Company Quick10K Filing
Quick10K
Regional Management
Closing Price ($) Shares Out (MM) Market Cap ($MM)
$23.80 12 $284
10-Q 2019-06-30 Quarter: 2019-06-30
10-Q 2019-03-31 Quarter: 2019-03-31
10-K 2018-12-31 Annual: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-09-30 Quarter: 2018-09-30
10-Q 2018-06-30 Quarter: 2018-06-30
10-Q 2018-03-31 Quarter: 2018-03-31
10-K 2017-12-31 Annual: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-09-30 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-Q 2017-06-30 Quarter: 2017-06-30
10-Q 2017-03-31 Quarter: 2017-03-31
10-K 2016-12-31 Annual: 2016-12-31
10-Q 2016-09-30 Quarter: 2016-09-30
10-Q 2016-06-30 Quarter: 2016-06-30
10-Q 2016-03-31 Quarter: 2016-03-31
10-K 2015-12-31 Annual: 2015-12-31
10-Q 2015-09-30 Quarter: 2015-09-30
10-Q 2015-06-30 Quarter: 2015-06-30
10-Q 2015-03-31 Quarter: 2015-03-31
10-K 2014-12-31 Annual: 2014-12-31
10-Q 2014-09-30 Quarter: 2014-09-30
10-Q 2014-06-30 Quarter: 2014-06-30
10-Q 2014-03-31 Quarter: 2014-03-31
10-K 2013-12-31 Annual: 2013-12-31
8-K 2019-07-31 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-07-10 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2019-05-14 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-05-06 Earnings, Officers, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2019-04-25 Shareholder Vote
8-K 2019-02-06 Earnings, Officers, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-12-13 Enter Agreement, Off-BS Arrangement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-11-08 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-10-30 Enter Agreement, Off-BS Arrangement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-09-24 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-30 Enter Agreement, Off-BS Arrangement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-15 Regulation FD
8-K 2018-07-31 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-06-28 Enter Agreement, Off-BS Arrangement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-06-18 Regulation FD, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-05-23 Enter Agreement, Off-BS Arrangement, Exhibits
8-K 2018-03-21 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-02-26 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-02-07 Earnings, Officers, Code of Ethics, Exhibits
8-K 2018-01-26 Enter Agreement, Officers, Regulation FD, Exhibits
CHA China Telecom 41,650
DRE Duke Realty 10,940
CIG Energy Co of Minas Gerais 5,130
RDN Radian Group 4,720
OCFC Oceanfirst Financial 1,290
OIS Oil States International 1,110
DSKE Daseke 353
PLPC Preformed Line Products 253
BUKS Butler National 0
GAIF Graham Alternative Investment Fund I 0
RM 2019-06-30
Item 1. Financial Statements.
Note 1. Nature of Business
Note 2. Basis of Presentation and Significant Accounting Policies
Note 3. Finance Receivables, Credit Quality Information, and Allowance for Credit Losses
Note 4. Leases
Note 5. Long-Term Debt
Note 6. Stockholders' Equity
Note 7. Disclosure About Fair Value of Financial Instruments
Note 8. Income Taxes
Note 9. Earnings per Share
Note 10. Share-Based Compensation
Note 11. Commitments and Contingencies
Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.
Item 4. Controls and Procedures.
Part II. Other Information
Item 1. Legal Proceedings.
Item 1A. Risk Factors.
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.
Item 6. Exhibits.
EX-31.1 d760179dex311.htm
EX-31.2 d760179dex312.htm
EX-32.1 d760179dex321.htm

Regional Management Earnings 2019-06-30

RM 10Q Quarterly Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

10-Q 1 d760179d10q.htm 10-Q 10-Q
Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-Q

 

 

 

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2019

OR

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period ended

Commission File Number: 001-35477

 

 

Regional Management Corp.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Delaware   57-0847115

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

979 Batesville Road, Suite B

Greer, South Carolina

  29651
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

(864) 448-7000

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of Each Class

 

Trading

Symbol

 

Name of Each Exchange

on Which Registered

Common Stock, $0.10 par value   RM   New York Stock Exchange

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  ☒    No  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (Section 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes  ☒    No  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer      Accelerated filer  
Non-accelerated filer      Smaller reporting company  
     Emerging growth company  

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ☐    No  ☒

As of July 30, 2019, the registrant had outstanding 11,481,659 shares of Common Stock, $0.10 par value.

 

 

 


Table of Contents
         Page No.
PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION   
Item 1.   Financial Statements   
 

Consolidated Balance Sheets Dated June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018

   3
 

Consolidated Statements of Income for the Three and Six Months Ended June  30, 2019 and 2018

   4
 

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the Three and Six Months Ended June 30, 2019 and 2018

   5
 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Six Months Ended June 30, 2019 and 2018

   6
 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

   7
Item 2.   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations    20
Item 3.   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk    38
Item 4.   Controls and Procedures    39
PART II. OTHER INFORMATION   
Item 1.   Legal Proceedings    40
Item 1A.   Risk Factors    40
Item 2.   Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds    40
Item 6.   Exhibits    40
SIGNATURE    41

 

2


Table of Contents
ITEM 1.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS.

Regional Management Corp. and Subsidiaries

Consolidated Balance Sheets

(in thousands, except par value amounts)

 

Assets    June 30, 2019
(Unaudited)
    December 31, 2018  

Cash

   $ 694     $ 3,657  

Gross finance receivables

     1,300,043       1,237,526  

Unearned finance charges and insurance premiums

     (326,609     (305,283
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Finance receivables

     973,434       932,243  

Allowance for credit losses

     (57,200     (58,300
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net finance receivables

     916,234       873,943  

Restricted cash

     41,803       46,484  

Lease assets

     25,575       —    

Property and equipment

     14,132       13,926  

Intangible assets

     9,953       10,010  

Deferred tax asset

     437       —    

Other assets

     10,488       8,375  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 1,019,316     $ 956,395  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity

    

Liabilities:

    

Long-term debt

   $ 689,310     $ 660,507  

Unamortized debt issuance costs

     (7,357     (9,158
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net long-term debt

     681,953       651,349  

Lease liabilities

     27,454       —    

Accounts payable and accrued expenses

     19,690       25,138  

Deferred tax liability

     —         747  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

     729,097       677,234  

Commitments and contingencies (Notes 4 and 10)

    

Stockholders’ equity:

    

Preferred stock ($0.10 par value, 100,000 shares authorized, no shares issued or outstanding)

     —         —    

Common stock ($0.10 par value, 1,000,000 shares authorized, 13,494 shares issued and 11,663 shares outstanding at June 30, 2019 and 13,323 shares issued and 11,777 shares outstanding at December 31, 2018)

     1,349       1,332  

Additional paid-in-capital

     100,486       98,778  

Retained earnings

     220,574       204,097  

Treasury stock (1,831 shares at June 30, 2019 and 1,546 shares at December 31, 2018)

     (32,190     (25,046
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total stockholders’ equity

     290,219       279,161  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

   $ 1,019,316     $ 956,395  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

The following table presents the assets and liabilities of our consolidated variable interest entities:

    

Assets

    

Cash

   $ 167     $ 168  

Finance receivables

     356,679       342,481  

Allowance for credit losses

     (17,406     (18,378

Restricted cash

     34,268       39,361  

Other assets

     129       75  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 373,837     $ 363,707  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Liabilities

    

Net long-term debt

   $ 337,776     $ 324,879  

Accounts payable and accrued expenses

     83       25  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

   $ 337,859     $ 324,904  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

3


Table of Contents

Regional Management Corp. and Subsidiaries

Consolidated Statements of Income

(Unaudited)

(in thousands, except per share amounts)

 

     Three Months Ended
June 30,
     Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
     2019      2018      2019      2018  

Revenue

           

Interest and fee income

   $ 75,974      $ 66,829      $ 150,296      $ 132,980  

Insurance income, net

     5,066        2,882        9,179        6,271  

Other income

     3,234        2,705        6,547        5,790  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total revenue

     84,274        72,416        166,022        145,041  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Expenses

           

Provision for credit losses

     25,714        20,203        49,057        39,718  

Personnel

     22,511        19,390        44,904        40,618  

Occupancy

     6,210        5,478        12,375        11,096  

Marketing

     2,261        2,258        3,912        3,711  

Other

     6,761        6,089        14,735        12,382  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total general and administrative expenses

     37,743        33,215        75,926        67,807  

Interest expense

     9,771        7,915        19,492        15,092  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Income before income taxes

     11,046        11,083        21,547        22,424  

Income taxes

     2,677        2,601        5,070        5,298  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 8,369      $ 8,482      $ 16,477      $ 17,126  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net income per common share:

           

Basic

   $ 0.71      $ 0.73      $ 1.41      $ 1.47  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Diluted

   $ 0.70      $ 0.70      $ 1.37      $ 1.42  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Weighted-average shares outstanding:

           

Basic

     11,706        11,658        11,709        11,638  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Diluted

     12,022        12,138        12,049        12,084  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

4


Table of Contents

Regional Management Corp. and Subsidiaries

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity

(Unaudited)

(in thousands)

 

     Three Months Ended June 30, 2019  
     Common Stock     Additional
Paid-in-Capital
    Retained
Earnings
     Treasury
Stock
    Total  
     Shares      Amount  

Balance, March 31, 2019

     13,465      $ 1,347     $ 99,310     $ 212,205      $ (25,046   $ 287,816  

Issuance of restricted stock awards

     29        3       (3     —          —         —    

Repurchase of common stock

     —          —         —         —          (7,144     (7,144

Shares withheld related to net share settlement

     —          (1     (16     —          —         (17

Share-based compensation

     —          —         1,195       —          —         1,195  

Net income

     —          —         —         8,369        —         8,369  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance, June 30, 2019

     13,494      $ 1,349     $ 100,486     $ 220,574      $ (32,190   $ 290,219  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

     Three Months Ended June 30, 2018  
     Common Stock     Additional
Paid-in-Capital
    Retained
Earnings
     Treasury
Stock
    Total  
     Shares     Amount  

Balance, March 31, 2018

     13,294     $ 1,329     $ 95,272     $ 177,396      $ (25,046   $ 248,951  

Issuance of restricted stock awards

     29       3       (3     —          —         —    

Exercise of stock options

     29       2       —         —          —         2  

Shares withheld related to net share settlement

     (18     (1     (196     —          —         (197

Share-based compensation

     —         —         1,296       —          —         1,296  

Net income

     —         —         —         8,482        —         8,482  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance, June 30, 2018

     13,334     $ 1,333     $ 96,369     $ 185,878      $ (25,046   $ 258,534  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

     Six Months Ended June 30, 2019  
     Common Stock     Additional
Paid-in-Capital
    Retained
Earnings
     Treasury
Stock
    Total  
     Shares     Amount  

Balance, December 31, 2018

     13,323     $ 1,332     $ 98,778     $ 204,097      $ (25,046   $ 279,161  

Issuance of restricted stock awards

     190       19       (19     —          —         —    

Repurchase of common stock

     —         —         —         —          (7,144     (7,144

Shares withheld related to net share settlement

     (19     (2     (465     —          —         (467

Share-based compensation

     —         —         2,192       —          —         2,192  

Net income

     —         —         —         16,477        —         16,477  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance, June 30, 2019

     13,494     $ 1,349     $ 100,486     $ 220,574      $ (32,190   $ 290,219  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

     Six Months Ended June 30, 2018  
     Common Stock     Additional
Paid-in-Capital
    Retained
Earnings
     Treasury
Stock
    Total  
     Shares     Amount  

Balance, December 31, 2017

     13,205     $ 1,321     $ 94,384     $ 168,752      $ (25,046   $ 239,411  

Issuance of restricted stock awards

     97       10       (10     —          —         —    

Exercise of stock options

     89       8       —         —          —         8  

Shares withheld related to net share settlement

     (57     (6     (509     —          —         (515

Share-based compensation

     —         —         2,504       —          —         2,504  

Net income

     —         —         —         17,126        —         17,126  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance, June 30, 2018

     13,334     $ 1,333     $ 96,369     $ 185,878      $ (25,046   $ 258,534  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

5


Table of Contents

Regional Management Corp. and Subsidiaries

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

(Unaudited)

(in thousands)

 

     Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
     2019     2018  

Cash flows from operating activities:

    

Net income

   $ 16,477     $ 17,126  

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:

    

Provision for credit losses

     49,057       39,718  

Depreciation and amortization

     5,327       4,071  

Loss on disposal of property and equipment

     41       50  

Share-based compensation

     2,192       2,504  

Fair value adjustment on interest rate caps

     243       (139

Deferred income taxes, net

     (1,185     (1,129

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

    

Increase in other assets

     (473     (1,271

Decrease in accounts payable and accrued expenses

     (5,072     (840
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

     66,607       60,090  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities:

    

Net originations of finance receivables

     (91,348     (69,954

Purchases of intangible assets

     (993     (1,183

Purchases of property and equipment

     (2,418     (1,667

Proceeds from disposal of property and equipment

     49       —    
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash used in investing activities

     (94,710     (72,804
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities:

    

Net advances (payments) on senior revolving credit facility

     17,516       (68,870

Payments on amortizing loan

     (9,391     (20,487

Net advances (payments) on revolving warehouse credit facility

     20,748       (36,374

Net advances (payments) on securitizations

     (70     150,000  

Payments for debt issuance costs

     (386     (3,730

Taxes paid related to net share settlement of equity awards

     (814     (687

Repurchase of common stock

     (7,144     —    
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided by financing activities

     20,459       19,852  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net change in cash and restricted cash

     (7,644     7,138  

Cash and restricted cash at beginning of period

     50,141       22,017  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash and restricted cash at end of period

   $ 42,497     $ 29,155  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Supplemental cash flow information:

    

Interest paid

   $ 17,059     $ 14,249  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income taxes paid

   $ 9,121     $ 5,543  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

The following table reconciles cash and restricted cash from the Consolidated Balance Sheets to the statements above:

 

     June 30, 2019      December 31, 2018      June 30, 2018      December 31, 2017  

Cash

   $ 694      $ 3,657      $ 2,799      $ 5,230  

Restricted cash

     41,803        46,484        26,356        16,787  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total cash and restricted cash

   $ 42,497      $ 50,141      $ 29,155      $ 22,017  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

6


Table of Contents

Regional Management Corp. and Subsidiaries

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

Note 1. Nature of Business

Regional Management Corp. (the “Company”) was incorporated and began operations in 1987. The Company is engaged in the consumer finance business, offering small loans, large loans, retail loans, and related payment and collateral protection insurance products. The Company previously offered automobile loans, but it ceased such originations in November 2017. As of June 30, 2019, the Company operated under the name “Regional Finance” in 356 branch locations across 11 states in the Southeastern, Southwestern, Mid-Atlantic, and Midwestern United States.

The Company’s loan volume and contractual delinquency follow seasonal trends. Demand for the Company’s small and large loans is typically highest during the second, third, and fourth quarters, which the Company believes is largely due to customers borrowing money for vacation, back-to-school, and holiday spending. Loan demand has generally been the lowest during the first quarter, which the Company believes is largely due to the timing of income tax refunds. Delinquencies generally reach their lowest point in the first half of the year and rise in the second half of the year. Consequently, the Company experiences seasonal fluctuations in its operating results and cash needs.

Note 2. Basis of Presentation and Significant Accounting Policies

Basis of presentation: The consolidated financial statements of the Company have been prepared in accordance with the instructions to the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) and generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America (“GAAP”) for interim financial information and, accordingly, do not include all information and note disclosures required by GAAP for complete financial statements. The interim financial statements in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q have not been audited by an independent registered public accounting firm in accordance with standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), but in the opinion of management, the interim financial statements include all adjustments, consisting only of normal recurring adjustments, necessary for a fair presentation of the Company’s financial position, results of operations, and cash flows in accordance with GAAP. These consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018, as filed with the SEC.

Significant accounting policies: The following is a description of significant accounting policies used in preparing the financial statements. The accounting and reporting policies of the Company are in accordance with GAAP and conform to general practices within the consumer finance industry.

Principles of consolidation: The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries. All significant intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. The Company operates through a separate wholly-owned subsidiary in each state. The Company also consolidates variable interest entities (each, a “VIE”) when it is considered to be the primary beneficiary of the VIE because it has (i) power over the significant activities of the VIE and (ii) the obligation to absorb losses or the right to receive returns that could be significant to the VIE.

Variable interest entities: The Company transfers pools of loans to wholly-owned, bankruptcy-remote, special purpose entities (each, an “SPE”) to secure debt for general funding purposes. These entities have the limited purpose of acquiring finance receivables and holding and making payments on the related debts. Assets transferred to each SPE are legally isolated from the Company and its affiliates, as well as the claims of the Company’s and its affiliates’ creditors. Further, the assets of each SPE are owned by such SPE and are not available to satisfy the debts or other obligations of the Company or any of its affiliates. The Company continues to service the finance receivables transferred to the SPEs. The lenders and investors in the debt issued by the SPEs generally only have recourse to the assets of the SPEs and do not have recourse to the general credit of the Company.

The SPEs’ debt arrangements are structured to provide enhancements to the lenders and investors in the form of overcollateralization (the principal balance of the collateral exceeds the balance of the debt) and reserve funds (restricted cash held by the SPEs). These enhancements, along with the isolated finance receivables pools, increase the creditworthiness of the SPEs above that of the Company as a whole. This increases the marketability of the Company’s collateral for borrowing purposes, leading to more favorable borrowing terms, improved interest rate risk management, and additional flexibility to grow the business.

The SPEs are considered VIEs under GAAP and are consolidated into the financial statements of their primary beneficiary. The Company is considered to be the primary beneficiary of the SPEs because it has (i) power over the significant activities through its role as servicer of the finance receivables under each debt arrangement and (ii) the obligation to absorb losses or the right to receive returns that could be significant through the Company’s interest in the monthly residual cash flows of the SPEs after each debt is paid.

 

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Consolidation of VIEs results in these transactions being accounted for as secured borrowings; therefore, the pooled receivables and the related debts remain on the consolidated balance sheet of the Company. Each debt is secured solely by the assets of the VIEs and not by any other assets of the Company. The assets of the VIEs are the only source of funds for repayment on each debt, and restricted cash held by the VIEs can only be used to support payments on the debt. The Company recognizes revenue and provision for credit losses on the finance receivables of the VIEs and interest expense on the related secured debt.

Use of estimates: The preparation of financial statements requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, revenues and expenses, and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities for the periods indicated in the financial statements. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Material estimates that are particularly susceptible to change relate to the determination of the allowance for credit losses, the fair value of share-based compensation, the valuation of deferred tax assets and liabilities, contingent liabilities on litigation matters, and the allocation of the purchase price to assets acquired in business combinations.

Reclassifications: Certain prior-period amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current presentation. Such reclassifications had no impact on previously reported net income or stockholders’ equity.

Recent accounting pronouncements: In February 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued an accounting update to increase transparency and comparability of accounting for lease transactions. The update required: (i) all leases to be recognized on the balance sheet as lease (right-of-use) assets and lease liabilities and (ii) both quantitative and qualitative disclosures regarding key information about leasing arrangements. The update was effective for annual and interim periods beginning after December 15, 2018. The Company completed the implementation of third-party software to facilitate compliance with the accounting and reporting requirements of the lease standard. Prior to adoption, all of the Company’s leases were classified as operating leases, with no lease assets or liabilities recorded. The Company transitioned to this accounting change on a modified retrospective basis by recording the cumulative-effect of lease assets and liabilities for active leases as of January 1, 2019. The Company did not restate comparative periods in transition and elected to use the effective date of January 1, 2019 as the initial date of transition. The Company also elected to utilize the package of transition practical expedients, which included not reassessing the following: (i) whether existing contracts contain leases, (ii) the existing classification of leases as operating or financing, or (iii) the initial direct costs of leases. The Company did not use hindsight to determine the lease term or include options to extend for leases existing at the transition date. In addition, the Company elected not to apply the new lease standard to leases with terms of twelve months or less.

As a result of the adoption of the new lease standard on January 1, 2019, the Company recorded $24.1 million for both lease liabilities and the corresponding lease assets. The lease liabilities were based on the present value of the remaining minimum rental payments using discount rates as of the effective date. There was no impact to the consolidated statements of income related to the adoption of this standard. The adoption of this standard did not require the Company to alter its debt covenants.

In June 2016, the FASB issued an accounting update significantly changing the impairment model for estimating credit losses on financial assets. The current incurred loss impairment model requires the recognition of credit losses when it is probable that a loss has been incurred. The incurred loss model will be replaced by an expected credit loss model, which requires entities to estimate the lifetime expected credit loss on such instruments and to record an allowance to offset the amortized cost basis of the financial asset. The new expected credit loss model will require earlier recognition of credit losses as compared to the incurred loss approach. The expected credit loss model uses historical experience, current conditions, and reasonable and supportable forecasts to estimate lifetime expected credit losses. This accounting update is effective for annual and interim periods beginning after December 15, 2019, and early adoption is permitted.

The Company’s cross-functional implementation team, expected credit loss software vendor, and expected credit loss consulting team are progressing with the established project plan to ensure compliance with all facets of the accounting update at the time of adoption. The Company believes the implementation of the accounting update will have a material adverse effect on the Company’s consolidated financial statements. The adoption of this standard will cause an increase to the allowance for credit losses, an increase to deferred tax assets, and a corresponding one-time cumulative reduction to retained earnings, net of tax, in the consolidated balance sheet as of January 1, 2020. The implementation of the accounting update will not result in changes in the cash flows of the financial assets and will not require existing debt covenants to be modified. The accounting update will require expanded disclosures related to the new model. As the implementation plan progresses, the Company will provide further disclosure in the future regarding the impact of the update on its consolidated financial statements.

In August 2018, the FASB issued an accounting update to provide additional guidance on the accounting for costs of implementation activities performed in a cloud computing arrangement that is a service contract. The amendments align the capitalization requirements for hosting arrangements that are service contracts with the capitalization principles for internal-use software. This update is effective for annual and interim periods beginning after December 15, 2019, and early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the potential impact of this update on its consolidated financial statements.

 

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Note 3. Finance Receivables, Credit Quality Information, and Allowance for Credit Losses

Finance receivables for the periods indicated consisted of the following:

 

In thousands    June 30, 2019      December 31, 2018  

Small loans

   $ 431,214      $ 437,662  

Large loans

     498,757        437,998  

Automobile loans

     15,686        26,154  

Retail loans

     27,777        30,429  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Finance receivables

   $ 973,434      $ 932,243  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

The contractual delinquency of the finance receivable portfolio by product and aging for the periods indicated are as follows:

 

     June 30, 2019  
     Small     Large     Automobile     Retail     Total  
In thousands    $      %     $      %     $      %     $      %     $      %  

Current

   $ 347,335        80.6   $ 425,496        85.3   $ 11,168        71.2   $ 21,216        76.3   $ 805,215        82.7

1 to 29 days past due

     50,603        11.7     47,814        9.6     3,224        20.6     4,376        15.8     106,017        10.9
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Delinquent accounts

                         

30 to 59 days

     11,270        2.5     9,424        1.8     565        3.5     823        3.0     22,082        2.3

60 to 89 days

     7,430        1.7     5,781        1.2     279        1.8     471        1.7     13,961        1.4

90 to 119 days

     5,391        1.3     4,089        0.9     145        1.0     337        1.2     9,962        1.1

120 to 149 days

     4,554        1.1     3,105        0.6     163        1.0     267        1.0     8,089        0.8

150 to 179 days

     4,631        1.1     3,048        0.6     142        0.9     287        1.0     8,108        0.8
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total delinquency

   $ 33,276        7.7   $ 25,447        5.1   $ 1,294        8.2   $ 2,185        7.9   $ 62,202        6.4
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total finance receivables

   $ 431,214        100.0   $ 498,757        100.0   $ 15,686        100.0   $ 27,777        100.0   $ 973,434        100.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Finance receivables in nonaccrual status

   $ 16,168        3.7   $ 11,849        2.4   $ 713        4.5   $ 1,007        3.6   $ 29,737        3.1
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

     December 31, 2018  
     Small     Large     Automobile     Retail     Total  
In thousands    $      %     $      %     $      %     $      %     $      %  

Current

   $ 347,053        79.3   $ 365,950        83.6   $ 17,767        67.9   $ 23,392        76.9   $ 754,162        80.9

1 to 29 days past due

     49,946        11.4     45,234        10.3     6,304        24.1     4,436        14.6     105,920        11.4
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Delinquent accounts

                         

30 to 59 days

     12,168        2.8     8,768        2.0     751        2.9     842        2.7     22,529        2.3

60 to 89 days

     9,555        2.2     6,779        1.5     421        1.6     627        2.1     17,382        1.9

90 to 119 days

     7,202        1.6     4,407        1.0     241        0.9     429        1.4     12,279        1.3

120 to 149 days

     6,266        1.4     3,823        0.9     434        1.7     367        1.2     10,890        1.2

150 to 179 days

     5,472        1.3     3,037        0.7     236        0.9     336        1.1     9,081        1.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total delinquency

   $ 40,663        9.3   $ 26,814        6.1   $ 2,083        8.0   $ 2,601        8.5   $ 72,161        7.7
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total finance receivables

   $ 437,662        100.0   $ 437,998        100.0   $ 26,154        100.0   $ 30,429        100.0   $ 932,243        100.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Finance receivables in nonaccrual status

   $ 22,549        5.2   $ 14,379        3.3   $ 1,359        5.2   $ 1,276        4.2   $ 39,563        4.2
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Changes in the allowance for credit losses for the periods indicated are as follows:

 

     Three Months Ended June 30,      Six Months Ended June 30,  
In thousands    2019      2018      2019      2018  

Balance at beginning of period

   $ 56,400      $ 47,750      $ 58,300      $ 48,910  

Provision for credit losses

     25,714        20,203        49,057        39,718  

Credit losses

     (26,001      (20,666      (52,378      (42,686

Recoveries

     1,087        1,163        2,221        2,508  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Balance at end of period

   $ 57,200      $ 48,450      $ 57,200      $ 48,450  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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In September 2018, the Company recorded a $3.9 million increase to the allowance for credit losses related to estimated incremental credit losses on customer accounts impacted by hurricanes. As of June 30, 2019, the allowance for credit losses no longer requires or includes an incremental hurricane allowance.

The following is a reconciliation of the allowance for credit losses by product for the periods indicated:

 

In thousands    Balance
April 1, 2019
     Provision      Credit Losses     Recoveries      Balance
June 30, 2019
     Finance
Receivables
June 30, 2019
     Allowance as
Percentage of
Finance
Receivables
June 30, 2019
 

Small loans

   $ 29,793      $ 13,736      $ (14,993   $ 598      $ 29,134      $ 431,214        6.8

Large loans

     23,217        10,989        (9,550     398        25,054        498,757        5.0

Automobile loans

     1,470        131        (566     58        1,093        15,686        7.0

Retail loans

     1,920        858        (892     33        1,919        27,777        6.9
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 56,400      $ 25,714      $ (26,001   $ 1,087      $ 57,200      $ 973,434        5.9
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

In thousands    Balance
April 1, 2018
     Provision      Credit Losses     Recoveries      Balance
June 30, 2018
     Finance
Receivables
June 30, 2018
     Allowance as
Percentage of
Finance
Receivables
June 30, 2018
 

Small loans

   $ 23,366      $ 12,720      $ (12,782   $ 665      $ 23,969      $ 384,690        6.2

Large loans

     18,589        6,784        (6,002     327        19,698        392,101        5.0

Automobile loans

     3,316        64        (873     135        2,642        39,414        6.7

Retail loans

     2,479        635        (1,009     36        2,141        31,033        6.9
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 47,750      $ 20,203      $ (20,666   $ 1,163      $ 48,450      $ 847,238        5.7
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

In thousands    Balance
January 1,
2019
     Provision      Credit Losses     Recoveries      Balance
June 30, 2019
     Finance
Receivables
June 30, 2019
     Allowance as
Percentage of
Finance
Receivables
June 30, 2019
 

Small loans

   $ 30,759      $ 27,691      $ (30,481   $ 1,165      $ 29,134      $ 431,214        6.8

Large loans

     23,702        19,440        (18,887     799        25,054        498,757        5.0

Automobile loans

     1,893        240        (1,218     178        1,093        15,686        7.0

Retail loans

     1,946        1,686        (1,792     79        1,919        27,777        6.9
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 58,300      $ 49,057      $ (52,378   $ 2,221      $ 57,200      $ 973,434        5.9
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

In thousands    Balance
January 1,
2018
     Provision      Credit Losses     Recoveries      Balance
June 30, 2018
     Finance
Receivables
June 30, 2018
     Allowance as
Percentage of
Finance
Receivables
June 30, 2018
 

Small loans

   $ 24,749      $ 24,003      $ (26,156   $ 1,373      $ 23,969      $ 384,690        6.2

Large loans

     17,548        13,663        (12,198     685        19,698        392,101        5.0

Automobile loans

     4,025        585        (2,340     372        2,642        39,414        6.7

Retail loans

     2,588        1,467        (1,992     78        2,141        31,033        6.9
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 48,910      $ 39,718      $ (42,686   $ 2,508      $ 48,450      $ 847,238        5.7
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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Impaired finance receivables as a percentage of total finance receivables were 3.0% and 2.9% as of June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively. The following is a summary of finance receivables evaluated for impairment for the periods indicated:

 

     June 30, 2019  
In thousands    Small      Large      Automobile      Retail      Total  

Impaired receivables specifically evaluated

   $ 9,839      $ 18,849      $ 799      $ 133      $ 29,620  

Finance receivables evaluated collectively

     421,375        479,908        14,887        27,644        943,814  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Finance receivables outstanding

   $ 431,214      $ 498,757      $ 15,686      $ 27,777      $ 973,434  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Impaired receivables in nonaccrual status

   $ 1,073      $ 2,187      $ 152      $ 44      $ 3,456  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Amount of the specific reserve for impaired accounts

   $ 4,135      $ 7,089      $ 380      $ 72      $ 11,676  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Amount of the general component of the allowance

   $ 24,999      $ 17,965      $ 713      $ 1,847      $ 45,524  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

     December 31, 2018  
In thousands    Small      Large      Automobile      Retail      Total  

Impaired receivables specifically evaluated

   $ 8,361      $ 17,196      $ 918      $ 110      $ 26,585  

Finance receivables evaluated collectively

     429,301        420,802        25,236        30,319        905,658  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Finance receivables outstanding

   $ 437,662      $ 437,998      $ 26,154      $ 30,429      $ 932,243  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Impaired receivables in nonaccrual status

   $ 1,209      $ 2,292      $ 178      $ 37      $ 3,716  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Amount of the specific reserve for impaired accounts

   $ 3,791      $ 6,860      $ 492      $ 61      $ 11,204  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Amount of the general component of the allowance

   $ 26,968      $ 16,842      $ 1,401      $ 1,885      $ 47,096  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The average recorded investment in impaired finance receivables and the amount of interest income recognized on impaired loans for the periods indicated are as follows:

 

     Three Months Ended June 30,  
     2019      2018  
In thousands    Average
Recorded
Investment
     Interest Income
Recognized
     Average
Recorded
Investment
     Interest Income
Recognized
 

Small loans

   $ 9,813      $ 437      $ 6,272      $ 248  

Large loans

     18,584        667        12,318        383  

Automobile loans

     803        9        1,512        11  

Retail loans

     134        1        105        1  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 29,334      $ 1,114      $ 20,207      $ 643  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
     Six Months Ended June 30,  
     2019      2018  
In thousands    Average
Recorded
Investment
     Interest Income
Recognized
     Average
Recorded
Investment
     Interest Income
Recognized
 

Small loans

   $ 9,336      $ 684      $ 5,868      $ 499  

Large loans

     18,011        1,081        11,693        754  

Automobile loans

     829        17        1,589        52  

Retail loans

     127        1        101        5  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 28,303      $ 1,783      $ 19,251      $ 1,310  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Note 4. Leases

The Company adopted a new lease accounting standard in January 2019. See Note 2, “Basis of Presentation and Significant Accounting Policies,” for an overview of the transition to this standard.

The Company maintains lease agreements related to its branch network and for its corporate headquarters. The branch lease agreements range from five to seven years and generally contain options to extend from three to five years. The corporate headquarters lease agreement is for eleven years and contains an option to extend for ten years. All of the Company’s lease agreements are considered operating leases. None of the Company’s lease payments are dependent on a rate or index that may change after the commencement date, other than the passage of time.

 

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The Company’s lease liability was $27.5 million as of June 30, 2019. This liability is based on the present value of the remaining minimum rental payments using a discount rate that is determined based on the Company’s incremental borrowing rate on its senior revolving credit facility. The lease asset was $25.6 million as of June 30, 2019. This asset includes right-of-use assets equaling the lease liability, net of prepaid rent and deferred rents that existed as of the adoption of the new lease standard.

The Company has made several policy elections related to lease assets and liabilities. The Company elected to utilize the package of transition practical expedients, which includes not reassessing the following at adoption: (i) whether existing contracts contained leases, (ii) the existing classification of leases as operating or financing, or (iii) the initial direct costs of leases. In addition, the Company did not use hindsight to determine the lease term or include options to extend for leases existing at the transition date.

Lease agreements with terms of twelve months or less are not capitalized as part of lease assets or liabilities and are expensed as incurred. The Company has elected to account for each separate lease component of a contract and its associated non-lease components as a single lease component for its branch leases. The Company has elected not to apply this policy in relation to the corporate headquarters lease. The Company has also determined that it is reasonably certain that the first option to extend lease contracts will be exercised for new branch locations; therefore, the first option to extend is included in the lease asset and liability calculation.

Future maturities of the Company’s operating lease liabilities are as follows:

 

In thousands    June 30, 2019  

2019 (remaining six months)

   $ 3,015  

2020

     7,224  

2021

     5,901  

2022

     4,607  

2023

     4,011  

Thereafter

     7,262  
  

 

 

 

Total future minimum lease payments

     32,020  

Present value adjustment

     (4,566
  

 

 

 

Operating lease liability

   $ 27,454  
  

 

 

 

The following table present the Company’s lease expense for the periods indicated:

 

In thousands    Three Months Ended
June 30, 2019
     Six Months Ended
June 30, 2019
 

Operating leases

   $ 1,936      $ 3,868  

Short-term leases

     86        167  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total lease expense

   $ 2,022      $ 4,035  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Supplemental cash flow and non-cash information related to the Company’s operating leases are presented below:

 

In thousands    Three Months Ended
June 30, 2019
     Six Months Ended
June 30, 2019
 

Cash paid for operating leases

   $ 1,695      $ 3,433  

Lease assets and liabilities acquired (1)

   $ 2,300      $ 6,125  

 

  (1)

Excludes $24.1 million of lease assets and liabilities recorded on the transition date.

As of June 30, 2019, the weighted-average remaining lease term and weighted-average discount rate were 5.4 years and 5.54%, respectively.

 

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Note 5. Long-Term Debt

The following is a summary of the Company’s long-term debt as of the periods indicated:

 

     June 30, 2019      December 31, 2018  
In thousands    Long-Term
Debt
     Unamortized
Debt Issuance
Costs
    Net
Long-Term
Debt
     Long-Term
Debt
     Unamortized
Debt Issuance
Costs
    Net
Long-Term
Debt
 

Senior revolving credit facility

   $ 345,590      $ (1,413   $ 344,177      $ 328,074      $ (1,604   $ 326,470  

Amortizing loan

     12,251        (113     12,138        21,642        (201     21,441  

Revolving warehouse credit facility

     50,874        (1,474     49,400        30,126        (1,899     28,227  

RMIT 2018-1 securitization

     150,246        (2,203     148,043        150,246        (2,849     147,397  

RMIT 2018-2 securitization

     130,349        (2,154     128,195        130,419        (2,605     127,814  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

   $ 689,310      $ (7,357   $ 681,953      $ 660,507      $ (9,158   $ 651,349  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Unused amount of revolving credit facilities (subject to borrowing base)

   $ 368,456           $ 406,600       
  

 

 

         

 

 

      

Senior Revolving Credit Facility: In June 2017, the Company amended and restated its senior revolving credit facility to, among other things, increase the availability under the facility from $585 million to $638 million and extend the maturity of the facility from August 2019 to June 2020. The facility has an accordion provision that allows for the expansion of the facility to $700 million. Excluding the receivables held by the Company’s VIEs, the senior revolving credit facility is secured by substantially all of the Company’s finance receivables and equity interests of the majority of its subsidiaries. Advances on the senior revolving credit facility are capped at 85% of eligible secured finance receivables, plus 70% of eligible unsecured finance receivables. These advance rates are subject to adjustment at certain credit quality levels (81% of eligible secured finance receivables and 66% of eligible unsecured finance receivables as of June 30, 2019). As of June 30, 2019, the Company had $67.7 million of eligible borrowing capacity under the facility. Borrowings under the facility bear interest, payable monthly, at rates equal to LIBOR of a maturity the Company elects between one and six months, with a LIBOR floor of 1.00%, plus a 3.00% margin, increasing to 3.25% when the availability percentage is below 10%. The one-month LIBOR rate was 2.40% and 2.50% at June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively. Alternatively, the Company may pay interest at the prime rate, plus a 2.00% margin, increasing to 2.25% when the availability percentage is below 10%. The prime rate was 5.50% at both June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018. The Company pays an unused line fee of 0.50% per annum, payable monthly. This fee decreases to 0.375% when the average outstanding balance exceeds $413.0 million.

Variable Interest Entity Debt: As part of its overall funding strategy, the Company has transferred certain finance receivables to VIEs for asset-backed financing transactions, including securitizations. The following debt arrangements are issued by the Company’s SPEs, which are considered VIEs under GAAP and are consolidated into the financial statements of their primary beneficiary. The Company is considered to be the primary beneficiary because it has (i) power over the significant activities through its role as servicer of the finance receivables under each debt arrangement and (ii) the obligation to absorb losses or the right to receive returns that could be significant through the Company’s interest in the monthly residual cash flows of the SPEs after each debt is paid.

These long-term debts are supported by the expected cash flows from the underlying collateralized finance receivables. Collections on these finance receivables are remitted to restricted cash collection accounts, which totaled $29.3 million and $33.5 million as of June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively. Cash inflows from the finance receivables are distributed to the lenders/investors, the service providers, and/or the residual interest that the Company owns in accordance with a monthly contractual priority of payments. The SPEs pay a servicing fee to the Company, which is eliminated in consolidation. Distributions from the SPEs to the Company are permitted under the debt arrangements.

At each sale of receivables from the Company’s affiliates to the SPEs, the Company makes certain representations and warranties about the quality and nature of the collateralized receivables. The debt arrangements require the Company to repurchase the receivables in certain circumstances, including circumstances in which the representations and warranties made by the Company concerning the quality and characteristics of the receivables are inaccurate. Assets transferred to each SPE are legally isolated from the Company and its affiliates, as well as the claims of the Company’s and its affiliates’ creditors. Further, the assets of each SPE are owned by such SPE and are not available to satisfy the debts or other obligations of the Company or any of its affiliates.

 

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Amortizing Loan: In November 2017, the Company and its wholly-owned SPE, Regional Management Receivables, LLC (“RMR I”), amended and restated the December 2015 credit agreement that provided for a $75.7 million asset-backed, amortizing loan. The amended and restated credit agreement provided for an additional advance in the amount of $37.8 million and extended the maturity date to December 2024. The debt is secured by finance receivables and other related assets that the Company purchased from its affiliates, which the Company then sold and transferred to RMR I. Advances on the loan were capped at 88% of eligible finance receivables. RMR I held $1.3 million in restricted cash reserves as of June 30, 2019 to satisfy provisions of the credit agreement. Borrowings previously bore interest, payable monthly, at a rate of 3.00%. In February 2018, the advance rate lowered to 85% and the interest rate increased to 3.25%. The credit agreement allows the Company to prepay the loan when the outstanding balance falls below 20% of the original loan amount.

Revolving Warehouse Credit Facility: In August 2018, the Company and its wholly-owned SPE, Regional Management Receivables II, LLC (“RMR II”), amended the June 2017 credit agreement that provides for a $125 million revolving warehouse credit facility to RMR II. The amendment extended the date at which the facility converts to an amortizing loan and the termination date to February 2020 and February 2021, respectively. The facility has an accordion provision that allows for the expansion of the facility to $150 million. The Company elected to expand the facility to $150 million from May 2018 to August 2018. The debt is secured by finance receivables and other related assets that the Company purchased from its affiliates, which the Company then sold and transferred to RMR II. Advances on the facility are capped at 80% of eligible finance receivables. RMR II held $0.6 million in restricted cash reserves as of June 30, 2019 to satisfy provisions of the credit agreement. Borrowings under the facility previously bore interest, payable monthly, at a blended rate equal to three-month LIBOR, plus a margin of 3.50%. In October 2017 and February 2018, the margin decreased to 3.25% and 3.00%, respectively, following the satisfaction of milestones associated with the Company’s conversion to a new loan origination and servicing system. The August 2018 amendment to the credit agreement further decreased the margin to 2.20%. The three-month LIBOR was 2.32% and 2.81% at June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively. RMR II pays an unused commitment fee of between 0.35% and 0.85% based upon the average daily utilization of the facility.

RMIT 2018-1 Securitization: In June 2018, the Company, its wholly-owned SPE, Regional Management Receivables III, LLC (“RMR III”), and its indirect wholly-owned SPE, Regional Management Issuance Trust 2018-1 (“RMIT 2018-1”), completed a private offering and sale of $150 million of asset-backed notes. The transaction consisted of the issuance of three classes of fixed-rate asset-backed notes by RMIT 2018-1. The asset-backed notes are secured by finance receivables and other related assets that RMR III purchased from the Company, which RMR III then sold and transferred to RMIT 2018-1. The notes have a revolving period ending in June 2020, with a final maturity date in July 2027. RMIT 2018-1 held $1.7 million in restricted cash reserves as of June 30, 2019 to satisfy provisions of the transaction documents. Borrowings under the RMIT 2018-1 securitization bear interest, payable monthly, at a weighted-average rate of 3.93%. Prior to maturity in July 2027, the Company may redeem the notes in full, but not in part, at its option on any note payment date on or after the payment date occurring in July 2020. No payments of principal of the notes will be made during the revolving period.

RMIT 2018-2 Securitization: In December 2018, the Company, RMR III, and the Company’s indirect wholly-owned SPE, Regional Management Issuance Trust 2018-2 (“RMIT 2018-2”), completed a private offering and sale of $130 million of asset-backed notes. The transaction consisted of the issuance of four classes of fixed-rate asset-backed notes by RMIT 2018-2. The asset-backed notes are secured by finance receivables and other related assets that RMR III purchased from the Company, which RMR III then sold and transferred to RMIT 2018-2. The notes have a revolving period ending in December 2020, with a final maturity date in January 2028. RMIT 2018-2 held $1.4 million in restricted cash reserves as of June 30, 2019 to satisfy provisions of the transaction documents. Borrowings under the RMIT 2018-2 securitization bear interest, payable monthly, at a weighted-average rate of 4.87%. Prior to maturity in January 2028, the Company may redeem the notes in full, but not in part, at its option on any note payment date on or after the payment date occurring in January 2021. No payments of principal of the notes will be made during the revolving period.

The carrying amounts of consolidated VIE assets and liabilities are as follows:

 

In thousands    June 30, 2019      December 31, 2018  

Assets

     

Cash

   $ 167      $ 168  

Finance receivables

     356,679        342,481  

Allowance for credit losses

     (17,406      (18,378

Restricted cash

     34,268        39,361  

Other assets

     129        75  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 373,837      $ 363,707  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Liabilities

     

Net long-term debt

   $ 337,776      $ 324,879  

Accounts payable and accrued expenses

     83        25  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total liabilities

   $ 337,859      $ 324,904  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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The Company’s debt arrangements are subject to certain covenants, including monthly and annual reporting, maintenance of specified interest coverage and debt ratios, restrictions on distributions, limitations on other indebtedness, maintenance of a minimum allowance for credit losses, and certain other restrictions. At June 30, 2019, the Company was in compliance with all debt covenants.

Note 6. Stockholders’ Equity

Stock repurchase program: In May 2019, the Company’s Board of Directors (“Board”) authorized a new stock repurchase program allowing for the repurchase of up to $25.0 million of the Company’s outstanding shares of common stock in open market purchases, privately negotiated transactions, or through other structures in accordance with applicable federal securities laws. The authorization was effective immediately and extends through May 6, 2021. As of June 30, 2019, the Company had repurchased 285 thousand shares of common stock at a total cost of $7.1 million.

Note 7. Disclosure About Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The following methods and assumptions were used to estimate the fair value of each class of financial instruments for which it is practicable to estimate that value:

Cash and restricted cash: Cash and restricted cash is recorded at cost, which approximates fair value due to its generally short maturity and highly liquid nature.

Finance receivables: Finance receivables are originated at prevailing market rates. The Company’s finance receivable portfolio turns approximately 1.2 times per year. The portfolio turnover is calculated by dividing cash payments, renewals, and net credit losses by the average finance receivables. Management believes that the carrying amount approximates the fair value of its finance receivable portfolio.

Interest rate caps: The fair value of the interest rate caps is the estimated amount the Company would receive to terminate the cap agreements at the reporting date, taking into account current interest rates and the creditworthiness of the counterparty.

Repossessed assets: Repossessed assets are valued at the lower of the finance receivable balance prior to repossession or the estimated net realizable value of the repossessed asset. The Company estimates net realizable value using the projected cash value upon liquidation, less costs to sell the related collateral.

Long-term debt: The Company’s long-term debt is frequently renewed, amended, or recently originated. As a result, the Company believes that the fair value of long-term debt approximates carrying amounts. The Company also considered its creditworthiness in its determination of fair value.

The carrying amount and estimated fair values of the Company’s financial instruments summarized by level are as follows:

 

     June 30, 2019      December 31, 2018  
In thousands    Carrying
Amount
     Estimated
Fair Value
     Carrying
Amount
     Estimated
Fair Value
 

Assets

           

Level 1 inputs

           

Cash

   $ 694      $ 694      $ 3,657      $ 3,657  

Restricted cash

     41,803        41,803        46,484        46,484  

Level 2 inputs

           

Interest rate caps

     6        6        249        249  

Level 3 inputs

           

Net finance receivables

     916,234        916,234        873,943        873,943  

Repossessed assets

     122        122        124        124  

Liabilities

           

Level 3 inputs

           

Long-term debt

     689,310        689,310        660,507        660,507  

Certain of the Company’s assets carried at fair value are classified and disclosed in one of the following three categories:

Level 1 – Quoted market prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

Level 2 – Observable market-based inputs or unobservable inputs that are corroborated by market data.

Level 3 – Unobservable inputs that are not corroborated by market data.

 

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In determining the appropriate levels, the Company performs an analysis of the assets and liabilities that are carried at fair value. At each reporting period, all assets and liabilities for which the fair value measurement is based on significant unobservable inputs are classified as Level 3.

Note 8. Income Taxes

The Company recognizes tax benefits or deficiencies from the exercise or vesting of share-based awards in the income tax line of the consolidated statements of income. Income tax expense was $2.7 million and $2.6 million for the three months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively. Included in these amounts are $0.1 million of tax deficiencies and $0.2 million of tax benefits from share-based awards for the three months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively. For the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, the Company recorded income tax expense of $5.1 million and $5.3 million, respectively. Included in these amounts are tax benefits from share-based awards of $0.1 million and $0.3 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

Note 9. Earnings Per Share

The following schedule reconciles the computation of basic and diluted earnings per share for the periods indicated:

 

     Three Months Ended
June 30,
     Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
In thousands, except per share amounts    2019      2018      2019      2018  

Numerator:

           

Net income

   $ 8,369      $ 8,482      $ 16,477      $ 17,126  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Denominator:

           

Weighted-average shares outstanding for basic earnings per share

     11,706        11,658        11,709        11,638  

Effect of dilutive securities

     316        480        340        446  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Weighted-average shares adjusted for dilutive securities

     12,022        12,138        12,049        12,084  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Earnings per share:

           

Basic

   $ 0.71      $ 0.73      $ 1.41      $ 1.47  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Diluted

   $ 0.70      $ 0.70      $ 1.37      $ 1.42  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Options to purchase 290 thousand and 138 thousand shares of common stock were outstanding during the three and six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively, but were not included in the computation of diluted earnings per share because they were anti-dilutive.

Note 10. Share-Based Compensation

The Company previously adopted the 2007 Management Incentive Plan (the “2007 Plan”) and the 2011 Stock Incentive Plan (the “2011 Plan”). On April 22, 2015, the stockholders of the Company approved the 2015 Long-Term Incentive Plan (the “2015 Plan”), and on April 27, 2017, the stockholders of the Company re-approved the 2015 Plan, as amended and restated. As of June 30, 2019, subject to adjustments as provided in the 2015 Plan, the maximum aggregate number of shares of the Company’s common stock that could be issued under the 2015 Plan could not exceed the sum of (i) 1.55 million shares plus (ii) any shares (A) remaining available for the grant of awards as of the 2015 Plan effective date (April 22, 2015) under the 2007 Plan or the 2011 Plan, and/or (B) subject to an award granted under the 2007 Plan or the 2011 Plan, which award is forfeited, cancelled, terminated, expires, or lapses without the issuance of shares or pursuant to which such shares are forfeited. As of the effectiveness of the 2015 Plan (April 22, 2015), there were 922 thousand shares available for grant under the 2015 Plan, inclusive of shares previously available for grant under the 2007 Plan and the 2011 Plan that were rolled over to the 2015 Plan. No further grants will be made under the 2007 Plan or the 2011 Plan. However, awards that are outstanding under the 2007 Plan and the 2011 Plan will continue in accordance with their respective terms. As of June 30, 2019, there were 0.9 million shares available for grant under the 2015 Plan.

For the three months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, the Company recorded share-based compensation expense of $1.2 million and $1.3 million, respectively. The Company recorded $2.2 million and $2.5 million in share-based compensation for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively. As of June 30, 2019, unrecognized share-based compensation expense to be recognized over future periods approximated $7.8 million. This amount will be recognized as expense over a weighted-average period of 1.9 years. Share-based compensation expenses are recognized on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period of the agreement. All share-based compensation is classified as equity awards.

 

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Table of Contents

The Company allows for the settlement of share-based awards on a net share basis. With net share settlement, the employee does not surrender any cash or shares upon the exercise of stock options or the vesting of stock awards or stock units. Rather, the Company withholds the number of shares with a value equivalent to the option exercise price (for stock options) and the statutory tax withholding (for all share-based awards). Net share settlements have the effect of reducing the number of shares that would have otherwise been issued as a result of exercise or vesting.

Long-term incentive program: The Company issues non-qualified stock options, performance-contingent restricted stock units (“RSUs”), cash-settled performance units (“CSPUs”), and restricted stock awards (“RSAs”) to certain members of senior management under a long-term incentive program (“LTIP”). The CSPUs are cash incentive awards, and the associated expense is not based on the market price of the Company’s common stock. Recurring annual grants are made at the discretion of the Board. The annual grants are subject to cliff- and graded-vesting, generally concluding at the end of the third calendar year and subject to continued employment or as otherwise provided in the underlying award agreements. The actual value of the RSUs and CSPUs that may be earned can range from 0% to 150% of target based on the percentile ranking of the Company’s compound annual growth rate of net income and net income per share compared to a public company peer group over a three-year performance period.

The Company also has a key team member incentive program for certain other members of senior management. Recurring annual participation in the program is at the discretion of the Board and executive management. Each participant in the program is eligible to earn an RSA, subject to performance over a one-year period. Payout under the program can range from 0% to 150% of target based on the achievement of five Company performance metrics and individual performance goals (subject to continued employment and certain other terms and conditions of the program). If earned, the RSA is issued following the one-year performance period and vests ratably over a subsequent two-year period (subject to continued employment or as otherwise provided in the underlying award agreement).

Inducement and retention program: From time to time, the Company issues stock awards and other long-term incentive awards in conjunction with employment offers to select new employees and retention grants to select existing employees. The Company issues these awards to attract and retain talent and to provide market competitive compensation. The grants have various vesting terms, including fully-vested awards at the grant date, cliff-vesting, and graded-vesting over periods of up to five years (subject to continued employment or as otherwise provided in the underlying award agreements).

Non-employee director compensation program: The Company awards its non-employee directors a cash retainer and shares of restricted common stock. The RSAs are granted on the fifth business day following the Company’s annual meeting of stockholders and fully vest upon the earlier of the first anniversary of the grant date or the completion of the directors’ annual service to the Company. The Board revised the compensation program in April 2018 to modify the amount of the annual cash retainers for Board and committee members, eliminate committee meeting fees, and modify the value of the RSAs for committee members.

The following are the terms and amounts of the awards issued under the Company’s share-based incentive programs:

Non-qualified stock options: The exercise price of all stock options is equal to the Company’s closing stock price on the date of grant. Stock options are subject to various vesting terms, including graded- and cliff-vesting over periods of up to five years. In addition, stock options vest and become exercisable in full or in part under certain circumstances, including following the occurrence of a change of control (as defined in the option award agreements). Participants who are awarded options must exercise their options within a maximum of ten years of the grant date.

The fair value of option grants is estimated on the grant date using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model with the following weighted-average assumptions for option grants during the periods indicated below:

 

     Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
     2019     2018  

Expected volatility

     41.14     41.63

Expected dividends

     0.00     0.00

Expected term (in years)

     6.0       6.0  

Risk-free rate

     2.55     2.66

Expected volatility is based on the Company’s historical stock price volatility. The expected term is calculated by using the simplified method (average of the vesting and original contractual terms) due to insufficient historical data to estimate the expected term. The risk-free rate is based on the zero coupon U.S. Treasury bond rate over the expected term of the awards.

 

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The following table summarizes the stock option activity for the six months ended June 30, 2019:

 

In thousands, except per share amounts    Number of
Shares
     Weighted-Average
Exercise Price
Per Share
     Weighted-Average
Remaining
Contractual
Life (Years)
     Aggregate
Intrinsic
Value
 

Options outstanding at January 1, 2019

     981      $ 18.69        

Granted

     100        27.89        

Exercised

     —          —          

Forfeited

     —          —          

Expired

     —          —          
  

 

 

    

 

 

       

Options outstanding at June 30, 2019

     1,081      $ 19.55        6.4      $ 7,936  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Options exercisable at June 30, 2019

     871      $ 17.83        5.8      $ 7,715  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The following table provides additional NQSO information for the periods indicated:

 

     Three Months Ended
June 30,
     Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
In thousands, except per share amounts    2019      2018      2019      2018  

Weighted-average grant date fair value per share

   $ —        $ —      $  12.07      $  12.39  

Intrinsic value of options exercised

   $ —      $ 574      $ —      $ 1,604  

Fair value of NQSOs that vested

   $ —      $ —      $ —      $ 199  

Performance-contingent restricted stock units: Compensation expense for RSUs is based on the Company’s closing stock price on the date of grant and the probability that certain financial goals will be achieved over the performance period. Compensation expense is estimated based on expected performance and is adjusted at each reporting period.

The following table summarizes RSU activity during the six months ended June 30, 2019:

 

In thousands, except per unit amounts    Units      Weighted-Average
Grant Date

Fair Value Per Unit
 

Non-vested units at January 1, 2019

     182      $ 21.89  

Granted (target)

     39        27.89  

Achieved performance adjustment (1)

     8        16.98  

Vested

     (54      16.98  

Forfeited

     —          —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Non-vested units at June 30, 2019

     175      $ 24.55  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1)

The 2016 LTIP RSUs were earned and vested at 116.5% of target, as described in greater detail in the Company’s definitive proxy statement filed with the SEC on March 27, 2019.

The following table provides additional RSU information for the periods indicated:

 

     Three Months Ended
June 30,
     Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
In thousands, except per unit amounts    2019      2018      2019      2018  

Weighted-average grant date fair value per unit

   $ —      $ —      $  27.89      $  28.25  

Fair value of RSUs that vested

   $ —      $ —      $ 916      $ —  

 

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Restricted stock awards: The fair value and compensation expense of RSAs are calculated using the Company’s closing stock price on the date of grant.

The following table summarizes RSA activity during the six months ended June 30, 2019:

 

In thousands, except per share amounts    Shares      Weighted-Average
Grant Date

Fair Value Per Share
 

Non-vested shares at January 1, 2019

     71      $ 26.95  

Granted

     138        26.92  

Vested

     (28      32.36  

Forfeited

     (2      27.22  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Non-vested shares at June 30, 2019

     179      $ 26.06  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

The following table provides additional RSA information for the periods indicated:

 

     Three Months Ended
June 30,
     Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
In thousands, except per share amounts    2019      2018      2019      2018  

Weighted-average grant date fair value per share

   $ 24.66      $ 34.39      $ 26.92      $ 24.70  

Fair value of RSAs that vested

   $ 810      $ 651      $ 918      $ 711  

Note 11. Commitments and Contingencies

In the normal course of business, the Company has been named as a defendant in legal actions in connection with its activities. Some of the actual or threatened legal actions include claims for compensatory damages or claims for indeterminate amounts of damages. The Company contests liability and the amount of damages, as appropriate, in each pending matter.

Where available information indicates that it is probable that a liability has been incurred and the Company can reasonably estimate the amount of that loss, the Company accrues the estimated loss by a charge to net income.

However, in many legal actions, it is inherently difficult to determine whether any loss is probable, or even reasonably possible, or to estimate the amount of loss. This is particularly true for actions that are in their early stages of development or where plaintiffs seek indeterminate damages. In addition, even where a loss is reasonably possible or an exposure to loss exists in excess of the liability already accrued, it is not always possible to reasonably estimate the size of the possible loss or range of loss. Before a loss, additional loss, range of loss, or range of additional loss can be reasonably estimated for any given action, numerous issues may need to be resolved, including through lengthy discovery, following determination of important factual matters, and/or by addressing novel or unsettled legal questions.

For certain other legal actions, the Company can estimate reasonably possible losses, additional losses, ranges of loss, or ranges of additional loss in excess of amounts accrued, but the Company does not believe, based on current knowledge and after consultation with counsel, that such losses will have a material adverse effect on the consolidated financial statements.

While the Company will continue to identify legal actions where it believes a material loss to be reasonably possible and reasonably estimable, there can be no assurance that material losses will not be incurred from claims that the Company has not yet been notified of or are not yet determined to be probable, or reasonably possible and reasonable to estimate.

The Company expenses legal costs as they are incurred.

 

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ITEM 2.

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.

The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with, and is qualified in its entirety by reference to, our unaudited consolidated financial statements and the related notes that appear elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. These discussions contain forward-looking statements that reflect our current expectations and that include, but are not limited to, statements concerning our strategies, future operations, future financial position, future revenues, projected costs, expectations regarding demand and acceptance for our financial products, growth opportunities and trends in the market in which we operate, prospects, and plans and objectives of management. The words “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “expects,” “intends,” “may,” “plans,” “projects,” “predicts,” “will,” “would,” “should,” “could,” “potential,” “continue,” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements, although not all forward-looking statements contain these identifying words. We may not actually achieve the plans, intentions, or expectations disclosed in our forward-looking statements, and you should not place undue reliance on our forward-looking statements. Our forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results, events, and/or performance to differ materially from the plans, intentions, and expectations disclosed in the forward-looking statements. Such risks and uncertainties include, without limitation, the risks set forth in our filings with the SEC, including our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018 (which was filed with the SEC on March 8, 2019), our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2019 (which was filed on May 8, 2019), and this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. The forward-looking information we have provided in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q pursuant to the safe harbor established under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 should be evaluated in the context of these factors. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they were made, and we undertake no obligation to update or revise such statements, except as required by the federal securities laws.

Overview

We are a diversified consumer finance company that provides installment loan products primarily to customers with limited access to consumer credit from banks, thrifts, credit card companies, and other lenders. We operate under the name “Regional Finance” in 356 branch locations across 11 states in the Southeastern, Southwestern, Mid-Atlantic, and Midwestern United States, serving 404,900 active accounts, as of June 30, 2019. Most of our loan products are secured, and each is structured on a fixed rate, fixed term basis with fully amortizing equal monthly installment payments, repayable at any time without penalty. Our loans are sourced through our multiple channel platform, which includes our branches, centrally-managed direct mail campaigns, digital partners, retailers, and our consumer website. We operate an integrated branch model in which nearly all loans, regardless of origination channel, are serviced through our branch network. This provides us with frequent in-person contact with our customers, which we believe improves our credit performance and customer loyalty. Our goal is to consistently grow our finance receivables and to soundly manage our loan portfolio risk, while providing our customers with attractive and easy-to-understand loan products that serve their varied financial needs.

Our products include small, large, and retail installment loans:

 

   

Small Loans (£$2,500) – As of June 30, 2019, we had 272.0 thousand small installment loans outstanding, representing $431.2 million in finance receivables. This included 106.5 thousand small loan convenience checks, representing $158.9 million in finance receivables.

 

   

Large Loans (>$2,500) – As of June 30, 2019, we had 111.1 thousand large installment loans outstanding, representing $498.8 million in finance receivables. This included 3.8 thousand large loan convenience checks, representing $11.1 million in finance receivables.

 

   

Retail Loans – As of June 30, 2019, we had 19.4 thousand retail purchase loans outstanding, representing $27.8 million in finance receivables.

 

   

Optional Insurance Products – We offer optional payment and collateral protection insurance to our direct loan customers.

Small and large installment loans are our core loan products and will be the drivers of our future growth. We ceased originating automobile purchase loans in November 2017 to focus on growing our core loan portfolio, but we continue to own and service the automobile loans that we previously originated. As of June 30, 2019, we had 2.4 thousand automobile loans outstanding, representing $15.7 million in finance receivables. Our primary sources of revenue are interest and fee income from our loan products, of which interest and fees relating to small and large installment loans are the largest component. In addition to interest and fee income from loans, we derive revenue from optional insurance products purchased by customers of our direct loan products.

 

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Factors Affecting Our Results of Operations

Our business is driven by several factors affecting our revenues, costs, and results of operations, including the following:

Quarterly Information and Seasonality. Our loan volume and contractual delinquency follow seasonal trends. Demand for our small and large loans is typically highest during the second, third, and fourth quarters, which we believe is largely due to customers borrowing money for vacation, back-to-school, and holiday spending. Loan demand has generally been the lowest during the first quarter, which we believe is largely due to the timing of income tax refunds. Delinquencies generally reach their lowest point in the first half of the year and rise in the second half of the year. Consequently, we experience seasonal fluctuations in our operating results and cash needs.

Growth in Loan Portfolio. The revenue that we derive from interest and fees is largely driven by the balance of loans that we originate and purchase. Average finance receivables grew 14.7% from $744.2 million in 2017 to $853.8 million in 2018. Average finance receivables grew 13.9% from $816.2 million in the first six months of 2018 to $929.7 million in the first six months of 2019. We source our loans through our branches, direct mail program, retail partners, digital partners, and consumer website. Our loans are made almost exclusively in geographic markets served by our network of branches. Increasing the number of loans per branch and the number of branches we operate allows us to increase the number of loans that we are able to service. We opened one new branch and consolidated three branches during the first six months of 2018. We opened two new branches and consolidated five branches during the first six months of 2019. We believe that we have the opportunity to add as many as 700 additional branches in states where it is currently favorable for us to conduct business, and we have plans to continue to grow our branch network.

Product Mix. We are exposed to different credit risks and charge different interest rates and fees with respect to the various types of loans we offer. Our product mix also varies to some extent by state, and we may further diversify our product mix in the future. The interest rates and fees vary from state to state, depending on the competitive environment and relevant laws and regulations.

Asset Quality and Allowance for Credit Losses. Our results of operations are highly dependent upon the credit quality of our loan portfolio. The credit quality of our loan portfolio is the result of our ability to enforce sound underwriting standards, maintain diligent servicing of the portfolio, and respond to changing economic conditions as we grow our loan portfolio. The allowance for credit losses calculation uses the current delinquency profile and historical delinquency roll rates as key data points in estimating the allowance. We believe that the primary underlying factors driving the provision for credit losses for each loan type are our underwriting standards, the general economic conditions in the areas in which we conduct business, loan portfolio growth, and the effectiveness of our collection efforts. In addition, the market for repossessed automobiles at auction is another underlying factor that we believe influences the provision for credit losses for automobile purchase loans and, to a lesser extent, large loans. We monitor these factors, and the amount and past due status of all loans one or more days past due, to identify trends that might require us to modify the allowance for credit losses.

Interest Rates. Our costs of funds are affected by changes in interest rates, as the interest rates that we pay on certain of our credit facilities are variable. As a component of our strategy to manage the interest rate risk associated with future interest payments on our variable-rate debt, we have purchased interest rate cap contracts. As of June 30, 2019, we held three interest rate cap contracts with an aggregate notional principal amount of $350.0 million. The interest rate caps have maturities of April 2020 ($100.0 million, 3.25% strike rate), June 2020 ($50.0 million, 2.50% strike rate), and April 2021 ($200.0 million, 3.50% strike rate). As of June 30, 2019, the one-month LIBOR was 2.40%. When the one-month LIBOR exceeds the strike rate, the counterparty reimburses us for the excess over the strike rate. No payment is required by us or the counterparty when the one-month LIBOR is below the strike rate. In addition, the interest rate on a portion of our long-term debt (the amortizing loan, RMIT 2018-1 securitization, and RMIT 2018-2 securitization (each as described below)) is fixed. As of June 30, 2019, 42.5% of our long-term debt was at a fixed rate.

Operating Costs. Our financial results are impacted by the costs of operations and home office functions. Those costs are included in general and administrative expenses on our consolidated statements of income. Our operating expense ratio (annualized sum of general and administrative expenses divided by average finance receivables) was 16.3% for the first six months of 2019, compared to 16.6% for the first six months of 2018. We believe that this ratio is generally in line with industry standards for companies of our size, and we expect that it will continue to decline in future years as we continue to grow our loan portfolio and control expense growth.

Components of Results of Operations

Interest and Fee Income. Our interest and fee income consists primarily of interest earned on outstanding loans. Accrual of interest income on finance receivables is suspended when an account becomes 90 days delinquent. If the account is charged off, the accrued interest income is reversed as a reduction of interest and fee income.

 

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Most states allow certain fees in connection with lending activities, such as loan origination fees, acquisition fees, and maintenance fees. Some states allow for higher fees while keeping interest rates lower. Loan fees are additional charges to the customer and generally are included in the annual percentage rate shown in the Truth in Lending disclosure that we make to our customers. The fees may or may not be refundable to the customer in the event of an early payoff, depending on state law. Fees are accrued to income over the life of the loan on the constant yield method.

Insurance Income, Net. Our insurance operations are a material part of our overall business and are integral to our lending activities. Insurance income, net consists primarily of earned premiums, net of certain direct costs, from the sale of various optional payment and collateral protection insurance products offered to customers who obtain loans directly from us. Insurance income, net also includes the earned premiums and direct costs associated with the non-file insurance that we purchase to protect us from credit losses where, following an event of default, we are unable to take possession of personal property collateral because our security interest is not perfected. We do not sell insurance to non-borrowers. Direct costs included in insurance income, net are claims paid, claims reserves, ceding fees, and premium taxes paid. We do not allocate to insurance income, net, any other home office or branch administrative costs associated with managing our insurance operations, managing our captive insurance company, marketing and selling insurance products, legal and compliance review, or internal audits.

In recent years, as large loans have become a larger percentage of our loan portfolio, the severity of non-file insurance claims has increased and non-file insurance claims expenses have exceeded non-file insurance fees. The resulting net loss from the non-file insurance product has been reflected in our insurance income, net. We have evaluated various ways to lower our non-file insurance claims, and we reduced our utilization of non-file insurance beginning in the fourth quarter of 2018. This policy change will cause substantially offsetting increases to insurance income, net and net credit losses in current and future years.

As reinsurer, we maintain cash reserves for life insurance claims in an amount determined by the unaffiliated insurance company. As of June 30, 2019, the restricted cash balance for these cash reserves was $7.5 million. The unaffiliated insurance company maintains the reserves for non-life claims.

Other Income. Our other income consists primarily of late charges assessed on customers who fail to make a payment within a specified number of days following the due date of the payment. In addition, fees for extending the due date of a loan, returned check charges, commissions earned from the sale of an auto club product, and interest income from restricted cash are included in other income.

Provision for Credit Losses. Provisions for credit losses are charged to income in amounts that we estimate as sufficient to maintain an allowance for credit losses at an adequate level to provide for estimated losses on the related finance receivable portfolio. Credit loss experience, delinquency of finance receivables, loan portfolio growth, the value of underlying collateral, and management’s judgment are factors used in assessing the overall adequacy of the allowance and the resulting provision for credit losses. Our provision for credit losses fluctuates so that we maintain an adequate credit loss allowance that reflects forecasted future credit losses over the estimated loss emergence period (the interval of time between the event that caused a borrower to default and our recording of the credit loss) for each finance receivable type. Changes in our delinquency and net credit loss rates may result in changes to our provision for credit losses. Substantial adjustments to the allowance may be necessary if there are significant changes in economic conditions or loan portfolio performance.

General and Administrative Expenses. Our general and administrative expenses are comprised of four categories: personnel, occupancy, marketing, and other. We measure our general and administrative expenses as a percentage of average finance receivables, which we refer to as our operating expense ratio.

Our personnel expenses are the largest component of our general and administrative expenses and consist primarily of the salaries and wages, overtime, contract labor, relocation costs, bonuses, benefits, and related payroll taxes associated with all of our operations and home office employees.

Our occupancy expenses consist primarily of the cost of renting our facilities, all of which are leased, as well as the utility, depreciation of leasehold improvements and furniture and fixtures, telecommunication, data processing, and other non-personnel costs associated with operating our business.

Our marketing expenses consist primarily of costs associated with our direct mail campaigns (including postage and costs associated with selecting recipients), digital marketing, and maintaining our consumer website, as well as some local marketing by branches. These costs are expensed as incurred.

 

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Other expenses consist primarily of legal, compliance, audit, and consulting costs, non-employee director compensation, amortization of software licenses and implementation costs, electronic payment processing costs, bank service charges, office supplies, and credit bureau charges. We expect legal and compliance costs to remain elevated due to the regulatory environment in the consumer finance industry. For a discussion regarding how risks and uncertainties associated with the current regulatory environment may impact our future expenses, net income, and overall financial condition, see Part II, Item 1A, “Risk Factors” and the filings referenced therein.

Interest Expense. Our interest expense consists primarily of paid and accrued interest for long-term debt, unused line fees, and amortization of debt issuance costs on long-term debt. Interest expense also includes costs attributable to the interest rate caps that we use to manage our interest rate risk. Changes in the fair value of the interest rate caps are reflected in interest expense.

Income Taxes. Income taxes consist of state and federal income taxes. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to temporary differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The change in deferred tax assets and liabilities is recognized in the period in which the change occurs, and the effects of future tax rate changes are recognized in the period in which the enactment of new rates occurs.

Results of Operations

The following table summarizes our results of operations, both in dollars and as a percentage of average finance receivables (annualized):

 

     2Q 19     2Q 18     YTD 19     YTD 18  
In thousands    Amount      % of
Average
Finance
Receivables
    Amount      % of
Average
Finance
Receivables
    Amount      % of
Average
Finance
Receivables
    Amount      % of
Average
Finance
Receivables
 

Revenue

                    

Interest and fee income

   $ 75,974        32.5   $ 66,829        32.7   $ 150,296        32.3   $ 132,980        32.6

Insurance income, net

     5,066        2.2     2,882        1.4     9,179        2.0     6,271        1.5

Other income

     3,234        1.4     2,705        1.3     6,547        1.4     5,790        1.4
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total revenue

     84,274        36.1     72,416        35.4     166,022        35.7     145,041        35.5
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Expenses

                    

Provision for credit losses

     25,714        11.0     20,203        9.9     49,057        10.6     39,718        9.7

Personnel

     22,511        9.6     19,390        9.5     44,904        9.7     40,618        10.0

Occupancy

     6,210        2.7     5,478        2.7     12,375        2.7     11,096        2.7

Marketing

     2,261        1.0     2,258        1.1     3,912        0.8     3,711        0.9

Other

     6,761        2.9     6,089        2.9     14,735        3.1     12,382        3.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total general and administrative

     37,743        16.2     33,215        16.2     75,926        16.3     67,807        16.6

Interest expense

     9,771        4.2     7,915        3.9     19,492        4.2     15,092        3.7
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Income before income taxes

     11,046        4.7     11,083        5.4     21,547        4.6     22,424        5.5

Income taxes

     2,677        1.1     2,601        1.3     5,070        1.1     5,298        1.3
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 8,369        3.6   $ 8,482        4.1   $ 16,477        3.5   $ 17,126        4.2
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Information explaining the changes in our results of operations from year-to-year is provided in the following pages.

 

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The following table summarizes the quarterly trend of our financial results:

 

     Income Statement Quarterly Trend  
In thousands, except per share amounts    2Q 18     3Q 18     4Q 18     1Q 19     2Q 19     QoQ $
B(W)
    YoY $
B(W)
 

Revenue

              

Interest and fee income

   $ 66,829     $ 72,128     $ 75,013     $ 74,322     $ 75,974     $ 1,652     $ 9,145  

Insurance income, net

     2,882       2,898       5,624       4,113       5,066       953       2,184  

Other income

     2,705       2,890       3,112       3,313       3,234       (79     529  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenue

     72,416       77,916       83,749       81,748       84,274       2,526       11,858  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Expenses

              

Provision for credit losses

     20,203       23,640       23,698       23,343       25,714       (2,371     (5,511

Personnel

     19,390       21,376       22,074       22,393       22,511       (118     (3,121

Occupancy

     5,478       5,490       5,933       6,165       6,210       (45     (732

Marketing

     2,258       2,132       1,902       1,651       2,261       (610     (3

Other

     6,089       6,863       6,707       7,974       6,761       1,213       (672
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total general and administrative

     33,215       35,861       36,616       38,183       37,743       440       (4,528

Interest expense

     7,915       8,729       9,643       9,721       9,771       (50     (1,856
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income before income taxes

     11,083       9,686       13,792       10,501       11,046       545       (37

Income taxes

     2,601       2,237       3,022       2,393       2,677       (284     (76
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 8,482     $ 7,449     $ 10,770     $ 8,108     $ 8,369     $ 261     $ (113
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income per common share:

              

Basic

   $ 0.73     $ 0.64     $ 0.92     $ 0.69     $ 0.71     $ 0.02     $ (0.02
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Diluted

   $ 0.70     $ 0.61     $ 0.90     $ 0.67     $ 0.70     $ 0.03     $ —  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted-average shares outstanding:

              

Basic

     11,658       11,672       11,672       11,712       11,706       6       (48
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Diluted

     12,138       12,133       12,010       12,076       12,022       54       116  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net interest margin

   $ 64,501     $ 69,187     $ 74,106     $ 72,027     $ 74,503     $ 2,476     $ 10,002  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net credit margin

   $ 44,298     $ 45,547     $ 50,408     $ 48,684     $ 48,789     $ 105     $ 4,491  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
     Balance Sheet Quarterly Trend  
     2Q 18     3Q 18     4Q 18     1Q 19     2Q 19     QoQ $
Inc (Dec)
    YoY $
Inc (Dec)
 

Total assets

   $ 868,220     $ 893,279     $ 956,395     $ 953,467     $ 1,019,316     $ 65,849     $ 151,096  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Finance receivables

   $ 847,238     $ 888,076     $ 932,243     $ 912,250     $ 973,434     $ 61,184     $ 126,196  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Allowance for credit losses

   $ 48,450     $ 55,300     $ 58,300     $ 56,400     $ 57,200     $ 800     $ 8,750  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Long-term debt

   $ 595,765     $ 611,593     $ 660,507     $ 628,786     $ 689,310     $ 60,524     $ 93,545  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
     Other Key Metrics Quarterly Trend  
     2Q 18     3Q 18     4Q 18     1Q 19     2Q 19     QoQ
Inc (Dec)
    YoY
Inc (Dec)
 

Interest and fee yield (annualized)

     32.7     33.2     32.9     32.1     32.5     0.4     (0.2 )% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating expense ratio (1)

     16.2     16.5     16.1     16.5     16.2     (0.3 )%      0.0
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

30+ contractual delinquency

     6.3     7.1     7.7     7.0     6.4     (0.6 )%      0.1
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net credit loss (2)

     9.5     7.7     9.1     10.9     10.7     (0.2 )%      1.2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Book value per share

   $ 21.93     $ 22.68     $ 23.70     $ 24.15     $ 24.88     $ 0.73     $ 2.95  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(1)

Annualized general and administrative expenses as a percentage of average finance receivables.

(2)

Annualized net credit losses as a percentage of average finance receivables.

 

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Comparison of June 30, 2019, Versus June 30, 2018

The following discussion and table describe the changes in finance receivables by product type:

 

   

Small Loans (£$2,500) – Small loans outstanding increased by $46.5 million, or 12.1%, to $431.2 million at June 30, 2019, from $384.7 million at June 30, 2018. The increase was primarily due to increased marketing and growth in receivables in branches opened during 2018.

 

   

Large Loans (>$2,500) – Large loans outstanding increased by $106.7 million, or 27.2%, to $498.8 million at June 30, 2019, from $392.1 million at June 30, 2018. The increase was primarily due to increased marketing, the transition of small loan customers to large loans, and growth in receivables in branches opened during 2018.

 

   

Automobile Loans – Automobile loans outstanding decreased by $23.7 million, or 60.2%, to $15.7 million at June 30, 2019, from $39.4 million at June 30, 2018. We ceased originating automobile loans in November 2017 to focus on growing our core loan portfolio.

 

   

Retail Loans – Retail loans outstanding decreased by $3.3 million, or 10.5%, to $27.8 million at June 30, 2019, from $31.0 million at June 30, 2018.

 

     Finance Receivables by Product  
In thousands    2Q 19      1Q 19      QoQ $
Inc (Dec)
    QoQ %
Inc (Dec)
    2Q 18      YoY $
Inc (Dec)
    YoY %
Inc (Dec)
 

Small loans

   $ 431,214      $ 421,712      $ 9,502       2.3   $ 384,690      $ 46,524       12.1

Large loans

     498,757        440,707        58,050       13.2     392,101        106,656       27.2
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total core loans

     929,971        862,419        67,552       7.8     776,791        153,180       19.7

Automobile loans

     15,686        20,511        (4,825     (23.5 )%      39,414        (23,728     (60.2 )% 

Retail loans

     27,777        29,320        (1,543     (5.3 )%      31,033        (3,256     (10.5 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total finance receivables

   $ 973,434      $ 912,250      $ 61,184       6.7   $ 847,238      $ 126,196       14.9
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Number of branches at period end

     356        360        (4     (1.1 )%      340        16       4.7

Average finance receivables per branch

   $ 2,734      $ 2,534      $ 200       7.9   $ 2,492      $ 242       9.7
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comparison of the Three Months Ended June 30, 2019, Versus the Three Months Ended June 30, 2018

Net Income. Net income decreased $0.1 million, or 1.3%, to $8.4 million during the three months ended June 30, 2019, from $8.5 million during the prior-year period. The decrease was primarily due to an increase in provision for credit losses of $5.5 million, an increase in general and administrative expenses of $4.5 million, and an increase in interest expense of $1.9 million, offset by an increase in revenue of $11.9 million.

Revenue. Total revenue increased $11.9 million, or 16.4%, to $84.3 million during the three months ended June 30, 2019, from $72.4 million during the prior-year period. The components of revenue are explained in greater detail below.

Interest and Fee Income. Interest and fee income increased $9.1 million, or 13.7%, to $76.0 million during the three months ended June 30, 2019, from $66.8 million during the prior-year period. The increase was primarily due to a 14.2% increase in average finance receivables, offset by a 0.2% decrease in average yield.

The following table sets forth the average finance receivables balance and average yield for our loan products:

 

     Average Finance Receivables for the Quarter Ended     Average Yields for the Quarter Ended  
In thousands    2Q 19      2Q 18      YoY %
Inc (Dec)
    2Q 19     2Q 18     YoY %
Inc (Dec)
 

Small loans

   $ 419,349      $ 366,647        14.4     38.6     40.1     (1.5 )% 

Large loans

     468,305        375,836        24.6     28.6     28.6     0.0

Automobile loans

     17,933        43,980        (59.2 )%      14.6     16.0     (1.4 )% 

Retail loans

     28,786        31,530        (8.7 )%      18.8     18.8     0.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total interest and fee yield

   $ 934,373      $ 817,993        14.2     32.5     32.7     (0.2 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Small loan yields decreased 1.5% compared to the prior-year period as more of our small loan customers have originated loans with larger balances and longer maturities, which typically are priced at lower interest rates. Large loan and retail loan yields remained constant compared to the prior-year period. Automobile loan yields decreased 1.4% compared to the prior-year period. We anticipate that the automobile loan yields will remain at the current level or decline due to higher-yielding loans paying off or renewing into large loans, leaving the lower-yielding loans in the liquidating automobile loan portfolio.

As a result of our focus on large loan growth over the last several years, the large loan portfolio has grown faster than the rest of our loan products, and we expect that this trend will continue in the future. Over time, large loan growth will change our product mix, which will reduce our total interest and fee yield.

The following table represents the amount of loan originations and refinancing, net of unearned finance charges:

 

     Net Loans Originated  
In thousands    2Q 19      1Q 19      QoQ $
Inc (Dec)
    QoQ %
Inc (Dec)
    2Q 18      YoY $
Inc (Dec)
    YoY %
Inc (Dec)
 

Small loans

   $ 174,440      $ 129,245      $ 45,195       35.0   $ 165,023      $ 9,417       5.7

Large loans

     169,373        84,068        85,305       101.5     109,186        60,187       55.1

Retail loans

     5,179        6,197        (1,018     (16.4 )%      6,713        (1,534     (22.9 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total net loans originated

   $ 348,992      $ 219,510      $ 129,482       59.0   $ 280,922      $ 68,070       24.2
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

The following table summarizes the components of the increase in interest and fee income:

 

     Components of Increase in Interest and Fee Income
2Q 19 Compared to 2Q 18
Increase (Decrease)
 
In thousands    Volume      Rate      Volume & Rate      Net  

Small loans

   $ 5,279      $ (1,363    $ (196    $ 3,720  

Large loans

     6,609        38        9        6,656  

Automobile loans

     (1,042      (153      91        (1,104

Retail loans

     (129      2        —          (127

Product mix

     (1,209      1,158        51        —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total increase in interest and fee income

   $ 9,508      $ (318    $ (45    $ 9,145  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The $9.1 million increase in interest and fee income during the three months ended June 30, 2019 from the prior-year period was primarily driven by finance receivables growth, offset by a decrease in yield, as illustrated in the table above. We expect future increases in interest and fee income to continue to be driven primarily by growth in our average finance receivables.

Insurance Income, Net. Insurance income, net increased $2.2 million, or 75.8%, to $5.1 million during the three months ended June 30, 2019, from $2.9 million during the prior-year period. Annualized insurance income, net represented 2.2% and 1.4% of average finance receivables during the three months ended June 30, 2019 and the prior-year period, respectively. During both the three months ended June 30, 2019 and the prior-year period, personal property insurance premiums represented the largest component of aggregate earned insurance premiums and non-file insurance claims expense represented the largest component of direct insurance expenses.

The following table summarizes the components of insurance income, net:

 

     Insurance Premiums and Direct Expenses for the Quarter Ended  
In thousands    2Q 19     2Q 18     YoY $
B(W)
     YoY %
B(W)
 

Earned premiums

   $ 8,345     $ 7,507     $ 838        11.2

Claims, reserves, and certain direct expenses

     (3,279     (4,625     1,346        29.1
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Insurance income, net

   $ 5,066     $ 2,882     $ 2,184        75.8
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Earned premiums increased by $0.8 million and claims, reserves, and certain direct expenses decreased by $1.3 million, in each case, compared to the prior-year period. The increase in earned premiums was primarily due to loan growth. The decrease in claims, reserves, and certain direct expenses compared to the prior-year period was primarily due to $1.4 million less in non-file insurance claims expense related to our change in business practice to decrease utilization of non-file insurance. The change in business practice to lower utilization of non-file insurance causes substantially offsetting increases to insurance income, net and net credit losses.

 

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Other Income. Other income increased $0.5 million, or 19.6%, to $3.2 million during the three months ended June 30, 2019, from $2.7 million during the prior-year period, due to a $0.4 million increase in commissions earned from the sale of our auto club product and a $0.1 million increase in interest income from restricted cash. Late charges of $2.1 million and $2.0 million represented 64.2% and 74.5% of total other income for the three months ended June 30, 2019 and the prior-year period, respectively. As large loans continue to represent a greater percentage of our total loan portfolio and we continue to leverage electronic payment options, we expect lower late charges per active account. Annualized other income represented 1.4% and 1.3% of average finance receivables during the three months ended June 30, 2019 and the prior-year period, respectively.

Provision for Credit Losses. Our provision for credit losses increased $5.5 million, or 27.3%, to $25.7 million during the three months ended June 30, 2019, from $20.2 million during the prior-year period. The increase was primarily due to an increase in net credit losses of $5.4 million compared to the prior-year period. The annualized provision for credit losses as a percentage of average finance receivables during the three months ended June 30, 2019 was 11.0%, compared to 9.9% during the prior-year period. The three months ended June 30, 2019 and the prior-year period included a 0.8% and 0.2% impact, respectively, from the increase in net credit losses discussed in the insurance income, net paragraph above.

The increase in the provision for credit losses is explained in greater detail below.

Net Credit Losses. Net credit losses increased $5.4 million, or 27.7%, to $24.9 million during the three months ended June 30, 2019, from $19.5 million during the prior-year period. The increase was primarily due to a $116.4 million increase in average finance receivables over the prior-year period. Net credit losses also increased due to credit tightening associated with the implementation of new custom loan origination scorecards for small and large loans. Beginning in mid-2018, we implemented stricter underwriting guidelines, which impacted our small and large loan customers. A portion of our existing small and large loan customers attempted to renew their loans but did not qualify under these tighter underwriting guidelines. As a result, some of these accounts became delinquent and were subsequently charged off. As of March 2019, the new small and large loan scorecards have been implemented across all of our states.

Annualized net credit losses as a percentage of average finance receivables were 10.7% during the three months ended June 30, 2019, compared to 9.5% during the prior-year period. The three months ended June 30, 2019 and the prior-year period included 0.8% and 0.2% impacts, respectively, from the increase in net credit losses discussed in the insurance income, net paragraph above. The current-year period included a 0.6% impact from $1.4 million in net credit losses resulting from the 2018 hurricanes. The prior-year period included a 0.5% impact from $1.1 million in net credit losses resulting from the 2017 hurricanes.

The following table provides net credit losses and the benefit to net credit losses associated with non-file insurance claims expense as a percentage of average finance receivables for the periods indicated:

 

     Non-File Insurance Impact on
Net Credit Loss Rates for
the Quarter Ended
 
     2Q 19     2Q 18  

Annualized net credit losses

     10.7     9.5

Annualized non-file insurance claims benefit

     0.6     1.2

Delinquency Performance. Our June 30, 2019 contractual delinquency as a percentage of total finance receivables increased to 6.4% from 6.3% as of June 30, 2018, primarily due to credit tightening.

To actively manage the delinquencies and credit losses of our loan portfolios, we have undertaken a number of initiatives to drive improved delinquency results in 2019. For example, we migrated to a new convenience check risk and response model earlier this year. Additionally, custom credit scorecards have been implemented in all 11 states as of March 2019. These initiatives combine to provide an improvement over the previous criteria that were used to underwrite small and large loans.

 

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Table of Contents

The following tables include delinquency balances by aging category and by product:

 

     Contractual Delinquency by Aging  
In thousands    2Q 19     2Q 18  

Allowance for credit losses

   $ 57,200        5.9   $ 48,450        5.7

Current

     805,215        82.7     704,770        83.1

1 to 29 days past due

     106,017        10.9     89,510        10.6
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Delinquent accounts:

          

30 to 59 days

     22,082        2.3     18,886        2.3

60 to 89 days

     13,961        1.4     12,103        1.4

90 to 119 days

     9,962        1.1     8,373        1.0

120 to 149 days

     8,089        0.8     6,857        0.8

150 to 179 days

     8,108        0.8     6,739        0.8
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total contractual delinquency

   $ 62,202        6.4   $ 52,958        6.3
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total finance receivables

   $ 973,434        100.0   $ 847,238        100.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 
     Contractual Delinquency by Product  
In thousands    2Q 19     2Q 18  

Small loans

   $ 33,276        7.7   $ 28,347        7.4

Large loans

     25,447        5.1     19,600        5.0

Automobile loans

     1,294        8.2     2,909        7.4

Retail loans

     2,185        7.9     2,102        6.8
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total contractual delinquency

   $ 62,202        6.4   $ 52,958        6.3
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Allowance for Credit Losses. We evaluate delinquency and credit losses in each of our loan products in establishing the allowance for credit losses. The following table sets forth our allowance for credit losses compared to the related finance receivables as of the end of the periods indicated:

 

     2Q 19     2Q 18  
In thousands    Finance
Receivables
     Allowance
for Credit
Losses
     Allowance as a
Percentage
of
Finance
Receivables
    Finance
Receivables
     Allowance
for Credit
Losses
     Allowance as a
Percentage
of
Finance
Receivables
 

Small loans

   $ 431,214      $ 29,134        6.8   $ 384,690      $ 23,969        6.2

Large loans

     498,757        25,054        5.0     392,101        19,698        5.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total core loans

     929,971        54,188        5.8     776,791        43,667        5.6

Automobile loans

     15,686        1,093        7.0     39,414        2,642        6.7

Retail loans

     27,777        1,919        6.9     31,033        2,141        6.9
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 973,434      $ 57,200        5.9   $ 847,238      $ 48,450        5.7
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The allowance for credit losses as a percentage of finance receivables increased to 5.9% as of June 30, 2019, from 5.7% as of June 30, 2018. The increase was primarily due to higher net credit losses as of June 30, 2019, compared to June 30, 2018.

General and Administrative Expenses. Our general and administrative expenses, comprising expenses for personnel, occupancy, marketing, and other expenses, increased $4.5 million, or 13.6%, to $37.7 million during the three months ended June 30, 2019, from $33.2 million during the prior-year period. Our operating expense ratio (annualized general and administrative expenses as a percentage of average finance receivables) remained constant at 16.2% during the three months ended June 30, 2019 and the prior-year period. We believe that our operating expense ratio will decline in future years as we grow our loan portfolio and control expense growth. The absolute dollar increase in general and administrative expenses is explained in greater detail below.

 

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Table of Contents

Personnel. The largest component of general and administrative expenses is personnel expense, which increased $3.1 million, or 16.1%, to $22.5 million during the three months ended June 30, 2019, from $19.4 million during the prior-year period. Labor expenses increased $1.7 million primarily due to added headcount in our legacy branches, most of which was added to effectively service active account growth that has occurred since June 30, 2018. Personnel expenses related to our 16 net new branches that have opened since the prior-year period contributed to a $0.7 million increase compared to the prior-year period. Branch incentive expenses increased $0.7 million as a result of improved branch performance.

Occupancy. Occupancy expenses increased $0.7 million, or 13.4%, to $6.2 million during the three months ended June 30, 2019, from $5.5 million during the prior-year period. The increase was primarily due to our 16 net new branches that opened since the prior-year period. Additionally, we frequently experience increases in rent, leasehold improvements, and computer equipment expenses as we renew existing branch leases.

Marketing. Marketing expenses remained constant at $2.3 million during both the three months ended June 30, 2019 and the prior-year period. Increased efficiencies of marketing programs enabled us to increase marketing-driven loan volumes and effectively support our expanded branch footprint while holding marketing expenses equal to the prior-year period.

Other Expenses. Other expenses increased $0.7 million, or 11.0%, to $6.8 million during the three months ended June 30, 2019, from $6.1 million during the prior-year period. The increase was primarily due to a $0.3 million increase in collections expense, a $0.1 million increase in legal and settlement expenses, a $0.1 million increase in bank card processing fees, and a $0.1 million increase related to our 16 net new branches that have opened since the prior-year period.

Interest Expense. Interest expense on long-term debt increased $1.9 million, or 23.4%, to $9.8 million during the three months ended June 30, 2019, from $7.9 million during the prior-year period. The increase was primarily due to an increase in the average balance of our long-term debt facilities from finance receivable growth and an increase in interest rates, which combined for a $1.0 million increase in interest expense. The increase in the average balance of our senior revolving credit facility was partially due to stock repurchases of $7.1 million during the three months ended June 30, 2019. Additionally, amortization of debt issuance costs increased $0.5 million, while unused line fees and interest expense related to our interest rate cap contracts increased $0.3 million and $0.1 million, respectively. The annualized average cost of our total long-term debt increased 0.42% to 6.03% during the three months ended June 30, 2019, from 5.61% during the prior-year period. The average cost of our long-term debt has increased as we have diversified our long-term funding sources.

Income Taxes. Income taxes increased $0.1 million, or 2.9%, to $2.7 million during the three months ended June 30, 2019, from $2.6 million during the prior-year period. The increase was primarily due to a $0.2 million decrease in tax benefits related to the exercise and vesting of share-based awards. Our effective tax rates were 24.2% and 23.5% for the three months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

Comparison of the Six Months Ended June 30, 2019, Versus the Six Months Ended June 30, 2018

Net Income. Net income decreased $0.6 million, or 3.8%, to $16.5 million during the six months ended June 30, 2019, from $17.1 million during the prior-year period. The decrease was primarily due to an increase in provision for credit losses of $9.3 million, an increase in general and administrative expenses of $8.1 million, and an increase in interest expense of $4.4 million, offset by an increase in revenue of $21.0 million.

Revenue. Total revenue increased $21.0 million, or 14.5%, to $166.0 million during the six months ended June 30, 2019, from $145.0 million during the prior-year period. The components of revenue are explained in greater detail below.

Interest and Fee Income. Interest and fee income increased $17.3 million, or 13.0%, to $150.3 million during the six months ended June 30, 2019, from $133.0 million during the prior-year period. The increase was primarily due to a 13.9% increase in average finance receivables, offset by a 0.3% decrease in average yield.

The following table sets forth the average finance receivables balance and average yield for our loan products:

 

     Average Finance Receivables for the Six Months Ended     Average Yields for the Six Months Ended  
In thousands    YTD 19      YTD 18      YoY %
Inc (Dec)
    YTD 19     YTD 18     YoY %
Inc (Dec)
 

Small loans

   $ 426,732      $ 368,570        15.8     38.4     40.1     (1.7 )% 

Large loans

     452,975        365,865        23.8     28.3     28.5     (0.2 )% 

Automobile loans

     20,565        49,715        (58.6 )%      14.8     15.7     (0.9 )% 

Retail loans

     29,415        32,091        (8.3 )%      18.7     18.7     0.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total interest and fee yield

   $ 929,687      $ 816,241        13.9     32.3     32.6     (0.3 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents

Small loan yields decreased 1.7% compared to the prior-year period as more of our small loan customers have originated loans with larger balances and longer maturities, which typically are priced at lower interest rates. Large loan yields decreased 0.2% compared to the prior-year period primarily due to the maturation of our large loan portfolio and the associated increase in accrued interest and fee reversals on charged-off accounts. Automobile loan yields decreased 0.9% compared to the prior-year period. We anticipate that the automobile loan yields will remain at the current level or decline due to higher-yielding loans paying off or renewing into large loans, leaving the lower-yielding loans in the liquidating automobile loan portfolio.

As a result of our focus on large loan growth over the last several years, the large loan portfolio has grown faster than the rest of our loan products, and we expect that this trend will continue in the future. Over time, large loan growth will change our product mix, which will reduce our total interest and fee yield.

The following table represents the amount of loan originations and refinancing, net of unearned finance charges:

 

     Net Loans Originated  
In thousands    YTD 19      YTD 18      YTD $
Inc (Dec)
     YTD %
Inc (Dec)
 

Small loans

   $ 303,685      $ 288,779      $ 14,906        5.2

Large loans

     253,441        197,959        55,482        28.0

Retail loans

     11,376        14,015        (2,639      (18.8 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total net loans originated

   $ 568,502      $ 500,753      $ 67,749        13.5
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The following table summarizes the components of interest and fee income:

 

     Components of Increase in Interest and Fee Income
YTD 19 Compared to YTD 18
Increase (Decrease)
 
In thousands    Volume      Rate      Volume & Rate      Net  

Small loans

   $ 11,663      $ (3,208    $ (506    $ 7,949  

Large loans

     12,422        (342      (82      11,998  

Automobile loans

     (2,288      (235      138        (2,385

Retail loans

     (250      4        —          (246

Product mix

     (3,065      2,757        308        —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total increase in interest and fee income

   $ 18,482      $ (1,024    $ (142    $ 17,316  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The $17.3 million increase in interest and fee income during the six months ended June 30, 2019 from the prior-year period was primarily driven by finance receivables growth, offset by a decrease in yield, as illustrated in the table above. We expect future increases in interest and fee income to continue to be driven primarily from growth in our average finance receivables.

Insurance Income, Net. Insurance income, net increased $2.9 million, or 46.4%, to $9.2 million during the six months ended June 30, 2019, from $6.3 million during the prior-year period. Annualized insurance income, net represented 2.0% and 1.5% of average finance receivables during the six months ended June 30, 2019 and the prior-year period, respectively. During both the six months ended June 30, 2019 and the prior-year period, personal property insurance premiums represented the largest component of aggregate earned insurance premiums and non-file insurance claims expense represented the largest component of direct insurance expenses.

The following table summarizes the components of insurance income, net:

 

     Insurance Premiums and Direct Expenses  
In thousands    YTD 19      YTD 18      YoY $
B(W)
     YoY %
B(W)
 

Earned premiums

   $ 16,294      $ 15,131      $ 1,163        7.7

Claims, reserves, and certain direct expenses

     (7,115      (8,860      1,745        19.7
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Insurance income, net

   $ 9,179      $ 6,271      $ 2,908        46.4
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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Earned premiums increased by $1.2 million compared to the prior-year period, while claims, reserves, and certain direct expenses decreased $1.7 million compared to the prior-year period. The decrease in claims, reserves, and certain direct expenses compared to the prior-year period was primarily due to $2.5 million less in non-file insurance claims expense related to our change in business practice to decrease utilization of non-file insurance. The change in business practice to lower utilization of non-file insurance causes substantially offsetting increases to insurance income, net and net credit losses. The decrease in non-file claims was offset by increases in other claims, reserves, and certain direct expenses driven by increased volume.

Other Income. Other income increased $0.8 million, or 13.1%, to $6.5 million during the six months ended June 30, 2019, from $5.8 million during the prior-year period, due to a $0.5 million increase in commissions earned from the sale of our auto club product and a $0.4 million increase in interest income from restricted cash. Annualized other income represented 1.4% of average finance receivables during both the six months ended June 30, 2019 and the prior-year period. During the six months ended June 30, 2019, late charges represented 67.6% of total other income, compared to 75.6% during the prior-year period. As large loans continue to represent a greater percentage of our total loan portfolio and we continue to leverage electronic payment options, we expect lower late charges per active account.

Provision for Credit Losses. Our provision for credit losses increased $9.3 million, or 23.5%, to $49.1 million during the six months ended June 30, 2019, from $39.7 million during the prior-year period. The increase was due to an increase in net credit losses of $10.0 million, offset by a $0.6 million increase in the amount of allowance for credit losses released in the current-year period compared to the prior-year period. The annualized provision for credit losses as a percentage of average finance receivables during the six months ended June 30, 2019 was 10.6%, compared to 9.7% during the prior-year period. The six months ended June 30, 2019 and the prior-year period included a 0.7% and 0.2% impact, respectively, from the increase in net credit losses discussed in the insurance income, net paragraph above.

The increase in the provision for credit losses is explained in greater detail below.

Net Credit Losses. Net credit losses increased $10.0 million, or 24.8%, to $50.2 million during the six months ended June 30, 2019, from $40.2 million during the prior-year period. The increase was primarily due to a $113.4 million increase in average finance receivables over the prior-year period. Net credit losses during the current-year period that were attributable to the 2018 hurricanes were $0.5 million higher than net credit losses during the prior-year period that were attributable to the 2017 hurricanes.

Annualized net credit losses as a percentage of average finance receivables were 10.8% during the six months ended June 30, 2019, compared to 9.8% during the prior-year period. The six months ended June 30, 2019 and the prior-year period included 0.7% and 0.2% impacts, respectively, from the increase in net credit losses discussed in the insurance income, net paragraph above. The current-year period included a 0.5% impact from the $2.3 million in net credit losses resulting from the 2018 hurricanes. The prior-year period included a 0.4% impact from the $1.8 million in net credit losses resulting from the 2017 hurricanes.

The following table provides net credit losses and the benefit to net credit losses associated with non-file insurance claims expense as a percentage of average finance receivables for the periods indicated:

 

     Non-File Insurance Impact on
Net Credit Loss Rates for the
Six Months Ended
 
     YTD 19     YTD 18  

Annualized net credit losses

     10.8     9.8

Annualized non-file insurance claims benefit

     0.7     1.2

General and Administrative Expenses. Our general and administrative expenses, comprising expenses for personnel, occupancy, marketing, and other expenses, increased $8.1 million, or 12.0%, to $75.9 million during the six months ended June 30, 2019, from $67.8 million during the prior-year period. Our operating expense ratio (annualized general and administrative expenses as a percentage of average finance receivables) decreased to 16.3% during the six months ended June 30, 2019, from 16.6% during the prior-year period. We believe that our operating expense ratio will continue to decline in future years as we continue to grow our loan portfolio and control expense growth. The absolute dollar increase in general and administrative expenses is explained in greater detail below.

Personnel. The largest component of general and administrative expenses is personnel expense, which increased $4.3 million, or 10.6%, to $44.9 million during the six months ended June 30, 2019, from $40.6 million during the prior-year period. Labor expenses increased $3.6 million due to added headcount in our legacy branches to effectively service active account growth since June 30, 2018. Additional personnel expenses related to our 16 net new branches that opened since June 30, 2018 were $1.5 million. These increases were offset by a decrease in corporate incentive expenses of $0.8 million.

 

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Occupancy. Occupancy expenses increased $1.3 million, or 11.5%, to $12.4 million during the six months ended June 30, 2019, from $11.1 million during the prior-year period. The increase was primarily due to our 16 net new branches that opened since the prior-year period. Additionally, we frequently experience increases in rent, leasehold improvements, and computer equipment expenses as we renew existing branch leases.

Marketing. Marketing expenses increased $0.2 million, or 5.4%, to $3.9 million during the six months ended June 30, 2019, from $3.7 million during the prior-year period. The increase was due to increased convenience check mailings and expanded digital marketing related to our 16 net new branches that opened since June 30, 2018.

Other Expenses. Other expenses increased $2.4 million, or 19.0%, to $14.7 million during the six months ended June 30, 2019, from $12.4 million during the prior-year period. Collections expense and legal and settlement expenses each increased $0.6 million compared to the prior-year period. Lender custodian fees increased $0.3 million as a result of the RMIT 2018-2 securitization, which was completed in December 2018. Additional increases compared to the prior-year period include audit and professional fees of $0.2 million, bank card processing fees of $0.2 million, and expenses related to our 16 net new branches that opened since June 30, 2018 of $0.2 million.

Interest Expense. Interest expense on long-term debt increased $4.4 million, or 29.2%, to $19.5 million during the six months ended June 30, 2019, from $15.1 million during the prior-year period. The increase was primarily due to an increase in the average balance of our long-term debt facilities from finance receivable growth and an increase in interest rates, which combined for a $2.5 million increase in interest expense. The increase in the average balance of our senior revolving credit facility was partially due to stock repurchases of $7.1 million during the six months ended June 30, 2019. Additionally, amortization of debt issuance costs increased $0.9 million, while unused line fees and interest expense related to our interest rate cap contracts increased $0.6 million and $0.4 million, respectively. The annualized average cost of our total long-term debt increased 0.68% to 6.04% during the six months ended June 30, 2019, from 5.36% during the prior-year period. The average cost of our long-term debt has increased as we have diversified our long-term funding sources.

Income Taxes. Income taxes decreased $0.2 million, or 4.3%, to $5.1 million during the six months ended June 30, 2019, from $5.3 million during the prior-year period. The decrease was primarily due to a decrease in income before income taxes of $0.9 million, offset by a decrease in tax benefits related to the exercise of stock options. Our effective tax rates were 23.5% and 23.6% for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and the prior-year period, respectively.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Our primary cash needs relate to the funding of our lending activities and, to a lesser extent, expenditures relating to improving our technology infrastructure and expanding and maintaining our branch locations. In connection with our plans to improve our technology infrastructure and to expand our branch network in future years, we expect to incur approximately $9.0 million to $12.0 million of expenditures annually. We have historically financed, and plan to continue to finance, our short-term and long-term operating liquidity and capital needs through a combination of cash flows from operations and borrowings under our senior revolving credit facility, revolving warehouse credit facility, amortizing loan, and, more recently, asset-backed securitization transactions, all of which are described below. We had a funded debt-to-equity ratio of 2.4 to 1.0 and a shareholder equity ratio of 28.4% as of June 30, 2019.

We believe that cash flow from our operations and borrowings under our long-term debt facilities will be adequate to fund our business for the next twelve months, including initial operating losses of new branches and finance receivable growth of new and existing branches. From time to time, we have extended the maturity date of and increased the borrowing limits under our senior revolving credit facility. While we have successfully obtained such extensions and increases in the past, there can be no assurance that we will be able to do so if and when needed in the future. In addition, the revolving periods of our warehouse credit facility, RMIT 2018-1 securitization, and RMIT 2018-2 securitization (each as described below) end in February 2020, June 2020, and December 2020, respectively. There can be no assurance that we will be able to secure an extension of the warehouse credit facility or close additional securitization transactions if and when needed in the future.

In May 2019, the Board authorized the repurchase of up to $25.0 million of our outstanding shares of common stock. The authorization was effective immediately and extends through May 6, 2021. Stock repurchases under the program may be made in the open market at prevailing market prices, through privately negotiated transactions, or through other structures in accordance with applicable federal securities laws, at times and in amounts as management deems appropriate. The timing and the amount of any common stock repurchases will be determined by our management based on its evaluation of market conditions, our liquidity needs, legal and contractual requirements and restrictions (including covenants in our credit agreements), share price, and other factors. The repurchase program does not obligate us to purchase any particular number of shares and may be suspended, modified, or discontinued at any time without prior notice. We intend to fund the program with a combination of cash and debt. As of June 30, 2019, we had repurchased 285 thousand shares of our common stock for an aggregate purchase price of $7.1 million.

We are continuing to seek ways to diversify our long-term funding sources, though new funding sources may be more expensive than our existing funding sources.

 

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Cash Flow.

Operating Activities. Net cash provided by operating activities increased $6.5 million, or 10.8%, to $66.6 million during the six months ended June 30, 2019, from $60.1 million during the prior-year period. The increase was primarily due to an increase in net income before provision for credit losses, offset by a decrease in accounts payable and accrued expenses.

Investing Activities. Investing activities consist of originations and purchases of finance receivables, purchases of intangible assets, and purchases of property and equipment for new and existing branches. Net cash used in investing activities during the six months ended June 30, 2019 was $94.7 million, compared to $72.8 million during the prior-year period, a net increase of $21.9 million. The increase in cash used was primarily due to increased net originations of finance receivables.

Financing Activities. Financing activities consist of borrowings and payments on our outstanding indebtedness. During the six months ended June 30, 2019, net cash provided by financing activities was $20.5 million, compared to $19.9 million during the prior-year period, a net increase of $0.6 million. The increase in cash provided was primarily a result of an increase in net advances on debt instruments of $4.5 million and a decrease in payments for debt issuance costs of $3.3 million, offset by a $7.1 million increase in cash used in the repurchase of our common stock.

Financing Arrangements.

Senior Revolving Credit Facility. In June 2017, we amended and restated our senior revolving credit facility to, among other things, increase the availability under the facility from $585 million to $638 million and extend the maturity of the facility from August 2019 to June 2020. The facility has an accordion provision that allows for the expansion of the facility to $700 million. Excluding the receivables held by our VIEs, the senior revolving credit facility is secured by substantially all of our finance receivables and equity interests of the majority of our subsidiaries. Advances on the senior revolving credit facility are capped at 85% of eligible secured finance receivables and 70% of eligible unsecured finance receivables. These advance rates are subject to adjustment at certain credit quality levels (81% of eligible secured finance receivables and 66% of eligible unsecured finance receivables as of June 30, 2019). As of June 30, 2019, we had $67.7 million of eligible borrowing capacity under the facility. Borrowings under the facility bear interest, payable monthly, at rates equal to LIBOR of a maturity we elect between one and six months (one-month LIBOR was 2.40% as of June 30, 2019), with a LIBOR floor of 1.00%, plus a 3.00% margin, increasing to 3.25% when the availability percentage is below 10%. Alternatively, we may pay interest at the prime rate (5.50% as of June 30, 2019) plus a 2.00% margin, increasing to 2.25% when the availability percentage is below 10%. We also pay an unused line fee of 0.50% per annum, payable monthly. This fee decreases to 0.375% when the average outstanding balance exceeds $413.0 million.

Our long-term debt under the senior revolving credit facility was $345.6 million as of June 30, 2019. In advance of its June 2020 maturity date, we intend to extend the maturity date of the amended and restated senior revolving credit facility or take other appropriate action to address repayment upon maturity. See Part II, Item 1A, “Risk Factors” and the filings referenced therein for a discussion of risks related to our amended and restated senior revolving credit facility, including refinancing risk.

Variable Interest Entity Debt. As part of our overall funding strategy, we have transferred certain finance receivables to affiliated VIEs for asset-backed financing transactions, including securitizations. The following debt arrangements are issued by our wholly-owned, bankruptcy-remote, special purpose entities, which are considered VIEs under GAAP and are consolidated into the financial statements of their primary beneficiary. We are considered to be the primary beneficiary because we have (i) power over the significant activities through our role as servicer of the finance receivables under each debt arrangement and (ii) the obligation to absorb losses or the right to receive returns that could be significant through our interest in the monthly residual cash flows of the SPEs after each debt is paid.

These long-term debts are supported by the expected cash flows from the underlying collateralized finance receivables. Collections on these finance receivables are remitted to restricted cash collection accounts, which totaled $29.3 million and $33.5 million as of June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively. Cash inflows from the finance receivables are distributed to the lenders/investors, the service providers, and/or the residual interest that we own in accordance with a monthly contractual priority of payments. The SPEs pay a servicing fee to us, which is eliminated in consolidation. Distributions from the SPEs to us are permitted under the debt arrangements.

At each sale of receivables from our affiliates to the SPEs, we make certain representations and warranties about the quality and nature of the collateralized receivables. The debt arrangements require us to repurchase the receivables in certain circumstances, including circumstances in which the representations and warranties made by us concerning the quality and characteristics of the receivables are inaccurate. Assets transferred to SPEs are legally isolated from us and our affiliates, and the claims of our and our affiliates’ creditors. Further, the assets of each SPE are owned by such SPE and are not available to satisfy the debts or other obligations of us or any of our affiliates. See Part II, Item 1A, “Risk Factors” and the filings referenced therein for a discussion of risks related to our variable interest entity debt.

 

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Amortizing Loan. In November 2017, we and our wholly-owned SPE, RMR I, amended and restated the December 2015 credit agreement that provided for a $75.7 million asset-backed, amortizing loan. The amended and restated credit agreement provided for an additional advance in the amount of $37.8 million and extended the maturity date to December 2024. The debt is secured by finance receivables and other related assets that we purchased from our affiliates, which we then sold and transferred to RMR I. Advances on the loan were capped at 88% of eligible finance receivables. RMR I held $1.3 million in restricted cash reserves as of June 30, 2019 to satisfy provisions of the credit agreement. Borrowings previously bore interest, payable monthly, at a rate of 3.00%. In February 2018, the advance rate lowered to 85% and the interest rate increased to 3.25%. The credit agreement allows us to prepay the loan when the outstanding balance falls below 20% of the original loan amount. As of June 30, 2019, our long-term debt under the credit agreement was $12.3 million.

Revolving Warehouse Credit Facility. In August 2018, we and our wholly-owned SPE, RMR II, amended the June 2017 credit agreement that provides for a $125 million revolving warehouse credit facility to RMR II. The amendment extended the date at which the facility converts to an amortizing loan and the termination date to February 2020 and February 2021, respectively. The facility has an accordion provision that allows for the expansion of the facility to $150 million. We elected to expand the facility to $150 million from May 2018 to August 2018. The debt is secured by finance receivables and other related assets that we purchased from our affiliates, which we then sold and transferred to RMR II. Advances on the facility are capped at 80% of eligible finance receivables. Borrowings under the facility previously bore interest, payable monthly, at a blended rate equal to three-month LIBOR, plus a margin of 3.50%. In October 2017 and February 2018, the margin decreased to 3.25% and 3.00%, respectively, following the satisfaction of milestones associated with our conversion to a new loan origination and servicing system. The August 2018 amendment to the credit agreement further decreased the margin to 2.20%. The three-month LIBOR was 2.32% and 2.81% at June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively. RMR II pays an unused commitment fee of between 0.35% and 0.85% based upon the average daily utilization of the facility. We intend to seek an extension of the maturity date of the facility before February 2020. As of June 30, 2019, our long-term debt under the credit facility was $50.9 million.

RMIT 2018-1 Securitization. In June 2018, we, our wholly-owned SPE, RMR III, and our indirect wholly-owned SPE, RMIT 2018-1, completed a private offering and sale of $150 million of asset-backed notes. The transaction consisted of the issuance of three classes of fixed-rate asset-backed notes by RMIT 2018-1. The asset-backed notes are secured by finance receivables and other related assets that RMR III purchased from us, which RMR III then sold and transferred to RMIT 2018-1. The notes have a revolving period ending in June 2020, with a final maturity date in July 2027. Borrowings under the RMIT 2018-1 securitization bear interest, payable monthly, at a weighted-average rate of 3.93%. Prior to maturity in July 2027, we may redeem the notes in full, but not in part, at our option on any note payment date on or after the payment date occurring in July 2020. No payments of principal of the notes will be made during the revolving period. As of June 30, 2019, our long-term debt under the securitization was $150.2 million.

RMIT 2018-2 Securitization. In December 2018, we, our wholly-owned SPE, RMR III, and our indirect wholly-owned SPE, RMIT 2018-2, completed a private offering and sale of $130 million of asset-backed notes. The transaction consisted of the issuance of four classes of fixed-rate asset-backed notes by RMIT 2018-2. The asset-backed notes are secured by finance receivables and other related assets that RMR III purchased from us, which RMR III then sold and transferred to RMIT 2018-2. The notes have a revolving period ending in December 2020, with a final maturity date in January 2028. Borrowings under the RMIT 2018-2 securitization bear interest, payable monthly, at a weighted-average rate of 4.87%. Prior to maturity in January 2028, we may redeem the notes in full, but not in part, at our option on any note payment date on or after the payment date occurring in January 2021. No payments of principal of the notes will be made during the revolving period. As of June 30, 2019, our long-term debt under the securitization was $130.3 million.

Our debt arrangements are subject to certain covenants, including monthly and annual reporting, maintenance of specified interest coverage and debt ratios, restrictions on distributions, limitations on other indebtedness, maintenance of a minimum allowance for credit losses, and certain other restrictions. At June 30, 2019, we were in compliance with all debt covenants.

We expect that the LIBOR reference rate will be phased out by the end of 2021. Both our senior revolving credit facility and revolving warehouse credit facility use LIBOR as a benchmark in determining the cost of funds borrowed. We plan to work with our banking partners to modify our credit agreements to contemplate the cessation of the LIBOR reference rate. We will also work to identify a replacement rate to LIBOR and look to adjust the pricing structure of our facilities as needed.

Restricted Cash Reserve Accounts.

Amortizing Loan. As required under the credit agreement governing the amortizing loan, we deposited $3.7 million of cash proceeds into a restricted cash reserve account at closing. The reserve requirement decreased to $1.7 million in June 2016 following our satisfaction of certain provisions of the credit agreement. The credit agreement was amended and restated in November 2017 with a cash reserve requirement of $1.3 million, which will remain until the termination of the facility. The amortizing loan is supported by the expected cash flows from the underlying collateralized finance receivables. Collections are remitted to a restricted cash collection account, which totaled $1.1 million as of June 30, 2019.

 

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Revolving Warehouse Credit Facility. The credit agreement governing the revolving warehouse credit facility requires that we maintain a 1% cash reserve based upon the ending finance receivables balance of the facility. As of June 30, 2019, the warehouse facility cash reserve requirement totaled $0.6 million. The warehouse facility is supported by the expected cash flows from the underlying collateralized finance receivables. Collections are remitted to a restricted cash collection account, which totaled $2.6 million as of June 30, 2019.

RMIT 2018-1 Securitization. As required under the transaction documents governing the RMIT 2018-1 securitization, we deposited $1.7 million of cash proceeds into a restricted cash reserve account at closing. The securitization is supported by the expected cash flows from the underlying collateralized finance receivables. Collections are remitted to a restricted cash collection account, which totaled $14.1 million as of June 30, 2019.

RMIT 2018-2 Securitization. As required under the transaction documents governing the RMIT 2018-2 securitization, we deposited $1.4 million of cash proceeds into a restricted cash reserve account at closing. The securitization is supported by the expected cash flows from the underlying collateralized finance receivables. Collections are remitted to a restricted cash collection account, which totaled $11.5 million as of June 30, 2019.

RMC Reinsurance. Our wholly-owned subsidiary, RMC Reinsurance, Ltd., is required to maintain cash reserves against life insurance policies ceded to it, as determined by the ceding company. As of June 30, 2019, cash reserves for reinsurance were $7.5 million.

Interest Rate Caps.

As a component of our strategy to manage the interest rate risk associated with future interest payments on our variable-rate debt, we have purchased interest rate cap contracts. As of June 30, 2019, we held three interest rate cap contracts with an aggregate notional principal amount of $350.0 million. The interest rate caps have maturities of April 2020 ($100.0 million, 3.25% strike rate), June 2020 ($50.0 million, 2.50% strike rate), and April 2021 ($200.0 million, 3.50% strike rate). As of June 30, 2019, the one-month LIBOR was 2.40%. When the one-month LIBOR exceeds the strike rate, the counterparty reimburses us for the excess over the strike rate. No payment is required by us or the counterparty when the one-month LIBOR is below the strike rate.

Impact of Inflation

Our results of operations and financial condition are presented based on historical cost, except for interest rate caps, which are carried at fair value. While it is difficult to accurately measure the impact of inflation due to the imprecise nature of the estimates required, we believe the effects of inflation, if any, on our results of operations and financial condition have been immaterial.

Critical Accounting Policies

Management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations is based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with GAAP and conform to general practices within the consumer finance industry. The preparation of these financial statements requires estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, revenues and expenses, and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities for the periods indicated in the financial statements. Management bases estimates on historical experience and other assumptions it believes to be reasonable under the circumstances and evaluates these estimates on an ongoing basis. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

We set forth below those material accounting policies that we believe are the most critical to an understanding of our financial results and condition and that involve a higher degree of complexity and management judgment.

Credit Losses.

Provisions for credit losses are charged to income as losses are estimated to have occurred and in amounts sufficient to maintain an allowance for credit losses at an adequate level to provide for future losses on our finance receivables. We charge credit losses against the allowance when the account becomes 180 days delinquent, subject to certain exceptions. Our policy for non-titled accounts in a confirmed bankruptcy is to charge them off at 60 days delinquent, subject to certain exceptions. Deceased borrower accounts are charged off in the month following the proper notification of passing, with the exception of borrowers with credit life insurance. Subsequent recoveries, if any, are credited to the allowance. Loss experience, the loss emergence period, contractual delinquency of finance receivables by loan type, the value of underlying collateral, and management’s judgment are factors used in assessing the overall adequacy of the allowance and the resulting provision for credit losses. While management uses the best information available to make its evaluation, future adjustments to the allowance may be necessary if there are significant changes in economic conditions or loan portfolio performance. This evaluation is inherently subjective as it requires estimates that are susceptible to significant revisions as more information becomes available.

 

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We initiate repossession proceedings when, in the opinion of management, the customer is unlikely to make further payments. We sell substantially all repossessed vehicle inventory through sales conducted by independent automobile auction organizations after the required post-repossession waiting period. Losses on the sale of repossessed collateral are charged to the allowance for credit losses.

The allowance for credit losses consists of general and specific components. The general component of the allowance estimates credit losses for groups of finance receivables on a collective basis and relates to probable incurred losses of unimpaired finance receivables. Our finance receivable types are stratified by delinquency stages, and the future monthly delinquency profiles and credit losses are projected forward using historical delinquency roll rates. We record a general allowance for credit losses that includes forecasted future credit losses over the estimated loss emergence period (the interval of time between the event which caused a borrower to default and our recording of the credit loss) for each finance receivable type.

We adjust the computed roll rate forecast as described above for qualitative factors based on an assessment of internal and external influences on credit quality that are not fully reflected in the roll rate forecast. Those qualitative factors include trends in growth in the loan portfolio, delinquency, unemployment, bankruptcy, operational risks, and other economic trends.

The specific component of the allowance for credit losses relates to impaired finance receivables, which include accounts for which a customer has initiated a bankruptcy filing and finance receivables that have been modified under our loss mitigation policies. Finance receivables that have been modified are accounted for as troubled debt restructurings. At the time of the bankruptcy filing or restructuring pursuant to a loss mitigation policy, a specific valuation allowance is established for such finance receivables within the allowance for credit losses. We compute the estimated loss on our impaired loans by discounting the projected cash flows at the original contract rates on the loan using the terms imposed by the bankruptcy court or restructured by us. This method is applied in the aggregate to each of our four classes of loans. In making the computations of the present value of cash payments to be received on impaired accounts in each product category, we use the weighted-average interest rates and weighted-average remaining term based on data as of each balance sheet date.

For customers in a confirmed Chapter 13 bankruptcy plan, we reduce the interest rate to that specified in the bankruptcy order and we receive payments with respect to the remaining amount of the loan from the bankruptcy trustee. For customers who recently filed for Chapter 13 bankruptcy, we generally do not receive any payments until their bankruptcy plan is confirmed by the court. If the customers have made payments to the trustee in advance of plan confirmation, we may receive a lump sum payment from the trustee once the plan is confirmed. This lump sum payment represents our pro-rata share of the amount paid by the customer. If a customer fails to comply with the terms of the bankruptcy order, we will petition the trustee to have the customer dismissed from bankruptcy. Upon dismissal, we restore the account to the original terms and pursue collection through our normal loan servicing activities.

If a customer files for bankruptcy under Chapter 7 of the bankruptcy code, the bankruptcy court has the authority to cancel the customer’s debt. If a vehicle secures a Chapter 7 bankruptcy account, the customer has the option of surrendering the vehicle, buying the vehicle at fair value, or reaffirming the loan and continuing to pay the loan.

The FASB issued an accounting update in June 2016 to change the impairment model for estimating credit losses on financial assets. The current incurred loss impairment model requires the recognition of credit losses when it is probable that a loss has been incurred. The incurred loss model will be replaced by an expected loss model, which requires entities to estimate the lifetime expected credit loss on such instruments and to record an allowance to offset the amortized cost basis of the financial asset. This update is effective for annual and interim periods beginning after December 15, 2019, and early adoption is permitted. We believe the implementation of the accounting update will have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial statements, and we are in the process of quantifying the potential impacts. See Note 2, “Basis of Presentation and Significant Accounting Policies,” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Part I, Item 1, “Financial Statements” for more information on this new accounting standard.

Income Recognition.

Interest income is recognized using the interest method (constant yield method). Therefore, we recognize revenue from interest at an equal rate over the term of the loan. Unearned finance charges on pre-compute contracts are rebated to customers utilizing statutory methods, which in many cases is the sum-of-the-years’ digits method. The difference between income recognized under the constant yield method and the statutory method is recognized as an adjustment to interest income at the time of rebate. Accrual of interest income on finance receivables is suspended when an account becomes 90 days delinquent. If the account is charged off, the accrued interest income is reversed as a reduction of interest and fee income.

We recognize income on credit life insurance, credit property insurance, and automobile insurance using the sum-of-the-years’ digits or straight-line methods over the terms of the policies. We recognize income on credit accident and health insurance using the average of the sum-of-the-years’ digits and the straight-line methods over the terms of the policies. We recognize income on credit involuntary unemployment insurance using the straight-line method over the terms of the policies. Rebates are computed using statutory methods, which in many cases match the GAAP method, and where it does not match, the difference between the GAAP method and the statutory method is recognized in income at the time of rebate. Fee income for non-file insurance is recognized using the sum-of-the-years’ digits method over the loan term.

 

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We deferred fees charged to automobile dealers and recognize income using the constant yield method for indirect loans and the straight-line method for direct loans over the lives of the respective loans.

Charges for late fees are recognized as income when collected.

Share-Based Compensation.

We measure compensation cost for share-based awards at estimated fair value and recognize compensation expense over the service period for awards expected to vest. We use the closing stock price on the date of grant as the fair value of restricted stock awards. The fair value of stock options is determined using the Black-Scholes valuation model. The Black-Scholes model requires the input of highly subjective assumptions, including expected volatility, risk-free interest rate, and expected life, changes to which can materially affect the fair value estimate. We estimate volatility using our historical stock prices. The risk-free rate is based on the zero coupon U.S. Treasury bond rate for the expected term of the award on the grant date. The expected term is calculated by using the simplified method (average of the vesting and original contractual terms) due to insufficient historical data to estimate the expected term. In addition, the estimation of share-based awards that will ultimately vest requires judgment, and to the extent actual results or updated estimates differ from current estimates, such amounts will be recorded as a cumulative adjustment in the period estimates are revised.

Income Taxes.

We record a tax provision for the anticipated tax consequences of our reported operating results. The provision for income taxes is computed using the asset and liability method, under which deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to temporary differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effects of future tax rate changes are recognized in the period when the enactment of new rates occurs.

We recognize the financial statement effects of a tax position when it is more likely than not that, based on technical merits, the position will be sustained upon examination. The tax benefits of the position recognized in the consolidated financial statements are then measured based on the largest amount of benefit that is greater than 50% likely to be realized upon settlement with a taxing authority. As of June 30, 2019, we had not taken any tax position that exceeds the amount described above.

Pursuant to the adoption of an accounting standard update issued in March 2016 and effective beginning in fiscal year 2017, we recognize the tax benefits or deficiencies from the exercise or vesting of share-based awards in the income tax line of our consolidated statements of income. These tax benefits and deficiencies were previously recognized within additional paid-in-capital on our consolidated balance sheet.

Recently Issued Accounting Standards

See Note 2, “Basis of Presentation and Significant Accounting Policies,” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Part I, Item 1, “Financial Statements” for a discussion of recently issued accounting pronouncements, including information on new accounting standards and the future adoption of such standards.

 

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ITEM 3.

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK.

Interest Rate Risk

Interest rate risk arises from the possibility that changes in interest rates will affect our results of operations and financial condition. We originate finance receivables at either prevailing market rates or at statutory limits. Our finance receivables are structured on a fixed rate, fixed term basis. Accordingly, subject to statutory limits, our ability to react to changes in prevailing market rates is dependent upon the speed at which our customers pay off or renew loans in our existing loan portfolio, which allows us to originate new loans at prevailing market rates. Our loan portfolio turns over approximately 1.2 times per year from payments, renewals, and net credit losses. Because our large loans have longer maturities than our small loans and typically renew at a slower rate than our small loans, the rate of turnover of the loan portfolio may change as our large loans change as a percentage of our portfolio.

We also are exposed to changes in interest rates as a result of certain borrowing activities. As of June 30, 2019, the interest rates on 42.5% of our long-term debt (the amortizing loan, RMIT 2018-1 securitization, and RMIT 2018-2 securitization) were fixed. We maintain liquidity and fund our business operations in part through variable-rate borrowings under a senior revolving credit facility and a revolving warehouse credit facility. At June 30, 2019, the balances of the senior revolving credit facility and the revolving warehouse credit facility were $345.6 million and $50.9 million, respectively.

Borrowings under the senior revolving credit facility bear interest, payable monthly, at a rate equal to LIBOR of a maturity we elect between one and six months, with a LIBOR floor of 1.00%, plus a margin of 3.00%, increasing to 3.25% when the availability percentage is below 10%. Alternatively, we may pay interest under the senior revolving credit facility at a rate based on the prime rate, plus a margin of 2.00%, increasing to 2.25% when the availability percentage is below 10%. Borrowings under the revolving warehouse credit facility previously bore interest, payable monthly, at a blended rate equal to three-month LIBOR, plus a margin of 3.50%. Effective October 2017 and February 2018, the revolving warehouse credit facility margin decreased to 3.25% and 3.00%, respectively, following the satisfaction of milestones associated with our conversion to a new loan origination and servicing system. In August 2018, in connection with an amendment and extension of the revolving warehouse credit facility, the margin further decreased to 2.20%. As of June 30, 2019, the LIBOR rates under the senior revolving credit facility and the revolving warehouse credit facility were 2.40% and 2.32%, respectively.

We have purchased interest rate caps to manage the risk associated with an aggregate notional $350.0 million of our LIBOR-based borrowings. These interest rate caps are based on the one-month LIBOR and reimburse us for the difference when the one-month LIBOR exceeds the strike rate. The interest rate caps have maturities of April 2020 ($100.0 million, 3.25% strike rate), June 2020 ($50.0 million, 2.50% strike rate), and April 2021 ($200.0 million, 3.50% strike rate).

Effective interest rates for borrowings under the senior revolving credit facility and the revolving warehouse credit facility were 5.98% and 6.53%, respectively, for the six months ended June 30, 2019, including, in each case, an unused line fee. Based on the LIBOR rates and the outstanding balances at June 30, 2019, an increase of 100 basis points in LIBOR rates would result in approximately $4.0 million of increased interest expense on an annual basis, in the aggregate, under these LIBOR-based borrowings. Our interest rate cap coverage at June 30, 2019 would reduce this increased expense by approximately $0.6 million on an annual basis.

The nature and amount of our debt may vary as a result of future business requirements, market conditions, and other factors.

 

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ITEM 4.

CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES.

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

Our management, with the participation of our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as of June 30, 2019. The term “disclosure controls and procedures,” as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), means controls and other procedures of a company that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by a company in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by a company in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to the company’s management, including its principal executive officer and principal financial officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

Based on the evaluation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of June 30, 2019, our chief executive officer and chief financial officer concluded that, as of such date, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective. Management recognizes that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving their objectives, and management necessarily applies its judgment in evaluating the cost–benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures.

Changes in Internal Control

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting identified in management’s evaluation pursuant to Rules 13a-15(d) or 15d-15(d) of the Exchange Act during the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q that materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

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PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1.

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.

The Company is involved in various legal proceedings and related actions that have arisen in the ordinary course of its business that have not been fully adjudicated. The Company’s management does not believe that these matters, when ultimately concluded and determined, will have a material adverse effect on its financial condition, liquidity, or results of operations.

 

ITEM 1A.

RISK FACTORS.

There have been no material changes to our risk factors from those included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018. In addition to the other information set forth in this report and in our other reports and statements that we file with the SEC, you should carefully consider the factors discussed in Part I, Item 1A. “Risk Factors” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018 (which was filed with the SEC on March 8, 2019), which could materially affect our business, financial condition, and/or future operating results. The risks described in our Annual Report on Form 10-K and Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q are not the only risks facing our company. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to the Company or that the Company currently deems to be immaterial also may materially and adversely affect the Company’s business, financial condition, and/or operating results.

 

ITEM 2.

UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS.

The following table provides information regarding the Company’s repurchase of its common stock during the three months ended June 30, 2019.

 

     Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities  

Period

   Total Number
of Shares
Purchased
     Weighted-Average
Price Paid
per Share
     Total Number
of Shares
Purchased as
Part of
Publicly
Announced
Program
     Approximate
Dollar Value
of Shares that
May Yet Be
Purchased Under
the Program*
 

April 1, 2019 – April 30, 2019

     —        $ —        —        $ —  

May 1, 2019 – May 31, 2019

     36,342        24.26        36,342      $ 24,118,324  

June 1, 2019 – June 30, 2019

     248,862        25.13        248,862      $ 17,865,184  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total

     285,204      $ 25.02        285,204     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

*

On May 8, 2019, the Company announced that its Board of Directors had authorized the repurchase of up to $25.0 million of the Company’s outstanding shares of common stock. The authorization was effective immediately and extends through May 6, 2021. Stock repurchases under the program may be made in the open market at prevailing market prices, through privately negotiated transactions, or through other structures in accordance with applicable federal securities laws, at times and in amounts as management deems appropriate. The timing and the amount of common stock repurchases will be determined by the Company’s management based on its evaluation of market conditions, the Company’s liquidity needs, legal and contractual requirements and restrictions (including covenants in the Company’s credit agreements), share price, and other factors. The repurchase program does not obligate the Company to purchase any particular number of shares and may be suspended, modified, or discontinued at any time without prior notice.

 

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ITEM 6.

EXHIBITS.

 

                 Incorporated by Reference  

Exhibit

Number

  

Exhibit Description

   Filed
Herewith
     Form      File
Number
     Exhibit      Filing
Date
 
31.1    Rule 13a-14(a) / 15(d)-14(a) Certification of Principal Executive Officer      X              
31.2    Rule 13a-14(a) / 15(d)-14(a) Certification of Principal Financial Officer      X              
32.1    Section 1350 Certifications      X              
101    The following materials from our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the three and six months ended June 30, 2019, formatted in XBRL (eXtensible Business Reporting Language): (i) the Consolidated Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018; (ii) the Consolidated Statements of Income for the three and six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018; (iii) the Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and the year ended December 31, 2018; (iv) the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018; and (v) the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.      X              

 

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SIGNATURE

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

  REGIONAL MANAGEMENT CORP.
Date: July 31, 2019   By:  

/s/ Robert W. Beck

    Robert W.Beck, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer (Principal Financial Officer and Duly Authorized Officer)

 

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