gaap:EstimateOfFairValueFairValueDisclosureMember us-gaap:LineOfCreditMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:CarryingReportedAmountFairValueDisclosureMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel1Member us-gaap:EstimateOfFairValueFairValueDisclosureMember us-gaap:LineOfCreditMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel3Member us-gaap:EstimateOfFairValueFairValueDisclosureMember us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel2Member us-gaap:EstimateOfFairValueFairValueDisclosureMember us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel2Member us-gaap:EstimateOfFairValueFairValueDisclosureMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:InterestRateSwapMember us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel1Member us-gaap:FairValueMeasurementsRecurringMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:InterestRateSwapMember us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel3Member us-gaap:FairValueMeasurementsRecurringMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:InterestRateSwapMember us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel2Member us-gaap:FairValueMeasurementsRecurringMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:InterestRateSwapMember us-gaap:FairValueMeasurementsRecurringMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:InterestRateSwapMember us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel1Member us-gaap:FairValueMeasurementsRecurringMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:InterestRateSwapMember us-gaap:FairValueMeasurementsRecurringMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:InterestRateSwapMember us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel2Member us-gaap:FairValueMeasurementsRecurringMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:InterestRateSwapMember us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel3Member us-gaap:FairValueMeasurementsRecurringMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel2Member us-gaap:EstimateOfFairValueFairValueDisclosureMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel1Member us-gaap:EstimateOfFairValueFairValueDisclosureMember us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel3Member us-gaap:EstimateOfFairValueFairValueDisclosureMember us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel1Member us-gaap:EstimateOfFairValueFairValueDisclosureMember us-gaap:LineOfCreditMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel3Member us-gaap:EstimateOfFairValueFairValueDisclosureMember us-gaap:LineOfCreditMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel1Member us-gaap:EstimateOfFairValueFairValueDisclosureMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:CarryingReportedAmountFairValueDisclosureMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:CarryingReportedAmountFairValueDisclosureMember us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel2Member us-gaap:EstimateOfFairValueFairValueDisclosureMember us-gaap:MediumTermNotesMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel3Member us-gaap:EstimateOfFairValueFairValueDisclosureMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:CarryingReportedAmountFairValueDisclosureMember us-gaap:LineOfCreditMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel2Member us-gaap:EstimateOfFairValueFairValueDisclosureMember us-gaap:LineOfCreditMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:ComputerSoftwareIntangibleAssetMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:ComputerSoftwareIntangibleAssetMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 2018-01-01 0001692412 plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:LicensingAgreementsMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OtherIntangibleAssetsMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:ComputerSoftwareIntangibleAssetMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:ComputerSoftwareIntangibleAssetMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 plya:ManagementContractMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 plya:ManagementContractMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:LicensingAgreementsMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OtherIntangibleAssetsMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:MaterialReconcilingItemsMember plya:ManagementFeesMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:MaterialReconcilingItemsMember plya:CompulsoryTipsMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:MaterialReconcilingItemsMember us-gaap:ProductAndServiceOtherMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:MaterialReconcilingItemsMember plya:CostReimbursementsMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:MaterialReconcilingItemsMember plya:CostReimbursementsMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:MaterialReconcilingItemsMember us-gaap:ProductAndServiceOtherMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:MaterialReconcilingItemsMember plya:CompulsoryTipsMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:MaterialReconcilingItemsMember plya:ManagementFeesMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:MaterialReconcilingItemsMember us-gaap:ProductAndServiceOtherMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:MaterialReconcilingItemsMember plya:ManagementFeesMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:MaterialReconcilingItemsMember plya:CompulsoryTipsMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:MaterialReconcilingItemsMember plya:CostReimbursementsMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:MaterialReconcilingItemsMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:MaterialReconcilingItemsMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:MaterialReconcilingItemsMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:CorporateNonSegmentMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:CorporateNonSegmentMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:CorporateNonSegmentMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:CorporateNonSegmentMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember plya:JamaicaSegmentMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember plya:PacificCoastSegmentMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember plya:YucatanPeninsulaSegmentMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:CorporateNonSegmentMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 us-gaap:OperatingSegmentsMember plya:DominicanRepublicSegmentMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 2018-07-01 2018-09-30 0001692412 2018-01-01 2018-03-31 0001692412 2018-10-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 2018-04-01 2018-06-30 0001692412 2019-01-01 2019-03-31 0001692412 2019-04-01 2019-06-30 0001692412 2019-07-01 2019-09-30 0001692412 us-gaap:RevolvingCreditFacilityMember us-gaap:SubsequentEventMember 2020-02-18 2020-02-18 0001692412 us-gaap:SubsequentEventMember 2020-01-01 2020-02-27 0001692412 us-gaap:RevolvingCreditFacilityMember us-gaap:SubsequentEventMember 2020-02-25 2020-02-25 0001692412 us-gaap:SubsequentEventMember 2020-02-12 2020-02-12 0001692412 srt:ParentCompanyMember 2019-12-31 0001692412 srt:ParentCompanyMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 srt:ParentCompanyMember 2017-01-01 2017-12-31 0001692412 srt:ParentCompanyMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 srt:ParentCompanyMember 2019-01-01 2019-12-31 0001692412 srt:ParentCompanyMember 2017-12-31 0001692412 srt:ParentCompanyMember 2016-12-31 0001692412 srt:ParentCompanyMember us-gaap:ForeignCountryMember us-gaap:TaxAndCustomsAdministrationNetherlandsMember 2018-12-31 0001692412 srt:ParentCompanyMember us-gaap:ForeignCountryMember us-gaap:TaxAndCustomsAdministrationNetherlandsMember 2018-01-01 2018-12-31 0001692412 srt:ParentCompanyMember us-gaap:ForeignCountryMember us-gaap:TaxAndCustomsAdministrationNetherlandsMember 2019-12-31 xbrli:shares iso4217:USD iso4217:USD xbrli:shares iso4217:EUR xbrli:shares plya:unit xbrli:pure plya:resort plya:contract plya:criteria plya:entity plya:day plya:segment
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
___________________________________________________
FORM 10-K
 _______________________________________________
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019

OR
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934.

COMMISSION FILE NO. 001-38012
 Playa Hotels & Resorts N.V.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

The
Netherlands

98-1346104
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
 
(IRS Employer Identification Number)
Prins Bernhardplein 200
 
 
1097 JB
Amsterdam,
 the
Netherlands
 
Not Applicable
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)
 
(Zip Code)
+ 31 20 571 12 02
(Registrant's Telephone Number, Including Area Code)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of Each Class
Trading Symbol(s)
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
Ordinary Shares, €0.10 par value
PLYA
NASDAQ
 
 
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.      Yes      No   

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.   Yes      No    
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past ninety (90) days.    Yes        No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes        No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
 
Large accelerated filer
 
Accelerated filer
 
 
Non-accelerated filer  
 
Smaller reporting company         
 
 
 
 
 
Emerging growth company
 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.    

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).    Yes      No    

As of June 30, 2019, the aggregate market value of the registrant's ordinary shares, €0.10 par value, held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $431.5 million (based upon the closing sale price of the registrant's ordinary shares on June 30, 2019 on the NASDAQ).

As of February 21, 2020, there were 129,173,961 shares of the registrant’s ordinary shares, €0.10 par value, outstanding.




DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K incorporates by reference portions of the registrant's Proxy Statement for its 2020 annual general meeting of shareholders to be held on May 14, 2020.




Playa Hotels & Resorts N.V.
TABLE OF CONTENTS FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019
 
 
Page
Item 1.
Item 1A.
Item 1B.
Item 2.
Item 3.
Item 4.
Item 5.
Item 6.
Item 7.
Item 7A.
Item 8.
Item 9.
Item 9A.
Item 9B.
Item 10.
Item 11.
Item 12.
Item 13.
Item 14.
Item 15.
Item 16.
 




3


FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
This annual report contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements relate to expectations, beliefs, projections, future plans and strategies, anticipated events or trends and similar expressions concerning matters that are not historical facts. Forward-looking statements reflect our current views with respect to, among other things, our capital resources, portfolio performance and results of operations. Likewise, all of our statements regarding anticipated growth in our operations, anticipated market conditions, demographics and results of operations are forward-looking statements. In some cases, you can identify these forward-looking statements by the use of terminology such as “outlook,” “believes,” “expects,” “potential,” “continues,” “may,” “will,” “should,” “could,” “seeks,” “approximately,” “predicts,” “intends,” “plans,” “estimates,” “anticipates” or the negative version of these words or other comparable words or phrases.
The forward-looking statements contained in this annual report reflect our current views about future events and are subject to numerous known and unknown risks, uncertainties, assumptions and changes in circumstances that may cause our actual results to differ significantly from those expressed in any forward-looking statement. The following factors, among others, could cause actual results and future events to differ materially from those set forth or contemplated in the forward-looking statements:
general economic uncertainty and the effect of general economic conditions on the lodging industry in particular;
the popularity of the all-inclusive resort model, particularly in the luxury segment of the resort market;
changes in economic, social or political conditions in the regions we operate, including changes in perception of public-safety and changes in the supply of rooms from competing resorts;
the success and continuation of our relationships with Hyatt Hotels Corporation (“Hyatt”) and Hilton Worldwide Holdings, Inc. (“Hilton”);
the volatility of currency exchange rates;
the success of our branding or rebranding initiatives with our current portfolio and resorts that may be acquired in the future, including the recent rebranding of two of our resorts under the all-inclusive “Hilton” brand and rebranding of certain resorts acquired from Sagicor (as defined below) in Jamaica;
our failure to successfully complete acquisition, expansion, repair and renovation projects in the timeframes and at the costs and returns anticipated;
changes we may make in timing and scope of our development and renovation projects;
significant increases in construction and development costs;
significant increases in the cost of utilities;
our ability to obtain and maintain financing arrangements on attractive terms;
the impact of and changes in governmental regulations or the enforcement thereof, tax laws and rates, accounting guidance and similar matters in regions in which we operate;
the effectiveness of our internal controls and our corporate policies and procedures and the success and timing of the remediation efforts for the material weakness that we identified in our internal control over financial reporting;
changes in personnel and availability of qualified personnel;
environmental uncertainties and risks related to adverse weather conditions and natural disasters;
outbreak of widespread contagious diseases;
dependence on third parties to provide Internet, telecommunications and network connectivity to our data centers;
the volatility of the market price and liquidity of our ordinary shares and other of our securities; and
the increasingly competitive environment in which we operate.

4


 
While forward-looking statements reflect our good faith beliefs, they are not guarantees of future performance. The Company disclaims any obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement to reflect changes in underlying assumptions or factors, new information, data or methods, future events or other changes after the date of this annual report, except as required by applicable law. You should not place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements, which are based only on information currently available to us (or to third parties making the forward-looking statements).

Unless the context requires otherwise, in this annual report, we use the terms “the Company,” “Playa,” “our company,” “we,” “us,” “our” and similar references to refer to Playa Hotels & Resorts N.V., a Dutch public limited liability company (naamloze vennootschap), and, where appropriate, its subsidiaries.
Explanatory Note
At 12:00 a.m. Central European Time on March 12, 2017 (the “Closing Time”), we consummated a business combination (the “Pace Business Combination”) pursuant to a transaction agreement by and among us, Playa Hotels & Resorts B.V. (our “Predecessor”) and Pace Holdings Corp. (“Pace”), an entity that was formed as a special purpose acquisition company, for the purpose of effecting a merger or other similar business combination with one or more target businesses, and New Pace Holdings Corp. In connection with the Pace Business Combination, which is described in detail in our Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) on March 14, 2017, we changed our name from Porto Holdco N.V. to Playa Hotels & Resorts N.V. In addition, in connection with the Pace Business Combination, (i) prior to the consummation of the Pace Business Combination, all of our Predecessor's cumulative redeemable preferred shares were purchased and were subsequently extinguished upon the reverse merger of our Predecessor with and into us, and (ii) Pace's former shareholders and our Predecessor's former shareholders received a combination of our ordinary shares and warrants as consideration in the Pace Business Combination. Our Predecessor was the accounting acquirer in the Pace Business Combination, and the business, properties, and management team of our Predecessor prior to the Pace Business Combination are the business, properties, and management team of the Company following the Pace Business Combination.
Our financial statements, other financial information and operating statistics presented in this Form 10-K reflect the results of our Predecessor for all periods prior to the Closing Time. Our financial statements and other financial information also include the consolidation of Pace from the Closing Time of the Pace Business Combination to December 31, 2019.
 
On June 1, 2018, we completed a business combination with certain companies affiliated with Sagicor Group Jamaica Limited (collectively “Sagicor”) whereby Sagicor contributed to us a portfolio of five all-inclusive resorts, two adjacent oceanfront developable land sites with a potential density of up to 700 rooms and all of Sagicor's rights to “The Jewel” hotel brand (collectively the “Sagicor Assets”). The resorts included in the portfolio consist of the 495-room Hilton Rose Hall Resort & Spa, the 268-room Jewel Runaway Bay Beach Resort & Waterpark, the 250-room Jewel Dunn’s River Beach Resort & Spa, the 225-room Jewel Paradise Cove Beach Resort & Spa and the 217-room Jewel Grande Montego Bay Resort & Spa (where we own 88 rooms and manage 129 rooms). Previously, the resorts we acquired from Sagicor were managed by an external third-party but we assumed management of these resorts upon the closing of the transaction. Consideration for the Sagicor Assets consisted of 20,000,000 of our ordinary shares and $93.1 million in cash. In addition, two individuals nominated by Sagicor joined Playa’s Board of Directors upon the consummation of the transaction.

Our financial statements and other financial information include the consolidation of the Sagicor Assets from June 2, 2018 to December 31, 2019.

5


PART I
Item 1. Business.
Overview

Playa is a leading owner, operator and developer of all-inclusive resorts in prime beachfront locations in popular vacation destinations in Mexico and the Caribbean. As of December 31, 2019, we owned and/or managed a total portfolio consisting of 23 resorts (8,690 rooms) located in Mexico, Jamaica and the Dominican Republic. Playa’s strategy is to leverage its globally recognized brand partnerships in order to capitalize on the gap between the 14% U.S. brand-affiliated room supply in the regions in which we operate and the nearly 45% of visitors that come from the U.S. This strategy should drive outsized returns for our shareholders and enhance the lives of our associates and the communities in which we operate.

We believe that the resorts we own and manage are among the finest all-inclusive resorts in the markets they serve. We believe that our resorts have a competitive advantage due to their location, brand affiliations, extensive amenities, scale and design. Our portfolio is comprised of all-inclusive resorts that share some combination of the following characteristics:
Prime beachfront locations;
Globally recognized U.S. brand partners;
Convenient air access from a number of North American and other international gateway markets;
Strategic locations in popular vacation destinations in countries with strong government commitments to tourism;
High quality physical condition; and
Capacity for further revenues and earnings growth through incremental renovation or repositioning opportunities.

Our all-inclusive resorts provide guests an attractive vacation experience that offers both compelling value and price certainty, while at the same time providing Playa more predictable revenue, expense and occupancy rates than traditional full-service hotel business models. All-inclusive guests book and pay further in advance, resulting in lower cancellation rates and incremental sales of upgrades, premium services and amenities not included in the all-inclusive package pricing.  

We have strategic relationships with both Hyatt and Hilton, two of the preeminent globally recognized hotel brands. Hyatt’s and Hiltons selection of Playa as its strategic partner in the development and management of all-inclusive resorts throughout the Caribbean, Mexico and Latin America reflects their confidence and conviction in Playa’s best-in-class stewardship of all-inclusive resorts and provides us with unique advantages, including the following:
Access to worldwide reservation systems, global marketing scale, and approximately 125 million hotel loyalty members to drive revenue growth;
Higher propensity for guests to book direct, which results in significantly improved returns over bookings from online tour operators;
Lower customer acquisition costs, and higher net Average Daily Rates (ADRs);
Higher Net Asset value for branded hotels affiliated with global franchisors;
Lower cost of financing for properties affiliated with top tier brands;
Brand partners are a second set of eyes, focused on maximizing returns;
Immediate customer recognition for a new or converted resort;
Exposure to new consumers, who may not be familiar with the all-inclusive model;
Access to guests from different regions, creating a better segmentation mix, reducing the risk from an owner’s perspective;
Stronger marketing and public relations presence;
Brands are proven to reduce price sensitivity and encourage purchase decisions, resulting in higher revenues;
Branded resorts, on average, have higher occupancy than non-branded resorts;
Branded resorts have higher rates of group business; and
Branded resorts have lower failure rates.


6


We have an exclusive agreement with Panama Jack International, Inc. (“Panama Jack”), a consumer products company that focuses on resort clothes and furnishings and sun care products, that provides us with the right to develop and own and/or manage all-inclusive resorts under the Panama Jack brand in certain regions. We currently own two resorts operated under the Panama Jack Brand. We also own and operate five resorts in Jamaica that we acquired from Sagicor in June 2018, four of which are operated under the Jewel brand. Other resorts in our portfolio operate under the Dreams, Sanctuary, and Secrets brands.

In the fourth quarter of 2019, we completed and opened our first ever ground-up development project, the Hyatt Ziva and Hyatt Zilara Cap Cana. We also completed significant renovation work at the Hilton Playa del Carmen All-Inclusive Resort, Hilton La Romana All-Inclusive Adult Resort and the Hilton La Romana All-Inclusive Family Resort during the fourth quarter of 2019 as part of the rebranding and conversion of those respective hotels.

We consider each of our hotels to be an operating segment, none of which meets the threshold for a reportable segment. For further discussion about our operating segments and financial information about the geographic regions in which we operate, please see Segment Results in Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and Note 20 to the accompanying Consolidated Financial Statements.
Our Competitive Strengths
We believe the following competitive strengths distinguish us from other owners, operators, developers and acquirers of all-inclusive resorts:
Premier Collection of All-Inclusive Resorts in Highly Desirable Locations. We believe that our portfolio represents a premier collection of all-inclusive resorts. Our award-winning resorts are located in prime beachfront locations in popular vacation destinations, including Cancún, Playa del Carmen, Puerto Vallarta and Los Cabos in Mexico, Punta Cana in the Dominican Republic and Montego Bay in Jamaica. Guests may conveniently access our resorts from a number of North American and other international gateway markets.
Diversified Portfolio of All-Inclusive Resorts. We currently offer our guests resorts located in four main geographic markets and across a number of price points. This diversity helps to foster loyalty among our guests and to drive repeat business. As of December 31, 2019, we operated resorts under eight brands. Having multiple brands to offer owners and developers is essential to our ability to secure management agreements and high-return acquisitions since having a family of brands mitigates the risks of brand-on-brand supply growth and subsequent cannibalization.
Exclusive Focus on the All-Inclusive Model. We believe the all-inclusive resort model is increasing in popularity as more people come to appreciate the benefits of a high-quality vacation experience that couples value and a high degree of cost certainty. Because our guests have pre-purchased their vacation packages, we also have the opportunity to earn incremental revenue if our guests purchase upgrades, premium services and amenities that are not included in the all-inclusive package.
Integrated and Scalable Operating Platform. We believe we have developed a scalable resort management platform designed to improve operating efficiency at the 19 resorts we currently manage. Our platform enables us to integrate additional resorts we may acquire, manage hotels owned by third-parties and potentially internalize the management of the four resorts we own, but do not manage. Our platform also enables managers of each of our key functions, including sales, marketing and resort management, to observe, analyze, share and respond to trends throughout our portfolio. As a result, we are able to implement management initiatives on a real-time and portfolio-wide basis.
Strategic Relationship with Hyatt to Develop All-Inclusive Resorts. Our strategic relationship with Hyatt, which indirectly beneficially owned approximately 9.2% of our ordinary shares as of December 31, 2019, provides us with a range of benefits, including the right to operate certain of our existing resorts under the Hyatt Ziva and Hyatt Zilara brands (the Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands”) in certain countries and, through December 31, 2021, certain rights with respect to the development and management of future Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands resorts in Mexico, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, Jamaica and Panama (the Market Area”).
The Hyatt Ziva brand is marketed as an all-inclusive resort brand for all-ages and the Hyatt Zilara brand is marketed as an all-inclusive resort brand for adults-only. We believe these brands are currently Hyatt’s primary vehicle for all-inclusive resort growth and demonstrate Hyatt’s commitment to the all-inclusive model. The Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands have access to Hyatt’s low cost and high margin distribution channels, such as Hyatt guests using the World of Hyatt® guest loyalty program (which had approximately 22 million members as of December 31, 2019), Hyatt’s reservation system, Hyatt's mobile application and website and Hyatt’s extensive group sales business. We believe that our strategic relationship with Hyatt and the increasing awareness of our all-inclusive resort brands among potential guests will enable

7


us to increase the number of bookings made through lower cost sales channels, such as direct bookings through Hyatt and our company and resort websites.
Strategic Relationship with Hilton to Develop All-Inclusive Resorts. Our strategic alliance with Hilton affords us with the opportunity to leverage our management expertise and obtain access to Hilton's global portfolio of brands and over 103 million Hilton Honors members as of December 31, 2019. During 2018, we successfully converted two of our resorts into three Hilton all-inclusive resorts, with the potential to convert, develop or manage up to an additional eight resorts in certain locations in the Caribbean, Mexico, and South and Central America by 2025. Our strategic alliance with Hilton further diversifies our portfolio, enables us to reach more potential guests and greatly reduces our customer acquisition costs.
Experienced Leadership with a Proven Track Record. Our senior management team has significant experience in the lodging industry, including operating all-inclusive resorts.
Mr. Wardinski, our Chief Executive Officer has over 30 years of experience in the hospitality industry, founded our Predecessor and previously was the Chief Executive Officer of two lodging companies: Barceló Crestline Corporation, an independent hotel owner, lessee and manager; and Crestline Capital Corporation, a New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) listed hotel owner, lessee and manager. Mr. Wardinski was also the non-executive chairman of the board of directors of Highland Hospitality Corporation, an NYSE-listed owner of upscale full-service, premium limited-service and extended-stay properties. Mr. Wardinski held other leadership roles within the industry including Senior Vice President and Treasurer of Host Marriott Corporation (now Host Hotels and Resorts (NYSE: HST)) and various roles with Marriott International, Inc. As of December 31, 2019, approximately 2.3% of our outstanding ordinary shares are beneficially owned by Mr. Wardinski.
Mr. Stadlin, our Chief Operating Officer and Chief Executive Officer of our resort management company, has over 40 years of experience in the hospitality industry and was employed by Marriott International, Inc. for 33 years during which he spent 12 years working on its expansion into Latin America.
Mr. Froemming, our Chief Commercial Officer, has over 23 years of experience in the hospitality industry and spent 10 years as the sales and marketing leader of Sandals Resorts International, leading the growth of its two well-known all-inclusive brands, Sandals and Beaches.
Mr. Hymel, our Chief Financial Officer, has over 17 years of experience working within the hospitality sector. He previously served as Senior Vice President and Treasurer of Playa and has worked at Barceló Crestline Corporation and Crestline Capital Corporation, two hotel and resort owners and operators.
Our Business and Growth Strategies
Our goal is to be the leading owner, operator and developer of all-inclusive beachfront resorts in the markets we serve and to generate attractive risk-adjusted returns above our cost of capital and create value for our shareholders by implementing the following business and growth strategies:
Selectively Pursue Strategic Growth Opportunities. The all-inclusive segment of the lodging industry is highly fragmented. We believe that we are well positioned to grow our portfolio through acquisitions and partnerships in the all-inclusive segment of the lodging industry, such as the recent acquisition of the Sagicor Assets. We believe that our extensive experience in all-inclusive resort operations, brand relationships, acquisition, expansion, renovation, repositioning and rebranding, established and scalable management platform and ability to offer NASDAQ-listed ordinary shares to potential resort sellers will make us a preferred asset acquirer.
Secure New Management Agreements. We intend to pursue opportunities to capitalize on our scalable and integrated resort management platform and our expertise and experience with managing all-inclusive resorts, by seeking to manage all-inclusive resorts owned by third parties for a fee and to potentially, over time, internalize the management of resorts we own that are currently managed by a third-party. For example, in September 2017, we entered into a long-term agreement to manage the 323-room Sanctuary Resort in Cap Cana, and in June 2018, we secured a long-term agreement to manage 129 rooms at the Jewel Grande Montego Bay Resort & Spa. We will also look to make minority investments in high return projects to obtain management agreements.
Utilization of New Technologies and Leverage of Big Data. We utilize numerous technologies aimed at improving guest satisfaction and shareholder returns. We recently launched a new website using a new search engine and metasearch optimization tools aimed at driving direct bookings, our lowest cost customer acquisition channel. As a result, we benefited

8


from more direct business at our Playa-managed hotels in 2019. Our percentage of direct stays increased from 17.2% in 2018 to 23.1% in 2019 and our percentage of direct bookings, including future stays, increased from 21.6% in 2018 to 30.3% in 2019.
We also recently launched a new end-to-end technology at select resorts which uses sophisticated algorithms to identify in real-time what upgrades, packages and pricing to offer guests. This enables us to provide guests with several options to enhance their experience, while increasing revenue post-booking. Other new technological innovations underway include our recently launched travel agent portal, which facilitates travel agent bookings without the additional commission layer of a tour and travel operator, as well as the continued launch of our new yield management system, which should maximize guest revenues by optimizing both package rates and channel mix.
Additionally, by virtue of our partnerships with Hyatt and Hilton, we have greatly increased our access to member data and analytics with respect to millions of guests, further enabling us to drive lower customer acquisition costs, bookings and revenues.
Disposition of non-core assets. We continuously monitor, review and optimize our portfolio to align with our strategic vision and maximize our return on invested capital. As part of this ongoing process, we may sell assets that no longer fit our criteria for capital investment. We will look to use proceeds from asset sales to pay down debt, repurchase common shares, reinvest in projects within our existing portfolio or pursue new growth opportunities.
Playa’s Hyatt Resort Agreements

For each Playa resort using a Hyatt All-Inclusive Brand, the Hyatt franchise agreements (the “Hyatt Resort Agreements”) grant to each of Playa and any third party owner for whom Playa serves as hotel operator (each a “Resort Owner”) the right, and such Resort Owner undertakes the obligation, to use Hyatt’s hotel system and system standards to build or convert and operate the resort subject to the franchise agreement. Each franchise agreement between Hyatt and such Resort Owner has an initial 15-year term and Hyatt has two options to extend the term for an additional term of five years each or 10 years in the aggregate. Hyatt provides initial and ongoing training and guidance, marketing assistance and other assistance to each Resort Owner (and Playa as the resort’s manager) in connection with the resort’s development and operation. As part of this assistance, Hyatt reviews and approves the initial design and related elements of the resort. Hyatt also arranges for the provision of certain mandatory services, as well as (at the Resort Owner’s option) certain non-mandatory services, relating to the resort’s development and operation. In return, each Resort Owner agrees to operate the resort according to Hyatt’s operating procedures and its brand, quality assurance and other standards and specifications. This includes complying with Hyatt’s requirements relating to the central reservation system, global distribution systems and alternative distribution systems. In addition to the Hyatt franchise agreement, each Hyatt franchise Resort Owner enters into additional agreements with Hyatt pertaining to the development and operation of such new Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brand resort, including a trademark sublicense agreement, a World of Hyatt® guest loyalty program agreement, a chain marketing services agreement and a reservations agreement.

We continue to work with Hyatt to jointly improve all aspects of the brand system and standards for the Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands. Hyatt owns the intellectual property rights relating to the Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands, but we will have rights to use certain innovations that Hyatt and Playa jointly developed for the Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands.

The Hyatt Strategic Alliance Agreement

We have entered into the Hyatt Strategic Alliance Agreement, as amended by the First Amendment to the Hyatt Strategic Alliance Agreement (with “Hyatt Strategic Alliance Agreement”) with Hyatt pursuant to which Playa and Hyatt have provided each other a right of first offer through December 31, 2021, with respect to any proposed offer or arrangement to acquire the rights to own and operating an all-inclusive resort at the level of quality and service consistent with the Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands (a “Hyatt All-Inclusive Opportunity”) in the Market Area. If Playa intends to accept a Hyatt All-Inclusive Opportunity, Playa must notify Hyatt of such Hyatt All-Inclusive Opportunity and Hyatt has 10 business days to notify Playa of its decision to either accept or reject this Hyatt All-Inclusive Opportunity. If Hyatt accepts the Hyatt All-Inclusive Opportunity, Playa must negotiate in good faith with Hyatt the terms of a franchise agreement and related documents with respect to such property, provided that Playa acquires such property on terms acceptable to Playa within 60 days of offering such opportunity to Hyatt. If Hyatt intends to accept a Hyatt All-Inclusive Opportunity, Hyatt must notify Playa and Playa has to notify Hyatt within 10 business days of its decision to either accept or reject this Hyatt All-Inclusive Opportunity. If Playa accepts the Hyatt All-Inclusive Opportunity, Hyatt must negotiate in good faith with Playa the terms of a management agreement and other documents under which Playa would manage such Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brand resort (subject to a franchise agreement between Hyatt and the affiliate of Hyatt that would own such property), provided that Hyatt acquires such property on terms acceptable to it within 60 days of offering such opportunity to Playa. If Playa or Hyatt fails to notify each other of its decision or declines its right of first offer within the aforementioned 10 business day period, or if Playa or Hyatt

9


determine after good-faith discussions that we cannot reach mutual acceptance of terms under which the development property would be licensed as a Hyatt Ziva or Hyatt Zilara hotel, such right of first offer will expire and Playa or Hyatt will be able to acquire, develop and operate the property related to such Hyatt All-Inclusive Opportunity free of any restrictions. In addition, if either party is approached by a third party with respect to the management or franchising, as applicable, of an all-inclusive resort in the Market Area, and such third party has not identified a manager or franchisor, as applicable, for the resort, the parties will notify each other and provide an introduction to the third party for the purposes of negotiating a management agreement or franchise agreement, in the case of Hyatt.

The Hilton Strategic Alliance Agreement

We have entered into a Strategic Alliance Agreement with Hilton pursuant to which Hilton has granted to Playa, a right of first offer in the event that Hilton receives a letter of intent from a third party to franchise or manage a hotel under the Hilton all-inclusive Resort brand (the “Hilton Brand”), within certain countries located in the Caribbean (the “Caribbean Target Markets”) and Mexico, and certain countries in Central and South America (the “Mexico, Central and South America Target Markets” and collectively with the Caribbean Target Markets, the “Target Markets”) (collectively, the “Area of Exclusivity”). Upon receipt of any such third-party offer, Hilton shall notify Playa and we will have a period of 150 days from the date of such notice, to submit an application to Hilton to franchise a hotel in such country under the Hilton Brand. If we choose to submit a franchise application to Hilton, then we agree not to propose, negotiate, hold discussions or enter into any agreement with a third party to operate, or authorize the operating of a non-Hilton brand hotel in the country under consideration, until such time as Hilton has approved or denied our franchise application or we have informed Hilton of our desire not to pursue an application for franchise. In order to maintain our right of first offer in the Area of Exclusivity, we have agreed to open a total of eight additional Hilton Brand resorts, consisting of at least four hotels in the Caribbean Target Market (the “Caribbean Development Obligation”) and at least four hotels within the Mexico, Central and South America Target Market (the “Mexico, Central and South America Development Obligation”), under the Hilton Brand, no later than December 31, 2024 (provided that the last hotel in each market may open in 2025). In each case, the number of rooms in any proposed hotel must exceed 350. Additionally, we have agreed to certain development milestones (“Development Milestones”) in each of the Target Markets, including opening one hotel under the Hilton Brand during each calendar year commencing 2021. In November 2018, by virtue of Playa converting THE Royal Playa del Carmen to the Hilton Playa del Carmen All-Inclusive Resort and the Dreams La Romana to the Hilton La Romana All-Inclusive Family Resort and the Hilton La Romana All-Inclusive Adult Resort, we successfully satisfied our Development Milestones through 2021 in each of the Target Markets.

Playa's Hilton Franchise Agreements

In connection with our strategic alliance with Hilton, we have entered into franchise agreements with Hilton pursuant to which Hilton has granted to each of Playa and any third-party owner for whom Playa serves as hotel operator the right to operate such hotels under the Hilton Brand. These franchise agreements have an initial term of 15 years, unless sooner terminated in accordance with their terms. The franchise agreements also contain customary terms with respect to how we market and operate the hotel under the Hilton Brand and impose a number of requirements including, among others, that we comply with Hilton’s standards in connection with the design, construction, refurbishing and operating of our Hilton branded hotels.

AMResorts Management Agreements

Four of our resorts (Dreams Puerto Aventuras, Secrets Capri, Dreams Punta Cana and Dreams Palm Beach) are operated by AMResorts pursuant to management agreements that contain customary terms and conditions, including those related to fees, termination conditions, capital expenditures, transfers of control of parties or transfers of ownership to competitors, sales of the hotels and non-competition and non-solicitation. These agreements are scheduled to expire in 2022. We pay AMResorts and its affiliates, as operators of these resorts, base management fees and incentive management fees. In addition, we reimburse the operators for some of the costs they incur in the provision of certain centralized services. We may also choose to opportunistically sell one or more of these resorts and redeploy the proceeds from any such sales, subject to certain restrictions under our Senior Secured Credit Facility (as defined below).


10


The Panama Jack Agreement

We entered into a master development agreement (the “Panama Jack Agreement”) with Panama Jack in 2017. Pursuant to the Panama Jack Agreement, Panama Jack has granted us, subject to our compliance with certain development milestones, the exclusive right to develop and own and/or to manage resorts under the Panama Jack brand (the “Panama Jack Resorts”) in Antigua, Aruba, the Bahamas, Barbados, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Mexico, Panama, St. Lucia and, subject to the lifting of various U.S. sanctions, Cuba. In addition, if Playa wishes to participate in any project to develop, convert or operate any resorts in the aforementioned countries that we believe in good faith and reasonable judgment are suitable for branding or conversion as a Panama Jack Resort, we will submit an application to Panama Jack to operate such resort as a Panama Jack Resort pursuant to the terms of the Panama Jack Agreement. Panama Jack may, in its commercially reasonable discretion, decide to approve or reject our application to operate a Panama Jack Resort. If Panama Jack approves our application, each such approved resort will be subject to a separate license agreement with Panama Jack. The Panama Jack Agreement has a 10 year term expiring in 2026, subject to either party's right to terminate in certain circumstances.

Vacation Package Distribution Channels and Sales and Reservations

Our experienced sales and marketing team uses a strategic sales and marketing program across a variety of distribution channels through which our all-inclusive vacation packages are sold. Key components of this sales and marketing program include:
Targeting the primary tour operators and the wholesale market for transient business with a scalable program that supports shoulder and lower rate seasons while seeking to maximize revenue during high season, which also includes:
Engaging in cooperative marketing programs with leading travel industry participants;
Participating in travel agent tour operator promotional campaigns; and
Utilizing online travel leaders, such as Expedia and Booking.com, to supplement sales during shoulder and lower rate seasons;
Developing programs aimed at targeting consumers directly through:
Our company and resort websites;
The Hyatt website and toll free reservation telephone numbers;
The World of Hyatt® guest loyalty program;
The Hilton website and toll free reservation system;
The Hilton Honors guest loyalty program; and
Our toll free reservation system that provides a comprehensive view of inventory in real time, based on demand;
Targeting group and incentive markets to seek and grow a strong base of corporate and event business;
Highlighting destination wedding and honeymoon programs;
Participating in key industry trade shows targeted to the travel agent and wholesale market;
Engaging in online and social media, including:
Search engine optimization;
Targeted online and bounce-back advertising;
Social media presence via sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest; and
Flash sales and special offers for high need periods;
Monitoring and managing TripAdvisor and other similar consumer sites; and
Activating a targeted public relations plan to generate media attention-both traditional and new media including travel bloggers who focus on vacation travel to Mexico and the Caribbean.

We also seek luxury transient business to provide high rate business during peak seasons, such as winter and spring holidays, while “bargain hunters” can be targeted through social media for last minute high need periods. This multi-pronged strategy is designed to increase Net Package RevPAR (as defined in Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations) as well as generate strong Occupancy through all of the resort seasons.


11


Insurance

Our resorts carry what we believe are appropriate levels of insurance coverage for a business operating in the lodging industry in Mexico, the Dominican Republic and Jamaica. This insurance includes coverage for general liability, property, workers’ compensation and other risks with respect to our business and business interruption coverage.

This general liability insurance provides coverage for any claim, including terrorism and hurricane damage, resulting from our operations, goods and services and vehicles. We believe these insurance policies are adequate for foreseeable losses and on terms and conditions that are reasonable and customary with solvent insurance carriers.

Competition

We face intense competition for guests from other participants in the all-inclusive segment of the lodging industry and, to a lesser extent, from traditional hotels and resorts that are not all-inclusive. The all-inclusive segment remains a relatively small part of the broadly defined global vacation market that has historically been dominated by hotels and resorts that are not all-inclusive. Our principal competitors include other operators of all-inclusive resorts and resort companies, such as Barceló Hotels & Resorts, RIU Hotels & Resorts, IBEROSTAR Hotels & Resorts, Karisma Hotels & Resorts, AMResorts, Meliá Hotels International, Excellence Resorts and Palace Resorts, as well as some smaller, independent and local owners and operators. We compete for guests based primarily on brand name recognition and reputation, location, guest satisfaction, room rates, quality of service, amenities and quality of accommodations.

In addition, we also compete for guests based on the ability of hotel loyalty program members to earn and redeem loyalty program points at our Hyatt and Hilton all-inclusive resorts. We believe that our strategic relationship with Hyatt and Hilton, two globally recognized hotel brand leaders, provides us with a significant competitive advantage.

Seasonality

The seasonality of the lodging industry and the location of our resorts in Mexico and the Caribbean generally result in the greatest demand for our resorts between mid-December and April of each year, yielding higher occupancy levels and package rates during this period. This seasonality in demand has resulted in predictable fluctuations in revenue, results of operations and liquidity, which are consistently higher during the first quarter of each year than in successive quarters.

Cyclicality

The lodging industry is highly cyclical in nature. Fluctuations in operating performance are caused largely by general economic and local market conditions, which subsequently affect levels of business and leisure travel. In addition to general economic conditions, new hotel and resort room supply is an important factor that can affect the lodging industry’s performance, and over-building has the potential to further exacerbate the negative impact of an economic recession. Room rates and Occupancy, and thus Net Package RevPAR (as defined in Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations), tend to increase when demand growth exceeds supply growth. A decline in lodging demand, or increase in lodging supply, could result in returns that are substantially below expectations, or result in losses, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, liquidity and results of operations. Further, many of the costs of running a resort are fixed rather than variable. As a result, in an environment of declining revenues the rate of decline in earnings is likely to be higher than the rate of decline in revenues.

Intellectual Property

We own or have rights to use the trademarks, service marks or trade names that we use or will use in conjunction with the operation of our business, including certain of Hyatt’s and Hilton’s intellectual property under the Hyatt Resort Agreements and our franchise agreements with Hilton. We also have rights to certain of Panama Jack’s intellectual property under the Panama Jack Agreement and related agreements. In the highly competitive lodging industry in which we operate, trademarks, service marks, trade names and logos are very important to the success of our business.

Corporate Information

Playa Hotels & Resorts N.V. was organized as a public limited company (naamloze vennootschap) under the laws of the Netherlands in December 2016. Our registered office in the Netherlands is located at Prins Bernhardplein 200, 1097 JB Amsterdam. Our telephone number at that address is +31 20 571 12 02. We maintain a website at www.playaresorts.com, which includes additional contact information. All reports that we have filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) including this Annual

12


Report on Form 10-K and our current reports on Form 8-K, can be obtained free of charge from the SECs website at www.sec.gov or through our website.

Employees

As of December 31, 2019, we directly and indirectly employed approximately 12,000 employees worldwide at our corporate offices and on-site at our resorts.
Item 1A. Risk Factors.
The following discussion concerns some of the risks associated with our business and should be considered carefully. These risks are interrelated and you should treat them as a whole. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us may also materially and adversely affect our business operations, the value of our ordinary shares and our ability to pay dividends to our shareholders. In connection with the forward-looking statements that appear in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, in these risk factors and elsewhere, you should carefully review the section entitled “Forward-Looking Statements.”
Risks Related to Our Business
General economic uncertainty and weak demand in the lodging industry could have a material adverse effect on us.
Our business strategy depends significantly on demand for vacations generally and, more specifically, on demand for all-inclusive vacation packages. Weak economic conditions and other factors beyond our control, including high levels of unemployment and underemployment, in North America, especially the United States and Mexico, Europe and Asia could reduce the level of discretionary income or consumer confidence in the countries from which we source our guests and have a negative impact on the lodging industry. We cannot provide any assurances that demand for all-inclusive vacation packages will remain consistent with or increase from current levels. Furthermore, our business is focused primarily on, and our acquisition strategy targets the acquisition of resorts in, the all-inclusive segment of the lodging industry (and properties that we believe can be converted into all-inclusive resorts in a manner consistent with our business strategy). This concentration exposes us to the risk of economic downturns in the lodging industry broadly and, more specifically, in the leisure dominated all-inclusive segment of the lodging industry. As a result of the foregoing, we could experience a prolonged period of decreased demand and price discounting in our markets, which would negatively affect our revenues and could have a material adverse effect on us, including our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects.
Terrorist acts, armed conflict, civil unrest, criminal activity and threats thereof, and other international events impacting the security of travel or the perception of security of travel could adversely affect the demand for travel generally and demand for vacation packages at our resorts, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
Past acts of terrorism have had an adverse effect on tourism, travel and the availability of air service and other forms of transportation. The threat or possibility of future terrorist acts, an outbreak, escalation and/or continuation of hostilities or armed conflict abroad, civil unrest or the possibility thereof, the issuance of travel advisories by sovereign governments, and other geo-political uncertainties have had and may have an adverse impact on the demand for vacation packages and consequently the pricing for vacation packages. Decreases in demand and reduced pricing in response to such decreased demand would adversely affect our business by reducing our profitability.
Nine of the 23 resorts in our portfolio are located in Mexico, and Mexico has experienced criminal violence for years, primarily due to the activities of drug cartels and related organized crime. These activities and the possible escalation of violence or other safety concerns, including food and beverage safety concerns, associated with them in regions where our resorts are located, or an increase in the perception among our prospective guests of an escalation of such violence or safety concerns, could instill and perpetuate fear among prospective guests and may lead to a loss in business at our resorts in Mexico because these guests may choose to vacation elsewhere or not at all. In addition, increases in violence, crime or civil unrest or other safety concerns in the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, or any other location where we may own a resort in the future, may also lead to decreased demand for our resorts and negatively affect our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects.
High levels of Sargassum seaweed may dissuade tourists from visiting the markets our resorts are located in and cost us money to remove.
Many of our resorts are beach-front properties that have been exposed to elevated levels of Sargassum seaweed. In recent years, the amount of Sargassum that has washed up onshore in various geographies has increased. If not removed promptly, the seaweed can overrun the beach, making it difficult to swim in the water and generating a foul odor if it is allowed to rot. The heightened level of

13


Sargassum in recent years has led to negative media coverage and increased awareness of the potential problem and has required additional operating expenses to remove. Although we do our best to remove the seaweed and prevent the build-up, the exact cause of overgrowth is unknown.
We are exposed to significant risks related to the geographic concentration of our resorts, including weather-related emergencies such as hurricanes, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
Our resorts are concentrated in Mexico (accounted for 52.9% of our Total Net Revenue as defined in Item 7), Jamaica (31.9% of our Total Net Revenue) and the Dominican Republic (15.0% of our Total Net Revenue) for the year ended December 31, 2019. In addition to the matters referred to in the preceding risk factor, damage to these resorts or a disruption of their operations or a reduction of travel to them due to a hurricane or other weather-related or other emergency could reduce their revenue, which could have a material adverse effect on us, including our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects. We cannot assure you that any property or business interruption insurance will adequately address all losses, liabilities and damages. In addition, all of our resorts are located on beach front properties and are particularly susceptible to weather-related emergencies, such as hurricanes, or other marine environmental hazards, such as flooding, pollution or algae blooms.
The all-inclusive model may not be desirable to prospective guests in the luxury segment of the resort market, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
Our portfolio is composed predominantly of luxury all-inclusive resorts. The all-inclusive resort market has not traditionally been associated with the high-end and luxury segments of the lodging industry and there is a risk that our target guests, many of whom have not experienced an all-inclusive model, will not find the all-inclusive model appealing. A failure to attract our target guests could result in decreased revenue from our portfolio and could have a material adverse effect on us, including our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects.
 Our relationship with Hyatt may deteriorate and disputes between Hyatt and us may arise. The Hyatt relationship is important to our business and, if it deteriorates, the value of our portfolio could decline significantly, and it could have a material adverse effect on us.
We are the only operator of resorts operating under the Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands. However, except for the Hyatt franchise agreements, we have no contractual right to operate any resort in our current or future portfolio under the Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands or any other Hyatt-sponsored brands. In addition, in the future, Hyatt, in its sole discretion and subject to its obligations under the Hyatt Strategic Alliance Agreement in the Market Area, may designate other third parties as authorized operators of resorts, or Hyatt may decide to directly operate resorts, under the Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands or any other Hyatt brand, whether owned by third parties or Hyatt itself.
Also, and as described elsewhere in this annual report, subject to its obligations under the Hyatt Strategic Alliance Agreement, Hyatt is free to develop or license other all-inclusive resorts in the Market Area, even under the Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands. Additionally, outside of the Market Area, Hyatt is free to develop or license other all-inclusive resorts under the Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands and other Hyatt brands at any time.
Under the terms of our Hyatt Resort Agreements, we are required to meet specified operating standards and other terms and conditions. We expect that Hyatt will periodically inspect our resorts that carry a Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brand to ensure that we follow Hyatt’s standards. If we fail to maintain brand standards at one or more of our Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brand resorts, or otherwise fail to comply with the terms and conditions of the Hyatt Resort Agreements, then Hyatt could terminate the agreements related to those resorts and potentially all of our Hyatt resorts. Under the terms of the Hyatt franchise agreements, if, among other triggers, (i) the Hyatt franchise agreements for a certain number of Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brand resorts are terminated or (ii) certain persons acquire our ordinary shares in excess of a specified percentage and certain mechanisms in our Articles of Association fail to operate to reduce such percentage within 30 days, Hyatt has the right to terminate the Hyatt franchise agreements for all (but not less than all) of our resorts. In that situation, we would be subject to liquidated damage payments to Hyatt, even for those resorts that are in compliance with their Hyatt franchise agreements. If one or more Hyatt franchise agreements is terminated, the underlying value and performance of our related resort(s) could decline significantly from the loss of associated name recognition, participation in the World of Hyatt® guest loyalty program, Hyatt’s reservation system and website, and access to Hyatt group sales business, as well as from the costs of “rebranding” such resorts and the payment of liquidated damages to Hyatt.
Hyatt may, in its discretion and subject to its obligations under the Hyatt Strategic Alliance Agreement, decline to enter into Hyatt franchise agreements for other all-inclusive resort opportunities that we bring to Hyatt, whether we own the properties or manage them for third-party owners.

14


If any of the foregoing were to occur, it could have a material adverse effect on us, including our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects and the market price of our ordinary shares, and could divert the attention of our senior management from other important activities.
Our right of first offer in the Hyatt Strategic Alliance Agreement will expire on December 31, 2021 and certain provisions of our Hyatt franchise agreements impose certain restrictions on us, and such agreements are terminable under certain circumstances, any of which could have a material adverse effect on us.
Pursuant to the Hyatt Strategic Alliance Agreement, which will expire on December 31, 2021, we and Hyatt will provide each other the right of first offer with respect to any Hyatt All-Inclusive Opportunity in the Market Area and the right to receive an introduction to any third party with respect to any management opportunity for us or franchising opportunity for Hyatt, in each case, in the Market Area. However, such right of first offer for Hyatt All-Inclusive Opportunities is conditioned on the originating party’s acquisition of the related property within 60 days of its offer to the receiving party. Accordingly, if, for example, Hyatt determines to acquire such property subsequent to the expiration of the aforementioned 60 day period, it would be free to do so without any obligations to Playa in respect of such property.
Subject to its obligations under the Hyatt Strategic Alliance Agreement, Hyatt is free to develop or license other all-inclusive resorts in the Market Area, even under the Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands. Additionally, outside of the Market Area, Hyatt is free to develop or license other all-inclusive resorts under the Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands and other Hyatt brands at any time. Similarly, subject to our obligations under the Hyatt Strategic Alliance Agreement and the Hyatt Resorts Agreements, we will be allowed to operate any all-inclusive resort under any brand, such as Hilton and Panama Jack, provided that we implement strict informational and operational barriers, including marketing, management, development and strategic planning, between our operations with respect to our operations of such other hotel and our operations with respect to the Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands.
If we do not comply with our obligations to implement these strict informational and operations barriers under the Hyatt franchise agreements, Hyatt may terminate all (but not less than all) of its franchise agreements with us by providing the notice specified in the franchise agreement to us, and we will be subject to liquidated damage payments to Hyatt. As a result, such violations could have a material adverse effect on us, including our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects.
The success of eight of our resorts will depend substantially on the success of the Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands, which exposes us to risks associated with concentrating a significant portion of our portfolio in a family of two recently developed related brands. There is a risk that we and Hyatt may not succeed in marketing the Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands and that we may not receive the anticipated return on the investment incurred in connection with rebranding the eight resorts under the Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
Eight of the resorts in our portfolio bear the name of one or both of the Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands. As a result of this concentration, our success will depend, in part, on the continued success of these recently developed brands. We believe that building brand value is critical to increase demand and build guest loyalty. Consequently, if market recognition or the positive perception of Hyatt and its brands is reduced or compromised, the goodwill associated with Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brand resorts in our portfolio would likely be adversely affected. Under the Hyatt Resort Agreements, Hyatt provides (or causes to be provided) various marketing services to the relevant resorts, and we may conduct local and regional marketing, advertising and promotional programs, subject to compliance with Hyatt’s requirements. We cannot assure you that we and Hyatt will be successful in our marketing efforts to grow either Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brand. Additionally, we are not permitted under the Hyatt franchise agreements to change the brands of our resorts operating under the Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands for 15 years (plus any additional years pursuant to Hyatt’s renewal options) after the opening of the relevant resorts as Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brand resorts, even if the brands are not successful. As a result, we could be materially and adversely affected if these brands do not succeed.
 We have agreed to indemnify Hyatt for losses related to a broad range of matters and if we are required to make payments to Hyatt pursuant to these obligations, our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects may be materially and adversely affected.
Pursuant to the subscription agreement entered into between Hyatt and us in connection with our Predecessor’s formation transactions, we have agreed to indemnify Hyatt for any breaches of our representations, warranties and agreements in the subscription agreement, generally subject to (i) a deductible of $10 million and (ii) a cap of $50 million (other than for breaches of certain representations, for which indemnification is capped at $325 million). In addition, we have agreed to indemnify Hyatt for certain potential losses relating to the lack of operating licenses, noncompliance with certain environmental regulations, tax deficiencies and other matters. The representations and warranties we made and our related indemnification obligations survive for varying periods of time from the closing date of our Predecessor’s formation transactions in 2013 (some of which have already elapsed) and some survive indefinitely. If we are required to make future payments to Hyatt pursuant to these obligations, however, our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects could be materially and adversely affected.

15


 Our relationship with Hilton may deteriorate and disputes between Hilton and us may arise. The Hilton relationship is important to our business and, if it deteriorates, the value of our portfolio could decline significantly, and it could have a material adverse effect on us.
We have a right of first offer to franchise or manage a new Hilton all-inclusive resort under the Hilton Brand in the Target Markets through August 7, 2023. However, except for the Hilton franchise agreements, we have no contractual right to operate any resort in our current or future portfolio under the Hilton Brand or any other Hilton-sponsored brands. In addition, in the future, Hilton, in its sole discretion and subject to its obligations under the Hilton Strategic Alliance Agreement in the Target Markets, may designate other third parties as authorized operators of resorts, or Hilton may decide to directly operate resorts, under the Hilton Brand or any other Hilton-sponsored brand, whether owned by third parties or Hilton itself.
Also, subject to its obligations under the Hilton Strategic Alliance Agreement, including its obligation to give us a right of first offer to franchise or manage new resorts under the Hilton Brand in the Target Markets, Hilton is free to develop or license other all-inclusive resorts in the Target Markets, even under the Hilton Brand. Additionally, outside of the Target Markets, Hilton is free to develop or license other all-inclusive resorts under the Hilton Brand and other Hilton-sponsored brands at any time.
Under the terms of our Hilton Strategic Alliance Agreement and the Hilton franchise agreements, we are required to meet specified operating standards and other terms and conditions. We expect that Hilton will periodically inspect our resorts that carry the Hilton Brand and ensure that we follow Hilton’s standards. If we fail to maintain brand standards at one of our resorts that carry the Hilton Brand, or otherwise fail to comply with the terms and conditions of the Hilton franchise agreement, then Hilton could terminate the franchise agreements related to that resort. If one or more Hilton franchise agreements are terminated, the underlying value and performance of our related resort(s) could decline significantly from the loss of associated name recognition, participation in the Hilton Honors guest loyalty program, Hilton’s reservation system and website, and access to Hilton group sales business, as well as from the costs of “rebranding” such resorts and the payment of liquidated damages to Hilton.
Hilton may, in its discretion and subject to its obligations under the Hilton Strategic Alliance Agreement, decline to enter into Hilton franchise agreements for other all-inclusive resort opportunities that we bring to Hilton, even resorts under the Hilton Brand, whether we own the properties or manage them for third-party owners.
If any of the foregoing were to occur, it could have a material adverse effect on us, including our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects and the market price of our ordinary shares, and could divert the attention of our senior management from other important activities.
Our right of first offer in the Hilton Strategic Alliance Agreement will expire on August 7, 2023, and could be terminated earlier by Hilton if we fail to meet certain development milestones, and certain provisions of our Hilton Strategic Alliance Agreement impose certain restrictions on us, any of which could have a material adverse effect on us.
Pursuant to the Hilton Strategic Alliance Agreement, which will expire on August 7, 2023, we have the right of first offer to franchise or manage hotels under the Hilton Brand in the Target Markets, subject to certain conditions set forth in the Hilton Strategic Alliance Agreement. If we do not submit an application to franchise such new hotel within the 150-day time period specified in the Hilton Strategic Alliance Agreement, our right of first offer with respect to that particular property will expire. Our application to franchise such hotel remains subject to Hilton’s normal franchise criteria, so there is no guarantee that Hilton will accept our franchise application. In addition, during the 150-day period for which our right of first offer remains open for any particular property until the time when Hilton approves or denies our franchise application or our written confirmation to Hilton that we do not intend to submit a franchise application, we may not propose to, negotiate, hold discussions or enter into any agreement with any third party to operate, or authorize the operating of, any independent or non-Brand resorts in the country under consideration. It could take us some time to evaluate a particular opportunity before submitting a franchise application and Hilton would also need time to review and process our franchise application; therefore, this restriction may delay or hinder our ability to pursue other opportunities with non-Hilton brands during this period of time.
Our right of first offer with respect to resorts under the Hilton Brand is also subject to our obligation to open a minimum number of hotels under the Hilton Brand in each Target Market and our achievement of certain development milestones on a year-by-year basis in each Target Market. Pursuant to the terms of the Hilton Strategic Alliance Agreement, if we do not open a total of eight additional Brand resorts by December 31, 2024 (provided that the last hotel in each Target Market may open in 2025), consisting of at least four resorts in the Caribbean Target Market and at least four resorts within the Mexico, Central and South America Target Market, in each case under the Hilton Brand and having at least 350 guest rooms, Hilton will have the right to terminate the Strategic Alliance Agreement and our right of first offer in the Target Market in which we do not achieve such development obligation may also be terminated by Hilton. In addition, we have agreed to the Development Milestones, and if we do not open one Brand hotel in each of the Target Markets during each calendar year beginning 2021 and ending 2025, then Hilton will have the right to terminate the Strategic Alliance Agreement and our right of first offer in the Target Market in which we do not achieve such Development

16


Milestones may also be terminated by Hilton. Our inability to meet the Development Milestones and Hilton’s potential termination of the Strategic Alliance Agreement could have a material adverse effect on us, including our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects.
We are required to obtain Hilton’s consent to issue equity securities under certain circumstances or undergo change of control transactions, which could impede our ability to seek certain strategic opportunities and could have a material adverse effect on us.
Under the terms of the Hilton Strategic Alliance Agreement, Hilton has the right to terminate the Strategic Alliance Agreement if we permit the transfer of any equity interests in Playa (other than equity securities listed on a securities exchange or quoted in a publication or electronic reporting service maintained by the National Association of Securities Dealers, Inc. or comparable organization) without the prior written consent of Hilton. This restriction on our ability to issue securities could hinder our ability to, among other things, acquire properties through the issuance of securities in an offering exempt from registration, as we did in the Sagicor transaction, without jeopardizing our strategic relationship with Hilton, which could have a material adverse effect on us, including our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects.
Under the terms of the Hilton franchise agreements, we are obligated to undergo certain consent and/or review procedures, including providing Hilton with at least sixty days’ advance written notice and providing Hilton with certain applicable information, before we are permitted to (i) effect the transfer of more than 50% of our equity securities, (ii) undergo a change of control, or (iii) issue securities in a public or private offering that refers to Hilton or the Hilton franchise agreements in the offering materials. If we do not comply with these informational and consent requirements, Hilton has the right to terminate the franchise agreements immediately, without any opportunity for us to cure such breach, and we would be liable to Hilton for liquidated damages. The termination by Hilton of the franchise agreements and our payment of liquidated damages to Hilton could have a material adverse effect on us, including our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects.
The success of three of our current resorts, as well as the eight Hilton Brand resorts that we have committed to open under the Strategic Alliance Agreement, will depend substantially on the success of the recently developed Brand. There is a risk that we and Hilton may not succeed in marketing the Hilton Brand and that we may not receive the anticipated return on the investment incurred in connection with development or rebranding of our resorts under the Hilton Brand, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
Three of the resorts in our current portfolio bear the name of the Hilton Brand, and we have committed under the Hilton Strategic Alliance Agreement to add an additional eight Hilton Brand resorts before 2025. As a result of this concentration, our success will depend, in part, on the continued success of this recently developed brand. We believe that building brand value is critical to increase demand and build guest loyalty. Consequently, if market recognition or the positive perception of Hilton and its current or potential brands is reduced or compromised, the goodwill associated with the resorts in our portfolio under the Hilton Brand would likely be adversely affected. Under the Hilton franchise agreements, Hilton provides various marketing services to the relevant resorts, and we are obligated to conduct local and regional marketing, advertising and promotional programs, subject to compliance with Hilton’s requirements. We cannot assure you that we and Hilton will be successful in our marketing efforts to grow the Hilton Brand. Additionally, we are not permitted under the Hilton franchise agreements to change the brands of our resorts operating under the Hilton Brand for 15 years after the opening of the relevant resorts, even if the Hilton Brand is not successful. As a result, we could be materially and adversely affected if the Hilton Brand does not succeed.
If we fail to maintain or enhance our proprietary resort brands or if we or our third-party owners fail to maintain other brand standards, our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects may be materially and adversely affected.
In addition to the Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brands and the Hilton Brand, we own and manage resorts that use other brands, including proprietary brands. If we fail to maintain and enhance our proprietary resort brands, demand for these resorts will suffer. We cannot assure you that we will be successful in marketing such brands. With respect to resorts we own or manage for third parties that use other brands, we and such third parties will have to comply with applicable brand standards. These standards will require resort maintenance and improvements, including investments in furniture, fixtures, amenities and personnel. If we or our third-party property owners fail to maintain brand standards, or otherwise fail to comply with the terms and conditions of agreements with brand owners, then our ability and the ability of our third-party owners to use these brands may be terminated, which could cause our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects to be materially and adversely affected.
Our industry is highly competitive, which may impact our ability to compete successfully with other hotel and resort brands and operators for guests, which could have a material adverse effect on us, including our operating margins, market share and financial results.
We generally operate in markets that contain numerous competitors. Each of our resort brands compete with major chains in national and international venues and with independent companies in regional markets, including with recent entrants into the all-

17


inclusive segment of the lodging industry in the regions in which we operate. Our ability to remain competitive and to attract and retain guests depends on our success in establishing and distinguishing the recognition and reputation of our brands, our locations, our guest satisfaction, our room rates, quality of service, amenities and quality of accommodations and our overall value from offerings by others. If we are unable to compete successfully in these countries, it could have a material adverse effect on us, including our operating margins, market share and financial results.
New brands, such as Panama Jack Resorts, amenities or services that we launch in the future may not be successful, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, liquidity and results of operations.
We cannot assure you that any new brands, such as the Panama Jack brand, amenities or services we launch will be successful, or that we will recover the costs we incurred in developing the brands, amenities and services. If new brands, amenities and services are not as successful as we anticipate, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, liquidity and results of operations.
We are exposed to fluctuations in currency exchange rates, including fluctuations in (a) the value of the local currencies, in which we incur our costs at each resort, relative to the U.S. dollar, in which the revenue from each of our resorts is generally denominated, (b) the currency of our prospective guests, who may have a reduced ability to pay for travel to our resorts, relative to their ability to pay to travel to destinations with more attractive exchange rates, and (c) the value of local currencies relative to the U.S. dollar, which could impact our ability to meet our U.S. dollar-denominated obligations, including our debt service payments, any of which could have a material adverse effect on us.
The majority of our operating expenses are incurred locally at our resorts and are denominated in Mexican Pesos, the Dominican Peso or the Jamaican dollar. The net proceeds from our outstanding debt borrowings were received and are payable by our subsidiary Playa Resorts Holding B.V., in U.S. dollars and our functional reporting currency is U.S. dollars. An increase in the relative value of the local currencies, in which we incur our costs at each resort, relative to the U.S. dollar, in which our revenue from each resort is denominated, would adversely affect our results of operations for those resorts. Our current policy is not to hedge against changes in foreign exchange rates and we therefore may be adversely affected by appreciation in the value of other currencies against the U.S. dollar, or to prolonged periods of exchange rate volatility. These fluctuations may negatively impact our financial condition, liquidity and results of operations to the extent we are unable to adjust our pricing accordingly.
 
Additionally, in the event that the U.S. dollar increases in value relative to the currency of the prospective guests living outside the United States, our prospective guests may have a reduced ability to pay for travel to our resorts and this may lead to lower Occupancy rates and revenue, which could have a material adverse effect on us, including our financial results. An increase in the value of the Mexican Peso, the Dominican Peso or the Jamaican dollar compared to the currencies of other potential destinations may disadvantage the tourism industry in Mexico, the Dominican Republic or Jamaica, respectively, and result in a corresponding decrease in the Occupancy rates and revenue of our resorts as consumers may choose destinations in countries with more attractive exchange rates. In the event that this appreciation occurs, it could lead to an increase in the rates we charge for rooms in our resorts, which could result in a decrease in Occupancy rates and revenue and, therefore, negatively impact our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects.
Furthermore, appreciation of local currencies relative to the U.S. dollar could make fulfillment of our and our subsidiaries’ U.S. dollar denominated obligations, including Playa Resorts Holding B.V.’s debt service payments, more challenging and could have a material adverse effect on us, including our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects.
The departure of any of our key personnel, including Bruce D. Wardinski, Alexander Stadlin, Ryan Hymel, and Kevin Froemming, each of whom have significant experience and relationships in the lodging industry, could have a material adverse effect on us.
We depend on the experience and relationships of our senior management team, especially Bruce D. Wardinski, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Alexander Stadlin, our Chief Operating Officer, Ryan Hymel, our Chief Financial Officer, and Kevin Froemming, our Chief Commercial Officer, to manage our strategic business direction. The members of our senior management team have an average of 30 years of experience owning, operating, acquiring, repositioning, rebranding, renovating and financing hotel, resort and all-inclusive properties. In addition, our senior management team has developed an extensive network of industry, corporate and institutional relationships. We can provide no assurances that any of our key personnel identified above will continue their employment with us. In addition, as previously disclosed, it is expected that Mr. Stadlin will transition from his current role as Chief Operating Officer to a new role as advisor to the Chief Executive Officer at the end of 2020. The loss of services of any of Mr. Wardinski, Mr. Hymel, or Mr. Froemming or another member of our senior management team, the inability to find or integrate a suitable replacement for Mr. Stadlin, or any difficulty attracting and retaining other talented and experienced personnel could have a material adverse effect on us, including, among others, our ability to source potential investment opportunities, our relationship with global and national industry brands and other industry participants or the execution of our business strategy.

18


We rely on a third party, AMResorts, to manage four of our resorts and we can provide no assurance that AMResorts will manage these resorts successfully or that AMResorts will not be subject to conflicts harmful to our interests.
Pursuant to management agreements with AMResorts, four of our 23 resorts are managed by AMResorts. Absent payment by us of significant termination fees, until the expiration of the management agreements in 2022, we are not able to self-manage these resorts. We can provide no assurance that AMResorts will manage these resorts successfully.
Failure by AMResorts to fully perform the duties agreed to in the management agreements or the failure of AMResorts to adequately manage the risks associated with resort operations could materially and adversely affect us. We may have differences with AMResorts and other third-party service providers over their performance and compliance with the terms of the management agreements and other service agreements. In these cases, if we are unable to reach satisfactory results through discussions and negotiations, we may choose to litigate the dispute or submit the matter to third-party dispute resolution. In addition, AMResorts currently owns and/or manages and may in the future own and/or manage other resorts, including all-inclusive resorts in our markets that may compete with our resorts.
AMResorts and its affiliates may have interests that conflict with our interests, such as incentives to favor these other resorts over our resorts as a result of more favorable compensation arrangements or by ownership interests in these resorts.
Our strategy to opportunistically acquire, develop and operate in new geographic markets may not be successful, which could have a material adverse effect on us, including our financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects.
In the future, we may acquire or develop and operate resorts in geographic markets in which our management has little or no operating experience and in which potential guests are not familiar with a particular brand with which the resort is affiliated or do not associate the geographic market as an all-inclusive resort destination. As a result, we may incur costs relating to the opening, operation and promotion of such resorts that are substantially greater than those incurred in other geographic areas, and such resorts may attract fewer guests than other resorts we may acquire. Consequently, demand at any resorts that we may acquire in unfamiliar markets may be lower than those at resorts that we currently operate or that we may acquire in our existing markets. Unanticipated expenses at and insufficient demand for resorts that we acquire in new geographic markets, therefore, could materially and adversely affect us, including our financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects.
Our resort development, acquisition, expansion, repositioning and rebranding projects will be subject to timing, budgeting and other risks, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
We may develop, acquire, expand, reposition or rebrand resorts (such as the two resorts we have rebranded under the Panama Jack brand and the two resorts we have rebranded under the Hilton Brand) from time to time as suitable opportunities arise, taking into consideration general economic conditions. To the extent that we determine to develop, acquire, expand, reposition or rebrand resorts, we could be subject to risks associated with, among others:
construction delays or cost overruns that may increase project costs;
receipt of zoning, Occupancy and other required governmental permits and authorizations;
strikes or other labor issues;
development costs incurred for projects that are not pursued to completion;
investment of substantial capital without, in the case of developed or repositioned resorts, immediate corresponding income;
results that may not achieve our desired revenue or profit goals;
acts of nature such as earthquakes, hurricanes, floods or fires that could adversely impact a resort;
ability to raise capital, including construction or acquisition financing; and
governmental restrictions on the nature or size of a project.
 
As a result of the foregoing, we cannot assure you that any development, acquisition, expansion, repositioning and rebranding project will be completed on time or within budget or if the ultimate rates of investment return are below the returns forecasted at the time the project was commenced. If we are unable to complete a project on time or within budget, the resort’s projected operating results may be adversely affected, which could have a material adverse effect on us, including our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects.

19


Climate change may adversely affect our business, which could materially and adversely affect us.
We may be adversely impacted by the consequences of climate change, such as changes in the frequency, duration and severity of extreme weather events and changes in precipitation and temperature, which may result in physical damage or a decrease in demand for our properties, all of which are located in coastal beachfront locations that are vulnerable to significant property damage from severe weather events, including hurricanes. Should the impact of climate change be material in nature, we could be materially and adversely affected, including our financial condition, liquidity and results of operations. In addition, changes in applicable legislation and regulation on climate change could result in increased capital expenditures to improve the energy efficiency of the properties in order to comply with such regulations. Actual or anticipated losses resulting from the consequences of climate change could also impact the cost or availability of insurance.
Our insurance may not be adequate to cover our potential losses, liabilities and damages and we may not be able to secure insurance to cover all of our risks, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
The business of owning and managing resorts is subject to a number of risks, hazards, adverse environmental conditions, labor disputes, changes in the regulatory environment and natural phenomena such as floods, hurricanes, earthquakes and earth movements. Such occurrences could result in damage or impairment to, or destruction of, our resorts, personal injury or death, environmental damage, business interruption, monetary losses and legal liability.
While insurance is not commonly available for all these risks, we maintain customary insurance against risks that we believe are typical and reasonably insurable in the lodging industry and in amounts that we believe to be reasonable but that contain limits, deductibles, exclusions and endorsements. However, we may decide not to insure against certain risks because of high premiums compared to the benefit offered by such insurance or for other reasons. In the event that costs or losses exceed our available insurance or additional liability is imposed on us for which we are not insured or are otherwise unable to seek reimbursement, we could be materially and adversely affected, including our financial results. We may not be able to continue to procure adequate insurance coverage at commercially reasonable rates in the future or at all, and some claims may not be paid. There can be no assurance that the coverage and amounts of our insurance will be sufficient for our needs.
Labor shortages could restrict our ability to operate our properties or grow our business or result in increased labor costs that could adversely affect our results of operations and cash flows.
Our success depends in large part on our ability to attract, retain, train, manage and engage skilled employees. As of December 31, 2019, we directly and indirectly employed approximately 12,000 employees worldwide at both our corporate offices and on-site at our resorts. If we are unable to attract, retain, train, manage, and engage skilled employees, our ability to manage and staff our resorts could be impaired, which could reduce guest satisfaction. Staffing shortages in places where our resorts are located also could hinder our ability to grow and expand our businesses. Because payroll costs are a major component of the operating expenses at our resorts, a shortage of skilled labor could also require higher wages that would increase labor costs, which could adversely affect our results of operations and cash flows.
A significant number of our employees are unionized, and if labor negotiations or work stoppages were to disrupt our operations, it could have a material adverse effect on us.
Approximately 39% of our full-time equivalent work force is unionized. As a result, we are required to negotiate the wages, salaries, benefits, staffing levels and other terms with many of our employees collectively and we are exposed to the risk of disruptions to our operations. Our results could be adversely affected if future labor negotiations were to disrupt our operations. If we were to experience labor unrest, strikes or other business interruptions in connection with labor negotiations or otherwise, or if we were unable to negotiate labor contracts on reasonable terms, we could be materially and adversely affected, including our results of operations. In addition, our ability to make adjustments to control compensation and benefits costs, rebalance our portfolio or otherwise adapt to changing business needs may be limited by the terms and duration of our collective bargaining agreements.
 Many of our guests rely on a combination of scheduled commercial airline services and tour operator services for passenger connections, and price increases or service changes by airlines or tour operators could have a material adverse effect on us, including reducing our Occupancy rates and revenue and, therefore, our liquidity and results of operations.
Many of our guests depend on a combination of scheduled commercial airline services and tour operator services to transport them to airports near our resorts. Increases in the price of airfare, due to increases in fuel prices or other factors, would increase the overall vacation cost to our guests and may adversely affect demand for our vacation packages. Changes in commercial airline services or tour operator services as a result of strikes, weather or other events, or the lack of availability due to schedule changes or a high level of airline bookings, could have a material adverse effect on us, including our Occupancy rates and revenue and, therefore, our liquidity and results of operations.

20


The ongoing need for capital expenditures at our resorts could have a material adverse effect on us, including our financial condition, liquidity and results of operations.
Our resorts will have an ongoing need for renovations and other capital improvements, including replacements, from time to time, of furniture, fixtures and equipment. In addition, Hyatt and Hilton will require periodic capital improvements by us as a condition of maintaining the use of their brands. These capital improvements may give rise to the following risks:
possible environmental liabilities;
construction cost overruns and delays;
the decline in revenues while rooms or restaurants are out of service due to capital improvement projects;
a possible shortage of available cash to fund capital improvements and the related possibility that financing for these capital improvements may not be available to us on favorable terms, or at all;
uncertainties as to market demand or a loss of market demand after capital improvements have begun;
disputes with Hyatt and/or Hilton regarding compliance with the Hyatt Resort Agreements, the Hyatt Strategic Alliance Agreement and/or our agreements with Hilton; and
bankruptcy or insolvency of a contracted party during a capital improvement project or other situation that renders them unable to complete their work.
The costs of all these capital improvements or any of the above noted factors could have a material adverse effect on us, including our financial condition, liquidity and results of operations.
We have substantial debt outstanding currently and may incur additional debt in the future. The principal, premium, if any, and interest payment obligations of such debt may restrict our future operations and impair our ability to invest in our business.
As of December 31, 2019, our total debt obligations were $1,046.4 million (which represents the principal amounts outstanding under our term loan (the “Term Loan”) and revolving credit facility (the “Revolving Credit Facility,” and, collectively with the Term Loan, the “Senior Secured Credit Facility”), excluding a $2.2 million issuance discount and $3.6 million of unamortized debt issuance costs on our Term Loan. In addition, the terms of the Senior Secured Credit Facility will permit us to incur additional indebtedness, subject to our ability to meet certain borrowing conditions.
Our substantial debt may have important consequences to you. For instance, it could:
make it more difficult for us to satisfy our financial obligations;
require us to dedicate a substantial portion of any cash flow from operations to the payment of interest and principal due under our debt, which would reduce funds available for other business purposes, including capital expenditures and acquisitions;
 
place us at a competitive disadvantage compared to some of our competitors that may have less debt and better access to capital resources;
limit our ability to respond to changing business, industry and economic conditions and to withstand competitive pressures, which may adversely affect our operations;
cause us to incur higher interest expense in the event of increases in interest rates on our borrowings that have variable interest rates or in the event of refinancing existing debt at higher interest rates;
limit our ability to make investments or acquisitions, dispose of assets, pay cash dividends or redeem or repurchase shares; and/or
limit our ability to refinance existing debt or to obtain additional financing required to fund working capital and other business needs, including capital requirements and acquisitions.
Our ability to service our significant financial obligations depends on our ability to generate significant cash flow from operations, which is partially subject to general economic, financial, competitive, legislative, regulatory and other factors beyond our control, and we cannot assure you that our business will generate cash flow from operations, that future borrowings will be available to us under the Revolving Credit Facility, or that we will be able to complete any necessary financings or refinancings, in amounts sufficient to enable us to fund our operations, engage in acquisitions, capital improvements or other development activities, pay our debts and other obligations and fund our other liquidity needs. If we are not able to generate sufficient cash flow from operations, we may need to refinance or restructure our debt, sell assets, reduce or delay capital investments, or seek to raise additional capital. Additional debt or equity financing may not be available in sufficient amounts, at times or on terms acceptable to us, or at all, and any

21


additional debt financing we do obtain may significantly increase our leverage on unfavorable terms. If we are unable to implement one or more of these alternatives, we may not be able to service our debt or other obligations, which could result in us being in default thereon, in which circumstances our lenders could cease making loans to us, lenders or other holders of our debt could accelerate and declare due all outstanding obligations due under the respective agreements and secured lenders could foreclose on their collateral, any of which could have a material adverse effect on us.
The agreements which govern our various debt obligations impose restrictions on our business and limit our ability to undertake certain actions.
The agreements which govern our various debt obligations, including the Senior Secured Credit Facility, include covenants imposing significant restrictions on our business. These restrictions may affect our ability to operate our business and may limit our ability to take advantage of potential business opportunities as they arise. These covenants place restrictions on our ability to, among other things:
incur additional debt;
pay dividends or repurchase shares or make other distributions to shareholders;
make investments or acquisitions;
create liens or use assets as security in other transactions;
issue guarantees;
merge or consolidate, or sell, transfer, lease or dispose of substantially all of our assets;
amend our Articles of Association or bylaws;
engage in transactions with affiliates; and
purchase, sell or transfer certain assets.
 
The Senior Secured Credit Facility also requires us to comply with certain financial and other covenants. Our ability to comply with these agreements may be affected by events beyond our control, including prevailing economic, financial and industry conditions. These covenants could have a material adverse effect on our business by limiting our ability to take advantage of financing, mergers, acquisitions or other corporate opportunities. The breach of any of these covenants could result in a default under the Senior Secured Credit Facility. An event of default under any of our debt agreements could permit such lenders to declare all amounts borrowed from them, together with accrued and unpaid interest, to be immediately due and payable, which could, in turn, trigger defaults under other debt obligations and could result in the termination of commitments of the lenders to make further extensions of credit under the Revolving Credit Facility. If we are unable to repay debt to our lenders, or are otherwise in default under any provision governing any secured debt obligations, our secured lenders could proceed against us and against any collateral securing that debt.
Our variable rate indebtedness is priced using a spread over the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) and subjects us to interest rate risk, which could cause our debt service obligations to increase significantly.
Borrowings under the Senior Secured Credit Facility are at variable rates of interest and expose us to interest rate risk. If interest rates increase, our debt service obligations on our existing and any future variable rate indebtedness would also increase and our cash available to service our other obligations and invest in our business would decrease. Furthermore, rising interest rates would likely increase our interest obligations on future fixed rate indebtedness. As a result, rising interest rates could materially and adversely affect our financial condition and liquidity.
In addition, in July 2017, the head of the United Kingdom Financial Conduct Authority (the authority that regulates LIBOR) announced its intention to phase out the use of LIBOR by the end of 2021. At this time, it is not possible to predict the effect of any changes to LIBOR, any phase out of LIBOR or any establishment of alternative benchmark rates. At this time, no consensus exists as to what rate or rates will become accepted alternatives to LIBOR, and it is impossible to predict whether and to what extent banks will continue to provide LIBOR submissions to the administrator of LIBOR, whether LIBOR rates will cease to be published or supported before or after 2021 or whether any additional reforms to LIBOR may be enacted in the United Kingdom or elsewhere. Such developments and any other legal or regulatory changes in the method by which LIBOR is determined or the transition from LIBOR to a successor benchmark may result in, among other things, a sudden or prolonged increase or decrease in LIBOR, a delay in the publication of LIBOR, and changes in the rules or methodologies applied in calculating LIBOR, which may discourage market participants from continuing to administer or to participate in LIBOR’s determination and, in certain situations, could result in LIBOR no longer being determined and published. The U.S. Federal Reserve, in conjunction with the Alternative Reference Rates Committee, a steering committee comprised of large U.S. financial institutions, is considering replacing U.S.-dollar LIBOR with the Secured

22


Overnight Financing Rate, or “SOFR”, a new index calculated by short-term repurchase agreements, backed by Treasury securities. At this time, it is not possible to definitively predict the effect of any changes to LIBOR, any phase out of LIBOR or any establishment of alternative benchmark rates, including SOFR. If LIBOR ceases to exist, we may need to amend the terms of our Senior Secured Credit Facility or any future credit agreements extending beyond 2021 and indexed to LIBOR to replace LIBOR with SOFR or such other standard that is established, which could have a material adverse effect on us, including on our cost of funds, access to capital markets and financial results.
Any mortgage debt we incur will expose us to increased risk of property losses due to foreclosure, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
Incurring mortgage debt increases our risk of property losses because any defaults on indebtedness secured by our resorts may result in foreclosure actions initiated by lenders and ultimately our loss of the property securing the loan for which we are in default. For tax purposes, a foreclosure of any nonrecourse mortgage on any of our resorts may be treated as a sale of the property for a purchase price equal to the outstanding balance of the debt secured by the mortgage. In certain of the jurisdictions in which we operate, if any such foreclosure is treated as a sale of the property and the outstanding balance of the debt secured by the mortgage exceeds our tax basis in the property, we could recognize taxable income upon foreclosure but may not receive any cash proceeds.
In addition, any default under our mortgage debt may increase the risk of default on our other indebtedness, including other mortgage debt. If this occurs, we may not be able to satisfy our obligations under our indebtedness, which could have a material adverse effect on us, including our financial condition, liquidity (including our future access to borrowing) and results of operations.
We may become subject to disputes or legal, regulatory or other proceedings that could involve significant expenditures by us, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
The nature of our business exposes us to the potential for disputes or legal, regulatory or other proceedings from time to time relating to tax matters, environmental matters, government regulations, including licensing and permitting requirements, food and beverages safety regulations, personal injury, labor and employment matters, contract disputes and other issues. In addition, amenities at our resorts, including restaurants, bars and swimming pools, are subject to significant regulations, and government authorities may disagree with our interpretations of these regulations, or may enforce regulations that historically have not been enforced. Such disputes, individually or collectively, could adversely affect our business by distracting our management from the operation of our business or impacting our market reputation with our guests. If these disputes develop into proceedings or judgments, these proceedings or judgments, individually or collectively, could distract our senior management, disrupt our business or involve significant expenditures and our reserves relating to ongoing proceedings, if any, may ultimately prove to be inadequate, any of which could have a material adverse effect on us, including our financial results.
Some of the resorts in our portfolio located in Mexico were constructed and renovated without certain approvals. The authority granted to the Mexican government is plenary and we can give no assurance it will not exercise its authority to impose fines, remediation measures or close part or all of the related resort(s), which could have a material adverse effect on us.
Some of the resorts in our portfolio were constructed and renovated without certain approvals at the time the construction and renovation work was carried out, as the prior owners of such resorts determined that such approvals were not required under the Mexican law. We can give no assurance that the Mexican authorities will have the same interpretation of Mexican law as the prior owners. The authority granted to the Mexican government in this regard is plenary and we can give no assurance the Mexican government will not exercise its authority to impose fines, to require us to perform remediation/restoration activities and/or to contribute to environmental trusts, and/or to close part or all of the related resort(s), which could have a material adverse effect on us, including our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects.
As of 1988, Mexican environmental laws were amended in order to establish that, among other things, any new hotel construction and certain renovations require the preparation of an environmental impact statement (“MIA”) in order to obtain an Environmental Impact Authorization (Resolutivo de Impacto Ambiental). Furthermore, since 2003 depending on each specific project, a supporting technical report (“ETJ”) is required to obtain an Authorization to Change the Use of Soil of Forestal Land (Autorización de Cambio de Uso de Suelo en Terrenos Forestales).
With respect to the applicable resorts:
Two of the acquired resorts, Panama Jack Resorts Cancún and Hyatt Zilara Cancún, were built prior to implementation of the MIA in 1988 and, therefore, required no such authorization. However, certain renovations to these resorts were carried out after 1988 without an MIA because the prior owner determined that no authorization was needed pursuant to an exception in the Mexican law. We can give no assurance that the Mexican authorities will have the same interpretation of the applicability of the exception as the prior owner.

23


The remaining two resorts, Hilton Playa del Carmen All-Inclusive Resort and Panama Jack Resorts Playa del Carmen, were constructed after 1988 without the required MIA and ETJ authorizations. Notwithstanding the foregoing, those resorts were operated by the prior owner, and since our Predecessor’s acquisition at the time of our Predecessor’s formation transaction have been operated by our Predecessor and us, with no interference in the normal course of business.
The consequences of failing to obtain the MIA and/or ETJ, as applicable, could result in fines of up to approximately $300,000, obligations to perform remediation/restoration activities and/or contribute to environmental trusts, and, in the case of a severe violation, a partial or total closing or a demolition of the relevant resort(s). Although we are not aware of closings or demolitions due to the failure to obtain the MIA and/or ETJ, no assurance can be given that such action will not be taken in the future.
Our wholly-owned subsidiary Playa Resorts Holding B.V. may be required to obtain a banking license and/or may be in violation of the prohibition to attract repayable funds as a result of having issued senior notes and borrowing under our Senior Secured Credit Facility, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
Under the Regulation (EU) No 575/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of June 26, 2013 on prudential requirements for credit institutions and investment firms and amending Regulation (EU) No 648/2012 (the “CRR”), which took effect on January 1, 2014, there is uncertainty regarding how certain key terms in the CRR are to be interpreted.
 
If such terms are not interpreted in a manner that is consistent with current Dutch national guidance on which Playa Resorts Holding B.V. (our wholly-owned subsidiary) relies, Playa Resorts Holding B.V. could be categorized as a “credit institution” as a consequence of borrowing under our Senior Secured Credit Facility if it is deemed to be “an undertaking the business of which is to receive deposits or other repayable funds from the public and to grant credits for its own account.” This would require it to obtain a banking license and it could be deemed to be in violation of the prohibition on conducting the business of a bank without such a license. With respect to the borrowing under our Senior Secured Credit Facility, Playa Resorts Holding B.V. could also be deemed to be in violation of the prohibition on attracting repayable funds from the public. In each such case, it could, as a result, be subject to certain enforcement measures such as a warning and/or instructions by the regulator, incremental penalty payments (last onder dwangsom) and administrative fines (bestuurlijke boete), which all may be disclosed publicly by the regulator.
There is limited official guidance at the EU level as to the key elements of the definition of “credit institution,” such as the terms “repayable funds” and “the public.” The Netherlands legislature has indicated that, as long as there is no clear guidance at the EU level, it is to be expected that the current Dutch national interpretation of these terms will continue to be taken into account for the use and interpretation thereof. Playa Resorts Holding B.V. relies on this national interpretation to reach the conclusion that a requirement to obtain a banking license is not triggered, and that the prohibitions on conducting the business of a bank without such a license and on attracting repayable funds from the public have not been violated, on the basis that (i) each lender under our Senior Secured Credit Facility has extended loans to Playa Resorts Holding B.V. for an initial amount of at least the U.S. dollar equivalent of €100,000 or has assumed rights and/or obligations vis-à-vis Playa Resorts Holding B.V. the value of which is at least the U.S. dollar equivalent of €100,000 and (ii) all senior notes which were issued by Playa Resorts Holding B.V. were in denominations which equal or are greater than the U.S. dollar equivalent of €100,000.
If European guidance is published on what constitutes “the public” as referred to in the CRR, and such guidance does not provide that the holder of a note of $150,000 or more, such as was the case with our senior notes, or the lenders under our Senior Secured Credit Facility, each providing a loan the initial amount of which exceeds the U.S. dollar equivalent of €100,000, are excluded from being considered part of “the public” and the current Dutch national interpretation of these terms is not considered to be “grandfathered,” then Playa Resorts Holding B.V. may be required to obtain a banking license, and/or may be deemed to be in violation of the prohibition on conducting the business of a bank without such a license and, with respect to our Senior Secured Credit Facility, the prohibition on attracting repayable funds from the public and, as a result may, in each case, be subject to certain enforcement measures as described above. If Playa Resorts Holding B.V. is required to obtain a banking license or becomes subject to such enforcement measures, we could be materially adversely affected.
The results of operations of our resorts may be adversely affected by various operating risks common to the lodging industry, including competition, over-supply and dependence on tourism, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
Our resorts are subject to various operating risks common to the lodging industry, many of which are beyond our control, including, among others, the following:
the availability of and demand for hotel and resort rooms;
over-building of hotels and resorts in the markets in which we operate, which results in increased supply and may adversely affect Occupancy and revenues at our resorts;

24


pricing strategies of our competitors;
increases in operating costs due to inflation and other factors that may not be offset by increased room rates or other income;
international, national, and regional economic and geopolitical conditions;
the impact of war, crime, actual or threatened terrorist activity and heightened travel security measures instituted in response to war, terrorist activity or threats (including Travel Advisories issued by the U.S. Department of State) and civil unrest;
 
the impact of any economic or political instability in Mexico due to unsettled political conditions, including civil unrest, widespread criminal activity, acts of terrorism, force majeure, war or other armed conflict, strikes and governmental actions;
the desirability of particular locations and changes in travel patterns;
the occurrence of natural or man-made disasters, such as earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, and oil spills;
events that may be beyond our control that could adversely affect the reputation of one or more of our resorts or that may disproportionately and adversely impact the reputation of our brands or resorts;
taxes and government regulations that influence or determine wages, prices, interest rates, construction procedures, and costs;
adverse effects of a downturn in the lodging industry, especially leisure travel and tourism spending;
changes in interest rates and in the availability, cost and terms of debt financing;
necessity for periodic capital reinvestment to maintain, repair, expand, renovate and reposition our resorts;
the costs and administrative burdens associated with compliance with applicable laws and regulations, including, among others, those associated with privacy, marketing and sales, licensing, labor, employment, the environment, and the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Asset Control and the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”);
the availability, cost and other terms of capital to allow us to fund investments in our portfolio and the acquisition of new resorts;
regional, national and international development of competing resorts;
increases in wages and other labor costs, energy, healthcare, insurance, transportation and fuel, and other expenses central to the conduct of our business or the cost of travel for our guests, including recent increases in energy costs and any resulting increase in travel costs or decrease in airline capacity;
availability, cost and other terms of insurance;
organized labor activities, which could cause the diversion of business from resorts involved in labor negotiations, loss of group business, and/or increased labor costs;
currency exchange fluctuations;
trademark or intellectual property infringement; and
risks generally associated with the ownership of hotels, resorts and real estate, as we discuss in detail below.
Any one or more of these factors could limit or reduce the demand for our resorts or the prices our resorts are able to obtain or could increase our costs and therefore reduce the operating results of our resorts. Even where such factors do not reduce demand, resort-level profit margins may suffer if we are unable to fully recover increased operating costs from our guests. These factors could have a material adverse effect on us, including our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects.
The seasonality of the lodging industry could have a material adverse effect on us.
The lodging industry is seasonal in nature, which can be expected to cause quarterly fluctuations in our revenues. The seasonality of the lodging industry and the location of our resorts in Mexico and the Caribbean will generally result in the greatest demand for our resorts between mid-December and April of each year, yielding higher Occupancy levels and package rates during this period. This seasonality in demand has resulted in predictable fluctuations in revenue, results of operations and liquidity, which are consistently higher during the first quarter of each year than in successive quarters. We can provide no assurances that these seasonal fluctuations will, in the future, be consistent with our historical experience or whether any shortfalls that occur as a result of these fluctuations will not have a material adverse effect on us.

25


The cyclical nature of the lodging industry may cause fluctuations in our operating performance, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
The lodging industry is highly cyclical in nature. Fluctuations in operating performance are caused largely by general economic and local market conditions, which subsequently affect levels of business and leisure travel. In addition to general economic conditions, new hotel and resort room supply is an important factor that can affect the lodging industry’s performance, and over-building has the potential to further exacerbate the negative impact of an economic recession. Room rates and Occupancy, and thus Net Package RevPAR (as defined in Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations), tend to increase when demand growth exceeds supply growth. A decline in lodging demand, or increase in lodging supply, could result in returns that are substantially below expectations, or result in losses, which could have a material adverse effect on us, including our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects. Further, the costs of running a resort tend to be more fixed than variable. As a result, in an environment of declining revenue, the rate of decline in earnings is likely to be higher than the rate of decline in revenue.
The increasing use of Internet travel intermediaries by consumers could have a material adverse effect on us.
Some of our vacation packages are booked through Internet travel intermediaries, including, but not limited to, Travelocity.com, Expedia.com and Priceline.com. As these Internet bookings increase, these intermediaries may be able to obtain higher commissions, reduced room rates or other significant contract concessions from us. Moreover, some of these Internet travel intermediaries are attempting to offer lodging as a commodity, by increasing the importance of price and general indicators of quality, such as “three-star downtown hotel,” at the expense of brand identification or quality of product or service. If consumers develop loyalty to Internet reservations systems rather than to our booking system or the brands we own and operate, the value of our resorts could deteriorate and we could be materially and adversely affected, including our financial results.
Cyber risk and the failure to maintain the integrity of internal or guest data could harm our reputation and result in a loss of business and/or subject us to costs, fines, investigations, enforcement actions or lawsuits.
We, Hyatt, Hilton, our third-party resort manager and other third-party service providers collect, use and retain large volumes of guest data, including credit card numbers and other personally identifiable information, for business, marketing and other purposes in our, Hyatt’s, Hilton’s, our third-party resort manager's and other third-party service providers' various information technology systems, which enter, process, summarize and report such data. We also maintain personally identifiable information about our employees. We, Hyatt, Hilton, our third-party resort manager and other third-party service providers store and process such internal and guest data both at on-site facilities and at third-party owned facilities including, for example, in a third-party hosted cloud environment. The integrity and protection of our guest, employee and company data, as well as the continuous operation of our, Hyatt’s, Hilton’s, our third-party resort manager's and other third-party service providers' systems, is critical to our business. Our guests and employees expect that we will adequately protect their personal information. The regulations and contractual obligations applicable to security and privacy are increasingly demanding, both in the United States and in other jurisdictions where we operate, and cyber-criminals have been recently targeting the lodging industry. We continue to develop and enhance controls and security measures to protect against the risk of theft, loss or fraudulent or unlawful use of guest, employee or company data, and we maintain an ongoing process to re-evaluate the adequacy of our controls and measures.
Notwithstanding our efforts to protect against unauthorized access of our systems and sensitive information, because of the scope and complexity of their information technology structure, our reliance on third parties to support and protect our structure and data, and the constantly evolving cyber-threat landscape, our systems and those of third parties on which we rely are vulnerable to disruptions, failures, unauthorized access, cyber-terrorism, employee error, negligence, fraud or other misuse, and given the sophistication of hackers to gain unauthorized access to our sensitive information, we may not be able to detect the breach for long periods of time or at all. These or similar occurrences, whether accidental or intentional, could result in theft, unauthorized access or disclosure, loss, fraudulent or unlawful use of guest, employee or company data which could harm our reputation, result in an interruption or disruption of our services or result in a loss of business, as well as remedial and other costs, fines, investigations, enforcement actions, or lawsuits. As a result, future incidents could have a material adverse impact on us, including our business, our financial condition, liquidity and results of operations and prospects.
Information technology systems, software or website failures or interruptions could have a material adverse effect on our business or results of operations.
We rely on the uninterrupted and efficient operation of our information technology systems and software. Information technology is critical to our day-to-day operations, including, but not exclusive to guest check-in and check-out, housekeeping and room service, and reporting our financial results and the financial results of our resorts. We rely on certain third-party hardware, network and software vendors to maintain and upgrade many of our critical systems on an ongoing basis to support our business operations and to keep pace with technology developments in the hospitality industry. The software programs supporting many of our systems are

26


licensed to us by independent third-party software providers. An inability to continuously maintain and update our hardware and software programs or an inability for network providers to maintain their communications infrastructure would potentially disrupt or inhibit the efficiency of our operations if suitable alternatives could not be identified and implemented in a timely, efficient and cost-effective manner.
We face risks related to pandemic diseases, including avian flu, H1N1 flu, H7N9 flu, Ebola virus, Coronavirus and Zika virus, which could materially and adversely affect travel and result in reduced demand for our resorts and could have a material adverse effect on us.
Our business could be materially and adversely affected by the effect of, or the public perception or a risk of, a pandemic disease on the travel industry. For example, the outbreaks of severe acute respiratory syndrome (“SARS”) and avian flu in 2003 had a severe impact on the travel industry, and the outbreaks of H1N1 flu in 2009 threatened to have a similar impact. Cases of the Zika virus have been reported in regions in which our resorts are located. In addition, the ongoing Coronavirus outbreak emanating from China at the beginning of 2020 has resulted in increased travel restrictions and extended shutdown of certain businesses in the region, and a widespread outbreak of the virus in the U.S. or the regions in which our resorts are located would likely reduce travel and hotel demand at our resorts. Additionally, the public perception of a risk of a pandemic or media coverage of these diseases, or public perception of health risks linked to perceived regional food and beverage safety, particularly if focused on regions in which our resorts are located, may adversely affect us by reducing demand for our resorts. A prolonged occurrence of SARS, avian flu, H1N1 flu, H7N9 flu, Ebola virus, Coronavirus, Zika virus or another pandemic disease or health hazard also may result in health or other government authorities imposing restrictions on travel. Any of these events could result in a significant drop in demand for our resorts and could have a material adverse effect on us.
We may be subject to unknown or contingent liabilities related to our existing resorts and resorts that we acquire, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
Our existing resorts and resorts that we may in the future acquire may be subject to unknown or contingent liabilities for which we may have no recourse, or only limited recourse, against the sellers. In general, the representations and warranties provided under the transaction agreements related to our existing resorts and any future acquisitions of resorts by us may not survive the closing of the transactions. Furthermore, indemnification under such agreements may not exist or be limited and subject to various exceptions or materiality thresholds, a significant deductible or an aggregate cap on losses. As a result, there is no guarantee that we will recover any amounts with respect to losses due to breaches by the transferors or sellers of their representations and warranties or other prior actions by the sellers. In addition, the total amount of costs and expenses that may be incurred with respect to liabilities associated with these resorts may exceed our expectations, and we may experience other unanticipated adverse effects, all of which may materially and adversely affect us, including our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects.
Conducting business internationally may result in increased risks and any such risks could have a material adverse effect on us.
We operate our business internationally and plan to continue to develop an international presence. Operating internationally exposes us to a number of risks, including political risks, risks of increase in duties and taxes, risks relating to anti-bribery laws, such as the FCPA, as well as changes in laws and policies affecting vacation businesses, or governing the operations of foreign-based companies. Because some of our expenses are incurred in foreign currencies, we are exposed to exchange rate risks. Additional risks include interest rate movements, imposition of trade barriers and restrictions on repatriation of earnings. Any of these risks could have a material adverse effect on us, including our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects.
We could be exposed to liabilities under the FCPA and other anti-corruption laws and regulations, including non-U.S. laws, any of which could have a material adverse impact on us.
We have international operations, and as a result are subject to compliance with various laws and regulations, including the FCPA and other anti-corruption laws in the jurisdictions in which we do business, which generally prohibit companies and their intermediaries or agents from engaging in bribery or making improper payments to foreign officials or their agents or other entities. The FCPA also requires companies to make and keep books and records and accounts which, in reasonable detail, reflect their transactions, including the disposition of their assets. We have implemented, and will continue to evaluate and improve, safeguards and policies designed to prevent violations of various anti-corruption laws that prohibit improper payments or offers of payments to foreign officials or their agents or other entities for the purpose of conducting business, and we are in the process of expanding our training program. The countries in which we own resorts have experienced governmental corruption to some degree and, in certain circumstances, compliance with anti-corruption laws may conflict with local customs and practices. Despite existing safeguards and any future improvements to our policies and training, we will be exposed to risks from deliberate, reckless or negligent acts committed by our employees or agents for which we might be held responsible. Failure to comply with these laws or our internal policies could lead to criminal and civil penalties and other legal and regulatory liabilities and require us to undertake remedial measures, any of

27


which could have a material adverse impact on us, including our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects.
Our existing resorts and resorts that we may acquire may contain or develop harmful mold that could lead to liability for adverse health effects and costs of remediating the problem, either of which could have a material adverse effect on us.
When excessive moisture accumulates in buildings or on building materials, mold growth may occur, particularly if the moisture problem remains undiscovered or is not addressed over a period of time. Some molds may produce airborne toxins or irritants. Concern about indoor exposure to mold has been increasing as exposure to mold may cause a variety of adverse health effects and symptoms, including allergic or other reactions. Some of the resorts in our portfolio or resorts that we may acquire may contain microbial matter, such as mold and mildew, which could require us to undertake a costly remediation program to contain or remove the mold from the affected resort. Furthermore, we can provide no assurances that we will be successful in identifying harmful mold and mildew at resorts that we seek to acquire, which could require us to take remedial action at acquired resorts. The presence of significant mold could expose us to liability from guests, employees and others if property damage or health concerns arise, which could have a material adverse effect on us, including our results of operations.
 Illiquidity of real estate investments could significantly impede our ability to sell resorts or otherwise respond to adverse changes in the performance of our resorts, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
Because real estate investments are relatively illiquid, our ability to sell one or more resorts promptly for reasonable prices in response to changing economic, financial and investment conditions will be limited. The real estate market is affected by many factors beyond our control, including:
adverse changes in international, national, regional and local economic and market conditions;
changes in interest and tax rates and in the availability and cost and other terms of debt financing;
changes in governmental laws and regulations, fiscal policies and zoning ordinances and the related costs of compliance with laws and regulations, fiscal policies and ordinances;
the ongoing need for capital improvements, particularly in older structures;
changes in operating expenses; and
civil unrest, widespread criminal activity, and acts of nature, including hurricanes, earthquakes, floods and other natural disasters, which may result in uninsured losses, and acts of war or terrorism.
We may decide to sell resorts in the future. We cannot predict whether we will be able to sell any resort for the price or on the terms set by us, or whether any price or other terms offered by a prospective purchaser would be acceptable to us. We also cannot predict the length of time needed to find a willing purchaser and to close the sale of a resort.
During the recent economic recession, the availability of credit to purchasers of hotels and resorts and financing structures, such as commercial mortgage-backed securities, which had been used to finance many hotel and resort acquisitions in prior years, was reduced. Subsequent to the aforementioned economic recession, such credit availability and financing structures have been inconsistent from time to time. If financing for hotels and resorts is not available on attractive terms or at all, it will adversely impact the ability of third parties to buy our resorts. As a result, we may hold our resorts for a longer period than we would otherwise desire and may sell resorts at a loss.
In addition, we may be required to expend funds to correct defects, terminate contracts or to make improvements before a resort can be sold. We can provide no assurances that we will have funds available, or access to such funds, to correct those defects or to make those improvements. In acquiring a resort, we may agree to lock-out provisions or tax protection agreements that materially restrict us from selling that property for a period of time or impose other restrictions, such as a limitation on the amount of debt that can be placed or repaid on that property. These factors and any others that would impede our ability to respond to adverse changes in the performance of our resorts or a need for liquidity could materially and adversely affect us, including our financial results.
We could incur significant costs related to government regulation and litigation with respect to environmental matters, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
Our resorts are subject to various international, national, regional and local environmental laws that impose liability for contamination. Under these laws, governmental entities have the authority to require us, as the current owner of property, to perform or pay for the clean-up of contamination (including hazardous substances, waste, or petroleum products) at, on, under or emanating from our property and to pay for natural resource damages arising from such contamination. Such laws often impose liability without regard to whether the owner or operator or other responsible party knew of, or caused, such contamination, and the liability may be

28


joint and several. Because these laws also impose liability on persons who owned a property at the time it was or became contaminated, it is possible we could incur cleanup costs or other environmental liabilities even after we sell resorts. Contamination at, on, under or emanating from our resorts also may expose us to liability to private parties for costs of remediation and/or personal injury or property damage. In addition, environmental laws may create liens on contaminated sites in favor of the government for damages and costs it incurs to address such contamination. If contamination is discovered on our resorts, environmental laws also may impose restrictions on the manner in which our property may be used or our business may be operated, and these restrictions may require substantial expenditures. Moreover, environmental contamination can affect the value of a property and, therefore, an owner’s ability to borrow funds using the property as collateral or to sell the property on favorable terms or at all. Furthermore, persons who sent waste to a waste disposal facility, such as a landfill or an incinerator, may be liable for costs associated with cleanup of that facility.
In addition, our resorts are subject to various international, national, regional and local environmental, health and safety regulatory requirements that address a wide variety of issues. Some of our resorts routinely handle and use hazardous or regulated substances and wastes as part of their operations, which are subject to regulation (e.g., swimming pool chemicals). Our resorts incur costs to comply with these environmental, health and safety laws and regulations and could be subject to fines and penalties for non-compliance with applicable laws.
Liabilities and costs associated with contamination at, on, under or emanating from our properties, defending against claims, or complying with environmental, health and safety laws could be significant and could have a material adverse effect on us, including our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects. We can provide no assurances that (i) changes in current laws or regulations or future laws or regulations will not impose additional or new material environmental liabilities or (ii) the current environmental condition of our resorts will not be affected by our operations, by the condition of the resorts in the vicinity of our resorts, or by third parties unrelated to us. The discovery of material environmental liabilities at our resorts could subject us to unanticipated significant costs, which could result in significant losses. Please see “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Our Business — We may become subject to disputes or legal, regulatory or other proceedings that could involve significant expenditures by us, which could have a material adverse effect on us” as to the possibility of disputes or legal, regulatory or other proceedings that could adversely affect us.
The tax laws, rules and regulations (or interpretations thereof) in the jurisdictions in which we operate may change, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
We generally seek to structure our business activities in the jurisdictions in which we operate in a manner that is tax-efficient, taking into account the relevant tax laws, rules and regulations. However, tax laws, rules and regulations in these jurisdictions are complex and are subject to change as well as subject to interpretation by local tax authorities and courts. There can be no assurance that these tax laws, rules and regulations (or interpretations thereof) will not change, possibly with retroactive effect, or that local tax authorities may not otherwise successfully assert positions contrary to those taken by us. In any such case, we may be required to operate in a less tax-efficient manner, incur costs and expenses to restructure our operations and/or owe past taxes (and potentially interest and penalties), which in each case could negatively impact our operations. For example, we will need to renegotiate our agreements which determine our taxes in the Dominican Republic, known as advanced pricing agreements, with The Ministry of Finance of the Dominican Republic at the end of 2020 when our current agreements expire.
Increases in property taxes would increase our operating costs, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
Each of our resorts is subject to real estate and personal property taxes, especially upon any development, redevelopment, rebranding, repositioning and renovation. These taxes may increase as tax rates change and as our resorts are assessed or reassessed by taxing authorities. If property taxes increase, we would incur a corresponding increase in our operating expenses, which could have a material adverse effect on us, including our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects.
Risks Related to Ownership of Our Ordinary Shares
The rights of our shareholders and the duties of our directors are governed by Dutch law, our Articles of Association and internal rules and policies adopted by our board of directors (the Board), and differ in some important respects from the rights of shareholders and the duties of members of a board of directors of a U.S. corporation.
Our corporate affairs, as a Dutch public limited liability company (naamloze vennootschap), are governed by our Articles of Association, internal rules and policies adopted by our Board and by the laws governing companies incorporated in the Netherlands. The rights of our shareholders and the duties of our directors under Dutch law are different from the rights of shareholders and/or the duties of directors of a corporation organized under the laws of U.S. jurisdictions. In the performance of its duties, our Board is required by Dutch law to consider our interests and the interests of our shareholders, our employees and other stakeholders (e.g., our

29


creditors, guests and suppliers) as a whole and not only those of our shareholders, which may negatively affect the value of your investment.
In addition, the rights of our shareholders, including for example the rights of shareholders as they relate to the exercise of shareholder rights, are governed by Dutch law and our Articles of Association and such rights differ from the rights of shareholders under U.S. law. For example, if we engaged in a merger, Dutch law would not grant appraisal rights to any of our shareholders who wished to challenge the consideration to be paid to them upon such merger (without prejudice, however, to certain cash exit rights offered under Dutch law in certain circumstances).
We are organized and existing under the laws of the Netherlands, and, as such, the rights of our shareholders and the civil liability of our directors and executive officers are governed in certain respects by the laws of the Netherlands.
We are organized and existing under the laws of the Netherlands, and, as such, the rights of our shareholders and the civil liability of our directors and executive officers are governed in certain respects by the laws of the Netherlands. The ability of our shareholders in certain countries other than the Netherlands to bring an action against us, our directors and executive officers may be limited under applicable law. In addition, substantially all of our assets are located outside the United States. As a result, it may not be possible for shareholders to effect service of process within the United States upon us or our directors and executive officers or to enforce judgments against us or them in U.S. courts, including judgments predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the federal securities laws of the United States. In addition, it is not clear whether a Dutch court would impose civil liability on us or any of our directors and executive officers in an original action based solely upon the federal securities laws of the United States brought in a court of competent jurisdiction in the Netherlands.
As of the date of this annual report, there is no treaty in effect between the United States and the Netherlands providing for the reciprocal recognition and enforcement of judgments, other than arbitration awards, in civil and commercial matters. With respect to choice of court agreements in civil or commercial matters, it is noted that the Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements entered into force for the Netherlands, but has not entered into force for the United States. Accordingly, a judgment rendered by a court in the United States, whether or not predicated solely upon U.S. securities laws, would not automatically be recognized and enforced by the competent Dutch courts. However, if a person has obtained a judgment for the payment of money rendered by a court in the United States and files a claim with the competent Dutch court, the Dutch court will in principle give binding effect to a foreign judgment if (i) the jurisdiction of the foreign court was based on a ground of jurisdiction that is generally acceptable according to international standards, (ii) the judgment by the foreign court was rendered in legal proceedings that comply with the Dutch standards of proper administration of justice including sufficient safeguards (behoorlijke rechtspleging) and (iii) binding effect of such foreign judgment is not contrary to Dutch public order and (iv) the judgment by the foreign court is not incompatible with a decision rendered between the same parties by a Dutch court, or with a previous decision rendered between the same parties by a foreign court in a dispute that concerns the same subject and is based on the same cause, provided that the previous decision qualifies for acknowledgment in the Netherlands. Even if such a foreign judgment is giving binding effect, a claim based thereon may, however, still be rejected if the foreign judgment is not or no longer formally enforceable.
Based on the lack of a treaty as described above, U.S. investors may not be able to enforce against us or our directors, representatives or certain experts named herein who are residents of the Netherlands or countries other than the United States any judgments obtained in U.S. courts in civil and commercial matters, including judgments under the U.S. federal securities laws.
Under our Articles of Association, and certain other contractual arrangements between us and our directors, we indemnify and hold our directors harmless against all claims and suits brought against them, subject to limited exceptions. There is doubt, however, as to whether U.S. courts would enforce such indemnity provisions in an action brought against one of our directors in the United States under U.S. securities laws.
Each of TPG Global, LLC, Farallon Capital Management, L.L.C., Sagicor and Hyatt own a significant portion of our ordinary shares and have representation on our Board. Any of these investors may have interests that differ from those of other shareholders.

As of December 31, 2019, 23.2% of our outstanding ordinary shares were beneficially owned by Cabana Investors B.V. and Playa Four Pack, L.L.C. (collectively, “Cabana”), each of which is an affiliate of Farallon Capital Management, L.L.C. (“Farallon”). In addition, two of our directors were designated by Cabana. As of December 31, 2019, 15.1% of our outstanding ordinary shares were beneficially owned by Jamziv Mobay Jamaica Limited (“Jamziv”), which is owned by JCSD Trustee Services Limited (“JCSD”) and X Fund Properties (“XFUND”), both affiliates of Sagicor. Two of our directors have been designated by JCSD and XFUND. As of December 31, 2019, 9.2% of our outstanding ordinary shares were beneficially owned by HI Holdings Playa B.V. (“HI Holdings Playa”), an affiliate of Hyatt. In addition, one of our directors was designated by HI Holdings Playa and is currently an employee of Hyatt. As of December 31, 2019, 6.7% of our outstanding ordinary shares were beneficially owned by TPG Pace Sponsor, LLC (“Pace Sponsor”), an affiliate of TPG Global, LLC. In addition, three of our directors were designated by Pace Sponsor. 

30



As a result, these shareholders, individually or collectively, may be able to significantly influence the outcome of matters submitted for director action, subject to our directors’ obligation to act in the interest of all of our stakeholders, and for shareholder action, including the designation and appointment of our Board (and committees thereof) and approval of significant corporate transactions, including business combinations, consolidations and mergers. So long as these shareholders and/or their affiliates continue to directly or indirectly own a significant amount of our outstanding equity interests and have the right to designate members of our Board and/or one or more committees thereof, these shareholders may be able to exert substantial influence on us and may be able to exercise its influence in a manner that is not in the interests of our other stakeholders. These shareholders' influence over our management could have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a change in control or otherwise discouraging a potential acquirer from attempting to obtain control of us, which could cause the market price of our ordinary shares to decline or prevent our shareholders from realizing a premium over the market price for our ordinary shares. Prospective investors in our ordinary shares should consider that the interests of these shareholders may differ from their interests in material respects.
Provisions of our Articles of Association or Dutch corporate law might deter or discourage acquisition bids for us that shareholders might consider to be favorable and prevent or frustrate any attempt to replace or remove our Board at the time of such acquisition bid.
Certain provisions of our Articles of Association may make it more difficult for a third party to acquire control of us or effect a change in our Board. These provisions include:
A provision that our directors are appointed by our General Meeting at the binding nomination of our Board. Such binding nomination may only be overruled by the General Meeting by a resolution adopted by at least a majority of the votes cast, if such votes represent more than 50% of our issued share capital.
A provision that our shareholders at a General Meeting may suspend or remove directors at any time. A resolution of our General Meeting to suspend or remove a director may be passed by a majority of the votes cast, provided that the resolution is based on a proposal by our Board. In the absence of a proposal by our Board, a resolution of our General Meeting to suspend or remove a director shall require a vote of at least a majority of the votes cast, if such votes represent more than 50% of our issued share capital.
A requirement that certain actions can only be taken by the General Meeting with at least two-thirds of the votes cast, unless such resolution is passed at the proposal by our Board, including an amendment of our Articles of Association, the issuance of shares or the granting of rights to subscribe for shares, the limitation or exclusion of preemptive rights, the reduction of our issued share capital, the application for bankruptcy, the making of a distribution from our profits or reserves on our ordinary shares, the making of a distribution in the form of shares in our capital or in the form of assets, instead of cash, the entering into of a merger or demerger, our dissolution and the designation or granting of authorizations such as the authorization to issue shares and to limit or exclude preemptive rights. Our General Meeting adopted a resolution to grant such authorizations to our Board.
A provision prohibiting (a) a “Brand Owner” (which generally means a franchisor, licensor or owner of a hotel concept or brand that has at least 12 all-inclusive resorts and that competes with any Hyatt All-Inclusive Resort Brand resort) from acquiring our ordinary shares such that the Brand Owner (together with its affiliates) acquires beneficial ownership in excess of 15% of our outstanding shares, or (b) a “Restricted Brand Company” from acquiring our ordinary shares such that the Restricted Brand Company (together with its affiliates) acquires beneficial ownership in excess of 5% of our outstanding ordinary shares. Upon becoming aware of either share cap being exceeded, we will send a notice to such shareholder informing such shareholder of a violation of this provision and granting the shareholder two weeks to dispose of such excess ordinary shares to an unaffiliated third party. Such notice will immediately trigger the transfer obligation and suspend the right to attend our General Meeting and voting rights (together, “Shareholder Rights”) of the shares exceeding the cap. If such excess shares are not disposed by such time, (i) the Shareholder Rights on all shares held by the shareholder exceeding the share cap will be suspended until the transfer obligations have been complied with, (ii) we will be irrevocably authorized under our Articles of Association to transfer the excess shares to a foundation until sold to an unaffiliated third party and (iii) such foundation shall issue depositary receipts for the ordinary shares concerned to the relevant Brand Owner or Restricted Brand Company for as long as those ordinary shares are held by the foundation.
Such provisions could discourage a takeover attempt and impair the ability of shareholders to benefit from a change in control and realize any potential change of control premium. This may adversely affect the market price of the ordinary shares.
Our General Meeting has authorized our Board to issue and grant rights to subscribe for our ordinary shares, up to the amount of the authorized share capital (from time to time) and limit or exclude preemptive rights on those shares, in each case for a period of five

31


years from the date of the resolution. Accordingly, an issue of our ordinary shares may make it more difficult for a shareholder or potential acquirer to obtain control over our General Meeting or us.
Provisions of our franchise agreements with Hyatt might deter acquisition bids for us that shareholders might consider to be favorable and/or give Hyatt the right to terminate such agreements if certain persons obtain and retain more than a specified percentage of our ordinary shares.
Certain provisions of our franchise agreements with Hyatt may make it more difficult for certain third parties to acquire more than a specified percentage of issued ordinary shares. Our franchise agreements with Hyatt and our Articles of Association both contain a provision prohibiting (a) a Brand Owner from acquiring issued ordinary shares such that the Brand Owner (together with its affiliates) acquires beneficial ownership in excess of 15% of issued and outstanding ordinary shares, and (b) a Restricted Brand Company from acquiring issued ordinary shares such that the Restricted Brand Company (together with its affiliates) acquires beneficial ownership in excess of 5% of issued and outstanding ordinary shares. Upon becoming aware of either share cap being exceeded, we must send a notice to such shareholder informing such shareholder of a violation of this provision and granting the shareholder two weeks to dispose of such excess ordinary shares to an unaffiliated third party. Such notice will immediately trigger the transfer obligation and suspend the Shareholder Rights of ordinary shares exceeding the share cap. If such excess ordinary shares are not disposed by such time, (i) the Shareholder Rights on all ordinary shares held by the shareholder exceeding the share cap will be suspended until the transfer obligations have been complied with and (ii) we will be irrevocably authorized under our Articles of Association to transfer the excess ordinary shares to a foundation until sold to an unaffiliated third party. Our franchise agreements provide that, if the excess ordinary shares are not transferred to a foundation or an unaffiliated third party within 30 days following the earlier of the date on which a public filing is made with respect to either share cap being exceeded and the date we become aware of either share cap being exceeded, Hyatt will have the right to terminate all (but not less than all) of its franchise agreements with us by providing the notice specified in the franchise agreement to us and we will be subject to liquidated damage payments to Hyatt. In the event that any Brand Owner or Restricted Brand Company acquires any ownership interest in us, we will be required to establish and maintain controls to protect the confidentiality of certain Hyatt information and will provide Hyatt with a detailed description and evidence of such controls.
Future issuances of debt securities and equity securities may adversely affect us, including the market price of our ordinary shares and may be dilutive to existing shareholders.
In the future, we may incur debt or issue equity ranking senior to our ordinary shares. Those securities will generally have priority upon liquidation. Such securities also may be governed by an indenture or other instrument containing covenants restricting its operating flexibility. Additionally, any convertible or exchangeable securities that we issue in the future may have rights, preferences and privileges more favorable than those of our ordinary shares. Because our decision to issue debt or equity in the future will depend on market conditions and other factors beyond our control, we cannot predict or estimate the amount, timing, nature or success of our future capital raising efforts. As a result, future capital raising efforts may reduce the market price of our ordinary shares and be dilutive to existing shareholders.
Our shareholders may not have any preemptive rights in respect of future issuances of our ordinary shares.
In the event of an increase in our share capital, our ordinary shareholders are generally entitled under Dutch law to full preemptive rights, unless these rights are limited or excluded either by a resolution of the General Meeting or by a resolution of our Board (if our Board has been authorized by the General Meeting for this purpose), or where shares are issued to our employees or a group company (i.e., certain affiliates, subsidiaries or related companies) or where shares are issued against a non-cash contribution, or in case of an exercise of a previously acquired right to subscribe for shares. The same preemptive rights apply when rights to subscribe for shares are granted.
Preemptive rights may be excluded by our Board on the basis of the irrevocable authorization of the General Meeting to our Board for a period of five years from the date of this authorization with respect to the issue of our ordinary shares up to the amount of the authorized share capital (from time to time). The General Meeting has delegated the authority to issue our ordinary shares and grant rights to purchase our ordinary shares up to the amount of our authorized share capital (from time to time) to our Board for that same period.
Accordingly, holders of our ordinary shares may not have any preemptive rights in connection with, and may be diluted by an issue of our ordinary shares and it may be more difficult for a shareholder to obtain control over our General Meeting. Certain of our shareholders outside the Netherlands, in particular, U.S. shareholders, may not be allowed to exercise preemptive rights to which they are entitled, if any, unless a registration statement under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), is declared effective with respect to our ordinary shares issuable upon exercise of such rights or an exemption from the registration requirements is available.

32


We are not obligated to and do not comply with all the best practice provisions of the Dutch Corporate Governance Code (the “DCGC”). This could adversely affect your rights as a shareholder.
As we are incorporated under Dutch law and our ordinary shares have been listed on a government-recognized stock exchange (i.e., the NASDAQ), we are subject to the DCGC. The DCGC contains both principles and best practice provisions for our Board, shareholders and the General Meeting, financial reporting, auditors, disclosure compliance and enforcement standards.
 The DCGC is based on a “comply or explain” principle. Accordingly, we are required to disclose in our annual management report publicly filed in the Netherlands, whether or not we are complying with the various provisions of the DCGC. If we do not comply with one or more of those provisions (e.g., because of a conflicting NASDAQ requirement or U.S. market practice), we are required to explain the reasons for such non-compliance in our annual management report.
We acknowledge the importance of good corporate governance. However, we do not comply with all the provisions of the DCGC, to a large extent because such provisions conflict with or are inconsistent with the corporate governance rules of the NASDAQ and U.S. securities laws that apply to us, or because we believe such provisions do not reflect customary practices of global companies listed on the NASDAQ. This could adversely affect your rights as a shareholder and you may not have the same level of protection as a shareholder in a Dutch company that fully complies with the DCGC.
If, based on Mexican law, the accounting value of our ordinary shares is derived more than 50% from property in Mexico, it could result in the imposition of tax on a selling shareholder who is not eligible to claim benefits under the income tax treaty between Mexico and the United States or under any other favorable income tax treaty with Mexico.
According to article 161 of the Income Tax Law of Mexico, the transfer by a nonresident of Mexico of shares in an entity where the accounting value of the transferred shares is derived, directly or indirectly, from more than 50% from immovable property located in Mexico could be subject to Mexican income tax. The applicable Mexican law does not provide for the method to be followed in making this calculation. The income tax rate in Mexico for the disposal of shares by nonresidents is currently either 25% of the gross sale proceeds or, if certain conditions are met, 35% of the net gain. Withholding of 25% of gross sale proceeds is required of the buyer only if the latter is a Mexican resident. A Mexican nonresident subject to tax under article 161 may be eligible to claim exemption from taxation or a reduced tax rate under an applicable income tax treaty with Mexico, such as the income tax treaty between Mexico and the United States. A determination of whether the accounting value of our ordinary shares is derived, directly or indirectly, more than 50% from immovable property located in Mexico is subject to interpretations of the applicable law and will be affected by various factors with regard to us that may change over time. If, at the time of a transfer of our ordinary shares, the accounting value of our ordinary shares is derived, directly or indirectly, from more than 50% from immovable property located in Mexico and article 161 were applied to such transfer, it could result in the imposition of the above-mentioned tax on a selling shareholder who is not eligible to claim benefits under the income tax treaty between Mexico and the United States or under any other favorable income tax treaty with Mexico.
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.

None.

33


Item 2. Properties.
As of December 31, 2019, the following table presents an overview of our resorts and is organized by our four geographic business segments: the Yucatán Peninsula, the Pacific Coast, the Dominican Republic and Jamaica.
Name of Resort 
 
Location 
 
Brand and Type 
 
Operator 
 
Year Built; Significant Renovations
 
Rooms
Owned Resorts
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Yucatán Peninsula
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hyatt Ziva Cancún
 
Cancún, Mexico
 
Hyatt Ziva (all ages)
 
Playa
 
1975; 1980; 1986; 2002; 2015
 
547
Hyatt Zilara Cancún
 
Cancún, Mexico
 
Hyatt Zilara 
(adults-only)
 
Playa
 
2006; 2009; 2013; 2017
 
310
Panama Jack Resorts Cancún
 
Cancún, Mexico
 
Panama Jack (all ages)
 
Playa
 
1985; 2009; 2017
 
458
Hilton Playa del Carmen All-Inclusive Resort(1)
 
Playa del Carmen, Mexico
 
Hilton (adults-only)
 
Playa
 
2002; 2009; 2019
 
524
Panama Jack Resorts Playa del Carmen
 
Playa del Carmen, Mexico
 
Panama Jack (all ages)
 
Playa
 
1996; 2006; 2012; 2017
 
287
Secrets Capri
 
Riviera Maya, Mexico
 
Secrets (adults-only)
 
AMResorts
 
2003
 
291
Dreams Puerto Aventuras
 
Riviera Maya, Mexico
 
Dreams (all ages)
 
AMResorts
 
1991; 2009
 
305
Pacific Coast
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hyatt Ziva Los Cabos
 
Cabo San Lucas, Mexico
 
Hyatt Ziva (all ages)
 
Playa
 
2007; 2009; 2015
 
591
Hyatt Ziva Puerto Vallarta
 
Puerto Vallarta, Mexico
 
Hyatt Ziva (all ages)
 
Playa
 
1969; 1990; 2002; 2009; 2014; 2017
 
335
Dominican Republic
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hilton La Romana All-Inclusive Resort(2)
 
La Romana, Dominican Republic
 
Hilton (adults-only)
 
Playa(2)
 
1997; 2008; 2019
 
356
Hilton La Romana All-Inclusive Resort(2)
 
La Romana, Dominican Republic
 
Hilton (all ages)
 
Playa(2)
 
1997; 2008; 2019
 
418
Dreams Palm Beach
 
Punta Cana, Dominican Republic
 
Dreams (all ages)
 
AMResorts
 
1994; 2008
 
500
Dreams Punta Cana
 
Punta Cana, Dominican Republic
 
Dreams (all ages)
 
AMResorts
 
2004
 
620
Hyatt Ziva Cap Cana
 
Cap Cana, Dominican Republic
 
Hyatt Ziva (all ages)
 
Playa
 
2019
 
375
Hyatt Zilara Cap Cana
 
Cap Cana, Dominican Republic
 
Hyatt Zilara (adults-only)
 
Playa
 
2019
 
375
Jamaica
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hyatt Ziva Rose Hall
 
Montego Bay, Jamaica
 
Hyatt Ziva (all ages)
 
Playa
 
2000; 2014; 2017
 
276
Hyatt Zilara Rose Hall
 
Montego Bay, Jamaica
 
Hyatt Zilara (adults-only)
 
Playa
 
2000; 2014; 2017
 
344
Hilton Rose Hall Resort & Spa
 
Montego Bay, Jamaica
 
Hilton (all ages)
 
Playa
 
1974; 2008; 2017
 
495
Jewel Runaway Bay Beach Resort & Waterpark
 
Runaway Bay, Jamaica
 
Jewel (all ages)
 
Playa
 
1960; 1961; 1965; 2007; 2012
 
268
Jewel Dunn’s River Beach Resort & Spa
 
Ocho Rios, Jamaica
 
Jewel (adults-only)
 
Playa
 
1957; 1970; 1980; 2010
 
250
Jewel Paradise Cove Beach Resort & Spa
 
Runaway Bay, Jamaica
 
Jewel (adults-only)
 
Playa
 
2013
 
225
Jewel Grande Montego Bay Resort & Spa(3)
 
Montego Bay, Jamaica
 
Jewel (all ages)
 
Playa
 
2016; 2017
 
88
Total Rooms Owned
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8,238
Managed Resorts
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sanctuary Cap Cana(4) 
 
Punta Cana, Dominican Republic
 
Sanctuary (adults-only)
 
Playa
 
2008; 2015; 2018
 
323
Jewel Grande Montego Bay Resort & Spa(3)
 
Montego Bay, Jamaica
 
Jewel (condo-hotel)
 
Playa
 
2016; 2017
 
129
Total Rooms Operated
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
452
Total Rooms Owned and Operated
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8,690
 
(1) Effective November 20, 2018, this resort was rebranded into Hilton all-inclusive resorts. Renovations were completed in 2019.
(2) Pursuant to an agreement with Hilton, we rebranded these resorts as Hilton all-inclusive resorts in November 2018. The resorts are still owned and operated by Playa.
(3) We acquired an 88-unit tower and spa as part of the business combination with Sagicor. Additionally, we manage the majority of the units within the remaining two condo-hotel towers owned by Sagicor that comprise the Jewel Grande Montego Bay Resort & Spa.
(4) Owned by a third party.

34


Item 3. Legal Proceedings.

In the ordinary course of our business, we are subject to claims and administrative proceedings, none of which we believe are material or would be expected to have, individually or in the aggregate, a material adverse effect on our financial condition, cash flows or results of operations. The outcome of claims, lawsuits and legal proceedings brought against us, however, is subject to significant uncertainties. Refer to Note 8 to our financial statements included in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Form 10-K for a more detailed description of such proceedings and contingencies.
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.

Not Applicable.
PART II
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.
Our ordinary shares have been traded on NASDAQ under the symbol “PLYA” since March 13, 2017.
Shareholder Information
As of February 21, 2020, we had 129,173,961 ordinary shares outstanding that were held by approximately 37 shareholders of record, which does not include Depository Trust Company participants, beneficial owners holding shares through nominee names or our employees holding restricted shares granted pursuant to our 2017 Omnibus Incentive Plan that have not vested.
Dividend Policy
We have never paid cash dividends on our ordinary shares and we do not anticipate paying cash dividends in the foreseeable future. In addition, payments of dividends are restricted by our Senior Secured Credit Facility. We currently intend to retain any earnings for future operations and expansion. Any future determination to pay dividends will be at the discretion of shareholders at a General Meeting, subject to a proposal from our Board, and will depend on our actual and projected financial condition, liquidity and results of operations, capital requirements, prohibitions and other restrictions contained in current or future financing instruments and applicable law, and such other factors as our Board deems relevant.

Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plan
The following table sets forth information regarding securities authorized for issuance under our equity compensation plan, our 2017 Omnibus Incentive Plan, as of December 31, 2019. See Note 12 to the accompanying Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information regarding our 2017 Omnibus Incentive Plan.
Plan Category
 
Number of securities to be issued upon exercise of outstanding options, warrants and rights
 
Weighted-average exercise price of outstanding options, warrants and rights
 
Number of securities remaining for future issuance under equity compensation plans
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders
 

 

 
7,665,750
Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders
 

 

 

Total
 

 

 
7,665,750

35


Performance Graph
The graph below compares the cumulative total return for our ordinary shares from March 13, 2017 through December 31, 2019 with the comparable cumulative return of three indices: the Dow Jones United States Travel and Leisure Index (“DOW JONES US TRAVEL & LEISURE”), the NASDAQ Composite Index (“NASDAQ”), and the Russell 2000 Index (“RUSSELL 2000”). The graph assumes $100 invested on March 13, 2017 in our ordinary shares and the three indices presented.
a2019performancegraph.jpg
Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds
None.
Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
The following table sets forth information regarding our purchases of our ordinary shares during the quarter ended December 31, 2019:
 
 
Total number of shares purchased
 
Average price paid per share (1)
 
Total number of shares purchased as part of publicly announced program (2)
 
Maximum approximate dollar value of shares that may yet be purchased under the program
($ in thousands) (2)
October 1, 2019 to October 31, 2019
 
139,649

 
$
7.74

 
139,649

 
$
88,298

November 1, 2019 to November 30, 2019
 
184,119

 
7.47

 
184,119

 
86,923

December 1, 2019 to December 31, 2019
 
118,535

 
7.85

 
118,535

 
85,992

Total
 
442,303

 
$
7.66

 
442,303

 
$
85,992

_______
(1) The average price paid per share and maximum approximate dollar value of shares disclosed above include broker commissions.
(2) In December 2018, our Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $100.0 million of its outstanding ordinary shares as market conditions and our liquidity warrant. The repurchase program is subject to certain limitations under Dutch law, including existing repurchase authorization granted by our shareholders. Repurchases may be made from time to time in the open market, in privately negotiated transactions or by other means (including Rule 10b5-1 trading plans). Depending on market conditions and other factors, these repurchases may be commenced or suspended from time to time without prior notice.

36


Item 6. Selected Financial Data.
The following table includes selected historical financial information which has been derived from the audited Consolidated Financial Statements. The following information should be read in conjunction with Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” and all of the financial statements and notes included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Consolidated Statement of Operations Data ($ in thousands, except per share data):
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2019
 
     2018 (1)
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
Total revenue
$
636,477

 
$
617,013

 
$
559,545

 
$
521,491

 
$
408,345

Operating income
$
25,710

 
$
90,597

 
$
88,669

 
$
84,631

 
$
58,692

Net (loss) income
$
(4,357
)
 
$
18,977

 
$
(241
)
 
$
20,216

 
$
9,711

Net (loss) income available to ordinary shareholders
$
(4,357
)
 
$
18,977

 
$
(9,042
)
 
$
(23,460
)
 
$
(29,946
)
(Losses) earnings per share - Basic (2)
$
(0.03
)
 
$
0.16

 
$
(0.09
)
 
$
(0.46
)
 
$
(0.59
)
(Losses) earnings per share - Diluted (2)
$
(0.03
)
 
$
0.16

 
$
(0.09
)
 
$
(0.46
)
 
$
(0.59
)
________
(1) 
Includes the results of operations of the Sagicor Assets (as defined in Note 4 of the Consolidated Financial Statements included herein) acquired in the business combination with certain companies affiliated with Sagicor Group Jamaica Limited.
(2) 
As a result of the Pace Business Combination further described in Note 4 of the Consolidated Financial Statements included herein, the number of ordinary shares attributable to our Predecessor shareholders is reflected retroactively to the earliest period presented. Accordingly, the weighted-average number of shares outstanding was adjusted for the retrospective application of the recapitalization for all periods prior to 2017.
Consolidated Balance Sheet Data ($ in thousands):
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2019
 
     2018 (1)
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
Property and equipment, net
$
1,929,914

 
$
1,808,412

 
$
1,466,326

 
$
1,400,317

 
$
1,432,855

Cash and cash equivalents
$
20,931

 
$
116,353

 
$
117,229

 
$
33,512

 
$
35,460

Total assets
$
2,196,964

 
$
2,135,158

 
$
1,737,823

 
$
1,590,890

 
$
1,644,024

Total debt
$
1,040,658

 
$
989,387

 
$
898,215

 
$
828,317

 
$
828,438

Total liabilities
$
1,387,313

 
$
1,295,317

 
$
1,138,274

 
$
1,074,336

 
$
1,098,034

Cumulative redeemable preferred shares
$

 
$

 
$

 
$
345,951

 
$
352,275

Total equity (excluding preferred shares)
$
809,651

 
$
839,841

 
$
599,549

 
$
170,603

 
$
193,715

________
(1) 
Includes the Sagicor Assets.
Consolidated Statement of Cash Flow Data ($ in thousands):
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2019
 
     2018 (1)
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
Net cash provided by (used in):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating activities
$
72,188

 
$
114,430

 
$
64,191

 
$
76,181

 
$
30,799

Investing activities
$
(203,816
)
 
$
(204,586
)
 
$
(109,829
)
 
$
(19,046
)
 
$
(104,147
)
Financing activities
$
36,206

 
$
89,280

 
$
119,704

 
$
(55,815
)
 
$
69,662

Capital expenditures
$
(208,970
)
 
$
(110,851
)
 
$
(106,230
)
 
$
(19,262
)
 
$
(119,704
)
________
(1) 
Includes the results of operations of the Sagicor Assets.
Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Any reference in this Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations to our financial condition and results of operations prior to the Pace Business Combination on March 11, 2017 refer to the financial condition and results of operations of our Predecessor, Playa Hotels & Resorts B.V.


37


This section of this Annual Report on Form 10-K generally discusses 2019 and 2018 items and year-to-year comparisons between 2019 and 2018. Discussions of 2017 items and year-to-year comparisons between 2018 and 2017 that are not included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K can be found in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in Part II, Item 7 of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018.
Overview
Playa is a leading owner, operator and developer of all-inclusive resorts in prime beachfront locations in popular vacation destinations in Mexico and the Caribbean. As of December 31, 2019, Playa owned and/or managed a total portfolio consisting of 23 resorts (8,690 rooms) located in Mexico, Jamaica, and the Dominican Republic. In Mexico, Playa owns and manages Hyatt Zilara Cancún, Hyatt Ziva Cancún, Panama Jack Resorts Cancún, Panama Jack Resorts Playa del Carmen, Hilton Playa del Carmen All-Inclusive Resort, Hyatt Ziva Puerto Vallarta and Hyatt Ziva Los Cabos. In Jamaica, Playa owns and manages Hyatt Zilara Rose Hall, Hyatt Ziva Rose Hall, Hilton Rose Hall Resort & Spa, Jewel Dunn’s River Beach Resort & Spa, Jewel Grande Montego Bay Resort & Spa, Jewel Runaway Bay Beach Resort & Waterpark and Jewel Paradise Cove Beach Resort & Spa. In the Dominican Republic, Playa owns and manages the Hilton La Romana All-Inclusive Family Resort, the Hilton La Romana All-Inclusive Adult Resort, Hyatt Zilara Cap Cana and Hyatt Ziva Cap Cana. Playa also owns four resorts in Mexico and the Dominican Republic that are managed by a third party and Playa manages the Sanctuary Cap Cana in the Dominican Republic. We believe that the resorts we own and manage are among the finest all-inclusive resorts in the markets they serve. All of our resorts offer guests luxury accommodations, noteworthy architecture, extensive on-site activities and multiple food and beverage options. Our guests also have the opportunity to purchase upgrades from us such as premium rooms, dining experiences, wines and spirits and spa packages.
For the year ended December 31, 2019, we generated a net loss of $4.4 million, total revenue of $636.5 million, Net Package RevPAR of $198.28 and Adjusted EBITDA of $150.7 million. For the year ended December 31, 2018, we generated net income of $19.0 million, total revenue of $617.0 million, Net Package RevPAR of $205.83 and Adjusted EBITDA of $179.0 million. For discussions of Adjusted EBITDA and reconciliation to the most comparable U.S. GAAP financial measures, see “Key Indicators of Financial and Operating Performance” and “Non-U.S. GAAP Financial Measures,” below.

38


Results of Operations

Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018
The following table summarizes our results of operations on a consolidated basis for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 ($ in thousands):
<
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
Increase / Decrease
 
2019
 
2018
 
Change
 
% Change
Revenue
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Package
$
538,088

 
$
532,090

 
$
5,998

 
1.1
 %
Non-package
90,157

 
83,190

 
6,967

 
8.4
 %
Management fees
1,820

 
755

 
1,065

 
141.1
 %
Cost reimbursements
6,412

 
978

 
5,434

 
555.6
 %
Total revenue
636,477

 
617,013

 
19,464

 
3.2
 %
Direct and selling, general and administrative expenses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Direct
369,050

 
340,080

 
28,970

 
8.5
 %
Selling, general and administrative
125,788

 
115,975

 
9,813

 
8.5
 %
Pre-opening
1,452

 
321

 
1,131

 
352.3
 %
Depreciation and amortization
101,897

 
73,278

 
28,619

 
39.1
 %
Reimbursed costs
6,412

 
978

 
5,434

 
555.6
 %
Impairment loss
6,168

 

 
6,168

 
100.0
 %
Gain on insurance proceeds

 
(4,216
)
 
4,216

 
(100.0
)%
Direct and selling, general and administrative expenses
610,767

 
526,416

 
84,351

 
16.0
 %
Operating income
25,710

 
90,597

 
(64,887
)
 
(71.6
)%
Interest expense
(44,087
)
 
(62,243
)
 
18,156

 
(29.2
)%
Other (expense) income
(3,200
)
 
2,822

 
(6,022
)
 
(213.4
)%
Net (loss) income before tax
(21,577