Company Quick10K Filing
RMG Acquisition
Price1.00 EPS-1,833,364
Shares-0 P/E-0
MCap-0 P/FCF0
Net Debt-2 EBIT3
TEV-2 TEV/EBIT-1
TTM 2019-09-30, in MM, except price, ratios
S-1 2021-01-19 Public Filing
10-Q 2020-09-30 Filed 2020-11-09
10-Q 2020-06-30 Filed 2020-08-06
10-Q 2020-03-31 Filed 2020-05-11
10-K 2019-12-31 Filed 2020-03-16
10-Q 2019-09-30 Filed 2019-11-12
10-Q 2019-06-30 Filed 2019-08-13
10-Q 2019-03-31 Filed 2019-05-14
10-K 2018-12-31 Filed 2019-03-29
8-K 2020-11-25
8-K 2020-11-18
8-K 2020-11-17
8-K 2020-11-10
8-K 2020-10-05
8-K 2020-02-05
8-K 2020-01-15
8-K 2019-08-15
8-K 2019-03-29
8-K 2019-02-12
8-K 2019-02-07

RMG Filing

Note 1 - Basis of Pro Forma Presentation
Note 2 - Adjustments To Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Combined Balance Sheet As of September 30, 2020
Note 3 - Adjustments To Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Combined Statement of Operations for The Nine Months Ended September 30, 2020
Note 4 - Adjustments To Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Combined Statement of Operations for The Year Ended December 31, 2019
Note 1 - Description of Organization, Business Operations and Basis of Presentation
Note 2 - Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Note 3 - Initial Public Offering
Note 4 - Private Placement
Note 5 - Notes Payable
Note 6 - Related Party Transactions
Note 7 - Commitments & Contingencies
Note 8 - Stockholder's Equity
Note 9 - Fair Value Measurements
Note 10 - Subsequent Events
Note 1 - Description of Organization, Business Operations and Basis of Presentation
Note 2 - Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Note 3 - Initial Public Offering
Note 4 - Private Placement
Note 5 - Related Party Transactions
Note 6 - Commitments & Contingencies
Note 7 - Stockholder's Equity
Note 8 - Fair Value Measurements
Note 9 - Income Taxes
Part II
Item 13. Other Expenses of Issuance and Distribution.
Item 14. Indemnification of Directors and Officers.
Item 15. Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities.
Item 16. Exhibits.
Item 17. Undertakings.
EX-5.1 rmo-20210119xex5d1.htm
EX-23.1 rmo-20210119xex23d1.htm
EX-23.2 rmo-20210119xex23d2.htm

RMG Acquisition Filing 2021-01-19

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As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on January 18, 2021

Registration No. 333-

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM S-1

REGISTRATION STATEMENT

UNDER THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

Romeo Power, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware

    

3714

    

83-2289787

(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)

 

(Primary standard industrial
classification code number)

 

(I.R.S. Employer
Identification Number)

4380 Ayers Avenue

Vernon, CA 90058

Telephone: (844) 257-8557

(Address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of registrant’s principal executive offices)

Lionel E. Selwood, Jr.

President and Chief Executive Officer

4380 Ayers Avenue

Vernon, CA 90058

Telephone: (844) 257-8557

(Name, address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of agent for service)

With copies to:

David M. Hernand
Paul Hastings LLP
1999 Avenue of the Stars
Los Angeles, California 90067
(310) 620-5700

Jonathan Ko
Paul Hastings LLP
515 South Flower Street, Twenty-Fifth Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90071
(213) 683-6000

Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale of the securities to the public: From time to time after the effective date of this registration statement.

If any of the securities being registered on this Form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933, please check the following box.

If this Form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, please check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer

Smaller reporting company

Emerging growth company

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act.

CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE

Title of Each Class of Securities To Be Registered

Amount to be
Registered(1)

Proposed
Maximum
Offering Price
Per Security

Proposed
Maximum
Aggregate
Offering Price

Amount of
Registration
Fee

Primary Offering:

Common Stock, $0.0001 par value

12,266,648(4)

$11.50(2)

$141,006,452

$15,390.35

Secondary Offering:

Common Stock, $0.0001 par value

62,150,554(5)

$21.59(3)

$1,341,830,461

$146,393.70

Warrants to purchase Common Stock

4,763,058(6)

—(7)

Total

$1,482, 896,913

$161,784.05

(1)

Pursuant to Rule 416 of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), there are also being registered an indeterminable number of additional shares of Common Stock as may be issued to prevent dilution resulting from share splits, stock dividends, recapitalizations or similar transactions.

(2)

The price per share is based upon the exercise price per warrant of $11.50 per share.

(3)

Pursuant to Rule 457(c) under the Securities Act, and solely for the purpose of calculating the registration fee, the proposed maximum offering price per share is $21.59, which is the average of the high and low prices of the Common Stock on January 13, 2021 on the New York Stock Exchange.

(4)

Consists of (i) 4,600,000 shares of Common Stock issuable upon the exercise of 4,600,000 Private Warrants (as defined below) by the holders thereof and (ii) 7,666,648 shares of Common Stock issuable upon the exercise of 7,666,648 Public Warrants (as defined below) by the holders thereof.

(5)

Represents the resale of 62,150,554 shares of Common Stock by the Selling Securityholders (as defined below), which includes (i) 4,600,000 shares of Common Stock issuable upon the exercise of Private Warrants by the holders thereof and (ii) 163,058 shares of Common Stock issuable upon the exercise of Public Warrants by the holders thereof.

(6)

Represents the resale by the Selling Securityholders of (i) 4,600,000 Private Warrants and (ii) 163,058 Public Warrants.

(7)

In accordance with Rule 457(g), the entire registration fee for the Warrants is allocated to the shares of Common Stock underlying the Warrants, and no separate fee is payable for the Warrants.

The registrant hereby amends this registration statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this registration statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act or until the registration statement shall become effective on such date as the Securities and Exchange Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.

The information in this preliminary prospectus is not complete and may be changed. Neither we nor the selling securityholders may sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This preliminary prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.

SUBJECT TO COMPLETION — DATED JANUARY 18, 2021

PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS

Graphic

Romeo Power, Inc.

Up to 62,150,554 Shares of Common Stock
Up to 12,266,648 Shares of Common Stock Issuable Upon Exercise of Warrants
Up to 4,763,058 Warrants

This prospectus relates to the issuance by us of up to an aggregate of up to 12,266,648 shares of our common stock, $0.0001 par value per share (“Common Stock”), which consists of (i) up to 4,600,000 shares of Common Stock that are issuable upon the exercise of 4,600,000 warrants (the “Private Warrants”) originally issued in a private placement in connection with the initial public offering of RMG Acquisition Corp., a Delaware corporation (“RMG”), by the holders thereof, and (ii) up to 7,666,648 shares of Common Stock that are issuable upon the exercise of 7,666,648 warrants (the “Public Warrants” and, together with the Private Warrants, the “Warrants”) originally issued in the initial public offering of RMG, by the holders thereof. We will receive the proceeds from any exercise of any Warrants for cash.

This prospectus also relates to the offer and sale from time to time by the selling securityholders (including their transferees, donees, pledgees and other successors-in-interest) named in this prospectus (the “Selling Securityholders”) of (i) up to 62,150,554 shares of Common Stock (including up to 4,600,000 shares of Common Stock that may be issued upon exercise of the Private Warrants and 163,058 shares of Common Stock that may be issued upon exercise of 163,058 Public Warrants) and (ii) up to 4,763,058 Warrants, which consists of up to 4,600,000 Private Warrants and up to 163,058 Public Warrants. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of shares of Common Stock or Warrants by the Selling Securityholders pursuant to this prospectus.

We are registering the securities for resale pursuant to the Selling Securityholders’ registration rights under certain agreements between us and the Selling Securityholders. Our registration of the securities covered by this prospectus does not mean that the Selling Securityholders will offer or sell any of the shares of Common Stock or Warrants. The Selling Securityholders may offer, sell or distribute all or a portion of their shares of Common Stock or Warrants publicly or through private transactions at prevailing market prices or at negotiated prices. We provide more information about how the Selling Securityholders may sell the shares or Warrants in the section entitled “Plan of Distribution.”

We are an “emerging growth company” as defined in Section 2(a) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and are subject to reduced public company reporting requirements. This prospectus complies with the requirements that apply to an issuer that is an emerging growth company.

Our Common Stock and Public Warrants are listed on the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) under the symbols “RMO” and “RMO.WT,” respectively. On January 15, 2021, the closing price of our Common Stock was $22.08 and the closing price for our Public Warrants was $9.95.

See the section entitled “Risk Factors” beginning on page 7 of this prospectus to read about factors you should consider before buying our securities.

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

The date of this prospectus is         , 2021

TABLE OF CONTENTS

i

ABOUT THIS PROSPECTUS

This prospectus is part of a registration statement on Form S-1 that we filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) using the “shelf” registration process. Under this shelf registration process, the Selling Securityholders may, from time to time, sell the securities offered by them described in this prospectus. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale by such Selling Securityholders of the securities offered by them described in this prospectus. This prospectus also relates to the issuance by us of the shares of Common Stock issuable upon the exercise of the Warrants. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of shares of Common Stock underlying the Warrants pursuant to this prospectus, except with respect to amounts received by us upon the exercise of the Warrants for cash.

Neither we nor the Selling Securityholders have authorized anyone to provide you with any information or to make any representations other than those contained in this prospectus or any applicable prospectus supplement or any free writing prospectuses prepared by or on behalf of us or to which we have referred you. Neither we nor the Selling Securityholders take responsibility for, and can provide no assurance as to the reliability of, any other information that others may give you. Neither we nor the Selling Securityholders will make an offer to sell these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.

We may also provide a prospectus supplement or post-effective amendment to the registration statement to add information to, or update or change information contained in, this prospectus. You should read both this prospectus and any applicable prospectus supplement or post-effective amendment to the registration statement together with the additional information to which we refer you in the sections of this prospectus entitled “Where You Can Find More Information.”

On December 29, 2020 (the “Closing Date”), we consummated the previously announced merger pursuant to that certain Agreement and Plan of Merger, dated as of October 5, 2020 (as amended, the “Merger Agreement”), by and among RMG, RMG Merger Sub, Inc., a Delaware corporation and wholly owned subsidiary of RMG (“Merger Sub”), and Romeo Systems, Inc., a Delaware corporation (“Legacy Romeo”). Pursuant to the terms of the Merger Agreement, a business combination between RMG and Legacy Romeo was effected through the merger of Merger Sub with and into Legacy Romeo, with Legacy Romeo surviving as the surviving company and as a wholly-owned subsidiary of RMG (the “Merger” and, collectively with the other transactions described in the Merger Agreement, the “Business Combination”). On the Closing Date, and in connection with the closing of the Business Combination (the “Closing”), RMG Acquisition Corp. changed its name to Romeo Power, Inc.

Unless the context indicates otherwise, references in this prospectus to the “Company,” “Romeo,” “we,” “us,” “our” and similar terms refer to Romeo Power, Inc. (f/k/a RMG Acquisition Corp.) and its consolidated subsidiaries (including Legacy Romeo). References to “RMG” refer to RMG Acquisition Corp. prior to the consummation of the Business Combination.

ii

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This prospectus contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act, and Section 21E of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). We have based these forward-looking statements on our current expectations and projections about future events. All statements, other than statements of present or historical fact included in this prospectus, our future financial performance, strategy, expansion plans, future operations, future operating results, estimated revenues, losses, projected costs, prospects, plans and objectives of management are forward-looking statements. Any statements that refer to projections, forecasts or other characterizations of future events or circumstances, including any underlying assumptions, are forward-looking statements. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “should,” “could,” “would,” “expect,” “plan,” “anticipate,” “contemplate,” “intend,” “believe,” “estimate,” “continue,” “goal,” “project” or the negative of such terms or other similar terms. These forward-looking statements are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and assumptions about us that may cause our actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Except as otherwise required by applicable law, we disclaim any duty to update any forward-looking statements, all of which are expressly qualified by the statements in this section, to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this prospectus. We caution you that these forward-looking statements are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties, most of which are difficult to predict and many of which are beyond our control.

Forward-looking statements in this prospectus may include, for example, statements about:

our ability to recognize the anticipated benefits of the Business Combination, which may be affected by, among other things, competition and the ability of the combined business to grow and manage growth profitably;
our financial and business performance following the Business Combination, including financial projections and business metrics;
our strategy, future operations, financial position, estimated revenues and losses, projected costs, prospects and plans;
our ability to maintain the listing of our securities on the NYSE;
the potential liquidity and trading of our securities;
the implementation, market acceptance and success of our business model;
our ability to scale in a cost-effective manner;
developments and projections relating to our competitors and industry;
our ability to develop new products, improve existing products and adapt our business model to keep pace with industry trends;
our ability to operate in highly competitive markets and the potential adverse effects of this competition;
our ability to maintain a high-level of client service and expand operations;
our ability to comply with various trade restrictions, such as sanctions and export controls;
our ability to comply with the anti-corruption laws of the United States and various international jurisdictions;

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our ability to execute our business model, including market acceptance of our planned products and services;
the impact of health epidemics, including the novel coronavirus (“COVID-19”) pandemic, on our business and the actions we may take in response thereto;
our expectations regarding our ability to obtain and maintain intellectual property protection and not infringe on the rights of others;
our future capital requirements and sources and uses of cash;
our ability to obtain funding for our operations;
our business, expansion plans and opportunities; and
the outcome of any known and unknown litigation and regulatory proceedings.

These statements are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and assumptions that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected or otherwise implied by the forward-looking statements, including the following:

the outcome of any legal proceedings;
our ability to recognize the anticipated benefits of the Business Combination, which may be affected by, among other things, competition and the ability of the combined business to grow and manage growth profitably;
costs related to the Business Combination;
our success in retaining or recruiting, or changes required in, officers, key employees or directors following the Business Combination;
risks that we are unsuccessful in integrating potential acquired businesses and product lines;
risks of decreased revenues due to pricing pressures;
risks that our products and services fail to interoperate with third-party systems;
potential unavailability of third-party technology or battery cells that we use in our products;
potential disruption of our products, offerings, website and networks;
our ability to deliver products and services following a disaster or business continuity event;
increased risks resulting from our international operations;
potential unauthorized use of our products and technology by third parties;
potential impairment charges related to goodwill, identified intangible assets and fixed assets;
changes in applicable laws or regulations;

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potential failure to comply with privacy and information security regulations governing the client datasets we process and store;
expectations regarding the time during which we will be an “emerging growth company” under the Jumpstart our Business Startups Act of 2012, as amended (the “JOBS Act”);
that we have identified a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting which, if not corrected, could affect the reliability of our consolidated financial statements;
the possibility that the COVID-19 pandemic may adversely affect our results of operations, financial position and cash flows; and
the possibility that we may be adversely affected by other economic, business or competitive factors.

Given these risks and uncertainties, you should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Additional cautionary statements or discussions of risks and uncertainties that could affect our results or the achievement of the expectations described in forward-looking statements may also be contained in any accompanying prospectus supplement.

Should one or more of the risks or uncertainties described in this prospectus or any of the underlying assumptions thereof prove incorrect, our actual results and plans could differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statements. Additional information concerning these and other factors that may impact the operations and projections discussed herein can be found in the section entitled “Risk Factors” beginning on page 7 of this prospectus and in our periodic filings with the SEC. Our SEC filings are available publicly on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.

Before investing in our securities, you should read this prospectus and any accompanying prospectus supplement completely and with the understanding that our actual future results, levels of activity and performance as well as other events and circumstances may be materially different from what we expect. We qualify all of our forward-looking statements by these cautionary statements.

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SUMMARY

This summary highlights selected information appearing elsewhere in this prospectus. Because it is a summary, it may not contain all of the information that may be important to you. To understand this offering fully, you should read this entire prospectus carefully, including the information set forth under the heading “Risk Factors” and our financial statements.

The Company

We are an industry leading energy storage technology company focused on designing and manufacturing lithium-ion battery modules and packs for commercial electric vehicles. Through our energy dense battery modules and packs, we enable large-scale sustainable transportation by delivering safe, longer lasting batteries that have shorter charge times and longer life. With greater energy density, we are able to create lightweight and efficient solutions that deliver superior performance and provide improved acceleration, range and durability compared to battery packs provided by our competitors. Our modules and packs are customizable and scalable and are optimized by our proprietary battery management systems. We believe we produce superior battery products compared to our competitors by leveraging our technical expertise and depth of knowledge of energy storage systems.

Background

We were originally known as RMG Acquisition Corp. On December 29, 2020, RMG consummated the Business Combination with Legacy Romeo pursuant to the Merger Agreement, dated as of October 5, 2020, among RMG, Legacy Romeo and Merger Sub. In connection with the Closing of the Business Combination, RMG changed its name to Romeo Power, Inc. Legacy Romeo was deemed to be the accounting acquirer in the Merger based on an analysis of the criteria outlined in Accounting Standards Codification 805. While RMG was the legal acquirer in the Merger, because Legacy Romeo was deemed the accounting acquirer, the historical financial statements of Legacy Romeo became the historical financial statements of the combined company, upon the consummation of the Merger.

At the effective time of the Merger (the “Effective Time”):

each share of Legacy Romeo common stock and preferred stock issued and outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time (with each share of Romeo preferred stock being treated as if it were converted into Legacy Romeo common stock immediately prior to the Effective Time) (other than shares owned by Legacy Romeo as treasury stock or dissenting shares) converted into the right to receive 0.121730 shares (the “Exchange Ratio”) of our Common Stock and, if applicable, a cash amount payable in respect of fractional shares of Common Stock that would otherwise be issued in connection with the foregoing conversion;
each Legacy Romeo convertible note converted into the right to receive a number of shares our Common Stock equal to the Exchange Ratio for each share of Legacy Romeo common stock into which such note would convert at a price equal to $0.4339 and, if applicable, a cash amount payable in respect of fractional shares of our Common Stock that would otherwise be issued in connection with the foregoing conversion; and
the holders of Legacy Romeo options and holders of Legacy Romeo warrants continue to hold such options or warrants, as applicable, but such options and warrants became exercisable to purchase a number of shares of our Common Stock equal to the number of shares of Legacy Romeo common stock subject to such Legacy Romeo options and Legacy Romeo warrants multiplied by the Exchange Ratio (rounded down to the nearest whole share) at an exercise price per share divided by the Exchange Ratio (rounded up to the nearest whole cent).

At the Effective Time, each share of common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, of Merger Sub issued and outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time was converted into and exchanged for one validly issued, fully paid and nonassessable share of Legacy Romeo common stock.

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On December 29, 2020, a number of purchasers (each, a “Subscriber”) purchased from the Company an aggregate of 16,000,000 shares of Class A Common Stock (the “PIPE Shares”), for a purchase price of $10.00 per share and an aggregate purchase price of $160,000,000, pursuant to separate subscription agreements (each, a “Subscription Agreement”) entered into effective as of October 5, 2020. Pursuant to the Subscription Agreements, the Company gave certain registration rights to the Subscribers with respect to the PIPE Shares. The sale of PIPE Shares was consummated concurrently with the Closing.

Pursuant to our prior amended and restated certificate of incorporation, each share of Class B Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per share (the “Class B Common Stock”), converted into one share of Class A Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per share (the “Class A Common Stock”), at the Closing. After the Closing and following the effectiveness of our second amended and restated certificate of incorporation (“Certificate of Incorporation”), each share of Class A Common Stock was automatically reclassified, redesignated and changed into one validly issued, fully paid and non-assessable share of Common Stock, without any further action by us or any stockholder.

Our Common Stock and Public Warrants are currently listed on the on the NYSE under the symbols “RMO” and “RMO.WT,” respectively.

The rights of holders of our Common Stock and Warrants are governed by our Certificate of Incorporation, our amended and restated bylaws (the “Bylaws”) and the Delaware General Corporation Law (the “DGCL”), and, in the case of the Warrants, that certain Warrant Agreement, dated February 7, 2019 (the “Warrant Agreement”), between RMG and American Stock Transfer & Trust Company, LLC (the “Warrant Agent”). See the sections entitled “Description of Securities” and “Certain Relationships and Related Person Transactions.”

Emerging Growth Company

We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined under the JOBS Act. As an emerging growth company, we are eligible to take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies. These include, but are not limited to, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports and proxy statements, and exemptions from the requirements of holding a nonbinding advisory vote on executive compensation and the requirement to obtain stockholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved.

We will remain an emerging growth company until the earlier of (1) December 31, 2024 (the last day of the fiscal year following the fifth anniversary of the consummation of the Initial Public Offering), (2) the last day of the fiscal year in which we have total annual gross revenue of at least $1.07 billion, (3) the last day of the fiscal year in which we are deemed to be a “large accelerated filer,” as defined in the Exchange Act, and (4) the date on which we have issued more than $1.0 billion in nonconvertible debt securities during the prior three-year period.

Corporate Information

RMG was incorporated on October 22, 2018 for the purpose of effecting a merger, capital stock exchange, asset acquisition, stock purchase, reorganization or similar business combination with one or more businesses. RMG completed its initial public offering (the “Initial Public Offering”) in February 2019. In December 2020, Merger Sub merged with and into Legacy Romeo, with Legacy Romeo surviving the Merger as a wholly-owned subsidiary of RMG. In connection with the Merger, we changed our name to Romeo Power, Inc. Our principal executive offices are located at 4380 Ayers Avenue, Vernon, California 90058. Our telephone number is (844) 257-8557. Our website address is www.romeopower.com. Information contained on our website or connected thereto does not constitute part of, and is not incorporated by reference into, this prospectus or the registration statement of which it forms a part.

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THE OFFERING

    

Issuer

Romeo Power, Inc. (f/k/a RMG Acquisition Corp.)

Issuance of Common Stock

Shares of Common Stock Offered by us

12,266,648 shares of Common Stock issuable upon exercise of the Warrants, consisting of (i) 4,600,000 shares of Common Stock that are issuable upon the exercise of 4,600,000 Private Warrants by the holders thereof and (ii) 7,666,648 shares of Common Stock that are issuable upon the exercise of 7,666,648 Public Warrants by the holders thereof.

Shares of Common Stock Outstanding Prior to Exercise of All Warrants

126,787,151 shares (as of December 29, 2020).

Shares of Common Stock Outstanding Assuming Exercise of All Warrants

139,053,817 shares (based on total shares outstanding as of December 29, 2020, and excluding any Legacy Romeo warrants).

Exercise Price of Warrants

$11.50 per share, subject to adjustment as described herein.

Use of Proceeds

We will receive up to an aggregate of approximately $141.1 million from the exercise of the Warrants, assuming the exercise in full of all of the Warrants for cash. We expect to use the net proceeds from the exercise of the Warrants for general corporate purposes. See “Use of Proceeds.”

Resale of Common Stock and Warrants

Shares of Common Stock Offered by the Selling Securityholders

62,150,554 shares (including up to 4,600,000 shares of Common Stock that may be issued upon exercise of the Private Warrants and up to 163,058 shares of Common Stock that may be issued upon exercise of 163,058 Public Warrants).

Warrants Offered by the Selling Securityholders

4,763,058 Warrants, consisting of (i) 4,600,000 Private Warrants and (ii) 163,058 Public Warrants.

Redemption

The Warrants are redeemable in certain circumstances. See “Description of Securities—Warrants” for further discussion.

Use of Proceeds

We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of shares of Common Stock or Private Warrants by the Selling Securityholders.

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Lock-Up Restrictions

Certain of our stockholders are subject to certain restrictions on transfer until the termination of applicable lock-up periods. See “Certain Relationships and Related Person Transactions” for further discussion.

Market for Common Stock and Warrants

Our Common Stock and Public Warrants are currently traded on the NYSE under the symbols “RMO” and “RMO.WT,” respectively.

Risk Factors

See “Risk Factors” and other information included in this prospectus for a discussion of factors you should consider before investing in our securities.

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Summary Risk Factors

An investment in shares of our Common Stock involves a high degree of risk. If any of the factors enumerated below or in the section entitled “Risk Factors” occurs, our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects could be materially and adversely affected.

Our limited operating history makes evaluating our business and future prospects difficult and may increase the risk of your investment.
We have identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting which, if not corrected, could affect the reliability of our consolidated financial statements and have other adverse consequences.
Our business and future growth depends on the growth in demand for electric vehicles, hybrid vehicles and alternative fuel.
We are currently dependent on a limited number of customers for a significant portion of our revenues.
Many of our target customers are large commercial vehicle OEM customers and large volume customers, and the failure to obtain such customers, loss of sales to such customers or failure to negotiate acceptable terms in contract renewal negotiations could have an adverse impact on our business.
Under certain circumstances, our customers can cancel or terminate our contracts.
If any of our battery products fails to perform as expected, our ability to develop, market and sell our current products or future technology could be harmed.
We operate in an extremely competitive industry and are subject to pricing pressures. Further, many other battery manufacturers have significantly greater resources than we have.
Entering into strategic alliances, such as our joint venture with BorgWarner Inc. (“Borg Warner”), and relying on third party manufacturing expose us to risks.
We may be restricted from growing sales of battery packs beyond those that we can produce in our current manufacturing facility.
BorgWarner indirectly controls our research and development budget and critical research and development activities and priorities, which may require us to divert research and development resources away from activities that would grow our business in non-mobility sectors.
BorgWarner has rights in Legacy Romeo’s intellectual property, and the option to expand such rights under certain circumstances.
Legacy Romeo must disclose all of its technology to BorgWarner and may not be able to (i) effectively monitor whether BorgWarner is using such technology in accordance with applicable restrictions or (ii) obtain adequate compensation for any infringement or misappropriation of our intellectual property rights in such technology.
BorgWarner could obtain a broad commercial license to Legacy Romeo’s intellectual property in the event of its insolvency or breach of any debt covenant.
Our interest in the BorgWarner JV (as defined below) and the Legacy Romeo intellectual property are pledged to BorgWarner to secure Legacy Romeo’s performance of all of its obligations to BorgWarner relating to the BorgWarner JV.
BorgWarner will have a call option to purchase our interest in the BorgWarner JV for an amount that may be less than the value that we could obtain for such interest on the open market.
We are dependent on our suppliers to fulfill our customers’ orders, and if we fail to manage our relationships effectively with, or lose the services of, these suppliers and we cannot substitute suitable alternative suppliers, our operations would be materially adversely affected.
Increases in costs, disruption of supply or shortage of any of our battery components, particularly cells, could harm our business.

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Our failure to keep up with rapid technological changes and evolving industry standards may cause our products to become obsolete and less marketable, resulting in loss of market share to our competitors or a decrease in demand for our battery packs and modules due to substitute products.
If we cannot continue to develop new products in a timely manner and at favorable margins, we may not be able to compete effectively.
Developments in alternative technology may adversely affect the demand for our battery modules, packs, and battery management systems (“BMS”) for electric vehicles.
Lithium-ion battery cells have been observed to catch fire or vent smoke and flame.
Manufacturing or use of our products may cause accidents, which could result in significant production interruption, delay or claims for substantial damages.
We may become subject to product liability claims, which could harm our financial condition and liquidity if we are not able to successfully defend or insure against such claims.
As components of electric vehicles, our products as installed in the products of our customers are subject to motor vehicle standards, and the failure of the vehicles to satisfy such mandated safety standards could have a material adverse effect on the demand for our products, our business and our operating results.
Future product recalls could materially adversely affect our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.
Third-party claims or litigation alleging infringement of patents or infringement or misappropriation of other proprietary rights, or seeking to invalidate our patents may adversely affect our business.
Maintaining our manufacturing operations will require significant capital expenditures, and our inability or failure to maintain our operations would have a material adverse impact on our market share and ability to generate revenue.
We rely on complex machinery for our operations, and production involves a significant degree of risk and uncertainty in terms of operational performance and costs.
We are currently dependent on a single manufacturing facility. If our facility becomes inoperable, we will be unable to produce our battery products and our business will be harmed.
Our operations are subject to a variety of environmental, health and safety rules that can bring scrutiny from regulatory agencies and increase our costs.
Our battery packs and BMS rely on software and hardware that are highly technical, and if these systems contain errors, bugs or vulnerabilities, or if we are unsuccessful in addressing or mitigating technical limitations in our systems, our business could be adversely affected.
The unavailability, reduction or elimination of government and economic incentives due to policy changes or government regulation could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.
Failure to maintain adequate financial, information technology and management processes and controls could impair our ability to comply with the financial reporting and internal controls requirements for publicly traded companies, which could lead to errors in our financial reporting and adversely affect our business.
We rely on information technology and any failure, inadequacy, interruption or security lapse of that technology, including any cybersecurity incidents, could harm our ability to operate our business effectively.
A widespread health crisis could adversely affect the global economy, resulting in an economic downturn that could impact demand for our products.
Ownership of our Common Stock is concentrated, and as a result, certain stockholders may exercise significant influence over us.

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RISK FACTORS

Investing in our securities involves risks. Before you make a decision to buy our securities, in addition to the risks and uncertainties discussed above under “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” and “Summary Risk Factors,” you should carefully consider the specific risks set forth herein. If any of these risks actually occur, our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects could be materially and adversely affected. As a result, the market price of our securities could decline, and you could lose all or part of your investment. Additionally, the risks and uncertainties described in this prospectus or any prospectus supplement are not the only risks and uncertainties that we face. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or that we currently believe to be immaterial may become material and adversely affect our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects.

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry

Our limited operating history makes evaluating our business and future prospects difficult and may increase the risk of your investment.

You must consider the risks and difficulties we face as an early stage company with a limited operating history. If we do not successfully address these risks, our business, prospects, financial condition, and operating results will be materially and adversely harmed. Legacy Romeo was incorporated in June 2014 and has a very limited operating history on which investors can base an evaluation of our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results. We derive, and intend to continue to derive, the majority of our revenues from the sale of our battery packs, modules, and battery management systems. As of September 30, 2020, we had a backlog (as defined below) of approximately $310 million, of which approximately $240 million represented the minimum revenue that would be received under such contracts to satisfy take or pay minimum order commitments. We define contracted revenue (or “backlog”) as revenue expected to be received under our existing customer contracts from sales of battery packs, modules, battery management system software and services not yet built and delivered or provided. The difference between our backlog and our minimum revenue that would be received in satisfaction of take or pay minimum order commitments reflects that our backlog does not represent a guarantee that our customers will complete purchases of our products and services in the quantities that we anticipate, and some of our contracts allow our customers to purchase in smaller quantities with certain minimum order penalties. Although we have attempted to de-risk such backlog through minimum value commitments in existing contracts, there are no assurances that we will be able to maintain our current customers or supplier relationships, or secure future business with customers, such as major commercial vehicle original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”), trucking companies and other fleet owners.

It is difficult to predict our future revenues and appropriately budget for our expenses, and we have limited insight into trends that may emerge and affect our business. In the event that actual results differ from our estimates or we adjust our estimates in future periods, our operating results and financial condition could be materially affected.

We have identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting which, if not corrected, could affect the reliability of our consolidated financial statements and have other adverse consequences.

We have identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting that we are currently working to remediate, which relate to: (a) Legacy Romeo’s general segregation of duties, including the review and approval of journal entries; and (b) a lack of sufficient technical accounting resources.

A material weakness is a deficiency or combination of deficiencies in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of a company’s financial statements would not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. These deficiencies could result in material misstatements to its consolidated financial statements that would not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

Our management has concluded that these material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting are due to the fact that, prior to the completion of the Business Combination, Legacy Romeo was a private company with limited resources and did not have the necessary business processes and related internal controls formally designed and

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implemented coupled with the appropriate resources with the appropriate level of experience and technical expertise to oversee its business processes and controls.

Our management is in the process of developing a remediation plan. The material weaknesses will be considered remediated when management designs and implements effective controls that operate for a sufficient period of time and management has concluded, through testing, that these controls are effective. Our management will monitor the effectiveness of our remediation plans and will make changes management determines to be appropriate.

If not remediated, these material weaknesses could result in further material misstatements to our annual or interim consolidated financial statements that might not be prevented or detected on a timely basis, or in delayed filing of required periodic reports. If we are unable to assert that our internal control over financial reporting is effective, or when required in the future, if our independent registered public accounting firm is unable to express an unqualified opinion as to the effectiveness of the internal control over financial reporting, investors may lose confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports, the market price of our Common Stock could be adversely affected and we could become subject to litigation or investigations by the NYSE, the SEC, or other regulatory authorities, which could require additional financial and management resources.

Our business and future growth depends on the growth in demand for electric vehicles, hybrid vehicles and alternative fuel.

As the demand for our products is directly related to the market demand for electric vehicles, a fast-growing e-mobility market will be critical to the success of our business. In anticipation of an expected increase in the demand for electric vehicles in the next few years, we have developed our manufacturing facility and sought long-term strategic partnerships, such as our strategic alliance with tier 1 automotive supplier BorgWarner Inc. (“BorgWarner”). However, the markets we have targeted, primarily those in North America (North American commercial vehicles Class 6 through 8) and Europe (European high-performance vehicles), may not achieve the level of growth we expect during the time frame projected. If either of these markets fails to achieve our expected level of growth, we may have excess production capacity and may not be able to generate enough revenue to obtain profitability. If the market for alternative fuel, hybrid vehicles and electric vehicles does not develop at the rate or in the manner or to the extent that we expect, or if critical assumptions that we have made regarding the efficiency of our energy solutions are incorrect or incomplete, our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results could be harmed.

Our future depends on the needs and success of our customers, as well as the demand for our customers’ products or services.

The demand for our battery products will ultimately depend on our end-market users. Decisions to purchase our battery packs, modules, and BMS may depend on the performance of the industries of our customers and if demand for output in those industries decreases, then the demand for our products may decrease as well. Demand in these industries is impacted by numerous factors, including, but not limited to, commodity prices, infrastructure spending, consumer spending, customer fleet ICE replacement schedules, travel restrictions, fuel costs, energy demands, municipal spending and government mandates and incentives. Increases or decreases in these variables may significantly impact the demand for our products. If we are unable to predict demand accurately, we may be unable to meet our customers’ needs, resulting in the loss of potential sales, or we may produce excess products, resulting in increased inventories and overcapacity in our production facilities, increasing our unit production cost and decreasing our operating margins.

Further, our customers’ inability to market and sell their products or services successfully, whether from lack of market acceptance or otherwise, could materially and adversely affect our business and prospects because such customers may not order new or additional products from us. If we cannot achieve the expected level of sales, we will not be able to make sufficient profits to offset the expenditures we have incurred to expand our production capacity, nor will we be able to grow our business. Accordingly, our business, financial condition, results of operations and future success would be materially and adversely affected.

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We are currently dependent on a limited number of customers for a significant portion of our revenues.

We have been dependent on a limited number of customers for a significant portion of our revenue. For the year ended December 31, 2019, Agility Fuel Systems LLC and Zume, Inc. accounted for approximately 74% of total revenue, and BorgWarner JV engineering services revenue accounted for 23% of total revenue. For the year ended December 31, 2018, four customers accounted for 78% of revenue. For the nine months ended September 30, 2020, BorgWarner JV engineering services revenue accounted for 47% of total revenue and Agility Fuel Systems, LLC accounted for approximately 47% of total revenue. For the nine months ended September 30, 2019, Agility Fuel Systems LLC, Zume, Inc. and BorgWarner JV engineering services revenue accounted for approximately 97% of revenue. Our top customer, Nikola, accounted for approximately 66% of our contracted revenues as of September 30, 2020, and, had our contract with Lion Buses been entered into as of such date (instead of the actual November 2, 2020 contract date), Nikola and Lion would have accounted for approximately 38% and 43%, respectively, of our contracted revenues as of September 30, 2020. Dependence on a few customers could make it difficult to negotiate attractive prices for our products and could expose us to the risk of substantial losses if a single dominant customer stops purchasing our products or if we lose a single dominant customer due to reasons out of our control. We expect that a limited number of customers will continue to contribute a significant portion of our sales in the near future. Our ability to maintain close relationships with these top customers is essential to the growth and profitability of our business. If we fail to sell our products to one or more of these top customers in any particular period, or if a large customer purchases fewer of our products, defers orders or fails to place additional orders with us, or if we fail to develop additional major customers, our revenue could decline and our results of operations could be adversely affected.

Our customers may fail to fulfill their purchase commitments.

Our order backlog currently consists of commitments by a small number of customers to purchase hundreds of millions of dollars of our products over the next several years. Our customers operate in a relatively new industry of commercial vehicles powered by electric batteries and have based their commitments to us on assumptions that sales in their industry will experience considerable growth over the next several years and that they will capture a significant portion of those sales. Further, those customers do not yet have a track record of profitability and may need to rely partially on invested capital to fulfill their commitments to us, and the products of those customers have not yet demonstrated broad market acceptance. If the market for commercial vehicles powered by electric batteries does not grow as expected, if some of our major customers fail to obtain necessary financial backing, or if their products are not widely accepted by the market, those customers may fail to satisfy their minimum purchase commitments to us. In that event, our revenue and profitability could be adversely effected.

Many of our target customers are large commercial vehicle OEM customers and large volume customers, and the failure to obtain such customers, loss of sales to such customers or failure to negotiate acceptable terms in contract renewal negotiations could have an adverse impact on our business.

Although we intend to sell predominantly to commercial vehicle OEMs and other large volume customers, we may not be able to establish or continue our relationships with such OEMs or large volume customers if customer demand is not as high as we expect or if commercial vehicle OEMs face pressure or contractual obligations from their existing suppliers not to purchase our products. We may enter into long-term contracts with certain of these commercial vehicle OEMs and other large volume customers who have substantial bargaining power with respect to price and other commercial terms, and any long-term contracts would be subject to renegotiation and renewal from time to time. Failure to obtain new customers, maintain existing customers, loss of all or a substantial portion of sales to any future or current customers for whatever reason (including, but not limited to, loss of contracts or failure to negotiate acceptable terms in contract renewal negotiations, loss of market share by these customers, insolvency of such customers, reduced or delayed customer requirements, plant shutdowns, strikes or other work stoppages affecting production by such customers) or continued reduction of prices to these customers could have a significant adverse effect on our financial results and business prospects. There can be no assurance that we will be able to obtain large volume customers, maintain our current large volume customers, not lose all or a portion of sales to any future large volume customers, or offset any reduction of prices to these customers with reductions in our costs or by obtaining new contracts.

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The level of any future sales to commercial vehicle OEMs, including the realization of future sales from awarded business or obtaining new business or customers, is inherently subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, including the number of vehicles that these commercial vehicle OEMs actually manufacture and sell. Further, to the extent that the financial condition, including bankruptcy or market share, of any of our largest customers deteriorates or their sales otherwise continue to decline, our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results could be adversely affected. Accordingly, we may not in fact realize all of the future sales represented by our awarded business. Any failure to realize these sales could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

We may not be able to engage target customers successfully and to convert such contacts into meaningful orders in the future.

Our success, and our ability to increase revenue and operate profitably, depends in part on our ability to identify target customers and convert such contacts into meaningful orders or expand on current customer relationships. In some cases, our battery products have been delivered to certain customers on an early trial deployment basis, where such customers have the ability to evaluate whether our products meet their performance requirements before such customers commit to meaningful orders.

In addition to new customers, our future success depends on whether our current customers are willing to continue using our battery products as well as whether their product lines continue to incorporate our products. As our customers expand their product lines, we hope to be the primary supplier for their fleets. Our products are fully customizable and our R&D efforts strive to create products that are on the cutting edge of technology, but competition in our industry is high. To secure acceptance of our products, we must constantly develop and introduce longer-range and more cost-effective batteries with enhanced functionality and performance to meet evolving industry standards. If we are unable to meet our customers’ performance requirements or industry specifications, retain target customers, or convert early trial deployments into meaningful orders, our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results could be materially adversely affected.

Under certain circumstances, our customers can cancel or terminate our contracts.

We have ongoing arrangements with our customers and target customers. Some of these arrangements are evidenced by non-binding letters of intent and memoranda of understanding, early stage agreements that are used for design and development purposes but will require renegotiation at later stages of development or production or master agreements that have yet to be implemented under separately negotiated statements of work, each of which could be terminated or may not materialize into next-stage contracts or long-term contract partnership arrangements. For instance, we have entered into non-binding letters of intent or memoranda of understanding with certain commercial vehicle companies in the United States and Canada. If these arrangements are terminated or if we are unable to enter into next-stage contracts or long-term operational contracts, our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results may be materially adversely affected.

If we are unable to establish and maintain confidence in our long-term business prospects among customers and analysts and within our industry or are subject to negative publicity, then our financial condition, operating results, business prospects and access to capital may suffer materially.

Customers may be less likely to purchase our battery products if they are not convinced that our business will succeed or that our service and support and other operations will continue in the long term. Similarly, suppliers and other third parties will be less likely to invest time and resources in developing business relationships with us if they are not convinced that our business will succeed. Accordingly, in order to build and maintain our business, we must maintain confidence among customers, suppliers, analysts, ratings agencies and other parties in our products, long-term financial viability and business prospects. Maintaining such confidence may be particularly complicated by certain factors including those that are largely outside of our control, such as our limited operating history, customer unfamiliarity with our battery products, any delays in scaling production, delivery and service operations to meet demand, competition, future changes in the evolving hybrid electric and electric vehicle market or uncertainty regarding our production and sales performance compared with market expectations.

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If any of our battery products fails to perform as expected, our ability to develop, market and sell our current products or future technology could be harmed.

Our products, such as our battery modules, packs and BMS, could contain defects in design and production that may cause them not to perform as expected or to require repair. We currently have a limited frame of reference by which to evaluate the performance of our products upon which our business prospects depend. There can be no assurance that we will be able to detect and fix any defects in our battery products. We may experience recalls in the future, which could adversely affect our brand and could adversely affect our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

Further, our products may not perform consistent with customers’ expectations or consistent with other vehicles that may become available. Any product defects or any other failure of our battery modules, packs and software to perform as expected could harm our reputation and result in lost revenue, delivery delays, product recalls, negative publicity, product liability claims and significant warranty and other expenses and could have a material adverse impact on our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results. Additionally, problems and defects experienced by other alternative fuel commercial vehicle companies or electric consumer vehicles could by association have a negative impact on public perception and customer demand for our products.

We operate in an extremely competitive industry and are subject to pricing pressures. Further, many other battery manufacturers have significantly greater resources than we have.

We compete with a number of major international manufacturers and distributors, as well as a number of smaller, regional competitors. We expect competition to become more intense as our end-markets transition to zero-emission transportation. Increased competition may result in declines in average selling prices of our products, causing a decrease in margins. Due to excess capacity in some sectors of our industry and consolidation among industrial battery purchasers, we may be subjected to significant pricing pressures.

Many of our competitors have greater financial, personnel, technical, manufacturing, marketing, sales and other resources than we do, which may place us at a competitive disadvantage. In addition, certain of our competitors may have a lower overall cost structure. As a result, these competitors may be in a stronger position to respond quickly to market opportunities, new or emerging technologies and evolving industry standards. Many of our competitors are developing a variety of battery technologies, such as solid state batteries and fuel cells, which are expected to compete with our existing product lines. It is possible that our competitors will be able to introduce new products with more desirable features than ours and their new products will gain greater market acceptance. If our competitors successfully do so, we may not be able to maintain our competitive position, and our business and future success would be materially and adversely affected.

We anticipate continued competitive pricing pressure as foreign producers are able to employ labor at significantly lower costs than producers in the U.S. and Western Europe, expand their export capacity and increase their marketing presence in our major end markets. Several of our competitors have strong technical, marketing, sales, manufacturing, distribution and other resources, as well as significant name recognition, established positions in the market and long-standing relationships with our industry’s potential customer base. In addition, certain of our competitors may have long-standing relationships with suppliers, which may provide them with a competitive pricing advantage and reduce their exposure to volatile raw material costs. Our ability to maintain and improve our operating margins has depended, and continues to depend, on our ability to control and reduce our costs. We cannot assure you that we will be able to continue to control our operating expenses, to raise or maintain our prices or increase our unit volume, in order to maintain or improve our operating results.

Entering into strategic alliances, such as our joint venture with BorgWarner, and relying on third party manufacturing expose us to risks.

We have entered into, and may in the future enter into additional, strategic alliances, including joint ventures or minority equity investments with various third parties to further our business. For example, in May 2019, Legacy Romeo joined forces with a subsidiary of tier 1 automotive supplier BorgWarner to form a joint venture named BorgWarner Romeo Power LLC (the “BorgWarner JV”). Our strategic alliance with BorgWarner gives us, through our ownership interest in the BorgWarner JV, an opportunity to benefit from BorgWarner’s and its affiliates’ manufacturing expertise,

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superior purchasing power with our existing suppliers, and longstanding relationships with many of our target customers. With BorgWarner’s global footprint, we believe we have an opportunity through the BorgWarner JV to significantly and efficiently expand into the European and Asian electric vehicle markets.

While offering potential benefits, these strategic alliances could subject us to a number of risks, including risks associated with sharing proprietary information, non-performance by the partners and increased expenses in establishing new strategic alliances, any of which may materially and adversely affect our business. We may have limited ability to monitor or control the actions of these third parties and, to the extent any of these strategic third parties suffers negative publicity or harm to their reputation from events relating to their business, we may also suffer negative publicity or harm to our reputation by virtue of our association with any such third party. For example, if we rely on BorgWarner’s manufacturing facilities, those operations would be outside of our control. We could experience delays if our partners do not meet agreed upon timelines or experience capacity constraints, and in turn, we could lose customers and face reputational harm.

Further, there is risk of potential disputes with partners, and we could be affected by adverse publicity related to our partners whether or not such publicity is related to their collaboration with us. Our ability to successfully build a premium brand could also be adversely affected by perceptions about the quality of our partners’ products. In addition, because we rely on our partners and third parties to meet our quality standards, there can be no assurance that we will successfully maintain quality standards. Any of the foregoing could adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects.

We may be restricted from growing sales of battery packs beyond those that we can produce in our current manufacturing facility.

Legacy Romeo has the right to exploit its own intellectual property pursuant to an Intellectual Property License Agreement (the “IP License”) that it entered into with BorgWarner at the time BorgWarner invested in Legacy Romeo and the parties formed the BorgWarner JV. However, rights of first refusal in the Joint Venture Operating Agreement that Legacy Romeo entered into with BorgWarner (the “JV Agreement”) limit Legacy Romeo’s right to exploit its intellectual property. Those rights give the BorgWarner JV a right of first refusal to manufacture all of Legacy Romeo’s mobility products, and give BorgWarner a right of first refusal to manufacture all of Legacy Romeo’s stationary products once Legacy Romeo exceeds the projected 6.8 gigawatt hour annual production capacity of our existing manufacturing facility. If the BorgWarner JV exercised its right to manufacture all of Legacy Romeo’s mobility battery products over such annual production capacity limit, Legacy Romeo would benefit from such sales through its ownership of 40% of the BorgWarner JV and through its right to collect a royalty based on the BorgWarner JV’s revenue. Further, if BorgWarner were to exercise its right to manufacture Legacy Romeo’s stationary battery products over such annual production capacity limit, BorgWarner would be required to do so via a joint venture with Legacy Romeo on terms that Legacy Romeo and BorgWarner would negotiate at the time of forming such venture.

The relevant provisions in the JV Agreement and the IP License arguably could be interpreted by BorgWarner to restrict our right to exploit Legacy Romeo’s intellectual property to expand production operations and/or sell products beyond the products that we can manufacture within our projected 6.8 gigawatt hour annual production capacity regardless of whether BorgWarner or the BorgWarner JV exercise their rights of first refusal, which may limit our business growth potential and make our company less attractive than it otherwise would be to potential investors and/or acquirors.

BorgWarner indirectly controls our research and development (“R&D”) budget and critical R&D activities and priorities, which may require us to divert R&D resources away from activities that would grow our business in non-mobility sectors.

Our success depends on our ability to continue to effectively develop our technology and intellectual property through our R&D program. However, Legacy Romeo’s overall annual R&D budget is subject to approval by the board of directors of the BorgWarner JV (the “JV Board”), which BorgWarner controls. Our inability to exclusively determine our own R&D budget may impair our competitiveness.

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Further, we have the sole right under the Legacy Romeo intellectual property to commercialize stationary applications anywhere in the world, and the sole right in North America relating to certain recreational vehicles and specialty items. However, generally Legacy Romeo may only allocate 20% of its total R&D spend to activities directed to non-mobility applications. That limitation may impair our ability to effectively pursue non-mobility market opportunities.

Legacy Romeo’s other R&D activities (i.e., activities accounting generally for at least 80% of Legacy Romeo’s total R&D budget) must be focused on technology for use in mobile applications, including vehicles that move on air, in water, on-road, or off-road, and any application that transports people or cargo. Our pursuit of such activities also must be directed, prioritized and approved by the JV Board, and agreed to by Legacy Romeo’s board of directors.

Because the markets in which the BorgWarner JV has an intellectual property license to operate differ from the markets in which Legacy Romeo has an intellectual property license to operate (for example, only the BorgWarner JV is licensed to operate in the market for passenger vehicle batteries), the R&D priorities that we may have apart from our interest in and obligations to the BorgWarner JV may not always align with the R&D priorities of the BorgWarner JV. Further, BorgWarner owns 60% of the BorgWarner JV but only 15.2% of our outstanding Common Stock, so BorgWarner’s portion of any gain in the value of the BorgWarner JV is greater than its portion of any gain in the value of the Company. As a result, by enforcing its contractual rights, the BorgWarner JV could require us to divert our R&D resources away from activities that we believe would most benefit us and towards activities that would primarily benefit the BorgWarner JV.

BorgWarner has rights in Legacy Romeo’s intellectual property, and the option to expand such rights under certain circumstances.

Under the IP License, BorgWarner has a perpetual, irrevocable, worldwide license to use all of Legacy Romeo’s current and future intellectual property. The license is currently limited to noncommercial uses. However, under certain circumstances, such as if Legacy Romeo sells or grants rights under its intellectual property to a direct competitor of either BorgWarner or the BorgWarner JV, if Legacy Romeo is acquired by a direct competitor of either BorgWarner or the BorgWarner JV, or if Legacy Romeo performs certain activities such as R&D in relation to mobility applications without BorgWarner’s approval, BorgWarner would have the right to expand its license to Legacy Romeo’s intellectual property so that the license becomes transferable, sub-licensable and arguably exclusive, enabling BorgWarner to commercialize any products, without any obligation to pay any license or other fee in connection with such license expansion. Because BorgWarner is a large enterprise, the range of automotive businesses that may be considered a direct competitor of BorgWarner is quite broad. Further, BorgWarner may disagree with us as to whether any particular business not already identified is a direct competitor.

Although we would argue, if necessary, that BorgWarner’s expanded license described above would not restrict or limit Legacy Romeo’s rights to sublicense or otherwise exploit the rights granted to Legacy Romeo under the IP License, BorgWarner could argue that, if the license were interpreted as being exclusive, the effect would limit Legacy Romeo’s rights under the IP License.

BorgWarner’s rights to expand the scope of its license under such agreement in the event that Legacy Romeo is acquired by a direct competitor may make our company less attractive than it otherwise would be to potential strategic acquirors and thus impair the value of our Common Stock.

Legacy Romeo must disclose all of its technology to BorgWarner and may not be able to (i) effectively monitor whether BorgWarner is using such technology in accordance with applicable restrictions or (ii) obtain adequate compensation for any infringement or misappropriation of our intellectual property rights in such technology.

Legacy Romeo is obligated to provide the BorgWarner JV and BorgWarner access to all of its proprietary technology, including the source code for our battery management system. It would be possible for BorgWarner to use that technology and related intellectual property without our knowledge or in ways that the IP License does not permit. If this happened, we might have limited monetary remedies available to us given contractual limitations of liability.

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BorgWarner could obtain a broad commercial license to Legacy Romeo’s intellectual property in the event of its insolvency or breach of any debt covenant.

If Legacy Romeo becomes insolvent, forms an intent to evaluate potential insolvency proceedings, or breaches any debt covenant that results in an event of default under any debt instrument, or if the BorgWarner JV is dissolved based on any breach by Legacy Romeo of any agreement relating to the BorgWarner JV, then BorgWarner would have the option, to the extent that it is valid and enforceable under applicable law, to convert its license from a noncommercial license to a perpetual, irrevocable, worldwide, transferrable and sub-licensable license to commercialize any products. BorgWarner may elect to obtain such commercial license on a nonexclusive basis by paying three times the then prior year’s Romeo IP Royalty (as defined below) (see the section entitled “Business — Joint Venture with BorgWarner”) or may elect to obtain such commercial license on an exclusive basis (subject to Legacy Romeo’s license from IP Holdco) by paying five times such Romeo IP Royalty.

Although we would argue, if necessary, that BorgWarner’s exclusive license described above would not restrict or limit Legacy Romeo’s rights to sublicense or otherwise exploit the rights granted to Legacy Romeo under the IP License, BorgWarner could argue that, if such exclusive license is triggered, the effect would be to limit Legacy Romeo’s rights under the IP License.

Our interest in the BorgWarner JV and the Legacy Romeo intellectual property are pledged to BorgWarner to secure Legacy Romeo’s performance of all of its obligations to BorgWarner relating to the BorgWarner JV.

Legacy Romeo has granted security interests to BorgWarner in its ownership interests in the BorgWarner JV and in Romeo IP Holdco (as defined below) (which holds all of Legacy Romeo’s intellectual property), as well as in Legacy Romeo’s intellectual property, to secure its obligations under all of the agreements relating to the formation or operation of the BorgWarner JV, including, but not limited to, its R&D-related obligations. Those security interests may impair our ability to raise debt or equity capital.

BorgWarner will have a call option to purchase our interest in the BorgWarner JV for an amount that may be less than the value that we could obtain for such interest on the open market.

BorgWarner’s subsidiary will have the right at any time after June 28, 2022 to purchase our entire interest in the BorgWarner JV. The purchase price will be the value of our interest as determined by an independent appraiser (the choice of which must be approved by Legacy Romeo and BorgWarner) using standard valuation methodologies taking into account a discount for lack of marketability. The purchase price determined by this method may be less than the amount that we could obtain for our interest in the BorgWarner JV from a willing buyer in an arm’s-length transaction.

We are dependent on our suppliers to fulfill our customers’ orders, and if we fail to manage our relationships effectively with, or lose the services of, these suppliers and we cannot substitute suitable alternative suppliers, our operations would be materially adversely affected.

We rely on third-party suppliers for the provision and development of many of the key components and materials used in our battery modules and packs, such as cells, electrical components, and enclosure materials. The inability of our suppliers to deliver necessary components of our battery products at prices and volumes, performance and specifications acceptable to us could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results. While we plan to obtain components from multiple sources whenever possible, some of the components used in our vehicles may be purchased by us from a single source. While we believe that we may be able to establish alternate supply relationships and can obtain or engineer replacement components for our single source components, we may be unable to do so in the short term (or at all) at prices or quality levels that are favorable to us, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

Our third-party suppliers may not be able to meet their product specifications and performance characteristics or our desired specifications, performance and pricing, which would impact our ability to achieve our product specifications and performance characteristics as well. Additionally, our suppliers may be unable to obtain required certifications for their products for which we plan to use or provide warranties that are necessary for our solutions. If we are unable to obtain

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components and materials used in our battery products from our suppliers or if our suppliers decide to create or supply a competing product, our business could be materially adversely affected.

Increases in costs, disruption of supply or shortage of any of our battery components, particularly cells, could harm our business.

From time to time, we may experience increases in the cost or a sustained interruption in the supply or shortage of our components. Any such increase or supply interruption could materially and negatively impact our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results. The prices for our components fluctuate depending on market conditions and global demand and could adversely affect our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results. For instance, we are exposed to multiple risks relating to price fluctuations for battery cells. These risks include, but are not limited to:

the inability or unwillingness of our suppliers and their competitors to build or operate cell production facilities to supply the numbers of cells required to support the growth of the electric vehicle industry as demand for such cells increases;
disruption in the supply of cells due to quality issues or recalls by the cell manufacturers;
a decrease in the number of manufacturers of cells; and
an increase in the cost of raw materials.

Any disruption in the supply of battery cells could temporarily disrupt production of our products until a different supplier is fully qualified. Moreover, cell manufacturers may refuse to supply electric vehicle manufacturers if they determine that the vehicles are not sufficiently safe. Furthermore, fluctuations or shortages in petroleum and other economic conditions may cause us to experience significant increases in freight charges. Substantial increases in the prices for raw materials may increase the cost of our components and consequently, the costs of products. There can be no assurance that we will be able to recoup increasing costs of our components by increasing prices, which in turn could reduce our profit margins.

Our failure to keep up with rapid technological changes and evolving industry standards may cause our products to become obsolete and less marketable, resulting in loss of market share to our competitors or a decrease in demand for our battery packs and modules due to substitute products.

The lithium-based battery market is characterized by changing technologies and evolving industry standards, which are difficult to predict. This, coupled with frequent introduction of new products and models, has shortened product life cycles and may render our products obsolete or unmarketable. Our ability to adapt to evolving industry standards and anticipate future standards and market trends will be a significant factor in maintaining and improving our competitive position and our prospects for growth. To achieve this goal, we have invested and plan to continue investing significant financial resources in our R&D infrastructure. R&D activities, however, are inherently uncertain, and we might encounter practical difficulties in commercializing our research results. Accordingly, our significant investment in our R&D infrastructure may not bear fruit. On the other hand, our competitors may improve their technologies or even achieve technological breakthroughs that would render our products obsolete or less marketable. Therefore, our failure to effectively keep up with rapid technological changes and evolving industry standards by introducing new and enhanced products may cause us to lose our market share and to suffer a decrease in our revenue.

We may experience significant delays in the design, production and launch of our new products, which could harm our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

Our R&D team is continually looking to improve our battery packs and modules. Production of light weight pack series, next generation module, and third generation BMS are not expected to begin until 2022 and may occur later or not at all. Any delay in the financing, design, production and launch of our new products could materially damage our brand, business, prospects, financial condition and operating results. There are often delays in the design, production and commercial release of new products, and to the extent we delay the launch of the items identified above, our growth

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prospects could be adversely affected as we may fail to grow our market share, to keep up with competing products or to satisfy customers’ demands or needs. We rely on third-party suppliers for the provision and development of many of the key components and materials used in our battery products, and to the extent they experience any delays, we may need to seek alternative suppliers. If we experience delays by our third-party suppliers, we could experience delays in delivering on our timelines.

If we cannot continue to develop new products in a timely manner and at favorable margins, we may not be able to compete effectively.

The battery industry has been notable for the pace of innovations in product life, product design and applied technology. We and our competitors have made and continue to make, investments in R&D with the goal of further innovation. Our ability to create new products and line extensions and to sustain existing products is affected by whether we can, among other things:

develop and fund research and technological innovations;
receive and maintain necessary intellectual property protections;
obtain governmental approvals and registrations;
comply with governmental regulations; and
anticipate customer needs and preferences successfully.

The failure to develop and launch successful new products could hinder the growth of our business and any delay in the development or launch of a new product could also compromise our competitive position. If competitors introduce new or enhanced products that significantly outperform ours, or if they develop or apply manufacturing technology that permits them to manufacture at a significantly lower cost relative to ours, we may be unable to compete successfully in the market segments affected by these changes.

Developments in alternative technology may adversely affect the demand for our battery modules, packs, and BMS for electric vehicles.

Significant developments in alternative technologies, such as fuel cell technology, advanced diesel, ethanol or natural gas, or breathing batteries, may materially and adversely affect our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results in ways that we may not currently anticipate. Existing and other battery technologies, fuels or sources of energy may emerge as customers’ preferred alternatives to our battery products. Any failure by us to develop new or enhanced technologies or processes, or to react to changes in existing technologies, could materially delay our development and introduction of new and enhanced alternative products, which could result in decreased revenue and a loss of market share to our competitors.

Our R&D efforts may not be sufficient to adapt to changes in alternative fuel and electric vehicle technology. As technologies evolve, we plan to upgrade or adapt our energy solutions with the latest technology, in particular lighter weight modules and packs, advanced cooling methods, and advanced battery chemistry, which may also negatively impact the adoption of our other products. However, we may not compete effectively with alternative systems if we are not able to source and integrate the latest technology into our battery products.

Lithium-ion battery cells have been observed to catch fire or vent smoke and flame.

Our battery packs and modules make use of lithium-ion cells. On rare occasions, lithium-ion cells can rapidly release the energy they contain by venting smoke and flames in a manner that can ignite nearby materials as well as other lithium-ion cells. While our battery packs and modules are single cell fault tolerant and, therefore, designed to contain any single cell’s release of energy without spreading to neighboring cells, a field or testing failure of our battery packs could occur.

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This faulty result could subject us to lawsuits, product recalls, or redesign efforts, all of which would be time consuming and expensive. Also, negative public perceptions regarding the suitability of lithium-ion cells for automotive applications or any future incident involving lithium-ion cells, such as a vehicle or other fire, even if such incident does not involve vehicles containing our battery packs, could seriously harm our business and reputation.

In addition, we store a significant number of lithium-ion cells at our facility. Any mishandling of battery cells may cause disruption to the operation of our facility. While we have implemented safety procedures related to the handling of the cells, a safety issue or fire related to the cells could disrupt our operations. Such damage or injury could lead to adverse publicity and potentially a safety recall. Moreover, any failure of a competitor’s electric vehicle or energy storage product may cause indirect adverse publicity for us and our products. Such adverse publicity could negatively affect our brand and harm our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

Manufacturing or use of our products may cause accidents, which could result in significant production interruption, delay or claims for substantial damages.

Due to the high energy density inherent in lithium-based batteries, our batteries can pose certain safety risks, including the risk of fire. Our battery modules and packs are single cell fault tolerant, meaning if for some reason a certain battery exhibits a thermal incident, the thermal incident will not propagate to the neighboring cells. Our state-of-the-art testing systems verify all critical specifications to assure everything is fully functional as intended. Nevertheless, accidents causing death or personal injury or property damage, can occur. Although we incorporate safety procedures in the research, development, manufacture and transportation of batteries that are designed to minimize safety risks, the manufacture or use of our products may still cause accidents. Any accident, whether occurring at the manufacturing facilities or from the use of our products, may result in significant production interruption, delays or claims for substantial damages caused by personal injuries or property damage.

We may become subject to product liability claims, which could harm our financial condition and liquidity if we are not able to successfully defend or insure against such claims.

Product liability claims, even those without merit or those that do not involve our products, could harm our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results. The automobile industry in particular experiences significant product liability claims, and we face inherent risk of exposure to claims in the event that our battery products do not perform or are claimed not to have performed as expected. As is true for other commercial vehicle suppliers, we expect in the future that our battery products will be installed on vehicles that will be involved in crashes resulting in death or personal injury. Additionally, product liability claims that affect our competitors may cause indirect adverse publicity for us and our products.

A successful product liability claim against us could require us to pay a substantial monetary award. While we maintain product liability insurance, we may not be able to cover any substantial monetary judgment against us. Moreover, a product liability claim against us or our competitors could generate substantial negative publicity about our products and business and could have a material adverse effect on our brand, business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

As components of electric vehicles, our products as installed in the products of our customers are subject to motor vehicle standards, and the failure of the vehicles to satisfy such mandated safety standards could have a material adverse effect on the demand for our products, our business and our operating results.

Our products are used as components in electric vehicles. All vehicles sold must comply with applicable international, federal, and state motor vehicle safety standards, which vary by national and other jurisdictions. In the United States, vehicles that meet or exceed all federally mandated safety standards are certified under the federal regulations. Rigorous testing and the use of approved materials and equipment are among the requirements for achieving federal certification. Failure by our vehicle manufacturing customers to satisfy motor vehicle standards could have a material adverse effect on our business and operating results.

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Moreover, we may incur our own significant costs in complying with these regulations. Regulations related to the electric vehicle industry and alternative energy industry are currently evolving and we face risks associated with changes to these regulations.

To the extent the laws become more stringent or otherwise change, our components or the vehicles into which they are incorporated may not comply with applicable international, federal, state or local laws, which would have an adverse effect on our business. Compliance with changing regulations could be burdensome, time consuming, and expensive. To the extent compliance with new regulations is cost prohibitive, our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results would be adversely affected.

Internationally, there may be laws in jurisdictions we have not yet entered or laws of which we are unaware in jurisdictions we have entered that may restrict our sales or other business practices. Even for those jurisdictions we have analyzed, the laws in this area can be complex and difficult to interpret and may change over time. Continued regulatory limitations and other obstacles interfering with our or our customer’s ability to sell products could have a negative and material impact on our business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations.

Future product recalls could materially adversely affect our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

Any product recall in the future, whether it involves our or a competitor’s product, may result in negative publicity, damage our brand and materially adversely affect our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results. In the future, we may voluntarily or involuntarily, initiate a recall if any of our products are proven to, or possibly could, be defective or noncompliant with applicable federal motor vehicle safety standards. Such recalls involve significant expense and diversion of management attention and other resources, which could adversely affect our brand image, as well as our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

Third-party claims or litigation alleging infringement of patents or infringement or misappropriation of other proprietary rights, or seeking to invalidate our patents may adversely affect our business.

Our success depends in part on our avoiding infringement, misappropriation and other violations of the patents and other intellectual property rights of third parties. Claims of infringement, misappropriation, or other violation of patents or other intellectual property rights are often expensive and time-consuming to defend, and if we were unsuccessful in defending such claims we could be forced to stop use of certain technologies and/or pay damages or on-going royalties. It is very difficult to determine whether products and technologies infringe, misappropriate or otherwise violate the patents or other intellectual property rights of third parties.

Some of our competitors may have more resources than we do to pursue claims of infringement, misappropriation or other violations of patents or other intellectual property rights. We may conclude that even if third parties are infringing, misappropriating or otherwise violating our patents or other intellectual property rights, the risk-adjusted costs of bringing claims against such third parties may be too high or otherwise not in the interest of our company. Finally, even if our patent applications are granted, competitors or infringers of such patents could successfully challenge their validity or enforceability.

Our patent applications may not result in issued patents and our patents may be invalidated or narrowly interpreted, in which event our competitiveness and value may be undermined.

Our key technological innovations, including innovations that are currently commercialized in our products and innovations that we plan to deploy in the future, are described in our one issued patent and in several pending patent applications. There is no assurance that the pending applications will result in issued patents. Further, to the extent that we endeavor to enforce our currently issued patent or any patents that are issued in the future, an alleged infringer is likely to assert that it has not infringed any claim of the applicable patent(s) and that the applicable patent(s) is, in any event, invalid or unenforceable. There can be no assurance that we will overcome those defenses. Further, if one or more of our patents are held to be invalid or unenforceable, or if claims of those patents are interpreted narrowly, or if patents fail to issue from our pending applications, our competitiveness and value may be undermined.

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If the estimates and assumptions we use to determine the size of our total addressable market are inaccurate, our future growth rate may be affected and our business would be harmed.

Market estimates and growth forecasts are subject to significant uncertainty and are based on assumptions and estimates that may prove to be inaccurate. Even if the market in which we compete meets our size estimates and forecasted growth, our business could fail to grow at similar rates, if at all. The principal assumptions relating to our market opportunity include: a $225 billion total addressable market for commercial vehicles in North America and Europe, regulatory developments driven by consumer and societal pressures to reduce CO2, commitments by large logistics and commercial vehicle OEMs to convert to battery electric vehicle (“BEV”) fleets, and our ability to maintain and expand our technological and operational advantage over competitors. Our market opportunity is also based on the assumption that our existing and future offerings will be more attractive to our customers and potential customers than competing products. If these assumptions prove inaccurate, our business, financial condition, and results of operations could be adversely affected. For more information regarding our estimates of market opportunity and the forecasts of market growth included in this prospectus, see the section entitled “Business—Industry & Market.”

Maintaining our manufacturing operations will require significant capital expenditures, and our inability or failure to maintain our operations would have a material adverse impact on our market share and ability to generate revenue.

We released our first commercial vehicle products to the market in 2018, and we plan to begin producing these products at increased scale for existing and new customers. We will be required to incur significant capital expenditures as we grow our production operations to meet customer demand. If we are unable or fail to adequately maintain our manufacturing capacity or quality control processes, we could lose customers, and there could be a material adverse impact on our market share and our ability to generate revenue.

We rely on complex machinery for our operations, and production involves a significant degree of risk and uncertainty in terms of operational performance and costs.

We rely heavily on complex machinery for our operations, and our production will involve a significant degree of uncertainty and risk in terms of operational performance and costs. Our manufacturing facility consists of large-scale machinery combining many components. The manufacturing facility components are likely to suffer unexpected malfunctions from time to time and will depend on repairs and spare parts to resume operations, which may not be available when needed. Unexpected malfunctions of the manufacturing plant components may significantly affect the intended operational efficiency. Operational performance and costs can be difficult to predict and are often influenced by factors outside of our control, such as, but not limited to, environmental hazards and remediation, costs associated with decommissioning of machines, difficulty or delays in obtaining governmental permits, damages or defects in electronic systems, industrial accidents, fire, and seismic activity and natural disasters. Should operational risks materialize, it may result in the personal injury to or death of workers, the loss of production equipment, damage to manufacturing facilities, monetary losses, delays and unanticipated fluctuations in production, environmental damage, administrative fines, increased insurance costs and potential legal liabilities, all which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition or prospects.

We are currently dependent on a single manufacturing facility. If our facility becomes inoperable, we will be unable to produce our battery products and our business will be harmed.

Our 113,000 square foot headquarters and manufacturing facility is based in Vernon, California, where all our production and R&D activities take place. Our plant and the equipment we use to manufacture our battery modules, packs, and BMS would be costly to replace and could require substantial lead time to replace and qualify for use. Our facility may be harmed or rendered inoperable by natural or man-made disasters, including earthquakes, flooding, fire and power outages, or by health epidemics, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, which may render it difficult or impossible for us to manufacture our products for some period of time. Although we maintain insurance for damage to our property and the disruption of our business, this insurance may not be sufficient to cover all of our potential losses and may not continue to be available to us on acceptable terms, if at all. The inability to produce our battery products or the backlog that could develop if our manufacturing facility is inoperable for even a short period of time may result in harm to our reputation, a loss of customers or a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition or prospects.

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We may not be able to accurately plan our production based on our sales contracts, which may result in carrying excess raw material inventory.

Our sales contracts typically provide for a forecast of twelve months on the quantity of products that our customers may purchase from us. We typically have a sixteen-week lead time to manufacture products to meet our customers’ requirements once our customers place orders with us. To meet this delivery deadline, we generally make decisions on our production level and timing, procurement, facility requirements, personnel needs and other resources requirements based on estimates made in light of this forecast, our past dealings with such customers, market conditions and other relevant factors. Our customers’ final purchase orders may not be consistent with our estimates. If the final purchase orders substantially differ from our estimates, we may have excess raw material inventory or material shortages. Excess inventory could result in unprofitable sales or write-offs as our products are susceptible to obsolescence and price declines. Expediting additional material to make up for any shortages within a short time frame could result in unprofitable sales or cause us to adjust delivery dates. In either case, our results of operation would fluctuate from period-to-period.

Our operations are subject to a variety of environmental, health and safety rules that can bring scrutiny from regulatory agencies and increase our costs.

Our operations are subject to environmental, health and safety rules, laws and regulations, including those governing hazardous material handling, transportation, and cleanup and occupational health and safety. While we believe that the policies and programs we have in place are reasonably designed and implemented to assure compliance with these requirements and to avoid hazardous substance release lability with respect to our manufacturing facility leasehold (see the section entitled “Business—Environmental, Health and Safety Regulations”), there can be no guarantee that we will not confront new or more stringent compliance obligations that could impose substantial costs.

We may be subject to declining average selling prices, which may harm our revenue and gross profits.

Electric vehicles, light electric vehicles and energy storage are subject to declines in average selling prices due to rapidly evolving technologies, industry standards and consumer preferences. As a result, our customers may expect us as suppliers to cut our costs and lower the price of our products in order to mitigate the negative impact on their own margins.

We continue to refine and optimize our manufacturing process to provide our top-notch products at competitive prices. Our designs are optimized and inherently flexible for high rate manufacturing on the same automated lines. Automation of critical assembly steps, coupled with patented component designs, makes our module production process economical, reliable and speedy. Despite our cost-effective production, we expect to face possible market-driven downward pricing pressures in the future. Our revenue and profitability will suffer if we are unable to offset any declines in our average selling prices by developing new or enhanced products with higher selling prices or gross profit margins, increasing our sales volumes or reducing the material costs of our products on a timely basis.

Our battery packs and BMS rely on software and hardware that are highly technical, and if these systems contain errors, bugs or vulnerabilities, or if we are unsuccessful in addressing or mitigating technical limitations in our systems, our business could be adversely affected.

Our products rely on software and hardware, including software and hardware developed or maintained internally or by third parties, that are highly technical and complex and will require modification and updates over the life of a battery pack. In addition, certain of our products depend on the ability of such software and hardware to store, retrieve, process and manage immense amounts of data. Our software and hardware may contain, errors, bugs or vulnerabilities, and our systems are subject to certain technical limitations that may compromise our ability to meet the objectives. Some errors, bugs or vulnerabilities inherently may be difficult to detect and may only be discovered after the code has been released for external or internal use. Errors, bugs, vulnerabilities, design defects or technical limitations may be found within our software and hardware. Although we attempt to remedy any issues that we observe in our products as effectively and rapidly as possible, such efforts may not be timely, may hamper production, or may not be to the satisfaction of our customers. If we are unable to prevent or effectively remedy errors, bugs, vulnerabilities or defects in our software and hardware, we may suffer damage to our brand, loss of customers, loss of revenue or liability for damages, any of which could adversely affect our business and financial results.

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Inability to leverage vehicle and customer data could impact our software algorithms and impact our research and development operations.

We rely on data collected from the use of fleet vehicles outfitted with our products, including vehicle data and data related to battery usage statistics. We use this data in connection with our software algorithms and the research, development and analysis of our products. Our inability to obtain this data or the necessary rights to use this data could result in delays or otherwise negatively impact our research and development efforts.

The unavailability, reduction or elimination of government and economic incentives due to policy changes or government regulation could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

Any reduction, elimination or discriminatory application of government subsidies and economic incentives because of policy changes, the reduced need for such subsidies and incentives due to the perceived success of the electric vehicle industry or other reasons may result in the diminished competitiveness of the alternative fuel and electric vehicle industry generally or our battery power solutions. While certain tax credits and other incentives for alternative energy production, alternative fuel and electric vehicles have been available in the past, there is no guarantee these programs will be available in the future or that they will remain at current levels. In particular, our business is affected by federal, state and local tax credits, rebates, grants and other government programs and incentives that promote the use of electric vehicles. Additionally, our business is affected by laws, rules and regulations that require reductions in carbon emissions or the use of renewable fuels, such as the California Low Carbon Fuel Standards and the Oregon Clean Fuels Program. These programs and regulations, which have the effect of encouraging the demand for electric vehicles, could expire or be repealed or amended for a variety of reasons. For example, parties with an interest in gasoline and diesel, natural gas or other alternative vehicles or vehicle fuels, including lawmakers, regulators, policymakers, environmental or advocacy organizations, OEMs, trade groups, suppliers or other powerful groups, may invest significant time and money in efforts to delay, repeal or otherwise negatively influence regulations and programs that promote battery powered vehicles. Many of these parties have substantially greater resources and influence than we have. Further, changes in federal, state or local political, social or economic conditions, including a lack of legislative focus on these programs and regulations, could result in their modification, delayed adoption or repeal. Any failure to adopt, delay in implementation, expiration, repeal or modification of these programs and regulations, or the adoption of any programs or regulations that encourage the use of other alternative fuels or alternative vehicles over battery power, would reduce the market for batteries as a source of power and harm our operating results, liquidity and financial condition.

Government reviews, inquiries, investigations, and actions could harm our business or reputation.

Our operations are subject to significant governmental scrutiny and may be adversely impacted by the results of such scrutiny. The regulatory environment with regard to our business is evolving, and officials often exercise broad discretion in deciding how to interpret and apply applicable regulations. From time to time, we receive formal and informal inquiries from various government regulatory authorities, as well as self-regulatory organizations, about our business and compliance with local laws, regulations or standards. For example, the City of Vernon conducts an annual health inspection.

Any determination that our operations or activities, or the activities of our employees, are not in compliance with existing laws, regulations or standards could result in the imposition of substantial fines, interruptions of business, loss of supplier, vendor, customer or other third-party relationships, termination of necessary licenses and permits, or similar results, all of which could potentially harm our business and/or reputation. Even if an inquiry does not result in these types of determinations, regulatory authorities could cause us to incur substantial costs or require us to change our business practices in a manner materially adverse to our business, and it potentially could create negative publicity that could harm our business and/or reputation.

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We will face risks associated with potential international operations, including unfavorable regulatory, political, tax and labor conditions, which could harm our business.

We will face risks associated with any potential international operations, including possible unfavorable regulatory, political, tax and labor conditions, which could harm our business. We anticipate having subsidiaries that are subject to the legal, political, regulatory and social requirements and economic conditions in international jurisdictions. We may be subject to a number of risks associated with international business activities that may increase our costs, impact our ability to manufacture or sell our products and require significant management attention. These risks include, but are not limited to:

conforming our products to various international regulatory requirements where those products are sold, which requirements may change over time;
United States and foreign government trade restrictions, tariffs and price or exchange controls;
changes in diplomatic and trade relationships;
political instability, natural disasters, war or events of terrorism; and
the strength of international economies.

If we fail to address these risks successfully, our business and prospects could be negatively impacted.

Our business could be adversely affected by trade tariffs or other trade barriers.

In recent years, China and the United States have each imposed tariffs, and there remains a potential for further trade barriers. These barriers may escalate into a trade war between China and the United States. Tariffs could potentially impact our raw material prices and impact any plans to sell products in China. In addition, these developments could have a material adverse effect on global economic conditions and the stability of global financial markets. Any of these factors could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We are subject to anti-corruption, anti-bribery, anti-money laundering, financial and economic sanctions and similar laws, and non-compliance with such laws can subject us to administrative, civil and criminal fines and penalties, collateral consequences, remedial measures and legal expenses, all of which could adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and reputation.

We are subject to anti-corruption, anti-bribery, anti-money laundering, financial and economic sanctions and similar laws and regulations in various jurisdictions in which we conduct or in the future may conduct activities, including the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”), the U.K. Bribery Act 2010, and other anti-corruption laws and regulations. The FCPA and the U.K. Bribery Act 2010 prohibit us and our officers, directors, employees and business partners acting on our behalf, including agents, from corruptly offering, promising, authorizing or providing anything of value to a “foreign official” for the purposes of influencing official decisions or obtaining or retaining business or otherwise obtaining favorable treatment. The FCPA also requires companies to make and keep books, records and accounts that accurately reflect transactions and dispositions of assets and to maintain a system of adequate internal accounting controls. The U.K. Bribery Act also prohibits non-governmental “commercial” bribery and soliciting or accepting bribes. A violation of these laws or regulations could adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and reputation. Our policies and procedures designed to ensure compliance with these regulations may not be sufficient and our directors, officers, employees, representatives, consultants, agents, and business partners could engage in improper conduct for which we may be held responsible.

Non-compliance with anti-corruption, anti-bribery, anti-money laundering or financial and economic sanctions laws could subject us to whistleblower complaints, adverse media coverage, investigations, and severe administrative, civil and criminal sanctions, collateral consequences, remedial measures and legal expenses, all of which could materially and

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adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and reputation. In addition, changes in economic sanctions laws in the future could adversely impact our business and investments in our shares.

We are subject to governmental export and import control laws and regulations. Our failure to comply with these laws and regulations could have an adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

Our products and solutions, including components of our products, are subject to export control and import laws and regulations, including the U.S. Export Administration Regulations, U.S. Customs regulations and various economic and trade sanctions regulations administered by the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control. U.S. export control laws and regulations and economic sanctions prohibit the shipment of certain products and services to U.S. embargoed or sanctioned countries, governments and persons. In addition, complying with export control and sanctions regulations for a particular sale may be time-consuming and result in the delay or loss of sales opportunities. Exports of our products and technology must be made in compliance with these laws and regulations. If we fail to comply with these laws and regulations, we and even some of our employees could be subject to substantial civil or criminal penalties, including the possible loss of export or import privileges, fines, which may be imposed on us and responsible employees or managers and, in extreme cases, the incarceration of responsible employees or managers.

In addition, changes in our products or solutions or changes in applicable export or import laws and regulations may create delays in the introduction and sale of our products and solutions in international markets, increase costs due to changes in import and export duties and taxes, prevent our customers from deploying our products and solutions or, in some cases, prevent the export or import of our products and solutions to certain countries, governments or persons altogether. Any change in export or import laws and regulations, shift in the enforcement or scope of existing laws and regulations, or change in the countries, governments, persons or technologies targeted by such laws and regulations, could also result in decreased use of our products and solutions, decreased ability to export or sell our products and solutions to customers, and decreased ability to import components or parts critical to the manufacture of our products. Any decreased use of our products and solutions, limitation on our ability to export or sell our products and solutions, or limitation on our ability to import components or parts would likely adversely affect our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

Our products might fail to qualify as “domestic origin” for purposes of “Buy America” requirements imposed on the recipients of U.S. Government grants.

Some of our customers are recipients of grants subject to regulations implemented by the U.S. Federal Transit Authority for purchases of rolling stock, including “Buy America” requirements codified at 49 C.F.R. Part 661. In some cases our customers must ensure that our products, when incorporated into rolling stock subject to “Buy America” requirements, qualify as “domestic origin” components or subcomponents. Some of our products are manufactured using parts or components that are imported from other countries. If our products manufactured from imported parts or components fail to meet the regulatory thresholds to qualify as “domestic origin” under the applicable regulations, we might be disqualified or otherwise precluded from supplying those products to customers that are subject to applicable “Buy America” requirements, or we might be liable to those customers for having failed to comply with certifications or representations that are products are “domestic origin,” each of which would likely adversely affect our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

Changes in public policies affecting the development and more widespread adoption of electric vehicles could affect the demand for our products.

Sales to electric vehicle producers account for a large portion of our battery sales. If the market for electric vehicles does not develop, demand for our products could be harmed. As a result, our success depends, in part, on laws that affect demand for electric vehicles. For example, laws compelling the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions could create opportunity for increased sales of our batteries for incorporation in electric vehicles. California proposed the world’s first zero-emission sales mandate on commercial trucks, including that 40 percent of trucks be zero-emission by 2035. Twelve states have announced plans to require, by 2050, that every new medium- and heavy-duty vehicle be fully electric. Incentives, including tax credits or rebates, for electric vehicle purchases to reduce greenhouse gas emissions create a climate in which our sales may increase. Eliminating or phasing out such incentives could have the opposite effect. The

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financial success of our electric vehicle producing customers may depend, in part, on their ability to sell tradable regulatory emission credits. Laws that restrict or diminish the value of such credits may lessen our electric vehicle producing customers’ demand for our batteries.

If we fail to manage our growth effectively, including failing to attract and integrate qualified personnel, we may not be able to develop, produce, market and sell our battery pack, modules, or battery management systems successfully.

Any failure to manage our growth effectively could materially and adversely affect our business, prospects, operating results and financial condition. We intend to expand our operations significantly. We expect our future expansion to include, among other things:

expanding the management team;
hiring and training new personnel;
leveraging consultants to assist with company growth and development;
conducting market research and analysis;
controlling expenses and investments in anticipation of expanded operations;
expanding design, production, and service departments;
implementing and enhancing administrative infrastructure, systems and processes; and
expanding our market share in international markets, including Europe and Asia, through the BorgWarner JV.

Our success depends, in part, on our continuing ability to identify, hire, attract, train and develop other highly qualified personnel, in particular engineers specializing in various disciplines, including battery design and production. Experienced and highly skilled employees are in high demand and competition for these employees can be intense. Our ability to hire, attract and retain them depends on our ability to provide competitive compensation packages. We may not be able to attract, integrate, train, motivate or retain additional highly qualified personnel, and our failure to do so could adversely affect our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

Any failure to offer high-quality technical support services may adversely affect our relationships with our customers and harm our financial results.

Our customers depend on our support organization to resolve any technical issues relating to our products. In addition, our sales process is highly dependent on the quality of our products, our business reputation and on strong recommendations from our existing customers. Any failure to maintain high-quality and highly-responsive technical support, or a market perception that we do not maintain high-quality and highly-responsive support, could harm our reputation, adversely affect our ability to sell our products to existing and prospective customers, and harm our business, operating results and financial condition.

We offer technical support services with our products and may be unable to respond quickly enough to accommodate short-term increases in demand for support services, particularly as we increase the size of our customer base. We also may be unable to modify the format of our support services to compete with changes in support services provided by competitors. It is difficult to predict demand for technical support services and if demand increases significantly, we may be unable to provide satisfactory support services to our customers. Additionally, increased demand for these services, without corresponding revenue, could increase costs and adversely affect our results of operations.

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We may need to raise additional funds and these funds may not be available to us when we need them. If we cannot raise additional funds when we need them, our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results could be negatively affected.

The design, manufacture, sale and servicing of our battery products is capital-intensive. We currently have sufficient capital to fund our planned operations for the next three years, at which point we expect to be generating self-sustaining free cash flow. However, we may need to raise additional capital to scale our manufacturing, continue our R&D efforts, improve our infrastructure, and expand into emerging markets. Further, we may subsequently determine that additional funds are necessary earlier than anticipated. We may raise additional funds through the issuance of equity, equity related or debt securities, or through obtaining credit from government or financial institutions. This capital may be necessary to fund our ongoing operations, continue research, development and design efforts, and improve infrastructure. We cannot be certain that additional funds will be available to us on favorable terms when required, or at all. If we cannot raise additional funds when we need them, our financial condition, results of operations, business and prospects could be materially adversely affected.

We recently were the victim of a data breach resulting in publication of proprietary source code.

We discovered on August 5, 2020 that, without our knowledge or authorization, in mid-July 2020 a hacker published on the Internet the source code for the earliest version (1.0) of our battery management firmware (the individual also published source code belonging to 40 other companies). There is no evidence that the hacker obtained access to other source code of Legacy Romeo, which was stored on different servers with stronger security protections, and we are currently releasing a new version of the battery management firmware. Nevertheless, the unauthorized publication of version 1.0 of such firmware may have eliminated trade secret protection for such firmware, which would cause us to have to resort to copyright protection in case of unauthorized use.

We rely on information technology and any failure, inadequacy, interruption or security lapse of that technology, including any cybersecurity incidents, could harm our ability to operate our business effectively.

Experienced computer programmers and hackers may be able to penetrate our network and misappropriate or compromise our confidential information or that of third parties, create system disruptions or cause shutdowns. Computer programmers and hackers also may be able to develop and deploy viruses, worms and other malicious software programs that attack our products or otherwise exploit any security vulnerabilities of our products. While we employ a number of protective measures, including firewalls, network infrastructure vulnerability scanning, anti-virus and endpoint detection and response technologies, these measures may fail to prevent or detect attacks on our systems. We have experienced one intrusion, and we may experience future intrusions, which could adversely affect our business, operations, or products.

In addition, our hardware and software or third party components and software that we utilize in our products may contain defects in design or manufacture, including “bugs” and other problems that could unexpectedly interfere with the operation or security of the products. The costs to us to eliminate or mitigate cyber or other security problems, bugs, viruses, worms, malicious software programs and security vulnerabilities could be significant and, if our efforts to address these problems are not successful, such problems could result in interruptions, delays, cessation of service and loss of existing or potential customers that may impede our sales, manufacturing, distribution or other critical functions.

Any claim that our products or systems are subject to a cybersecurity risk, whether valid or not, could damage our reputation and adversely impact our revenues and results of operations. We manage and store various proprietary information and sensitive or confidential data relating to our business as well as information from our suppliers and customers. Breaches of our or any of our third party suppliers’ security measures or the accidental loss, inadvertent disclosure or unapproved dissemination of proprietary information or sensitive or confidential data about us or our customers or suppliers, including the potential loss or disclosure of such information or data as a result of fraud, trickery or other forms of deception, could expose us or our customers or suppliers to a risk of loss or misuse of this information, result in litigation and potential liability for us, damage our brand and reputation or otherwise harm our business.

To the extent we experience cyber-security incidents in the future, our relationships with our customers and suppliers may be materially impacted, our brand and reputation may be harmed and we could incur substantial costs in responding

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to and remediating the incidents and in resolving any investigations or disputes that may arise with respect to them, any of which would cause our business, operations, or products to be adversely affected. In addition, the cost and operational consequences of implementing and adding further data protection measures could be significant.

Risks Related to Ownership of Our Securities

The price of our Common Stock may be volatile.

The price of our Common Stock may fluctuate due to a variety of factors, including:

actual or anticipated fluctuations in our quarterly and annual results and those of other public companies in our industry;
mergers and strategic alliances in the industry in which we operate;
market prices and conditions in the industry in which we operate;
changes in government regulation;
potential or actual military conflicts or acts of terrorism;
announcements concerning us or our competitors; and
the general state of the securities markets.

These market and industry factors may materially reduce the market price of our Common Stock, regardless of our operating performance.

Ownership of our Common Stock is concentrated, and as a result, certain stockholders may exercise significant influence over us.

As of December 29, 2020, BorgWarner beneficially owned approximately 15.2% of our outstanding Common Stock and Michael Patterson, the founder of Legacy Romeo, beneficially owned approximately 11.3% of our outstanding Common Stock. In addition, BorgWarner owns 60% of the BorgWarner JV and controls the JV Board. As a result, these stockholders are able to exercise a significant level of control over all matters requiring stockholder approval, including the election of directors, amendment of our Certificate of Incorporation and approval of significant corporate actions. This control could have the effect of delaying or preventing a change of control of us or changes in management and will make the approval of certain actions difficult without the support of these stockholders.

We do not expect to declare any dividends in the foreseeable future.

We do not anticipate declaring any cash dividends to holders of our Common Stock in the foreseeable future. Consequently, investors may need to rely on sales of their shares after price appreciation, which may never occur, as the only way to realize any future gains on their investment.

Reports published by analysts, including projections in those reports that differ from our actual results, could adversely affect the price and trading volume of our Common Stock.

We expect that securities research analysts will establish and publish their own periodic projections for our business. These projections may vary widely and may not accurately predict the results we actually achieve. Our stock price may decline if our actual results do not match the projections of these securities research analysts. Similarly, if one or more of the analysts who write reports on our business downgrades our securities or publishes inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, the price of our Common Stock could decline. If one or more of these analysts ceases coverage of our

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business or fails to publish reports on our business regularly, the price of our Common Stock or its trading volume could decline. While we expect research analyst coverage of the Company, if no analysts commence coverage of it, the trading price and volume for our Common Stock could be adversely affected.

We may issue additional shares of Common Stock or other equity securities without your approval, which would dilute your ownership interests and may depress the market price of our Common Stock.

As of December 29, 2020, we had warrants outstanding to purchase up to an aggregate of 15,458,583 shares of Common Stock and options outstanding to purchase up to an aggregate of 11,295,587 shares of Common Stock. We also have the ability to issue up to 15,000,000 shares under the 2020 Plan (as defined below) (see the section entitled “Market Information for Common Stock and Dividend Policy — Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans”). We may also issue additional shares of Common Stock or other equity securities of equal or senior rank in the future in connection with, among other things, future acquisitions or repayment of outstanding indebtedness, without stockholder approval, in a number of circumstances.

Our issuance of additional shares of Common Stock or other equity securities of equal or senior rank would have the following effects:

our existing stockholders’ proportionate ownership interest will decrease;
the amount of cash available per share, including for payment of dividends in the future, may decrease;
the relative voting strength of each previously outstanding share of Common Stock may be diminished; and
the market price of shares of our Common Stock and/or Warrants may decline.

Our Certificate of Incorporation and Bylaws contain anti-takeover provisions that could adversely affect the rights of our stockholders.

Our Certificate of Incorporation and Bylaws contain provisions that will limit the ability of others to acquire control of the Company or cause it to engage in change-of-control transactions, including, among other things:

provisions that authorize our board of directors, without action by our stockholders, to issue additional shares of Common Stock and preferred stock with preferential rights determined by our board of directors;
provisions that permit only (i) the chairperson of our board, (ii) our chief executive officer, or (iii) a majority of our board of directors to call special meetings of stockholders and therefore do not permit our stockholders to call stockholder meetings; and
provisions that impose advance notice requirements and other requirements and limitations on the ability of stockholders to propose matters for consideration at stockholder meetings.

These provisions could have the effect of depriving our stockholders of an opportunity to sell their Common Stock at a premium over prevailing market prices by discouraging third parties from seeking to obtain control of the Company in a tender offer or similar transaction.

Our Certificate of Incorporation provides, subject to limited exceptions, that the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware will be the sole and exclusive forum for certain stockholder litigation matters, which could limit our stockholders’ ability to obtain a favorable judicial forum for disputes with the Company or our directors, officers, employees or stockholders.

Our Certificate of Incorporation requires, to the fullest extent permitted by law, that derivative actions brought in our name, actions against our directors, officers and employees for breach of fiduciary duty and other similar actions may be

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brought only in the Court of Chancery in the State of Delaware and, if brought outside of Delaware, the stockholder bringing the suit will be deemed to have consented to service of process on such stockholder’s counsel except any action (A) as to which the Court of Chancery in the State of Delaware determines that there is an indispensable party not subject to the jurisdiction of the Court of Chancery (and the indispensable party does not consent to the personal jurisdiction of the Court of Chancery within ten days following such determination), (B) which is vested in the exclusive jurisdiction of a court or forum other than the Court of Chancery, or (C) for which the Court of Chancery does not have subject matter jurisdiction. Any person or entity purchasing or otherwise acquiring any interest in shares of our capital stock shall be deemed to have notice of and consented to the forum provisions in our Certificate of Incorporation.

This choice of forum provision may limit a stockholder’s ability to bring a claim in a judicial forum that it finds favorable for disputes with us or any of our directors, officers, other employees or stockholders, which may discourage lawsuits with respect to such claims. We cannot be certain that a court will decide that this provision is either applicable or enforceable, and if a court were to find the choice of forum provision contained in our Certificate of Incorporation to be inapplicable or unenforceable in an action, we may incur additional costs associated with resolving such action in other jurisdictions, which could harm our business, operating results and financial condition.

Our Certificate of Incorporation provides that the exclusive forum provision is applicable to the fullest extent permitted by applicable law. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the choice of forum provision will not apply to claims brought to enforce any liability or duty created by the Securities Act, the Exchange Act or any other claim for which the federal courts have exclusive jurisdiction. Section 27 of the Exchange Act creates exclusive federal jurisdiction over all suits brought to enforce any duty or liability created by the Exchange Act or the rules and regulations thereunder. As a result, the exclusive forum provision will not apply to suits brought to enforce any duty or liability created by the Exchange Act or any other claim for which the federal courts have exclusive jurisdiction.

Future resales of our Common Stock may cause the market price of our securities to drop significantly, even if our business is doing well.

The sale or possibility of sale of shares of Common Stock, including by our officers and directors and certain of our stockholders granted rights to register the resale of Common Stock held by them under the Securities Act could have the effect of increasing the volatility in share price of our Common Stock or putting significant downward pressure on the price of our Common Stock. Such sale or the perception that these sales might occur could also impair our ability to raise capital through the sale of additional equity securities.

The shares of Common Stock offered by the Selling Securityholders represent approximately 44.9% of our outstanding Common Stock, not including the shares of Common Stock underlying our outstanding warrants. To the extent that the warrants are exercised, additional shares of Common Stock will be issued, which will result in dilution to the holders of our Common Stock and increase the number of shares eligible for resale in the public market. Sales or the potential sales of substantial numbers of shares of our Common Stock in the public market by the Selling Securityholders could have the effect of increasing the volatility in share price of our Common Stock or putting significant downward pressure on the price of our Common Stock.

There is no guarantee that the Warrants will be in the money at the time they become exercisable, and they may expire worthless.

The exercise price of the Warrants is $11.50 per share of Common Stock. There is no guarantee that the Warrants will be in the money following the time that they become exercisable and prior to their expiration, and as such, the Warrants may expire worthless.

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We may amend the terms of the Warrants in a manner that may be adverse to holders with the approval by the holders of at least 50% of the then-outstanding Public Warrants. As a result, the exercise price of your Warrants could be increased, the exercise period could be shortened and the number of shares of our Common Stock purchasable upon exercise of a Warrant could be decreased, all without your approval.

Our Warrants are issued pursuant to the terms of a Warrant Agreement. The Warrant Agreement provides that the terms of the Warrants may be amended without the consent of any holder to cure any ambiguity or correct any defective provision, but require the approval by the holders of at least 50% of the then-outstanding Public Warrants to make any change that adversely affects the interests of the registered holders of Public Warrants. Accordingly, we may amend the terms of the Public Warrants in a manner adverse to a holder if holders of at least 50% of the then-outstanding Public Warrants approve of such amendment. Although our ability to amend the terms of the Public Warrants with the consent of at least 50% of the then-outstanding Public Warrants is unlimited, examples of such amendments could be amendments to, among other things, increase the exercise price of the Warrants, convert the Warrants into cash or stock (at a ratio different than initially provided), shorten the exercise period or decrease the number of shares of our Common Stock purchasable upon exercise of a Warrant.

We may redeem unexpired Warrants prior to their exercise at a time that is disadvantageous to holders of the Warrants.

We have the ability to redeem outstanding Warrants for cash, in whole or in part, at a price of $0.01 per Warrant, at any time while the Warrants are exercisable, upon not less than 30 days’ prior written notice of redemption to each Warrant holder and if, and only if, the last reported sales price of our Common Stock equals or exceeds $18.00 per share (as adjusted for stock splits, stock dividends, reorganizations, recapitalizations and the like) for any 20 trading days within a 30-day trading period ending on the third business day prior to the notice of redemption to the Warrant holders.

If and when the Warrants become redeemable by us, we may exercise our redemption right even if we are unable to register or qualify the underlying securities for sale under all applicable state securities laws. Redemption of the outstanding Warrants could force you (i) to exercise your Warrants and pay the exercise price therefor at a time when it may be disadvantageous for you to do so, (ii) to sell your Warrants at the then-current market price when you might otherwise wish to hold your Warrants or (iii) to accept the nominal redemption price which, at the time the outstanding Warrants are called for redemption, is likely to be substantially less than the market value of your Warrants. The Private Warrants will be non-redeemable so long as they are held by the initial purchasers or such purchasers’ permitted transferees.

In addition, we may redeem your Warrants after they become exercisable for a number of shares of Common Stock determined based on the redemption date and the fair market value of our Common Stock. Any such redemption may have similar consequences to a cash redemption described above. In addition, such redemption may occur at a time when the Warrants are “out-of-the-money,” in which case, you would lose any potential embedded value from a subsequent increase in the value of our Common Stock had your Warrants remained outstanding.

Risk Relating to Our Management

Our business depends substantially on the continuing efforts of our key executive officers and senior management team and the loss of one or more of these employees could adversely affect our business.

Our success depends largely upon the continued services of our key executive officers. These executive officers are “at-will” employees and, therefore, may terminate employment with us at any time with no advance notice. We also rely on our management team in the areas of R&D, marketing, services and general administrative functions. If one or more of our other senior executives are unable or unwilling to continue to work for us in their present positions, we would be significantly disadvantaged. Moreover, if any of our current or former senior executives joins a competitor or forms a competing company, we may lose customers, suppliers, know-how and key personnel. Each of our executive officers has entered into an employment agreement with us, which contains confidentiality clauses. The unexpected loss of or failure to retain one or more of our key employees could adversely affect our business.

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We do not currently maintain key man life insurance policies with respect to every officer and are evaluating whether to obtain such additional key man life insurance policies. Any failure by our management team and our employees to perform as expected may have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

Our management has limited experience in operating a public company.

Our executive officers have limited experience in the management of a publicly traded company. Our management team may not successfully or effectively manage its transition to a public company that will be subject to significant regulatory oversight and reporting obligations under federal securities laws. Their limited experience in dealing with the increasingly complex laws pertaining to public companies could be a significant disadvantage in that it is likely that an increasing amount of their time may be devoted to these activities which will result in less time being devoted to the management and growth of our business. We may not have adequate personnel with the appropriate level of knowledge, experience and training in the accounting policies, practices or internal controls over financial reporting required of public companies in the United States. The development and implementation of the standards and controls necessary for us to achieve the level of accounting standards required of a public company in the U.S. may require costs greater than expected. It is possible that we will be required to expand our employee base and hire additional employees to support our operations as a public company which will increase our operating costs in future periods.

The requirements of being a public company may strain our resources and divert management’s attention, and the increases in legal, accounting and compliance expenses may be greater than we anticipate.

As a result of operating as a public company (and particularly after we are no longer an “emerging growth company” or “smaller reporting company”), we will incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses that we did not incur as a private company. As a public company, we are subject to the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act, and are required to comply with the applicable requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, as well as the rules and regulations subsequently implemented by the SEC and the listing standards of the NYSE, including changes in corporate governance practices and the establishment and maintenance of effective disclosure and financial controls. Compliance with these rules and regulations can be burdensome. Our management and other personnel will need to devote a substantial amount of time to these compliance initiatives. Moreover, these rules and regulations will increase our historical legal and financial compliance costs and will make some activities more time-consuming and costly. For example, we expect that these rules and regulations may make it more difficult and more expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance than we obtained as a private company, and could also make it more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified members of our board of directors as compared to when we were a private company. In particular, we expect to incur significant expenses and devote substantial management effort toward ensuring compliance with the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, which will increase when we are no longer an “emerging growth company” or a “smaller reporting company.”  We will need to hire additional accounting and financial staff, and engage outside consultants, all with appropriate public company experience and technical accounting knowledge and maintain an internal audit function, which will increase our operating expenses. Moreover, we could incur additional compensation costs in the event that we decide to pay cash compensation closer to that of other public companies, which would increase our general and administrative expenses and could materially and adversely affect our profitability. We are evaluating these rules and regulations, and cannot predict or estimate the amount of additional costs we may incur or the timing of such costs.

General Risk Factors

The uncertainty in global economic conditions could negatively affect our operating results.

Our operating results are directly affected by the general global economic conditions of the industries in which our major customer groups operate. Our business segments are highly dependent on the economic and market conditions in each of the geographic areas in which we operate. Sales of our battery packs and battery management systems (“BMS”) for truck fleets, for example, depend significantly on demand for new electric vehicle transportation by large consumer companies. The uncertainty in global economic conditions varies by geographic segment and can result in substantial volatility in global credit markets. These conditions affect our business by reducing prices that our customers may be able

30

or willing to pay for our products or by reducing the demand for our products, which could in turn negatively impact our sales and result in a material adverse effect on our business, cash flow, results of operations and financial condition.

If we are unable to grow, or if we fail to manage future growth effectively, our revenue may not increase and we may be unable to implement our business strategy.

Our future success depends upon our ability to grow, and if we are unable to manage our growth effectively, we may incur unexpected expenses and be unable to meet our clients’ requirements, all of which could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. To manage our current and anticipated future growth effectively, we must continue to maintain and enhance our infrastructure, financial and accounting systems and controls. We must also attract, train and retain a significant number of engineers, sales and marketing personnel, customer support personnel, professional services personnel, software engineers, technical personnel and management personnel, and the availability of such personnel may be constrained.

As we continue to grow, including from the integration of employees and businesses acquired in connection with previous or future acquisitions, we may find it difficult to maintain important aspects of our corporate culture, which could negatively affect our profitability and our ability to retain and recruit qualified personnel who are essential for our future success. If we do not effectively manage our growth, we may not be able to execute on our business plan, respond to competitive pressures, take advantage of market opportunities, satisfy customer requirements or manufacture high-quality products. Additionally, we may not be able to expand and upgrade our infrastructure to accommodate future growth.

Failure to effectively manage our growth could also lead us to over-invest or under-invest in development and operations; result in weaknesses in our infrastructure, systems or controls; give rise to operational mistakes, financial losses, loss of productivity or business opportunities; and result in loss of employees and reduced productivity of remaining employees. Our growth is expected to require significant capital expenditures and may divert financial resources from other projects such as the development of new products and services. If we are unable to manage our growth effectively, our expenses may increase more than expected, our revenue may not increase or may grow more slowly than expected and we may be unable to implement our business strategy.

A change in our product mix may cause our results of operations to differ substantially from the anticipated results in any particular period.

Our overall profitability may not meet expectations if our products, customers or geographic mix are substantially different than anticipated. Our profit margins vary among products, customers and geographic markets. Consequently, if our mix of any of these is substantially different from what is anticipated in any particular period, our profitability could be lower than anticipated.

We experience fluctuations in quarterly and annual operating results.

Our quarterly and annual operating results have fluctuated in the past and likely will fluctuate in the future. The demand for our products is driven largely by the demand for the end-product applications that are powered by our products. Accordingly, the battery industry for electric transportation is affected by market conditions that are often outside our control. Our results of operations may fluctuate significantly from period-to-period due to a number of factors, including seasonal variations in consumer demand for batteries and their end applications, industry-wide technological changes, the loss of a key customer and the postponement, rescheduling or cancellation of large orders by a key customer. As a result of these factors and other risks discussed in this section, period-to-period comparisons should not be relied upon to predict our future performance.

Failure to maintain adequate financial, information technology and management processes and controls could impair our ability to comply with the financial reporting and internal controls requirements for publicly traded companies, which could lead to errors in our financial reporting and adversely affect our business.

As a private company, we were not required to document and test our internal controls over financial reporting, our management was not required to certify the effectiveness of our internal controls and our auditors were not required to

31

opine on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. As a publicly-traded company, we may lose our emerging growth company status and become subject to the SEC’s internal control over financial reporting management and auditor attestation requirements in the year in which we are deemed to be a large accelerated filer, which would occur once we are subject to Exchange Act reporting requirements for 12 months, have filed at least one SEC annual report and the market value of our common equity held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the end of the prior fiscal year’s second fiscal quarter. We expect that we will be subject to the SEC’s internal control reporting and attestation requirements with respect to our annual report on Form 10-K for the year ending December 31, 2021. We might not be able to complete our evaluation, testing and any required remediation in a timely fashion. In addition, our current controls and any new controls that we develop may become inadequate because of poor design and changes in our business, including increased complexity resulting from any international expansion. Any failure to implement and maintain effective internal controls over financial reporting could adversely affect the results of assessments by our independent registered public accounting firm and their attestation reports.

Our operations may be adversely affected by the coronavirus outbreak, and we face risks that could impact our business.

In December 2019, COVID-19 surfaced in Wuhan, China. The World Health Organization declared a global emergency on January 30, 2020 with respect to the outbreak, and several countries have initiated travel restrictions, closed borders and given social distancing directives, including instructions requiring “shelter-in-place.”  In addition to these existing travel restrictions, some locales may impose prolonged quarantines and further restrict travel, which may significantly impact the ability of our employees to visit and qualify new production suppliers, may make it such that we are unable to obtain sufficient components or raw materials and component parts on a timely basis or at a cost-effective price or may significantly hamper our products from moving through the supply chain.

Our global business could be adversely affected by risks associated with public health crises and epidemics/pandemics, such COVID-19. We rely on our production facilities, as well as third-party suppliers, in the United States, Europe and Asia, which have been significantly impacted by COVID-19. This outbreak has resulted in the extended shutdown of certain businesses in many of these countries, which may result in disruptions or delays to our supply chain and either have resulted in or may result in significant disruptions to our customer base. Any disruption in these businesses will likely impact our sales and operating results. We have taken temporary precautionary measures intended to help minimize the risk of the virus to our employees including temporarily requiring some employees to work remotely and implementing social distancing protocol for all work conducted onsite. We have suspended non-essential travel worldwide for our employees and are discouraging employee attendance at other gatherings. Business disruptions elsewhere in the world could also negatively affect the sources and availability of components and materials that are essential to the operation of our business in the United States, Europe, and Asia. In 2020, COVID-19 had a limited adverse impact on our operations, supply chains and distribution systems, but did result in our sustaining higher losses on raw materials than we had previously expected. However, many regions, particularly the Southern California region where our operations are principally located, are experiencing increases in COVID-19 cases and governmental authorities are implementing temporary closures, lockdowns and restrictions to combat COVID-19. This increase in COVID-19 cases and these restrictions may have negative impacts on our operations, supply chains and distribution systems in 2021 and beyond. In addition, our efforts to qualify new suppliers, particularly in Asia, have been postponed indefinitely, which delay has required us to continue using higher cost components for our products. Because of travel restrictions we are not able to visit many prospective customers in person, which could delay the sales conversion cycle. Due to these precautionary measures and resulting global economic impacts, we may experience significant and unpredictable reductions in demand for certain of our products. The degree and duration of disruptions to future business activity due to COVID-19 are unknown at this time.

A widespread health crisis could adversely affect the global economy, resulting in an economic downturn that could impact demand for our products.

The future impact of the COVID-19 outbreak is highly uncertain and cannot be predicted and there is no assurance that such outbreak will not have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations. The extent of the impact will depend on future developments, including actions taken to contain COVID-19, and if these impacts persist or exacerbate over an extended period of time.

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Changes in tax laws may materially adversely affect our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

New income, sales, use or other tax laws, statutes, rules, regulations or ordinances could be enacted at any time, which could adversely affect our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results. Further, existing tax laws, statutes, rules, regulations or ordinances could be interpreted, changed, modified or applied adversely to us. For example, U.S. federal tax legislation enacted in 2017, informally titled the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Act”), enacted many significant changes to the U.S. tax laws. Future guidance from the IRS with respect to the Tax Act may affect us, and certain aspects of the Tax Act could be repealed or modified in future legislation. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”), has already modified certain provisions of the Tax Act. In addition, it is uncertain if and to what extent various states will conform to the Tax Act, the CARES Act or any newly enacted federal tax legislation.

Our business and operations could be negatively affected if we become subject to any securities litigation or shareholder activism, which could cause us to incur significant expense, hinder execution of our business and growth strategy and impact the price of our Common Stock and Warrants.

Shareholder activism, which could take many forms or arise in a variety of situations, has been increasing recently. Volatility in the price of our Common Stock and Warrants or other factors may in the future cause us to become the target of securities litigation or shareholder activism. Securities litigation and shareholder activism, including potential proxy contests, could result in substantial costs and divert management’s and our board of director’s attention and resources from our business. Additionally, such securities litigation and shareholder activism could give rise to perceived uncertainties as to our future, adversely affect our relationships with service providers and make it more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified personnel. Also, we may be required to incur significant legal fees and other expenses related to any securities litigation and activist shareholder matters. Further, the price of our Common Stock and Warrants could be subject to significant fluctuation or otherwise be adversely affected by the events, risks and uncertainties of any securities litigation and shareholder activism.

33

USE OF PROCEEDS

All of the Common Stock and Warrants offered by the Selling Securityholders pursuant to this prospectus will be sold by the Selling Securityholders for their respective accounts. We will not receive any of the proceeds from these sales.

We will receive up to an aggregate of approximately $141.1 million from the exercise of the Warrants, assuming the exercise in full of all of the Warrants for cash. We expect to use the net proceeds from the exercise of the Warrants for general corporate purposes. We will have broad discretion over the use of proceeds from the exercise of the Warrants. There is no assurance that the holders of the Warrants will elect to exercise any or all of such Warrants. To the extent that the Warrants are exercised on a “cashless basis,” the amount of cash we would receive from the exercise of the Warrants will decrease.

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DETERMINATION OF OFFERING PRICE

The offering price of the shares of Common Stock underlying the Warrants offered hereby is determined by reference to the exercise price of the Warrants of $11.50 per share. The Public Warrants are listed on the NYSE under the symbol “RMO.WT.”

We cannot currently determine the price or prices at which shares of our Common Stock or Warrants may be sold by the Selling Securityholders under this prospectus.

35

MARKET INFORMATION FOR COMMON STOCK AND DIVIDEND POLICY

Market Information

Our Common Stock and Public Warrants are currently listed on the NYSE under the symbols “RMO” and “RMO.WT,” respectively. Prior to the consummation of the Business Combination, our Common Stock and our Public Warrants were listed on the NYSE under the symbols “RMG” and “RMG.WT,” respectively. As of December 29, 2020 following the completion of the Business Combination, there were 252 holders of record of our Common Stock. We currently do not intend to list the Private Warrants offered hereby on any stock exchange or stock market.

Dividend Policy

We have not paid any cash dividends on our Common Stock to date. We may retain future earnings, if any, for future operations, expansion and debt repayment and we have no current plans to pay cash dividends for the foreseeable future. Any decision to declare and pay dividends in the future will be made at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend on, among other things, our results of operations, financial condition, cash requirements, contractual restrictions and other factors that our board of directors may deem relevant. In addition, our ability to pay dividends may be limited by covenants of any existing and future outstanding indebtedness we or our subsidiaries incur. We do not anticipate declaring any cash dividends to holders of the Common Stock in the foreseeable future.

Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

As of December 29, 2020, there were 26,295,587 shares authorized for issuance under our equity incentive plans.

Our stockholders approved our 2020 Long-Term Incentive Plan (the “2020 Plan”) on December 28, 2020, which became effective immediately upon the Closing. Upon the Closing, all outstanding options under the Romeo Systems, Inc. 2016 Stock Plan (the “2016 Plan”) became exercisable to purchase a number of shares of our Common Stock equal to the number of shares of Legacy Romeo common stock subject to such Legacy Romeo options multiplied by the Exchange Ratio (rounded down to the nearest whole share) at an exercise price per share divided by the Exchange Ratio (rounded up to the nearest whole cent).

We intend to file one or more registration statements on Form S-8 under the Securities Act to register the shares of Common Stock issued or issuable under the 2020 Plan and the assumed Legacy Romeo options. Any such Form S-8 registration statement will become effective automatically upon filing. We expect that the initial registration statement on Form S-8 will cover shares of Common Stock underlying the 2020 Plan and the assumed Legacy Romeo options. Once these shares are registered, they can be sold in the public market upon issuance, subject to applicable restrictions.

36

SELECTED HISTORICAL FINANCIAL INFORMATION

RMG’s balance sheet data as of December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018 and statement of operations data for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019 and the period from October 22, 2018 (inception) through December 31, 2018 are derived from RMG’s audited financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. The selected historical interim financial information of RMG as of September 30, 2020 and for the nine months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019 is derived from the unaudited interim financial statements of RMG included elsewhere in this prospectus.

Legacy Romeo’s consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, consolidated statement of operations data and consolidated statement of cash flow data for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018 are derived from Legacy Romeo’s audited financial statements, included elsewhere in this prospectus. The selected historical interim financial information of Legacy Romeo as of September 30, 2020 and for the nine months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019 is derived from the unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements of Legacy Romeo included elsewhere in this prospectus.

This information is only a summary and should be read in conjunction with each of Legacy Romeo’s and RMG’s consolidated financial statements and related notes and the section entitled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” included elsewhere in this prospectus. The historical results included below and elsewhere in this prospectus are not indicative of the future performance of the Company. All amounts are in U.S. dollars.

37

RMG’s Selected Financial Information

Period from

Nine Months

Nine Months

Year Ended

October 22, 2018

Ended September 30,

Ended September 30,

December 31,

(inception) to

    

2020

    

2019

    

2019

    

December 31, 2018

Income Statement Data

Loss from operations

$

(1,199,222)

$

(818,222)

$

(1,093,066)

$

(2,565)

Interest income

1,111

22,725

12,602

10

Gain on marketable securities (net), and dividends held in Trust Account

3,299,930

3,565,051

Net income (loss)

125,935

1,835,919

2,086,083

(2,555)

Basic and diluted net income per share, Class A

$

0.05

$

0.11

$

0.13

$

Basic and diluted net loss per share, Class B

$

(0.18)

$

(0.11)

$

(0.15)

$

0.00

Balance Sheet Data

    

As of September 30, 2020

    

As of December 31, 2019

Cash

$

315,502

$

1,175,207

Restricted cash equivalents held in Trust Account

 

234,179,516

 

233,232,730

Total assets

 

234,639,206

 

234,584,340

Total liabilities

 

8,900,550

 

8,971,619

Total stockholders’ equity

 

5,000,006

 

5,000,001

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Legacy Romeo’s Selected Financial Information

(dollars in thousands)

Nine Months Ended September 30,

Year Ended December 31,

Statement of Operations Data:

    

2020

    

2019

    

2019

    

2018

(Unaudited)

Total revenue

$

4,326

$

5,357

$

8,488

$

3,064

Total cost of revenues

7,851

10,675

17,237

12,795

Gross loss

(3,525)

(5,318)

(8,749)

(9,731)

Total operating expenses

15,516

20,902

29,718

38,214

Operating loss

(19,041)

(26,220)

(38,467)

(47,945)

Interest expense

(783)

(10,848)

(10,954)

(8,802)

Interest income

266

269

Loss on extinguishment of debt

(9,181)

(9,181)

(2,580)

Other expense

(1,614)

Net loss before income taxes and equity (loss) in affiliates

(21,438)

(45,983)

(58,333)

(59,327)

Equity (loss) in affiliates

(1,272)

(669)

(1,520)

Income tax expense

(1)

(1)

(1)

Net loss

$

(22,710)

$

(46,653)

$

(59,854)

$

(59,328)

Nine Months Ended September 30,

Year Ended December 31,

Statement of Cash Flow Data:

    

2020

    

2019

    

2019

    

2018

(Unaudited)

Net cash provided by (used for):

Operating activities

$

(14,126)

$

(37,671)

$

(46,964)

$

(42,337)

Investing activities

$

(561)

$

(843)

$

(1,171)

$

(3,049)

Financing activities

$

14,504

$

42,295

$

48,553

$

41,027

    

As of September 30,
2020

As of December 31,

Balance Sheet Data:

(Unaudited)

    

2019

    

2018

Cash and cash equivalents

$

246

$

429

$

11

Restricted cash

$

1,500

$

1,500

$

1,500

Total assets

$

37,518

$

32,578

$

22,443

Total liabilities

$

51,829

$

30,005

$

58,753

Total stockholders’ deficit

$

(121,891)

$

(101,007)

$

(47,725)

Nine Months Ended September 30,

Year Ended December 31,

Other Financial Data:

    

2020

    

2019

    

2019

    

2018

(Unaudited)

(Unaudited)

EBITDA(1)

$

(20,523)

$

(34,683)

$

(47,297)

$

(48,952)

Adjusted EBITDA(1)

$

(18,125)

$

(24,553)

$

(31,964)

$

(43,424)

(1)Management utilizes certain non-GAAP performance measures, EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA, for purposes of evaluating Romeo’s ongoing operations and for internal planning and forecasting purposes. We believe that these non-GAAP operating measures, when reviewed collectively with Romeo’s GAAP financial information, provide useful supplemental information to investors in assessing Romeo’s operating performance. See the section captioned “Non-GAAP Financial Measures” included within “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” for a complete description of the non-GAAP performance measures and a reconciliation to the nearest GAAP measures.

39

UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONDENSED COMBINED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Introduction

The following unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information has been prepared in accordance with Article 11 of Regulation S-X. This information has been provided to aid in your analysis of the financial aspects of the Business Combination. For each of the periods presented, the pro forma financial information reflects the combination of historical financial information of RMG and Legacy Romeo, adjusted to give effect to (1) the Business Combination, inclusive of the issuance of Common Stock for Legacy Romeo’s issued and outstanding preferred stock and convertible notes as if each converted to Legacy Romeo common stock immediately prior to the Business Combination, (2) the repayment of certain of Legacy Romeo’s outstanding notes, (3) certain related equity financing transactions, and (4) the payment of transaction costs (collectively, the “Transactions”). Hereinafter, RMG and Legacy Romeo are collectively referred to as the “Companies,” and the Companies, subsequent to the Business Combination, are referred to herein as the “Combined Company.”

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined balance sheet, which has been presented for the Combined Company as of September 30, 2020, gives effect to the transactions summarized below, as if they were consummated on September 30, 2020. The unaudited pro forma condensed combined statements of operations, which have been presented for the nine months ended September 30, 2020 and for the year ended December 31, 2019, give pro forma effect to the transactions summarized below, as if they had occurred on January 1, 2019. The unaudited pro forma condensed combined balance sheet does not purport to represent, and is not necessarily indicative of, what the actual financial condition of the Combined Company would have been had the Business Combination taken place on September 30, 2020, nor is it indicative of the financial condition of the Combined Company as of any future date. The unaudited pro forma condensed combined statements of operations do not purport to represent, and are not necessarily indicative of, what the actual results of operations of the Combined Company would have been had the Business Combination taken place on January 1, 2019, nor are they indicative of the results of operations of the Combined Company for any future period.

Accounting for the Business Combination

Notwithstanding the legal form of the Business Combination pursuant to the Merger Agreement, the Business Combination is accounted for as a reverse recapitalization in accordance with U.S. GAAP. Under this method of accounting, RMG is treated as the acquired company for financial reporting purposes, and Legacy Romeo will be treated as the accounting acquiror. In accordance with this accounting method, the Business Combination will be treated as the equivalent of Legacy Romeo issuing stock for the net assets of RMG, accompanied by a recapitalization. The net assets of RMG will be stated at historical cost, with no goodwill or other intangible assets recorded, and operations prior to the Business Combination will be those of Legacy Romeo. Legacy Romeo has been deemed the accounting acquiror for purposes of the Business Combination based on an evaluation of the following facts and circumstances:

1.Legacy Romeo’s existing stockholders hold a majority ownership interest in the Combined Company;
2.Legacy Romeo’s existing senior management team comprise the senior management of the Combined Company;
3.Legacy Romeo is the larger of the companies based on historical operating activity and employee base; and
4.Legacy Romeo’s operations comprise the ongoing operations of the Combined Company.

Basis of Pro Forma Presentation

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial statements give effect to the following events that are (i) directly attributable to the Transactions, (ii) factually supportable, and (iii) with respect to the pro forma statements of operations, expected to have a continuing impact on the Combined Company’s results following the Transactions:

The Merger between RMG’s newly-formed merger subsidiary and Legacy Romeo, with Legacy Romeo surviving as a wholly-owned subsidiary of RMG;
The issuance of shares of Common Stock for all of the issued and outstanding equity interests of Legacy Romeo, inclusive of Common Stock issued in exchange for both Romeo’s issued and outstanding preferred

40

stock and issued and outstanding convertible notes (inclusive of interest accrued thereon), as if each had converted into Legacy Romeo common stock immediately prior to the Business Combination;
The sale and issuance of 16 million shares of Class A Common Stock for a purchase price of $10.00 per share, or $160 million in the aggregate, immediately prior to the Business Combination, pursuant to the Subscription Agreements entered into concurrently with the Merger Agreement (the “Private Placement”);
The settlement of all of Legacy Romeo’s issued and outstanding term notes, inclusive of accrued and unpaid interest;
The payment of transaction costs incurred by both RMG and Legacy Romeo;
The payment of deferred legal fees, underwriting commissions, and other costs incurred in connection with RMG’s Initial Public Offering (“IPO”);
The contribution of $35 million to Heritage Battery Recycling, LLC (“HBR”), a related party to both a pre-Business Combination stockholder of Legacy Romeo and Subscriber;
The settlement of $9.1 million of the notes receivable due to Legacy Romeo from stockholders, inclusive of the forgiveness of $3.8 million of the amount due; and
The exchange of all issued and outstanding warrants and stock options for the purchase of shares of Legacy Romeo common stock, inclusive of stock options for which vesting is fully contingent upon Legacy Romeo being acquired by a special purpose acquisition company (“SPAC”), for warrants and stock options for the purchase of Common Stock.

Pursuant to RMG’s prior amended and restated certificate of incorporation, public stockholders were offered the opportunity to redeem, upon the closing of the Business Combination, shares of RMG Class A Common Stock then held by them for cash equal to their pro rata share of the aggregate amount on deposit in a trust account at Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas (the “Trust Account”). The unaudited condensed combined pro forma financial statements reflect that there were no properly elected redemptions of shares of RMG Class A Common Stock.

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information was derived from, and should be read in conjunction with, the following historical financial statements and the accompanying notes, which are included elsewhere in the prospectus and incorporated herein by reference:

The historical unaudited condensed financial statements of RMG as of and for the nine months ended September 30, 2020, and the historical audited financial statements of RMG as of and for the year ended December 31, 2019; and
The historical unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements of Legacy Romeo as of and for the nine months ended September 30, 2020, and the historical audited consolidated financial statements of Legacy Romeo as of and for the year ended December 31, 2019.

This unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information should also be read together with the section of the prospectus entitled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” as well as other information included elsewhere in the prospectus, which is incorporated herein by reference.

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information has been presented for illustrative purposes only. The pro forma adjustments represent estimates based on information available as of the dates of the unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information and are subject to change as additional information becomes available. Assumptions and estimates underlying the pro forma adjustments set forth in the unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information are described in the accompanying notes. The actual financial position and results of operations of the Combined Company subsequent to consummation of the Transactions may differ significantly from the pro forma amounts reflected herein.

41

PRO FORMA CONDENSED COMBINED BALANCE SHEET

AS OF SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

(UNAUDITED)

(in thousands)

    

RMG

    

Legacy Romeo

    

Pro Forma

    

    

    

Pro Forma

(Historical)

(Historical)

Adjustments

Ref

Combined

Assets

Current Assets

Cash and cash equivalents

$

316 

$

246 

$

303,381 

(A)

$

303,943 

Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts

— 

996 

— 

996 

Inventories, net

— 

8,572 

— 

8,572 

Insurance receivable

— 

6,000 

— 

6,000 

Deferred costs

— 

2,357 

— 

2,357 

Prepaid expenses

144 

1,834 

— 

1,978 

Total current assets

460 

20,005 

303,381 

323,846 

 

Restricted cash

— 

1,500 

— 

1,500 

Restricted cash equivalents held in Trust Account

234,179 

— 

(234,179)

(C)

— 

Property, plant, and equipment, net

— 

5,316 

— 

5,316 

Investment in unconsolidated  joint venture

— 

1,208 

— 

1,208 

Heritage battery recycling contribution

— 

— 

35,000 

(D)

35,000 

Operating lease right-of-use assets

— 

5,531 

— 

5,531 

Deferred Offering Costs

— 

2,804 

(2,804)

(E)

— 

Other noncurrent assets

— 

1,154 

— 

1,154 

Total Assets

234,639 

37,518 

101,398 

373,555 

 

Liabilities

Current liabilities

Accounts payable

10,348 

(2,149)

(F)

8,205 

Accrued expenses

202 

3,923 

(815)

(F)

3,310 

Contract liabilities

— 

3,104 

— 

3,104 

Franchise tax payable

150 

— 

— 

150 

Income tax payable

— 

— 

— 

— 

Current maturities of long-term debt

— 

8,437 

(6,700)

(G)

1,737 

Current maturities of long-term debt to related parties

— 

2,850 

(2,850)

(G)

— 

Operating lease liabilities - current

— 

853 

— 

853 

Legal settlement payable

— 

6,000 

— 

6,000 

Accrued interest

— 

407 

(407)

(G)

— 

Other current related party liability

— 

1,614 

(1,614)

(K)

— 

Other current liabilities

— 

314 

— 

314 

Total current liabilities

358 

37,850 

(14,535)

23,673 

 

Deferred legal fees

450 

— 

(450)

(F)

— 

Deferred underwriting commissions

8,050 

— 

(8,050)

(F)

— 

Note payable

42 

— 

— 

42 

Long-term debt - net of current portion

— 

8,712 

(7,149)

(L)

1,563 

Long-term accrued interest

— 

429 

(429)

(L)

— 

Operating lease liabilities - noncurrent

— 

4,782 

— 

4,782 

Other noncurrent liabilities

— 

56 

— 

56 

Total liabilities

8,900 

51,829 

(30,613)

30,116 

 

Preferred stock (R)

Series seed preferred stock

— 

7,369 

(7,369)

(M)

— 

Series A-1 preferred stock

— 

49,762 

(49,762)

(M)

— 

Series A-2 preferred stock

— 

19,818 

(19,818)

(M)

— 

Series A-3 preferred stock

— 

8,698 

(8,698)

(M)

— 

Series A-4 preferred stock

— 

17,933 

(17,933)

(M)

— 

Series A-5 preferred stock

— 

4,000 

(4,000)

(M)

— 

Total preferred stock

— 

107,580 

(107,580)

— 

 

Class A common shares subject to possible redemption (R)

220,739 

— 

(220,739)

(N)

— 

 

Stockholders’ equity (deficit):