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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q
 
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF
THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2024

or
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF
THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the transition period from ____________________ to ____________________

Commission File Number: 001-5532-99

PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Oregon93-0256820
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
     (I.R.S. Employer          
     Identification No.)          
121 SW Salmon Street
Portland, Oregon 97204
(503) 464-8000
(Address of principal executive offices, including zip code,
and registrant’s telephone number, including area code) 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
(Title of class)(Trading Symbol)(Name of exchange on which registered)
Common Stock, no par valuePORNew York Stock Exchange

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. [x] Yes [ ] No
  
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).
[x] Yes x [ ] No
  
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer Accelerated filer
Non-accelerated filerSmaller reporting company
Emerging growth company
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standard provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. [ ]

 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes [x] No
 
Number of shares of common stock outstanding as of April 19, 2024 is 103,031,278 shares.
1

PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
FORM 10-Q
FOR THE QUARTERLY PERIOD ENDED MARCH 31, 2024

TABLE OF CONTENTS

2

DEFINITIONS

The following abbreviations and acronyms are used throughout this document:

Abbreviation or AcronymDefinition
AFUDCAllowance for funds used during construction
AUTAnnual Power Cost Update Tariff
ColstripColstrip Units 3 and 4 coal-fired generating plant
EFSAEquity Forward Sale Agreement
EPAUnited States Environmental Protection Agency
FERCFederal Energy Regulatory Commission
FMB
First Mortgage Bond
GAAPAccounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America
GRCGeneral Rate Case
IRPIntegrated Resource Plan
Moody’sMoody’s Investors Service
MWMegawatts
MWaAverage megawatts
MWhMegawatt hour
NasdaqNational Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations
NVPCNet Variable Power Costs
NYSENew York Stock Exchange
OPUCPublic Utility Commission of Oregon
PCAMPower Cost Adjustment Mechanism
ROE
Regulated return on equity
RPSRenewable Portfolio Standard
S&PS&P Global Ratings
SECUnited States Securities and Exchange Commission
3

PART I FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1.Financial Statements.
 
PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME
AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
(Dollars in millions, except per share amounts)
(Unaudited)                            
Three Months Ended March 31,
20242023
Revenues:
Revenues, net$940 $745 
Alternative revenue programs, net of amortization(11)3 
Total revenues929 748 
Operating expenses:
Purchased power and fuel405 304 
Generation, transmission and distribution99 93 
Administrative and other95 80 
Depreciation and amortization121 111 
Taxes other than income taxes47 43 
Total operating expenses767 631 
Income from operations162 117 
Interest expense, net51 44 
Other income:
Allowance for equity funds used during construction5 3 
Miscellaneous income, net6 12 
Other income, net11 15 
Income before income tax expense122 88 
Income tax expense 13 14 
Net income 109 74 
Other comprehensive income1  
Net income and Comprehensive income$110 $74 
Weighted-average common shares outstanding (in thousands):
Basic101,299 91,840 
Diluted101,467 92,571 
Earnings per share:
    Basic
$1.08 $0.81 
Diluted$1.08 $0.80 
See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.
    
4


PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(Dollars in millions)
(Unaudited)                            


March 31, 2024December 31, 2023
ASSETS
Current assets:
Cash and cash equivalents$176 $5 
Accounts receivable, net412 414 
Inventories114 113 
Regulatory assets—current177 221 
Other current assets203 182 
Total current assets1,082 935 
Electric utility plant, net9,663 9,546 
Regulatory assets—noncurrent606 492 
Nuclear decommissioning trust30 31 
Non-qualified benefit plan trust36 35 
Other noncurrent assets171 169 
Total assets$11,588 $11,208 
See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.


5


PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS, continued
(Dollars in millions)
(Unaudited)                        


March 31, 2024December 31, 2023
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Current liabilities:
Accounts payable$289 $347 
Liabilities from price risk management activities—current137 164 
Short-term debt 146 
Current portion of long-term debt80 80 
Current portion of finance lease obligation23 20 
Accrued expenses and other current liabilities356 355 
Total current liabilities885 1,112 
Long-term debt, net of current portion4,353 3,905 
Regulatory liabilities—noncurrent1,406 1,398 
Deferred income taxes534 488 
Unfunded status of pension and postretirement plans160 172 
Liabilities from price risk management activities—noncurrent56 75 
Asset retirement obligations273 272 
Non-qualified benefit plan liabilities78 79 
Finance lease obligations, net of current portion285 289 
Other noncurrent liabilities99 99 
Total liabilities8,129 7,889 
Commitments and contingencies (see notes)
Shareholders’ Equity:
Preferred stock, no par value, 30,000,000 shares authorized; none issued and outstanding as of March 31, 2024 and December 31, 2023
  
Common stock, no par value, 160,000,000 shares authorized; 103,023,507 and 101,159,609 shares issued and outstanding as of March 31, 2024 and December 31, 2023, respectively
1,828 1,750 
Accumulated other comprehensive loss(4)(5)
Retained earnings1,635 1,574 
Total shareholders’ equity3,459 3,319 
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity$11,588 $11,208 
See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

6


PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(In millions)
(Unaudited)    
                                                        
Three Months Ended March 31,
20242023
Cash flows from operating activities:
Net income$109 $74 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization121 111 
Deferred income taxes37 4 
Pension and other postretirement benefits1 1 
Allowance for equity funds used during construction(5)(3)
Decoupling mechanism deferrals, net of amortization11 (3)
Regulatory assets(120)(6)
Regulatory liabilities(3)8 
Other non-cash income and expenses, net23 10 
Changes in working capital:
Accounts receivable, net(5)34 
Inventories(1) 
Margin deposits27 86 
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities24 (174)
Margin deposits from wholesale counterparties (140)
Other working capital items, net(16)(27)
Other, net(28)(14)
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities
175 (39)
See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.
7


PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS, continued
(In millions)
(Unaudited)        
Three Months Ended March 31,
20242023
Cash flows from investing activities:
Capital expenditures(325)(274)
Proceeds from sale of properties 2 
Other, net(6)(4)
Net cash used in investing activities(331)(276)
Cash flows from financing activities:
Proceeds from issuance of common stock$78 $300 
Proceeds from issuance of long-term debt450 100 
Payments on long-term debt (260)
Issuance (maturities) of commercial paper, net
(146)68 
Dividends paid(48)(40)
Other(7)(6)
Net cash provided by financing activities
327 162 
Change in cash and cash equivalents
171 (153)
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period5 165 
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period$176 $12 
Supplemental cash flow information is as follows:
Cash paid for interest, net of amounts capitalized$26 $22 
Cash paid for income taxes, net
2 2 
See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.
8


PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

NOTE 1: BASIS OF PRESENTATION

Nature of Business

Portland General Electric Company (PGE or the Company) is a single, vertically-integrated electric utility engaged in the generation, purchase, transmission, distribution, and retail sale of electricity in the State of Oregon (State). The Company also participates in the wholesale market by purchasing and selling electricity and natural gas in an effort to meet the needs of, and obtain reasonably-priced power for its retail customers, manage risk, and administer it’s long-term wholesale contracts. In addition, PGE performs portfolio management and wholesale market services for third parties in the region. The Company continues to develop products and service offerings for the benefit of retail and wholesale customers. PGE operates as a single segment, with revenues and costs related to its business activities recorded and analyzed on a total electric operations basis. The Company owns unregulated, non-utility real estate comprised primarily of PGE’s corporate headquarters. The Company’s corporate headquarters is located in Portland, Oregon and its approximately 4,000 square mile, State-approved service area, entirely within the State, encompasses 51 incorporated cities. As of March 31, 2024, PGE served 940,000 retail customers within a service area of 1.9 million residents.

PGE is subject to the jurisdiction of the Public Utility Commission of Oregon (OPUC) with respect to retail prices, utility services, accounting policies and practices, issuances of securities, and certain other matters. Retail prices are based on the Company’s cost to serve customers, including an opportunity to earn a reasonable rate of return, as determined by the OPUC. The Company is also subject to regulation by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in matters related to wholesale energy transactions, transmission services, reliability standards, natural gas pipelines, hydroelectric project licensing, accounting policies and practices, short-term debt issuances, and certain other matters.

Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

These condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared pursuant to the rules and regulations of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Certain information and note disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (GAAP) have been condensed or omitted pursuant to such regulations, although PGE believes that the disclosures provided are adequate to make the interim information presented not misleading.

The financial information included herein as of and for the three months ended March 31, 2024 and 2023 is unaudited; however, in the opinion of management, such information reflects all adjustments necessary to fairly present the condensed consolidated financial position, condensed consolidated income and comprehensive income, and condensed consolidated cash flows of the Company for these interim periods. All such adjustments are of a normal recurring nature, unless otherwise noted. The financial information as of December 31, 2023 is derived from the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto for the year ended December 31, 2023, included in Item 8 of PGE’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, filed with the SEC on February 20, 2024, which should be read in conjunction with the interim unaudited Financial Statements.

Comprehensive Income

No material change occurred in Other comprehensive income in the three months ended March 31, 2024 and 2023.


9


PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued
(Unaudited)
Miscellaneous Income, Net

Miscellaneous income, net includes $3 million and $8 million in interest income from regulatory assets for the three months ended March 31, 2024 and 2023, respectively, and $2 million and $3 million realized and unrealized gains on the non-qualified benefit plan trust assets. The remaining activity is comprised of $1 million in other miscellaneous income in both 2024 and 2023.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of condensed consolidated financial statements in accordance with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, and disclosures of gain or loss contingencies, as of the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results experienced by the Company could differ materially from those estimates.

Certain costs are estimated for the full year and allocated to interim periods based on estimates of operating time expired, benefit received, or activity associated with the interim period; accordingly, such costs may not be reflective of amounts to be recognized for a full year. Due to seasonal fluctuations in electricity sales, as well as the price of wholesale electricity and natural gas, interim financial results do not necessarily represent those to be expected for the year.

NOTE 2: REVENUE RECOGNITION

Disaggregated Revenue

The following table presents PGE’s revenue, disaggregated by customer type (in millions):
Three Months Ended March 31,
20242023
Retail:
Residential$415 $362 
Commercial227 197 
Industrial102 82 
Direct access customers6 6 
Subtotal750 647 
Alternative revenue programs, net of amortization(11)3 
Other accrued revenues, net1 1 
Total retail revenues740 651 
Wholesale revenues*
176 88 
Other operating revenues13 9 
Total revenues$929 $748 

* Wholesale revenues include $88 million and $34 million related to electricity commodity contract derivative settlements for the three months ended March 31, 2024 and 2023, respectively. Price risk management derivative activities are included within total revenues but do not represent revenues from contracts with customers as defined by GAAP. For further information, see Note 5, Risk Management.


10


PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued
(Unaudited)
Retail Revenues

The Company’s primary revenue source is the sale of electricity to customers at regulated, tariff-based prices. Retail customers are classified as residential, commercial, or industrial. Residential customers include single-family housing, multiple-family housing (such as apartments, duplexes, and town homes), manufactured homes, and small farms. Residential demand is sensitive to the effects of weather, with demand highest during the winter heating and summer cooling seasons. Commercial customers consist of non-residential customers who accept energy deliveries at voltages equivalent to those delivered to residential customers and are also sensitive to the effects of weather, although to a lesser extent than residential customers. Commercial customers include most businesses, small industrial companies, and public street and highway lighting accounts. Industrial customers consist of non-residential customers who accept delivery at higher voltages than commercial customers. Demand from industrial customers is primarily driven by economic conditions, with weather having little impact on energy use by this customer class.

In accordance with state regulations, PGE’s retail customer prices are based on the Company’s cost of service and determined through General Rate Case (GRC) proceedings and various tariff filings with the OPUC. Additionally, the Company offers pricing options that include a daily market price option, various time-of-use options, and several renewable energy options.

Retail revenue is billed based on monthly meter readings taken at various cycle dates throughout the month. At the end of each month, PGE estimates and records the revenue earned from energy deliveries that have not yet been billed to customers. This amount, which is classified as unbilled revenues and included in Accounts receivable, net in the Company’s condensed consolidated balance sheets, is calculated based on actual net retail system load each month, the number of days from the last meter read date through the last day of the month, and current customer prices.

PGE’s obligation to sell electricity to retail customers generally represents a single performance obligation representing a series of distinct services that are substantially the same and have the same pattern of transfer to the customer that is satisfied over time as customers simultaneously receive and consume the benefits provided. PGE applies the invoice method to measure its progress towards satisfactorily completing its performance obligations.
Pursuant to regulation by the OPUC, PGE is mandated to maintain several tariff schedules to collect funds from customers for programs that benefit the general public, such as conservation, low-income housing, energy efficiency, renewable energy programs, and privilege taxes. For such programs, PGE generally collects the funds and remits the amounts to third party agencies that administer the programs. In these arrangements, PGE is considered to be an agent, as PGE’s performance obligation is to facilitate a transaction between customers and the administrators of these programs. Therefore, such amounts are presented on a net basis and do not appear in Revenues, net within the condensed consolidated statements of income.

Alternative Revenues programsRevenues related to PGE’s decoupling mechanism and Renewable Adjustment Clause (RAC) are considered earned under alternative revenue programs, as these amounts represent contracts with the regulator and not with customers. Such revenues are presented separately from revenues from contracts with customers and classified as Alternative revenue programs, net of amortization on the condensed consolidated statements of income. The activity within this line item is comprised of current period deferral adjustments, which can either be a collection from or a refund to customers, and is net of any related amortization. When amounts related to alternative revenue programs are ultimately included in prices and customer bills, the amounts are included within Revenues, net, with an equal and offsetting amount of amortization recorded on the Alternative revenue programs, net of amortization line item. Under the RAC in 2024, the Company has deferred amounts related to the Clearwater Wind Development (Clearwater). For further information, see “Clearwater RAC” in the Regulatory Assets and Liabilities section of Note 3, Balance Sheet Components, in this Item 1.

11


PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued
(Unaudited)
Wholesale Revenues

PGE participates in the wholesale electricity marketplace in order to balance its supply of power to meet the needs of, and secure reasonably priced power for, its retail customers, manage risk, and administer its current long-term wholesale contracts. In addition, the Company performs portfolio management and wholesale market services for third parties in the region. Interconnected transmission systems in the western United States serve utilities with diverse load requirements and allow PGE to purchase and sell electricity within the region depending upon the relative price and availability of power, hydro, solar and wind conditions; and daily and seasonal retail demand.
PGE’s Wholesale revenues are primarily short-term electricity sales to utilities and power marketers that consist of single performance obligations that are satisfied as energy is transferred to the counterparty. The Company may choose to net certain purchase and sale transactions in which it would simultaneously receive and deliver physical power with the same counterparty; in such cases, only the net amount of those purchases or sales required to meet retail and wholesale obligations will be physically settled and recorded in Wholesale revenues.

Other Operating Revenues

Other operating revenues consist primarily of gains and losses on the sale of natural gas volumes purchased that exceeded what was needed to fuel the Company’s generating facilities, as well as revenues from transmission services, excess transmission capacity resales, excess fuel sales, utility pole attachment revenues, and other electric services provided to customers.

Arrangements with Multiple Performance Obligations

Certain contracts with customers, primarily wholesale, may include multiple performance obligations. For such arrangements, PGE allocates revenue to each performance obligation based on its relative standalone selling price. The Company generally determines standalone selling prices based on the prices charged to customers.

NOTE 3: BALANCE SHEET COMPONENTS

Inventories

PGE’s inventories, which are recorded at average cost, consist primarily of materials and supplies for use in operations, maintenance, and capital activities, as well as fuel, which includes natural gas, coal, and oil, for use in the Company’s generating plants. Periodically, PGE assesses whether inventories are recorded at the lower of average cost or net realizable value.


12


PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued
(Unaudited)
Accounts Receivable, Net

Accounts receivable, net includes $132 million and $138 million of unbilled revenues as of March 31, 2024 and December 31, 2023, respectively. Accounts receivable, net includes an allowance for credit losses of $11 million as of March 31, 2024 and $9 million as of December 31, 2023. The following summarizes activity in the allowance for credit losses (in millions):
Three Months Ended March 31,
 2024
Balance as of beginning of period$9 
Increase in provision3 
Amounts written off(3)
Recoveries2 
Balance as of end of period$11 

Other Current Assets

Other current assets consist of the following (in millions):
March 31, 2024December 31, 2023
Prepaid expenses$109 $68 
Assets from price risk management activities29 22 
Margin deposits65 92 
Other current assets$203 $182 

Electric Utility Plant, Net

Electric utility plant, net consists of the following (in millions):         
March 31, 2024December 31, 2023
Electric utility plant in-service$13,881 $13,329 
Construction work-in-progress628 974 
Total cost14,509 14,303 
Less: accumulated depreciation and amortization(4,846)(4,757)
Electric utility plant, net$9,663 $9,546 

Accumulated depreciation and amortization in the table above includes accumulated amortization related to intangible assets of $576 million and $558 million as of March 31, 2024 and December 31, 2023, respectively. Amortization expense related to intangible assets was $18 million and $14 million for the three months ended March 31, 2024 and 2023, respectively. The Company’s intangible assets primarily consist of computer software development and hydro licensing costs.
Battery storage agreement—On April 26, 2023, PGE entered into a battery storage purchased power agreement (PPA) that will be accounted for as a lease upon commencement. The lease is expected to commence in December 2024 and has a term of 20 years. The total fixed contract consideration is expected to be $737 million over the lease term.


13


PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued
(Unaudited)
Regulatory Assets and Liabilities

Regulatory assets and liabilities consist of the following (in millions):
March 31, 2024December 31, 2023
CurrentNoncurrentCurrentNoncurrent
Regulatory assets:
Price risk management$108 $48 $143 $63 
Reliability contingency events
 75   
Pension and other postretirement plans 104  104 
Trojan decommissioning activities 141  139 
February 2021 ice storm and damage12 53 12 55 
January 2024 storm and damage
 48   
2020 Labor Day wildfire5 22 5 23 
Wildfire mitigation19 13 19 10 
Other33 102 42 98 
Total regulatory assets$177 $606 $221 $492 
Regulatory liabilities:
Asset retirement removal costs$ $1,178 $ $1,173 
Deferred income taxes 171  177 
Clearwater RAC
 10   
Other50 47 48 48 
Total regulatory liabilities$50 
*
$1,406 $48 
*
$1,398 
* Included in Accrued expenses and other current liabilities in the condensed consolidated balance sheets.

January 2024 storm and damageBeginning January 13, 2024, the Company’s service territory encountered a severe winter weather event that included snow, ice, and high winds over several days that caused catastrophic damage to physical assets and resulted in widespread customer power outages. As a result of the historic winter storm, Oregon’s Governor declared a state of emergency on January 19, 2024, which will allow PGE to seek recovery of incremental storm expenses through the OPUC pre-authorized emergency deferral mechanism. On February 9, 2024, PGE filed a Notice of Deferral with the OPUC, under Docket UM 2190, related to the emergency restoration costs for the January storm, and as of March 31, 2024, PGE’s deferred balance related to the January 2024 storm was $48 million. PGE believes amounts deferred as of March 31, 2024 are probable of recovery under the emergency deferral mechanism. The OPUC has significant discretion in making the final determination of recovery. The OPUC’s conclusion of overall prudence, including an earnings test, could result in a portion, or all, of PGE’s deferrals being disallowed for recovery. Such disallowance would be recognized as a charge to earnings.

Reliability contingency eventsA portion of the January 2024 storm also qualified as a Reliability Contingency Event (RCE) as approved by the OPUC in PGE’s 2024 GRC. Under the RCE mechanism, PGE is allowed to defer and recover 80% of prudent costs for RCEs above amounts forecasted in the Company’s Annual Power Cost Update Tariff, without application of an earnings test, with the remaining 20% flowing through operating expenses and subject to the existing PCAM. As of March 31, 2024, PGE’s deferred balance related to the 2024 RCE was $75 million. Full impacts cannot be determined until all settlements and invoices are received for the period to which the RCE applies. PGE files the results of the PCAM annually with the OPUC no later than July 1, initiating a regulatory review process that typically results in a final determination and order from the OPUC by the end of the year, with any resulting refund or collection impacting customer prices effective January 1 of the following year. Costs related to the RCE in January 2024 will be included in the Company’s PCAM for 2024, which the Company expects to file no later than July 1, 2025. The OPUC has significant discretion in making the final determination of
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PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued
(Unaudited)
recovery. The OPUC’s conclusion of overall prudence could result in a portion, or all, of PGE’s deferrals being disallowed for recovery. Such disallowance would be recognized as a charge to earnings.

Wildfire Mitigation represents incremental costs and investments made by PGE related to intensifying efforts on its system to mitigate the risk of wildfire and improve resiliency to wildfire damage under SB 762, enacted in July 2021. These efforts include enhanced tree and brush clearing, hardening equipment, and making emergency plans in close partnership with various land and emergency management agencies to further expand the use of a public safety power shutoff, if the need should arise. PGE submitted its 2024 risk-based Wildfire Mitigation Plan to the OPUC in December 2023, and it is pending approval from the OPUC, which is expected no later than June 25, 2024.

As of March 31, 2024 and December 31, 2023, PGE’s deferred balance related to incremental wildfire mitigation operating expenses was $32 million and $29 million, respectively. The 2024 balance is comprised of:
Pre-AACPrior to establishing the collections noted below, PGE had deferred incremental costs related to wildfire mitigation and as of March 31, 2024 this balance is $22 million. On July 1, 2022, PGE filed an application for reauthorization of OPUC Docket UM 2019 to defer incremental wildfire mitigation costs that exceed the amount granted in base rates. On May 10, 2023, in Order No. 23-173, the OPUC approved an automatic adjustment clause mechanism to recover wildfire mitigation costs (capital and expense). PGE and certain parties agreed to a stipulation, which was adopted by the OPUC on October 18, 2023, that allows PGE to begin amortizing $27 million comprised of $23 million related to the September 30, 2023 deferred operating expense balance of $31 million and $4 million for capital related revenue requirement.
2023 Base ratesThe outcome of PGE’s 2022 GRC provided an annual amount of $24 million to be collected in base rates for recovery of operating expenses related to wildfire mitigation efforts beginning May 9, 2022, through December 31, 2023. As of March 31, 2024, there was $1 million in the balancing account.
2024 AACBeginning January 1, 2024, and in conjunction with the Company’s 2024 GRC proceeding, PGE removed 2024 related collections for wildfire mitigation costs (for both capital and expense) from base prices and will include the forecasted costs for current year spending within the automatic adjustment clause in a separate tariff, with the final amount pending OPUC approval. Differences between actual expense and customer collections will be recorded as regulatory assets or liabilities within the automatic adjustment clause balancing account, which will be subject to a prudence review, but will not be subject to an earnings test. As of March 31, 2024, there was $9 million in the balancing account.
The OPUC has significant discretion in making the final determination of recovery. The OPUC’s conclusion of overall prudence could result in a portion, or all, of PGE’s deferrals being disallowed for recovery. Such disallowance would be recognized as a charge to earnings.

Clearwater RACThe RAC allows PGE to recover prudently incurred costs of renewable resources through filings made each year, outside of a GRC. Under the RAC, during 2023, the Company submitted a filing for Clearwater, which estimated the annual revenue requirement, net of NVPC benefits to be a refund to customers of approximately $30 million that would be included in customers prices June 1, 2024. Pursuant to the filing, PGE would defer the revenue requirement, net of NVPC benefits from the in-service date of January 2024 until Clearwater was reflected in customer prices. On April 4, 2024, the OPUC rejected PGE and parties’ Stipulation regarding Clearwater and requested that PGE submit reply testimony responding to the arguments raised by the OPUC Staff by April 25, 2024. The rejection order provided a new target rate effective date of August 1, 2024. As of March 31, 2024, the Company had recorded a $10 million regulatory liability refund to customers. The OPUC has significant discretion in making the final determination of recovery. The OPUC’s conclusion of overall prudence could result in a portion, or all, of PGE’s deferrals being disallowed for recovery. Such disallowance would be recognized as a charge to earnings.
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PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued
(Unaudited)

Accrued Expenses and Other Current Liabilities

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities consist of the following (in millions):
March 31, 2024December 31, 2023
Accrued employee compensation and benefits$50 $74 
Accrued taxes payable29 30 
Accrued interest payable58 40 
Accrued dividends payable50 51 
Regulatory liabilities—current50 48 
Margin deposits from wholesale counterparties5 5 
Other114 107 
Total accrued expenses and other current liabilities$356 $355 

Credit Facilities

On August 18, 2023, PGE entered into an amendment of its existing revolving credit facility. As of March 31, 2024, PGE had a $750 million revolving credit facility scheduled to expire in September 2028. The Company has the ability to expand the revolving credit facility to $850 million, if needed, subject to the requirements of the agreement. Pursuant to the terms of the agreement, the revolving credit facility may be used for general corporate purposes, including as backup for commercial paper borrowings and to permit the issuance of standby letters of credit. PGE may borrow for one, three, or six months at a fixed interest rate established at the time of the borrowing, or at a variable interest rate for any period up to the then remaining term of the applicable credit facility. The revolving credit facility contains a provision that requires annual fees based on the Companys unsecured credit ratings, and contains customary covenants and default provisions, including a requirement that limits consolidated indebtedness, as defined in the agreement, to 65% of total capitalization. As of March 31, 2024, PGE was in compliance with this covenant with a 56.9% debt-to-total capital ratio and had no outstanding balance on the revolving credit facility. As a result of the policy to backup commercial paper borrowings, the aggregate unused available credit capacity under the credit facility was $750 million. In addition, the credit facility offers the potential for adjustments to interest rate margins and fees based on PGE’s achievement of certain annual sustainability-linked metrics related to its non-emitting generation capacity and the percentage of management comprised of women and employees who identify as black, indigenous, and people of color. The Company believes these potential adjustments will have an immaterial impact on PGE’s results of operations.

The Company has a commercial paper program under which it may issue commercial paper for terms of up to 270 days. The Company has elected to limit its borrowings under the revolving credit facility in order to allow for coverage of any potential need to repay commercial paper that may be outstanding at the time. As of March 31, 2024, PGE had no commercial paper outstanding.

PGE typically classifies borrowings under the revolving credit facility and outstanding commercial paper as Short-term debt on the condensed consolidated balance sheets.

In addition, PGE has four letter of credit facilities that provide a total capacity of $320 million under which the Company can request letters of credit for original terms not to exceed one year. The issuance of such letters of credit is subject to the approval of the issuing institution. Under these facilities, letters of credit for a total of $131 million were outstanding as of March 31, 2024. Letters of credit issued are not reflected on the Company’s condensed consolidated balance sheets.

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PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued
(Unaudited)
Pursuant to an order issued by the FERC, the Company is authorized to issue short-term debt in an aggregate amount of up to $900 million through February 6, 2026.

Long-term Debt

On February 22, 2024, PGE entered into a Bond Purchase Agreement related to the sale of $450 million in First Mortgage Bonds (FMBs). The Bonds were issued and funded in full on February 22, 2024 and consist of:
a series, due in 2029, in the amount of $100 million that will bear interest from its issuance date at an annual rate of 5.15%;
a series, due in 2034, in the amount of $100 million that will bear interest from its issuance date at an annual rate of 5.36%; and
a series, due in 2054, in the amount of $250 million that will bear interest from its issuance date at an annual rate of 5.73%.

Defined Benefit Retirement Plan Costs

Components of net periodic benefit cost under the defined benefit pension plan are as follows (in millions):
Three Months Ended March 31,
20242023
Service cost$3 $3 
Interest cost*8 9 
Expected return on plan assets*(10)(11)
Net periodic benefit cost$1 $1 

* The net expense portion of non-service cost components are included in Miscellaneous income, net within Other income on the Company’s condensed consolidated statements of income and comprehensive income.

NOTE 4: FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

PGE estimated the fair value of financial asset and liability instruments as of March 31, 2024 and December 31, 2023, and classified these financial instruments based on a fair value hierarchy that is applied to prioritize the inputs to the valuation techniques used to measure fair value. The three levels of the fair value hierarchy and application to the Company are:

Level 1
Quoted prices are available in active markets for identical assets or liabilities as of the measurement date;
Level 2
Pricing inputs include those that are directly or indirectly observable in the marketplace as of the measurement date; and
Level 3
Pricing inputs include significant inputs that are unobservable for the asset or liability.
Financial assets and liabilities are classified in their entirety based on the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. The Company’s assessment of the significance of a particular input to the fair value measurement requires judgment, and may affect the valuation of assets and liabilities and their placement within the fair value hierarchy. Assets measured at fair value using net asset value (NAV) as a practical expedient are not categorized in the fair value hierarchy. These assets are listed in the totals of the fair value hierarchy to permit the reconciliation to amounts presented in the financial statements.
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PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued
(Unaudited)

Changes to market liquidity conditions, the availability of observable inputs, or changes in the economic structure of a security marketplace may require transfer of the securities between levels.

The Company’s financial assets and liabilities whose values were recognized at fair value in the Company’s condensed consolidated balance sheets are as follows by level within the fair value hierarchy (in millions):

As of March 31, 2024
Level 1Level 2Level 3
Other (2)
Total
Assets:
Cash equivalents$173 $ $ $— $173 
Nuclear decommissioning trust: (1)
Debt securities:
Domestic government8 8  — 16 
Corporate credit 7  — 7 
Money market funds— — — 7 7 
Non-qualified benefit plan trust: (3)
Debt securities—domestic government3   — 3 
Money market funds2   — 2 
Paid Leave Oregon Trust
Money market funds— — — 
Price risk management activities: (1) (4)
Electricity 20 6 — 26 
Natural gas 11  — 11 
$186 $46 $6 $10 $248 
Liabilities:
Price risk management activities: (1) (4)
Electricity$ $28 $33 $— $61 
Natural gas 116 16 — 132 
$ $144 $49 $— $193 
 
(1)Activities are subject to regulation, with certain gains and losses deferred pursuant to regulatory accounting and included in Regulatory assets or Regulatory liabilities as appropriate.
(2)Assets are measured at NAV as a practical expedient and not subject to hierarchy level classification disclosure.
(3)Excludes insurance policies of $31 million, which are recorded at cash surrender value.
(4)For further information, see Note 5, Risk Management.

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PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued
(Unaudited)
As of December 31, 2023
Level 1Level 2Level 3
Other (2)
Total
Assets:
Cash equivalents$ $ $ $— $ 
Nuclear decommissioning trust: (1)
Debt securities:
Domestic government9 9  — 18 
Corporate credit 7  — 7 
Money market funds— — — 6 6 
Non-qualified benefit plan trust: (3)
Debt securities—domestic government3   — 3 
Money market funds2   — 2 
Paid Leave Oregon Trust:
Money market funds— — — 
Price risk management activities: (1) (4)
Electricity 8 14 — 22 
Natural gas 11  — 11 
$14 $35 $14 $9 $72 
Liabilities:
Price risk management activities: (1) (4)
Electricity$ $30 $43 $— $73 
Natural gas 150 16 — 166 
$ $180 $59 $— $239 
 
(1)Activities are subject to regulation, with certain gains and losses deferred pursuant to regulatory accounting and included in Regulatory assets or Regulatory liabilities as appropriate.
(2)Assets are measured at NAV as a practical expedient and not subject to hierarchy level classification disclosure.
(3)Excludes insurance policies of $30 million, which are recorded at cash surrender value.
(4)For further information, see Note 5, Risk Management.

Cash equivalents are highly liquid investments with maturities of three months or less at the date of acquisition and primarily consist of money market funds. Such funds seek to maintain a stable net asset value and are comprised of short-term, government funds. Policies of such funds require that the weighted average maturity of securities holdings of such funds not exceed 90 days and provide investors with the ability to redeem shares of the funds daily at their respective net asset value. Cash equivalents are classified as Level 1 in the fair value hierarchy due to the availability of quoted prices for identical assets in an active market as of the measurement date. Principal markets for money market fund prices include published exchanges such as the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations (Nasdaq) and the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE).

Assets held in the Nuclear decommissioning trust (NDT) and Non-qualified benefit plan (NQBP) trusts are recorded at fair value in PGE’s condensed consolidated balance sheets and invested in securities that are exposed to interest rate, credit, and market volatility risks. These assets are classified within Level 1, 2, or 3 based on the following factors:
 
Debt securities—PGE invests in highly-liquid United States Treasury securities to support the investment objectives of the trusts. These domestic government securities are classified as Level 1 in the fair value hierarchy due to the availability of quoted prices for identical assets in an active market as of the measurement date.
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PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued
(Unaudited)
 
Assets classified as Level 2 in the fair value hierarchy include domestic government debt securities, such as municipal debt, and corporate credit securities. Prices are determined by evaluating pricing data such as broker quotes for similar securities and adjusted for observable differences. Significant inputs used in valuation models generally include benchmark yields and issuer spreads. The external credit rating, coupon rate, and maturity of each security are considered in the valuation, as applicable.

Money market funds—PGE invests in money market funds that seek to maintain a stable net asset value. These funds invest in high-quality, short-term, diversified money market instruments, short-term treasury bills, federal agency securities, certificates of deposits, and commercial paper. The Company believes the redemption value of these funds is likely to be the fair value, which is represented by the net asset value. Redemption is permitted daily without written notice.

The NQBP trust is invested in exchange-traded government money market funds and is classified as Level 1 in the fair value hierarchy due to the availability of quoted prices in published exchanges such as Nasdaq and the NYSE. The money market fund in the NDT is valued at NAV as a practical expedient and is not included in the fair value hierarchy.

Assets and liabilities from price risk management activities, recorded at fair value in PGE’s condensed consolidated balance sheets, consist of derivative instruments entered into by the Company to manage its risk exposure to commodity price and foreign currency exchange rates and reduce volatility in net variable power costs (NVPC) for the Company’s retail customers. For additional information regarding these assets and liabilities, see Note 5, Risk Management.

For those assets and liabilities from price risk management activities classified as Level 2, fair value is derived using present value formulas that utilize inputs such as forward commodity prices and interest rates. Substantially all of these inputs are observable in the marketplace throughout the full term of the instrument, can be derived from observable data, or are supported by observable levels at which transactions are executed in the marketplace. Instruments in this category include commodity forwards, futures, and swaps.

Assets and liabilities from price risk management activities classified as Level 3 consist of longer-term commodity forwards, futures, swaps, and options for which fair value is derived using one or more significant inputs that are not observable for the entire term of the instrument.

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PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued
(Unaudited)
Quantitative information regarding the significant, unobservable inputs used in the measurement of Level 3 assets and liabilities from price risk management activities is presented below:
Fair ValueValuation TechniqueSignificant Unobservable InputPrice per Unit
Commodity ContractsAssetsLiabilitiesLowHighWeighted Average
(in millions)
As of March 31, 2024
Electricity physical forwards$5 $32 Discounted cash flowElectricity forward price (per MWh)$17.00 $156.50 $78.73 
Natural gas financial swaps 16 Discounted cash flowNatural gas forward price (per Decatherm)2.28 9.59 3.40 
Electricity financial futures1 1 Discounted cash flowElectricity forward price (per MWh)40.00 156.50 92.51 
$6 $49 
As of December 31, 2023
Electricity physical forwards$14 $43 Discounted cash flowElectricity forward price (per MWh)$37.53 $153.33 $84.58 
Natural gas financial swaps 16 Discounted cash flowNatural gas forward price (per Decatherm)2.25 8.89 3.37 
Electricity financial futures  Discounted cash flowElectricity forward price (per MWh)65.30 107.31 91.33 
$14 $59 

The significant unobservable inputs used in the Company’s fair value measurement of price risk management assets and liabilities are long-term forward prices for commodity derivatives. For certain long-term contracts, observable, liquid market transactions are not available for the duration of the delivery period. In such instances, the Company uses internally-developed long-term price curves that utilize observable data when available. When not available, regression techniques are used to estimate unobservable future prices.

The Company’s Level 3 assets and liabilities from price risk management activities are sensitive to market price changes in the respective underlying commodities. The significance of the impact is dependent upon the magnitude of the price change and PGE’s position as either the buyer or seller under the contract. Sensitivity of the fair value measurements to changes in the significant unobservable inputs is as follows:

Significant Unobservable InputPositionChange to InputImpact on Fair Value
Market priceBuyIncrease (decrease)Gain (loss)
Market priceSellIncrease (decrease)Loss (gain)


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PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued
(Unaudited)
Changes in the fair value of net liabilities from price risk management activities (net of assets from price risk management activities) classified as Level 3 in the fair value hierarchy were as follows (in millions):
Three Months Ended March 31,
20242023
Balance as of the beginning of the period$45 $32 
Net realized and unrealized losses/(gains)*
(2)(11)
Transfers from Level 3 to Level 2 7 
Balance as of the end of the period$43 $28 
* Both realized and unrealized losses/(gains), of which the unrealized portions are offset by the effects of regulatory accounting until settlement of the underlying transactions, are recorded in Revenues, net or Purchased power and fuel expense in the condensed consolidated statements of income and comprehensive income. Includes $1 million and $5 million in net realized losses for the three months ended March 31, 2024 and 2023, respectively.

Transfers out of Level 3 occur when the significant inputs become more observable, such as when the time between the valuation date and the delivery term of a transaction becomes shorter.

Long-term debt is recorded at amortized cost in PGE’s condensed consolidated balance sheets. The value of the Company’s FMBs and Pollution Control Revenue Bonds is classified as a Level 2 fair value measurement.

As of March 31, 2024, the carrying amount of PGE’s long-term debt was $4,433 million, net of $15 million of unamortized debt expense, and its estimated aggregate fair value was $3,955 million. As of December 31, 2023, the carrying amount of PGE’s long-term debt was $3,985 million, net of $14 million of unamortized debt expense, and its estimated aggregate fair value was $3,705 million.

NOTE 5: RISK MANAGEMENT

PGE participates in the wholesale marketplace to balance its supply of power, which consists of its own generation combined with wholesale market transactions, to meet the needs of its retail customers, manage risk, and administer the Company’s long-term wholesale contracts. Wholesale market transactions include purchases and sales of both power and fuel resulting from economic dispatch decisions with respect to Company-owned generation resources. The Company also performs portfolio management and wholesale market services for third parties in the region. As a result of this ongoing business activity, PGE is exposed to commodity price risk and foreign currency exchange rate risk, from which changes in prices and/or rates may affect the Company’s financial position, results of operations, or cash flows.

PGE utilizes derivative instruments to manage its exposure to commodity price risk and foreign exchange rate risk in order to reduce volatility in NVPC for its retail customers. Such derivative instruments, recorded at fair value on the condensed consolidated balance sheets, may include forwards, futures, swaps, and options contracts for electricity, natural gas, and foreign currency, with changes in fair value recorded in the condensed consolidated statements of income and comprehensive income. In accordance with ratemaking and cost recovery processes authorized by the OPUC, PGE recognizes a regulatory asset or liability to defer the gains and losses from derivative activity until settlement of the associated derivative instrument. The Company may designate certain derivative instruments as cash flow hedges or may use derivative instruments as economic hedges. PGE does not intend to engage in trading activities for non-retail purposes.



22


PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued
(Unaudited)
PGE’s Assets and Liabilities from price risk management activities consist of the following (in millions):
March 31, 2024December 31, 2023
Current assets:
Commodity contracts:
Electricity$20 $13 
Natural gas9 9 
Total current derivative assets (1)
29 22 
Noncurrent assets:
Commodity contracts:
Electricity6 9 
Natural gas2 2 
Total noncurrent derivative assets (1)
8 11 
Total derivative assets (2)
$37 $33 
Current liabilities:
Commodity contracts:
Electricity$44 $51 
Natural gas93 113 
Total current derivative liabilities137 164 
Noncurrent liabilities:
Commodity contracts:
Electricity17 22 
Natural gas39 53 
Total noncurrent derivative liabilities56 75 
Total derivative liabilities (2)
$193 $239 
(1) Total current derivative assets are included in Other current assets, and Total noncurrent derivative assets are included in Other noncurrent assets on the condensed consolidated balance sheets.
(2) As of March 31, 2024 and December 31, 2023, no derivative assets or liabilities were designated as hedging instruments.

PGE’s net volumes related to its Assets and Liabilities from price risk management activities resulting from its derivative transactions, which are expected to deliver or settle at various dates through 2035, were as follows (in millions):
March 31, 2024December 31, 2023
Commodity contracts:
Electricity4 MWhs3 MWhs
Natural gas200 Decatherms213 Decatherms
Foreign currency$22 Canadian$20 Canadian
PGE has elected to report positive and negative exposures resulting from derivative instruments pursuant to agreements that meet the definition of a master netting arrangement gross on the condensed consolidated balance sheets. In the case of default on, or termination of, any contract under the master netting arrangements, such agreements provide for the net settlement of all related contractual obligations with a given counterparty through a single payment. These types of transactions may include non-derivative instruments, derivatives qualifying for scope exceptions, receivables and payables arising from settled positions, and other forms of non-cash collateral, such as letters of credit. As of March 31, 2024, gross amounts included as Price risk management liabilities subject to master netting agreements were $24 million, comprised of $21 million for natural gas and $3 million for electricity, for which PGE has posted no collateral. As of December 31, 2023, gross amounts included as Price risk
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PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued
(Unaudited)
management liabilities subject to master netting agreements were $28 million, for which PGE had posted $1 million collateral. Of the gross amounts recognized as of December 31, 2023, $3 million was for electricity and $25 million was for natural gas.

Net realized and unrealized losses (gains) on derivative transactions not designated as hedging instruments are classified in Revenues, net or Purchased power and fuel, as applicable, in the condensed consolidated statements of income and comprehensive income and were as follows (in millions):
Three Months Ended March 31,
20242023
Commodity contracts:
Electricity$(19)$(35)
Natural Gas14 132 

Net unrealized and certain net realized losses/(gains) presented in the table above are offset within the condensed consolidated statements of income and comprehensive income by the effects of regulatory accounting. Of the net amounts recognized in Net income for the three-month periods ended March 31, 2024 and 2023, net gains of $49 million and net losses of $206 million, respectively, have been offset.

Assuming no changes in market prices and interest rates, the following table indicates the year in which the net unrealized loss/(gain) recorded as of March 31, 2024 related to PGE’s derivative activities would become realized as a result of the settlement of the underlying derivative instrument (in millions):
20242025202620272028ThereafterTotal
Commodity contracts:
Electricity$17 $19 $(1)$(1)$ $1 $35 
Natural gas76 29 15 1   121 
Net unrealized loss/(gain)$93 $48 $14 $ $ $1 $156 

PGE’s secured and unsecured debt is currently rated at investment grade by Moody’s Investors Service (Moody’s) and S&P Global Ratings (S&P). Should Moody’s or S&P reduce their rating on the Company’s unsecured debt to below investment grade, PGE could be subject to requests by certain wholesale counterparties to post additional performance assurance collateral, in the form of cash or letters of credit, based on total portfolio positions with each of those counterparties. Certain other counterparties would have the right to terminate their agreements with the Company.

The aggregate fair value of derivative instruments with credit-risk-related contingent features that were in a liability position as of March 31, 2024 was $177 million, for which PGE has posted $65 million in collateral, consisting of $20 million of letters of credit and $45 million of cash. If the credit-risk-related contingent features underlying these agreements were triggered at March 31, 2024, the cash requirement to either post as collateral or settle the instruments immediately would have been $117 million. As of March 31, 2024, PGE had $6 million cash collateral posted for derivative instruments with no credit-risk-related contingent features. Cash collateral for derivative instruments is classified as Margin deposits included in Other current assets on the Company’s condensed consolidated balance sheets.

As of March 31, 2024, PGE held from counterparties $10 million in collateral, consisting of $5 million of letters of credit and $5 million of cash. The obligation to return cash collateral held for derivative instruments is included in Accrued expenses and other current liabilities on the Company’s condensed consolidated balance sheets.
24


PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued
(Unaudited)

PGE is exposed to credit risk in its commodity price risk management activities related to potential nonperformance by counterparties. Credit risk may be concentrated to the extent the Company’s counterparties have similar economic, industry or other characteristics and due to direct or indirect relationships among the counterparties. PGE manages the risk of counterparty default according to its credit policies by performing financial credit reviews, setting limits and monitoring exposures, and requiring collateral (in the form of cash, letters of credit, and guarantees) when needed. The Company also uses standardized enabling agreements and, in certain cases, master netting agreements, which allow for the netting of positive and negative exposures under multiple agreements with counterparties.
See Note 4, Fair Value of Financial Instruments, for additional information concerning the determination of fair value for the Company’s Assets and Liabilities from price risk management activities.

NOTE 6: EARNINGS PER SHARE

Basic earnings per share are computed based on the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted earnings per share are computed using the weighted average number of common shares outstanding and the effect of dilutive potential common shares outstanding during the period using the treasury stock method. Potential common shares consist of: i) employee stock purchase plan shares; ii) contingently issuable time-based and performance-based restricted stock units, along with associated dividend equivalent rights; and iii) shares issuable pursuant to the at the market offering program. Unvested performance-based restricted stock units and associated dividend equivalent rights are included in dilutive potential common shares only after the performance criteria have been met.

For the three months ended March 31, 2024, unvested performance-based restricted stock units and related dividend equivalent rights of 507 thousand shares were excluded from the dilutive calculation because the performance goals had not been met, with 413 thousand shares excluded for the three months ended March 31, 2023.

Net income is the same for both the basic and diluted earnings per share computations. The denominators of the basic and diluted earnings per share computations are as follows (in thousands):
Three Months Ended March 31,
20242023
Weighted-average common shares outstanding—basic101,299 91,840 
Dilutive effect of potential common shares *
168 731 
Weighted-average common shares outstanding—diluted101,467 92,571 
* As of March 31, 2023, 577,479 incremental shares were included in the calculation of diluted EPS related to the securities under the EFSA. There was no dilutive impact from the EFSA in 2024 as it was settled in July 2023.



25


PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued
(Unaudited)
NOTE 7: SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

The activity in equity during the three-month periods ended March 31, 2024 and 2023 was as follows (dollars in millions, except per share amounts):
Common StockAccumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Loss
Retained
Earnings
SharesAmountTotal
Balances as of December 31, 2023
101,159,609 $1,750 $(5)$1,574 $3,319 
Issuances of shares pursuant to equity-based plans148,926  — —  
Issuances of shares pursuant to equity agreements
1,714,972 78 — — 78 
Dividends declared ($0.4750 per share)
—   (48)(48)
Net income— — — 109 109 
Other comprehensive income
— — 1 — 1 
Balances as of March 31, 2024
103,023,507 $1,828 $(4)$1,635 $3,459 
Balances as of December 31, 2022
89,283,353 $1,249 $(4)$1,534 $2,779 
Issuances of shares pursuant to equity-based plans159,603  — —  
Issuances of shares pursuant to equity agreements
7,178,016 300 —  300 
Stock-based compensation— (1)— — (1)
Dividends declared ($0.4525 per share)
— — — (40)(40)
Net income— — — 74 74 
Balances as of March 31, 2023
96,620,972 $1,548 $(4)$1,568 $3,112 

At-the-Market Offering Program—On April 28, 2023, PGE entered into an equity distribution agreement under which it could sell up to $300 million of its common stock through at the market offering programs. In 2023, pursuant to the terms of the equity distribution agreement, PGE entered into separate forward sale agreements with forward counterparties. In March 2024, the Company issued 1,714,972 shares pursuant to the agreements and received net proceeds of $78 million, settling all forward sale agreements in place. Any proceeds from the issuances of common stock will be used for general corporate purposes and investments in renewables and non-emitting dispatchable capacity.

NOTE 8: CONTINGENCIES

PGE is subject to legal, regulatory, and environmental proceedings, investigations, and claims that arise from time to time in the ordinary course of its business. Contingencies are evaluated using the best information available at the time the condensed consolidated financial statements are prepared. Legal costs incurred in connection with loss contingencies are expensed as incurred. The Company may seek regulatory recovery of certain costs that are incurred in connection with such matters, although there can be no assurance that such recovery would be granted.

Loss contingencies are accrued, and disclosed if material, when it is probable that an asset has been impaired or a liability incurred as of the financial statement date and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. If a
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(Unaudited)
reasonable estimate of probable loss cannot be determined, a range of loss may be established, in which case the minimum amount in the range is accrued, unless some other amount within the range appears to be a better estimate.

A loss contingency will also be disclosed when it is reasonably possible that an asset has been impaired, or a liability incurred, if the estimate or range of potential loss is material. If a probable or reasonably possible loss cannot be reasonably estimated, then PGE: i) discloses an estimate of such loss or the range of such loss, if the Company is able to determine such an estimate; or ii) discloses that an estimate cannot be made and the reasons why the estimate cannot be made.

If an asset has been impaired or a liability incurred after the financial statement date, but prior to the issuance of the financial statements, the loss contingency is disclosed, if material, and the amount of any estimated loss is recorded in either the current or the subsequent reporting period, depending on the nature of the underlying event.

PGE evaluates, on a quarterly basis, developments in such matters that could affect the amount of any accrual, as well as the likelihood of developments that would make a loss contingency both probable and reasonably estimable. The assessment as to whether a loss is probable or reasonably possible, and as to whether such loss or a range of such loss is estimable, often involves a series of complex judgments about future events. Management is often unable to estimate a reasonably possible loss, or a range of loss, particularly in cases in which: i) the damages sought are indeterminate or the basis for the damages claimed is not clear; ii) the proceedings are in the early stages; iii) discovery is not complete; iv) the matters involve novel or unsettled legal theories; v) significant facts are in dispute; vi) a large number of parties are represented (including circumstances in which it is uncertain how liability, if any, would be shared among multiple defendants); or vii) a wide range of potential outcomes exist. In such cases, there may be considerable uncertainty regarding the timing or ultimate resolution, including any possible loss, fine, penalty, or business impact.

EPA Investigation of Portland Harbor

An investigation by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of a segment of the Willamette River known as Portland Harbor that began in 1997 revealed significant contamination of river sediments. The EPA subsequently included Portland Harbor on the National Priority List pursuant to the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act as a federal Superfund site. PGE has been included among more than one hundred Potentially Responsible Parties (PRPs), as it historically owned or operated property near the river.

A Portland Harbor site remedial investigation was completed pursuant to an agreement between the EPA and several PRPs known as the Lower Willamette Group (LWG), which did not include PGE. The LWG funded the remedial investigation and feasibility study and stated that it had incurred $115 million in investigation-related costs. The Company anticipates that such costs will ultimately be allocated to PRPs as a part of the allocation process for remediation costs of the EPA’s preferred remedy.

The EPA finalized a feasibility study, along with the remedial investigation, and the results provided the framework for the EPA to determine a clean-up remedy for Portland Harbor that was documented in a Record of Decision (ROD) issued in 2017. The ROD outlined the EPA’s selected remediation plan for clean-up of Portland Harbor that had an undiscounted estimated total cost of $1.7 billion, comprised of $1.2 billion related to remediation construction costs and $0.5 billion related to long-term operation and maintenance costs. Remediation construction costs were estimated to be incurred over a 13-year period, with long-term operation and maintenance costs estimated to be incurred over a 30-year period from the start of construction. Stakeholders have raised concerns that the EPA’s cost estimates are understated, and PGE estimates undiscounted total remediation costs for Portland Harbor per the ROD could range from $1.9 billion to $3.5 billion. The EPA acknowledged the estimated costs were
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(Unaudited)
based on data that was outdated and that pre-remedial design sampling was necessary to gather updated baseline data to better refine the remedial design and estimated cost.

A small group of PRPs performed pre-remedial design sampling to update baseline data and submitted the data in an updated evaluation report to the EPA for review. The evaluation report concluded that the conditions of Portland Harbor have improved substantially with the passage of time. In response, the EPA indicated that while it would use the data to inform implementation of the ROD, the EPA’s conclusions remained materially unchanged. With the completion of pre-remedial design sampling, Portland Harbor is now in the remedial design phase, which consists of additional technical information and data collection to be used to design the expected remedial actions. Certain PRPs, not including PGE, have entered into consent agreements to perform remedial design and the EPA has indicated it will take the initial lead to perform remedial design on the remaining areas. The Company anticipates that remedial design costs will ultimately be allocated to PRPs as a part of the allocation process for remediation costs of the EPA’s preferred remedy. The entirety of Portland Harbor continues under an active engineering design phase.

PGE continues to participate in a voluntary process to determine an appropriate allocation of costs amongst the PRPs. Significant uncertainties remain surrounding facts and circumstances that are integral to the determination of such an allocation percentage, including conclusion of remedial design, a final allocation methodology, and data with regard to property specific activities and history of ownership of sites within Portland Harbor that will inform the precise boundaries for clean-up. It is probable that PGE will share in a portion of the costs related to Portland Harbor. Based on the above facts and remaining uncertainties in the voluntary allocation process, PGE does not currently have sufficient information to reasonably estimate the amount, or range, of its potential liability or determine an allocation percentage that would represent PGE’s portion of the liability to clean-up Portland Harbor. However, the Company may obtain sufficient information, prior to the final determination of allocation percentages among PRPs, to develop a reasonable estimate, or range, of its potential liability that would require recording of the estimate, or low end of the range. The Company’s liability related to the cost of remediating Portland Harbor could be material to PGE’s financial position.

In cases in which injuries to natural resources have occurred as a result of releases of hazardous substances, federal and state natural resource trustees may seek to recover for damages at such sites, which are referred to as Natural Resource Damages (NRD). The EPA does not manage NRD assessment activities but does provide claims information and coordination support to the NRD trustees. NRD assessment activities are typically conducted by a Council made up of the trustee entities for the site. The Portland Harbor NRD trustees consist of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the State, the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon, the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, and the Nez Perce Tribe.

The NRD trustees may seek to negotiate legal settlements or take other legal actions against the parties responsible for the damages. Funds from such settlements must be used to restore injured resources and may also compensate the trustees for costs incurred in assessing the damages. PGE’s portion of NRD liabilities related to Portland Harbor will not have a material impact on its results of operations, financial position, or cash flows.

The impact of costs related to EPA and NRD liabilities on the Company’s results of operations is mitigated by the Portland Harbor Environmental Remediation Account (PHERA) mechanism. As approved by the OPUC in 2017, the PHERA allows the Company to defer estimated liabilities and recover incurred environmental expenditures related to Portland Harbor through a combination of third-party proceeds, including but not limited to insurance recoveries, and, if necessary, through customer prices. The mechanism established annual prudency reviews of environmental expenditures and third-party proceeds. Annual expenditures in excess of $6 million, excluding expenses related to contingent liabilities, are subject to an annual earnings test and would be ineligible for recovery
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(Unaudited)
to the extent PGE’s actual regulated return on equity exceeds its return on equity as authorized by the OPUC in PGE’s most recent GRC. PGE’s results of operations may be impacted to the extent such expenditures are deemed imprudent by the OPUC or ineligible per the prescribed earnings test. The Company plans to seek recovery of any costs resulting from EPA’s determination of liability for Portland Harbor through application of the PHERA. At this time, PGE is not collecting any Portland Harbor cost from the PHERA through customer prices.

Governmental Investigations

In March, April, and May 2021, the Division of Enforcement of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), the Division of Enforcement of the SEC, and the Division of Enforcement of the FERC, respectively, informed the Company they are conducting investigations arising out of the energy trading losses the Company previously announced in August 2020. The Company is cooperating with the CFTC, the SEC, and the FERC. Management cannot predict the eventual scope or outcome of these matters.

Colstrip-Related Litigation

The Company has a 20% ownership interest in the Colstrip Units 3 and 4 coal-fired generating plant (Colstrip), which is located in the state of Montana and operated by one of the co-owners, Talen Montana, LLC (Talen). In May 2022, Talen’s parent company, Talen Energy Supply, LLC filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, although Colstrip continues to operate and generate electricity for PGE customers and others. Various business disagreements have arisen amongst the co-owners regarding interpretation of the Ownership and Operation (O&O) Agreement and other matters. An arbitration process has been initiated to address such business disagreements and, along with other matters related to Colstrip, are summarized below.

Arbitration—In March 2021, co-owner NorthWestern Corporation (NorthWestern) initiated arbitration against all other co-owners of Colstrip to determine whether co-owners representing 55% or more of the ownership shares can vote to close one or both units of Colstrip, or, alternatively, whether unanimous consent is required. The O&O Agreement among the parties states that any dispute shall be submitted for resolution to a single arbitrator with appropriate expertise. The parties had agreed to stay the arbitration through April 1, 2024 and are now in the process of reengaging in arbitration discussions. An arbitration date has not yet been scheduled. PGE cannot predict the ultimate outcome of the arbitration process.

Richard Burnett; Colstrip Properties Inc., et al v. Talen Montana, LLC; PGE, et al.—In December 2020, the original claim was filed in the Montana Sixteenth Judicial District Court, Rosebud County, Cause No. CV-20-58. The plaintiffs allege they have suffered adverse effects from the defendants’ coal dust. In August 2021, the claim was amended to add PGE as a defendant. Plaintiffs are seeking economic damages, costs and disbursements, punitive damages, attorneys’ fees, and an injunction prohibiting defendants from allowing coal dust to blow onto plaintiffs’ properties, as determined by the Court. This case is currently set for trial on November 5, 2024. The Company is unable to predict the outcome or estimate a range of any possible loss in this matter.

Westmoreland Mine PermitsTwo lawsuits were commenced by the Montana Environmental Information Center, challenging certain permits relating to the operation of the Westmoreland Rosebud Mine, which provides coal to Colstrip. In the first, the Montana District Court for Rosebud County issued an order vacating a permit for one area of the mine. This case was appealed and on November 22, 2023, the Supreme Court of Montana reinstated the Montana District Court vacating the permit and affirming the lower court order to return to the Board of Environmental Review for additional permit review considerations. In the second, the Montana Federal District Court issued findings and recommended that a decision approving expansion of the mine into a new area should be vacated, but recommended the decision not take effect for 365 days from the date of a final order. On November 24, 2023, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals dismissed the appeal by Westmoreland for lack of appellate jurisdiction, and noted that the appropriate venue to raise issues will be the U.S. Office of Surface Mining during the remand
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PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued
(Unaudited)
process. PGE is not a party to either of these proceedings, but is continuing to monitor the progress of both lawsuits and assess the impact, if any, of the proceedings on Westmoreland’s ability to meet its contractual coal supply obligations.

Other Matters

PGE is subject to other regulatory, environmental, and legal proceedings, investigations, and claims that arise from time to time in the ordinary course of business that may result in judgments against the Company. Although management currently believes that resolution of such known matters, individually and in the aggregate, will not have a material impact on its financial position, results of operations, or cash flows, these matters are subject to inherent uncertainties, and management’s view of these matters may change in the future.

NOTE 9: GUARANTEES

PGE enters into financial agreements for, and purchase and sale agreements involving physical delivery of, both power and natural gas that include indemnification provisions relating to certain claims or liabilities that may arise relating to the transactions contemplated by these agreements. Generally, a maximum obligation is not explicitly stated in the indemnification provisions and, therefore, the overall maximum amount of the obligation under such indemnifications cannot be reasonably estimated. PGE periodically evaluates the likelihood of incurring costs under such indemnities based on the Company’s historical experience and the evaluation of the specific indemnities. As of March 31, 2024, management believes the likelihood is remote that PGE would be required to perform under such indemnification provisions or otherwise incur any significant losses with respect to such indemnities. The Company has not recorded any liability on the condensed consolidated balance sheets with respect to these indemnities.

NOTE 10: INCOME TAXES

Income tax expense for interim periods is based on the estimated annual effective tax rate, which includes tax credits, regulatory flow-through adjustments, and other items, applied to the Company’s year-to-date, pre-tax income. The significant differences between the Federal statutory tax rate and PGE’s effective tax rate are reflected in the following table:
Three Months Ended March 31,
20242023
Federal statutory tax rate21.0 %21.0 %
Federal tax credits*
(16.2)(9.3)
State and local taxes, net of federal tax benefit9.1 9.0 
Flow-through depreciation and cost basis differences0.2 1.0 
Amortization of excess deferred income tax(3.3)(3.7)
Other(0.1)(2.1)
Effective tax rate10.7 %15.9 %
* Federal tax credits primarily consist of production tax credits (PTCs) earned from Company-owned wind-powered generating facilities. PTCs are earned based on a per-kilowatt hour rate and, as a result, the annual amount of PTCs earned will vary based on weather conditions and availability of the facilities. PTCs are earned for 10 years from the in-service dates of the corresponding facilities. PGE’s PTC generation will end at various dates through 2034.


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NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, continued
(Unaudited)
Carryforwards

Federal tax credit carryforwards as of March 31, 2024 and December 31, 2023 were $94 million and $73 million, respectively. These credits primarily consist of PTCs, which will expire at various dates through 2044. PGE included anticipated proceeds from the sale of tax credits in determining the need for a valuation allowance. PGE believes that it is more likely than not that its deferred income tax assets as of March 31, 2024 will be realized, however a valuation allowance has been recorded for the expected discount on the sale of tax credits. The valuation allowance as of March 31, 2024 was $1 million and was deferred as a regulatory asset. As of December 31, 2023, no material valuation allowance was recorded. As of March 31, 2024, and December 31, 2023, PGE had no material unrecognized tax benefits.

Item 2.Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
 
Forward-Looking Statements

The information in this report includes statements that are forward-looking within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements that relate to expectations, beliefs, plans, assumptions, and objectives concerning future results of operations, business prospects, loads, outcome of litigation and regulatory proceedings, capital expenditures, market conditions, events or performance, and other matters. Words or phrases such as “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “expects,” “intends,” “plans,” “predicts,” “projects,” “will likely result,” “will continue,” “should,” “based on,” “conditioned upon,” “considers,” “could,” “expected,” “forecast,” “goals,” “needs,” “promises,” “subject to,” “targets,” or similar expressions are intended to identify such forward-looking statements.

Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results or outcomes to differ materially from those expressed. PGE’s expectations, beliefs, and projections are expressed in good faith and are believed by the Company to have a reasonable basis including, but not limited to, management’s examination of historical operating trends and data contained either in internal records or available from third parties, but there can be no assurance that PGE’s expectations, beliefs, or projections will be achieved or accomplished.

In addition to any assumptions and other factors and matters referred to specifically in connection with forward-looking statements, factors that could cause actual results or outcomes for PGE to differ materially from those discussed in such forward-looking statements include:

governmental policies, legislative action, and regulatory audits, investigations, and actions, including those of the Federal Regulatory Energy Commission (FERC), the Public Utility Commission of Oregon, (OPUC), the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), and the Division of Enforcement of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), with respect to allowed rates of return, financings, electricity pricing and price structures, acquisition and disposal of facilities and other assets, construction and operation of plant facilities, transmission of electricity, recovery of power costs, operating expenses, deferrals, timely recovery of costs and capital investments, energy trading activities, and current or prospective wholesale and retail competition;
economic conditions that result in decreased demand for electricity, reduced revenue from sales of excess energy during periods of low wholesale market prices, impaired financial stability of vendors and service providers, and elevated levels of uncollectible customer accounts;
inflation and volatility in interest rates;
changing customer expectations and choices that may reduce customer demand for PGE’s services may impact the Company’s ability to make and recover its investments through rates and earn its authorized
31

return on equity, including the impact of growing distributed and renewable generation resources, changing customer demand for enhanced electric services, and an increasing risk that customers procure electricity from Electricity Service Suppliers (ESSs) or the adoption of community choice aggregation;
the timing or outcome of legal and regulatory proceedings and issues including, but not limited to, the matters described in Regulatory Matters of the “Overview” in this Item 2, and Note 8, Contingencies in the Notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 1. Financial Statements of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q;
natural or human-caused disasters and other risks, including, but not limited to, earthquake, flood, ice, drought, extreme heat, lightning, wind, fire, accidents, equipment failure, acts of terrorism, computer system outages, and other events that disrupt PGE operations, damage PGE facilities and systems, cause the release of harmful materials, cause fires, and subject the Company to liability;
cybersecurity attacks, data security breaches, physical attacks and security breaches, or other malicious acts that cause damage to the Company’s generation, transmission, or distribution facilities, information technology systems, inhibit the capability of equipment or systems to function as designed or expected, or result in the release of confidential customer, vendor, employee, or Company information;
the effects of climate change, whether global or local in nature, including unseasonable or extreme weather and other natural phenomena that may affect energy costs or consumption, increase the Company’s costs, cause damage to PGE facilities and system, or adversely affect its operations;
unseasonable or severe weather and other natural phenomena, such as the greater size and prevalence of wildfires in Oregon in recent years, which could affect public safety, customers’ demand for power, and PGE’s ability and cost to procure adequate power and fuel supplies to serve its customers, access the wholesale energy market, or operate its generating facilities and transmission and distribution systems, and the Company’s costs to maintain, repair, and replace such facilities and systems, and recovery of such costs;
PGE’s ability to effectively implement a public safety power shutoff (PSPS) and de-energize its system in the event of heightened wildfire risk or implement effective system hardening programs, the inability of which could lead to potential liability if energized systems are involved in wildfires that cause harm, as well as the risk that damages from wildfires may not be recoverable through rates or insurance, resulting in impact to the financial condition, results of operations, or reputation of the Company;
operational factors affecting PGE’s power generating facilities and battery storage facilities, including forced outages, fires, unscheduled delays, hydro and wind conditions, and disruption of fuel supply, any of which may cause the Company to incur repair costs or purchase replacement power at increased costs;
default or nonperformance on the part of any parties from whom PGE purchases fuel, capacity, or energy, which may cause the Company to incur costs to purchase replacement power and related renewable attributes at increased costs;
complications arising from PGE’s jointly-owned plant, including changes in ownership, adverse regulatory outcomes or legislative actions, or operational failures that result in legal or environmental liabilities or unanticipated costs related to replacement power or repair costs;
delays in the supply chain and increased supply costs, failure to complete capital projects on schedule or within budget, inability to complete negotiations on contracts for capital projects, failure of counterparties to perform under agreements, or the abandonment of capital projects, any of which could result in the Company’s inability to recover project costs or impact PGE’s competitive position, market share, or results of operations in a material way;
volatility in wholesale power and natural gas prices, including but not limited to volatility caused by macroeconomic and international issues, that could require PGE to post additional collateral or issue additional letters of credit pursuant to power and natural gas purchase agreements;
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changes in the availability and price of wholesale power and fuels, including natural gas and coal, and the impact of such changes on the Company’s power costs;
capital market conditions, including availability of capital, volatility of interest rates, reductions in demand for investment-grade commercial paper, volatility of equity markets as well as changes in PGE’s credit ratings, any of which could have an impact on the Company’s cost of capital and its ability to access the capital markets to support requirements for working capital, construction of capital projects, the repayments of maturing debt, and stock-based compensation plans, which are relied upon in part to retain key executives and employees;
future laws, regulations, and proceedings that could increase the Company’s costs of operating its thermal generating plants, or affect the operations of such plants by imposing requirements for additional emissions controls or significant emissions fees or taxes in order to mitigate carbon dioxide, mercury, and other gas emissions;
changes in, and compliance with, environmental laws and policies, including those related to threatened and endangered species, fish, and wildlife;
changes in residential, commercial, or industrial customer growth, or demographic patterns, including changes in load resulting in future transmission constraints, in PGE’s service territory;
the effectiveness of PGE’s risk management policies and procedures;
employee workforce factors, including potential strikes, work stoppages, transitions in senior management, the ability to recruit and retain key employees and other talent, and turnover due to macroeconomic trends such as voluntary resignation of large numbers of employees similar to that experienced by other employers and industries since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic;
new federal, state, and local laws that could have adverse effects on operating results;
failure to achieve the Company’s greenhouse gas emission goals or being perceived to have either failed to act responsibly with respect to the environment or effectively respond to legislative requirements concerning greenhouse gas emission reductions, any of which could lead to adverse publicity and have adverse effects on the Company's operations and/or damage the Company's reputation;
social attitudes regarding the electric utility and power industries;
political and economic conditions;
the impact of widespread health developments and responses to such developments (such as voluntary and mandatory quarantines, including government stay at home orders, as well as shut downs and other restrictions on travel, commercial, social and other activities), which could materially and adversely affect, among other things, demand for electric services, customers’ ability to pay, supply chains, personnel, contract counterparties, liquidity, and financial markets;
changes in financial or regulatory accounting principles or policies imposed by governing bodies;
risks and uncertainties related to current or future All-Source Request For Proposals (RFP) projects, including, but not limited to regulatory processes, legal actions, transmission capabilities, system interconnections, inflationary impacts, supply chain constraints, supply cost increases (including application of tariffs impacting solar module imports), permitting and construction delays, and legislative uncertainty; and
acts of war or terrorism.

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Any forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date on which such statement is made and, except as required by law, PGE undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after the date on which such statement is made or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events. New factors emerge from time to time and it is not possible for management to predict all such factors or assess the impact of any such factor on the business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statement.

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OVERVIEW

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (MD&A) is intended to provide an understanding of the business environment, results of operations, and financial condition of PGE. MD&A should be read in conjunction with the Company’s condensed consolidated financial statements contained in this report, and other periodic and current reports filed with the SEC.

PGE is a vertically-integrated electric utility engaged in the generation, transmission, distribution, and retail sale of electricity in the State. The Company participates in wholesale markets by purchasing and selling electricity and natural gas in an effort to meet the needs of, and obtain reasonably-priced power for, its retail customers, manage risk, and administer its long-term wholesale contracts. In addition, PGE continues to develop products and service offerings for the benefit of retail and wholesale customers. The Company generates revenues and cash flows primarily from the sale and distribution of electricity to retail customers in its service territory.

Company Strategy

The Company exists to power the advancement of society. PGE energizes lives, strengthens communities, and fosters energy solutions that promote social, economic, and environmental progress. The Company is committed to being a clean energy leader and delivering steady growth and returns to shareholders. PGE is focused on working with customers, communities, policy makers, and other stakeholders to deliver affordable, safe, reliable electricity service to all, while increasing opportunities to deliver clean and renewable energy, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and responding to evolving customer expectations. At the same time, the Company is building an increasingly smart, integrated, and interconnected grid that spans from residential customers to other utilities within the region. PGE is transforming all aspects of its business to empower its workforce to be even more results oriented to serve customers well. To create a clean energy future, PGE is focused on the following strategic imperatives:
Decarbonize Power—Reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with electricity served to retail customers by at least 80% by 2030 and 100% by 2040;
Electrify the Economy—Increase beneficial electricity use to capture the benefits of new technologies while building an increasingly clean, flexible, and reliable grid; and
Advance Performance—Improve safety, efficiency, and system and equipment reliability while maintaining affordable energy service and growing earnings per share 5% to 7% annually.

Climate Change

State-mandated GHG emissions reduction targets—In June 2021, the Oregon legislature passed House Bill (HB) 2021, establishing a 100% clean electricity by 2040 framework for PGE and other investor-owned utilities and electric service suppliers in the State. A number of provisions in the bill align with PGE’s strategic direction and highlight Oregon’s ambitious, economy-wide goals to combat climate change. The GHG emissions reduction targets applicable to these regulated entities are an 80% reduction in GHG emissions by 2030, 90% by 2035, and 100% by 2040 and every year thereafter. For more information regarding HB 2021 and the baseline to which the target reductions apply, see “HB 2021” in the “Laws and Regulations” section of this Overview.

Empowering customers and communities—PGE’s customers have a desire for purchasing clean energy, as over 229 thousand residential and small commercial customers voluntarily participate in PGE’s Green Future Program, the largest renewable power program by participation in the nation. In 2017, Oregon’s most populous city, Portland, and most populous county, Multnomah, each passed resolutions to achieve 100% clean and renewable electricity by 2035 and 100 % economy-wide clean and renewable energy by 2050. Other jurisdictions in PGE’s service area have similar goals and continue to consider similar goals for the future.

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The Company implemented a customer subscription option, the Green Future Impact Program, which is a renewable energy program that allows large business and municipality customers to have a choice in how they source their electricity. Under the Green Future Impact Program, customers can enroll in a Customer-Supplied Option (CSO) or PGE-Supplied Option (PSO). Under the CSO, participants are responsible for finding a renewable energy facility that meets established requirements and bringing those resources to PGE. Under the PSO, customers who enrolled in Phase I can receive energy from PGE-provided purchased power agreements (PPAs) for renewable resources and customers who enroll in Phase II can receive energy either from PGE-provided PPAs for renewable resources or energy from renewable resources that are PGE owned, under certain conditions.

As of March 31, 2024, the Green Future Impact Program has an approved capacity of 750 MW nameplate. Through this voluntary program, the Company seeks to support the customers’ clean energy acceleration, achieve PGE sustainability goals, mitigate cost and manage risk, and reliably integrate power.

The Climate Pledge—In 2021, PGE joined The Climate Pledge, a commitment to be net-zero annual carbon emissions by 2040, which is a decade ahead of the Paris Agreement’s goal of 2050. As a signatory to The Climate Pledge, PGE agrees to: i) measure and report GHG emissions on a regular basis; ii) implement decarbonization strategies in line with the Paris Agreement through real business changes and innovations, including efficiency improvements, renewable energy, materials reductions, and other carbon emission elimination strategies; and iii) neutralize any remaining emissions with additional, quantifiable, real, permanent, and socially-beneficial offsets.

Severe weather—In recent years, PGE’s territory has experienced unprecedented heat, historic ice and snowstorms, and wildfires. On January 13, 2024, the Company’s service territory encountered the first of a series of severe winter weather events, including snow, ice, and high winds that caused catastrophic damage to physical assets and resulted in widespread customer power outages. For more information regarding the January 2024 severe winter weather events, see “Declared States of Emergency” within this Overview section of this Item 2. August 2023 experienced a record-breaking heat wave with temperatures in the region reaching all-time recorded highs for the month. This resulted in a peak load demand of 4,498 MW, beating the Company’s previous all-time peak load demand, and surpassing the prior summer peak load by nearly 6%. The increase and severity of weather events highlights the importance of combating the effects of climate change through decarbonizing the power supply and investing in a more reliable and resilient grid.

Investing in a Clean Energy Future

The Resource Planning Process— PGE’s resource planning process includes working with customers, stakeholders, and regulators to chart the course toward a clean, affordable, and reliable energy future. With the passage of HB 2021, PGE created a Clean Energy Plan (CEP), which articulates the Company’s strategy to meet the 2030, 2035, and 2040 emission reduction targets through an equitable transition to a decarbonized grid. The CEP is based on, and was filed in connection with, the Company’s 2023 IRP. PGE filed its first combined IRP and CEP with the OPUC in March 2023. That filing projected PGE’s resource and capacity needs over the next 20 years and proposed an Action Plan to meet near-term needs, subject to the new HB 2021 emissions reduction requirements.

PGE estimates a total resource need of approximately 3,500 to 4,500 MW of renewable energy and non-emitting capacity in order to meet the Company’s 2030 emissions reduction target. Through the 2021 All-Source RFP, PGE procured 311 MW of wind resources and 475 MW of capacity, leaving a remaining need to procure approximately 2,700 to 3,700 MW.

On January 25, 2024, the OPUC acknowledged PGE’s IRP, subject to certain conditions, providing regulatory support for the Company to pursue the near-term resource additions articulated in the Action Plan. However, the OPUC declined to acknowledge the CEP, directing the Company to provide additional forecast of its emission reductions based on new analysis in the CEP/IRP Update to be filed in January 2025. PGE will continue to pursue its 2023 All-Source RFP while revising forecasts of emissions in the CEP


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2021 All-Source RFP
Pursuant to the 2021 All-Source RFP process, seeking approximately 1,000 MW of renewable resources and non-emitting dispatchable capacity, PGE entered into agreements to acquire resources as follows:
Clearwater Wind Development—PGE and NextEra Energy Resources, LLC, a subsidiary of NextEra Energy, Inc. entered into agreements to construct a 311 MW wind energy facility in Eastern Montana. PGE owns 208 MW of production capacity of the facility. Subsidiaries of NextEra Energy Resources, LLC, which operates the facility, owns the remaining 103 MW of production capacity and sells their portion of the output to PGE under a 30-year PPA. The project was placed in-service during the first quarter of 2024 with a total cost of $424 million, including AFUDC, as of March 31, 2024.
Seaside Grid—PGE entered into an agreement to construct a 200 MW Battery Energy Storage System (BESS) in Portland, Oregon. PGE will own the resource, with an investment of approximately $360 million, excluding AFUDC. The project has an estimated commercial operation date of June 30, 2025. As of March 31, 2024, the Company has recorded $92 million, including AFUDC, in CWIP for the Seaside Grid.
Constable BESS (formerly Evergreen)—PGE entered into an agreement to construct a 75 MW BESS in Hillsboro, Oregon. PGE will own the resource, with an investment of approximately $150 million, excluding AFUDC. The project has an estimated commercial operation date of December 31, 2024. As of March 31, 2024, the Company has recorded $48 million, including AFUDC, in CWIP for the Constable BESS.
Troutdale Grid—PGE entered into a storage capacity agreement for a 200 MW BESS in Troutdale, Oregon. NextEra Energy Resources, LLC, will own the resource and will sell the capacity to PGE under a 20-year storage capacity agreement. The project has an estimated commercial operation date of December 31, 2024.

The Clearwater agreements and all BESS agreements represent the final procurement from the 2021 All-Source RFP. Resources required to meet the remaining 2030 need are anticipated to be procured through future acquisition processes, including, but not limited to, the 2023 All-Source RFP and future RFPs.

All BESS projects will be directly interconnected to PGE’s system. Emissions associated with energy used to charge the BESS are accounted for when they are emitted from the generating facility. BESS projects do not add incremental emissions to the grid, and therefore, are non-emitting dispatchable capacity resources. The BESS projects will qualify for the federal investment tax credit (ITC). The Clearwater agreements will qualify for production tax credits (PTCs) and will be eligible under Oregon’s Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS). The agreements will be subject to prudency review by the OPUC.

In February 2022, NewSun Energy LLC (NewSun) filed a petition for judicial review in the Marion County Circuit Court against the OPUC challenging the scoring methodology in the 2021 All-Source RFP. PGE joined in the case as an intervenor. NewSun also filed a motion to stay the 2021 All-Source RFP process, which the Court subsequently denied. The OPUC filed a motion to dismiss the case and PGE joined the OPUC’s motion to dismiss. NewSun opposed the motion. In May 2022, the Court granted the motion to dismiss to which NewSun responded in June 2022 by filing a notice of appeal with the Court of Appeals of the State of Oregon. After receiving multiple extensions, NewSun filed its opening brief in the appeal in February 2023 and PGE filed a response brief in June 2023. In August 2023, PGE filed a notice asking the Court to dismiss the case. That motion remains pending. Oral argument in this case occurred March 18, 2024. The parties await a decision from the Court.

In October 2022, NewSun filed a petition in Deschutes County Circuit Court seeking review of the OPUC order acknowledging, with conditions, PGE’s 2021 All-Source RFP shortlist. PGE intervened in this case and, in March 2023, filed a motion to dismiss. In September 2023, the judge granted PGE’s motion to dismiss. In November 2023, NewSun filed a notice of appeal in the Court of Appeals of the State of Oregon. Opening briefs in the Appeal were filed March 1, 2024, with PGE to respond by May 9, 2024.

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PGE cannot predict the outcome of these proceedings or potential impact, if any, to its 2021 All-Source RFP process.

2023 All-Source RFP

PGE filed notice with the OPUC in January 2023 that an RFP in 2023 was needed to procure resources to meet a forecasted 2026 capacity shortfall and to make continued progress toward decarbonization targets under HB 2021. These actions were consistent with the 2023 IRP Action Plan and CEP. The filing included PGE’s request for a partial waiver of the OPUC’s competitive bidding rules, which was approved by the OPUC in April 2023, and outlined PGE’s recommended timeline for obtaining necessary regulatory approvals. PGE filed the draft 2023 All-Source RFP with the OPUC in May 2023 and regulatory approval was granted in January 2024. The Company issued the RFP to market on February 2, 2024, seeking bids for resources that can provide non-emitting dispatchable capacity and renewable generation. The submission deadline for proposals is in April 2024. Bids will be evaluated based on the OPUC-approved scoring methodology. Following determination of a final shortlist, PGE plans to file for acknowledgement in mid-2024 with a final selection in the third or fourth quarter of 2024.

Transmission Upgrades

In alignment with local and regional transmission plans, the 2023 IRP Action Plan, and CEP, PGE is evaluating and implementing upgrades to existing transmission resources and expansions of current transmission networks. Transmission resource actions are intended to alleviate congestion, improve regional adequacy and reliability, enable decarbonization goals, and address growing customer demand.

Building a resilient grid—To serve communities with clean energy, PGE’s grid of the future will need to be smart and adaptive. Highlights of PGE’s key investments and plans for building a resilient grid include:
Wildfire Mitigation—PGE has a Wildfire Mitigation Program under which an annual Wildfire Mitigation Plan (WMP) is developed and submitted to the OPUC to coordinate activities across the Company and with state-wide stakeholders. The 2024 WMP forecasts $45 million in operations and maintenance costs and an additional $43 to $49 million in capital investments in the current year to continue system hardening efforts, expand situational awareness capabilities, implement specific inspection and maintenance along with vegetation management, raise community and customer awareness, and take operational actions within high fire risk zones. PGE strives to improve regional safety by reducing the risk that the Company’s electric utility infrastructure could cause a wildfire, while limiting the impacts of PSPS events and other mitigation activities on customers and increasing the resiliency of PGE assets to wildfire damage. In the three months ended March 31, 2024, PGE invested $3 million in capital projects related to wildfire mitigation and resiliency and utility asset management, consistent with the 2024 WMP.
Virtual Power Plant (VPP)—PGE’s VPP is a production resource comprised of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) and flexible loads that are managed through technology platforms to provide grid and power operations services. PGE’s customer offerings related to energy efficiency and flexible load programs, rooftop solar, battery storage, and electric vehicle charging solutions support grid reliability and increase portfolio flexibility and resource diversity. These DERs and flexible loads are the foundation of PGE’s VPP that will provide a growing suite of grid and system services over time. When coordinated through the Company’s DER Management Systems, the various DERs and flexible loads support cost-effective decarbonization, advance customer and community energy resiliency, promote customer engagement with the energy system, and unlock additional grid services that enhance PGE’s operation of a dynamic two-way system. In 2023, PGE saw record energy demand of 4,498 MW on August 14. Customer actions that day, orchestrated through the VPP, reduced load by more than 90 MW, helping avoid customer service interruptions and reducing exposure to scarcity pricing in energy markets.
Distribution System Plan—In 2021 and 2022, PGE filed its inaugural DSP in two parts, which were accepted by the OPUC in March 2022 and February 2023, respectively. While the OPUC Staff is in the
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process of reviewing whether to modify the current DSP guidelines, PGE plans to file its next DSP in the fourth quarter of 2024. The DSP outlines distribution system assets, describes how the Company plans for new load, including distributed resources such as electric vehicles (EVs) and Solar Photovoltaic installations, and presents the vision for modernizing the grid to enable accelerated decarbonization and customer participation in meeting PGE’s clean energy goals.

Electrify the economy—To help Oregon reach its decarbonization goals, PGE is working to build a safe, reliable, and affordable, economy-wide, clean energy future. The Company is committed to increasing electrification of buildings and supports the accelerating pace of vehicle electrification for our customers, as well as its own vehicle fleet.

Transportation electrification is one of the most significant ways to reduce GHG emissions in Oregon. PGE is engaged with customers and communities to manage electric vehicle (EV) charging load, develop infrastructure projects aimed at improving accessibility to electric vehicle charging stations, build fleet partnerships, and offer programs to encourage customers to advance transportation electrification.

In 2021, the Oregon legislature enacted HB 2165, ensuring the OPUC has clear and broad authority to allow electric company investments in infrastructure to support transportation electrification.

In 2023, PGE’s second Transportation Electrification (TE) plan was filed and accepted by the OPUC. This second TE plan considers current and planned activities, along with forecasted EV loads and potential system impacts. The 2023 TE plan represents a continuation of the approach and programmatic efforts found within PGE’s 2019 TE plan while also outlining the Company’s current strategy to integrate TE into utility business in order to plan, service, and manage EV load.

In the 2023 to 2025 period covered by the 2023 TE plan, capital expenditures are expected to be approximately $25 million. The final 2023 TE plan with its planned activities was accepted by the OPUC on October 17, 2023.

Businesses and families continue to turn to electricity to serve their home and workplace needs. PGE continues to pursue advanced technologies to enhance the grid, pursue distributed generation and energy storage, and develop microgrids and the use of data and analytics to better predict demand and support energy-saving customer programs.

Laws and Regulations

Federal Grants—In November 2021, the $1.2 trillion Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA), which includes approximately $550 billion of new federal spending, was signed into law. PGE continues to pursue multiple areas under the IIJA, and other state, federal, and private programs, for potential grant funding of projects. These projects target improvements in electrical system reliability and resiliency, wildfire situational awareness and mitigation, greater communications capabilities, advancements in customer usage analytics using artificial intelligence, renewable resources and advanced electrical grid support, hydro generation operations, hydrogen production, utility workforce development, and regional transmission capacity constraints.

As of March 31, 2024, PGE has submitted 27 full federal grant applications and has been awarded 11 grants totaling $317.8 million, including the following:
U.S. DOE Bethel-Round Butte Transmission Line Upgrade—The U.S. DOE selected the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWS), in partnership with PGE, for a $250 million grant to upgrade the existing 230 kV Bethel-Round Butte Transmission line to 500 kV. The project will accelerate the development of transmission capacity, enabling new carbon-free generation in Central and Eastern Oregon to reach customer demand loads in Western Oregon. The added capacity and associated upgrades will also increase resiliency of the transmission system as well as resiliency of the CTWS Tribal communities by increasing
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resources available to the Tribes to support adaptation and response strategies. The U.S DOE and PGE are negotiating the final funding and scope for the line upgrade as part of a multi-year process.
U.S. DOE Smart Grid Chip—The U.S. DOE selected a PGE led consortium for a $50 million grant for the Smart Grid Chip project. The project will enable real-time information at each meter to improve the visibility of the electrical system to grid operators, providing detection of potential operational problems and shorten outage times, ultimately helping to anticipate and mitigate the impacts of extreme weather on grid resiliency. The DOE and PGE are negotiating the final funding and scope for the line upgrade as part of a multi-year process.

PGE is in the process of assessing the impacts of these federal grants on the Company’s results of operations. Although PGE continues to apply for additional grants, the Company cannot predict the ultimate timing and success of securing funding from federal programs.

Inflation Reduction Act of 2022—The Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 (IRA) was signed into law in August 2022 with a majority of the provisions effective for tax years beginning after December 31, 2022.

The United States Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service released extensive rules addressing credit transfer eligibility and application, including but not limited to, required registration, filing, and documentation for transferors and transferees to elect and claim a credit transfer. On December 12, 2023, PGE received approval from the OPUC to transfer 2023 production tax credits and record any difference in the full value and the discounted value in a property balancing account. Consistent with options available under the IRA, PGE transferred 2023 credits with the final transfer occurring in the first quarter of 2024. On April 16, 2024, PGE received approval from the OPUC to transfer 2024 and 2025 PTCs and record any difference in the full value and the discounted value in a property balancing account. PGE has entered into an agreement to transfer 2024 and 2025 PTCs and expects to generate and transfer approximately $55 million in PTCs in 2024.

Compared to previous resource planning processes, the Company believes the new tax incentives will provide additional investment opportunities for PGE and result in lower customer prices. Increased capital expenditures in such investment opportunities would likely result in additional financing needs through debt and equity instruments.

HB 3143—In June 2023, the Oregon Legislature passed HB 3143, which was signed by the Governor on August 1, 2023. HB 3143 allows the OPUC to authorize the State’s investor-owned utilities, including PGE, to issue bonds and securitize debt for expenses associated with declared emergency events. The bill enables PGE, after a public process and rigorous review and approval by the OPUC, to issue, at a minimum, investment grade bonds to pay for the costs of declared emergencies.

HB 2021—In 2021, the Oregon Legislature passed HB 2021, which, among other things, requires retail electricity providers to reduce GHG emissions associated with serving Oregon retail electricity consumers 80% by 2030, 90% by 2035, and 100% by 2040, compared to baseline emissions levels. For PGE, the baseline levels are the average annual emissions for the years 2010, 2011, and 2012 associated with the electricity sold to its retail electricity consumers as reported to the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ).

HB 2021 requires utilities to develop a CEP for meeting the targets, concurrent with each IRP, that results in an affordable, reliable, and clean electric system. In reviewing a CEP, the OPUC must ensure that utilities create a plan that is in the public interest, demonstrate continual progress toward meeting the targets, and take actions as soon as practicable that facilitate rapid reduction of GHG emissions.

Under the law, retail electricity providers utilize the existing, required, annual reporting of GHG emissions to the ODEQ. In the target years of 2030, 2035, and 2040, and every year thereafter in the target period, the OPUC will use the data reported to the ODEQ for that compliance year to determine whether the reduction targets are met.

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RPS standards and other laws—In 2016, Oregon Senate Bill (SB) 1547 increased the 2007 benchmarks for the percentage of electricity that must come from renewable sources by dates certain and required the elimination of coal as a fuel for generation of electricity used to serve Oregon utility customers no later than 2030.

PGE ceased coal fired operation at its Boardman generating facility (Boardman) in 2020 and decommissioning of the plant is substantially complete. The Company has a 20% ownership share in Colstrip Units 3 and 4 coal-fired generation plant (Colstrip) and, in response to SB 1547 has accelerated depreciation of Colstrip to December 31, 2025. In order to meet PGE’s regulatory and legislative requirements, the Company continues to evaluate the possibility of exiting ownership in Colstrip. See Note 8, Contingencies, in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 1.—“Financial Statements” for information regarding legal proceedings related to Colstrip.

Any reduction in generation from Colstrip has the potential to provide additional capacity availability on the Colstrip transmission facilities, which stretch from eastern Montana to near the western end of that state to serve markets in the Pacific Northwest and neighboring states. PGE has an approximate 15% ownership interest in, and capacity on, the Colstrip transmission facilities. See “Investing in a Clean Energy Future” in this Overview for information regarding development in eastern Montana.

Other provisions of SB 1547:
established RPS thresholds of 27% by 2025, 35% by 2030, 45% by 2035, and 50% by 2040;
limited the life of renewable energy credits (RECs) generated from facilities that become operational after 2022 to five years, but continue unlimited lifespan for all existing RECs and allow for the generation of additional unlimited RECs for a period of five years for projects online before December 31, 2022; and
provided opportunity to pursue recovery of energy storage costs related to renewable energy in the Company’s Renewable Adjustment Clause (RAC) filings.
PGE believes it is on track to meet the 2025 RPS threshold.

Regulatory Matters

PGE focuses on providing reliable, clean power to customers at affordable prices while providing a fair return to investors. To achieve this goal the Company must execute effectively within its regulatory framework and maintain prudent management of key financial, regulatory, and environmental matters that may affect customer prices and investor returns. The following discussion provides detail on such matters.

General Rate Case—On February 29, 2024, PGE filed with the OPUC a GRC based on a 2025 test year (2025 GRC) that seeks a $225 million increase in the annual revenue requirement related primarily to recovery of costs associated with non-emitting battery projects, an increase in base business costs for upgrades to PGE's transmission and distribution system, and investments in strengthening and safeguarding the grid to meet growing customer demand and bolster reliability. PGE continues to build a modern grid designed to withstand severe weather and allow energy to flow from more resources to improve reliability, resiliency, and capability to deliver safe, reliable, clean electricity to customers. The total increase in annual revenue requirement includes an increase in annual revenue requirement of $37 million as a result of higher net variable power costs expected in 2025, as reflected in the Annual Power Cost Update Tariff (AUT) filed, separately, with the OPUC February 29, 2024 (OPUC Docket UE 436). The NVPC projection will be updated periodically during 2024.

Other key items in the 2025 GRC filing include requests for a Renewable Automatic Adjustment Clause mechanism for standalone energy storage and an investment recovery mechanism.


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The proposed net increase in annual revenue requirement in the 2025 GRC was based upon a:
capital structure of 50% debt and 50% equity;
return on equity of 9.75%;
cost of capital of 7.189%; and
rate base of $7.5 billion.

Regulatory review of the 2025 GRC is expected to continue throughout 2024. The Company cannot predict the ultimate outcome of the remaining regulatory process. A final order on the 2025 GRC is targeted to be issued by the OPUC by the end of 2024, with new customer prices to take effect January 1, 2025.

The 2025 GRC filing (OPUC Docket UE 435) and the 2025 AUT filing, including copies of direct testimony and exhibits, are available on the OPUC website at www.oregon.gov/puc.

Declared states of emergencyIn 2021, the OPUC issued an order that approved a pre-authorized deferral of costs associated with declared states of emergency. Qualifying events would include federal or state declared emergencies with impacts on PGE’s service territory. Previously the Company had to file a request for deferred accounting when an event of that nature occurred, and had to seek OPUC approval of such deferred accounting applications to be effective. With this order, PGE would provide notice of an event that qualifies and would not need to seek OPUC approval to apply deferred accounting treatment for incremental costs related to the emergency. The OPUC maintains responsibility to review utility requests to amortize deferred amounts in customer prices, including a review of utility prudence in a future proceeding, among other requirements.

Beginning January 13, 2024, the Company’s service territory encountered a severe winter weather event that included snow, ice, and high winds over several days that caused catastrophic damage to physical assets and resulted in widespread customer power outages. Along with over a dozen mutual assistance crews, PGE repaired damage and restored power to over 500,000 customers throughout the storm and the days that followed.

As of March 31, 2024, PGE incurred $60 million in incremental costs to repair damage to PGE’s transmission and distribution systems and restore power to customers, with $48 million of that representing operating expenses associated with transmission and distribution. PGE expects to incur and defer additional costs subsequent to the storm related to addressing vegetation and other debris and hazards both in and outside of PGE’s property and right-of-way, however the Company does not expect these costs to be material. As a result of the historic winter storm, Oregon’s Governor declared a state of emergency on January 18, 2024, which allows PGE to seek recovery of incremental storm expenses through the previously filed emergency deferral. On February 9, 2024, PGE filed a Notice of Deferral with the OPUC, under Docket UM 2190, related to the emergency restoration costs for the January storm and as of March 31, 2024 has deferred $48 million of these costs as regulatory assets. For further information, see “January 2024 storm and damage” in the Regulatory Assets and Liabilities section of Note 3, Balance Sheet Components in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 1.—“Financial Statements.”

Power costsPursuant to the AUT process, PGE annually files an estimate of power costs for the following year. As approved by the OPUC, the 2024 AUT included a final increase in power costs for 2024, and a corresponding increase in annual revenue requirement, of $216 million from 2023 levels, which were reflected in customer prices effective January 1, 2024.

Portland Harbor Environmental Remediation Account (PHERA) mechanismThe EPA has listed PGE as one of over one hundred Potentially Responsible Parties (PRPs) related to the remediation of the Portland Harbor Superfund site. As of March 31, 2024, significant uncertainties still remained concerning the precise boundaries for clean-up, the assignment of responsibility for clean-up costs, the final selection of a proposed remedy by the EPA, and the method of allocation of costs amongst PRPs. It is probable that PGE will share in a portion of these costs. In
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a Record of Decision (ROD) issued in 2017, the EPA outlined its selected remediation plan for clean-up of the Portland Harbor site, which had an estimated total cost of $1.7 billion. Stakeholders have raised concerns that EPA’s cost estimates are understated, and PGE estimates undiscounted total remediation costs for Portland Harbor per the ROD could range from $1.9 billion to $3.5 billion. The Company does not currently have sufficient information to reasonably estimate the amount, or range, of its potential costs for investigation or remediation of Portland Harbor. However, the Company may obtain sufficient information, prior to the final determination of allocation percentages among PRPs, to develop a reasonable estimate, or range, of its potential liability that would require recording an estimate, or low end of the range. The Company’s liability related to the cost of remediating Portland Harbor could be material to PGE’s financial position. The impact of such costs to the Company’s results of operations is mitigated by the PHERA mechanism. As approved by the OPUC, the recovery mechanism allows the Company to defer and recover estimated liabilities and incurred legal and technical analysis expenditures related to the Portland Harbor Superfund Site through a combination of third-party proceeds, including, but not limited to, insurance recoveries, and customer prices, as necessary. The mechanism established annual prudency reviews of environmental expenditures and third-party proceeds, and annual expenditures in excess of $6 million, excluding contingent liabilities, are subject to an annual earnings test. PGE’s results of operations may be impacted to the extent such expenditures were to be deemed imprudent by the OPUC or disallowed per the prescribed earnings test. For further information regarding the PHERA mechanism, see “EPA Investigation of Portland Harbor” in Note 8, Contingencies in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 1.—“Financial Statements.”

DecouplingThe decoupling mechanism, previously authorized by the OPUC through 2022, was intended to provide for recovery of margin lost as a result of a reduction in electricity sales attributable to energy efficiency, customer-owned generation, and conservation efforts by residential and certain commercial customers. The mechanism provided for collection from (or refund to) customers if weather-adjusted use per customer was less (or more) than that projected in the Company’s most recent GRC.

In the 2022 GRC, parties reached an agreement that eliminated PGE’s decoupling mechanism upon the effective date of new customer prices that resulted in May 2022. Pursuant to the 2022 GRC Order, the OPUC adopted the agreement such that deferrals would not occur after 2022, although amortization of then previously recorded deferrals was to continue as scheduled until collected or refunded in future customer prices. For the year ended December 31, 2022, with OPUC approval, PGE is collecting $5 million in customer prices over a one-year period that began January 1, 2024.

In the 2024 GRC filing, the Company included a concept proposal that could lead to resuming decoupling, with certain modifications. As stipulated in the 2024 GRC settlement agreement, PGE made a tariff filing on January 26, 2024 that proposes weather-normalized decoupling, which would sunset after December 31, 2025, for residential and small non-residential customers. The proposal seeks a 3% annual limit on collections or refunds and a balancing account, which would carry forward to subsequent years for refund or recovery, to capture any amounts that exceed the limit. The Company subsequently agreed to extend the requested effective date from April 1, 2024 to May 1, 2024. However, PGE is now requesting to extend the effective date to July 1, 2024. An OPUC decision on the proposal is expected at an upcoming public meeting.

Renewable recovery frameworkAs previously authorized by the OPUC, the RAC is a primary method available to recover costs associated with renewable resources. The RAC allows PGE to recover prudently incurred costs of renewable resources through filings made each year, outside of a GRC. Under the RAC, during 2023, the Company submitted a filing for Clearwater, which went into service in January 2024. See “Clearwater RAC” in Note 3, Regulatory Assets and Liabilities, in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 1.—“Financial Statements,” for more information regarding the timing of the tariff, annual revenue requirement, and related deferral.

Operating Activities

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In addition to electricity provided by PGE’s own generation portfolio, to meet retail load requirements and balance energy supply with customer demand, the Company purchases and sells electricity in the wholesale market. To fuel its generation portfolio, the Company purchases natural gas in the United States and Canada and sells excess gas back into the wholesale market. PGE also performs portfolio management and wholesale market services for third parties in the region.

The Company participates in the California Independent System Operator's (CAISO) western Energy Imbalance Market (EIM), which allows, among other things, more renewable energy integration into the grid by better complementing the variable output of renewable resources. PGE recently announced plans to join the CAISO’s Extended Day-Ahead Market (EDAM) to build on the success of the western EIM and help provide the Company and its customers access to more affordable, reliable and clean energy. Utilities that participate in the EDAM, expected to begin operating in 2026, will bid their anticipated energy demand and generating resources into the market a day ahead of expected usage. The EDAM will then optimize generation resources and the energy needed for all market participants, allowing them to receive the least costly and cleanest energy to meet their energy needs. The EDAM takes advantage of existing technology and systems PGE has deployed and leverages the Company’s transmission system to connect regional resources across a common market, such as hydropower and wind facilities in the Pacific Northwest and solar facilities in California and the desert Southwest.

In its ongoing effort to benefit retail and wholesale customers, in 2023, PGE joined the Western Power Pool’s resource adequacy program known as the Western Resource Adequacy Program (WRAP), which could become a binding commitment in 2026 or 2027. The WRAP represents a regional framework to more effectively address resource adequacy, enhance reliability, integrate clean energy, and manage costs through resource diversification and capacity sharing across a wide geographic footprint and broad pool of participants across the West.

PGE generates revenues and cash flows primarily from the sale and distribution of electricity to its retail customers. The impact of seasonal weather conditions on demand for electricity can cause the Company’s revenues, cash flows, and income from operations to fluctuate from period to period. Historically, PGE has experienced its highest MWa deliveries and retail energy sales during the winter heating season and did record a new winter peak load in December 2022. Summer peak deliveries have continued to exceed those of the winter months for several years, generally resulting from air conditioning demand and the trend toward a warmer overall climate. In August 2023, demand reached a new all-time high, surpassing the previous mark, which was set in summer 2021. Retail customer price changes and customer usage patterns, which can be affected by the economy also have an effect on revenues. Wholesale power availability and price, hydro and wind generation, and fuel costs for thermal plants can also affect income from operations. PGE has taken measures to help ensure the availability of supply chain-constrained items that are needed to serve new and existing customers, such as advance ordering of critical materials, pre-securing manufacturing capacity with strategic partners, and evaluating availability with established and new suppliers. PGE has also taken measures to help mitigate cost increases through long-term agreements, supplier engagement, and expanding the supply base.


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Customers and Demand—The following tables present total energy deliveries and the average number of retail customers by customer type for the periods indicated:
Three Months Ended March 31, % Increase (Decrease) in Energy
Deliveries
% Increase (Decrease) in Weather Adjusted Energy
Deliveries
20242023
Energy deliveries (MWhs in thousands):
Retail:
Residential2,243 2,327 (4)%%
Commercial1,628 1,657 (2)(1)
Industrial1,186 1,071 11 11 
Subtotal5,057 5,055 — 
Direct access:
Commercial120 129 (7)(6)
Industrial396 436 (9)(9)
Subtotal516 565 (9)(9)
Total retail5,573 5,620 (1)%
Wholesale2,179 1,396 56 
Total7,752 7,016 10 %


Three Months Ended March 31,
20242023