Company Quick10K Filing
Quick10K
Skyworks Solutions
Closing Price ($) Shares Out (MM) Market Cap ($MM)
$74.95 173 $12,943
10-K 2019-09-27 Annual: 2019-09-27
10-Q 2019-06-28 Quarter: 2019-06-28
10-Q 2019-03-29 Quarter: 2019-03-29
10-Q 2018-12-28 Quarter: 2018-12-28
10-K 2018-09-28 Annual: 2018-09-28
10-Q 2018-06-29 Quarter: 2018-06-29
10-Q 2018-03-30 Quarter: 2018-03-30
10-Q 2017-12-29 Quarter: 2017-12-29
10-K 2017-09-29 Annual: 2017-09-29
10-Q 2017-06-30 Quarter: 2017-06-30
10-Q 2017-03-31 Quarter: 2017-03-31
10-Q 2016-12-30 Quarter: 2016-12-30
10-K 2016-09-30 Annual: 2016-09-30
10-Q 2016-07-01 Quarter: 2016-07-01
10-Q 2016-04-01 Quarter: 2016-04-01
10-Q 2016-01-01 Quarter: 2016-01-01
10-K 2015-10-02 Annual: 2015-10-02
10-Q 2015-07-03 Quarter: 2015-07-03
10-Q 2015-04-03 Quarter: 2015-04-03
10-Q 2015-01-02 Quarter: 2015-01-02
10-K 2014-10-03 Annual: 2014-10-03
10-Q 2014-06-27 Quarter: 2014-06-27
10-Q 2014-03-28 Quarter: 2014-03-28
10-Q 2013-12-27 Quarter: 2013-12-27
8-K 2019-11-12 Earnings, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2019-08-22 Officers
8-K 2019-08-07 Earnings, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2019-06-04 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-05-08 Shareholder Vote
8-K 2019-05-02 Earnings, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2019-02-05 Earnings, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2019-01-30 Other Events
8-K 2019-01-08 Earnings, Exhibits
8-K 2018-11-13 Officers
8-K 2018-11-08 Earnings, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-08-03 Enter Agreement, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-07-23 Officers
8-K 2018-07-19 Earnings, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-05-11 Shareholder Vote
8-K 2018-05-03 Earnings, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-02-14 Officers
TSM Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing 1,071,962
FSLR First Solar 6,557
IPHI Inphi 2,723
SPWR Sunpower 1,874
SYNA Synaptics 1,072
PLAB Photronics 690
LASR Nlight 492
ICHR Ichor Holdings 453
MX Magnachip Semiconductor 362
AOSL Alpha & Omega Semiconductor 293
SWKS 2019-09-27
Item 1. Business.
Item 1A. Risk Factors.
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.
Item 2. Properties.
Item 3. Legal Proceedings.
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.
Part II
Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.
Item 6. Selected Financial Data.
Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure.
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures.
Item 9B. Other Information.
Part III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance.
Item 11. Executive Compensation.
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters.
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services.
Part IV
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules.
Item 16. Form 10-K Summary.
EX-4.2 fy1910k92719ex42.htm
EX-21 fy1910k9272019ex21.htm
EX-23.1 fy1910k92719ex231kpmgconse.htm
EX-31.1 fy1910k92719ex311.htm
EX-31.2 fy1910k92719ex312.htm
EX-32.1 fy1910k92719ex321.htm
EX-32.2 fy1910k92719ex322.htm

Skyworks Solutions Earnings 2019-09-27

SWKS 10K Annual Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

Document
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UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended September 27, 2019
OR
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from __________to__________
Commission file number 001-05560
Skyworks Solutions, Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
04-2302115
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
20 Sylvan Road,
Woburn
Massachusetts
01801
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)
 
 
 
 
 
(781)
376-3000
 
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
Trading Symbol
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, par value $0.25 per share
SWKS
Nasdaq Global Select Market

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. þ Yes o No
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act. o Yes þ No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. þ Yes o No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). þ Yes o No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company,” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer
þ
Accelerated filer
Non-accelerated filer
 Smaller reporting company
Emerging growth company
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes þ No
The aggregate market value of the registrant’s common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant (based on the closing price of the registrant’s common stock as reported on the Nasdaq Global Select Market on the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter March 29, 2019) was approximately $14.2 billion. The number of outstanding shares of the registrant’s common stock, par value $0.25 per share, as of November 12, 2019, was 170,375,324.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Part of Form 10-K
 
Documents from which portions are incorporated by reference
Part III
 
Portions of the Registrant’s Proxy Statement relating to the Registrant’s 2020 Annual Meeting of Stockholders (to be filed) are incorporated by reference into Items 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.



SKYWORKS SOLUTIONS, INC.

ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K
FOR THE YEAR ENDED SEPTEMBER 27, 2019

TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
PAGE NO.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

2

Table of Contents

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT

This Annual Report contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), and is subject to the “safe harbor” created by those sections. Any statements that are not statements of historical fact should be considered to be forward-looking statements. Words such as “anticipates”, “believes”, “continue”, “could”, “estimates”, “expects”, “intends”, “may”, “plans”, “potential”, “predicts”, “projects”, “seek”, “should”, “targets”, “will”, “would”, and similar expressions or variations or negatives of such words are intended to identify forward-looking statements, but are not the exclusive means of identifying forward-looking statements in this Annual Report. Additionally, forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to:

our plans to develop and market new products, enhancements or technologies and the timing of these development and marketing plans;
our estimates regarding our capital requirements and our needs for additional financing;
our estimates of our expenses, future revenues and profitability;
our estimates of the size of the markets for our products and services;
our expectations related to the rate and degree of market acceptance of our products; and
our estimates of the success of other competing technologies that may become available.
Although forward-looking statements in this Annual Report reflect the good faith judgment of our management, such statements can only be based on facts and factors currently known and understood by us. Consequently, forward-looking statements involve inherent risks and uncertainties and actual financial results and outcomes may differ materially and adversely from the results and outcomes discussed in or anticipated by the forward-looking statements. A number of important factors could cause actual financial results to differ materially and adversely from those in the forward-looking statements. We urge you to consider the risks and uncertainties discussed elsewhere in this report and in the other documents filed by us with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) in evaluating our forward-looking statements. We have no plans, and undertake no obligation, to revise or update our forward-looking statements to reflect any event or circumstance that may arise after the date of this report. We caution readers not to place undue reliance upon any such forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date made.

This Annual Report also contains estimates made by independent parties and by us relating to market size and growth and other industry data. These estimates involve a number of assumptions and limitations and you are cautioned not to give undue weight to such estimates. In addition, projections, assumptions and estimates of our future performance and the future performance of the industries in which we operate are necessarily subject to a high degree of uncertainty and risk due to a variety of important factors, including those described in “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations”. These and other factors could cause results to differ materially and adversely from those expressed in the estimates made by the independent parties and by us.

In this document, the words “we”, “our”, “ours”, “us”, “Skyworks”, and “the Company” refer only to Skyworks Solutions, Inc., and its consolidated subsidiaries and not any other person or entity. In addition, the following is a list of industry standards that may be referenced throughout the document:
5G (Fifth Generation): next-generation cellular network technology
ASoC (Analog System on Chip): combines the required electronic circuits of various computer components into a single, integrated chip.
BAW (Bulk Acoustic Wave): electrical input signal is converted to an acoustic wave for filtering and converted back into an electrical signal by a metal-piezo-metal vertical structure
BiFET (Bipolar Field Effect Transistor): integrates indium gallium phosphide based heterojunction bipolar transistors with field effect transistors on the same gallium arsenide substrate
DC (Direct Current): unidirectional flow of an electrical charge
CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor): a technology of constructing integrated circuits
GaAs (Gallium Arsenide): a compound of the elements gallium and arsenic that is used in the production of semiconductors
HBT (Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor): a type of bipolar junction transistor which uses differing semiconductor materials for the emitter and base regions, creating a heterojunction

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IoT (Internet of Things): is the interconnection of uniquely identifiable embedded computing devices within the existing internet infrastructure
LED (Light Emitting Diode): a two-lead semiconductor light source
LTE (Long Term Evolution): 4th generation (“4G”) radio technologies designed to increase the capacity and speed of mobile telephone networks
MIMO (Multiple In, Multiple Out): a method for multiplying the capacity of a radio link using multiple transmission and receiving antennas to exploit multipath propagation; more commonly, it refers to LTE, 5G, and Wi-Fi techniques to send more than one data signal (also known as data layers) with encoded information to increase capacity in modern telecommunications systems
pHEMT (Pseudomorphic High Electron Mobility Transistor): a type of field effect transistor incorporating a junction between two materials with different band gaps
RF (Radio Frequency): electromagnetic wave frequencies that lie in the range extending from around 3 kHz to 300 GHz
SAW (Surface Acoustic Wave): electrical input signal is converted to an acoustic wave for filtering and converted back into an electrical signal by interdigitated transducers on a piezoelectric substrate.
SOI (Silicon On Insulator): technology refers to the use of layered silicon-insulator-silicon substrate in place of conventional silicon substrates in semiconductor manufacturing
TC-SAW (Temperature Compensated Surface Acoustic Wave): SAW filters that have been designed to reduce shift in frequency over temperature.
Skyworks and the Skyworks symbol are trademarks or registered trademarks of Skyworks Solutions, Inc. or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries. Third-party brands and names are for identification purposes only, and are the property of their respective owners.

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PART l

ITEM 1. BUSINESS.

Skyworks Solutions, Inc., together with its consolidated subsidiaries (“Skyworks” or the “Company”), is empowering the wireless networking revolution. The Company’s highly innovative analog semiconductors are connecting people, places, and things, spanning a number of new and previously unimagined applications within the aerospace, automotive, broadband, cellular infrastructure, connected home, industrial, medical, military, smartphone, tablet and wearable markets.

Our key customers include Amazon, Apple, Arris, Bose, Cisco, DJI, Ericsson, Foxconn, Garmin, Gemalto (a Thales company), General Electric, Google, Honeywell, HTC, Huawei, Itron, Lenovo, LG Electronics, Microsoft, Motorola, Netgear, Northrop Grumman, OPPO, Rockwell Collins, Samsung, Sierra Wireless, Sonos, Technicolor, VIVO, Xiaomi and ZTE. Our competitors include Analog Devices, Broadcom, Cirrus Logic, Maxim Integrated Products, Murata Manufacturing, NXP Semiconductors, Qorvo and Qualcomm.

We are a Delaware corporation that was formed in 1962. We changed our corporate name from Alpha Industries, Inc. to Skyworks Solutions, Inc. on June 25, 2002, following a business combination. We operate worldwide with engineering, manufacturing, sales, and service facilities throughout Asia, Europe, and North America. Our Internet address is www.skyworksinc.com. We make available free of charge on our website our Annual Report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports as soon as practicable after we electronically submit such material to the SEC. The information contained on our website is not incorporated by reference in this Annual Report. Our SEC filings are also available to the public at www.sec.gov.

In August 2018, we acquired Avnera Corporation (“Avnera”) and expanded our leadership in wireless connectivity by adding ultra-low power analog circuits to enable smart interfaces via acoustic signal processing, sensors, and integrated software. The acquisition of Avnera enables us to capitalize on the rapid proliferation of audio functionality and its convergence with our advanced connectivity solutions. With our global sales channels, strong customer relationships and operational scale, we are leveraging Avnera’s innovative product portfolio and systems expertise to increase our footprint in automotive, industrial, home automation, enterprise and high-end consumer markets.

INDUSTRY BACKGROUND
Wireless connectivity is exploding on a global basis. 5G is dramatically altering the world, creating an ecosystem where everyone is connected to everything, all the time—changing how individuals live, work, play, and learn. More importantly, 5G goes well beyond simply making the mobile communications experience better by increasing reliability, adding new features, and enhancing data rates. It is creating a market for diverse and transformative applications driven by the ability to deliver greater speeds, bandwidth and capacity, significantly lower latency, and more secure connectivity.

In fact, 5G connections will approach ten to 100 times faster than 4G speeds. To put this in perspective, downloading a full-length HD movie in 3G took one day; in 4G, the same file took minutes. On a 5G network, this content can be downloaded in mere seconds. 5G will also enable increasingly efficient and safe vehicle communication, paving the way for autonomous vehicles as well as networks that could make wireless healthcare a reality.

At the same time, connectivity is expanding into an adjacent set of IoT markets. From smart homes to the smart grid and from industrial to wearables, the number of connected devices is rapidly proliferating. IHS Markit Ltd. projects the IoT market to grow from an installed base of 15 billion units in 2015 to more than 75 billion units by 2025. Skyworks is enabling these opportunities with highly customized system solutions supporting a broad set of wireless protocols including cellular LTE, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth®, LoRa®, Thread, and Zigbee®.

Looking forward, we see a market that presents a significant growth opportunity for our industry and for Skyworks. The key catalysts for Skyworks will continue to be the insatiable demand for data and the profitable usage model, as each connection becomes more valuable and the world embraces 5G. According to a June 2019 Ericsson “Mobility Report,” there are expected to be 1.9 billion mobile 5G subscriptions globally by the end of 2024 driven by “rapid early momentum and enthusiasm” in the global market. 5G technology will also support the tens of billions of connected devices, smart objects, and embedded sensors expected to come online as the IoT becomes mainstream.

Solving Connectivity Challenges

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We expect that highly integrated semiconductor solutions will play an increasingly pivotal role in the deployment of this next generation standard by resolving the daunting analog and RF complexities that are challenging the capabilities of existing hardware and the supporting network infrastructure. Meeting these design challenges requires broad competencies including signal transmission and conditioning, the ability to ensure seamless hand-offs between multiple standards, power management, voltage regulation, battery charging, advanced filtering, and tuning.

Skyworks is at the forefront of this sea change in connectivity, delivering the solutions that will enable the true potential of 5G and the IoT. We have a rich heritage in analog systems design and have spent the last decade investing in key technologies and resources. Our strength is underpinned by world-class performance and scale across a broad array of capabilities that include advanced TC-SAW and BAW filters, an expanded family of MIMO, ultra-high band, and diversity receive modules and expanding into emerging technologies including millimeter wave. From our breakthrough SKY5® unifying platform to our 5G small cell solutions, Skyworks’ approach across both infrastructure and user equipment facilitates powerful, high-speed end-to-end 5G connectivity.

SKYWORKS’ STRATEGY

Our ambitious vision is to connect everyone and everything, all the time. To this end, key elements of our strategy include:

Industry-Leading Technology
As the industry migrates to more complex 5G architectures across a multitude of wireless applications, we are well positioned to help mobile device manufacturers handle growing levels of system complexity in the transmit and receive chain. The trend towards increasing front-end and analog design challenges in smartphones and other platforms plays directly into our core strengths and positions us to address these challenges. We believe that we offer the broadest portfolio of radio and analog solutions from the transceiver to the antenna as well as all required manufacturing process technologies. We also hold strong technology leadership positions in passive devices, advanced integration including proprietary shielding and 3-D die stacking as well as SAW, TC-SAW and BAW filters. Our product portfolio is reinforced by a library of approximately 3,500 worldwide patents and other intellectual property that we own and control. Together, our industry-leading technology enables us to deliver the highest levels of product performance and integration.

Customer Relationships
Given our scale and technology leadership, we are engaged with key original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”), smartphone providers and baseband reference design partners. Our customers value our supply chain strength, our innovative technology and our system engineering expertise, resulting in deep customer loyalty. We partner with our customers to support their long-term product road maps and are valued as a system solutions provider rather than just a point product vendor.

Diversification
We are diversifying our business in three areas: our addressed markets, our customer base and our product offerings. By leveraging core analog and mixed signal technologies, we are expanding our family of solutions to a set of increasingly diverse end markets and customers. With the adoption of 5G and the opportunity to enable more applications, we are steadily growing our business beyond just mobile devices (where we support all top-tier manufacturers, including the leading smartphone suppliers and key baseband vendors) into additional high-performance analog markets, including automotive, home and factory automation, infrastructure, medical, smart energy and wireless networking. In these markets we leverage our scale, intellectual property and worldwide distribution network, which spans over 3,200 customers and over 2,500 analog components.

Delivering Operational Excellence
We vertically integrate our supply chain where we can differentiate with highly specialized internal manufacturing capabilities, or enter into alliances and strategic relationships for leading-edge technologies. This hybrid manufacturing model allows us to better balance our manufacturing capacity with the demand of the marketplace. Our internal capacity utilization remains high, resulting in an increase of our gross margin and the return on invested capital on a broader range of revenue.

Additionally, we continue to drive reductions in product design and manufacturing cycle times and further improve product yields. The combination of agile, flexible capacity and world-class module manufacturing and scale advantage allows us to achieve low product costs while integrating multiple technologies into highly sophisticated multi-chip modules.

Maintaining a Performance-Driven Culture
We consider our people and corporate culture to be a major competitive advantage and a key driver of our overall strategy. We create key performance indicators that align employee efforts with corporate strategy and link responsibilities with performance

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measurement. Accountability is paramount and we compensate our employees through a pay-for-performance methodology. We strive to be an employer-of-choice among peer companies and have created a work environment in which turnover is below geographic and industry averages.

Generating Superior Operating Results and Shareholder Returns
We seek to generate financial returns that are comparable to a highly diversified analog semiconductor company. Given our product volume and overall utilization we strive to achieve a best-in-class return on investment and operating income to reward shareholders.

OUR PRODUCT PORTFOLIO
Our product portfolio consists of various solutions, including:
Amplifiers: the modules that strengthen the signal so that it has sufficient energy to reach a base station
Antenna Tuners: aperture and impedance tuning products that improve antenna performance across frequencies
Attenuators: circuits that allow a known source of power to be reduced by a predetermined factor (usually expressed as decibels)
Circulators/Isolators: ferrite-based components commonly found on the output of high-power amplifiers used to protect receivers in wireless transmission systems
Wireless ASoC: an intelligent 2.4 GHz and 5GHz wireless radio integrated circuit that includes all the analog and digital functions optimized for building wireless audio headsets, headphones, and wireless speaker systems
DC/DC Converters: an electronic circuit which converts a source of direct current from one voltage level to another
Demodulators: a device or an RF block used in receivers to extract the information that has been modulated onto a carrier or from the carrier itself
Detectors: devices used to measure and control RF power in wireless systems
Diodes: semiconductor devices that pass current in one direction only
Directional Couplers: transmission coupling devices for separately sampling the forward or backward wave in a transmission line
Diversity Receive Modules: devices used to improve receiver sensitivity in high data rate applications
Filters: devices for recovering and separating mixed and modulated data in RF stages
Front-end Modules: two or more functions co-packaged to optimize the performance, cost and application suitability in products, including intermediate or radio frequency signal paths
Hybrid: a type of directional coupler used in radio and telecommunications
LED Drivers: devices which regulate the current through a light emitting diode or string of diodes for the purpose of creating light
Low Noise Amplifiers: devices used to reduce system noise figure in the receive chain
Mixers: devices that enable signals to be converted to a higher or lower frequency signal and thereby allowing the signals to be processed more effectively
Modulators: devices that take a baseband input signal and output a radio frequency modulated signal
Optocouplers/Optoisolators: semiconductor devices that allow signals to be transferred between circuits or systems while ensuring that the circuits or systems are electrically isolated from each other
Phase Locked Loops: closed-loop feedback control system that maintains a generated signal in a fixed phase relationship to a reference signal
Phase Shifters: designed for use in power amplifier distortion compensation circuits in base station applications
Power Dividers/Combiners: utilized to equally split signals into in-phase signals as often found in balanced signal chains and local oscillator distribution networks
Receivers: electronic devices that change a radio signal from a transmitter into useful information
Switches: components that perform the change between the transmit and receive function, as well as the band function for cellular handsets
Synthesizers: devices that provide ultra-fine frequency resolution, fast switching speed, and low phase-noise performance
Technical Ceramics: polycrystalline oxide materials used for a wide variety of electrical, mechanical, thermal and magnetic applications
Voltage Controlled Oscillators/Synthesizers: fully integrated, high performance signal source for high dynamic range transceivers
Voltage Regulators: generate a fixed level which ideally remains constant over varying input voltage or load conditions

We believe we possess broad technology capabilities and one of the most complete wireless communications product portfolios in the industry.


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MARKETING AND DISTRIBUTION
Our products are sold globally through a direct sales force, electronic component distributors and independent sales representatives. Certain distributors have agreements with us which allow for certain sales returns, stock rotations and price protection on certain inventory if we lower the price of those products (see “Critical Accounting Estimates” in Part II, Item 7 - Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and Note 2 to Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for further detail on revenue reserves). As is customary in the semiconductor industry, our distributors may also market other products that compete with ours.

Our sales engagement begins at the earliest stages of the design of an existing or potential customer’s product. We collaborate technically with our customers and reference design partners at the inception of new programs. These relationships allow our team to facilitate customer-driven solutions, which leverage the unique strength of our intellectual property and product portfolio while providing high value and greatly reducing time-to-market.

We believe the technical and complex nature of our products and markets demand an extraordinary commitment to maintain close ongoing relationships with our customers. As such, we strive to expand the scope of our customer relationship to include design, engineering, manufacturing, procurement, logistics and project management. We also employ a collaborative approach in developing these relationships by combining the support of our design teams, applications engineers, manufacturing personnel, sales and marketing staff and senior management. Lastly, we leverage our customer relationships with cross-selling opportunities across product lines in order to maximize revenue.

We believe that maintaining frequent and interactive contact with our customers is paramount to our continuous efforts to provide world-class sales and service support. By listening and responding to feedback, we are able to mobilize resources to raise our level of customer satisfaction, improve our ability to anticipate future product needs, and enhance our understanding of key market dynamics. We are confident that diligently following this path positions us to participate in numerous opportunities for growth in the future.

CUSTOMER CONCENTRATION
A small number of OEMs historically has accounted for a significant portion of our net revenue. In the fiscal years ended September 27, 2019 (“fiscal 2019”), and September 28, 2018 (“fiscal 2018”), Apple Inc. (“Apple”), through sales to multiple distributors, contract manufacturers and direct sales for multiple applications including smartphones, tablets, desktop and notebook computers, watches, and other devices) constituted more than ten percent of our net revenue. In the fiscal year ended September 29, 2017 (“fiscal 2017”), three customers—Apple, Samsung Electronics (“Samsung”), and Huawei Technology Co., Ltd. (“Huawei”)—each constituted ten percent or more of our net revenue. For further information regarding customer concentrations see Note 15 to Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND PROPRIETARY RIGHTS
We own or have a license to use numerous United States and foreign patents and patent applications related to our products and our manufacturing operations and processes. In addition, we own a number of trademarks and service marks applicable to certain of our products and services. We believe that our intellectual property, including patents, patent applications, trade secrets and trademarks, is of material importance to our business. We rely on patent, copyright, trademark, trade secret and other intellectual property laws, as well as non-disclosure and confidentiality agreements and other methods, to protect our confidential and proprietary technologies, designs, devices, algorithms, processes and other intellectual property. Our efforts may not meaningfully protect our intellectual property, or others may independently develop substantially equivalent or superior proprietary technologies, designs, devices, algorithms, processes or other intellectual property. In addition, the laws of some foreign countries do not protect proprietary rights to the same extent as the laws of the United States, and effective copyright, patent, trademark and trade secret protection may not be available in those jurisdictions. In addition to protecting our intellectual property, we strive to strengthen our intellectual property portfolio to enhance our ability to obtain cross-licenses of intellectual property from others, to obtain access to intellectual property we do not possess and to more favorably resolve potential intellectual property claims against us. Due to rapid technological changes in the industry, we believe establishing and maintaining a technological leadership position depends primarily on our ability to develop new, innovative products through the technical competence of our engineering personnel.

COMPETITIVE CONDITIONS
The competitive environment in the semiconductor industry is in a constant state of flux, with new products continually emerging and existing products approaching technological obsolescence. We compete on the basis of time-to-market, new product innovation, quality, performance, price, compliance with industry standards, strategic relationships with customers and baseband vendors,

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personnel and protection of our intellectual property. We participate in highly competitive markets against numerous competitors that may be able to adapt more quickly than we can to new or emerging technologies and changes in customer requirements, or may be able to devote greater resources to the development, promotion and sale of their products than we can.

Erosion of average selling prices of established products is typical of the semiconductor industry. Consistent with trends in the industry, we anticipate that average selling prices for our established products will continue to decline over time. We mitigate the gross margin impact of declining average selling prices with efforts to increase unit volumes, reduce material costs and lower manufacturing costs of existing products and by introducing new and higher value-added products.

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
Our products and markets demand rapid technological advancements requiring a continuous effort to enhance existing products and develop new products and technologies. Accordingly, we maintain a high level of research and development activity. We invested $424.1 million, $404.5 million and $355.2 million in research and development during fiscal 2019, fiscal 2018 and fiscal 2017, respectively. The growth in research and development expenses were the result of increases in our internal product designs and product development activity for our target markets in each of these fiscal years. Our research and development expenses include new product development and innovations in integrated circuit design, investment in advanced semiconductor manufacturing processes, development of new packaging and test capabilities and research on next generation technologies and product opportunities. We maintain close collaborative relationships with many of our customers to help identify market demands and target our development efforts to meet those demands.

RAW MATERIALS
Raw materials for our products and manufacturing processes are generally available from several sources. It is our intent not to depend on a sole source of supply unless market or other conditions dictate otherwise. However, there are limited situations where we procure certain components and services for our products from single or limited sources, and we are currently dependent on a limited number of sole source suppliers. We purchase materials and services primarily pursuant to individual purchase orders. However, we have entered into certain supply agreements for the purchase of raw materials or other manufacturing related services that specify minimum prices and purchase quantity based on our anticipated future requirements. Such amounts are reviewed and included in our contractual obligations and commitments as required. Certain of our suppliers consign raw materials to us at our manufacturing facilities to which we take title as needed in our manufacturing process. We believe we have adequate sources for the supply of raw materials and components for our manufacturing needs with suppliers located around the world.

BACKLOG AND INVENTORY
Our sales are primarily from the sale of semiconductor products under individual customer purchase orders, some of which have underlying master sales agreements that specify terms governing the product sales. In the absence of a sales agreement, the Company’s standard terms and conditions apply. We also maintain Skyworks-owned finished goods inventory at certain customer “hub” locations. We do not recognize revenue until these customers consume the Skyworks-owned inventory from these hub locations. Due to industry practice, which allows customers to cancel orders with limited advance notice to us prior to shipment, and with little or no penalty, we believe that backlog as of any particular date may not be a reliable indicator of our future revenue levels. The cancellation or deferral of product orders, the return of previously sold products, or overproduction due to a change in anticipated order volume could result in a reduction in revenue and us holding excess or obsolete inventory, which could result in inventory write-downs and, in turn, could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition.

ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS
Federal, state and local requirements relating to the discharge of substances into the environment, the disposal of hazardous wastes, and other activities affecting the environment have had, and will continue to have, an impact on our manufacturing operations. Most of our customers have mandated that our products comply with various local, regional and national “green” initiatives initiated by such customers or the locations in which they operate. We believe that our current expenditures for environmental capital investment and remediation necessary to comply with present regulations governing environmental protection, and other expenditures for the resolution of environmental claims, will not have a material adverse effect on our liquidity and capital resources, competitive position or financial condition. Environmental regulations are subject to change in the future, and accordingly we are unable to assess the possible effect of compliance with future requirements.

SEASONALITY
Sales of our products are subject to seasonal fluctuation and periods of increased demand in end-user consumer applications, such as smartphones and tablet computing devices. The highest demand for our products generally occurs in our first fiscal quarter ending

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in December and the fourth fiscal quarter ending in September. The lowest demand for our handset products generally occurs in our second fiscal quarter ending in March and the third fiscal quarter ending in June.

EMPLOYEES
As of September 27, 2019, we employed approximately 9,000 employees world-wide. Approximately 2,850 of our employees in Mexico, 315 employees in Singapore, and 320 employees in Japan are covered by collective bargaining and other union agreements.


ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS.

You should carefully consider the risks described below in addition to the other information contained in this report before making an investment decision with respect to any of our securities. Our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially impacted by any of these risks. The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones we face. Additional risks not currently known to us or other factors not perceived by us to present significant risks to our business at this time may impair our business operations, financial condition, or results of operations.

We operate in the highly cyclical semiconductor industry, which is subject to significant downturns.
We operate in the semiconductor industry, which is cyclical and subject to rapid declines in demand for end-user products in both the consumer and enterprise markets. Uncertain worldwide economic and political conditions, together with other factors such as the volatility of the financial markets, continue to make it difficult for our customers and for us to accurately forecast and plan future business activities. Uncertainty and economic weakness could result in a market contraction and, as a result, our business, financial condition and results of operations would likely be materially and adversely affected. Such periods of industry downturn are characterized by diminished product demand and revenue, manufacturing overcapacity, excess inventory levels, accelerated erosion of average selling prices, bad debt, inventory charges, restructuring charges, and asset impairment charges. Furthermore, downturns in the semiconductor industry may be prolonged, and any extended delay or failure of the market to recover from an economic downturn would materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations beyond our current fiscal year.

Our operating results may be adversely affected by quarterly and annual fluctuations and market downturns.
Our revenues, earnings, and other operating results may fluctuate significantly on a quarterly and annual basis. These fluctuations are typically the result of a number of factors, many of which are beyond our control.

These factors include, among others:
changes in end-user demand for the products manufactured and sold by our customers,
the effects of competitive pricing pressures, including decreases in average selling prices of our products,
production capacity levels and fluctuations in manufacturing yields,
availability and cost of materials and services from our suppliers,
the gain or loss of significant customers,
our ability to develop, introduce and market new products and technologies on a timely basis,
new product and technology introductions by competitors,
delays in the adoption of standards by standard-setting bodies and delays in the commercial deployment of certain technologies (including, but not limited to, 5G),
actions by government regulators to restrict or delay the availability of sufficient spectrum for wireless technologies, including technologies that utilize unlicensed spectrum and/or shared spectrum,
changes in consumers’ rates of replacement of smartphones and other devices that utilize our products,
increasing industry consolidation among our competitors,
changes in the mix of products produced and sold,
market acceptance of our products and our customer’s products (including, but not limited to, market acceptance of 5G products), and
intellectual property disputes, including those concerning payments associated with the licensing and/or sale of intellectual property, and related remedies (e.g., monetary damages, injunctions, or exclusion orders affecting our or our customers’ products).

We employ certain methods, assumptions, estimates, and other subjective judgments in order to apply our accounting policies and to project future performance, projections which may be publicly disclosed from time to time. Changes to such methods, assumptions, estimates, and judgments, combined with other factors that are difficult to forecast, including the factors listed above, could materially and adversely affect our quarterly or annual operating results and could produce actual operating results that differ significantly from

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previous estimates and projections. If our operating results fail to meet the expectations of analysts or investors, it could materially and adversely affect the price of our common stock.

Our reliance on a small number of customers for a large portion of our sales could have a material adverse effect on the results of our operations.
Significant portions of our sales are concentrated among a limited number of customers. If we lost one or more of these major customers, or if one or more major customers significantly decreased its orders for our products, our business could be materially and adversely affected. In each of fiscal 2019 and fiscal 2018, one customer accounted for greater than ten percent of our net revenue. In fiscal 2017, three customers each accounted for ten percent or greater of our net revenue. For further discussion see Note 15 to Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Our stock price has been volatile and may fluctuate in the future.
The trading price of our common stock has and may continue to fluctuate significantly. Such fluctuations may be influenced by many factors, including:    
the volatility of the financial markets,
uncertainty regarding the prospects of the domestic and foreign economies,
instability in global credit and financial markets,
our performance and prospects,
the performance and prospects of our major customers and competitors,
our revenue concentrations with relatively few customers,
the depth and liquidity of the market for our common stock,
investor perception of us and the industry in which we operate,
changes in earnings estimates, price targets, or buy/sell recommendations by analysts,
domestic and international political conditions,
domestic and international tax, fiscal, and trade policy decisions, and
our ability to successfully identify, acquire, and integrate acquisition candidates.

Public stock markets have experienced price and trading volume volatility. This volatility has affected, and could significantly and negatively affect, the market prices of securities of many technology companies, particularly the market price of our common stock. Such volatility could materially and adversely affect the market price of our common stock in future periods.

In addition, fluctuations in our stock price, volume of shares traded, and changes in our trading multiples may make our stock attractive to momentum, hedge, day-trading, or activist investors who often shift funds into and out of stocks rapidly, exacerbating price fluctuations in either direction. Our company has been, and in the future may be, the subject of commentary by financial news media. Such commentary may contribute to volatility in our stock price. If our operating results do not meet the expectations of securities analysts, the financial news media, or investors, our stock price may decline, possibly substantially over a short period of time.

The wireless communications and analog semiconductor markets are characterized by significant competition which may cause pricing pressures, decreased gross margins and rapid loss of market share and may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

The wireless communications semiconductor industry, in general, and the other analog markets in which we compete are very competitive. We compete with international and United States semiconductor manufacturers of all sizes in terms of resources and market share, including, but not limited to, Analog Devices, Broadcom, Cirrus Logic, Maxim Integrated Products, Murata Manufacturing, NXP Semiconductors, Qorvo, and Qualcomm.

We currently face significant competition in our markets and expect that intense price and product competition will continue. This competition has resulted in, and is expected to continue to result in, declining average selling prices for many of our products and increased challenges in maintaining or increasing revenue, gross margin, and market share. Furthermore, additional competitors may enter our markets as a result of growth opportunities in communications electronics, the trend toward global expansion by foreign and domestic competitors and technological and public policy changes (including national or regional policies intended to develop and support localized competitors). We believe that the principal competitive factors for semiconductor suppliers in our markets include, among others:
rapid time-to-market and product ramps (including, but not limited to, high-volume product ramps),
timely new product innovation,
ability to capture design wins in new growth markets, such as 5G,
product quality, reliability, and performance,

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ability of certain products, including “high reliability” solutions, to perform under stringent operating conditions,
product cost and selling price,
features available in products,
alignment with customer performance specifications,
compliance with industry standards,
strategic relationships with customers,
access to, and the protection and enforcement of, intellectual property,
ability to partner with or participate in reference designs of baseband vendors, and
maintaining access to manufacturing capacity, raw materials, supplies, and services at a competitive cost.

We might not be able to successfully address these factors. Many of our competitors benefit from:
long presence in key markets,
brand recognition,
high levels of customer satisfaction,
vertical integration,
strong baseband partnership/participation in reference designs,
a broad product portfolio allowing them to bundle product offerings,
ownership or control of key technology or intellectual property, and
strong financial, sales and marketing, manufacturing, distribution, technical, or other resources.

As a result, certain competitors may be able to adapt more quickly than we can to new or emerging technologies and changes in customer requirements or may be able to devote greater resources to the development, promotion, and sale of their products than we can. As a result of industry consolidation, certain competitors may be able to further exploit such benefits to strengthen their competitive position.

Our baseband reference design partners may leverage their market position by integrating additional functionality into their product offerings that compete with our solutions. If such a product offering were competitive with our solution as to performance, price, and quality, or if the interoperability of our solution with the partner’s baseband products were to be restricted, our business could be adversely impacted.

Current and potential competitors have established, or may in the future establish, financial, or strategic relationships among themselves or with customers, resellers, or other third parties. These relationships may affect customers’ purchasing decisions. Accordingly, it is possible that new competitors or alliances among competitors could emerge and rapidly acquire significant market share. We may not be able to compete successfully against current and potential competitors. Increased competition could result in pricing pressures, decreased gross margins and loss of revenue and market share and may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

If Original Equipment Manufacturers, or OEMs, and Original Design Manufacturers, or ODMs, of communications electronics products do not design our products into their equipment, we will have difficulty selling those products. Moreover, a “design win” from a customer does not guarantee future sales to that customer.
Our products are not sold directly to the end-user, but are components or subsystems of other products. As a result, we rely on OEMs and ODMs of wireless communications electronics products to select our products from among alternative offerings to be designed into their equipment. Without these “design wins,” we would have difficulty selling our products. If a manufacturer designs another supplier’s product into one of its product platforms, it is more difficult for us to achieve future design wins with that platform because changing suppliers involves significant cost, time, effort, and risk on the part of that manufacturer. Also, achieving a design win with a customer does not ensure that we will receive revenue from that customer. Even after a design win, the customer is not obligated to purchase our products and can choose at any time to reduce or cease use of our products, for example, if its own products are not commercially successful, or for any other reason. We may not continue to achieve design wins or to convert design wins into actual sales, and failure to do so could materially and adversely affect our operating results. Furthermore, as a result of our lengthy product development and sales cycle, we may incur significant research and development expenses, and selling, general, and administrative expenses, without generating the anticipated revenue associated with these products.

We are subject to the risks of doing business internationally.
A substantial majority of our net revenue is derived from shipments to customers located outside the United States, primarily in countries located in the Asia-Pacific region and Europe. We have suppliers located outside the United States, and third-party packaging, assembly, and test facilities and foundries located in the Asia-Pacific region. We maintain wafer fabrication facilities in Kadoma, Japan, and Osaka, Japan, as well as packaging, assembly, and test facilities in Mexicali, Mexico, and in Singapore. Our international

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sales and operations are subject to a number of risks inherent in selling and operating abroad. These include, but are not limited to, risks regarding:
currency exchange rate fluctuations, including increases or decreases in commodities prices related to such fluctuations,
local economic and political conditions, including, but not limited to, social, economic, and political instability related to the uncertainty regarding the relationships between the United States and China, Russia, Mexico, North Korea, Middle Eastern countries, other foreign countries, and the international community at large, and related to the United Kingdom’s pending withdrawal from the European Union,
restrictive governmental actions (such as restrictions on transfer of funds and trade protection measures, including export duties, quotas, customs duties, border taxes, border closures, increased import or export controls, and tariffs), or actions by non-governmental individuals and groups (such as protests, insurgencies, and organized crime), that could negatively impact trade between, or increase the cost of operating in, the countries in which we do business,
labor market conditions and workers’ rights,
disruptions of capital and trading markets,
inability to collect accounts receivable,
changes in, or non-compliance with, legal or regulatory import/export requirements, including restrictions on selling to certain customers or into certain jurisdictions,
natural disasters, acts of terrorism, widespread illness, and war,
misappropriation or other unauthorized transfers of our electronic information and breaches of our information systems, as well as the potential lack of adequate remedies in certain jurisdictions,
difficulty in obtaining distribution and support,
cultural differences in the conduct of business,
direct or indirect government actions, subsidies or policies aimed at supporting local industry,
the laws and policies of the United States and other countries affecting trade, foreign investment and loans, foreign travel, and import or export licensing requirements,
withdrawal from, or renegotiation of, existing trade agreements by the United States (or other jurisdictions) potentially affecting Mexico, China, and other countries in which we do business,
changes in current or future tax law or regulations or new interpretations thereof, by federal or state agencies or foreign governments (including changes in certain countries in Europe and elsewhere regarding corporate taxes, transfer pricing, and tax treaty provisions),
changes in the effective tax rate as a result of our overall profitability and mix of earnings in countries with differing statutory tax rates,
results of audits and examination of previously filed tax returns,
the possibility of being exposed to legal proceedings and potential penalties in a foreign jurisdiction, and/or increased compliance expense, as a result of the numerous, and sometimes conflicting, legal regimes on matters as diverse as anti-corruption, anti-bribery, import/export controls, content requirements, trade restrictions, tariffs, taxation, sanctions, immigration, internal and disclosure control obligations, securities regulation, anti-competition, data privacy and protection (including, but not limited to, the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation), employment, and labor relations,
limitations on our ability under local laws to protect or enforce our intellectual property rights in a particular foreign jurisdiction, and
restrictions on our ability to repatriate foreign earnings and/or funds and the unfavorable tax impactions related to the same.

Additionally, we are subject to risks in certain global markets in which wireless operators provide subsidies on handset sales to their customers. Increases in cellular handset prices that negatively impact handset sales can result from changes in regulatory policies or other factors, which could impact the demand for our products. Limitations or changes in policy on phone subsidies in the United States, South Korea, Japan, China, and other countries may have additional negative impacts on our revenues.

Some of the countries in which we operate and seek to expand are in emerging markets where legal systems may be less developed or familiar to us, potentially impacting our ability to obtain appropriate recourse in the event of a dispute. Other jurisdictions in which we conduct business may establish legal and regulatory regimes that differ materially from United States laws and regulations. Compliance with diverse legal requirements is costly and time-consuming and requires significant resources. Violations of one or more of these regulations in the conduct of our business could result in significant fines or monetary damages, criminal sanctions against us or our officers, prohibitions on doing business, unfavorable publicity and other reputation damage, restrictions on our ability to process information, and allegations by our clients that we have not performed our contractual obligations.


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We are particularly exposed to risks of doing business in China. Although we intend to expand our business and operations in China, our success in the Chinese markets may be adversely affected by China’s continuously evolving laws and regulations, including those relating to taxation, import and export tariffs, currency controls, anti-corruption, environmental regulations, indigenous innovation, and intellectual property rights and enforcement of those rights. Enforcement of existing laws or agreements may be inconsistent. In addition, changes in the political environment, governmental policies or United States-China relations could result in revisions to laws or regulations or their interpretation and enforcement, exposure of our proprietary intellectual property, increased taxation, restrictions on imports, import duties, or currency revaluations, which could have an adverse effect on our business plans and operating results. In particular, the imposition by the United States of tariffs on goods imported from China or deemed to be of Chinese origin and other government actions that restrict our ability to sell our products to Chinese customers or to manufacture or source components in China, and countermeasures imposed by China in response, could directly or indirectly adversely impact our manufacturing costs and the sales of our products in China and elsewhere. For example, in May 2019, the U.S. Bureau of Industry and Security of the U.S. Department of Commerce placed Huawei and certain of its affiliates on the Bureau’s Entity List, which resulted in our temporarily suspending shipments to Huawei, and which is expected to adversely affect future demand for our products from this customer. Further, the evolving labor market and increasing labor unrest in China may have a negative impact on our customers, which would result in a negative impact on our business and results of operations. Finally, China’s stated policy of reducing its dependence on foreign semiconductor manufacturers and other technology companies could result in reduced demand for our products in China and other key markets as well as reduced supply of critical materials for our products.

Our manufacturing processes are extremely complex and specialized, and disruptions could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
Our manufacturing operations are complex and subject to disruption, including due to causes beyond our control. The fabrication of integrated circuits is an extremely complex and precise process consisting of hundreds of separate steps. It requires production in a highly controlled, clean environment. Minor impurities, contamination of the clean room environment in which our products are produced, errors in any step of the fabrication process, defects in the masks used to print circuits on a wafer, defects in equipment or materials, human error, or a number of other factors can cause a substantial percentage of our products to be rejected or to malfunction. Because our operating results are highly dependent upon our ability to produce integrated circuits at acceptable manufacturing yields, these factors could have a material and adverse effect on our business.

Additionally, our operations may be affected by lengthy or recurring disruptions of operations at any of our production facilities, as well as disruptions at facilities operated by our subcontractors or customers. These disruptions may result from electrical power outages, fire, earthquake, flooding, war, acts of terrorism, health advisories or risks, or other natural or man-made disasters, as well as equipment maintenance, repairs, and/or upgrades. Disruptions of our manufacturing operations, or those of our subcontractors and customers, could cause significant delays in shipments until we are able to shift production of the impacted products from an affected facility or subcontractor to another facility or subcontractor, or until the affected customer resumes operations and accepts shipments from us. In the event of such delays, the required alternative capacity, particularly wafer production capacity, may not be available on a timely basis or at all. Even if alternative production capacity is available, we may not be able to obtain it on favorable terms, which could result in higher costs and/or a loss of customers and revenue. Likewise, lower-than-expected demand could lead to underutilized manufacturing facilities, which could negatively impact our financial results.

Due to the highly specialized nature of our manufacturing processes, in the event of a disruption in production at one or more of our facilities for any reason, alternative production capacity would not be immediately available from third-party sources. These disruptions could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations. Our key facilities include, but are not limited to, our semiconductor wafer fabrication facilities in Newbury Park, California, and Woburn, Massachusetts, our SAW, TC-SAW, and BAW filter wafer fabrication facilities in Kadoma, Japan, and Osaka, Japan, and our assembly and test facilities in Mexicali, Mexico, and in Singapore.

We may not be able to maintain and improve manufacturing yields that contribute positively to our gross margin and profitability.
Minor deviations or disturbances in the manufacturing process can cause substantial manufacturing yield loss, and in some cases, cause production to be suspended and impact our ability to meet customer demand on a timely basis. Manufacturing yields for new products initially tend to be lower as we complete product development and commence volume manufacturing, and typically increase as we bring the product to full production. Our forward product pricing includes this assumption of improving manufacturing yields and, as a result, material variances between projected and actual manufacturing yields will have a direct effect on our gross margin and profitability. The difficulty of accurately forecasting manufacturing yields and maintaining cost competitiveness through improving manufacturing yields will continue to be magnified by the increasing process complexity of manufacturing semiconductor products. Our manufacturing operations may also face pressures arising from the compression of product life cycles, which may require us to manufacture new products faster and for shorter periods while maintaining acceptable manufacturing yields and quality without, in many cases, reaching the longer-term, high-volume manufacturing conducive to higher manufacturing yields and declining costs.

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Remaining competitive in the semiconductor industry depends upon our ability to develop new products, reduce costs in a timely manner, transition to smaller geometry process technologies, and achieve higher levels of design integration.
The semiconductor industry generally and, in particular, many of the markets into which we sell our products, are highly cyclical and characterized by constant and rapid technological change, continuous product evolution, price erosion, evolving technical standards, short product life cycles (including annual product refreshes in some cases), increasing demand for higher levels of integration, increased miniaturization, reduced power consumption, and wide fluctuations in product supply and demand. Our operating results depend largely on our ability to continue to cost-effectively introduce new and enhanced products on a timely basis. The successful development and commercialization of semiconductor devices and modules is highly complex and depends on numerous factors, including the ability:
to anticipate customer and market requirements and changes in technology and industry standards,
to obtain sufficient manufacturing capacity to meet customer demand,
to define new products that meet customer and market requirements,
to complete development of new products and bring products to market on a timely basis,
to differentiate our products from offerings of our competitors,
to achieve overall market acceptance of our products,
to lengthen the time that a particular product is in demand, and
to obtain adequate intellectual property protection for our new products.

Our ability to manufacture current products, and to develop new products, depends on, among other factors, the viability and flexibility of our own internal information technology systems.

We continually evaluate expenditures for planned product development and choose among alternatives based on our understanding of customer technical requirements, new industry standards, and expectations of future market growth. We may not be able to develop and introduce new or enhanced wireless communications and analog semiconductor products in a timely and cost-effective manner, and our products may not satisfy customer requirements or achieve market acceptance or we may not be able to anticipate new industry standards and technological changes. We also may not be able to respond successfully to new product announcements and introductions by competitors or to changes in the design or specifications of complementary products of third parties with which our products interface. If we fail to rapidly and cost-effectively introduce new and enhanced products in sufficient quantities that meet our customers’ requirements, our business and results of operations would be materially and adversely harmed.

In addition, prices of many of our products decline, sometimes significantly, over time. Our products may become obsolete earlier than planned or may not have life cycles long enough to allow us to recoup the cost of our investment in designing such products. Accordingly, we believe that to remain competitive, we must continue to reduce the cost of producing and delivering existing products at the same time that we develop and introduce new or enhanced products. We may not be able to continue to reduce the cost of producing and delivering our products and thereby remain competitive.

In order to remain competitive, we expect to continue to transition many of our products to increasingly smaller geometries. This transition often requires us to upgrade our capital equipment, modify the manufacturing processes for our products, design new products to more stringent standards, and redesign some existing products. In the past, we have experienced some difficulties migrating to smaller geometry process technologies or new manufacturing processes, which resulted in sub-optimal manufacturing yields, delays in product deliveries, and increased expenses. We may face similar difficulties, delays, and expenses as we continue to transition our products to smaller geometry processes in the future. In some instances, we depend on our relationships with our third-party foundries to transition to smaller geometry processes successfully. Our foundries may not be able to effectively manage the transition or we may not be able to maintain our relationships with certain foundries. If our foundries or we experience significant delays in this transition or fail to efficiently implement this transition, our business, financial condition, and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. As smaller geometry processes become more prevalent, we expect to continue to integrate greater levels of functionality, as well as customer and third-party intellectual property, into our products. However, we may not be able to achieve higher levels of design integration or deliver new integrated products on a timely basis, or at all.

We may be subject to warranty claims, product recalls, and liability claims.
Although we invest significant resources in the testing of our products, we may discover from time to time defects in our products after they have been shipped, and we may be required to incur additional development and remediation costs, or cash payments to settle claims pursuant to warranty and indemnification provisions in our customer contracts and purchase orders. Certain of our products, including “high reliability” solutions, may not be able to perform under stringent operating conditions. Examples of our “high reliability” solutions include applications intended for the aerospace, automotive, medical, and military markets. The potential liabilities associated with these, and similar, provisions in certain of our customer contracts are in some cases capped at significant amounts, and in other cases are uncapped. Depending on the nature of the product defects, we may not be able to recoup our losses

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from our third-party suppliers. These problems may divert our technical and other resources from other product development efforts and could result in claims against us by our customers or third parties, including liability for costs associated with product recalls, indemnification claims, or other obligations under customer contracts. If any of our products contain defects, or have reliability, quality, or compatibility problems, our reputation may be damaged and we could be subject to liability claims, which could make it more difficult for us to sell our products to existing and prospective customers and could adversely affect our operating results. Furthermore, such losses would not be covered under our existing corporate insurance programs.

We are dependent upon third parties for the manufacture, assembly, and testing of our products.
We rely on foundries to provide silicon-based products and to supplement our gallium arsenide wafer manufacturing capacity. There are significant risks associated with reliance on third-party foundries, including:

the lack of wafer supply, potential wafer shortages, and higher wafer prices,
limited ability to respond to unanticipated changes in customer demand,
limited control over delivery schedules, manufacturing yields, production costs, and quality assurance, and
the inaccessibility of, or delays in obtaining access to, key process technologies, materials, and IP blocks.

Even in cases where we have long-term supply arrangements to obtain additional external manufacturing capacity, the third-party foundries we use for our standby manufacturing capacity may allocate their limited capacity to the production requirements of other customers and in general we have no contractual right to prevent them from making such allocations. If we choose to use a new foundry to replace either existing or backup capacity, it will typically take an extended period of time for us to complete our qualification process for that foundry, which will result in a significant passage of time before we can begin shipping products from that new foundry.

Further, the third-party foundries may experience financial difficulties or changes in control, be unable to deliver products to us in a timely manner, or suffer damage or destruction to their facilities, particularly since some of them are located in areas prone to natural disasters. If any disruption of manufacturing capacity occurs, we may not have alternative manufacturing sources immediately available. We may therefore experience difficulties or delays in securing an adequate supply of our products, which could impair our ability to meet our customers’ needs and have a material adverse effect on our operating results.

Although we own and operate assembly and test facilities, we still depend on subcontractors to package, assemble, and test certain of our products at cost-competitive rates. For those assembly and test subcontractors with whom we do not have long-term agreements, we typically procure services from these suppliers on a per-order basis. If any of our subcontractors experiences capacity constraints or financial difficulties, suffers any damage to its facilities, experiences power outages or any other disruption of assembly or testing capacity, we may not be able to obtain alternative assembly and testing services in a timely manner and/or at cost-competitive rates. Due to the amount of time that it usually takes us to qualify assembly and test subcontractors, we could experience significant delays in product shipments if we are required to find alternative assembly and test subcontractors for our components. Any problems that we may encounter with the delivery, quality, or cost of our products could damage our customer relationships and materially and adversely affect our results of operations.

If we are unable to attract and retain qualified personnel to contribute to the design, development, manufacture and sale of our products, we may not be able to effectively operate our business.
As the source of our technological and product innovations, our key technical personnel represent a significant asset. Our success depends on our ability to continue to attract, retain, and motivate qualified personnel, including executive officers and other key management and technical personnel. The competition for management and technical personnel is intense in the semiconductor industry, and therefore we may not be able to continue to attract and retain the qualified management and other personnel necessary for the design, development, manufacture, and sale of our products. Our employees are highly sought after by our competitors and other companies. We may have particular difficulty attracting and retaining key personnel during periods of poor operating performance and/or declines in the price of our common stock, given among other factors, the use of equity-based compensation by us and our competitors. Further, existing immigration laws, together with any changes to immigration policies or regulations in the United States, make it more difficult for us to recruit and retain highly skilled foreign national graduates of universities in the United States, limiting the pool of available talent. Travel bans, difficulties obtaining visas and other restrictions on international travel make it more difficult to effectively manage our international operations, collaborate as a global company, or service our international customer base. We continue to anticipate increases in human resource needs, particularly in engineering. The loss of the services of one or more of our key employees or our inability to attract, retain, and motivate qualified personnel, could have a material adverse effect on our ability to operate our business.

Our business would be adversely affected by the departure of existing members of our senior management team or if our senior management team is unable to effectively implement our strategy.

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Our success depends, in large part, on the continued contributions of our senior management team, none of whom is bound by a written employment contract to remain with us for a specified period. The loss of any of our senior management could harm our ability to implement our business strategy and respond to the rapidly changing market conditions in which we operate.

Uncertainties involving the ordering and shipment of, and payment for, our products, could adversely affect our business.
Our sales are typically made pursuant to standard purchase orders and/or specified customer contracts for delivery of products and not under long-term supply arrangements with our customers. Our customers may cancel orders before shipment. Additionally, we sell a portion of our products through third-party distributors, some of whom have rights to return products if the product is nonconforming. We may purchase and manufacture inventory based on estimates of customer demand for our products, which is difficult to predict. This difficulty may be compounded when we sell to OEMs indirectly through distributors or contract manufacturers, or both, as our forecasts of demand will then be based on estimates provided by multiple parties. In addition, our customers and/or distributors may change their inventory practices on short notice for any reason. The cancellation or deferral of product orders, the return of previously sold products, or overproduction due to a change in anticipated order volumes could result in us holding excess or obsolete inventory, which could result in inventory write-downs and, in turn, could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition. Some of our customers have implemented vendor-managed inventory, consignment, or similar inventory programs which may result in an increase in the time between manufacture of, and payment for, our products.

In addition, if a customer or distributor encounters financial difficulties of its own as a result of a change in demand or for any other reason, the customer’s or distributor’s ability to make timely payments against our accounts receivable could be impaired.

We are dependent upon third parties for the supply of raw materials and components.
Our manufacturing operations depend on obtaining adequate supplies of raw materials and components used in our manufacturing processes at a competitive cost. Although we maintain relationships with suppliers located around the world with the objective of ensuring that we have adequate sources for the supply of raw materials and components for our manufacturing needs, increases in demand from the semiconductor industry for such raw materials and components (including, but not limited to, precious and rare earth metals), as well as increased demand for commodities in general, can result in tighter supplies and higher costs. Our suppliers may not be able to meet our delivery schedules, we may lose a significant or sole supplier, a supplier may not be able to meet performance and quality specifications and we may not be able to purchase such supplies or material at a competitive cost. If a supplier were unable to meet our delivery schedules or if we lost a supplier or a supplier were unable to meet performance or quality specifications, our ability to satisfy customer obligations would be materially and adversely affected. In addition, we review our relationships with suppliers of raw materials and components for our manufacturing needs on an ongoing basis. In connection with our ongoing review, we may modify or terminate our relationship with one or more suppliers. We may also enter into sole supplier arrangements to meet certain of our raw material or component needs. While we do not typically rely on a single source of supply for our raw materials, we are currently dependent on a limited number of sole-source suppliers. If we were to lose these sole sources of supply, for any reason, a material adverse effect on our business could result until an alternate source is obtained. To the extent we enter into additional sole supplier arrangements for any of our raw materials or components, the risks associated with our supply arrangements would be exacerbated.

Our business and operations could suffer in the event of information technology security breaches.
Security breaches, phishing, spoofing, attempts by others to gain unauthorized access to our information technology systems, and other cyberattacks are becoming more sophisticated and persistent and are sometimes successful. These incidents, which might be related to industrial or other espionage, include covertly introducing malware and spyware to our computers and networks (or to an electronic system operated by a third party for our benefit) and impersonating authorized users, among others. We seek to detect and investigate all security incidents and to prevent their recurrence, but in some cases, we might be unaware of an incident or its magnitude and effects. The theft, unauthorized use, transfer, or publication of our intellectual property, our confidential business information, or the personal data of our employees by third parties or by our employees could harm our competitive position, reduce the value of our investment in research and development and other strategic initiatives or otherwise adversely affect our business. To the extent that any security breach or other cybersecurity incident results in inappropriate disclosure of our customers’, suppliers’, licensees’ or employees’ confidential information, we may incur liability as a result. We expect to continue devoting significant resources to the security of our information technology systems and the training of our employees. However, we cannot ensure that our efforts will be sufficient to prevent or mitigate the damage caused by a cyberattack, cybersecurity incident, or network disruption.

If we are not successful in protecting our intellectual property rights, our ability to compete successfully may be materially and adversely affected.
We rely on patent, copyright, trademark, trade secret, and other intellectual property rights and laws, as well as nondisclosure and confidentiality agreements and other methods, to protect our proprietary technologies, inventions, information, data, devices, algorithms, processes, and other intellectual property. In addition, we often incorporate the intellectual property of our customers, suppliers, or other third parties into our designs, and we have obligations with respect to the non-use and non-disclosure of such

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third-party intellectual property. From time to time, it may be necessary to engage in litigation or like activities to enforce our intellectual property rights, to protect our trade secrets, or to determine the validity and scope of proprietary rights of others, including our customers. This could require us to expend significant resources and to divert the efforts and attention of our management and technical personnel from our business operations. Regardless of our actions:

the steps we take to prevent misappropriation, infringement, dilution, or other violation of our intellectual property or the intellectual property of our customers, suppliers, or other third parties may not be successful, and
any of our existing or future patents, copyrights, trademarks, trade secrets, or other intellectual property rights may be challenged, invalidated, deemed unenforceable, or circumvented.

A third party could copy, misappropriate, or otherwise obtain and use our technology without authorization, develop similar technology independently, or design around or invalidate our patents. If any of our intellectual property protection mechanisms fails to protect our technology, it would make it easier for our competitors to offer similar competitive products, potentially resulting in loss of market share and price erosion. Even if we receive a patent, the patent claims may not be broad enough to adequately cover and protect our technology. Furthermore, even if we receive patent protection in the United States, we may not seek, or may not be granted, patent protection in other relevant foreign countries. In addition, effective patent, copyright, trademark, and trade secret protection, and enforcement may be unavailable, impractical, or limited for certain technologies and in certain foreign countries.

We attempt to control access to, and distribution of, our proprietary and confidential information through operational, technological, and legal safeguards. Despite our efforts, parties, including former or current employees, may attempt to copy, disclose, transfer, or obtain access to our information without our authorization. Furthermore, attempts by computer hackers to gain unauthorized access to our systems or information could result in our confidential and/or proprietary information being compromised or our operations being interrupted. While we attempt to prevent such unauthorized access or misappropriation we may be unable to anticipate the methods used, or be unable to prevent the release of our confidential and/or proprietary information or that of a third party.

We may be subject to claims of infringement of third-party intellectual property rights, or demands that we license third-party technology, which could result in significant expense and prevent us from using our technology.
The semiconductor industry is characterized by vigorous protection, enforcement, and pursuit of intellectual property rights. From time to time, third parties have asserted and may in the future assert patent, copyright, trademark, and other intellectual property rights against technologies that are important to our business and have demanded and may in the future demand that we license their technology or refrain from using it.

Any litigation to determine the validity of any allegations that our products infringe or may infringe intellectual property rights of another party, including indemnification claims arising from our contractual obligations of our customers, regardless of their merit or resolution, could be costly and divert the efforts and attention of our management and technical personnel. Regardless of the merits of any specific claim, we may not prevail in litigation because of the complex technical issues and inherent uncertainties in intellectual property litigation. If litigation were to result in an adverse ruling, we could be required to:
pay substantial damages,
cease the manufacture, import, use, sale, or offer for sale of infringing products or processes,
discontinue the use of infringing technology,
expend significant resources to develop non-infringing technology, and
license technology from the third party claiming infringement, which license may not be available on commercially reasonable terms.

Our operating results or financial condition may be materially adversely affected if we, or one of our customers, were required to take any one or more of the foregoing actions.

In addition, if another supplier to one of our customers, or a customer of ours itself, were found to be infringing upon the intellectual property rights of a third party, the supplier or customer could be ordered to cease the manufacture, import, use, sale, or offer for sale of its infringing product(s) or process(es), either of which could result, indirectly, in a decrease in demand from our customers for our products. If such a decrease in demand for our products were to occur, it could have an adverse impact on our operating results.

Many of our products currently incorporate technology licensed or acquired from third parties and we expect our products in the future to also require technology from third parties. If the licenses to such technology that we currently hold become unavailable or the terms on which they are available become commercially unreasonable, or if we are unable to acquire or license necessary technology for our products in the future, our business could be adversely affected.

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We sell products in markets that are characterized by rapid technological changes, evolving industry standards, frequent new product introductions, short product life cycles, and increasing levels of integration. Our ability to keep pace with this market depends on our ability to obtain technology from third parties on commercially reasonable terms to allow our products to remain competitive. If licenses to such technology are not available on commercially reasonable terms and conditions or at all, and we cannot otherwise acquire or integrate such technology, our products or our customers’ products could become unmarketable or obsolete, and we could lose market share. In such instances, we could also incur substantial unanticipated costs or scheduling delays to develop substitute technology to deliver competitive products.

There can be no assurance that we will continue to declare cash dividends or repurchase our stock.
We intend to pay quarterly cash dividends subject to capital availability and periodic determinations by our Board of Directors that cash dividends are in the best interest of our stockholders. In addition, from time to time the Board of Directors approves stock repurchase programs, pursuant to which we are authorized to repurchase shares of common stock on the open market or in privately negotiated transactions.

Future cash dividends and the amount and timing of our stock repurchases may be affected by, among other factors:
our views on potential future capital requirements, including those related to acquisitions as well as research and development,
our ability to generate sufficient earnings and cash flows,
use of cash to consummate various acquisition transactions,
capital requirements related to cash dividends and stock repurchase programs,
changes in federal and state income tax laws or corporate laws, and
changes to our business model.

Our cash dividend payments may change from time to time, and we cannot provide assurance that we will increase our cash dividend payment or declare cash dividends in any particular amounts or at all. A reduction in our cash dividend payments or a reduction in the level of our stock repurchases could have a negative effect on our stock price.

Changes in tax laws and regulations worldwide could have an adverse impact on our operating results.
We are subject to taxation in many different countries and localities worldwide. To the extent the tax laws and regulations in these various countries and localities could change, including the Base Erosion and Profit Shifting project being conducted by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, our tax liability in general could increase.

The tax legislation (the “Tax Reform Act”), enacted by the United States in December 2017, included several changes to U.S. tax laws that have had, and will continue to have, a significant impact on our operations, including a reduction in the U.S. corporate tax rate, base-erosion prevention measures on earnings of our non-U.S. subsidiaries, and a one-time mandatory deemed repatriation tax on earnings of certain foreign jurisdictions. Because these changes require a number of complex calculations that previously were not required, our actual tax liability may differ materially from our income tax provisions, estimates, and accruals. Changes in our interpretations and assumptions, as well as additional guidance issued, could increase income tax liabilities and/or reduce certain tax benefits.

We face a risk that capital needed for our business will not be available when we need it.
To the extent that our existing cash and cash equivalents and cash generated from operations are insufficient to fund our future activities, we may need to raise additional funds through public or private equity or debt financing. If unfavorable capital market conditions exist in the event we were to seek additional financing, we may not be able to raise sufficient capital on favorable terms and on a timely basis, if at all. Failure to obtain capital when required by our business circumstances would have a material adverse effect on us.

In addition, any strategic investments and acquisitions that we may make to help us grow our business may require additional capital resources. The capital required to fund these investments and acquisitions may not be available in the future.

To be successful we may need to make certain investments and acquisitions, integrate companies we acquire, and/or enter into strategic alliances.
Although we have invested in the past, and intend to continue to invest, significant resources in internal research and development activities, the complexity and rapidity of technological changes and the significant expense of internal research and development make it impractical for us to pursue development of all technological solutions on our own. On an ongoing basis, we review investment, alliance, and acquisition prospects that would complement our product offerings, augment our market coverage or enhance our technological capabilities. We may not be able to identify and consummate suitable investment, alliance, or acquisition transactions in the future. Moreover, if such transactions are consummated, they could result in:

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issuances of equity securities dilutive to our stockholders,
restructuring or other impairment write-offs,
the incurrence of substantial debt and assumption of unknown liabilities,
the potential loss of key employees from the acquired company,
recognition of additional liabilities known or unknown at the time of acquisition,
amortization expenses related to intangible assets, and
the diversion of management’s attention from other business concerns.

Moreover, integrating acquired organizations and their products and services may be difficult, expensive, time-consuming, and a strain on our resources and our relationship with employees and customers and ultimately may not be successful. Additionally, in periods following an acquisition, we will be required to evaluate goodwill and acquisition-related intangible assets for impairment. If such assets are found to be impaired, they will be written down to estimated fair value, with a charge against earnings.

Increasingly stringent environmental laws, rules, and regulations may require us to redesign our existing products and processes, and could adversely affect our ability to cost-effectively produce our products.
The semiconductor industry has been subject to increasing environmental regulations, particularly those environmental requirements that control and restrict the use, transportation, emission, discharge, storage, and disposal of certain chemicals, elements, and materials used or produced in the semiconductor manufacturing process. Heightened public focus on climate change, sustainability, and environmental issues has also led to increased government regulation and caused certain of our customers to impose environmental standards on us as a part of doing business with them. We expect that the trend of increasing environmental awareness will continue which will result in higher costs of operations. In addition, our commitment to environmentally sustainable practices, while undertaken in a manner designed to be as efficient and cost effective as possible, may result in increases in costs of operations for us relative to our competitors until technologies and methods are developed that will help reduce those costs or such practices become industry best practice.

A number of domestic and foreign jurisdictions restrict or may seek to restrict the use of various substances, a number of which have been or are currently used in our products or processes. For example, the European Union Restriction of Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment (“RoHS”) Directive requires that certain substances, which may be found in certain products we have manufactured in the past, be removed from all electronics components. Eliminating such substances from our manufacturing processes requires the expenditure of additional research and development funds to seek alternative substances for our products, as well as increased testing by third parties to ensure the quality of our products and compliance with the RoHS Directive. While we have implemented a compliance program to ensure our product offering meets these regulations, there may be instances where alternative substances will not be available or commercially feasible, or may only be available from a single source, or may be significantly more expensive than their restricted counterparts. Additionally, if we were found to be non-compliant with any such rule or regulation, we could be subject to fines, penalties and/or restrictions imposed by government agencies that could adversely affect our operating results.

Regulations in the United States require that we determine whether certain materials used in our products, referred to as conflict minerals, originated in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or adjoining countries, or were from recycled or scrap sources. The verification and reporting requirements, in addition to customer demands for conflict-free sourcing, impose additional costs on us and on our suppliers, and may limit the sources or increase the prices of materials used in our products. Further, if we are unable to certify that our products are conflict free, we may face challenges with our customers, which could place us at a competitive disadvantage, and our reputation may be harmed.

New climate change laws and regulations could require us to change our manufacturing processes or obtain substitute materials that may cost more or be less available for our manufacturing operations. Various jurisdictions in which we do business have implemented, or in the future could implement or amend, restrictions on emissions of carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gases and other climate change-based rules and regulations, which may increase our expenses and adversely affect our operating results. We expect increased worldwide regulatory activity relating to climate change in the future. Compliance with these laws and regulations has not had a material impact on our capital expenditures, earnings, financial condition or competitive position.

Furthermore, environmental regulations often require parties to fund remedial action for violations of such regulations regardless of fault. Consequently, it is often difficult to estimate the future impact of environmental matters, including potential liabilities. In addition, our customers increasingly require warranties or indemnity relating to compliance with environmental regulations. The amount of expense and capital expenditures that might be required to satisfy environmental liabilities, to complete remedial actions, and to continue to comply with applicable environmental laws may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.


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Certain provisions in our organizational documents and Delaware law may make it difficult for someone to acquire control of us.
We have certain anti-takeover measures that may affect our common stock. Our certificate of incorporation, our by-laws, and the Delaware General Corporation Law contain several provisions that would make more difficult an acquisition of control of us in a transaction not approved by our Board of Directors. Our certificate of incorporation and by-laws include provisions such as:
the ability of our Board of Directors to issue shares of preferred stock in one or more series without further authorization of stockholders,
a prohibition on stockholder action by written consent,
a requirement that stockholders provide advance notice of any stockholder nominations of directors or any proposal of new business to be considered at any meeting of stockholders,
a requirement that the affirmative vote of at least 80% of our shares be obtained to amend or repeal the provisions of our certificate of incorporation relating to the election and removal of directors or the right to act by written consent,
a requirement that the affirmative vote of at least 80% of our shares be obtained for business combinations unless approved by a majority of the members of the Board of Directors and, in the event that the other party to the business combination is the beneficial owner of 5% or more of our shares, a majority of the members of the Board of Directors in office prior to the time such other party became the beneficial owner of 5% or more of our shares,
a fair price provision, and
a requirement that the affirmative vote of at least 90% of our shares be obtained to amend or repeal the fair price provision.

In addition to the provisions in our certificate of incorporation and by-laws, Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law generally provides that a corporation may not engage in any business combination with any interested stockholder during the three-year period following the time that such stockholder becomes an interested stockholder, unless a majority of the directors then in office approves either the business combination or the transaction that results in the stockholder becoming an interested stockholder or specified stockholder approval requirements are met.


ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS.

None.

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES.

We have executive offices in Irvine, California, and Woburn, Massachusetts. For information regarding property, plant and equipment by geographic region for each of the last three fiscal years, see Note 15 to Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The following table sets forth our principal facilities:

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Table of Contents

 
Location
 
 
Owned/Leased
 

Square Footage
 
 
Primary Function
Mexicali, Mexico
 
Owned
 
380,000
 
Manufacturing and office space
Woburn, Massachusetts
 
Owned
 
158,000
 
Manufacturing and office space
Adamstown, Maryland
 
Owned
 
121,200
 
Manufacturing and office space
Newbury Park, California
 
Owned
 
111,600
 
Manufacturing and office space
Osaka, Japan
 
Leased
 
405,300
 
Filter manufacturing
Singapore, Singapore
 
Leased
 
298,800
 
Filter manufacturing
Irvine, California
 
Leased
 
218,500
 
Design center and office space
Mexicali, Mexico
 
Leased
 
179,000
 
Manufacturing and office space
Newbury Park, California
 
Leased
 
115,700
 
Design center
Kadoma, Japan
 
Leased
 
97,300
 
Filter manufacturing and office space
Ottawa, Ontario
 
Leased
 
82,200
 
Design center
Hillsboro, Oregon
 
Leased
 
59,500
 
Design center and office space
San Jose, California
 
Leased
 
51,900
 
Design center and office space
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
 
Leased
 
42,900
 
Design center
Andover, Massachusetts
 
Leased
 
22,900
 
Design center
Seoul, Korea
 
Leased
 
22,900
 
Design center
Basking Ridge, New Jersey
 
Leased
 
21,800
 
Design center

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.

The information set forth under Note 11 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K is incorporated herein by reference.

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES.

Not Applicable.

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Table of Contents

PART II

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES.

MARKET INFORMATION AND DIVIDENDS
Our common stock is traded on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbol “SWKS”.

The number of stockholders of record of our common stock as of November 12, 2019, was 11,174. On November 12, 2019, the Company announced that the Board of Directors had declared a cash dividend of $0.44 per share of common stock, payable on December 24, 2019, to stockholders of record as of December 3, 2019. We intend to continue to pay quarterly dividends subject to capital availability and our view that cash dividends are in the best interests of our stockholders. Future cash dividends may be affected by, among other items, our views on potential future capital requirements, including those relating to research and development, creation and expansion of sales distribution channels and investments and acquisitions, legal risks, stock repurchase programs, debt issuance, changes in federal and state income tax law and changes to our business model.

ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
The following table provides information regarding repurchases of common stock made during the fiscal quarter ended September 27, 2019:
Period
Total Number of Shares Purchased
Average Price Paid per Share
Total Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plans or Programs (1)
Maximum Number (or Approximate Dollar Value) of Shares that May Yet Be Purchased Under the Plans or Programs (1)
6/29/19-7/26/19
1,277(2)
$81.69
$1.77 billion
7/27/19-8/23/19
780,814(3)
$76.72
772,437
$1.71 billion
8/24/19-9/27/19
1,163,658(4)
$75.00
1,160,559
$1.63 billion
Total
1,945,749

1,932,996
 
_________________________
(1) The stock repurchase program approved by the Board of Directors on January 30, 2019, authorizes the repurchase of up to $2.0 billion of our common stock from time to time on the open market or in privately negotiated transactions as permitted by securities laws and other legal requirements. The January 30, 2019, stock repurchase program replaced in its entirety the January 31, 2018, plan and is scheduled to expire on January 30, 2021.
(2) Represents shares repurchased by us at the fair market value of the common stock as of the applicable purchase date, in connection with the satisfaction of tax withholding obligations under equity award agreements.
(3) 772,437 shares were repurchased at an average price of $76.73 per share as part of our stock repurchase program, and 8,377 shares were repurchased by us at the fair market value of the common stock as of the applicable purchase date, in connection with the satisfaction of tax withholding obligations under equity award agreements with an average price of $76.33 per share.
(4) 1,160,559 shares were repurchased at an average price of $75.01 per share as part of our stock repurchase program, and 3,099 shares were repurchased by us at the fair market value of the common stock as of the applicable purchase date, in connection with the satisfaction of tax withholding obligations under equity award agreements with an average price of $74.95 per share.



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Table of Contents


ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA.

The information set forth below for the five years ended September 27, 2019, is not necessarily indicative of results of future operations, and should be read in conjunction with Part II, Item 7, Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, and our consolidated financial statements and related notes included in Part II, Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K to fully understand factors that may affect the comparability of the information presented below. Our fiscal year ends on the Friday closest to September 30. Fiscal 2019, 2018, 2017, 2016, and 2015 each consisted of 52 weeks and ended on September 27, 2019, September 28, 2018, September 29, 2017, September 30, 2016, and October 2, 2015, respectively.

The following table represents the selected financial data (in millions, except per share data):
 
Fiscal Years Ended
Statement of Operations Data:
September 27, 2019 (1)
 
September 28, 2018 (2)
 
September 29, 2017
 
September 30, 2016 (3)
 
October 2,
2015
Net revenue
$
3,376.8

 
$
3,868.0

 
$
3,651.4

 
$
3,289.0

 
$
3,258.4

Operating income
$
952.0

 
$
1,319.3

 
$
1,253.8

 
$
1,118.7

 
$
1,023.1

Operating margin
28.2
%
 
34.1
%
 
34.3
%
 
34.0
%
 
31.4
%
Net income
$
853.6

 
$
918.4

 
$
1,010.2

 
$
995.2

 
$
798.3

Earnings per share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
$
4.92

 
$
5.06

 
$
5.48

 
$
5.27

 
$
4.21

Diluted
$
4.89

 
$
5.01

 
$
5.41

 
$
5.18

 
$
4.10

Cash dividends declared per share
$
1.58

 
$
1.34

 
$
1.16

 
$
1.06

 
$
0.65

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
As of
Balance Sheet Data:
September 27, 2019
 
September 28, 2018
 
September 29, 2017
 
September 30,
2016
 
October 2,
2015
Working capital
$
1,860.6

 
$
1,872.5

 
$
2,245.8

 
$
1,791.9

 
$
1,450.8

Property, plant and equipment, net
$
1,205.6

 
$
1,140.9

 
$
882.3

 
$
806.3

 
$
826.4

Total assets
$
4,839.6

 
$
4,828.9

 
$
4,573.6

 
$
3,855.4

 
$
3,719.4

Stockholders’ equity
$
4,122.3

 
$
4,097.0

 
$
4,065.7

 
$
3,541.4

 
$
3,159.2

____________
(1) Fiscal 2019 net revenue, net income, and earnings per share were adversely impacted as a result of the U.S. Bureau of Industry and Security of the U.S. Department of Commerce placing Huawei and certain of its affiliates on the Bureau’s Entity List (the “Entity List”) in May 2019.
(2) Fiscal 2018 net income and earnings per share include a one-time charge of $224.6 million related to the mandatory deemed repatriation tax on foreign earnings and a one-time charge of $18.3 million related to the revaluation of deferred tax assets and liabilities at the new corporate tax rate, as a result of the Tax Reform Act.
(3) Fiscal 2016 net income and earnings per share include other income of $88.5 million related to the receipt of a merger termination fee in November 2015 in connection with the termination by PMC-Sierra, Inc. (“PMC”), of the Amended and Restated Agreement and Plan of Merger that we had entered into with PMC in October 2015.




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ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and related notes that appear elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. In addition to historical information, the following discussion contains forward-looking statements that are subject to risks and uncertainties. Actual results may differ substantially and adversely from those referred to herein due to a number of factors, including, but not limited to, those described below and in Item 1A “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

OVERVIEW

We, together with our consolidated subsidiaries, are empowering the wireless networking revolution. Our highly innovative analog semiconductors are connecting people, places, and things spanning a number of new and previously unimagined applications within the aerospace, automotive, broadband, cellular infrastructure, connected home, industrial, medical, military, smartphone, tablet and wearable markets. Our key customers include Amazon, Apple, Arris, Bose, Cisco, DJI, Ericsson, Foxconn, Garmin, Gemalto (a Thales company), General Electric, Google, Honeywell, HTC, Huawei, Itron, Lenovo, LG Electronics, Microsoft, Motorola, Netgear, Northrop Grumman, OPPO, Rockwell Collins, Samsung, Sierra Wireless, Sonos, Technicolor, VIVO, Xiaomi and ZTE.

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

FISCAL YEARS ENDED SEPTEMBER 27, 2019, SEPTEMBER 28, 2018, AND SEPTEMBER 29, 2017.

The table below sets forth the results of our operations expressed as a percentage of net revenue. See Part II, Item 7 of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended September 28, 2018, filed with the SEC on November 15, 2018, as amended by Amendment No. 1 to such Annual Report on Form 10-K, filed with the SEC on January 25, 2019 (the “2018 10-K”), for Management’s Discussions and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations for the fiscal year ended September 29, 2017.
 
September 27,
2019
 
September 28,
2018
 
September 29,
2017
Net revenue
100.0
%
 
100.0
%
 
100.0
%
Cost of goods sold
52.5

 
49.6

 
49.6

Gross profit
47.5

 
50.4

 
50.4

Operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
Research and development
12.5

 
10.4

 
9.7

Selling, general and administrative
5.9

 
5.4

 
5.6

Amortization of intangibles
0.7

 
0.5

 
0.8

Restructuring and other charges
0.2

 

 

Total operating expenses
19.3

 
16.3

 
16.1

Operating income
28.2

 
34.1

 
34.3

Other income (expense), net
0.3

 
0.3

 
0.1

Income before income taxes
28.5

 
34.4

 
34.4

Provision for income taxes
3.2

 
10.7

 
6.7

Net income
25.3
%
 
23.7
%
 
27.7
%

GENERAL
During the fiscal year ended September 27, 2019, the following key factors contributed to our overall results of operations, financial position and cash flows:
Net revenue decreased 12.7% to $3,376.8 million, as compared to fiscal 2018. This decrease in revenue was primarily driven by weakness in smartphone demand and Huawei being added to the Entity List, partially offset by the increasing number of IoT applications, our expanding analog product portfolio supporting new vertical markets including automotive, consumer, industrial, infrastructure, medical, and military, and our success in capturing a higher share of the increasing radio frequency and analog content per device as smartphone models continue to evolve.

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Table of Contents

Our ending cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities balance increased 3.1% to $1,082.2 million in fiscal 2019 from $1,050.2 million in fiscal 2018. This increase was primarily the result of a 8.5% increase in cash from operations to $1,367.4 million in fiscal 2019 from $1,260.6 million in fiscal 2018, partially offset by the repurchase of 8.9 million shares of our common stock for $657.6 million, capital expenditures of $398.4 million, and cash dividends of $273.9 million.

NET REVENUE
 
Fiscal Years Ended
 
September 27,
2019
Change
September 28,
2018
Change
September 29,
2017
(dollars in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
Net revenue
$
3,376.8

(12.7)%
$
3,868.0

5.9%
$
3,651.4


We market and sell our products directly to OEMs of communications and electronics products, third-party original design manufacturers and contract manufacturers, and indirectly through electronic components distributors. We generally experience seasonal peaks during our fourth and first fiscal quarters (which correspond to the second half of the calendar year), primarily as a result of increased worldwide production of consumer electronics in anticipation of increased holiday sales, whereas our second and third fiscal quarters are typically lower and in line with seasonal industry trends.
 
The $491.2 million decrease in net revenue in fiscal 2019, as compared to fiscal 2018, is primarily related to weakness in smartphone demand and Huawei being added to the Entity List, partially offset by the increasing number of IoT applications, our expanding analog product portfolio supporting new vertical markets including automotive, consumer, industrial, infrastructure, medical, and military, and our success in capturing a higher share of the increasing radio frequency and analog content per device as smartphone models continue to evolve.
  
For information regarding net revenue by geographic region and customer concentration, see Note 15 to Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

GROSS PROFIT
 
Fiscal Years Ended
 
September 27,
2019
Change
September 28,
2018
Change
September 29,
2017
(dollars in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
Gross profit
$
1,603.8

(17.8)%
$
1,950.7

5.9%
$
1,841.8

% of net revenue
47.5
%
 
50.4
%
 
50.4
%

Gross profit represents net revenue less cost of goods sold. Our cost of goods sold consists primarily of purchased materials, labor and overhead (including depreciation and share-based compensation expense) associated with product manufacturing. Erosion of average selling prices of established products is typical of the semiconductor industry. Consistent with trends in the industry, we anticipate that average selling prices for our established products will continue to decline over time. As part of our normal course of business, we mitigate the gross margin impact of declining average selling prices with efforts to increase unit volumes, reduce material costs, improve manufacturing efficiencies, lower manufacturing costs of existing products and by introducing new and higher value-added products.

The $346.9 million decrease in gross profit in fiscal 2019, as compared to fiscal 2018, was primarily the result of lower unit volumes and lower average selling prices with a gross profit impact of $546.5 million. In addition, we incurred a $66.1 million inventory-related charge due to lower expected demand as a result of Huawei being added to the Entity List. These negative impacts were partially offset by favorable product mix that positively impacted gross profit by $265.7 million. As a result of these impacts, gross profit margin decreased to 47.5% of net revenue for fiscal 2019 as compared to 50.4% in fiscal 2018.

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

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Fiscal Years Ended
 
September 27,
2019
Change
September 28,
2018
Change
September 29,
2017
(dollars in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
Research and development
$
424.1

4.8%
$
404.5

13.9%
$
355.2

% of net revenue
12.5
%
 
10.4
%
 
9.7
%

Research and development expenses consist primarily of direct personnel costs including share-based compensation expense, costs for pre-production evaluation and testing of new devices, masks, engineering prototypes and design tool costs.

The increase in research and development expense in fiscal 2019, as compared to fiscal 2018, was primarily related to an increase in employee-related compensation expense and product development-related expenses. Research and development expense increased as a percentage of net revenue as a result of our increased investment in developing new technologies and products, as well as the decrease in net revenue.
 
SELLING, GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE    
 
Fiscal Years Ended
 
September 27,
2019
Change
September 28,
2018
Change
September 29,
2017
(dollars in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
Selling, general and administrative
$
198.3

(4.6)%
$
207.8

1.6%
$
204.6

% of net revenue
5.9
%
 
5.4
%
 
5.6
%

Selling, general and administrative expenses include legal and related costs, accounting, treasury, human resources, information systems, customer service, bad debt expense, sales commissions, share-based compensation expense, advertising, marketing, costs associated with business combinations completed or contemplated during the period and other costs.

The decrease in selling, general and administrative expenses in fiscal 2019, as compared to fiscal 2018, was primarily related to a decrease in share-based compensation expense. Selling, general and administrative expenses increased as a percentage of net revenue primarily due to the decrease in net revenue.

AMORTIZATION OF INTANGIBLES
 
Fiscal Years Ended
 
September 27,
2019
Change
September 28,
2018
Change
September 29,
2017
(dollars in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
Amortization of intangibles, cost of goods sold
$
34.1

305.4%
$
8.4

100.0%
$

Amortization of intangibles, operating expense
22.6

23.5%
18.3

(33.7)%
27.6

Total amortization of intangibles, including inventory step-up
56.7

 
26.7

 
27.6

% of net revenue
1.7
%
 
0.7
%
 
0.8
%

The increase in amortization for fiscal 2019, as compared to fiscal 2018, was primarily due to amortization attributable to the Avnera acquisition completed in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2018.

RESTRUCTURING AND OTHER CHARGES
 
Fiscal Years Ended
 
September 27,
2019
Change
September 28,
2018
Change
September 29,
2017
(dollars in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
Restructuring and other charges
$
6.8

750.0%
$
0.8

33.3%
$
0.6

% of net revenue
0.2
%
 
%
 
%


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Restructuring and other charges incurred in fiscal 2019 were primarily related to employee severance and other termination benefits as well as charges on a leased facility resulting from restructuring plans initiated during the period. We do not anticipate any further significant charges associated with these restructuring activities and the remaining cash payments related to these restructuring plans are not material.

Restructuring and other charges incurred in fiscal 2018 are related to charges on a leased facility.

PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES
 
Fiscal Years Ended
 
September 27,
2019
Change
September 28,
2018
Change
September 29,
2017
(dollars in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
Provision for income taxes
$
107.4

(74.0)%
$
413.7

67.6%
$
246.8

% of net revenue
3.2
%
 
10.7
%
 
6.7
%

The annual effective tax rate for fiscal 2019 of 11.2% was less than the United States federal statutory rate of 21.0% primarily due to benefits of 12.0% related to foreign earnings taxed at a rate less than the United States federal rate, 4.3% related to benefits from the foreign derived intangible income (“FDII”) deduction, 0.2% related to stock windfall deductions, and 2.7% related to the recognition of federal research and development tax credits, partially offset by increases in income tax rate expense impact of 5.7% related to global intangible low-taxed income (“GILTI”) expense, 1.5% related to a change in our tax reserves, and 0.5% from the partial settlement of the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) audit of our fiscal 2015 and 2016 income tax returns.

The decrease in the effective tax rate for fiscal 2019, as compared to the 31.1% effective rate for fiscal 2018, was primarily due to the enactment of the 2017 Tax Reform Act including a one-time charge related to the mandatory deemed repatriation tax on foreign earnings and a one-time charge related to the revaluation of our deferred tax assets and liabilities.

See Note 8 to Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information regarding income taxes.

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES
 
Fiscal Years Ended
(in millions)
September 27,
2019
 
September 28,
2018
 
September 29,
2017
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
$
733.3

 
$
1,616.8

 
$
1,083.8

Net cash provided by operating activities
1,367.4

 
1,260.6

 
1,456.3

Net cash used in investing activities
(336.9
)
 
(1,150.4
)
 
(325.9
)
Net cash used in financing activities
(912.5
)
 
(993.7
)
 
(597.4
)
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
$
851.3

 
$
733.3

 
$
1,616.8


Cash provided by operating activities:
Cash provided by operating activities consists of net income for the period adjusted for certain non-cash items and changes in certain operating assets and liabilities. The $106.8 million increase in cash provided by operating activities for fiscal 2019, as compared to fiscal 2018, was primarily related to favorable changes in working capital driven by higher cash collections and the timing of capital expenditures and vendor payments.

Cash used in investing activities:
Cash used in investing activities consists primarily of cash paid for acquisitions net of cash acquired, capital expenditures, purchased intangibles, cash received from the sale of capital assets, and cash related to the sale or maturity of investments. The $813.5 million decrease in cash used in investing activities for fiscal 2019, as compared to fiscal 2018, was primarily related to $404.0 million paid for the Avnera acquisition in fiscal 2018 and a $401.9 million difference in the net purchase and sale of marketable securities.

Cash used in financing activities:
Cash used in financing activities consists primarily of cash transactions related to equity. The $81.2 million decrease in cash used in financing activities for fiscal 2019, as compared to fiscal 2018, was primarily related to $101.9 million decrease in stock repurchase activity, partially offset by an increase in dividend payments.


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Table of Contents

Liquidity:
Cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities totaled $1,082.2 million as of September 27, 2019, representing an increase of $32.0 million from September 28, 2018. The increase resulted from $1,367.4 million in cash generated from operations, which was partially offset by $657.6 million used to repurchase 8.9 million shares of stock, $398.4 million in capital expenditures, and $273.9 million in cash dividend payments during fiscal 2019. Based on our historical results of operations, we expect that our cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities on hand and the cash we expect to generate from operations will be sufficient to fund our research and development, capital expenditures, potential acquisitions, working capital, quarterly cash dividend payments (if such dividends are declared by the Board of Directors), outstanding commitments and other liquidity requirements associated with existing operations for at least the next 12 months. However, we cannot be certain that our cash on hand and cash generated from operations will be available in the future to fund all of our capital and operating requirements. In addition, any future strategic investments and acquisitions may require additional cash and capital resources. If we are unable to obtain sufficient cash or capital to meet our needs on a timely basis and on favorable terms, our business and operations could be materially and adversely affected.

Our invested cash balances primarily consist of highly liquid marketable securities that are available to meet near-term cash requirements including: term deposits, certificate of deposits, money market funds, U.S. Treasury securities, agency securities, other government securities, corporate debt securities and commercial paper.

OFF-BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS

All significant contractual obligations are recorded on our consolidated balance sheet or fully disclosed in the notes to our consolidated financial statements. We have no material off-balance sheet arrangements as defined in SEC Regulation S-K Item 303(a)(4)(ii).

CONTRACTUAL CASH FLOWS

Set forth below is a summary of our contractual payment obligations related to our operating leases, other commitments and long-term liabilities at September 27, 2019 (in millions):

 
Payments Due By Period
 
Obligation    
 
Total
 
Less Than 1 Year
 
1-3 Years
 
3-5 Years
 
Thereafter
Other long-term liabilities (1)
 
$
315.5

 
$

 
$
38.2

 
$
38.2

 
$
239.1

Operating lease obligations
 
219.9

 
26.7

 
50.7

 
44.8

 
97.7

Other commitments (2)
 
19.3

 
8.6

 
10.7

 

 

Total
 
$
554.7

 
$
35.3

 
$
99.6

 
$
83.0

 
$
336.8

_________________________
(1)
Other long-term liabilities primarily include our gross unrecognized tax benefits, repatriation tax payable, and executive deferred compensation. Gross unrecognized tax benefits and executive deferred compensation are both classified as beyond five years due to the uncertain nature of the liabilities.
(2)
Other commitments consist of contractual license and royalty payments and other purchase obligations. See Note 10 to Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING ESTIMATES
The discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments in applying our most critical accounting policies that can have a significant impact on the results we report in our financial statements. The SEC has defined critical accounting policies as those that are both most important to the portrayal of our financial condition and results and which require our most difficult, complex or subjective judgments or estimates. Based on this definition, our most critical accounting policies include revenue recognition, which impacts the recording of net revenue; inventory valuation, which impacts the cost of goods sold and gross margin; assessment of goodwill and long-lived assets, which impacts the impairment of the respective assets; share-based compensation, which impacts cost of goods sold and operating expenses; loss contingencies, which impacts operating expenses; and income taxes, which impacts the income tax provision. These policies and significant judgments involved are discussed further below. We have other significant accounting policies that do not generally require subjective estimates or judgments or would not have a material impact on our results of operations. Our significant accounting policies are described in Note 2 to Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Revenue Recognition. We recognize revenue in accordance with the Financial Accounting Standards Board’s (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 606 Revenue from Contracts with Customers net of estimated reserves. Our revenue reserves contain

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uncertainties because they require management to make assumptions and to apply judgment to estimate the value of future credits to customers for product returns, price protection and stock rotation for products sold to certain electronic component distributors. We base these estimates on the expected value method considering all reasonably available information, including our historical experience and current expectations, and is reflected in the transaction price when sales are recorded.

Inventory Valuation. We value our inventory at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Reserves for excess and obsolete inventory are established on a quarterly basis and are based on a detailed analysis of aged material, salability of our inventory, market conditions, and product life cycles. Once reserves are established, write-downs of inventory are considered permanent adjustments to the cost basis of inventory. Our reserves contain uncertainties because the calculation requires management to make assumptions and to apply judgment regarding historical experience, market conditions and technological obsolescence. Changes in actual demand or market conditions could adversely impact our reserve calculations.

Goodwill and Long-Lived Assets. We evaluate goodwill and long-lived assets for impairment annually on the first day of the fourth fiscal quarter and whenever events or circumstances arise that may indicate that the carrying value of the goodwill or other intangibles may not be recoverable.

Our impairment analysis contains uncertainties because it requires management to make assumptions and to apply judgment to items such as: determination of the reporting unit and asset groupings, estimated control premiums, discount rates, future cash flows, the profitability of future business strategies and useful lives.
Share-Based Compensation. We have share-based compensation plans which include non-qualified stock options, restricted and performance share awards and units, as well as an employee stock purchase plan and other special share-based awards. Note 9 of Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K details our current share-based compensation programs.

We determine the fair value of our share-based compensation items with pricing models as of the date of grant using a number of subjective variables and assumptions including, but not limited to: our expected stock price volatility over the term of the award, correlation coefficients, risk-free rate, the expected life of the award, dividend yield, and estimated performance against metrics. Compensation expense is recognized over the requisite service period of the underlying awards. Management periodically evaluates these assumptions and updates share-based compensation expense accordingly.

Loss Contingencies. We record an estimate for loss contingencies such as a legal proceeding or claims if it is probable that an asset has been impaired or a liability has been incurred and the amount of the loss or range of loss can be reasonably estimated. We disclose material loss contingencies if there is at least a reasonable possibility that a loss has been incurred.

Our loss contingency analysis contains uncertainties because it requires management to assess the degree of probability of an unfavorable outcome and to make a reasonable estimate of the amount of potential loss.

Income Taxes. We account for income taxes using the asset and liability method, under which deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between tax and financial reporting. We record a valuation allowance to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount that is believed more likely than not to be realized. Significant management judgment is required in developing our provision for income taxes, including the determination of deferred tax assets and liabilities and any valuation allowances that might be required against the deferred tax assets. 

The application of tax laws and regulations to calculate our tax liabilities is subject to legal and factual interpretation, judgment, and uncertainty in a multitude of jurisdictions. Tax laws and regulations themselves are subject to change as a result of changes in fiscal policy, changes in legislation, the evolution of regulations, and court rulings. We recognize potential liabilities for anticipated tax audit issues in the United States and other tax jurisdictions based on our estimate of whether, and the extent to which, additional taxes and interest will be due. We record an amount as an estimate of probable additional income tax liability at the largest amount that we feel is more likely than not, based upon the technical merits of the position, to be sustained upon audit by the relevant tax authority. 

OTHER MATTERS

Inflation did not have a material impact on our results of operations during the three-year period ended September 27, 2019.

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK.


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We are subject to overall financial market risks, such as changes in market liquidity, credit quality, investment risk, interest rate risk and foreign exchange rate risk as described below.

Investment and Interest Rate Risk

Our exposure to interest rate and general market risks relates principally to our investment portfolio, which consists of cash and cash equivalents (money market funds and marketable securities purchased with less than ninety days until maturity) that total approximately $851.3 million and marketable securities (U.S. Treasury and government securities, corporate bonds and notes, municipal bonds, other government securities) that total approximately $203.3 million and $27.6 million within short-term and long-term marketable securities, respectively, as of September 27, 2019.

The main objectives of our investment activities are liquidity and preservation of capital. Our cash equivalent investments have short-term maturity periods that dampen the impact of market or interest rate risk. Our marketable securities consist of short-term and long-term maturity periods between 90 days and two years. Credit risk associated with our investments is not material because our investments are diversified across several types of securities with high credit ratings, which reduces the amount of credit exposure to any one investment.

Based on our results of operations for the fiscal year ended September 27, 2019, a hypothetical reduction in the interest rates on our cash, cash equivalents, and other investments to zero would result in an immaterial reduction of interest income with a de minimis impact on income before taxes.

Given the low interest rate environment, the objectives of our investment activities, and the relatively low interest income generated from our cash, cash equivalents, and other investments, we do not believe that investment or interest rate risks pose material exposures to our current business or results of operations.

Foreign Exchange Rate Risk

Substantially all sales to customers and arrangements with third-party manufacturers provide for pricing and payment in United States dollars, thereby reducing the impact of foreign exchange rate fluctuations on our results. A percentage of our international operational expenses are denominated in foreign currencies and exchange rate volatility could positively or negatively impact those operating costs. For the fiscal years ended September 27, 2019, September 28, 2018, and September 29, 2017, we had foreign exchange losses of $6.2 million, $5.5 million and $3.1 million, respectively. Increases in the value of the United States dollar relative to other currencies could make our products more expensive, which could negatively impact our ability to compete. Conversely, decreases in the value of the United States dollar relative to other currencies could result in our suppliers raising their prices to continue doing business with us. Given the relatively small number of customers and arrangements with third-party manufacturers denominated in foreign currencies, we do not believe that foreign exchange volatility has a material impact on our current business or results of operations. However, fluctuations in currency exchange rates could have a greater effect on our business or results of operations in the future to the extent our expenses increasingly become denominated in foreign currencies.

We may enter into foreign currency forward and option contracts with financial institutions to protect against foreign exchange risks associated with certain existing assets and liabilities, certain firmly committed transactions, forecasted future cash flows and net investments in foreign subsidiaries. However, we may choose not to hedge certain foreign exchange exposures for a variety of reasons, including, but not limited to, accounting considerations and the prohibitive economic cost of hedging particular exposures. For the fiscal year ended September 27, 2019, we had no outstanding foreign currency forward or option contracts with financial institutions.



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ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA.

The following consolidated financial statements of the Company are included herewith:
(1)
Page 33
 
 
 
(2)
Page 35
 
 
 
(3)
Page 36
 
 
 
(4)
Page 37
 
 
 
(5)
Page 38
 
 
 
(6)
Page 39
 
 
 
(7)
Page 40 through 57



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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
To the Stockholders and Board of Directors
Skyworks Solutions, Inc.:
Opinions on the Consolidated Financial Statements and Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Skyworks Solutions, Inc. and subsidiaries (the Company) as of September 27, 2019 and September 28, 2018, the related consolidated statements of operations, comprehensive income, cash flows and stockholders’ equity for each of the years in the three-year period ended September 27, 2019 and the related notes (collectively, the consolidated financial statements). We also have audited the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of September 27, 2019, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission.
In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of September 27, 2019 and September 28, 2018, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended September 27, 2019, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Also in our opinion, the Company maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of September 27, 2019 based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission.
Basis for Opinions
The Company’s management is responsible for these consolidated financial statements, for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s consolidated financial statements and an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud, and whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects.
Our audits of the consolidated financial statements included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. Our audit of internal control over financial reporting included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audits also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinions.
Definition and Limitations of Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally

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accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
Critical Audit Matter
The critical audit matter communicated below is a matter arising from the current period audit of the consolidated financial statements that was communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that: (1) relates to accounts or disclosures that are material to the consolidated financial statements and (2) involved our especially challenging, subjective, or complex judgment. The communication of a critical audit matter does not alter in any way our opinion on the consolidated financial statements, taken as a whole, and we are not, by communicating the critical audit matter below, providing a separate opinion on the critical audit matter or on the accounts or disclosures to which it relates.
As discussed in Notes 2 and 8 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company has recorded gross unrecognized tax benefits of $103.3 million in domestic and foreign jurisdictions as of September 27, 2019. The Company records unrecognized tax benefits when there is more than a 50% likelihood that its tax positions will not be sustained upon examination by the taxing authorities. This determination requires the Company’s judgement in the interpretation of domestic and international tax laws and regulations.
We identified the assessment of the gross unrecognized tax benefits as a critical audit matter because of the high degree of auditor judgement involved in evaluating the Company’s interpretation of domestic and international tax laws and regulations.
The primary procedures we performed to address this critical audit matter included the following. We tested certain internal controls over the Company’s unrecognized tax benefit process, including controls over the interpretation of domestic and international tax laws and regulations. We involved domestic and international tax professionals with specialized skills and knowledge, who assisted in:
assessing the Company’s ongoing compliance with applicable domestic and international tax laws and regulations,
reading the Company’s documentation that provided the basis for its tax positions and evaluating the impact of changes in the Company’s tax structure, changes in domestic and international tax laws and regulations, and similar settlements with applicable taxing authorities, and
evaluating the Company’s interpretation of domestic and international tax laws and regulations by developing an independent assessment based on our understanding and interpretation of the domestic and international tax laws and regulations.
/s/ KPMG LLP
We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2002.
 
Irvine, California
November 14, 2019


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SKYWORKS SOLUTIONS, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(In millions, except per share amounts)

 
Fiscal Years Ended
 
September 27,
2019
 
September 28,
2018
 
September 29,
2017
Net revenue
$
3,376.8

 
$
3,868.0

 
$
3,651.4

Cost of goods sold
1,773.0

 
1,917.3

 
1,809.6

Gross profit
1,603.8

 
1,950.7

 
1,841.8

Operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
Research and development
424.1

 
404.5

 
355.2

Selling, general and administrative
198.3

 
207.8

 
204.6

Amortization of intangibles
22.6

 
18.3

 
27.6

Restructuring and other charges
6.8

 
0.8

 
0.6

Total operating expenses
651.8

 
631.4

 
588.0

Operating income
952.0

 
1,319.3

 
1,253.8

Other income, net
9.0

 
12.8

 
3.2

Income before income taxes
961.0

 
1,332.1

 
1,257.0

Provision for income taxes
107.4

 
413.7

 
246.8

Net income
$
853.6

 
$
918.4

 
$
1,010.2

Earnings per share:
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
$
4.92

 
$
5.06

 
$
5.48

Diluted
$
4.89

 
$
5.01

 
$
5.41

Weighted average shares:
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
173.5

 
181.3

 
184.3

Diluted
174.5

 
183.2

 
186.7

 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash dividends declared and paid per share
$
1.58

 
$
1.34

 
$
1.16



See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.



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SKYWORKS SOLUTIONS, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
(In millions)
 
Fiscal Years Ended
 
September 27,
2019
 
September 28,
2018
 
September 29,
2017
Net income
$
853.6

 
$
918.4

 
$
1,010.2

Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax
 
 
 
 
 
Fair value of investments
0.3

 
(0.1
)
 
0.9

Pension adjustments
0.5

 

 
0.7

Foreign currency translation adjustment

 
(0.2
)
 
0.8

Comprehensive income
$
854.4

 
$
918.1

 
$
1,012.6


See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.


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SKYWORKS SOLUTIONS, INC.
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(In millions, except per share amounts)

 
As of
 
September 27,
2019
 
September 28,
2018
ASSETS
 
 
 
Current assets:
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
851.3

 
$
733.3

Marketable securities
203.3

 
294.1

Receivables, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $0.8 and $0.6, respectively
465.3

 
655.8

Inventory
609.7

 
490.2

Other current assets
105.0

 
88.8

Total current assets
2,234.6

 
2,262.2

Property, plant and equipment, net
1,205.6

 
1,140.9

Goodwill
1,189.8

 
1,189.8

Intangible assets, net
107.9

 
143.7

Deferred tax assets, net
40.8

 
36.5

Marketable securities
27.6

 
22.8

Other assets
33.3

 
33.0

Total assets
$
4,839.6

 
$
4,828.9

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
 
 
 
Current liabilities:
 
 
 
Accounts payable
190.5

 
229.9

Accrued compensation and benefits
76.0

 
85.2

Other current liabilities
107.5

 
74.6

Total current liabilities
374.0

 
389.7

Long-term tax liabilities
312.4

 
310.5

Other long-term liabilities
30.9

 
31.7

Total liabilities
717.3

 
731.9

Commitments and contingencies (Note 10 and Note 11)
 
 
 
Stockholders’ equity:
 
 
 
Preferred stock, no par value: 25.0 shares authorized, no shares issued

 

Common stock, $0.25 par value: 525.0 shares authorized; 230.2 shares issued and 170.1 shares outstanding at September 27, 2019, and 228.4 shares issued and 177.4 shares outstanding at September 28, 2018
42.5

 
44.4

Additional paid-in capital
3,188.0

 
3,061.0

Treasury stock, at cost
(3,412.9
)
 
(2,732.5
)
Retained earnings
4,312.6

 
3,732.9

Accumulated other comprehensive loss
(7.9
)
 
(8.8
)
Total stockholders’ equity
4,122.3

 
4,097.0

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
$
4,839.6

 
$
4,828.9


See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.


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SKYWORKS SOLUTIONS, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(In millions)

 
Fiscal Years Ended
 
September 27,
2019
 
September 28,
2018
 
September 29,
2017
Cash flows from operating activities:
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
$
853.6

 
$
918.4

 
$
1,010.2

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
 
 
 
 
 
Share-based compensation
80.1

 
107.8

 
88.5

Depreciation
314.9

 
272.5

 
227.2

Amortization of intangible assets, including inventory step-up
56.7

 
26.7

 
27.6

Deferred income taxes
(6.1
)
 
27.3

 
2.2

Changes in fair value of contingent consideration
(3.1
)
 
(11.9
)
 
(1.3
)
Other, net
16.8

 
(0.7
)
 
0.3

Excess tax benefit from share-based compensation

 

 
(40.8
)
Changes in assets and liabilities:
 
 
 
 
 
Receivables, net
190.5

 
(193.8
)
 
(37.1
)
Inventory
(119.6
)
 
11.9

 
(69.2
)
Other current and long-term assets
(16.7
)
 
(12.2
)
 
3.3

Accounts payable
(33.0
)
 
(126.0
)
 
147.8

Other current and long-term liabilities
33.3

 
240.6

 
97.6

Net cash provided by operating activities
1,367.4

 
1,260.6

 
1,456.3

Cash flows from investing activities:
 
 
 
 
 
Capital expenditures
(398.4
)
 
(422.3
)
 
(303.3
)
Purchased intangibles
(25.0
)
 
(8.6
)
 
(12.1
)
Purchases of marketable securities
(360.5
)
 
(683.7
)
 

Sales and maturities of marketable securities
447.0