Company Quick10K Filing
Sunworks
Closing Price ($) Shares Out (MM) Market Cap ($MM)
$0.00 28 $17
10-Q 2019-10-31 Quarter: 2019-09-30
10-Q 2019-08-02 Quarter: 2019-06-30
10-Q 2019-05-14 Quarter: 2019-03-31
10-K 2019-03-29 Annual: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-11-07 Quarter: 2018-09-30
10-Q 2018-08-08 Quarter: 2018-06-30
10-Q 2018-05-15 Quarter: 2018-03-31
10-K 2018-03-28 Annual: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-11-14 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-Q 2017-08-10 Quarter: 2017-06-30
10-Q 2017-05-11 Quarter: 2017-03-31
10-K 2017-03-29 Annual: 2016-12-31
10-Q 2016-11-10 Quarter: 2016-09-30
10-Q 2016-08-10 Quarter: 2016-06-30
10-Q 2016-05-11 Quarter: 2016-03-31
10-K 2016-03-14 Annual: 2015-12-31
10-Q 2015-11-05 Quarter: 2015-09-30
10-Q 2015-08-06 Quarter: 2015-06-30
10-Q 2015-05-15 Quarter: 2015-03-31
10-K 2015-03-31 Annual: 2014-12-31
10-Q 2014-11-10 Quarter: 2014-09-30
10-Q 2014-07-23 Quarter: 2014-06-30
10-Q 2014-05-15 Quarter: 2014-03-31
10-K 2014-03-26 Annual: 2013-12-31
10-Q 2013-11-12 Quarter: 2013-09-30
10-Q 2013-08-07 Quarter: 2013-06-30
10-Q 2013-05-13 Quarter: 2013-03-31
10-K 2013-03-28 Annual: 2012-12-31
10-Q 2012-11-06 Quarter: 2012-09-30
10-Q 2012-08-20 Quarter: 2012-06-30
10-Q 2012-05-15 Quarter: 2012-03-31
10-K 2012-03-28 Annual: 2011-12-31
10-Q 2011-11-14 Quarter: 2011-09-30
10-Q 2011-08-15 Quarter: 2011-06-30
10-Q 2011-05-16 Quarter: 2011-03-31
10-K 2011-03-31 Annual: 2010-12-31
10-Q 2010-11-19 Quarter: 2010-09-30
10-Q 2010-08-16 Quarter: 2010-06-30
10-Q 2010-05-24 Quarter: 2010-03-31
10-K 2010-04-15 Annual: 2009-12-31
8-K 2020-01-08 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-10-31 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-10-01 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2019-08-29 Amend Bylaw, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2019-08-07 Shareholder Vote
8-K 2019-08-02 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-06-06 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2019-06-03 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
8-K 2019-05-14 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-03-20 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2019-03-12 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2019-01-24 Officers, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-11-07 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-09-20
8-K 2018-08-24 Shareholder Vote
8-K 2018-08-08 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-05-30 Officers, Code of Ethics, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-05-15 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-05-14 Officers, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-04-25 Enter Agreement, Off-BS Arrangement, Sale of Shares, Officers, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-03-28 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-03-22 Officers, Other Events, Exhibits
SUNW 2019-09-30
Part I - Financial Information
Item 1. Financial Statements.
Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.
Item 4. Controls and Procedures
Part II - Other Information
Item 1. Legal Proceedings.
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities.
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.
Item 5. Other Information.
Item 6. Exhibits.
EX-10.1 ex10-1.htm
EX-31.1 ex31-1.htm
EX-31.2 ex31-2.htm
EX-32.1 ex32-1.htm

Sunworks Earnings 2019-09-30

SUNW 10Q Quarterly Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

Comparables ($MM TTM)
Ticker M Cap Assets Liab Rev G Profit Net Inc EBITDA EV G Margin EV/EBITDA ROA
JCS 28 54 9 66 24 1 3 14 37% 5.5 1%
OCC 25 42 20 73 20 -5 -3 30 27% -9.7 -13%
WSTL 22 47 8 40 16 -14 -13 -2 40% 0.2 -29%
SUNW 17 29 22 65 10 -7 -6 17 15% -2.6 -24%
NVMM 13 32 30 49 14 -10 -8 29 29% -3.6 -32%
ABIL 13 25 22 0 0 0 0 -69 0%
MTSL 6 7 5 0 0 0 0 5 0%
OHGI 4 9 3 8 -1 -11 -10 3 -10% -0.3 -115%
DCAR 1 5 2 13 0 -10 -9 -2 4% 0.3 -213%
GLOW 1 6 1 11 0 -6 -5 -0 0% 0.1 -90%

10-Q 1 form10-q.htm

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

 

[X] QUARTERLY REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(D) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2019.

 

Or

 

[  ] TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(D) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from _______________ to _______________

 

Commission File Number 001-36868

 

 

 

SUNWORKS, INC.

(Name of registrant in its charter)

 

Delaware   01-0592299

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

1030 Winding Creek Road, Suite 100

Roseville, CA 95678

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

Issuer’s telephone Number:(916) 409-6900

 

 

(Former Address if Changed Since Last Report)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

 

Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).

 

Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer [  ] Accelerated filer [  ]
Non-accelerated filer [X] Smaller reporting company [X]
  Emerging growth company [  ]

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

 

Yes [  ] No [X]

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class   Ticker symbol(s)   Name of each exchange on which registered
Common stock, par value $0.001 per share   SUNW   The Nasdaq Capital Market

 

The number of shares of registrant’s common stock outstanding as of October 31, 2019 was 5,281,279

 

 

 

 
 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

  Page
   
PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION  
   
ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Unaudited) 4
   
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets at September 30, 2019 (Unaudited) and December 31, 2018 4
   
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the three months and nine months ended September 30, 2019 (Unaudited) and September 30, 2018 (Unaudited) 5
   
Condensed Consolidated Statement of Shareholders’ Equity for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 (Unaudited) 6
   
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 (Unaudited) and September 30, 2018 (Unaudited) 7
   
Notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) 8
   
ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS 22
   
ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK 29
   
ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES 29
   
PART II - OTHER INFORMATION  
   
ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS 30
   
ITEM 2. UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS 30
   
ITEM 3. DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES 30
   
ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES 30
   
ITEM 5. OTHER INFORMATION 30
   
ITEM 6. EXHIBITS 30
   
SIGNATURES 31

 

2
 

 

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and we intend that such forward-looking statements be subject to the safe harbors created thereby. For this purpose, any statements contained in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q except for historical information may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, words such as “may,” “will,” “expect,” “believe,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “could,” “estimate,” or “continue” or the negative or other variations thereof or comparable terminology are intended to identify forward-looking statements. In addition, any statements that refer to projections of our future financial performance, trends in our businesses, or other characterizations of future events or circumstances are forward-looking statements.

 

The forward-looking statements included herein are based on current expectations of our management based on available information and involve a number of risks and uncertainties, all of which are difficult or impossible to predict accurately and many of which are beyond our control. As such, our actual results may differ significantly from those expressed in any forward-looking statements. Readers should carefully review the factors identified in this report under the caption “Risk Factors” as well as the additional risks described in other documents we file from time to time with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), including our most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K and subsequent quarterly reports on Form 10-Q. In light of the significant risks and uncertainties inherent in the forward-looking information included herein, the inclusion of such information should not be regarded as a representation by us or any other person that such results will be achieved, and readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking information. Except as may be required by law, we disclaim any intent to revise the forward-looking statements contained herein to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events.

 

3
 

 

PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS.

 

SUNWORKS, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

AS OF SEPTEMBER 30, 2019 AND DECEMBER 31, 2018

(in thousands, except share and per share data)

 

   September 30, 2019   December 31, 2018 
   (Unaudited)     
Assets          
Current Assets          
Cash and cash equivalents  $2,157   $3,628 
Restricted cash   385    447 
Accounts receivable, net   7,228    8,201 
Inventory, net   2,006    3,233 
Contract assets   5,747    6,153 
Other current assets   940    150 
Total Current Assets   18,463    21,812 
Property and equipment, net   572    852 
Operating lease right-of-use asset   1,695    - 
Other Assets          
Other deposits   72    68 
Goodwill   9,464    9,464 
Total Other Assets   9,536    9,532 
Total Assets  $30,266   $32,196 
           
Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity          
Current Liabilities:          
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities  $12,447   $11,858 
Contract liabilities   2,678    5,069 
Customer deposits   780    58 
Operating lease liability, current portion   892    - 
Loan payable, current portion   124    179 
Convertible promissory note, current portion   -    100 
Acquisition convertible promissory note, current portion   404    757 
Total Current Liabilities   17,325    18,021 
           
Long Term Liabilities          
Operating lease liability   803    - 
Loan payable   3    88 
Promissory note payable, net   3,422    3,669 
Acquisition convertible promissory note   -    101 
Warranty liability   411    321 
Total Long-Term Liabilities   4,639    4,179 
Total Liabilities   21,964    22,200 
           
Shareholders’ Equity          
Preferred stock Series B, $.001 par value; 5,000,000 authorized shares; 0 shares issued and outstanding   -    - 
Common stock, $.001 par value; 200,000,000 authorized shares; 4,724,752 and 3,730,110 shares issued and outstanding, respectively   5    4 
Additional paid in capital   77,603    73,502 
Accumulated deficit   (69,306)   (63,510)
Total Shareholders’ Equity   8,302    9,996 
           
Total Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity  $30,266   $32,196 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

4
 

 

SUNWORKS, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

FOR THE THREE MONTHS AND NINE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2019 AND 2018

(in thousands, except share and per share data)

(unaudited)

 

   Three Months Ended   Nine Months Ended 
   September 30, 2019   September 30, 2018   September 30, 2019   September 30, 2018 
                 
Revenue  $17,547   $18,281   $45,470   $51,722 
                     
Cost of Goods Sold   14,547    14,916    39,486    43,048 
                     
Gross Profit   3,000    3,365    5,984    8,674 
                     
Operating Expenses                    
Selling and marketing expenses   761    891    2,147    3,048 
General and administrative expenses   3,006    2,399    8,365    7,666 
Stock-based compensation   99    151    333    1,183 
Depreciation and amortization   87    96    269    289 
                     
Total Operating Expenses   3,953    3,537    11,114    12,186 
                     
Loss before Other Expenses   (953)   (172)   (5,130)   (3,512)
                     
Other Expenses                    
Other income (expense)   (18)   (13)   (12)   (26)
Interest expense   (213)   (191)   (654)   (353)
                     
Total Other Expenses   (231)   (204)   (666)   (379)
                     
Loss before Income Taxes   (1,184)   (376)   (5,796)   (3,891)
                     
Income Tax Expense   -    -    -    - 
                     
Net Loss  $(1,184)  $(376)  $(5,796)  $(3,891)
                     
LOSS PER SHARE:                    
Basic  $(0.26)  $(0.10)  $(1.44)  $(1.11)
Diluted  $(0.26)  $(0.10)  $(1.44)  $(1.11)
                     
WEIGHTED-AVERAGE COMMON SHARES OUTSTANDING                    
Basic   4,508,530    3,672,845    4,024,116    3,508,484 
Diluted   4,508,530    3,672,845    4,024,116    3,508,484 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

5
 

 

SUNWORKS, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

FOR THE THREE AND NINE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2019 and 2018

(in thousands, except share and per share data)

 

   Series B           Additional         
   Preferred stock   Common stock   Paid-in   Accumulated     
   Shares   Amount   Shares   Amount   Capital   Deficit   Total 
Balance at December 31, 2018        -   $       -    3,730,110   $      4   $73,502   $(63,510)  $9,996 
Stock-based compensation for options   -    -    -    -    62    -    62 
Issuance of common stock under terms of restricted stock grants   -    -    5,952    -    62    -    62 
Net loss for the three months ended March 31, 2019   -    -    -    -    -    (4,535)   (4,535)
Balance at March 31, 2019 (unaudited)   -    -    3,736,062   $4   $73,626   $(68,045)  $5,585 
Stock-based compensation for options   -    -    -    -    48    -    48 
Issuance of common stock for conversion of promissory notes plus accrued interest   -    -    68,082    -    161    -    161 
Issuance of common stock under terms of restricted stock grants   -    -    5,953    -    62    -    62 
Issuance of common stock as fees paid for the extension of maturity date of debt   -    -    57,143    -    344    -    344 
Sales of common stock pursuant to S-3 registration statement   -    -    170,724    -    786    -    786 
Net loss for the three months ended June 30, 2019   -    -    -    -    -    (77)   (77)
Balance at June 30, 2019 (unaudited)   -   $-    4,037,964   $4   $75,027   $(68,122)  $6,909 
Stock-based compensation for options   -    -    -    -    37    -    37 
Issuance of common stock under terms of restricted stock grants   -    -    5,952    -    62    -    62 
Sales of common stock pursuant to S-3 registration statement   -    -    675,251    1    2,477    -    

2,478

 
Rounding shares due to reverse split   -    -    5,585    -    -    -    - 
Net loss for the three months ended September 30, 2019   -    -    -    -    -    (1,184)   (1,184)
Balance at September 30, 2019 (unaudited)   -   $-    4,724,752   $5   $77,603   $(69,306)  $8,302 
                                         
   Series B           Additional         
   Preferred stock   Common stock   Paid-in   Accumulated     
   Shares   Amount   Shares   Amount   Capital   Deficit   Total 
Balance at December 31, 2017   215,146   $    3,307,276   $        3   $72,022   $(56,365)  $15,660 
Adoption of ASC 606 (Note 3)   -    -    -    -    -    (1,405)   (1,405)
Stock-based compensation   -    -    -    -    232    -    232 
Net loss for the three months ended March 31, 2018   -    -    -    -    -    (1,728)   (1,728)
Balance at March 31, 2018 (unaudited)   215,146   $    3,307,276   $3   $72,254   $(59,498)  $12,759 
Conversion of preferred stock to common stock   (215,146)   -   215,146    

-

    -    -    - 
Stock-based compensation   -    -    -    -    800    -    800 
Issuance of common stock under terms of restricted stock grants   -    -    118,437    1    -    -    1 
Issuance of common stock for exercise of options   -    -    27,473    -    50    -    50 
Net loss for the three months ended June 30, 2018   -    -    -    -    -    (1,787)   (1,787)
Balance at June 30, 2018 (unaudited)   -   $-    3,668,332   $4   $73,104   $(61,285)  $11,823 
Stock-based compensation   -    -    -    -    

151

    -    151 
Issuance of common stock under terms of restricted stock grants   -    -    5,952    -    

-

    -    

-

 
Issuance of common stock for conversion of promissory notes, plus accrued interest   -    -    49,873    -    117    -    117 
Net loss for the three months ended September 30, 2018   -    -    -    -    -    (376)   (376)
Balance at September 30, 2018 (unaudited)   -   $-    3,724,157   $4   $73,372   $(61,661)  $11,715 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

6
 

 

SUNWORKS, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

FOR THE NINE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2019 and 2018

(in thousands, except share and per share data)

(unaudited)

 

 

    Nine Months Ended  
    September 30, 2019     September 30, 2018  
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:                
Net loss   $ (5,796 )   $ (3,891 )
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities                
Depreciation and amortization     269       289  
Amortization of right-of-use asset     458       -  
(Gain) on sale of equipment     (23 )     -  
Stock-based compensation     333       1,183  
Amortization of debt issuance costs     97       23  
Bad debt expense     67       36  
Changes in Assets and Liabilities                
(Increase) Decrease in:                
Accounts receivable     906       1,902  
Inventory     1,227       517  
Deposits and other current assets     (794 )     1,949  
Contract assets     406       (1,974 )
Increase (Decrease) in:                
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities     650       (1,434 )
Contract liabilities     (2,391 )     (1,858 )
Customer deposits     722       (2,788 )
Warranty and other liability     90       90  
Operating lease liability     (458 )     -  
NET CASH USED IN OPERATING ACTIVITIES     (4,237 )     (5,956 )
                 
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:                
Purchase of property and equipment     -       (9 )
Proceeds from sale of property and equipment     34       6  
NET CASH PROVIDED BY (USED IN) INVESTING ACTIVITIES     34       (3 )
                 
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:                
Loans payable repayments     (594 )     (473 )
Proceeds from issuance of note payable, net     -       3,632  
Proceeds from sale of common stock, net     3,264       -  
Proceeds from exercise of stock options     -       50  
NET CASH PROVIDED BY FINANCING ACTIVITIES     2,670       3,209  
                 
NET (DECREASE) IN CASH, CASH EQUIVALENTS, AND RESTRICTED CASH     (1,533 )     (2,750 )
CASH, CASH EQUIVALENTS, AND RESTRICTED CASH BEGINNING OF PERIOD     4,075       6,831  
CASH, CASH EQUIVALENTS, AND RESTRICTED CASH, END OF PERIOD   $ 2,542     $ 4,081  
                 
CASH PAID FOR:                
Interest   $ 431     $ 246  
Taxes   $ 47     $ -  
                 
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURES OF NON-CASH TRANSACTIONS                
Operating right-of-use asset and operating lease liability upon adoption of ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842)   $ 2,153     $ -  
Issuance of common stock for conversion of promissory notes plus accrued interest   $ 161     $ 117  
Issuance of common stock for fees paid for the extension of maturity date of debt   $ 344     $ -  
Issuance of common stock upon conversion of preferred stock   $ -     $ 2  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

7
 

 

SUNWORKS, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

SEPTEMBER 30, 2019

(in thousands, except share and per share data)

 

References herein to “we,” “us,” “Sunworks,” and “the Company” are to Sunworks, Inc. and its wholly-owned subsidiaries Sunworks United, Inc. (“dba Sunworks United”), MD Energy, Inc. (“MD Energy”), and Plan B Enterprises, Inc. (“Plan B”).

 

1. BASIS OF PRESENTATION

 

The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles for interim financial information and with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Rule 10-01 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and notes required by generally accepted accounting principles for complete financial statements. In the opinion of management, all normal recurring adjustments considered necessary for a fair presentation have been included. Operating results for the three months and nine months ended September 30, 2019 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ending December 31, 2019. The financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited financial statements and notes thereto included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

At the Company’s Annual Meeting of Stockholders on August 7, 2019, the stockholders of the Company approved a reverse stock split of our issued and outstanding common stock at a ratio not less than 1-for-3 and not greater than 1-for-10. On August 29, 2019, the board of directors of the Company approved the reverse stock split at a ratio of 1-for-7 which went into effect at the open of trading on August 30, 2019. At the effective time of the reverse stock split, every seven shares of issued and outstanding common stock was converted into one share of issued and outstanding common stock. The authorized shares of 200,000,000 and the par value of $0.001 remain the same. All shares and related financial information in this Form 10-Q is retroactively stated to reflect this 1-for-7 reverse stock split.

 

2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

This summary of significant accounting policies of the Company is presented to assist in understanding the Company’s financial statements. These accounting policies conform to accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) and have been consistently applied in the preparation of the financial statements.

 

There have been no significant changes in the Company’s accounting policies from those disclosed in its Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018, except for the policies described below in relation to the adoption of Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), discussed below in the section titled “Accounting Pronouncements Recently Adopted.”

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Sunworks, Inc., and its wholly owned operating subsidiaries, Sunworks United, MD Energy, and Plan B. All material intercompany transactions have been eliminated upon consolidation of these entities.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Significant estimates include estimates used to review the Company’s goodwill, impairments and estimations of long-lived assets, revenue recognition on construction contracts, allowances for uncollectible accounts, operating lease right-of-use-assets and liabilities, warranty reserves, inventory valuation, debt beneficial conversion features, valuations of non-cash capital stock issuances and the valuation allowance on deferred tax assets. The Company bases its estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable in the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

 

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Revenue Recognition

 

Revenues and related costs on construction contracts are recognized as the performance obligations for work are satisfied over time in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. Under ASC 606, revenue and associated profit, will be recognized as the customer obtains control of the goods and services promised in the contract (i.e., performance obligations). The cost of uninstalled materials or equipment will generally be excluded from our recognition of profit, unless specifically produced or manufactured for a project, because such costs are not considered to be a measure of progress. All un-allocable indirect costs and corporate general and administrative costs are charged to the periods as incurred. However, in the event a loss on a contract is foreseen, the Company will recognize the loss in the period it is determined.

 

Revisions in cost and profit estimates during the course of the contract are reflected in the accounting period in which the facts, which require the revision, become known. Provisions for estimated losses on uncompleted contracts are made in the period in which such losses are determined. Changes in job performance, job conditions, and estimated profitability, including those arising from contract penalty provisions, and final contract settlements may result in revisions to costs and income and are recognized in the period in which the revisions are determined.

 

Accounts Receivables and Accounts Payable

 

Accounts receivables are recorded on contracts for amounts currently due based upon progress billings, as well as retention, which are collectible upon completion of the contracts. Accounts payable to material suppliers and subcontractors are recorded for amounts currently due based upon work completed or materials received, as are retention due subcontractors, which are payable upon completion of the contract. General and administrative expenses are charged to operations as incurred and are not allocated to contract costs. Retention receivable is the amount withheld by a customer until a contract is completed. Retention receivables of $983 and $1,234 were included in the balance of trade accounts receivable as of September 30, 2019, and December 31, 2018, respectively.

 

The Company performs ongoing credit evaluation of its customers. Management monitors outstanding receivables based on factors surrounding the credit risk of specific customers, historical trends, age of receivables and other information, and records bad debts using the allowance method. Accounts receivable are presented net of an allowance of $350 at September 30, 2019, and $325, for doubtful accounts at December 31, 2018. During the three months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, $25 and $(54) was recorded as bad debt expense, respectively. During the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, $67 and $36 was recorded as bad debt expense, respectively.

 

Customer Deposits

 

Customer deposits are recorded for funds remitted by our customers in advance of progress billings being completed.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents.

 

Restricted Cash

 

The Company considers restricted cash to be cash balances that have legal and/or contractual restrictions imposed by a third party and are restricted as to withdrawal or use except for the specified purpose.

 

Concentration Risk

 

Cash includes amounts deposited in financial institutions in excess of insurable Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the “FDIC”) limits. At times throughout the year, the Company may maintain cash balances in certain bank accounts in excess of FDIC limits. As of September 30, 2019, the cash balance in excess of the FDIC limits was $2,404. The Company has not experienced any losses in such accounts and believes it is not exposed to any significant credit risk in these accounts.

 

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Inventory

 

Inventory is valued at the lower of cost or market and is determined by the first-in, first-out method. Inventory primarily consists of panels, inverters, and mounting racks and other materials. The Company also carries a reserve for inventory obsolescence that may arise from technological advancement or changes in government regulation. Inventory is presented net of an allowance of $50 at September 30, 2019, and $50 at December 31, 2018.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are stated at cost. Depreciation for property and equipment commences when property and equipment are put into service and are depreciated using the straight-line method over the property and equipment’s estimated useful lives:

 

Machinery & equipment   3-7 Years
Furniture & fixtures   5-7 Years
Computer equipment   3-5 Years
Vehicles   5-7 Years
Leaseholder improvements   3-5 Years

 

Depreciation expense for the three months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 was $87 and $96, respectively. Depreciation expense for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 was $269 and $289, respectively.

 

Leases

 

The Company determines if an arrangement is a lease at inception. Operating lease right-of-use assets (“ROU assets”) and short-term and long-term lease liabilities are included on the face of the condensed consolidated balance sheet. If the Company had finance lease ROU assets, such assets would be presented within other assets, and finance lease liabilities would be presented appropriately within liabilities.

 

ROU assets represent the right to use an underlying asset for the lease term and lease liabilities represent the Company’s obligation to make lease payments arising from the lease. Operating lease ROU assets and liabilities are recognized at commencement date based on the present value of lease payments over the lease term. As most of the Company’s leases do not provide an implicit rate, the Company uses an incremental borrowing rate based on the information available at commencement date in determining the present value of lease payments. The operating lease ROU asset also excludes lease incentives. The Company’s lease terms may include options to extend or terminate the lease when it is reasonably certain that the Company will exercise that option. Lease expense for lease payments is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term. The Company has lease agreements with lease and non-lease components, which are accounted for as a single lease component. For lease agreements with terms less than 12 months, the Company has elected the short-term lease measurement and recognition exemption, and the Company recognizes such lease payments on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

 

Advertising and Marketing

 

The Company expenses advertising and marketing costs as incurred. Advertising and marketing costs include primarily printed material, sponsorships, tradeshow costs, magazine, and catalog advertisement. Included within selling and marketing expenses are advertising and marketing costs for the three months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 of $18 and $56, respectively. Advertising and marketing costs for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 was $69 and $201, respectively.

 

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Warranty Liability

 

The Company establishes warranty liability reserves to provide for estimated future expenses as a result of installation and product defects, product recalls and litigation incidental to the Company’s business. Liability estimates are determined based on management’s judgment, considering such factors as historical experience, the likely current cost of corrective action, manufacturers’ and subcontractors’ participation in sharing the cost of corrective action, and consultations with third party experts such as engineers. Solar panel manufacturers currently provide substantial warranties between ten to twenty-five years with full reimbursement to replace and install replacement panels while inverter manufacturers currently provide warranties covering ten to fifteen-year replacement and installation. The warranty liability for estimated future warranty costs is $411 and $321 at September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

The Company periodically issues stock options and warrants to employees and non-employees. The Company accounts for stock option and warrant grants issued and vesting to employees based on the authoritative guidance provided by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (the “FASB”) whereas the value of the award is measured on the date of grant and recognized over the vesting period. The Company accounts for stock option and warrant grants issued and vesting to non-employees in accordance with the authoritative guidance of the FASB whereas the value of the stock compensation is based upon the measurement date as determined at either a) the date at which a performance commitment is reached, or b) at the date at which the necessary performance to earn the equity instruments is complete. Non-employee stock-based compensation charges generally are amortized over the vesting period on a straight-line basis. In certain circumstances where there are no future performance requirements by the non-employee, option grants are immediately vested and the total stock-based compensation charge is recorded in the period of the measurement date.

 

Basic and Diluted Net (Loss) per Share Calculations

 

(Loss) per Share dictates the calculation of basic earnings per share and diluted earnings per share. Basic earnings per share are computed by dividing income available to common shareholders by the weighted-average number of common shares available. Diluted earnings per share is computed similar to basic earnings per share except that the denominator is increased to include the number of additional common shares that would have been outstanding if the potential common shares had been issued and if the additional common shares were dilutive. The shares for employee options, restricted stock, warrants and convertible notes were not used in the calculation of the net loss per share.

 

A net loss causes all outstanding common stock options, warrants, convertible preferred stock, and convertible notes to be anti-dilutive. As a result, the basic and diluted losses per common share are the same for the three months and nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

As of September 30, 2019, the potentially dilutive securities that have been excluded from the computations of weighted average shares outstanding include 155,978 stock options, 11,904 restricted stock grants, and 428,143 warrants.

 

As of September 30, 2018, the potentially dilutive securities have been excluded from the computations of weighted average shares outstanding include 221,055 stock options, 37,699 restricted stock grants, 428,143 warrants, shares underlying convertible notes.

 

Dilutive per share amounts are computed using the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding and potentially dilutive securities, using the treasury stock method, if their effect would be dilutive.

 

Long-Lived Assets

 

The Company reviews its property and equipment and any identifiable intangibles for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. The test for impairment is required to be performed by management at least annually. Recoverability of assets to be held and used is measured by a comparison of the carrying amount of an asset to the future undiscounted operating cash flow expected to be generated by the asset. If such assets are considered to be impaired, the impairment to be recognized is measured by the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds the fair value of the asset. Long-lived assets to be disposed of are reported at the lower of carrying amount or fair value less costs to sell.

 

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Indefinite Lived Intangibles and Goodwill Assets

 

The Company accounts for business combinations under the acquisition method of accounting in accordance with ASC 805, “Business Combinations,” where the total purchase price is allocated to the tangible and identified intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed based on their estimated fair values. The purchase price is allocated using the information currently available, and may be adjusted, up to one year from acquisition date, after obtaining more information regarding, among other things, asset valuations, liabilities assumed and revisions to preliminary estimates. The purchase price in excess of the fair value of the tangible and identified intangible assets acquired less liabilities assumed is recognized as goodwill

 

The Company tests for indefinite lived intangibles and goodwill impairment in the fourth quarter of each year and whenever events or circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset exceeds its fair value and may not be recoverable. In accordance with its policies, the Company performed a quantitative assessment of indefinite lived intangibles and goodwill at December 31, 2018. At December 31, 2018, the Company determined that the carrying amount of goodwill exceeded its fair value and, as a result, recorded an impairment of $1,900.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

Disclosures about fair value of financial instruments, requires disclosure of the fair value information, whether or not recognized in the balance sheet, where it is practicable to estimate that value. As of September 30, 2019, the amounts reported for cash, accrued interest and other expenses, and notes payable approximate the fair value because of their short maturities.

 

We account for financial instruments measured as fair value on a recurring basis under ASC Topic 820. ASC Topic 820 defines fair value, established a framework for measuring fair value in accordance with GAAP and expands disclosures about fair value measurements.

 

Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. ASC Topic 820 established a three-tier fair value hierarchy which prioritizes the inputs used in measuring fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (level 1 measurements) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (level 3 measurements). These tiers include:

 

  Level 1, defined as observable inputs such as quoted prices for identical instruments in active markets;
     
  Level 2, defined as inputs other than quoted prices in active markets that are either directly or indirectly observable such as quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets or quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active; and
     
  Level 3, defined as unobservable inputs in which little or no market data exists, therefore requiring an entity to develop its own assumptions, such as valuations derived from valuation techniques in which one or more significant inputs or significant value drivers are unobservable.

 

Business Combinations

 

We allocate the fair value of purchase consideration to the tangible assets acquired, liabilities assumed, and intangible assets acquired based on their estimated fair values. The excess of the fair value of purchase consideration over the fair values of these identifiable assets and liabilities is recorded as goodwill. Such valuations require management to make significant estimates and assumptions, especially with respect to intangible assets. Significant estimates in valuing certain intangible assets include, but are not limited to, future expected cash flows from acquired customer lists, acquired technology, and trade names from a market participant perspective, useful lives and discount rates. Management’s estimates of fair value are based upon assumptions believed to be reasonable, but which are inherently uncertain and unpredictable and, as a result, actual results may differ from estimates. During the measurement period, which is one year from the acquisition date, we may record adjustments to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed, with the corresponding offset to goodwill. Upon the conclusion of the measurement period, any subsequent adjustments are recorded to earnings.

 

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Income Taxes

 

The Company uses the liability method of accounting for income taxes. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to financial statements carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases and operating loss and tax credit carry-forwards. The measurement of deferred tax assets and liabilities is based on provisions of applicable tax law. The measurement of deferred tax assets is reduced, if necessary, by a valuation allowance based on the amount of tax benefits that, based on available evidence, is not expected to be realized.

 

Reclassifications

 

Certain reclassifications have been made to prior year’s financial statement to conform to classifications used in the current year.

 

Segment Reporting

 

Operating segments are defined as components of an enterprise for which separate financial information is available and evaluated regularly by the chief operating decision maker, or decision-making group, in deciding the method to allocate resources and assess performance. The Company currently has one reportable segment for financial reporting purposes, which represents the Company’s core business.

 

New Accounting Pronouncements

 

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-04, Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment, which simplifies the subsequent measurement of goodwill by eliminating Step 2 from the goodwill impairment test. In computing the implied fair value of goodwill under Step 2, current U.S. GAAP requires the performance of procedures to determine the fair value at the impairment testing date of assets and liabilities (including unrecognized assets and liabilities) following the procedure that would be required in determining the fair value of assets acquired and liabilities assumed in a business combination. Instead, the amendments under this ASU require the goodwill impairment test to be performed by comparing the fair value of a reporting unit with its carrying amount. An impairment charge should be recognized for the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds the reporting unit’s fair value; however, the loss recognized should not exceed the total amount of goodwill allocated to that reporting unit. The ASU becomes effective for the Company on January 1, 2020. The amendments in this ASU should be applied on a prospective basis. Early adoption is permitted for interim or annual goodwill impairment tests performed. We are currently evaluating the impact ASU No. 2017-04 will have on our consolidated financial statements and associated disclosures.

 

Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), to increase transparency and comparability among organizations by recognizing a right-of-use asset and a lease liability on the balance sheet for all leases with terms longer than 12 months and disclosing key information about leasing transactions. Leases are classified as either operating or financing, with such classification affecting the pattern of expense recognition in the income statement. In July 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-11, Leases (Topic 842) - Targeted Improvements, which provided an optional transition method to apply the new lease requirements through a cumulative-effect adjustment in the period of adoption.

 

We adopted ASU 2016-02 in the first quarter of 2019 using the optional transition method and elected certain practical expedients permitted under the transition guidance, which, among other things, allowed us to not reassess prior conclusions related to contracts containing leases or lease classification. The adoption primarily affected our condensed consolidated balance sheet through the recognition of $2.1 million of right-of-use assets and $2.1 million of lease liabilities as of January 1, 2019. The adoption did not have a significant impact on our results of operations or cash flows. See Note 4. “Leases” to our condensed consolidated financial statements for further discussion of the effects of the adoption of ASU 2016-02 and the associated disclosures.

 

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In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (ASC 606), to clarify the principles of recognizing revenue and create common revenue recognition guidance between U.S. GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards. Under ASC 606, revenue is recognized when a customer obtains control of promised goods or services and is recognized at an amount that reflects the consideration expected to be received in exchange for such goods or services. In addition, ASC 606 requires disclosure of the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from contracts with customers. The ASC was effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017. The Company has adopted ASC 606 beginning on January 1, 2018 using the modified retrospective approach for contracts not substantially complete at that date by recognizing a cumulative adjustment to the opening balance of accumulated deficit. See Note 3 for additional disclosures in accordance with the new revenue recognition standard.

 

Management reviewed currently issued pronouncements during the nine months ended September 30, 2019, and believes that any other recently issued, but not yet effective, accounting standards, if currently adopted, would not have a material effect on the accompanying consolidated financial statements.

 

3. REVENUE FROM CONTRACTS WITH CUSTOMERS

 

Revenues and related costs on construction contracts are recognized as the performance obligations for work are satisfied over time in accordance with ASC 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. Under ASC 606, revenue and associated profit, will be recognized as the customer obtains control of the goods and services promised in the contract (i.e., performance obligations). The cost of uninstalled materials or equipment will generally be excluded from our recognition of profit, unless specifically produced or manufactured for a project, because such costs are not considered to be a measure of progress.

 

The following table represents a disaggregation of revenue by customer type from contracts with customers for the three months and nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018:

 

    Three Months Ended
September 30,
    Nine Months Ended
September 30,
 
    2019     2018     2019     2018  
Agricultural, Commercial, and Industrial (ACI)   $ 8,898     $ 8,715     $ 21,497     $ 23,235  
Public Works     4,137       4,613       10,042       14,511  
Residential     4,512       4,953       13,931       13,976  
Total   $ 17,547     $ 18,281     $ 45,470     $ 51,722  

 

In adopting ASC 606, we had the following significant changes in accounting principles:

 

(i) Timing of revenue recognition for uninstalled materials - We previously recognized the majority of our revenue from the installation or construction of commercial & public works projects using the percentage-of-completion method of accounting, whereby revenue is recognized as we progress on the contract. The percentage-of-completion for each project was determined on an actual cost-to-estimated final cost basis. Under ASC 606, revenue and associated profit, is recognized as the customer obtains control of the goods and services promised in the contract (i.e., performance obligations). The cost of uninstalled materials or equipment is generally excluded from our recognition of profit, unless specifically produced or manufactured for a project, because such costs are not considered to be a measure of progress.

 

(ii) Completed contracts - We previously recognized the majority of our revenue from the installation of residential projects using the completed contract method of accounting whereby revenue was recognized when the project is completed. Under, ASC 606, revenue is recognized as the customer obtains control of the goods and services promised in the contract (i.e., performance obligations).

 

Revenue recognition for other sales arrangements such as the sales of materials will remain materially consistent.

 

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The adoption of the new revenue recognition standard resulted in a cumulative effect adjustment to retained earnings of approximately $1,405 as of January 1, 2018. The details of this adjustment are summarized below.

 

    Balance at     Adjustments     Balance at  
    December 31, 2017     Due to ASC 606     January 1, 2018  
Contract assets   $ 3,790     $ (584 )   $ 3,206  
Contract liabilities     7,288       821       8,109  
Accumulated deficit     (56,365 )     (1,405 )     (57,770 )

 

The following tables summarize the impact of the adoption of ASC 606 on our condensed consolidated statement of operations and condensed consolidated balance sheet for the three and nine months ended and as of September 30, 2018:

 

   Nine Months Ended September 30, 2018 
       Without
Adoption
   Impact of
Adoption
 
   As Reported   of ASC 606   of ASC 606 
Revenue  $51,722   $50,306   $(1,416)
Cost of goods sold   43,048    42,323    (725)
Gross profit  $8,674   $7,983   $(691)

 

   Three Months Ended September 30, 2018 
       Without
Adoption
   Impact of
Adoption
 
   As Reported   of ASC 606   of ASC 606 
Revenue  $18,281   $17,889   $(392)
Cost of goods sold   14,916    14,876    (40)
Gross profit  $3,365   $3,013   $(352)

 

    September 30, 2018  
          Without
Adoption
    Impact of
Adoption
 
    As Reported     of ASC 606     of ASC 606  
Contract assets   $ 5,181     $ 5,315     $ 134  
Contract liabilities     6,252       5,502       (750 )

 

Contract assets represent revenue recognized in excess of amounts billed on contracts in progress. Contract liabilities represent billings in excess of revenue recognized on contracts in progress. At September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, the contract asset balances were $5,747 and $6,153, and the contract liability balances were $2,678 and $5,069, respectively.

 

4. Leases

 

The Company has operating leases for offices, warehouses, vehicles, and office equipment. The Company’s leases have remaining lease terms of 1 year to 5 years, some of which include options to extend.

 

The Company’s lease expense for the three months and nine months ended September 30, 2019 was entirely comprised of operating leases and amounted to $345 and $967, respectively. Operating lease payments, which reduced operating cash flows for the three months and nine months ended September 30, 2019 amounted to $345 and $967 respectively. The difference between the ROU asset amortization of $458 and the associated lease expense of $967 consists of interest, new vehicles, new facilities and lease extensions, office and office equipment leases originated during the first nine months of 2019.

 

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Supplemental balance sheet information related to leases was as follows:

 

    September 30, 2019  
    (in thousands)  
Operating lease right-of-use assets   $ 1,695  
         
Operating lease liabilities—short term     892  
Operating lease liabilities—long term     803  
Total operating lease liabilities   $ 1,695  

 

As of September 30, 2019, the weighted average remaining lease term was 1.5 years and the discount rates for the Company’s leases was 10.0%.

 

Maturities for leases were as follows:

 

    Operating Leases  
    (in thousands)  
Remainder of 2019   $ 277  
2020     913  
2021     627  
2022     33  
2023     5  
Thereafter     -  
Total lease payments   $ 1,855  
Less: imputed interest     160  
Total   $ 1,695  

 

5. LOANS PAYABLE

 

Plan B, a subsidiary of the Company, entered into a business loan agreement, prior to being acquired by the Company, with Tri Counties Bank dated March 14, 2014, in the original amount of $131 bearing interest at 4.95%. The loan agreement called for monthly payments of $2 and matured on March 14, 2019 when it was paid in full. Proceeds from the loan were used to purchase a pile driver and related equipment and was secured by the equipment. At September 30, 2019, there is no remaining loan balance.

 

Plan B entered into a business loan agreement prior to being acquired by the Company with Tri Counties Bank dated April 9, 2014, in the original amount of $250 bearing interest at 4.95%. The loan agreement called for monthly payments of $5, matured on April 9, 2019 when it was paid in full. Proceeds from the loan were used to purchase racking inventory and related equipment. The loan was secured by the inventory and equipment. At September 30, 2019, there is no remaining loan balance.

 

On January 5, 2016, the Company entered into a loan agreement for the acquisition of a pile driver in the principal amount of $182 bearing interest at 5.5%. The loan agreement calls for monthly payments of $4 and is scheduled to mature on January 15, 2020. The loan is secured by the equipment. The outstanding balance at September 30, 2019, is $17.

 

On September 8, 2016, the Company entered into a loan agreement for the acquisition of a pile driver in the principal amount of $174 bearing interest at 5.5%. The loan agreement calls for monthly payments of $4 and is scheduled to mature on September 15, 2020. The loan is secured by the equipment. The outstanding balance at September 30, 2019, is $46.

 

On November 14, 2016, the Company entered into a 0% interest loan agreement for the acquisition of an excavator in the principal amount of $59. The loan agreement calls for monthly payments of $1 and is scheduled to mature on November 13, 2020. The loan is secured by the equipment. The outstanding balance at September 30, 2019, is $17.

 

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On December 23, 2016, the Company entered into a loan agreement for the acquisition of modular office systems and related furniture in the principal amount of $172 bearing interest at 4.99%. The loan agreement calls for 16 quarterly payments of $12 and is scheduled to mature in September 2020. The loan is secured by the equipment. The outstanding balance at September 30, 2019, is $47.

 

As of September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, loans payable (“Loans Payable”) are summarized as follows:

 

   September 30, 2019   December 31, 2018 
Business loan agreement dated March 14, 2014  $-   $7 
Business loan agreement dated April 9, 2014   -    19 
Equipment notes payable   127    241 
Subtotal   127    267 
Less: Current position   (124)   (179)
Long-term position  $3   $88 

 

6. ACQUISITION CONVERTIBLE PROMISSORY NOTES

 

On February 28, 2015, the Company issued a 4% convertible promissory note in the aggregate principal amount of $2,650 as part of the consideration paid to acquire 100% of the total outstanding stock of MD Energy. The note was convertible into shares of common stock on or after each of the following dates: November 30, 2015, November 30, 2016 and November 30, 2017. The conversion price was $18.20 per share. A beneficial conversion feature of $3,262 was calculated but capped at the $2,650 value of the note. The beneficial conversion feature was calculated by multiplying the difference between the fair value of stock at the date of the note, $40.60, less the conversion price of $18.20 multiplied by the maximum number of shares subject to conversion, 145,605. In November 2015, the Company issued 48,535 shares of common stock upon conversion of the principal amount of $883. Commencing on March 31, 2015, and each quarter thereafter during the first two (2) years of the note, the Company made quarterly interest only payments to the shareholder for accrued interest on the Note during the quarter. Commencing with the quarter ending on June 30, 2017, the Company began to make quarterly payments of interest accrued on the convertible note during the prior quarter plus $151 with the final payment of all outstanding principal and accrued but unpaid interest on the convertible note due and payable on February 28, 2020 (the maturity date). The debt discount is fully amortized and has zero balance at December 31, 2018. The Company recorded interest expense of $4 and $10 during the three months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively. The Company recorded interest expense of $17 and $35 during the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively. The outstanding balances at September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018 were $404 and $858, respectively.

 

We evaluated the foregoing financing transactions in accordance with ASC Topic 470, Debt with Conversion and Other Options, and determined that the conversion feature of the convertible promissory note was afforded the exemption for conventional convertible instruments due to its fixed conversion rate. The convertible promissory notes had explicit limits on the number of shares issuable, so they did meet the conditions set forth in current accounting standards for equity classification. The convertible promissory notes were issued with non-detachable conversion options that were beneficial to the investors at inception because the conversion option has an effective strike price that is less than the market price of the underlying stock at the commitment date. The accounting for the beneficial conversion feature required that the beneficial conversion feature be recognized by allocating the intrinsic value of the conversion option to additional paid-in-capital, resulting in a discount on the convertible notes, which was amortized and recognized as interest expense.

 

7. CONVERTIBLE PROMISSORY NOTES

 

On January 31, 2014, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement providing for the sale of a 10% convertible promissory note in the principal amount of up to $750 for consideration of $750. The proceeds were restricted and were used for the purchase of Solar United Network, Inc., now operating as Sunworks United. The note was convertible into shares of common stock of the Company at a price equal to a variable conversion price equal to the lesser of $9.10 per share, or fifty percent (50%) of the lowest trading price after the effective date. As of September 30, 2014, the note was exchanged for a new convertible note with a fixed conversion price of $2.37. Per ASC 815, the derivative liability on the note was extinguished and the new note was re-valued per ASC 470 as a beneficial conversion feature, which was expensed in the statement of operations during 2014. The note originally matured on October 28, 2014, was extended three months to January 31, 2015, was extended to September 30, 2016, and in March 2016 was subsequently extended to September 30, 2019 with zero interest. During the year ended December 31, 2016, the noteholder made a partial conversion of principal and accrued interest in the amount of $196 and $45 respectively in exchange for 101,656 shares of common stock, with a remaining principal balance of $554. During the year ended December 31, 2017, the noteholder made a partial conversion of principal in the amount of $505 in exchange for 213,441 shares of common stock, with a remaining principal balance of $49. During the year ended December 31, 2018, the noteholder made a partial conversion of principal in the amount of $49 and accrued interest of $69 in exchange for 49,873 shares of common stock, with a remaining principal balance of $0.

 

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On February 11, 2014, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement providing for the sale of a 10% convertible promissory note in the principal amount of $100. The note was convertible into shares of common stock of the Company at a price equal to a variable conversion price equal to the lesser of $9.10 per share, or fifty percent (50%) of the lowest trading price after the effective date. As of September 30, 2014, the note was exchanged for a new convertible note with a fixed conversion price of $2.37. Per ASC 815, the derivative liability on the note was extinguished and the new note was re-valued per ASC 470 as a beneficial conversion feature. The note matured on various dates from the effective date of each advance with respect to each advance. At the sole discretion of the lender, the lender was able to modify the maturity date to be twelve (12) months from the effective date of each advance. The note matured on various dates in 2014, and was extended to September 30, 2016, and in March 2016 was subsequently extended to September 30, 2019 with zero interest. The Company recorded no interest since March 2016.

 

The convertible promissory note balance at December 31, 2018 was $100. On April 10, 2019, all remaining principal and accrued interest due under the convertible promissory notes dated January 31, 2014 and February 11, 2014 were converted into 68,082 shares of common stock. The balances converted included $100 of principal and $61 of accrued interest with a remaining principal balance of $0.

 

8. PROMISSORY NOTES PAYABLE

 

On April 27, 2018, the Company entered into a Loan Agreement (the “Loan Agreement”) with CrowdOut Capital, Inc. (“CrowdOut”) pursuant to which the Company issued an aggregate of $3,750 in promissory notes (the “Notes”), of which $3,000 are Senior Notes and $750 are Subordinated Notes (the “Subordinated Notes”). The Subordinated Notes were funded by the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, Charles Cargile and the Company’s Vice President of Business Development, Kirk Short.

 

The Notes bear interest at the rate of the one-month LIBOR plus 950 basis points and originally matured on June 30, 2020.

 

On June 3, 2019, the Company entered into an amendment to its Loan Agreement (the “Amendment”), pursuant to which the maturity date of the $3,000 Senior Note and $750 Subordinated Note was extended from June 30, 2020 to January 31, 2021. In connection with entering into the Amendment, the Company agreed to issue to CrowdOut, as the holder of the Senior Note, 57,143 shares of common stock as an amendment fee (the “Amendment Fee”) pursuant to the Company’s shelf registration statement on Form S-3.

 

Based upon the closing price of the Company’s common stock on June 17, 2019, the day of issuance, the 57,143 shares are valued at $344. The $344 Amendment Fee plus $7 for CrowdOut Amendment related legal fees have been added to the debt issuance costs and are being amortized over the remaining life of the loan. The Notes may be prepaid in whole without the consent of the lender or in part with the consent of the lender. In the event the Notes are prepaid in full prior to the maturity date, the Company shall pay CrowdOut, as the holder of the Senior Notes an exit fee of $375 if prepaid prior to March 31, 2020 or $435 if prepaid after March 31, 2020 but prior to the maturity date. The Company is accruing the exit fee of $435 over the extended remaining life of the Loan Agreement and recognizing the exit fee as interest expense. For the three months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, exit fee recorded as interest expense was $33 and $50, respectively. For the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, exit fee recorded as interest expense was $127 and $84, respectively.

 

In connection with the issuance of the Senior Notes, the Company entered into a security agreement (the “Security Agreement”) pursuant to which the Company granted to CrowdOut, as the holder of the Senior Notes a security interest in certain of the Company’s assets to secure the prompt payment, performance and discharge in full of all of the Company’s obligations under the Senior Notes. The Company also entered into a subordination agreement with the holders of the Subordinated Notes and the Senior Notes pursuant to which the Subordinated Notes are subordinated to the Senior Notes.

 

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The Loan Agreement contains certain customary events of default including, but not limited to, default in payment of any sum payable thereunder, breaches of representations or warranties thereunder, the occurrence of an event of default under the transaction documents, change in control of the Company, filing of bankruptcy and the entering or filing of certain monetary judgments against the Company. Upon the occurrence of an event of default the outstanding principal amount of the Notes, plus accrued but unpaid interest and other amounts owing in respect thereof, shall become, at the giving of notice by CrowdOut, as the lender, immediately due and payable. Interest on overdue payments upon the occurrence of an event of default shall accrue interest at a rate equal to the lesser of 18% per annum or the maximum rate permitted under applicable law. An event of default, for which the Company obtained a waiver through September 16, 2019, was deemed to have occurred due to the Company’s failure to Maintain compliance with the Nasdaq Stock Market’s minimum bid price requirement. The minimum bid price requirement was achieved by an August 30, 2019 reverse stock split of the Company’s issued and outstanding common stock at a ratio of 1-for-7 which is described below in Note 9, as such no extension to the waiver was needed. Additionally, the Loan Agreement includes a subjective acceleration clause if a “material adverse effect” occurs in the Company’s business that could result in an event of default. The Company believes that the likelihood of the lender exercising this right is remote and have classified the debt as long term.

 

In conjunction with the Amendment to the Loan Agreement, the Company added another $351 to the original $118 of capitalized debt issuance costs. The unamortized portion of debt issuance costs total $389 and is being amortized over the life of the Loan Agreement and recognized as interest expense. The Promissory Note Payable balance is reported net of the unamortized portion of the debt issuance costs. The Company recorded amortization of the debt issuance cost of $61 and $105 as interest expense during the three months and nine months ended September 30, 2019. The Company recorded amortization of the debt issuance cost of $14 and $23 as interest expense during the three months and nine months ended September 30, 2018.

 

Promissory notes payable at September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018 are as follows:

 

    September 30, 2019     December 31, 2018  
Promissory notes payable   $ 3,750     $ 3,750  
Less, debt issuance costs     (328 )     (81 )
Promissory notes payable, net   $ 3,422     $ 3,669  

 

9. CAPITAL STOCK

 

At the Company’s Annual Meeting of Stockholders on August 7, 2019, the stockholders of the Company approved a reverse stock split of our issued and outstanding common stock at a ratio not less than 1-for-3 and not greater than 1-for-10. On August 29, 2019, the board of directors of the Company approved the reverse stock split at a ratio of 1-for-7 which went in to effect at the open of trading on August 30, 2019. At the effective time of the reverse stock split, every seven shares of issued and outstanding common stock was converted into one share of issued and outstanding common stock. The authorized shares of 200,000,000 and the par value of $0.001 remain the same. All shares and related financial information in this Form 10-Q is retroactively stated to reflect this 1-for-7 reverse stock split.

 

Common Stock

 

During the nine months ended September 30, 2019, 17,857 shares of common stock were issued to Charles Cargile pursuant to the terms of a restricted stock grant agreement (the “March 2017 RSGA”) effective March 29, 2017 which is described below in Note 10.

 

On April 10, 2019, the remaining principal of $100 and accrued interest of $61 due under the convertible promissory notes dated January 31, 2014 and February 11, 2014 were converted into 68,082 shares of common stock.

 

In connection with the June 3, 2019 Amendment to the Loan Agreement, the Company agreed to issue 57,143 shares of common stock to CrowdOut, as the holder of the $3,000,000 Senior Note. The shares were issued pursuant to the Company’s shelf registration on Form S-3 on June 17, 2019 at a market value of $344 based upon a closing price of $6.01 per common share. (See Note 8)

 

Pursuant to an At Market Issuance Sales Agreement (the “ATM Agreement”) with B. Riley FBR, Inc. (the “Agent”), the Company may offer and sell from time to time up to an aggregate of $15,000,000 of shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.001 per share (the “Placement Shares”), through the Agent.

 

The Placement Shares have been registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, pursuant to the Registration Statement on Form S-3 (File No. 333-231653), which was originally filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) on May 21, 2019 and declared effective by the SEC on May 31, 2019, the base prospectus contained within the Registration Statement, and a prospectus supplement that was filed with the SEC on June 6, 2019.

 

Placement Shares sold between June 6, 2019 and September 30, 2019 total 845,975 shares. Total gross proceeds for the shares were $3,460, or $4.09 per share, as of September 30, 2019. Net proceeds, less issuance, costs were $3,264 or $3.86 per share as of September 30, 2019.

 

Sales of the Placement Shares, if any, pursuant to the ATM Agreement, may be made in sales deemed to be “at the market offerings” as defined in Rule 415 promulgated under the Securities Act. The Agent will act as sales agent and will use commercially reasonable efforts to sell on the Company’s behalf all of the Placement Shares requested to be sold by the Company, consistent with its normal trading and sales practices, on mutually agreed terms between the Agent and the Company.

 

The Company has no obligation to sell any of the Placement Shares under the ATM Agreement, and may at any time suspend offers under the ATM Agreement or terminate the ATM Agreement. The Company intends to use the net proceeds from this offering for general corporate purposes, including, without limitation, sales and marketing activities, product development, making acquisitions of assets, businesses, companies or securities, capital expenditures, repayment of indebtedness, and for working capital needs.

 

Preferred Stock

 

On November 25, 2015, the Company designated 242,857 shares, of its authorized preferred stock as Series B Preferred Stock, $0.001 par value per share. Pursuant to the Certificate of Designation filed with the Secretary of State of the State of Delaware, and subject to the rights of any other series of preferred stock that may be established by the board of directors of the Company, holders of Series B Preferred Stock (the “Holders”) will have liquidation preference over the holders of the Company’s Common Stock in any distribution upon winding up, dissolution, or liquidation. Holders will also be entitled to receive dividends, if, when and as declared by the board of directors of the Company, which dividends shall be payable in preference and priority to any payment of any dividend to holders of Common Stock. Holders will be entitled to convert each share of Series B Preferred Stock into one share of Common Stock and will also be entitled to vote together with the holders of Common Stock on all matters submitted to shareholders at a rate of one vote for each share of Series B Preferred Stock. In addition, so long as at least 14,286 shares of Series B Preferred Stock are outstanding, the Company may not, without the consent of the Holders of at least a majority of the shares of Series B Preferred Stock then outstanding: (i) amend, alter or repeal any provision of the Certificate of Incorporation or bylaws of the Company or the Certificate of Designation so as to adversely affect any of the rights, preferences, privileges, limitations or restrictions provided for the benefit of the Holders or (ii) issue or sell, or obligate itself to issue or sell, any additional shares of Series B Preferred Stock, or any securities that are convertible into or exchangeable for shares of Series B Preferred Stock. 215,146 shares of Series B Preferred Stock, at a fair value of $4,500 were issued in December 2015 in connection with the acquisition of Plan B. On May 2, 2018, the Holders converted 215,146 shares of Series B Preferred Stock into the same number of shares of the Company’s Common Stock. As of December 31, 2018, there were no outstanding shares of Preferred Stock.

 

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10. STOCK OPTIONS, RESTRICTED STOCK, AND WARRANTS

 

Options

 

As of September 30, 2019, the Company has 155,978 non-qualified stock options outstanding to purchase 155,978 shares of common stock, per the terms set forth in the option agreements. The stock options vest at various times and are exercisable for a period of five years from the date of grant at exercise prices ranging from $2.10 to $21.70 per share, the market value of the Company’s common stock on the date of each grant. The Company determined the fair market value of these options by using the Black Scholes option valuation model that uses assumptions for expected volatility, expected term, and the risk-free interest rate. Expected volatility is based on historical volatility of the Company’s common stock over the expected term of the options. The expected term of the options granted is derived using the “simplified method” which computes expected term as the average of the sum of the vesting term plus the contract term. The risk-free rate is based on the U.S. Treasury yield.

 

    September 30, 2019  
    Number     Weighted average  
    of Options     exercise price  
Outstanding, beginning December 31, 2018     224,107     $ 12.08  
Granted     48,564       2.77  
Exercised     -       -  
Forfeited     (116,693 )     11.29  
Outstanding, end of September 30, 2019     155,978       9.66  
Exercisable at the end of September 30, 2019     88,502       13.54  

 

During the three months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, the Company charged a total of $37 and $89, respectively, to operations to recognize stock-based compensation expense for stock options. During the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, the Company charged a total of $147 and $314, respectively, to operations to recognize stock-based compensation expense for stock options.

 

Restricted Stock Grant to CEO

 

With an effective date of March 29, 2017, subject to the Sunworks, Inc. 2016 Equity Incentive Plan, (the “2016 Plan”) the Company entered into the March 2017 RSGA with its Chief Executive Officer, Charles Cargile. All shares issuable under the RSGA are valued as of the grant date at $10.50 per share. The RSGA provides for the issuance of up to 71,429 shares of the Company’s common stock. The restricted shares shall vest as follows: 23,810 of the restricted shares shall vest on the one year anniversary of the effective date, and the balance, or 47,619 restricted shares, shall vest in 24 equal monthly installments commencing after the one year anniversary of the effective date.

 

In the three months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 stock-based compensation expense of $62 and $62, respectively was recognized for the March 2017 RSGA. In the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 stock-based compensation expense of $186 and $188, respectively was recognized for the March 2017 RSGA.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2013, the Company entered into an RSGA with its then Chief Executive Officer, James B. Nelson (the “December 2013 RSGA”), intended to provide and incentivize Mr. Nelson to improve the economic performance of the Company and to increase its value and stock price. All shares issuable under the RSGA were performance-based shares, valued as of the grant date at $3.29 per share. The RSGA provided for the issuance of up to 109,890 shares of the Company’s common stock to Mr. Nelson provided certain milestones are met in certain stages. As of September 30, 2014, two of the milestones were met, when the Company’s market capitalization exceeded $10 million and the consolidated gross revenue, calculated in accordance with GAAP, equaled or exceeded $10 million for the trailing twelve-month period. The Company issued 54,945 shares of common stock to Mr. Nelson at fair value of $180 during the year ended December 31, 2014. In conjunction with Mr. Nelson’s retirement in April 2018, the remaining 54,945 shares of the Company’s common stock vested and were issued to Mr. Nelson and $179 was expensed during the second calendar quarter of 2018.

 

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In recognition of the efforts of James B. Nelson, the Company’s Chairman, in leading the Company through the uplisting and financing transaction consummated by the Company in 2015, on August 31, 2016, the Company granted Mr. Nelson a restricted stock grant of 35,715 shares of the Company’s common stock pursuant an RSGA on the terms of the 2016 Plan (the “August 2016 RSGA”). All shares issuable under the August 2016 RSGA are valued as of the grant date at $20.30 per share. The restricted stock grant to Mr. Nelson was to vest upon the earlier of (i) January 1, 2021, (ii) a Change of Control as defined in the 2016 Plan (iii) upon Mr. Nelson’s retirement or (iv) upon Mr. Nelson’s death. “Change of Control” as defined in the 2016 Plan means (i) a sale of all or substantially all of the Company’s assets or (ii) a merger with another entity or an acquisition of the Company that results in the existing shareholders of the Company owning less than fifty percent (50%) of the outstanding shares of capital stock of the surviving entity following such transaction. Mr. Nelson’s retirement in April 2018 resulted in the August 2016 RSGA being vested in full and $502 was expensed during the second calendar quarter of 2018.

 

In the three months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, stock-based compensation expense of $0 and $0, respectively, was recognized for the August 2016 RSGA.

 

The total combined option and restricted stock compensation expense recognized, in the statement of operations, during the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 was $333 and $1,183, respectively.

 

Warrants

 

As of September 30, 2019, the Company had 428,143 common stock purchase warrants outstanding with an adjusted exercise price of $2.85 per share as of that date. The reduction in the exercise price is a result of the sale of Placement Shares pursuant to the ATM Agreement at prices less than the original $29.05 exercise price of the warrants. In accordance with the terms of the Warrant Agreement, the original $29.05 exercise price is reduced to a price equal to the aggregate consideration received divided by the number of additional shares of common stock issued. The warrants have an issuance date of March 9, 2015 and expire on March 9, 2020.

 

11. SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

Subsequent to September 30, 2019 and through October 30, 2019 the sale and issuance of Placement Shares pursuant to the ATM Agreement continued with 554,543 of additional common shares issued and outstanding resulting in net proceeds of $1,500. Further, 1,984 shares were issued under the March 2017 RSGA valued at $21.

 

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ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.

 

The following discussion of our financial condition and results of operations should be read together with our condensed consolidated financial statements included in Part I, Item 1 within this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and the audited consolidated financial statements in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018. This section contains forward-looking statements that are based on our current expectations and reflect our plans, estimates, and anticipated future financial performance. These statements involve numerous risks and uncertainties. Our actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements as a result of many factors, including those set forth in the sections entitled “Risk Factors” in Part II, Item 1A, and “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” within this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

 

Unless otherwise noted, (1) “Sunworks” refers to Sunworks, Inc., a Delaware corporation formerly known as Solar3D, Inc. (2) “Company,” “we,” “us,” and “our,” refer to the ongoing business operations of Sunworks and its Subsidiaries, whether conducted through Sunworks or a subsidiary of Sunworks, (3) “Subsidiaries” refers collectively to Sunworks United, Inc. (“Sunworks United”), MD Energy, Inc. (“MD Energy”) and Plan B Enterprises (“Plan B”).

 

Overview

 

Sunworks provides photovoltaic (“PV”) based power systems for the agricultural, commercial, industrial, public works, and residential markets in California, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, New Jersey and Washington. We have direct sales and/or operations personnel in California, Massachusetts, Nevada, and Oregon. Through our operating subsidiaries, we design, arrange financing, integrate, install, and manage systems ranging in size from 2kW (kilowatt) for residential loads to multi MW (megawatt) systems for larger agricultural, commercial and industrial (“ACI”) and public works projects. ACI installations have included installations at office buildings, manufacturing plants, warehouses, churches, and agricultural facilities such as farms, wineries, and dairies. Public works installations have included school districts, local municipalities, federal facilities and higher education institutions. The Company provides a full range of installation services to our solar energy customers including design, system engineering, procurement, permitting, construction, grid connection, warranty, system monitoring and maintenance.

 

We currently operate in one segment based upon our organizational structure and the way in which our operations are managed and evaluated.

 

On August 29, 2019, the board of directors of the Company approved the reverse stock split at a ratio of 1-for-7 which went in to effect at the open of trading on August 30, 2019, see Note 9. Share-related amounts have been retroactively adjusted in this report to reflect this reverse stock-split for all periods presented.

 

For the first nine months of 2019, approximately 69% of our 2019 revenue was from installations for the ACI and public works markets and approximately 31% of our revenue was from installations for the residential market.

 

For the first nine months of 2018, approximately 73% of our revenue was from installations for the ACI and public works markets and approximately 27% of our revenue was from installations for the residential market.

 

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Critical Accounting Policies

 

Our discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with GAAP. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates, including those related to impairment of property, plant and equipment, intangible assets, deferred tax assets, costs to complete projects, and fair value computation using the Black Scholes option pricing model. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions, such as the trading value of our common stock and estimated future undiscounted cash flows, that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions; however, we believe that our estimates, including those for the above-described items, are reasonable.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Significant estimates include estimates used to review the Company’s goodwill, impairments and estimations of long-lived assets, revenue recognition on percentage of completion type contracts, allowances for uncollectible accounts, operating lease right-of-use assets and liabilities, warranty reserves, inventory valuation, valuations of non-cash capital stock issuances and the valuation allowance on deferred tax assets. The Company bases its estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable in the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

Revenues and related costs on construction contracts are recognized as the performance obligations are satisfied over time in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. Under ASC 606, revenue and associated profit, will be recognized as the customer obtains control of the goods and services promised in the contract (i.e., performance obligations). The cost of uninstalled materials or equipment will generally be excluded from our recognition of profit, unless specifically produced or manufactured for a project, because such costs are not considered to be a measure of progress. All un-allocable indirect costs and corporate general and administrative costs are charged to the periods as incurred. However, in the event a loss on a contract is foreseen, the Company will recognize the loss as it is determined.

 

Revisions in cost and profit estimates, during the course of the contract, are reflected in the accounting period in which the facts, which require the revision, become known. Provisions for estimated losses on uncompleted contracts are made in the period in which such losses are determined. Changes in job performance, job conditions, and estimated profitability, including those arising from contract penalty provisions, and final contract settlements may result in revisions to costs and income and are recognized in the period in which the revisions are determined.

 

Contract assets represent revenue recognized in excess of amounts invoiced to customers on contracts in progress. Contract liabilities represent amounts invoiced to customers in excess of revenue recognized on contracts in progress.

 

Leases

 

We determine if an arrangement is a lease at inception. Operating lease right-of-use assets (“ROU assets”) and short-term and long-term lease liabilities are included on the face of the condensed consolidated balance sheet. If we had Finance lease ROU assets, such assets would be presented within other assets, and finance lease liabilities would be presented appropriately.

 

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ROU assets represent the right to use an underlying asset for the lease term and lease liabilities represent our obligation to make lease payments arising from the lease. Operating lease ROU assets and liabilities are recognized at commencement date based on the present value of lease payments over the lease term. As most of our leases do not provide an implicit rate, we use an incremental borrowing rate based on the information available at commencement date in determining the present value of lease payments. The operating lease ROU asset also excludes lease incentives. Our lease terms may include options to extend or terminate the lease when it is reasonably certain that we will exercise that option. Lease expense for lease payments is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term. We have lease agreements with lease and non-lease components, which are accounted for as a single lease component. For lease agreements with terms less than 12 months, we have elected the short-term lease measurement and recognition exemption, which recognizes such lease payments on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

 

Indefinite Lived Intangibles and Goodwill Assets

 

We account for business combinations under the acquisition method of accounting in accordance with ASC 805, “Business Combinations,” where the total purchase price is allocated to the tangible and identified intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed based on their estimated fair values. The purchase price is allocated using the information currently available, and may be adjusted, up to one year from acquisition date, after obtaining more information regarding, among other things, asset valuations, liabilities assumed and revisions to preliminary estimates. The purchase price in excess of the fair value of the tangible and identified intangible assets acquired less liabilities assumed is recognized as goodwill.

 

We test for indefinite lived intangibles and goodwill impairment in the fourth quarter of each year and whenever events or circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset exceeds its fair value and may not be recoverable. In accordance with its policies, we performed a quantitative assessment of indefinite lived intangibles and goodwill at December 31, 2018. At December 31, 2018, we determined that the carrying amount of goodwill exceeded its fair value and, as a result, recorded an impairment of $1,900.

 

Business Combinations

 

We allocate the fair value of purchase consideration to the tangible assets acquired, liabilities assumed and intangible assets acquired based on their estimated fair values. The excess of the fair value of purchase consideration over the fair values of these identifiable assets and liabilities is recorded as goodwill. Such valuations require management to make significant estimates and assumptions, especially with respect to intangible assets. Significant estimates in valuing certain intangible assets include, but are not limited to, future expected cash flows from acquired customer lists, acquired technology, and trade names from a market participant perspective, useful lives and discount rates. Management’s estimates of fair value are based upon assumptions believed to be reasonable, but which are inherently uncertain and unpredictable and, as a result, actual results may differ from estimates. During the measurement period, which is one year from the acquisition date, we may record adjustments to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed, with the corresponding offset to goodwill. Upon the conclusion of the measurement period, any subsequent adjustments are recorded to earnings.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

We periodically issue stock options to employees and directors. We account for stock option grants issued and vesting to employees based on the authoritative guidance provided by the FASB whereas the value of the award is measured on the date of grant and recognized over the vesting period.

 

We account for stock grants issued to non-employees in accordance with the authoritative guidance of the FASB whereas the value of the stock compensation is based upon the measurement date as determined at either a) the date at which a performance commitment is reached, or b) at the date at which the necessary performance to earn the equity instruments is complete. Non-employee stock-based compensation charges generally are amortized over the vesting period on a straight-line basis. In certain circumstances where there are no future performance requirements by the non-employee, option grants are immediately vested and the total stock-based compensation charge is recorded in the period of the measurement date.

 

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RESULTS OF OPERATIONS FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2019 COMPARED TO THE THREE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2018

 

REVENUE AND COST OF GOODS SOLD

 

For the three months ended September 30, 2019, revenue decreased 4.0% to $17,547 compared to $18,281 for the three months ended September 30, 2018. Cost of goods sold for the three months ended September 30, 2019 was $14,547, or 2.5% below the $14,916 reported, for the three months ended September 30, 2018.

 

Lower construction costs partially offset the lower revenue resulting in a gross profit of $3,000 for the quarter ended September 30, 2019. This compares to $3,365 of gross profit for the same quarter of the prior year, or a decrease in gross profit of $365. The gross margin was 17.1% in the third quarter of 2019 compared to 18.4% in the same quarter of 2018. Approximately 74% of revenue in the third quarter of 2019 was from installations for the ACI and public works markets compared to 73% of revenue in the same period the prior year.

 

SELLING AND MARKETING EXPENSES

 

For the three months ended September 30, 2019, selling and marketing (“S&M”) expenses were $761 compared to $891 for the three months ended September 30, 2018. As a percentage of revenue, S&M expenses were 4.3% of third quarter revenue in 2019 compared to 4.9% in the third quarter of 2018. Third quarter 2019 S&M expenses were $130 less than the same period in the prior year. Most of the decrease resulted from a reduction in personnel in the sales and sales support functions, lower commission and promotion expenses and lower advertising expenses. We continue to refine our marketing efforts, third-party revenue generators, and tracking systems with the goal of minimizing customer acquisition costs.

 

GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

 

Total general and administrative (G&A) expenses were $3,006 for the three months ended September 30, 2019, compared to $2,399 for the three months ended September 30, 2018, an increase of $607. The $607 is the result of a 2018 bonus accrual reversal of $97 and a 2018 reduction in the bad debt allowance of $54 resulting from the recovery of a fully reserved prior bad debt. In addition, for the third quarter of 2019, there were increases in general and labor related legal fees of $271, payroll and benefits of $103, recruiting fees of $27, and software expenses of $36 with all other expenses resulting in a net increase of $18. We do not anticipate anticipated that the labor related legal and recruiting expenses incurred in the third quarter will recur in the fourth quarter of 2019.

 

Minimizing our overhead burden, without compromising the ability to operate effectively has been, and continues to be, an emphasis.

 

STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION EXPENSES

 

During the three months ended September 30, 2019 we incurred $99 in total non-cash stock-based compensation expense compared to $151 for the same period in the prior year.

 

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Stock-based compensation includes $62 for the three months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 for the March 2017 grant of 71,429 restricted shares to our CEO at the per share value at the date of grant of $10.50. This grant is being expensed on a straight-line basis over 36 months, with 6 months of expense remaining.

 

Stock-based compensation, excluding restricted stock grant agreements, related to employee and director options totaled $37 and $89 for the three months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

DEPRECIATION AND AMORTIZATION

 

Depreciation and Amortization expenses for the three months ended September 30, 2019 were $87 compared to $96 for the same period in the prior year. Depreciation and Amortization expenses decreased primarily due to the depreciable life of assets having been met since the January 2014 acquisition of Solar United Network which now operates as Sunworks United.

 

OTHER (INCOME) EXPENSES

 

Total other (income) expenses were $231 for the three months ended September 30, 2019, compared to $204 for the same three months in 2018. Interest expense for the quarter ended September 30, 2019, was $213 primarily related to the interest paid on the $3.75 million Promissory Note from CrowdOut plus the amortization of the $435 exit fee, the origination fees and extension fees all of which are shown as interest expense. Interest expense for the quarter ended September 30, 2018 was $191. Refer to Note 5, “Loans Payable” and Note 8, “Promissory Note Payable” for further information.

 

NET LOSS

 

The net loss for the three months ended September 30, 2019 was $1,184 compared to a net loss of $376 for the three months ended September 30, 2018.

 

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS FOR THE NINE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2019 COMPARED TO THE NINE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2018

 

REVENUE AND COST OF GOODS SOLD

 

For the nine months ended September 30, 2019, revenue decreased 12.1% to $45,470 compared to $51,722 for the nine months ended September 30, 2018. Cost of goods sold for the nine months ended September 30, 2019, was $39,486, or 8.3% below the $43,048 reported for the nine months ended September 30, 2018.

 

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The lower revenue and higher construction costs during the first nine months of the year resulted in a gross profit of $5,984 for the nine months ended September 30, 2019. This compares to $8,674 of gross profit for the same period of the prior year. The gross margin was 13.2% in the first nine months of 2019 compared to 16.8% in the same nine month period of 2018. Approximately 69% of revenue in the first nine months of 2019 was from installations for the ACI and public works markets compared to 73% of revenues in the same period the prior year.

 

Revenue and gross profit in the first nine months of 2019 were negatively impacted by seasonally rainy conditions, during the first 3 months of the year which prohibited installation activity for many of the larger agriculture and commercial projects. In addition, during the first quarter of 2019, we experienced a number of negative impacts to gross profit including, unexpected rework on a number of projects leading to cost overruns, and a number of customer concessions for construction delays. We also incurred expenses in the first quarter for renegotiation and cancellation of several of the older projects agreed to in prior years. Although some of these costs may be recoverable in the future, such recovery is uncertain. Some of these costs have been recovered by change orders received during the second quarter. Any future recoveries of these costs would be expected to be reported in the periods in which they are finalized.

 

SELLING AND MARKETING EXPENSES

 

For the nine months ended September 30, 2019, S&M expenses were $2,147 compared to $3,048 for the nine months ended September 30, 2018. As a percentage of revenue, S&M expenses were 4.7% of the first nine months revenue in 2019 compared to 5.9% of the same period of 2018. The S&M expenses were $901 less than the same period in the prior year. Most of the decrease resulted from a reduction in personnel the sales and sales support functions, lower commission and promotion expenses and lower advertising expenses. We continue to refine our marketing efforts, third-party revenue generators, and customer tracking systems with the goal of minimizing customer acquisition costs, improving customer communication and customer referrals.

 

GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

 

Total G&A expenses were $8,365 for the nine months ended September 30, 2019, compared to $7,666 for the nine months ended September 30, 2018. G&A expenses increased by $699 from the prior year period. The $699 is the result of a 2018 bonus accrual reversal of $247 and a 2018 reduction in the bad debt allowance of $31 primarily resulting from the recovery of a fully reserved prior bad debt. In addition, for 2019, there were increases in general and labor related legal fees of $292, payroll and benefits of $162, recruiting fees of $27, and software expenses of $73. These cost increases were offset by decreases of $111 of travel and $108 of other professional service fees, with all other expenses resulting in a net increase of $86. We do not anticipate that the labor related legal expenses and recruiting expenses incurred in the third quarter will recur in the fourth quarter of 2019.

 

Reducing our overhead burden, without compromising the ability to operate effectively has been, and continues to be, an emphasis.

 

STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION EXPENSES

 

During the nine months ended September 30, 2019 we incurred $333 in total non-cash stock-based compensation expense compared to $1,183 for the same period in the prior year.

 

For 2018, approximately $460 of stock-based compensation was for the August 31, 2016 grant of 35,715 restricted shares to our former Chairman at the per share value at the date of grant of $20.30. This grant was previously expensed on a straight-line basis over 52 months but was accelerated and vested in full upon his retirement in April 2018.

 

In the second quarter of 2018, approximately $180 of stock-based compensation was for the September 23, 2013 grant of 54,945 restricted shares to our former Chairman at the per share value at the date of grant of $3.29. This grant was fully vested and issued in conjunction with his retirement.

 

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Stock-based compensation includes $186 for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 for the March 2017 grant of 71,429 restricted shares to our CEO at the per share value at the date of grant of $10.50. This grant is being expensed on a straight-line basis over 36 months, with 6 months of expense remaining.

 

Stock-based compensation, excluding restricted stock grant agreements, related to employee and director options totaled $147 and $314 for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

DEPRECIATION AND AMORTIZATION

 

Depreciation and Amortization expenses for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 were $269 compared to $289 for the same period in the prior year. Depreciation and Amortization expenses decreased primarily due to the depreciable life of assets having been met since the January 2014 acquisition of Solar United Network which now operates as Sunworks United.

 

TOTAL OTHER EXPENSES

 

Total other expenses were $666 for the nine months ended September 30, 2019, compared to $379 for the same nine months in 2018. Interest expense for the first nine months of 2019 was $654 primarily related to the interest paid on the $3.75 million Promissory Note from CrowdOut plus the amortization of the $435 exit fee and the origination fees and extension fees all of which are shown as interest expense. Interest expense for the first nine months of 2018 was $353 and was the result of the interest owed for the first five months of the new Promissory Note, amortization of the exit and origination fees plus interest on Loans Payable for equipment financing. Refer to Note 5, “Loans Payable” and Note 8 “Promissory Note Payable” for further information.

 

NET LOSS

 

The net loss for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 was $5,796 compared to a net loss of $3,891 for the nine months ended September 30, 2018.

 

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

We had $2,157 in unrestricted cash at September 30, 2019, as compared to $3,628 at December 31, 2018. Our recent cash and liquidity position were negatively impacted by our seasonally weak first quarter and lower operating profits in the second and third quarters. Our reduction in unrestricted cash from operations during the nine months ended September 30, 2019 was offset by cash proceeds from our at-the-market securities offering, or ATM. We received net proceeds of $3,264 from sales of securities under our ATM during the period between June 6, 2019 and September 30, 2019.  We believe that the aggregate of our existing cash and cash equivalents, in addition to funds expected to be generated from operations and through our ATM will be adequate for us to maintain sufficient liquidity and cash for operations during the next twelve months or more. Currently, we cannot be certain of our ability to conduct any type of financing in the future, including our ATM, or the terms and conditions, or actual timing, of any other equity financing or debt financing. To the extent that we raise additional funds by issuing equity securities, our stockholders may experience dilution. Debt financing may involve agreements that include high interest costs and restrictive covenants. If we are unable to raise additional capital when required or on acceptable terms, we may have to adjust our cost structure and/or delay execution of projects in backlog.

 

As of September 30, 2019, our working capital surplus was $1,138 compared to a working capital surplus of $3,791 at December 31, 2018. The surplus is lower by $892 as a result of the non-cash implementation of ASU 2016-02 which requires the Company to show a current liability for future operating lease obligations on its balance sheet for the first time.

 

The Loan Agreement for the Promissory Notes Payable contains a subjective acceleration clause based on the lender determining, in the exercise of its reasonable discretion, that a “material adverse effect” in our business has occurred. If this clause is applied, and the lender declares that an Event of Default has occurred, the outstanding indebtedness would likely become immediately due. Although we believe that the likelihood of the lender exercising this right is unlikely, there can be no assumption that the lender would not declare an Event of Default. Refer to Note 8, “Promissory Notes Payable” for further information.

 

During the nine months ended September 30, 2019, we had $4,237 of cash used in operating activities compared to $5,956 used in operating activities for same period in 2018. The cash used in operating activities was primarily the result of the current year net loss combined with increases in contract liabilities and deposits for materials. The cash impact of the net loss was offset by a reduction in inventory, collection of cash from accounts receivables, increases in customer deposits and decreases in contract assets, together with extension in accounts payable and accrued liabilities.

 

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Net cash used in investing activities for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 was insignificant.

 

Net cash provided by financing activities during the nine months ended September 30, 2019 was $2,670. The cash was used for working capital, to pay principal payments on the acquisition convertible promissory notes and existing vehicle and equipment debt. Net cash received through the ATM totaled $3,264.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements that are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, revenues, results of operations, liquidity, or capital expenditures.

 

ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK.

 

Not Applicable.

 

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

We carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)). Based upon that evaluation, our principal executive officer and principal financial officer concluded that, as of the end of the period covered in this report, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective to ensure that information required to be disclosed in reports we file or submit under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the required time periods specified in the SEC rules and forms and is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

Limitations on the Effectiveness of Controls

 

Our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, do not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures or our internal controls will prevent all errors or fraud. A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. In addition, the design of any system of controls is based on assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with policies and procedures may deteriorate. Control systems can also be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the control. Due to the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, have been detected.

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

There was no change in our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act) during the fiscal third quarter ended September 30, 2019 that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

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PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.

 

None.

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

Factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those in this report are described in Item 1.A. Risk Factors of our annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018 (“2018 Form 10-K”). Any of these factors could result in a significant or material adverse effect on our results of operations or financial condition. Additional risks not presently known to us or that we currently deem immaterial may also impair our business or results of operations. As of the date of this Quarterly Report, there have been no material changes to the risk factors disclosed in our 2018 Form 10-K. We may disclose changes to such risk factors or disclose additional risk factors from time to time in our future filings with the SEC.

 

ITEM 2. UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS.

 

None.

 

ITEM 3. DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES.

 

None.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES.

 

None.

 

ITEM 5. OTHER INFORMATION.

 

None.

 

ITEM 6. EXHIBITS.

 

Exhibit No.   Description
     
10.1   Form of Indemnification Agreement
31.1*   Certification of Principal Executive Officer, pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
31.2*   Certification of Principal Financial Officer, pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
32.1*   Certification of Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
101.INS**   XBRL Instance Document.
101.SCH**   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document.
101.CAL**   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document.
101.DEF**   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document.
101.LAB**   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document.
101.PRE**   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document.

 

* Filed herewith
   
** Furnished herewith

 

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SIGNATURES

 

In accordance with Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act, the registrant caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized, in the City of Roseville, State of California, on October 31, 2019.

 

  Sunworks, Inc.
     
Date: October 31, 2019 By: /s/ Charles F. Cargile
    Charles F. Cargile, Chief Executive Officer
    (Principal Executive Officer)
     
Date: October 31, 2019 By: /s/ Paul C. McDonnel
    Paul C. McDonnel, Interim Chief Financial Officer
    (Principal Financial and Accounting Officer)

 

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