Company Quick10K Filing
Quick10K
Rent A Center De
Closing Price ($) Shares Out (MM) Market Cap ($MM)
$20.50 54 $1,110
10-K 2018-12-31 Annual: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-09-30 Quarter: 2018-09-30
10-Q 2018-06-30 Quarter: 2018-06-30
10-Q 2018-03-31 Quarter: 2018-03-31
10-K 2017-12-31 Annual: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-09-30 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-Q 2017-06-30 Quarter: 2017-06-30
10-Q 2017-03-31 Quarter: 2017-03-31
10-K 2016-12-31 Annual: 2016-12-31
10-Q 2016-09-30 Quarter: 2016-09-30
10-Q 2016-06-30 Quarter: 2016-06-30
10-Q 2016-03-31 Quarter: 2016-03-31
10-K 2015-12-31 Annual: 2015-12-31
10-Q 2015-09-30 Quarter: 2015-09-30
10-Q 2015-06-30 Quarter: 2015-06-30
10-Q 2015-03-31 Quarter: 2015-03-31
10-K 2014-12-31 Annual: 2014-12-31
10-Q 2014-09-30 Quarter: 2014-09-30
10-Q 2014-06-30 Quarter: 2014-06-30
10-Q 2014-03-31 Quarter: 2014-03-31
10-K 2013-12-31 Annual: 2013-12-31
8-K 2019-04-16 Enter Agreement, Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2019-02-25 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-02-07 Officers
8-K 2018-12-19 Officers
8-K 2018-12-18 Leave Agreement, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-12-18 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-11-05 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-09-18 Shareholder Vote
8-K 2018-09-11 Other Events
8-K 2018-07-30 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-06-17 Enter Agreement, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-06-08 Code of Ethics
8-K 2018-06-05 Shareholder Vote
8-K 2018-05-25 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-04-30 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-03-28 Enter Agreement, Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2018-02-27 Enter Agreement, Leave Agreement, Shareholder Rights, Amend Bylaw, Exhibits
8-K 2018-02-20 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-02-05 Enter Agreement, Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2017-12-28 Officers, Other Events, Exhibits
SCL Stepan 2,050
FDP Fresh Del Monte Produce 1,280
KLXE KLX Energy Services Holdings 661
TIBR Tiberius Acquisition 217
EMX EMX Royalty 90
ZOM Zomedica Pharmaceuticals 36
OVAS Ovascience 0
REAP Renewable Energy & Power 0
ACBM Acro Biomedical 0
PRKR Parkervision 0
RCII 2018-12-31
Part I
Item 1. Business.
Item 1A. Risk Factors.
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.
Item 2. Properties.
Item 3. Legal Proceedings.
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.
Part II
Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.
Item 6. Selected Financial Data.
Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure.
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures.
Item 9B. Other Information.
Part III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance.(*)
Item 11. Executive Compensation.(*)
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters.(*)
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.(*)
Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services.(*)
Part IV
Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules.
EX-23.1 ex-231_q42018.htm
EX-31.1 ex-311_q42018.htm
EX-31.2 ex-312_q42018.htm
EX-32.1 ex-321_q42018.htm
EX-32.2 ex-322_q42018.htm

Rent A Center De Earnings 2018-12-31

RCII 10K Annual Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

10-K 1 rac2018-form10xk.htm 10-K Wdesk | Document

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
Form 10-K
(Mark One)
 
þ
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018
or
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
Commission File No. 001-38047
 
 
 
 
 
Rent-A-Center, Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
 
45-0491516
(State or other jurisdiction of
 
(I.R.S. Employer
incorporation or organization)
 
Identification No.)
5501 Headquarters Drive
Plano, Texas 75024
(Address, including zip code of registrant's
principal executive offices)
Registrant's telephone number, including area code: 972-801-1100
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of Each Class
 
Name of Exchange on Which Registered
Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share
 
The Nasdaq Global Select Market, Inc.
 
 
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
 
 
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  Yes ¨   No þ
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act.  Yes ¨   No þ
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes þ    No ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes þ    No ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  þ
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer þ     Accelerated filer ¨     Non-accelerated filer ¨
Smaller reporting company ¨ Emerging growth company  ¨ 
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes ¨   No þ
Aggregate market value of the 41,270,651 shares of Common Stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant at the closing sales price as reported on The Nasdaq Global Select Market, Inc. on June 30, 2018
$
607,503,983

Number of shares of Common Stock outstanding as of the close of business on February 19, 2019:
53,978,616

Documents incorporated by reference:
Portions of the definitive proxy statement relating to the 2019 Annual Meeting of Stockholders of Rent-A-Center, Inc. are incorporated by reference into Part III of this report.

.



TABLE OF CONTENTS 
 
 
Page
 
 
Item 1.
Business
Item 1A.
Risk Factors
Item 1B.
Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 2.
Properties
Item 3.
Legal Proceedings
Item 4.
Mine Safety Disclosures
 
 
 
 
 
Item 5.
Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6.
Selected Financial Data
Item 7.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 7A.
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk
Item 8.
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Item 9.
Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A.
Controls and Procedures
Item 9B.
Other Information
 
 
 
Item 10.
Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11.
Executive Compensation
Item 12.
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Item 13.
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
Item 14.
Principal Accountant Fees and Services
 
 
 
Item 15.
Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
 
 
 
SIGNATURES


i


CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
This Annual Report on Form 10-K includes “forward-looking” statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements can be identified by the fact that they do not relate strictly to historical or current facts. They often include words such as “believes,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “estimates,” “intends,” “plans,” “seeks” or words of similar meaning, or future or conditional verbs, such as “will,” “should,” “could,” “may,” “aims,” “intends,” or “projects.” A forward-looking statement is neither a prediction nor a guarantee of future events or circumstances, and those future events or circumstances may not occur. You should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. These forward-looking statements are based on currently available operating, financial and competitive information and are subject to various risks and uncertainties. Our actual future results and trends may differ materially depending on a variety of factors, including, but not limited to, the risks and uncertainties discussed under “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” Given these risks and uncertainties, you should not rely on forward-looking statements as a prediction of actual results. Any or all of the forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and any other public statement made by us, including by our management, may turn out to be incorrect. We are including this cautionary note to make applicable and take advantage of the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 for forward-looking statements. We expressly disclaim any obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events, changes in assumptions or otherwise. Factors that could cause or contribute to these differences include, but are not limited to:
the general strength of the economy and other economic conditions affecting consumer preferences and spending;
factors affecting the disposable income available to our current and potential customers;
changes in the unemployment rate;
the outcome of the litigation initiated by Vintage Capital Management, LLC (“Vintage Capital”) and B. Riley Financial, Inc. (“B. Riley”) challenging the validity of the termination of the Agreement and Plan of Merger (the “Merger Agreement”) and our right, or the ability, to collect on the $126.5 million reverse breakup fee;
risks relating to operations of the business and our financial results arising out of the termination of the Merger Agreement;
the effect of the termination of the Merger Agreement on our relationships with third parties, including our employees, franchisees, customers, suppliers, business partners and vendors, which may make it more difficult to maintain business and operations relationships, and negatively impact the operating results of our business segments and our business generally;
the risk of material price volatility with respect to trading in our common stock during litigation related to the termination of the Merger Agreement;
our ability to continue to effectively operate and execute our strategic initiatives as a stand-alone enterprise following the termination of the Merger Agreement;
capital market conditions, including availability of funding sources for us;
changes in our credit ratings;
difficulties encountered in improving the financial and operational performance of our business segments, including our ability to execute our franchise strategy;
our ability to recapitalize our debt, including our revolving credit facility expiring December 31, 2019, and senior notes maturing in November 2020 and May 2021 on favorable terms, if at all;
risks associated with pricing changes and strategies being deployed in our businesses;
our ability to continue to realize benefits from our initiatives regarding cost-savings and other EBITDA enhancements, efficiencies and working capital improvements;
our ability to continue to effectively operate and execute our strategic initiatives;
failure to manage our store labor and other store expenses;
disruptions caused by the operation of our store information management system;
our transition to more-readily scalable "cloud-based" solutions;
our ability to develop and successfully implement digital or E-commerce capabilities, including mobile applications;
disruptions in our supply chain;
limitations of, or disruptions in, our distribution network, and the impact, effects and results of the changes we have made and are making to our distribution methods;
rapid inflation or deflation in the prices of our products;

1




our ability to execute and the effectiveness of a store consolidation, including our ability to retain the revenue from customer accounts merged into another store location as a result of a store consolidation;
our available cash flow;
our ability to identify and successfully market products and services that appeal to our customer demographic;
consumer preferences and perceptions of our brand;
our ability to retain the revenue associated with acquired customer accounts and enhance the performance of acquired stores;
our ability to enter into new and collect on our rental or lease purchase agreements;
the passage of legislation adversely affecting the Rent-to-Own industry;
our compliance with applicable statutes or regulations governing our transactions;
changes in interest rates;
changes in tariff policies;
adverse changes in the economic conditions of the industries, countries or markets that we serve;
information technology and data security costs;
the impact of any breaches in data security or other disturbances to our information technology and other networks and our ability to protect the integrity and security of individually identifiable data of our customers and employees;
changes in estimates relating to self-insurance liabilities and income tax and litigation reserves;
changes in our effective tax rate;
fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates;
our ability to maintain an effective system of internal controls;
the resolution of our litigation; and
the other risks detailed from time to time in our reports furnished or filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

2




PART I
Item 1. Business.
History of Rent-A-Center
Unless the context indicates otherwise, references to “we,” “us” and “our” refer to the consolidated business operations of Rent-A-Center, Inc., the parent, and any or all of its direct and indirect subsidiaries. For any references in this document to Note A through Note T, refer to the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8.
We are one of the largest rent-to-own operators in North America, focused on improving the quality of life for our customers by providing them the opportunity to obtain ownership of high-quality durable products, such as consumer electronics, appliances, computers (including tablets), smartphones, and furniture (including accessories), under flexible rental purchase agreements with no long-term obligation. We were incorporated in the State of Delaware in 1986, and our common stock is traded on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbol "RCII."
Our principal executive offices are located at 5501 Headquarters Drive, Plano, Texas 75024. Our telephone number is (972) 801-1100 and our company website is www.rentacenter.com. We do not intend for information contained on our website to be part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. We make available free of charge on or through our website our Annual Report on Form 10-K, our quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, our current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). Additionally, we provide electronic or paper copies of our filings free of charge upon request.
The Rental Purchase Transaction
The rental purchase transaction is a flexible alternative for consumers to obtain use and enjoyment of brand name merchandise with no long-term obligation. Key features of the rental purchase transaction include:
Brand name merchandise. We offer well-known brands such as LG, Samsung, and Sony home electronics; Frigidaire, Whirlpool, Amana, and Maytag appliances; HP, Dell, Acer, Apple, Asus, Samsung and Toshiba computers and/or tablets; Samsung and Apple smartphones; and Ashley home furnishings.
Convenient payment options. Our customers make payments on a weekly, semi-monthly or monthly basis in our stores, kiosks, online or by telephone. We accept cash, credit or debit cards. Rental payments are generally made in advance and, together with applicable fees, constitute our primary revenue source. Approximately 78% and 92% of our rental purchase agreements are on a weekly term in our Core U.S. rent-to-own stores and our Mexico segment, respectively. Generally, payments are made on a monthly basis in our Acceptance Now segment.
No negative consequences. A customer may terminate a rental purchase agreement at any time without penalty.
No credit needed. Generally, we do not conduct a formal credit investigation of our customers. We verify a customer’s residence and sources of income. References provided by the customer are also contacted to verify certain information contained in the rental purchase order form.
Delivery & set-up included. We generally offer same-day or next-day delivery and installation of our merchandise at no additional cost to the customer in our rent-to-own stores. Our Acceptance Now locations rely on our third-party retail partners to deliver merchandise rented by the customer. Such third-party retail partners typically charge us a fee for delivery, which we pass on to the customer.
Product maintenance & replacement. We provide any required service or repair without additional charge, except for damage in excess of normal wear and tear. The cost to repair the merchandise may be reimbursed by the vendor if the item is still under factory warranty. If the product cannot be repaired at the customer’s residence, we provide a temporary replacement while the product is being repaired. If the product cannot be repaired, we will replace it with a product of comparable quality, age and condition.
Lifetime reinstatement. If a customer is temporarily unable to make payments on a piece of rental merchandise and must return the merchandise, that customer generally may later re-rent the same piece of merchandise (or if unavailable, a substitute of comparable quality, age and condition) on the terms that existed at the time the merchandise was returned, and pick up payments where they left off without losing what they previously paid.

3




Flexible options to obtain ownership. Ownership of the merchandise generally transfers to the customer if the customer has continuously renewed the rental purchase agreement for a period of seven to 30 months, depending upon the product type, or exercises a specified early purchase option.
Our Strategy
Our strategy focuses on multiple work streams including optimizing our cost structure, enhancing our value proposition, and executing our refranchising program.
Optimizing our cost structure by continuing to capitalize on recent initiatives targeting overhead, supply chain, and other store expenses; in addition to identifying future opportunities to efficiently manage cost within the business.
Enhance our value proposition through targeted pricing strategies across product categories aimed at improving traffic trends.
Executing our refranchising program allowing us to optimize our physical footprint and improve our capital position.
Our Operating Segments
We report four operating segments: Core U.S., Acceptance Now, Mexico, and Franchising. Additional information regarding our operating segments is presented in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” contained in Item 7 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and financial information regarding these segments and revenues by geographic area are provided in Note R to the consolidated financial statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Substantially all of our revenues for the past three years originated in the United States.
Core U.S.
Our Core U.S. segment is our largest operating segment, comprising approximately 70% of our consolidated net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2018. Approximately 80% of our business in this segment is from repeat customers.
At December 31, 2018, we operated 2,158 company-owned stores in the United States and Puerto Rico, including 44 retail installment sales stores under the names “Get It Now” and “Home Choice.” We routinely evaluate the markets in which we operate and will close, sell or merge underperforming stores.
Acceptance Now
Through our Acceptance Now segment, we generally provide an on-site rent-to-own option at a third-party retailer’s location. In the event a retail purchase credit application is declined, the customer can be introduced to an in-store Acceptance Now representative who explains an alternative transaction for acquiring the use and ownership of the merchandise. Because we neither require nor perform a formal credit investigation for the approval of the rental purchase transaction, applicants who meet certain basic criteria are generally approved. We believe our Acceptance Now program is beneficial for both the retailer and the consumer. The retailer captures more sales because we buy the merchandise directly from them and future rental payments are generally made at the retailer’s location. We believe consumers also benefit from our Acceptance Now program because they are able to obtain the products they want and need without the necessity of credit. The gross margins in this segment are lower than the gross margins in our Core U.S. segment because we pay retail for the product by the retailer's customer. Through certain retail partners, we offer our customers the option to obtain ownership of the product at or slightly above the full retail price if they pay within 90 days. In some cases, the retailer provides us a rebate on the cost of the merchandise if the customer exercises this 90-day option.
Generally, our Acceptance Now kiosk locations consist of an area with a computer, desk and chairs. We occupy the space without charge by agreement with each retailer. Accordingly, capital expenditures with respect to a new Acceptance Now location are minimal, and any exit costs associated with the closure of an Acceptance Now location would also be immaterial on an individual basis. Our operating model is highly agile and dynamic because we can open and close kiosk locations quickly and efficiently.
We rely on our third-party retail partners to deliver merchandise rented by the customer. Such third-party retail partners typically charge us a fee for delivery, which we pass on to the customer. In the event the customer returns rented merchandise, we pick it up at no additional charge. Merchandise returned from an Acceptance Now kiosk location is subsequently offered for rent at one of our Core U.S. rent-to-own stores.
As of December 31, 2018, we operated 1,106 staffed kiosk locations inside furniture and electronics retailers located in 41 states and Puerto Rico, and 96 virtual (direct) locations.

4




Mexico
Our Mexico segment currently consists of our company-owned rent-to-own stores in Mexico. At December 31, 2018, we operated 122 stores in this segment.
We are subject to the risks of doing business internationally as described under “Risk Factors.”
Franchising
The stores in our Franchising segment use Rent-A-Center's, ColorTyme's or RimTyme’s trade names, service marks, trademarks and logos, and operate under distinctive operating procedures and standards. Franchising's primary source of revenue is the sale of rental merchandise to its franchisees who, in turn, offer the merchandise to the general public for rent or purchase under a rent-to-own transaction.
At December 31, 2018, this segment franchised 281 stores in 32 states operating under the Rent-A-Center (213 stores), ColorTyme (32 stores) and RimTyme (36 stores) names. These rent-to-own stores primarily offer high quality durable products such as consumer electronics, appliances, computers, furniture and accessories, wheels and tires.
As franchisor, Franchising receives royalties of 2.0% to 6.0% of the franchisees’ monthly gross revenue and, generally, an initial fee up to $35,000 per new location.
The following table summarizes our locations allocated among these operating segments as of December 31:
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016
Core U.S.
2,158

 
2,381

 
2,463

Acceptance Now Staffed
1,106

 
1,106

 
1,431

Acceptance Now Direct
96

 
125

 
478

Mexico
122

 
131

 
130

Franchising
281

 
225

 
229

Total locations
3,763

 
3,968

 
4,731

The following discussion applies generally to all of our operating segments, unless otherwise noted.
Rent-A-Center Operations
Store Expenses
Our expenses primarily relate to merchandise costs and the operations of our stores, including salaries and benefits for our employees, occupancy expense for our leased real estate, advertising expenses, lost, damaged, or stolen merchandise, fixed asset depreciation, and other expenses.
Product Selection
Our Core U.S., Mexico, and franchise stores generally offer merchandise from five basic product categories: consumer electronics, appliances, computers (including tablets), smartphones, and furniture (including accessories). Although we seek to maintain sufficient inventory in our stores to offer customers a wide variety of models, styles and brands, we generally limit merchandise to prescribed levels to maintain strict inventory controls. We seek to provide a wide variety of high quality merchandise to our customers, and we emphasize products from name-brand manufacturers. Customers may request either new merchandise or previously rented merchandise. Previously rented merchandise is generally offered at a similar weekly, semi-monthly, or monthly rental rate as is offered for new merchandise, but with an opportunity to obtain ownership of the merchandise after fewer rental payments.
Consumer electronic products offered by our stores include high definition televisions, home theater systems, video game consoles and stereos. Appliances include refrigerators, freezers, washing machines, dryers, and ranges. We offer desktop, laptop, tablet computers and smartphones. Our furniture products include dining room, living room and bedroom furniture featuring a number of styles, materials and colors. Accessories include lamps and tables and are typically rented as part of a package of items, such as a complete room of furniture. Showroom displays enable customers to visualize how the product will look in their homes and provide a showcase for accessories.

5




The merchandise assortment may vary in our non-U.S. stores according to market characteristics and consumer demand unique to the particular country in which we are operating. For example, in Mexico, the appliances we offer are sourced locally, providing our customers in Mexico the look and feel to which they are accustomed in that product category.
Acceptance Now locations offer the merchandise available for sale at the applicable third-party retailer, primarily furniture and accessories, consumer electronics and appliances.
For the year ended December 31, 2018, furniture and accessories accounted for approximately 43% of our consolidated rentals and fees revenue, consumer electronic products for 18%, appliances for 15%, computers for 6%, smartphones for 3% and other products and services for 15%.
Product Turnover
On average, in the Core U.S. segment, a rental term of 14 months or exercising an early purchase option is generally required to obtain ownership of new merchandise. Product turnover is the number of times a product is rented to a different customer. On average, a product is rented (turned over) to three customers before a customer acquires ownership. Merchandise returned in the Acceptance Now segment is moved to a Core U.S. store where it is offered for rent. Ownership is attained in approximately 35% of first-time rental purchase agreements in the Core U.S. segment. The average total life for each product in our Core U.S. segment is approximately 17 months, which includes the initial rental period, all re-rental periods and idle time in our system. To cover the higher operating expenses generated by product turnover and the key features of rental purchase transactions, rental purchase agreements require higher aggregate payments than are generally charged under other types of purchase plans, such as installment purchase or credit plans.
Collections
Store managers use our management information system to track collections on a daily basis. If a customer fails to make a rental payment when due, store personnel will attempt to contact the customer to obtain payment and reinstate the agreement, or will terminate the account and arrange to regain possession of the merchandise. We attempt to recover the rental items as soon as possible following termination or default of a rental purchase agreement, generally by the seventh day. Collection efforts are enhanced by the personal and job-related references required of customers, the personal nature of the relationships between our employees and customers, and the availability of lifetime reinstatement. Currently, we track past due amounts using a guideline of seven days in our Core U.S. segment and 30 days in the Acceptance Now segment. These metrics align with the majority of the rental purchase agreements in each segment, since payments are generally made weekly in the Core U.S. segment and monthly in the Acceptance Now segment.
If a customer does not return the merchandise or make payment, the remaining book value of the rental merchandise associated with delinquent accounts is generally charged off on or before the 90th day following the time the account became past due in the Core U.S. and Mexico segments, and on or before the 150th day in the Acceptance Now segment.
Purchasing
In our Core U.S. and Mexico segments, we purchase our rental merchandise from a variety of suppliers. In 2018, approximately 21% of our merchandise purchases were attributable to Ashley Furniture Industries. No other brand accounted for more than 10% of merchandise purchased during these periods. We do not generally enter into written contracts with our suppliers that obligate us to meet certain minimum purchasing levels. Although we expect to continue relationships with our existing suppliers, we believe there are numerous sources of products available, and we do not believe the success of our operations is dependent on any one or more of our present suppliers.
In our Acceptance Now segment, we purchase the merchandise selected by the customer from the applicable third-party retailer at the time such customer enters into a rental purchase agreement with us.
With respect to our Franchising segment, the franchise agreement requires the franchised stores to exclusively offer for rent or sale only those brands, types and models of products that Franchising has approved. The franchised stores are required to maintain an adequate mix of inventory that consists of approved products for rent as dictated by Franchising policy manuals. Franchising negotiates purchase arrangements with various suppliers it has approved. Franchisees can purchase product through us or directly from those suppliers.

6




Management
Our executive management team has extensive rent-to-own or similar retail experience and has demonstrated the ability to grow and manage our business through their operational leadership and strategic vision. In addition, our regional and district managers generally have long tenures with us, and we have a history of promoting management personnel from within. We believe this extensive industry and company experience will allow us to effectively execute our strategies.
Marketing
We promote our products and services through television and radio commercials, print advertisements, store telemarketing, digital display advertisements, direct email campaigns, social networks, paid and organic search, website and store signage. Our advertisements emphasize such features as product and name-brand selection, the opportunity to pay as you go without credit, long-term contracts or obligations, delivery and set-up at no additional cost, product repair and loaner services at no extra cost, lifetime reinstatement and multiple options to acquire ownership, including 180-day option pricing, an early purchase option or through a fixed number of payments. In addition, we promote the “RAC Worry-Free Guarantee®” to further highlight these aspects of the rental purchase transaction. We believe that by leveraging our advertising efforts to highlight the benefits of the rental purchase transaction, we will continue to educate our customers and potential customers about the rent-to-own alternative to credit as well as solidify our reputation as a leading provider of high-quality, branded merchandise and services.
Franchising has established national advertising funds for the franchised stores, whereby Franchising has the right to collect up to 3% of the monthly gross revenue from each franchisee as contributions to the fund. Franchising directs the advertising programs of the fund, generally consisting of television and radio commercials and print advertisements. Franchising also has the right to require franchisees to expend up to 3% of their monthly gross revenue on local advertising.
Industry & Competition
According to a report published by the Association of Progressive Rental Organizations in 2016, the $8.5 billion rent-to-own industry in the United States, Mexico and Canada consists of approximately 9,200 stores, serves approximately 4.8 million customers and approximately 83% of rent-to-own customers have household incomes between $15,000 and $50,000 per year. The rent-to-own industry provides customers the opportunity to obtain merchandise they might otherwise be unable to obtain due to insufficient cash resources or a lack of access to credit. We believe the number of consumers lacking access to credit is increasing. According to data released by the Fair Isaac Corporation on September 24, 2018, consumers in the “subprime” category (those with credit scores below 650) made up approximately 29% of the United States population.
The rent-to-own industry is experiencing rapid change with the emergence of virtual and kiosk-based operations, such as our Acceptance Now business. These new industry participants are disrupting traditional rent-to-own stores by attracting customers and making the rent-to-own transaction more acceptable to potential customers. In addition, banks and consumer finance companies are developing products and services designed to compete for the traditional rent-to-own customer.
These factors are increasingly contributing to an already highly competitive environment. Our stores and kiosks compete with other national, regional and local rent-to-own businesses, including on-line only competitors, as well as with rental stores that do not offer their customers a purchase option. With respect to customers desiring to purchase merchandise for cash or on credit, we also compete with retail stores, online competitors, and non-traditional lenders. Competition is based primarily on convenience, store location, product selection and availability, customer service, rental rates and terms.
Seasonality
Our revenue mix is moderately seasonal, with the first quarter of each fiscal year generally providing higher merchandise sales than any other quarter during a fiscal year. Generally, our customers will more frequently exercise the early purchase option on their existing rental purchase agreements or purchase pre-leased merchandise off the showroom floor during the first quarter of each fiscal year, primarily due to the receipt of federal income tax refunds.
Trademarks
We own various trademarks and service marks, including Rent-A-Center® and RAC Worry-Free Guarantee® that are used in connection with our operations and have been registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The duration of our trademarks is unlimited, subject to periodic renewal and continued use. In addition, we have obtained trademark registrations in Mexico, Canada and certain other foreign jurisdictions. We believe we hold the necessary rights for protection of the trademarks and service marks essential to our business. The products held for rent in our stores also bear trademarks and service marks held by their respective manufacturers.

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Franchising licenses the use of the Rent-A-Center and ColorTyme trademarks and service marks to its franchisees under the franchise agreement. Franchising owns various trademarks and service marks, including ColorTyme® and RimTyme®, that are used in connection with its operations and have been registered with the United States Patent and Trademark office. The duration of these marks is unlimited, subject to periodic renewal and continued use.
Employees
As of February 19, 2019, we had approximately 14,000 employees.
Government Regulation
Core U.S. & Acceptance Now
State Regulation.    Currently, 46 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico have rental purchase statutes that recognize and regulate rental purchase transactions as separate and distinct from credit sales. We believe this existing legislation is generally favorable to us, as it defines and clarifies the various disclosures, procedures and transaction structures related to the rent-to-own business with which we must comply. With some variations in individual states, most related state legislation requires the lessor to make prescribed disclosures to customers about the rental purchase agreement and transaction, and provides time periods during which customers may reinstate agreements despite having failed to make a timely payment. Some state rental purchase laws prescribe grace periods for non-payment, prohibit or limit certain types of collection or other practices, and limit certain fees that may be charged. Eleven states limit the total rental payments that can be charged to amounts ranging from 2.0 times to 2.4 times the disclosed cash price or the retail value of the rental product. Six states limit the cash price of merchandise to amounts ranging from 1.56 to 2.5 times our cost for each item.
Although Minnesota has a rental purchase statute, the rental purchase transaction is also treated as a credit sale subject to consumer lending restrictions pursuant to judicial decision. Therefore, we offer our customers in Minnesota an opportunity to purchase our merchandise through an installment sale transaction in our Home Choice stores. We operate 17 Home Choice stores in Minnesota.
North Carolina has no rental purchase legislation. However, the retail installment sales statute in North Carolina expressly provides that lease transactions which provide for more than a nominal purchase price at the end of the agreed rental period are not credit sales under the statute. We operate 96 rent-to-own stores, and 44 and 4 Acceptance Now Staffed and Acceptance Now Direct locations, respectively, in North Carolina.
Courts in Wisconsin and New Jersey, which do not have rental purchase statutes, have rendered decisions which classify rental purchase transactions as credit sales subject to consumer lending restrictions. Accordingly, in Wisconsin, we offer our customers an opportunity to purchase our merchandise through an installment sale transaction in our Get It Now stores. In New Jersey, we have modified our typical rental purchase agreements to provide disclosures, grace periods, and pricing that we believe comply with the retail installment sales act. We operate 27 Get It Now stores in Wisconsin and 43 Rent-A-Center stores in New Jersey.
There can be no assurance as to whether new or revised rental purchase laws will be enacted or whether, if enacted, the laws would not have a material and adverse effect on us.
Federal Regulation.    To date, no comprehensive federal legislation has been enacted regulating or otherwise impacting the rental purchase transaction. The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (“Dodd-Frank Act”) does not regulate leases with terms of 90 days or less. Because the rent-to-own transaction is for a term of week to week, or at most, month to month, and established federal law deems the term of a lease to be its minimum term regardless of extensions or renewals, if any, we believe the rent-to-own transaction is not covered by the Dodd-Frank Act.
From time to time, we have supported legislation introduced in Congress that would regulate the rental purchase transaction. While both beneficial and adverse legislation may be introduced in Congress in the future, any adverse federal legislation, if enacted, could have a material and adverse effect on us.
Mexico
No comprehensive legislation regulating the rent-to-own transaction has been enacted in Mexico. We use substantially the same rental purchase transaction in Mexico as in the U.S. stores, but with such additional provisions as we believe may be necessary to comply with Mexico’s specific laws and customs.

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Item 1A. Risk Factors.
You should carefully consider the risks described below before making an investment decision. We believe these are all the material risks currently facing our business. Our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially adversely affected by these risks. The trading price of our common stock could decline due to any of these risks, and you may lose all or part of your investment. You should also refer to the other information included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including our consolidated financial statements and related notes.
Our success depends on the effective implementation and continued execution of our strategies.
We are focused on our mission to provide cash- and credit-constrained consumers with affordable and flexible access to durable goods that promote a higher quality of living. In 2018, we executed multiple initiatives targeting cost savings opportunities, a more competitive value proposition within our Core U.S. and Acceptance Now operating segments, and refranchising select brick and mortar locations, to improve profitability and enhance long-term value for our stockholders.
There is no assurance that we will be able to continue to implement and execute our strategic initiatives in accordance with our expectations. Our inability to lower costs or failure to achieve targeted results associated with our initiatives could adversely affect our results of operations, or negatively impact our ability to successfully execute future strategies, which may result in an adverse impact on our business and financial results.
The successful execution of our franchise strategy is important to our future growth and profitability.
We intend to pursue opportunities for growth through new and existing franchise partners, acquisitions and divestitures. These strategic transactions involve various inherent risks, including, without limitation:
inaccurate assessment of the value, future growth potential, strengths, weaknesses, contingent and other liabilities and potential profitability of such strategic transactions;
our ability to preserve, enhance and leverage the value of our brand;
diversion of management’s attention and focus away from existing operations towards execution of strategic transactions;
inability to achieve projected economic and operating benefits from our strategic transactions;
challenges in successfully completing franchise transactions and integrating new franchisees into our franchise system; and
unanticipated changes in business and economic conditions affecting our strategic transactions.
We are highly dependent on the financial performance of our Core U.S. operating segment.
Our financial performance is highly dependent on our Core U.S. segment, which comprised approximately 70% of our consolidated net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2018. Any significant decrease in the financial performance of the Core U.S. segment may also have a material adverse impact on our ability to implement our growth strategies.
The uncertainty regarding the Company’s future arising out of a series of executive departures and the resulting management transitions, and the volatility in our historical financial results may adversely impact our ability to attract and retain key employees.
Executive leadership transitions can be inherently difficult to manage and may cause disruption to our business. As a result of the changes in our executive management team over the past several years, our existing management team has taken on substantially more responsibility, which has resulted in greater workload demands and could divert attention away from other key areas of our business. In addition, management transition inherently causes some loss of institutional knowledge, may be disruptive to our daily operations or affect public or market perception, any of which could negatively impact our ability to operate effectively or execute our strategies and result in a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
Our future success depends in large part upon our ability to attract and retain key management executives and other key employees. In order to attract and retain executives and other key employees in a competitive marketplace, we must provide a competitive compensation package, including cash and equity compensation. Any prolonged inability to provide salary increases or cash incentive compensation opportunities, or if the anticipated value of such equity awards does not materialize or our equity compensation otherwise ceases to be viewed as a valuable benefit, our ability to attract, retain and motivate executives and key employees could be weakened. In addition, the uncertainty and operational disruptions caused by the management changes and related transitions could result in additional key employees deciding to leave the Company. If we are unable to retain, attract and motivate talented employees with the appropriate skill sets, we may not achieve our objectives and our results of operations could be adversely impacted.

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We may not be able to recapitalize our debt, including our senior credit facility expiring on December 31, 2019, and senior notes maturing in November 2020 and May 2021 on favorable terms, if at all. Our inability to recapitalize our debt would materially and adversely affect our liquidity and our ongoing results of operations in the future.
Our senior credit facility matures in December 2019, and our senior notes mature in November 2020 and May 2021. We intend to recapitalize our debt structure in 2019. Our ability to effect a recapitalization will depend in part on our operating and financial performance, which, in turn, is subject to prevailing economic conditions and to financial, business, legislative, regulatory and other factors beyond our control. In addition, prevailing interest rates or other factors at the time of refinancing could increase our interest expense. A recapitalization of our debt could also require us to comply with more onerous covenants and further restrict our business operations. Failure to refinance or recapitalize our debt, or satisfy the conditions and requirements of that debt, would likely result in an event of default and potentially the loss of some or all of the assets securing our obligations under the senior credit facility. In addition, our inability to refinance or recapitalize our debt or to obtain alternative financing from other sources, or our inability to do so upon attractive terms could materially and adversely affect our business, prospects, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows, and make us more vulnerable to adverse industry and general economic conditions.
A future lowering or withdrawal of the ratings assigned to our debt securities by rating agencies may increase our future borrowing costs and reduce our access to capital.
Our indebtedness currently has a non-investment grade rating, and any rating assigned could be lowered or withdrawn entirely by a rating agency if, in that rating agency’s judgment, future circumstances relating to the basis of the rating, such as adverse changes in our business, warrant. Our indebtedness was upgraded by Standard & Poor’s in January 2019 and Moody's improved our outlook. Any downgrade by any ratings agency may increase the interest rate on our future indebtedness, limit our access to vendor financing on favorable terms or otherwise result in higher borrowing costs, and likely would make it more difficult or more expensive for us to obtain additional debt financing or recapitalize our existing debt structure.
Our arrangements with our suppliers and vendors may be impacted by our financial results or financial position.
Substantially all of our merchandise suppliers and vendors sell to us on open account purchase terms. There is a risk that our key suppliers and vendors could respond to any actual or apparent decrease in, or any concern with, our financial results or liquidity by requiring or conditioning their sale of merchandise to us on more stringent or more costly payment terms, such as by requiring standby letters of credit, earlier or advance payment of invoices, payment upon delivery or other assurances or credit support or by choosing not to sell merchandise to us on a timely basis or at all. Our arrangements with our suppliers and vendors may also be impacted by media reports regarding our financial position or other factors relating to our business. Our need for additional liquidity could significantly increase and our supply of inventory could be materially disrupted if a significant portion of our key suppliers and vendors took one or more of the actions described above, which could have a material adverse effect on our sales, customer satisfaction, cash flows, liquidity and financial position.
Failure to effectively manage our costs could have a material adverse effect on our profitability.
Certain elements of our cost structure are largely fixed in nature. Consumer spending remains uncertain, which makes it more challenging for us to maintain or increase our operating income in the Core U.S. segment. The competitive environment in our industry and increasing price transparency means that the focus on achieving efficient operations is greater than ever. As a result, we must continuously focus on managing our cost structure. Failure to manage our overall cost of operations, labor and benefit rates, advertising and marketing expenses, operating leases, charge-offs due to customer stolen merchandise, other store expenses or indirect spending could materially adversely affect our profitability.
Our Acceptance Now segment depends on the success of our third-party retail partners and our continued relationship with them.
Our Acceptance Now segment revenues depend in part on the ability of unaffiliated third-party retailers to attract customers. The failure of our third-party retail partners to maintain quality and consistency in their operations and their ability to continue to provide products and services, or the loss of the relationship with any of these third-party retailers and an inability to replace them, could cause our Acceptance Now segment to lose customers, substantially decreasing the revenues and earnings of our Acceptance Now segment. This could adversely affect our financial results. In 2018, approximately 67% of the total revenue of the Acceptance Now segment originated at our Acceptance Now kiosks located in stores operated by four retail partners. We may be unable to continue growing the Acceptance Now segment if we are unable to find additional third-party retailers willing to partner with us or if we are unable to enter into agreements with third-party retailers acceptable to us.
The success of our business is dependent on factors affecting consumer spending that are not under our control.
Consumer spending is affected by general economic conditions and other factors including levels of employment, disposable consumer income, prevailing interest rates, consumer debt and availability of credit, costs of fuel, inflation, recession and fears of recession, war and fears of war, pandemics, inclement weather, tariff policies, tax rates and rate increases, timing of receipt of tax

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refunds, consumer confidence in future economic conditions and political conditions, and consumer perceptions of personal well-being and security. Unfavorable changes in factors affecting discretionary spending could reduce demand for our products and services resulting in lower revenue and negatively impacting the business and its financial results.
If we are unable to compete effectively with the growing e-commerce sector, our business and results of operations may be materially adversely affected.
With the continued expansion of Internet use, as well as mobile computing devices and smartphones, competition from the e-commerce sector continues to grow. We have launched virtual capabilities within our Acceptance Now and Core U.S. segments. There can be no assurance we will be able to grow our e-commerce business in a profitable manner. Certain of our competitors, and a number of e-commerce retailers, have established e-commerce operations against which we compete for customers. It is possible that the increasing competition from the e-commerce sector may reduce our market share, gross and operating margins, and may materially adversely affect our business and results of operations in other ways.
Disruptions in our supply chain and other factors affecting the distribution of our merchandise could adversely impact our business.
Any disruption in our supply chain could result in our inability to meet our customers’ expectations, higher costs, an inability to stock our stores, or longer lead time associated with distributing merchandise. Any such disruption within our supply chain network could also result in decreased net sales, increased costs and reduced profits.
Our senior secured asset-based revolving credit facility limits our borrowing capacity to the value of certain of our assets. In addition, our senior secured asset-based revolving credit facility is secured by substantially all of our assets, and lenders may exercise remedies against the collateral in the event of our default.
We are party to a $200 million senior secured asset-based revolving credit facility. Our borrowing capacity under our revolving credit facility varies according to our eligible rental contracts, eligible installment sales accounts, and inventory net of certain reserves. In the event of any material decrease in the amount of or appraised value of these assets, our borrowing capacity would similarly decrease, which could adversely impact our business and liquidity. Our revolving credit facility contains customary affirmative and negative covenants and certain restrictions on operations become applicable if our available credit falls below certain thresholds. These covenants could impose significant operating and financial limitations and restrictions on us, including restrictions on our ability to enter into particular transactions and to engage in other actions that we may believe are advisable or necessary for our business. Our obligations under the revolving credit facility are secured by liens with respect to inventory, accounts receivable, deposit accounts and certain related collateral. In the event of a default that is not cured or waived within any applicable cure periods, the lenders’ commitment to extend further credit under our revolving credit facility could be terminated, our outstanding obligations could become immediately due and payable, outstanding letters of credit may be required to be cash collateralized and remedies may be exercised against the collateral, which generally consists of substantially all of our tangible and intangible assets, including intellectual property and the capital stock of our U.S. subsidiaries. If we are unable to borrow under our revolving credit facility, we may not have the necessary cash resources for our operations and, if any event of default occurs, there is no assurance that we would have the cash resources available to repay such accelerated obligations, refinance such indebtedness on commercially reasonable terms, or at all, or cash collateralize our letters of credit, which would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and liquidity.
Our current insurance program may expose us to unexpected costs and negatively affect our financial performance.
Our insurance coverage is subject to deductibles, self-insured retentions, limits of liability and similar provisions that we believe are prudent based on our operations. Because we self-insure a significant portion of expected losses under our workers' compensation, general liability, vehicle and group health insurance programs, unanticipated changes in any applicable actuarial assumptions and management estimates underlying our recorded liabilities for these losses, including potential increases in medical and indemnity costs, could result in materially different amounts of expense than expected under these programs. This could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.
Our transactions are regulated by and subject to the requirements of various federal and state laws and regulations, which may require significant compliance costs and expose us to litigation. Any negative change in these laws or the passage of unfavorable new laws could require us to alter our business practices in a manner that may be materially adverse to us.
Currently, 46 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico have passed laws that regulate rental purchase transactions as separate and distinct from credit sales. One additional state has a retail installment sales statute that excludes leases, including rent-to-own transactions, from its coverage if the lease provides for more than a nominal purchase price at the end of the rental period. The specific rental purchase laws generally require certain contractual and advertising disclosures. They also provide varying levels of substantive consumer protection, such as requiring a grace period for late fees and contract reinstatement rights in the event the

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rental purchase agreement is terminated. The rental purchase laws of eleven states limit the total amount that may be charged over the life of a rental purchase agreement and the laws of six states limit the cash prices for which we may offer merchandise.
Similar to other consumer transactions, our rental purchase transaction is also governed by various federal and state consumer protection statutes. These consumer protection statutes, as well as the rental purchase statutes under which we operate, provide various consumer remedies, including monetary penalties, for violations. In our history, we have been the subject of litigation alleging that we have violated some of these statutory provisions.
Although there is currently no comprehensive federal legislation regulating rental purchase transactions, adverse federal legislation may be enacted in the future. From time to time, both favorable and adverse legislation seeking to regulate our business has been introduced in Congress. In addition, various legislatures in the states where we currently do business may adopt new legislation or amend existing legislation that could require us to alter our business practices in a manner that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our reputation, ability to do business and operating results may be impaired by improper conduct by any of our employees, agents or business partners.
Our operations in the U.S. and abroad are subject to certain laws generally prohibiting companies and their intermediaries from making improper payments to government officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business, such as the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, and similar anti-bribery laws in other jurisdictions. Our employees, contractors or agents may violate the policies and procedures we have implemented to ensure compliance with these laws. Any such improper actions could subject us to civil or criminal investigations in the U.S. and in other jurisdictions, could lead to substantial civil and criminal, monetary and non-monetary penalties, and related shareholder lawsuits, could cause us to incur significant legal fees, and could damage our reputation.
We may be subject to legal proceedings from time to time which seek material damages. The costs we incur in defending ourselves or associated with settling any of these proceedings, as well as a material final judgment or decree against us, could materially adversely affect our financial condition by requiring the payment of the settlement amount, a judgment or the posting of a bond.
In our history, we have defended class action lawsuits alleging various regulatory violations and have paid material amounts to settle such claims. Significant settlement amounts or final judgments could materially and adversely affect our liquidity and capital resources. The failure to pay any material judgment would be a default under our senior credit facilities and the indenture governing our outstanding senior unsecured notes.
Vintage Capital and B. Riley’s lawsuit against us in connection with our termination of the Merger Agreement, has caused, and may continue to cause, us to incur significant costs, may present material distractions and, if decided adversely to us, could negatively impact our financial position.
As described in Item 3 - Legal Proceedings of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, on December 18, 2018, we terminated the Merger Agreement with Vintage Capital. On December 21, 2018, Vintage Capital filed a lawsuit in the Delaware Court of Chancery against Rent-A-Center, asserting that the Merger Agreement remained in effect, and that Vintage Capital did not owe Rent-A-Center the $126.5 million reverse breakup fee associated with our termination of the Merger Agreement. On February 11th and 12th of this year, a trial was held in the Delaware Court of Chancery in connection with the lawsuit brought by Vintage Capital (and joined by B. Riley) against Rent-A-Center. An adverse decision by the Delaware Court of Chancery could result in the possible reinstatement of the Merger Agreement, monetary exposure for litigation costs of opposing parties, denial of the right to recovery of the reverse breakup fee and other possible monetary or equitable exposure to the opposing parties. These risks, coupled with the ongoing costs of litigation and potential management distractions associated therewith, could adversely affect our business, business relationships, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and market price.
Our operations are dependent on effective information management systems. Failure of these systems could negatively impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We utilize integrated information management systems. The efficient operation of our business is dependent on these systems to effectively manage our financial and operational data. The failure of our information management systems to perform as designed, loss of data or any interruption of our information management systems for a significant period of time could disrupt our business. If the information management systems sustain repeated failures, we may not be able to manage our store operations, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We invest in new information management technology and systems and implement modifications and upgrades to existing systems. These investments include replacing legacy systems, making changes to existing systems, building redundancies, and acquiring new systems and hardware with updated functionality. We take actions and implement procedures designed to ensure the successful implementation of these investments, including the testing of new systems and the transfer of existing data, with minimal disruptions

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to the business. These efforts may take longer and may require greater financial and other resources than anticipated, may cause distraction of key personnel, may cause disruptions to our existing systems and our business, and may not provide the anticipated benefits. A disruption in our information management systems, or our inability to improve, upgrade, integrate or expand our systems to meet our evolving business requirements, could impair our ability to achieve critical strategic initiatives and could materially adversely impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.
If we fail to protect the integrity and security of customer and employee information, we could be exposed to litigation or regulatory enforcement and our business could be adversely impacted.
We collect and store certain personal information provided to us by our customers and employees in the ordinary course of our business. Despite instituted safeguards for the protection of such information, we cannot be certain that all of our systems are entirely free from vulnerability to attack. Computer hackers may attempt to penetrate our network security and, if successful, misappropriate confidential customer or employee information. In addition, one of our employees, contractors or other third party with whom we do business may attempt to circumvent our security measures in order to obtain such information, or inadvertently cause a breach involving such information. Loss of customer or employee information could disrupt our operations, damage our reputation, and expose us to claims from customers, employees, regulators and other persons, any of which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, the costs associated with information security, such as increased investment in technology, the costs of compliance with privacy laws, and costs incurred to prevent or remediate information security breaches, could adversely impact our business.
A change in control could accelerate our obligation to pay our outstanding indebtedness, and we may not have sufficient liquid assets at that time to repay these amounts.
Under our senior credit facilities, an event of default would result if a third party became the beneficial owner of 35.0% or more of our voting stock or a majority of Rent-A-Center’s Board of Directors are not continuing directors (all of the current members of our Board of Directors are continuing directors under the senior credit facility). As of December 31, 2018, we had no outstanding balance under our senior credit facilities.
Under the indenture governing our outstanding senior unsecured notes, in the event of a change in control, we may be required to offer to purchase all of our outstanding senior unsecured notes at 101% of their original aggregate principal amount, plus accrued interest to the date of repurchase. A change in control also would result in an event of default under our senior credit facilities, which would allow our lenders to accelerate indebtedness owed to them.
If a specified change in control occurs and the lenders under our debt instruments accelerate these obligations, we may not have sufficient liquid assets to repay amounts outstanding under these agreements.
Rent-A-Center's organizational documents and our debt instruments contain provisions that may prevent or deter another group from paying a premium over the market price to Rent-A-Center's stockholders to acquire its stock.
Rent-A-Center’s organizational documents contain provisions that classify its Board of Directors, authorize its Board of Directors to issue blank check preferred stock and establish advance notice requirements on its stockholders for director nominations and actions to be taken at meetings of the stockholders. In addition, as a Delaware corporation, Rent-A-Center is subject to Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law relating to business combinations. Our senior credit facilities and the indentures governing our senior unsecured notes each contain various change in control provisions which, in the event of a change in control, would cause a default under those provisions. These provisions and arrangements could delay, deter or prevent a merger, consolidation, tender offer or other business combination or change in control involving us that could include a premium over the market price of Rent-A-Center’s common stock that some or a majority of Rent-A-Center’s stockholders might consider to be in their best interests.
Rent-A-Center is a holding company and is dependent on the operations and funds of its subsidiaries.
Rent-A-Center is a holding company, with no revenue generating operations and no assets other than its ownership interests in its direct and indirect subsidiaries. Accordingly, Rent-A-Center is dependent on the cash flow generated by its direct and indirect operating subsidiaries and must rely on dividends or other intercompany transfers from its operating subsidiaries to generate the funds necessary to meet its obligations, including the obligations under the senior credit facilities. The ability of Rent-A-Center’s subsidiaries to pay dividends or make other payments to it is subject to applicable state laws. Should one or more of Rent-A-Center’s subsidiaries be unable to pay dividends or make distributions, Rent-A-Center's ability to meet its ongoing obligations could be materially and adversely impacted.

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Our stock price is volatile, and you may not be able to recover your investment if our stock price declines.
The price of our common stock has been volatile and can be expected to be significantly affected by factors such as:
our ability to meet market expectations with respect to the growth and profitability of each of our operating segments;
quarterly variations in our results of operations, which may be impacted by, among other things, changes in same store sales or when and how many locations we acquire or open;
quarterly variations in our competitors’ results of operations;
changes in earnings estimates or buy/sell recommendations by financial analysts; 
uncertainties associated with the termination of the Merger Agreement and the litigation relating to its termination; and
the stock price performance of comparable companies.
In addition, the stock market as a whole historically has experienced price and volume fluctuations that have affected the market price of many specialty retailers in ways that may have been unrelated to these companies' operating performance.
Failure to achieve and maintain effective internal controls could have a material adverse effect on our business and stock price.
Effective internal controls are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports. If we cannot provide reliable financial reports, our brand and operating results could be harmed. All internal control systems, no matter how well designed, have inherent limitations. Therefore, even those systems determined to be effective can provide only reasonable assurance with respect to financial statement preparation and presentation.
While we continue to evaluate and improve our internal controls, we cannot be certain that these measures will ensure that we implement and maintain adequate controls over our financial processes and reporting in the future. Any failure to implement required new or improved controls, or difficulties encountered in their implementation, could harm our operating results or cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations.
If we fail to maintain the adequacy of our internal controls, as such standards are modified, supplemented or amended from time to time, we may not be able to ensure that we can conclude on an ongoing basis that we have effective internal control over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Failure to achieve and maintain an effective internal control environment could cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, which could have a material adverse effect on our stock price.
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.
None.
Item 2. Properties.
We lease space for all of our Core U.S. and Mexico stores and certain support facilities under operating leases expiring at various times through 2024. Most of our store leases are five year leases and contain renewal options for additional periods ranging from three to five years at rental rates adjusted according to agreed-upon formulas. Store sizes average approximately 4,800 square feet. Approximately 75% of each store’s space is generally used for showroom space and 25% for offices and storage space. Our Acceptance Now kiosks occupy space without charge in the retailer's location with no lease commitment.
We believe suitable store space generally is available for lease and we would be able to relocate any of our stores or support facilities without significant difficulty should we be unable to renew a particular lease. We also expect additional space is readily available at competitive rates to open new stores or support facilities, as necessary.
We own the land and building in Plano, Texas, in which our corporate headquarters is located. The land and improvements are pledged as collateral under our senior credit facilities.
Item 3. Legal Proceedings.
From time to time, we, along with our subsidiaries, are party to various legal proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business. We reserve for loss contingencies that are both probable and reasonably estimable. We regularly monitor developments related to these legal proceedings, and review the adequacy of our legal reserves on a quarterly basis. We do not expect these losses to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements if and when such losses are incurred.
We are subject to unclaimed property audits by states in the ordinary course of business. The property subject to review in this audit process included unclaimed wages, vendor payments and customer refunds. State escheat laws generally require entities to report and remit abandoned and unclaimed property to the state. Failure to timely report and remit the property can result in assessments that could include interest and penalties, in addition to the payment of the escheat liability itself. We routinely remit

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escheat payments to states in compliance with applicable escheat laws. The negotiated settlements did not have a material adverse impact to our financial statements.
Alan Hall, et. al. v. Rent-A-Center, Inc., et. al.; James DePalma, et. al. v. Rent-A-Center, Inc., et. al. On December 23, 2016, a putative class action was filed against us and certain of our former officers by Alan Hall in the Federal District Court for the Eastern District of Texas in Sherman, Texas. The complaint alleges that the defendants violated Section 10(b) and/or Section 20(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Rule 10b-5 promulgated thereunder by issuing false and misleading statements and omitting material facts regarding our business, including implementation of our point-of-sale system, operations and prospects during the period covered by the complaint. A complaint filed by James DePalma also in Sherman, Texas alleging similar claims was consolidated by the court into the Hall matter. On October 8, 2018, the parties agreed to settle this matter for $11 million. The court granted preliminary approval of the settlement on December 13, 2018. Under the terms of the settlement our insurance carrier paid an aggregate of $11 million in cash, subsequent to December 31, 2018, which will be distributed to an agreed upon class of claimants who purchased our common stock from July 27, 2015 through October 10, 2016, as well as used to pay costs of notice and settlement administration, and plaintiffs’ attorneys’ fees and expenses. A hearing to finally approve the settlement is scheduled for May 3, 2019.
Blair v. Rent-A-Center, Inc. This matter is a state-wide class action complaint originally filed on March 13, 2017 in the Federal District Court for the Northern District of California. The complaint alleges various claims, including that our cash sales and total rent to own prices exceed the pricing permitted under the Karnette Rental-Purchase Act. In addition, the plaintiffs allege that we fail to give customers a fully executed rental agreement and that all such rental agreements that were issued to customers unsigned are void under the law. The plaintiffs are seeking statutory damages under the Karnette Rental-Purchase Act which range from $100 - $1,000 per violation, injunctive relief, and attorney’s fees. We believe that these claims are without merit and intend to vigorously defend ourselves. However, we cannot assure you that we will be found to have no liability in this matter.
Vintage Rodeo Parent, LLC, Vintage Rodeo Acquisition, Inc. and Vintage Capital Management, LLC, and B. Riley Financial, Inc. v. Rent-A-Center, Inc. On December 18, 2018, after the Company did not receive an extension notice from Vintage Rodeo Parent, LLC (“Vintage”) that was required by December 17, 2018 to extend the Merger Agreement’s stated End Date, we terminated the Merger Agreement.  Our Board of Directors determined that terminating the Merger Agreement was in the best interests of our stockholders, and instructed Rent-A-Center’s management to exercise the Company’s right to terminate the Merger Agreement and make a demand on Vintage for the $126.5 million reverse breakup fee owed to us following the termination of the Merger Agreement. On December 21, 2018, Vintage and its affiliates filed a lawsuit in Delaware Court of Chancery against Rent-A-Center, asserting that the Merger Agreement remained in effect, and that Vintage did not owe Rent-A-Center the $126.5 million reverse breakup fee associated with our termination of the Merger Agreement. B. Riley, a guarantor of the payment of the reverse breakup fee, later joined the lawsuit brought by Vintage in Delaware Court of Chancery. In addition, we brought a counterclaim against Vintage and B. Riley asserting our right to payment of the reverse breakup fee.
On February 11th and 12th of this year, a trial was held in Delaware Court of Chancery in the lawsuit arising from Rent-A-Center's termination of the Merger Agreement. While it is difficult to predict the outcome of litigation, we believe Rent-A-Center had a clear right to terminate the Merger Agreement under the express and unambiguous language of that agreement and that it is entitled to the $126.5 million reverse breakup fee. Oral argument on the parties' post-trial briefs is scheduled for Monday, March 11th.
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.
Not applicable. 

15




PART II
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.
Our common stock has been listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market® and its predecessors under the symbol “RCII” since January 25, 1995, the date we commenced our initial public offering.
As of February 19, 2019, there were approximately 26 record holders of our common stock.
Future decisions to pay cash dividends on our common stock continue to be at the discretion of our Board of Directors and will depend on a number of factors, including future earnings, capital requirements, contractual restrictions, financial condition, future prospects and any other factors our Board of Directors may deem relevant. Cash dividend payments are subject to certain restrictions in our debt agreements. Please see Note I and Note J to the consolidated financial statements for further discussion of such restrictions.
Under our current common stock repurchase program, our Board of Directors has authorized the purchase, from time to time, in the open market and privately negotiated transactions, up to an aggregate of $1.25 billion of Rent-A-Center common stock. As of December 31, 2018, we had purchased a total of 36,994,653 shares of Rent-A-Center common stock for an aggregate purchase price of $994.8 million under this common stock repurchase program. Common stock repurchases are subject to certain restrictions in our debt agreements. Please see Note I and Note J to the consolidated financial statements for further discussion of such restrictions. No shares were repurchased during 2018 and 2017.


16




Stock Performance Graph
The following chart represents a comparison of the five year total return of our common stock to the NASDAQ Composite Index and the S&P 1500 Specialty Retail Index. We selected the S&P 1500 Specialty Retail Index for comparison because we use this published industry index as the comparator group to measure our relative total shareholder return for purposes of determining vesting of performance stock units granted under our long-term incentive compensation program. The graph assumes $100 was invested on December 31, 2013, and dividends, if any, were reinvested for all years ending December 31.
chart-67e7e42a9b0d5365b17.jpg

17




Item 6. Selected Financial Data.
The selected financial data presented below for the five years ended December 31, 2018, have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements. The historical financial data are qualified in their entirety by, and should be read in conjunction with, the consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto, the section entitled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and other financial information included in this report.
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
 (In thousands, except per share data)
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015(8)
 
2014
 
Consolidated Statements of Operations
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Store
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rentals and fees
$
2,244,860

 
$
2,267,741

 
$
2,500,053

 
$
2,781,315

 
$
2,745,828

(13) 
Merchandise sales
304,455

 
331,402

 
351,198

 
377,240

 
290,048

 
Installment sales
69,572

 
71,651

 
74,509

 
76,238

 
75,889

 
Other
9,000

 
9,620

 
12,706

 
19,158

 
19,949

 
Franchise
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Merchandise sales
19,087

 
13,157

 
16,358

 
15,577

 
19,236

 
Royalty income and fees
13,491

 
8,969

 
8,428

 
8,892

 
6,846

 
Total revenues
2,660,465

 
2,702,540

 
2,963,252

 
3,278,420

 
3,157,796

 
Cost of revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Store
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cost of rentals and fees
621,860

 
625,358

 
664,845

 
728,706

 
704,595

 
Cost of merchandise sold
308,912


322,628

 
323,727

 
356,696

 
231,520

 
Cost of installment sales
23,326

 
23,622

 
24,285

 
25,677

 
26,084

 
Other charges and (credits)

 

 

 
34,698

(9) 
(6,836
)
(14) 
Franchise cost of merchandise sold
18,199

 
12,390

 
15,346

 
14,534

 
18,070

 
Total cost of revenues
972,297

 
983,998

 
1,028,203

 
1,160,311

 
973,433

 
Gross profit
1,688,168

 
1,718,542

 
1,935,049

 
2,118,109

 
2,184,363

 
Operating expenses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Store expenses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Labor
683,422

 
732,466

 
789,049

 
854,610

 
888,929

 
Other store expenses
656,894

 
744,187

 
791,614

 
833,914

 
842,254

 
General and administrative expenses
163,445

 
171,090

 
168,907

 
166,102

 
162,316

 
Depreciation, amortization and write-down of intangibles
68,946

 
74,639

 
80,456

 
80,720

 
83,168

 
Goodwill impairment charge

 

 
151,320

(6) 
1,170,000

(10) 

 
Other charges
59,324

(1) 
59,219

(3) 
20,299

(7) 
20,651

(11) 
14,234

(15) 
Total operating expenses
1,632,031

 
1,781,601

 
2,001,645

 
3,125,997

 
1,990,901

 
Operating profit (loss)
56,137

 
(63,059
)
 
(66,596
)
 
(1,007,888
)
 
193,462

 
Write-off of debt issuance costs
475

(2) 
1,936

(4) 

 

 
4,213

(16) 
Interest expense, net
41,821

 
45,205

 
46,678

 
48,692

 
46,896

 
Earnings (loss) before income taxes
13,841

 
(110,200
)
 
(113,274
)
 
(1,056,580
)
 
142,353

 
Income tax expense (benefit)
5,349

 
(116,853
)
(5) 
(8,079
)
 
(103,060
)
(12) 
45,931

 
Net earnings (loss)
$
8,492

 
$
6,653

 
$
(105,195
)
 
$
(953,520
)
 
$
96,422

 
Basic earnings (loss) per common share
$
0.16

 
$
0.12

 
$
(1.98
)
 
$
(17.97
)
 
$
1.82

 
Diluted earnings (loss) per common share
$
0.16

 
$
0.12

 
$
(1.98
)
 
$
(17.97
)
 
$
1.81

 
Cash dividends declared per common share
$

 
$
0.16

 
$
0.32

 
$
0.96

 
$
0.93

 


18




Item 6. Selected Financial Data — Continued.
 
December 31,
 (Dollar amounts in thousands)
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015(8)
 
2014
Consolidated Balance Sheet Data
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rental merchandise, net
$
807,470

 
$
868,991

 
$
1,001,954

 
$
1,136,472

 
$
1,237,856

Intangible assets, net
57,344

 
57,496

 
60,560

 
213,899

 
1,377,992

Total assets
1,396,917

 
1,420,781

 
1,602,741

 
1,974,468

 
3,271,197

Total debt
540,042

 
672,887

 
724,230

 
955,833

 
1,042,813

Total liabilities
1,110,400

 
1,148,338

 
1,337,808

 
1,590,878

 
1,881,802

Total stockholders' equity
286,517

 
272,443

 
264,933

 
383,590

 
1,389,395

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating Data (Unaudited)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Core U.S. and Mexico stores open at end of period
2,280

 
2,512

 
2,593

 
2,815

 
3,001

Acceptance Now Staffed locations open at end of period
1,106

 
1,106

 
1,431

 
1,444

 
1,406

Acceptance Now Direct locations open at end of period
96

 
125

 
478

 
532

 

Same store revenue growth (decrease) (12)
4.7
%
 
(5.4
)%
 
(6.2
)%
 
5.7
%
 
1.2
%
Franchise stores open at end of period
281

 
225

 
229

 
227

 
187

(1) 
Includes $30.4 million related to cost savings initiatives, $16.4 million in incremental legal and advisory fees, $11.6 million related to store closure costs, $1.2 million in capitalized software write-downs, and $(0.3) million related to the 2018 and 2017 hurricane impacts.
(2) 
Includes the effects of a $0.5 million financing expense related to the write-off of unamortized financing costs.
(3) 
Includes $24.0 million related to the closure of Acceptance Now locations, $18.2 million for capitalized software write-downs, $6.5 million for incremental legal and advisory fees, $5.4 million for 2017 hurricane impacts, $3.4 million for reductions at the field support center, $1.1 million for previous store closure plans, and $0.6 million in legal settlements.
(4) 
Includes the effects of a $1.9 million financing expense related to the write-off of unamortized financing costs.
(5) 
Includes a $77.5 million gain resulting from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.
(6) 
Includes a $151.3 million goodwill impairment charge in the Core U.S. segment.
(7) 
Includes $22.5 million primarily related to the closure of Core U.S. stores, Acceptance Now locations, and Mexico stores, partially offset by a $2.2 million legal settlement.
(8) 
Includes revisions for immaterial correction of deferred tax error associated with our goodwill impairment reported in the fourth quarter of 2015.
(9) 
Includes a $34.7 million write-down of smartphones.
(10) 
Includes a $1,170.0 million goodwill impairment charge in the Core U.S. segment.
(11) 
Includes a $7.5 million loss on the sale of Core U.S. and Canada stores, a $7.2 million charge related to the closure of Core U.S. and Mexico stores, $2.8 million of charges for start-up and warehouse closure expenses related to our sourcing and distribution initiative, a $2.0 million corporate reduction charge and $1.1 million of losses for other store sales and closures.
(12) 
Includes $6.0 million of discrete adjustments to income tax reserves.
(13) 
Includes a $0.6 million reduction of revenue due to consumer refunds as a result of an operating system programming error.
(14) 
Includes a $6.8 million credit due to the settlement of a lawsuit against the manufacturers of LCD screen displays.
(15) 
Includes store closure charges of $5.1 million, asset impairment charges of $4.6 million, corporate reduction charges of $2.8 million, and a $1.8 million loss on the sale of stores in the Core U.S. segment.
(16) 
Includes the effects of a $4.2 million financing expense related to the payment of debt origination costs and the write-off of unamortized financing costs.




19




Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
Recent Developments
Merger Termination. On December 18, 2018, we terminated the Merger Agreement with Vintage Capital. On December 21, 2018, Vintage Capital and its affiliates filed a lawsuit in the Delaware Court of Chancery against Rent-A-Center, asserting that the Merger Agreement remained in effect, and that Vintage Capital did not owe Rent-A-Center the $126.5 million reverse breakup fee associated with our termination of the Merger Agreement. On February 11th and 12th of this year, a trial was held in the Delaware Court of Chancery in connection with the lawsuit brought by Vintage Capital (and joined by B Riley) against Rent-A-Center. The Delaware Court of Chancery has not yet rendered its verdict in this case. Oral argument on the parties' post-trial briefs is schedule for Monday, March 11th.
Results of Operations
The following discussion focuses on our results of operations and issues related to our liquidity and capital resources. You should read this discussion in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Overview
During the twelve months ended December 31, 2018, we experienced a decline in revenues and gross profit driven primarily by reductions in our store base for the Core U.S. and Acceptance Now segments, partially offset by increases in same store sales. Operating profit, however, increased during the twelve months ended December 31, 2018, primarily due to cost savings initiatives, including reductions in overhead and supply chain, and lower rental merchandise losses.
Revenues in our Core U.S. segment increased approximately $20.3 million for the twelve months ended December 31, 2018, primarily due to increases in same store sales, partially offset by a reduction in our Core U.S. store base. Gross profit as a percentage of revenue increased 0.5% primarily due to the intercompany book value adjustment of Acceptance Now returned product transferred to Core U.S. stores. Operating profit increased $61.6 million for the twelve months ended December 31, 2018, primarily due to decreases of $19.8 million and $37.5 million in labor and other store expenses, respectively.
The Acceptance Now segment revenues decreased by approximately $75.4 million for the twelve months ended December 31, 2018, primarily due to kiosk closures at our former retailer partners Conn's and hhgregg, partially offset by increases in same store sales. Gross profit as a percent of revenue decreased 3.1% primarily due to the intercompany book value adjustment of Acceptance Now returned product transferred to Core U.S. stores, and the new value proposition enhancements initiated in 2018 for Acceptance Now customers. Operating profit as a percent of revenue increased 6.9% primarily due to lower rental merchandise losses.
Operating profit for the Mexico segment as a percentage of revenue increased by 5.9% for the twelve months ended December 31, 2018, driven primarily by lower rental merchandise losses.
Cash flow from operations was $227.5 million for the twelve months ended December 31, 2018. We paid down debt by $139.3 million during the year, ending the period with $155.4 million of cash and cash equivalents.


20




The following table is a reference for the discussion that follows.
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2018-2017 Change
 
2017-2016 Change
(Dollar amounts in thousands)
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
$
 
%
 
$
 
%
Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Store
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rentals and fees
$
2,244,860

 
$
2,267,741

 
$
2,500,053

 
$
(22,881
)
 
(1.0
)%
 
$
(232,312
)
 
(9.3
)%
Merchandise sales
304,455

 
331,402

 
351,198

 
(26,947
)
 
(8.1
)%
 
(19,796
)
 
(5.6
)%
Installment sales
69,572

 
71,651

 
74,509

 
(2,079
)
 
(2.9
)%
 
(2,858
)
 
(3.8
)%
Other
9,000

 
9,620

 
12,706

 
(620
)
 
(6.4
)%
 
(3,086
)
 
(24.3
)%
Total store revenues
2,627,887

 
2,680,414

 
2,938,466

 
(52,527
)
 
(2.0
)%
 
(258,052
)
 
(8.8
)%
Franchise
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Merchandise sales
19,087

 
13,157

 
16,358

 
5,930

 
45.1
 %
 
(3,201
)
 
(19.6
)%
Royalty income and fees
13,491

 
8,969

 
8,428

 
4,522

 
50.4
 %
 
541

 
6.4
 %
Total revenues
2,660,465

 
2,702,540

 
2,963,252

 
(42,075
)
 
(1.6
)%
 
(260,712
)
 
(8.8
)%
Cost of revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Store
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cost of rentals and fees
621,860

 
625,358

 
664,845

 
(3,498
)
 
(0.6
)%
 
(39,487
)
 
(5.9
)%
Cost of merchandise sold
308,912

 
322,628

 
323,727

 
(13,716
)
 
(4.3
)%
 
(1,099
)
 
(0.3
)%
Cost of installment sales
23,326

 
23,622

 
24,285

 
(296
)
 
(1.3
)%
 
(663
)
 
(2.7
)%
Total cost of store revenues
954,098

 
971,608

 
1,012,857

 
(17,510
)
 
(1.8
)%
 
(41,249
)
 
(4.1
)%
Franchise cost of merchandise sold
18,199

 
12,390

 
15,346

 
5,809

 
46.9
 %
 
(2,956
)
 
(19.3
)%
Total cost of revenues
972,297

 
983,998

 
1,028,203

 
(11,701
)
 
(1.2
)%
 
(44,205
)
 
(4.3
)%
Gross profit
1,688,168

 
1,718,542

 
1,935,049

 
(30,374
)
 
(1.8
)%
 
(216,507
)
 
(11.2
)%
Operating expenses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Store expenses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Labor
683,422

 
732,466

 
789,049

 
(49,044
)
 
(6.7
)%
 
(56,583
)
 
(7.2
)%
Other store expenses
656,894

 
744,187

 
791,614

 
(87,293
)
 
(11.7
)%
 
(47,427
)
 
(6.0
)%
General and administrative
163,445

 
171,090

 
168,907

 
(7,645
)
 
(4.5
)%
 
2,183

 
1.3
 %
Depreciation, amortization and write-down of intangibles
68,946

 
74,639

 
80,456

 
(5,693
)
 
(7.6
)%
 
(5,817
)
 
(7.2
)%
Goodwill impairment charge

 

 
151,320

 

 
 %
 
(151,320
)
 
(100.0
)
Other charges
59,324

 
59,219

 
20,299

 
105

 
0.2
 %
 
38,920

 
191.7
 %
Total operating expenses
1,632,031

 
1,781,601

 
2,001,645

 
(149,570
)
 
(8.4
)%
 
(220,044
)
 
(11.0
)%
Operating profit (loss)
56,137

 
(63,059
)
 
(66,596
)
 
119,196

 
189.0
 %
 
3,537

 
5.3
 %
Write-off of debt issuance costs
475

 
1,936

 

 
(1,461
)
 
(75.5
)%
 
1,936

 
100.0
 %
Interest, net
41,821

 
45,205

 
46,678

 
(3,384
)
 
(7.5
)%
 
(1,473
)
 
(3.2
)%
Income (loss) before income taxes
13,841

 
(110,200
)
 
(113,274
)
 
124,041

 
112.6
 %
 
3,074

 
2.7
 %
Income tax expense (benefit)
5,349

 
(116,853
)
 
(8,079
)
 
122,202

 
104.6
 %
 
(108,774
)
 
(1,346.4
)%
Net earnings (loss)
$
8,492

 
$
6,653

 
$
(105,195
)
 
$
1,839

 
27.6
 %
 
$
111,848

 
106.3
 %
Comparison of the Years Ended December 31, 2018 and 2017
Store Revenue. Total store revenue decreased by $52.5 million, or 2.0%, to $2,627.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, from $2,680.4 million for 2017. This was primarily due to a decrease of approximately $75.4 million in the Acceptance Now segment, partially offset by an increase of $20.3 million in the Core U.S. segment, as discussed further in the segment performance section below.
Same store revenue is reported on a constant currency basis and generally represents revenue earned in 2,575 locations that were operated by us for 13 months or more, excluding any store that receives a certain level of customer accounts from another store (acquisition or merger). Receiving stores will be eligible for inclusion in the same store sales base in the twenty-fourth full month

21




following the account transfer. In addition, due to the severity of the hurricane impacts, we instituted a change to the same store sales store selection criteria to exclude stores in geographically impacted regions for 18 months. Same store revenues increased by $74.8 million, or 4.7%, to $1,653.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, as compared to $1,578.6 million in 2017. The increase in same store revenues was primarily attributable to an improvement in the Core U.S. segment, as discussed further in the segment performance section below.
Cost of Rentals and Fees. Cost of rentals and fees consists primarily of depreciation of rental merchandise. Cost of rentals and fees for the year ended December 31, 2018 decreased by $3.5 million, or 0.6%, to $621.9 million, as compared to $625.4 million in 2017. This decrease in cost of rentals and fees was primarily attributable to a decrease of $8.1 million in the Core U.S. segment as a result of lower rentals and fees revenue, partially offset by an increase of $3.8 million in the Acceptance Now segment. Cost of rentals and fees expressed as a percentage of rentals and fees revenue increased to 27.7% for the year ended December 31, 2018 as compared to 27.6% in 2017.
Cost of Merchandise Sold. Cost of merchandise sold represents the net book value of rental merchandise at time of sale. Cost of merchandise sold decreased by $13.7 million, or 4.3%, to $308.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, from $322.6 million in 2017, primarily attributable to a decrease of $18.8 million in the Acceptance Now segment, partially offset by an increase of $5.1 million in the Core U.S. segment. The gross margin percent of merchandise sales decreased to (1.5)% for the year ended December 31, 2018, from 2.6% in 2017.
Gross Profit. Gross profit decreased by $30.3 million, or 1.8%, to $1,688.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, from $1,718.5 million in 2017, due primarily to a decrease of $60.4 million in the Acceptance Now segment, partially offset by an increase of $23.6 million and $4.6 million in the Core U.S. and Franchising segments, respectively, as discussed further in the segment performance section below. Gross profit as a percentage of total revenue decreased to 63.5% in 2018 compared to 63.6% in 2017.
Store Labor. Store labor includes all salaries and wages paid to store-level employees and district managers' salaries, together with payroll taxes and benefits. Store labor decreased by $49.1 million, or 6.7%, to $683.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, as compared to $732.5 million in 2017, primarily attributable to a decrease of $29.4 million and $19.8 million in the Acceptance Now and Core U.S. segments, respectively, driven by our cost savings initiatives and lower Core U.S. store base. Store labor expressed as a percentage of total store revenue was 26.0% for the year ended December 31, 2018, as compared to 27.3% in 2017.
Other Store Expenses. Other store expenses include occupancy, charge-offs due to customer stolen merchandise, delivery, advertising, selling, insurance, travel and other store-level operating expenses. Other store expenses decreased by $87.3 million, or 11.7%, to $656.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, as compared to $744.2 million in 2017, primarily attributable to decreases of $51.6 million and $37.5 million in the Acceptance Now and Core U.S. segments, respectively, as a result of lower customer stolen merchandise losses for Acceptance Now and lower Core U.S. store base. Other store expenses expressed as a percentage of total store revenue decreased to 25.0% for the year ended December 31, 2018, from 27.8% in 2017.
General and Administrative Expenses. General and administrative expenses include all corporate overhead expenses related to our headquarters such as salaries, payroll taxes and benefits, stock-based compensation, occupancy, administrative and other operating expenses, as well as salaries and labor costs for our regional directors, divisional vice presidents and executive vice presidents. General and administrative expenses decreased by $7.7 million, or 4.5%, to $163.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, as compared to $171.1 million in 2017. General and administrative expenses expressed as a percentage of total revenue decreased to 6.1% for the year ended December 31, 2018, compared to 6.3% in 2017.
Other Charges. Other charges increased by $0.1 million, or 0.2%, to $59.3 million in 2018, as compared to $59.2 million in 2017. Other charges for the year ended December 31, 2018 primarily related to cost savings initiatives, including reductions in overhead and supply chain, incremental legal and advisory fees, Core U.S. store closures, and write-down of capitalized software assets. See Note L to the consolidated financial statements for additional detail regarding these other charges.
Operating Profit (Loss). Operating profit increased $119.2 million, or 189.0%, to $56.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, as compared to operating loss of $63.1 million in 2017, primarily due to increases of $61.6 million and $45.3 million in the Core U.S. and Acceptance Now segments, respectively, as discussed further in the segment performance sections below. Operating profit (loss) expressed as a percentage of total revenue was 2.1% for the year ended December 31, 2018, as compared to (2.3)% for 2017. Excluding other charges, profit was $115.5 million or 4.3% of revenue or the year ended December 31, 2018, compared to $(3.8) million or (0.1)% of revenue for the comparable period of 2017.
Income Tax Expense (Benefit). Income tax expense for the twelve months ended December 31, 2018 was $5.3 million, as compared to an income tax benefit of $116.9 million in 2017, primarily due to the impact of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (“Tax Act”)

22




on our deferred tax balances in the prior year. The effective tax rate was 38.6% for the twelve months ended December 31, 2018, compared to 106.0% in 2017. Excluding impacts from the Tax Act, the effective tax rate was 41.5% for the twelve months ended December 31, 2017.
Net Earnings. Net earnings were $8.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2018 as compared to $6.7 million in 2017. Excluding impacts from other charges and the Tax Act, net earnings were $57.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2018 as compared to net loss of $28.7 million in 2017.
Comparison of the Years Ended December 31, 2017 and 2016
Store Revenue. Total store revenue decreased by $258.1 million, or 8.8%, to $2,680.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, from $2,938.5 million for 2016. This was primarily due to a decrease of approximately $234.3 million in the Core U.S. segment, as discussed further in the segment performance section below.
Same store revenue is reported on a constant currency basis and generally represents revenue earned in 3,376 locations that were operated by us for 13 months or more, excluding any store that receives a certain level of customer accounts from another store (acquisition or merger). Receiving stores will be eligible for inclusion in the same store sales base in the twenty-fourth full month following the account transfer. In addition, due to the severity of the hurricane impacts, we instituted a change to the same store sales store selection criteria to exclude stores in geographically impacted regions for 18 months. Same store revenues decreased by $99.2 million, or 5.4%, to $1,753.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to $1,853.1 million in 2016. The decrease in same store revenues was primarily attributable to a decline in the Core U.S. segment, as discussed further in the segment performance section below.
Cost of Rentals and Fees. Cost of rentals and fees consists primarily of depreciation of rental merchandise. Cost of rentals and fees for the year ended December 31, 2017, decreased by $39.5 million, or 5.9%, to $625.4 million, as compared to $664.8 million in 2016. This decrease in cost of rentals and fees was primarily attributable to a decrease of $35.7 million in the Core U.S. segment as a result of lower rentals and fees revenue. Cost of rentals and fees expressed as a percentage of rentals and fees revenue increased to 27.6% for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to 26.6% in 2016.
Cost of Merchandise Sold. Cost of merchandise sold represents the net book value of rental merchandise at time of sale. Cost of merchandise sold decreased by $1.1 million, or 0.3%, to $322.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, from $323.7 million in 2016. The gross margin percent of merchandise sales decreased to 2.6% for the year ended December 31, 2017, from 7.8% in 2016. These decreases were primarily attributable to a decrease of $6.4 million in the Core U.S. segment, partially offset by an increase of $5.3 million in the Acceptance Now segment driven by a focused effort to encourage ownership and reduce returned product.
Gross Profit. Gross profit decreased by $216.5 million, or 11.2%, to $1,718.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, from $1,935.0 million in 2016, due primarily to a decrease of $191.5 million in the Core U.S. segment, as discussed further in the segment performance section below. Gross profit as a percentage of total revenue decreased to 63.6% in 2017 compared to 65.3% in 2016.
Store Labor. Store labor includes all salaries and wages paid to store-level employees and district managers' salaries, together with payroll taxes and benefits. Store labor decreased by $56.6 million, or 7.2%, to $732.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to $789.0 million in 2016, primarily attributable to a decrease of $44.4 million and $10.7 million in the Core U.S. and Acceptance Now segments, respectively, primarily as a result of a lower Core U.S. store base and closure of Acceptance Now locations in the first half of 2017. Store labor expressed as a percentage of total store revenue increased to 27.3% for the year ended December 31, 2017, from 26.9% in 2016.
Other Store Expenses. Other store expenses include occupancy, charge-offs due to customer stolen merchandise, delivery, advertising, selling, insurance, travel and other store-level operating expenses. Other store expenses decreased by $47.4 million, or 6.0%, to $744.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to $791.6 million in 2016, primarily attributable to a decrease of $64.0 million in the Core U.S. segment as a result of our rationalization of the Core U.S. store base, partially offset by an increase of $17.6 million in the Acceptance Now segment primarily, partially due to a one-time, non-cash, charge to write-off unreconciled invoices with certain retail partners, in addition to increased customer stolen merchandise. Other store expenses expressed as a percentage of total store revenue increased to 27.8% for the year ended December 31, 2017, from 26.9% in 2016.
General and Administrative Expenses. General and administrative expenses include all corporate overhead expenses related to our headquarters such as salaries, payroll taxes and benefits, stock-based compensation, occupancy, administrative and other operating expenses, as well as salaries and labor costs for our regional directors, divisional vice presidents and executive vice presidents. General and administrative expenses increased by $2.2 million, or 1.3%, to $171.1 million for the year ended

23




December 31, 2017, as compared to $168.9 million in 2016, primarily due to project related expenses, insurance expenses, legal and other professional fees. General and administrative expenses expressed as a percentage of total revenue increased to 6.3% for the year ended December 31, 2017, compared to 5.7% in 2016.
Goodwill Impairment Charge. During 2016, we recognized a goodwill impairment charge of $151.3 million due to an impairment of the goodwill in the Core U.S. segment. Goodwill impairment charge is discussed further in Note F to the consolidated financial statements.
Other Charges. Other charges increased by $38.9 million, or 191.7%, to $59.2 million in 2017, as compared to $20.3 million in 2016. Other charges for the year ended December 31, 2017 primarily included charges related to the closure of Acceptance Now locations, write-downs of capitalized software, incremental legal and advisory fees, damage caused by hurricanes, and reductions in our field support center, partially offset by legal settlements. Other charges for the year ended December 31, 2016 primarily included charges related to the closure of Core U.S. and Mexico stores, and Acceptance Now locations, partially offset by litigation settlements. See Note M to the consolidated financial statements for additional detail regarding these other charges.
Operating Loss. Operating loss decreased $3.5 million, or 5.3%, to $63.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to $66.6 million in 2016, due to a decrease of $87.2 million in the Core U.S. segment, primarily related to the goodwill impairment charge recorded in 2016, partially offset by increases of $57.3 million in the Acceptance Now segment as discussed in the segment performance sections below. Operating loss expressed as a percentage of total revenue was 2.3% for the year ended December 31, 2017, as compared to 2.2% for 2016. Excluding the goodwill impairment and other charges operating results as a percentage of revenue would have been (0.1)% and 3.5% in 2017 and 2016, respectively, discussed further in the segment performance sections below.
Income Tax Benefit. Income tax benefit for the twelve months ended December 31, 2017 was $116.9 million, as compared to $8.1 million in 2016. The effective tax rate was 106.0% for the twelve months ended December 31, 2017, compared to 7.1% in 2016. The increase in income tax benefit is primarily due to the impact of the Tax Act on our deferred tax balances. Excluding impacts from other charges, the Tax Act, and the goodwill impairment charge, the effective tax rate was 41.5% for the twelve months ended December 31, 2017, as compared to 29.8% in 2016.
Net Earnings (Loss). Net earnings were $6.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to net loss of $105.2 million in 2016. Excluding impacts from other charges, the Tax Act, and the goodwill impairment charge, net loss was $28.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to net earnings of $40.9 million in 2016.
Segment Performance
Core U.S. segment. 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2018-2017 Change
 
2017-2016 Change
(Dollar amounts in thousands)
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
$
 
%
 
$
 
%
Revenues
$
1,855,712

 
$
1,835,422

 
$
2,069,725

 
$
20,290

 
1.1
%
 
$
(234,303
)
 
(11.3
)%
Gross profit
1,299,809

 
1,276,212

 
1,467,679

 
23,597

 
1.8
%
 
(191,467
)
 
(13.0
)%
Operating profit (loss)
147,787

 
86,196

 
(1,020
)
 
61,591

 
71.5
%
 
87,216

 
8,550.6
 %
Change in same store revenue
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
4.4
%
 


 
(8.0
)%
Stores in same store revenue calculation
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1,904

 
 
 
2,118

Revenues. The increase in revenue for the year ended December 31, 2018 was driven primarily by an increase in rentals and fees revenue of $26.1 million, as compared to 2017. This increase is primarily due to increases in same store sales, partially offset by decreases of $3.3 million and $2.1 million in merchandise sales and installment sales, respectively, primarily due to rationalization of our Core U.S. store base.
Gross Profit. Gross profit increased in 2018 primarily due to the increase in rentals and fees revenue described above, and a decrease in cost of rentals and fees of $8.1 million, partially offset by an increase in cost of merchandise sold of $5.1 million as compared to 2017. Gross profit as a percentage of segment revenues increased to 70.0% in 2018 from 69.5% in 2017, primarily due to the intercompany book value adjustment for Acceptance Now returned product transferred to Core U.S. stores.
Operating Profit. Operating profit as a percentage of segment revenues was 8.0% for 2018 compared to 4.7% for 2017, primarily due to decreases in other store expenses of $37.5 million and store labor of $19.8 million, partially offset by other charges and higher merchandise losses. Declines in store labor and other store expenses were driven primarily by lower store count, offset by the increase in other charges primarily related to one-time charges associated with store closures. Charge-offs in our Core U.S.

24




rent-to-own stores due to customer stolen merchandise, expressed as a percentage of Core U.S. rent-to-own revenues, were approximately 3.3% for the year ended December 31, 2018, compared to 2.7% in 2017. Other merchandise losses include unrepairable and missing merchandise, and loss/damage waiver claims. Charge-offs in our Core U.S. rent-to-own stores due to other merchandise losses, expressed as a percentage of revenues, were approximately 1.6% for the year ended December 31, 2018, compared to 2.1% in 2017.
Acceptance Now segment. 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2018-2017 Change
 
2017-2016 Change
(Dollar amounts in thousands)
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
$
 
%
 
$
 
%
Revenues
$
722,562

 
$
797,987

 
$
817,814

 
$
(75,425
)
 
(9.5
)%
 
$
(19,827
)
 
(2.4
)%
Gross profit
339,616

 
400,002

 
422,381

 
(60,386
)
 
(15.1
)%
 
(22,379
)
 
(5.3
)%
Operating profit
93,951

 
48,618

 
105,925

 
45,333

 
93.2
 %
 
(57,307
)
 
(54.1
)%
Change in same store revenue
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
5.9
 %
 
 
 
5.2
 %
Stores in same store revenue calculation
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
563

 
 
 
1,140

Revenues. The decrease in revenue for the year ended December 31, 2018 was driven primarily by store closures for hhgregg and Conn's locations, partially offset by increases in same store sales.
Gross Profit. Gross profit decreased for the year ended December 31, 2018 compared to 2017, primarily due to the decrease in revenue described above. Gross profit as a percentage of segment revenue decreased to 47.0% in 2018 as compared to 50.1% in 2017, primarily due to the intercompany book value adjustment of Acceptance Now returned product transferred to Core U.S. stores, and the new value proposition enhancements.
Operating Profit. Operating profit increased by 93.2% compared to 2017, primarily due to decreases in labor and other store expenses driven by the closure of our collection centers, decreased rental merchandise losses, and a decrease in charges incurred for store closures in 2017. Charge-offs in our Acceptance Now locations due to customer stolen merchandise, expressed as a percentage of revenues, were approximately 9.0% in 2018 as compared to 12.7% in 2017. Other merchandise losses include unrepairable merchandise and loss/damage waiver claims. Charge-offs in our Acceptance Now locations due to other merchandise losses, expressed as a percentage of revenues, were approximately 0.6% and 1.3% in 2018 and 2017, respectively.
Mexico segment. 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2018-2017 Change
 
2017-2016 Change
(Dollar amounts in thousands)
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
$
 
%
 
$
 
%
Revenues
$
49,613

 
$
47,005

 
$
50,927

 
$
2,608

 
5.5
%
 
$
(3,922
)
 
(7.7
)%
Gross profit
34,364

 
32,592

 
35,549

 
1,772

 
5.4
%
 
(2,957
)
 
(8.3
)%
Operating profit (loss)
2,605

 
(260
)
 
(2,449
)
 
2,865

 
1,101.9
%
 
2,189

 
89.4
 %
Change in same store revenue
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
8.5
%
 
 
 
(5.1
)%
Stores in same store revenue calculation
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
108

 
 
 
118

Revenues. Revenues for 2018 were negatively impacted by exchange rate fluctuations of approximately $0.9 million, as compared to 2017. On a constant currency basis, revenues for the year ended December 31, 2018 increased approximately $3.5 million.
Gross Profit. Gross profit for the year ended December 31, 2018 was negatively impacted by approximately $0.6 million due to exchange rate fluctuations as compared to 2017. On a constant currency basis, gross profit increased by approximately $2.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, compared to 2017. Gross profit as a percentage of segment revenues remained flat at 69.3% in 2018 and 2017.
Operating Profit (Loss). Operating profit for the year ended December 31, 2018 was minimally impacted by exchange rate fluctuations compared to 2017. Operating profit as a percentage of segment revenues increased to 5.3% in 2018, compared to a loss of 0.6% in 2017.

25




Franchising segment. 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2018-2017 Change
 
2017-2016 Change
(Dollar amounts in thousands)
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
$
 
%
 
$
 
%
Revenues
$
32,578

 
$
22,126

 
$
24,786

 
$
10,452

 
47.2
 %
 
$
(2,660
)
 
(10.7
)%
Gross profit
14,379

 
9,736

 
9,440

 
4,643

 
47.7
 %
 
296

 
3.1
 %
Operating profit
4,385

 
5,081

 
5,650

 
(696
)
 
(13.7
)%
 
(569
)
 
(10.1
)%
Revenues. Revenues increased for the year ended December 31, 2018, compared to 2017, primarily due to an increase in merchandise sales driven by higher store count and a change in accounting for franchise advertising fees as a result of the adoption of ASC 606. During the year ended December 31, 2018 franchise advertising fees are presented on a gross basis, as revenue, in the consolidated statement of operations, rather than net of operating expenses in the consolidated statement of operations, as they are presented in 2017.
Gross Profit. Gross profit as a percentage of segment revenues increased to 44.1% in 2018 from 44.0% in 2017, primarily due to the change in accounting for franchise advertising fees described above.
Operating Profit. Operating profit as a percentage of segment revenues decreased to13.5% in 2018 from 23.0% for 2017.
Quarterly Results
The following table contains certain unaudited historical financial information for the quarters indicated:
(In thousands, except per share data)
1st Quarter
 
2nd Quarter
 
3rd Quarter
 
4th Quarter
Year Ended December 31, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenues
$
698,043

 
$
655,730

 
$
644,942

 
$
661,750

Gross profit
436,978

 
423,886

 
407,740

 
419,564

Operating (loss) profit
(10,270
)
 
27,151

 
25,632

 
13,624

Net (loss) earnings
(19,843
)
 
13,753

 
12,918

 
1,664

Basic (loss) earnings per common share
$
(0.37
)
 
$
0.26

 
$
0.24

 
$
0.03

Diluted (loss) earnings per common share
$
(0.37
)
 
$
0.25

 
$
0.24

 
$
0.03

(In thousands, except per share data)
1st Quarter
 
2nd Quarter
 
3rd Quarter
 
4th Quarter
Year Ended December 31, 2017
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenues
$
741,986

 
$
677,635

 
$
643,965

 
$
638,954

Gross profit
462,663

 
432,533

 
412,465

 
410,881

Operating profit (loss)
1,152

 
(873
)
 
(8,445
)
 
(54,893
)
Net (loss) earnings
(6,679
)
 
(8,893
)
 
(12,599
)
 
34,824

Basic (loss) earnings per common share
$
(0.13
)
 
$
(0.17
)
 
$
(0.24
)
 
$
0.65

Diluted (loss) earnings per common share
$
(0.13
)
 
$
(0.17
)
 
$
(0.24
)
 
$
0.65

Cash dividends declared per common share
$
0.08

 
$
0.08

 
$

 
$

(As a percentage of revenues)
1st Quarter
 
2nd Quarter
 
3rd Quarter
 
4th Quarter
Year Ended December 31, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenues
100.0
 %
 
100.0
%
 
100.0
%
 
100.0
%
Gross profit
62.6
 %
 
64.6
%
 
63.2
%
 
63.4
%
Operating (loss) profit
(1.5
)%
 
4.1
%
 
4.0
%
 
2.1
%
Net (loss) earnings
(2.8
)%
 
2.1
%
 
2.0
%
 
0.3
%

26




(As a percentage of revenues)
1st Quarter
 
2nd Quarter
 
3rd Quarter
 
4th Quarter
Year Ended December 31, 2017
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenues
100.0
 %
 
100.0
 %
 
100.0
 %
 
100.0
 %
Gross profit
62.4
 %
 
63.8
 %
 
64.1
 %
 
64.3
 %
Operating profit (loss)
0.2
 %
 
(0.1
)%
 
(1.3
)%
 
(8.6
)%
Net (loss) earnings
(0.9
)%
 
(1.3
)%
 
(2.0
)%
 
5.5
 %
Liquidity and Capital Resources
Overview. For the year ended December 31, 2018, we generated $227.5 million in operating cash flow. We paid down debt by $139.3 million from cash generated from operations, used cash in the amount of $28.0 million for capital expenditures, and received proceeds from the sale of property assets of $25.3 million, ending the year with $155.4 million of cash and cash equivalents.
Analysis of Cash Flow. Cash provided by operating activities increased by $117.0 million to $227.5 million in 2018 from $110.5 million in 2017. This was primarily attributable to the improvement in net earnings during the twelve months ended December 31, 2018 compared to 2017, receipt of our 2017 federal income tax refund of approximately $35.2 million, and other net changes in operating assets and liabilities.
Cash used in investing activities decreased approximately $58.6 million to $4.7 million in 2018 from $63.3 million in 2017, due primarily to a decrease in capital expenditures of approximately $37.5 million and an increase in proceeds from the sale of property assets of approximately $20.7 million.
Cash used in financing activities increased by $69.8 million to $140.3 million in 2018 from $70.5 million in 2017, primarily driven by our net reduction in debt of $139.3 million in 2018, as compared to a net decrease in debt of $52.5 million in 2017, offset by dividend payments of $12.8 million and higher debt issuance payments of $3.2 million during the twelve months ended December 31, 2017.
Liquidity Requirements. Our primary liquidity requirements are for rental merchandise purchases. Other capital requirements include expenditures for property assets and debt service. Our primary sources of liquidity have been cash provided by operations. Should we require additional funding sources, we maintain revolving credit facilities, including a $12.5 million line of credit at INTRUST Bank, N.A. We utilize our Revolving Facility for the issuance of letters of credit, as well as to manage normal fluctuations in operational cash flow caused by the timing of cash receipts. In that regard, we may from time to time draw funds under the Revolving Facility for general corporate purposes. Amounts are drawn as needed due to the timing of cash flows and are generally paid down as cash is generated by our operating activities.
We believe the cash flow generated from operations, together with amounts available under our Credit Agreement for the remainder of its term, will be sufficient to fund our liquidity requirements during the next 12 months. While our operating cash flow has been strong and we expect this strength to continue, our liquidity could be negatively impacted if we do not remain as profitable as we expect. At February 19, 2019, we had $181.1 million in cash on hand, and $95.9 million available under our Revolving Facility at December 31, 2018.
The availability and attractiveness of any outside sources of financing will depend on a number of factors, some of which relate to our financial condition and performance, and some of which are beyond our control, such as prevailing interest rates and general financing and economic conditions. There can be no assurance that additional financing will be available, or if available, that it will be on terms we find acceptable.
Deferred Taxes. Certain federal tax legislation enacted during the period 2009 to 2017 permitted bonus first-year depreciation deductions ranging from 50% to 100% of the adjusted basis of qualified property placed in service during such years. The depreciation benefits associated with these tax acts are now reversing. The Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015 ("PATH") extended the 50% bonus depreciation to 2015 and through September 26, 2017, when it was updated by the Tax Act. The Tax Act allows 100% bonus depreciation for certain property placed in service between September 27, 2017 and December 31, 2022, at which point it will begin to phase out. The bonus depreciation provided by the Tax Act resulted in an estimated benefit of $174 million for us in 2018. We estimate the remaining tax deferral associated with bonus depreciation from this act is approximately $207 million at December 31, 2018, of which approximately 78%, or $161 million, will reverse in 2019, and the majority of the remainder will reverse between 2020 and 2021.

27




Merchandise Losses. Merchandise losses consist of the following: 
 
Year Ended December 31,
(In thousands)
2018
 
2017
 
2016
Customer stolen merchandise
$
136,705

 
$
161,912

 
$
169,021

Other merchandise losses(1)
33,219

 
47,596

 
49,731

Total merchandise losses
$
169,924

 
$
209,508

 
$
218,752

(1) 
Other merchandise losses include unrepairable and missing merchandise, and loss/damage waiver claims.
Capital Expenditures. We make capital expenditures in order to maintain our existing operations as well as for new capital assets in new and acquired stores, and investment in information technology. We spent $28.0 million, $65.5 million and $61.1 million on capital expenditures in the years 2018, 2017 and 2016, respectively.
Acquisitions and New Location Openings. See Note F to the consolidated financial statements for information about cash used to acquire locations and accounts. The table below summarizes the location activity for the years ended December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016.
 
Year Ended December 31, 2018
 
Core U.S.
 
Acceptance Now Staffed
 
Acceptance Now Direct
 
Mexico
 
Franchising
 
Total
Locations at beginning of period
2,381

 
1,106

 
125

 
131

 
225

 
3,968

New location openings

 
122

 
7

 

 
3

 
132

Acquired locations remaining open
1

 

 

 

 
71

 
72

Conversions

 
(3
)
 
3

 

 

 

Closed locations
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Merged with existing locations
(137
)
 
(119
)
 
(39
)
 
(8
)
 

 
(303
)
Sold or closed with no surviving location
(87
)
 

 

 
(1
)
 
(18
)
 
(106
)
Locations at end of period
2,158

 
1,106

 
96

 
122

 
281

 
3,763

Acquired locations closed and accounts merged with existing locations
6

 

 

 

 

 
6

Total approximate purchase price (in millions)
$
2.0

 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$
2.0

 
Year Ended December 31, 2017
 
Core U.S.
 
Acceptance Now Staffed
 
Acceptance Now Direct
 
Mexico
 
Franchising
 
Total
Locations at beginning of period
2,463

 
1,431

 
478

 
130

 
229

 
4,731

New location openings

 
222

 
24

 
1

 
1

 
248

Acquired locations remaining open

 

 

 

 
4

 
4

Conversions

 
(63
)
 
63

 

 

 

Closed locations
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Merged with existing locations
(51
)
 
(483
)
 
(439
)
 

 

 
(973
)
Sold or closed with no surviving location
(31
)
 
(1
)
 
(1
)
 

 
(9
)
 
(42
)
Locations at end of period
2,381

 
1,106

 
125

 
131

 
225

 
3,968

Acquired locations closed and accounts merged with existing locations
8

 

 

 

 

 
8

Total approximate purchase price (in millions)
$
2.5

 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$
2.5


28




 
Year Ended December 31, 2016
 
Core U.S.
 
Acceptance Now Staffed
Acceptance Now Direct
 
Mexico
 
Franchising
 
Total
Locations at beginning of period
2,672

 
1,444

 
532

 
143

 
227

 
5,018

New location openings

 
171

 
67

 
1

 
2

 
241

Acquired locations remaining open

 

 

 

 
5

 
5

Conversions

 
1

 
(2
)
 

 

 
(1
)
Closed locations
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Merged with existing locations
(185
)
 
(185
)
 

 
(4
)
 
(1
)
 
(375
)
Sold or closed with no surviving location
(24
)
 

 
(119
)
 
(10
)
 
(4
)
 
(157
)
Locations at end of period
2,463

 
1,431

 
478

 
130

 
229

 
4,731

Acquired locations closed and accounts merged with existing locations
3

 

 

 

 

 
3

Total approximate purchase price (in millions)
$
2.3

 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$
2.3

Senior Debt. As discussed in Note I to the consolidated financial statements, the Credit Agreement consists of a $200.0 million Revolving Facility.
We may use the full amount of the Revolving Facility for the issuance of letters of credit, of which $92.0 million had been so utilized as of February 19, 2019. The Revolving Facility has a scheduled maturity of December 31, 2019.
Senior Notes. See descriptions of the senior notes in Note J to the consolidated financial statements.
Store Leases. We lease space for all of our Core U.S. and Mexico stores and certain support facilities under operating leases expiring at various times through 2024. Most of our store leases are five year leases and contain renewal options for additional periods ranging from three to five years at rental rates adjusted according to agreed-upon formulas.
Contractual Cash Commitments. The table below summarizes debt, lease and other minimum cash obligations outstanding as of December 31, 2018:
 
Payments Due by Period
(In thousands)
Total
 
2019
 
2020-2021
 
2022-2023
 
Thereafter
6.625% Senior Notes(1)
331,528

 
19,394

 
312,134

 

 

4.75% Senior Notes(2)
279,688