10-K 1 ef20015292_10k.htm 10-K

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2023
OR
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission File Number 001-07626

Sensient Technologies Corporation

WISCONSIN
 
39-0561070
(State of Incorporation)
 
(IRS Employer Identification Number)

777 EAST WISCONSIN AVENUE
MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 53202-5304
(414) 271-6755
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OF THE ACT:

TITLE OF EACH CLASS
Common Stock, $0.10 par value
 
 TRADING SYMBOL(S)
SXT
NAME OF EACH EXCHANGE
ON WHICH REGISTERED
New York Stock Exchange LLC

SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(g) OF THE ACT:  None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.   Yes   No

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.  Yes     No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes   No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes    No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.  (Check one):

Large Accelerated Filer 
Accelerated Filer 
Non-Accelerated Filer 
 
Smaller Reporting Company 
Emerging Growth Company 
 
 

 If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report. 

If securities are registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act, indicate by check mark whether the financial statements of the registrant included in the filing reflect the correction of an error to previously issued financial statements. 

Indicate by check mark whether any of those error corrections are restatements that required a recovery analysis of incentive-based compensation received by any of the registrant’s executive officers during the relevant recovery period pursuant to §240.10D-1(b). 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes    No 

The aggregate market value of the voting Common Stock held by non-affiliates of the Registrant as of June 30, 2023, was $2,949,219,588. For purposes of this computation only, the registrant’s directors and executive officers were considered to be affiliates of the registrant. Such characterization shall not be construed to be an admission or determination for any other purpose that such persons are affiliates of the registrant.

There were 42,343,684 shares of Common Stock outstanding as of February 9, 2024.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Part III of this report incorporates information by reference to the registrant’s definitive proxy statement for its 2024 annual meeting of shareholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days after December 31, 2023.



SENSIENT TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION—FORM 10-K FOR YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2023 INDEX
 
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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
 
This report contains forward-looking statements that reflect management’s current assumptions and estimates of future economic circumstances, industry conditions, Company performance, and financial results. Forward-looking statements include statements in the future tense, statements referring to any period after December 31, 2023, and statements including the terms “expect,” “believe,” “anticipate,” and other similar terms that express expectations as to future events or conditions. The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 provides a safe harbor for such forward-looking statements. Such forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties, and other factors that could cause actual events to differ materially from those expressed in the forward-looking statements. A variety of factors could cause the Company’s actual results and experience to differ materially from the anticipated results. These factors and assumptions include, among others, the Company’s ability to manage general business, economic, and capital market conditions, including actions taken by customers in response to such market conditions, and the impact of recessions and economic downturns; the impact of macroeconomic and geopolitical volatility, including inflation and shortages impacting the availability and cost of raw materials, energy, and other supplies, disruptions and delays in the Company’s supply chain, and the conflicts between Russia and Ukraine and Israel and Hamas and other parties in the Middle East; the availability and cost of labor, logistics, and transportation; the pace and nature of new product introductions by the Company and the Company’s customers; the Company’s ability to anticipate and respond to changing consumer preferences and changing technologies; the Company’s ability to successfully implement its growth strategies; the outcome of the Company’s various productivity-improvement and cost-reduction efforts, acquisition and divestiture activities, and portfolio optimization plan; industry, regulatory, legal, and economic factors related to the Company’s domestic and international business; the effects of tariffs, trade barriers, and disputes; growth in markets for products in which the Company competes; industry and customer acceptance of price increases; actions by competitors; the Company’s ability to enhance its innovation efforts and drive cost efficiencies; currency exchange rate fluctuations; and the matters discussed below under the heading “Risk Factors” and under Part II, including the critical accounting policies set forth under the heading “CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES” within “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” Except to the extent required by applicable law, the Company does not undertake to publicly update or revise its forward-looking statements even if experience or future changes make it clear that any projected results expressed or implied herein will not be realized.

NON-GAAP FINANCIAL MEASURES

Within this document, the Company reports certain non-GAAP financial measures, including: (1) adjusted operating income, adjusted net earnings, and adjusted diluted earnings per share (which exclude divestiture & other related income and restructuring and other costs, which include portfolio optimization plan costs) and (2) percentage changes in revenue, operating income, and diluted earnings per share on an adjusted local currency basis (which eliminate the effects that result from translating its international operations into U.S. dollars, divestiture & other related income, and restructuring and other costs, which include portfolio optimization plan costs). The Company has included each of these non-GAAP measures in order to provide additional information regarding our underlying operating results and comparable year-over-year performance. Such information is supplemental to information presented in accordance with GAAP and is not intended to represent a presentation in accordance with GAAP. These non-GAAP measures should not be considered in isolation. Rather, they should be considered together with GAAP measures and the rest of the information included in this report. Management internally reviews each of these non-GAAP measures to evaluate performance on a comparative period-to-period basis and to gain additional insight into underlying operating and performance trends. The Company believes this information can be beneficial to investors for these same purposes. These non-GAAP measures may not be comparable to similarly titled measures used by other companies.

Additional information related to the Company’s use of non-GAAP financial measures and the divestiture & other related income and restructuring and other costs, which include portfolio optimization plan costs that have been excluded from the non-GAAP financial measures, and reconciliations of non-GAAP financial measures to the most comparable GAAP financial measures are available below in Item 7 under the section titled “NON-GAAP FINANCIAL MEASURES.”

PART I
 
Item 1.
Business.

General

Sensient Technologies Corporation (the Company) was incorporated under the laws of the State of Wisconsin in 1882. Its principal executive offices are located at 777 East Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1100, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202-5304, telephone (414) 271-6755.

The Company is subject to the informational and reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the Exchange Act). In accordance with the Exchange Act, the Company files annual, quarterly and current reports, proxy statements, and other information with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the Commission). These reports and other information may be accessed from the website maintained by the Commission at https://www.sec.gov.

The Company can also be reached at its website at www.sensient.com. The Company’s web address is provided as an inactive textual reference only, and the contents of that website are not incorporated in or otherwise to be regarded as part of this report. The Company makes available free of charge on its website its proxy statement, its annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to these reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act as soon as reasonably practicable after such documents are electronically filed with or furnished to the Commission. Charters for the Audit, Compensation and Development, Nominating and Corporate Governance, Finance, and Executive Committees of the Company’s Board of Directors, as well as the Company’s Code of Conduct, Corporate Governance Guidelines, Policy Relating to  Recovery of Erroneously Awarded Compensation, and Non-Employee Directors and Executive Officers Stock Ownership Guidelines are available on the Company’s website. These documents are also available in print to any shareholder, free of charge, upon request. If there are any amendments to the Code of Conduct, or if waivers from it are granted for executive officers or directors, those amendments or waivers also will be posted on the Company’s website.

Description of Business

The Company is a leading global manufacturer and marketer of colors, flavors, and other specialty ingredients. The Company uses advanced technologies and robust global supply chain capabilities to develop specialized solutions for food and beverages, as well as products that serve the pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and personal care industries. The Company’s customers range in size from small entrepreneurial businesses to major international manufacturers representing some of the world’s best-known brands.

The Company’s principal products include:

 
flavors, flavor enhancers, ingredients, extracts, and bionutrients;

 
essential oils;

 
dehydrated vegetables and other food ingredients;

 
natural and synthetic food and beverage colors;

 
personal care colors and ingredients;
 
 
pharmaceutical and nutraceutical colors, excipients, and ingredients; and

 
technical colors, specialty colors, and specialty dyes and pigments.

For 2023, the Company’s three reportable segments were the Flavors & Extracts Group and the Color Group, which are managed on a product line basis, and the Asia Pacific Group, which is managed on a geographic basis. The Company’s corporate expenses, divestiture & other related costs and income, share-based compensation, restructuring and other charges, including operational improvement plan costs and income and portfolio optimization plan costs, and certain other costs are included in the “Corporate & Other” category as described in this report. Financial information regarding the Company’s three reportable segments and the operations included within Corporate & Other is set forth in Note 12, Segment and Geographic Information, in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in this report.

Acquisitions

On July 15, 2021, the Company acquired substantially all of the assets of Flavor Solutions, Inc., a flavors business located in New Jersey.

The purchase price for this acquisition was $14.9 million in cash. This business is part of the Flavors & Extracts segment.

On October 3, 2022, the Company acquired Endemix Doğal Maddeler A.Ş. and Teknoloji Yatırımları ve Danışmanlık Sanayi ve Ticaret A.Ş. (collectively, Endemix), a natural colors business located in Turkey. The Company paid $23.3 million in cash for this acquisition, which is net of $1.3 million in debt assumed. This business is part of the Color segment.

Divestitures

In 2021, the Company received $1.5 million of net cash related to the previously completed sales of its yogurt fruit preparations and inks product lines. In 2022, the Company received $2.5 million of net cash related to its previously completed sale of its yogurt fruit preparations product line.

On April 1, 2021, the Company completed the sale of the fragrances product line (excluding its essential oils product line) for $36.3 million of net cash.

Flavors & Extracts Group

The Company is a global developer, manufacturer, and supplier of flavor systems for the food, beverage, and personal care industries. The Company’s flavor formulations are used in many of the world’s best-known consumer products. Under the unified brand names of Sensient Flavors and Sensient Natural Ingredients, the Group is a supplier to multinational and regional companies. As noted above, during the second quarter of 2021, the Company divested its fragrances product line (excluding its essential oils product line).

The Flavors & Extracts Group produces flavor, extracts, and essential oils products that impart a desired taste, texture, aroma, or other characteristics to a broad range of consumer and other products. This Group includes the Company’s natural ingredients business, which produces dehydrated garlic, onion, and other natural ingredients for food processors. The main products of the Group are systems products, including flavor-delivery systems, and compounded and blended products. In addition, the Group has strong positions in selected ingredient products such as essential oils, natural and synthetic flavors, and natural extracts. The Group serves food and non-food industries. In food industries, markets include savory, beverage, and sweet flavors, as well as certain bioingredients. Through April 1, 2021, in non-food industries, the Group supplied fragrances and essential oil products to the personal, homecare, and bioingredients markets. After the divestiture of the fragrances product line on April 1, 2021, the Group still produces and supplies essential oils to the personal care market.

Operating through its Natural Ingredients business, which we formerly referred to as our Dehydrated Ingredients business, the Company believes it is the second largest producer (by sales) of dehydrated onion and garlic products in the United States. The Company is also one of the largest producers and distributors of chili powder, paprika, chili pepper, and dehydrated vegetables such as parsley, celery, and spinach. The Company sells dehydrated products to food manufacturers for use as ingredients and also for repackaging under private labels for sale to the retail market and to the food service industry. The advanced dehydration technologies utilized by our Natural Ingredients business permit fast and effective rehydration of ingredients used in many of today’s popular convenience foods.

As of December 31, 2023, the Group’s principal manufacturing plants are located in California, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, New Mexico, Belgium, Costa Rica, Mexico, Germany, and the United Kingdom.

Color Group

The Company is a developer, manufacturer, and supplier of colors for businesses worldwide. The Company provides natural and synthetic color systems for use in foods, beverages, pharmaceuticals, and nutraceuticals; colors and other ingredients for personal care, such as active ingredients, solubilizers, and surface treated pigments; pharmaceutical and nutraceutical excipients, such as colors, flavors, coatings, and nutraceutical ingredients; and technical colors for industrial applications.

The Company believes that it is one of the world’s largest producers (by sales) of synthetic and natural colors, and that it is the world’s largest manufacturer (by sales) of certified food colors. The Company sells its synthetic and natural colors to domestic and international producers of beverages, bakery products, processed foods, confections, pet foods, personal care, pharmaceuticals, and nutraceuticals. The Company also makes industrial colors and other dyes and pigments used in a variety of non-food applications.

As of December 31, 2023, the Group’s principal manufacturing plants are located in Missouri, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Peru, Turkey, and the United Kingdom.

The Color Group operates under the following trade names:


Sensient Food Colors (food and beverage colors);

 
Sensient Pharmaceutical Coating Systems (pharmaceutical and nutraceutical colors and coatings);

 
Sensient Cosmetic Technologies (personal care colors, ingredients, and systems); and

 
Sensient Specialty Markets (paper colors and industrial colors for plastics, leather, wood stains, antifreeze, landscaping, and other uses).

The Company believes that its advanced process technology, state-of-the-art laboratory facilities and equipment, world-class application chemists, and a complete range of synthetic and natural color products constitute the basis for its market leadership position.

Asia Pacific Group

The Asia Pacific Group focuses on marketing the Company’s diverse product lines in the Pacific Rim under the Sensient name. Through these operations, the Company offers a full range of products from its Flavors & Extracts Group and Color Group as well as products developed by regional technical teams to appeal to local preferences.

Sales, marketing, and technical functions are managed through the Asia Pacific Group’s headquarters, which is located in Singapore. Manufacturing operations are located in Australia, China, India, Japan, Thailand, New Zealand, and the Philippines, with sales offices also located in the India and Thailand facilities. The Asia Pacific Group maintains additional offices for local technical support and sales in China and Indonesia as well as for research and development in Singapore.

Corporate

Corporate provides management, administrative, and support services to the Company from its headquarters in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The Company’s corporate expenses, divestiture & other related costs and income, share-based compensation, restructuring and other charges, including operational improvement plan costs and income and portfolio optimization plan costs, and other costs, are included in the “Corporate & Other” category.

Research and Development/Quality Assurance

The development of specialized products and services is a complex technical process calling upon the combined knowledge and talents of the Company’s research, development, and quality assurance personnel. The Company believes that its competitive advantage lies in its ability to work with its customers to develop and deliver high-performance products that address the distinct needs of those customers.

The Company’s research, development, and quality assurance personnel support the Company’s efforts to improve existing products and develop new products tailored to customer needs, while providing ongoing technical support and know-how to the Company’s manufacturing activities. The Company’s efforts also include the development of proprietary seed lines, sometimes in partnership with other business partners, for its natural ingredients and natural colors business lines. The Company employed 760 people in research and development, quality assurance, quality control, and lab technician positions as of December 31, 2023.

As part of its commitment to quality as a competitive advantage, the Company’s production facilities hold various certifications, such as those under the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and those recognized by the Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI), including the Safe Quality Food Program (SQF), British Retail Consortium (BRC), and Food Safety System Certification (FSSC 22000), for certifying the safety and quality of its products and production processes.

Products and Application Activities

The Company’s strategic focus is on the manufacturing and marketing of high-performance components that bring life to products. Accordingly, the Company devotes considerable attention and resources to the development of product applications and processing improvements to support its customers’ numerous new and reformulated products. The majority of the proprietary processes and formulae developed by the Company are maintained as trade secrets and protected through internal physical and information technology controls and confidentiality agreements with customers as well as confidentiality and non-competition agreements with employees.

Within the Flavors & Extracts Group, development activity is focused on ingredients, flavors, natural extracts, and essential oils as well as flavor systems that are responsive to consumer trends and the processing needs of our food and beverage customers. These activities include the development of functional ingredient systems for foods and beverages, savory flavors, and ingredient systems for prepared foods and flavors and ingredients for dairy, confectionery, and other applications. The Company believes that the development of yeast derivatives and other specialty ingredients also provides growth opportunities in bionutrients and biotechnology markets, such as probiotics and fermented ingredients, including enzymes, vitamins, and amino acids.

Within the Color Group, development activity for food and beverage product lines is focused on value-added products derived from synthetic dyes and pigments, natural food and beverage colors, and color systems. The Company also produces a diverse line of colors and ingredients for personal care, pharmaceutical, and nutraceutical applications, and technical colors for industrial applications.

Raw Materials

The Company uses a wide range of raw materials in producing its products. Chemicals used to produce certified colors are obtained from several domestic and foreign suppliers. Raw materials for natural colors, such as carmine, beta-carotene, annatto, and turmeric, are sourced internally at our Lima, Peru facility or purchased from overseas and U.S. sources. As of October 2022, the Company owns a natural food colorings business located near Istanbul, Turkey, and has vertically integrated production and processing capacity in black carrot and other natural color products.

In the production of flavors, extracts, and essential oils, the principal raw materials include essential oils, botanicals, extracts, fruits, and juices. These raw materials are obtained from domestic and foreign suppliers. Flavor enhancers and secondary flavors are produced from brewers’ yeast and vegetable materials such as corn and soybeans. Chili peppers, onion, garlic, and other vegetables are acquired under annual contracts with numerous growers in the western United States and China.

The Company believes that its ability to reformulate its products and the general availability of alternate sources of materials from different geographic areas would generally enable it to maintain its competitive position in the event of an interruption in the supply of raw materials from a single supplier.

Competition

All Company products are sold in highly competitive markets. While no single factor is determinative, the Company’s competitive position is based principally on process and applications expertise, quality, technological advances resulting from its research and development, and customer service and support. Because of its highly differentiated products, the Company competes with only a few companies across multiple product lines and generally encounters different competitors in different product lines.


Flavors & Extracts. Competition in the flavors, extracts, and ingredients industries continues to have an ever-increasing global nature. Most of the Company’s customers do not buy all of their flavor and ingredients products from a single supplier, and the Company does not compete with a single supplier in all product categories. Competition for the supply of flavors, extracts, and essential oils is based on the development of customized ingredients for new and reformulated customer products as well as on quality, customer service, and price. Competition to supply dehydrated vegetable products is present through several large and small domestic competitors as well as competitors from other countries. Competition for the supply of dehydrated vegetables is based principally on product quality, customer service, and price.


Color. Competition in the color market is diverse, with the majority of the Company’s competitors specializing in either synthetic dyes and pigments or natural colors or coloring foodstuffs (in Europe). The Company believes that it gains a competitive advantage as the only major basic manufacturer of a full range of color products, including synthetic dyes and pigments as well as natural colors. Competition in the supply of personal care colors and ingredients and pharmaceutical and nutraceutical ingredients and excipients is based on the development of customized products and solutions as well as quality, customer service, and price. The Company believes that its reputation and capacity as a color producer as well as its product development and applications expertise give it a competitive advantage in these markets.


Asia Pacific. The Company offers a broad array of products to customers through the Asia Pacific Group. Competition is based upon reliability in product quality, service, and price as well as technical support available to customers.

Foreign Operations

Additional information regarding the Company’s foreign operations is set forth in Note 12, Segment and Geographic Information, in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in this report.

Patents, Formulae, and Trademarks

The Company owns or controls many patents, formulae, and trademarks related to its businesses. The businesses are not materially dependent upon any particular patent, trademark, or formula; however, trademarks, patents, and formulae are important to the business of the Company.

Human Capital

As of December 31, 2023, the Company employed 3,956 persons worldwide. Approximately 43% of our employees were employed in the United States, and approximately 57% were employed outside of the United States. Of our 3,956 employees worldwide, we had 505 general administration employees (e.g., accounting, administrative, regulatory compliance, IT, human resources, etc.), 2,459 production employees, 465 research and development employees, and 527 sales and marketing employees.

We believe that our future success is dependent upon our continued ability to attract, retain, and motivate successful employees. Our Board of Directors oversees our human capital management program, in consultation with our CEO and Vice President, Human Resources. The Board also has routine contact with all Company officers and periodically receives presentations from the Group Presidents and Vice President as well as select General Managers.

Talent Acquisition and Talent Development

We are committed to the recruitment, retention, and continued development of people who thrive and succeed in our culture. In furtherance of this goal, our primary areas of focus remain: (i) talent acquisition, (ii) on-boarding, (iii) coaching, development, and retention, and (iv) integrity and professionalism. As part of the Company’s effort to attract and motivate employees, we offer compensation and comprehensive benefits that we believe are competitive in the markets in which we operate and compete for talent. We also have a dedicated internal talent acquisition team, with deep knowledge of our Company and our core values, in order to help us find the best prospective employees for open positions worldwide. We hold ourselves accountable for filling open roles expeditiously by closely monitoring and limiting days to fill open roles. We also challenge ourselves to take a broad view of talent acquisition, regularly seeking talent from non-traditional backgrounds and from outside our industry, and moving beyond restrictive pedigree requirements in favor of skills and the ability to learn. With our sales and technical roles, we have implemented a gamified AI-based platform to identify candidates, without bias, who share the behavioral and cognitive attributes of our most successful sales and technical employees from around the world.

After hiring a candidate, we believe that an effective on-boarding is a critical factor in whether a new employee succeeds or fails. We continue to develop, and improve upon, our on-boarding process to differentiate ourselves from our competitors and help enable our employees to succeed. We generally track our progress through weekly pre-hire team on-boarding calls, new hire surveys, new hire interviews, hiring manager surveys, and a monthly report of our results to senior leadership. We also promote regular 1:1 meetings between non-production employees and their supervisors.

In order to continue to develop and retain our key talent, we offer training programs based upon the employee’s role in the Company. We also maintain personalized career planning, ongoing coaching and development by Corporate and local leadership, and a “High Potential Program,” which ensures our key talent learns from and gains exposure to senior leadership. Performance reviews and succession planning occur company-wide on an annual basis. Individual goals are set annually for employees, which flow from the Company strategy, and attainment of those goals is an element of the employee’s performance assessment. We invest in our development programs for high-impact roles, such as our General Management Development, Sales Representative Trainee, and Flavorist Trainee programs. We continue to “promote-from-within” and provide opportunities for our internal employees to grow their careers, with over half of our senior leadership and over half of our business unit leaders previously having been promoted to their current role from within the Company. We closely monitor turnover overall and in critical roles to vet our retention efforts and identify areas of need for future investment.

Our Corporate Creed, set forth at the beginning of our Code of Conduct, sets forth three non-negotiable rules: (1) Always tell the truth; (2) Always produce safe, high-quality products in safe and secure facilities; and (3) Always be professional. Employees throughout the organization know these expectations as the “Three Rules.” Under the Three Rules, all of our employees are expected to exhibit and promote integrity and professionalism in the workplace. All of our employees must adhere to these non-negotiable expectations for appropriate behavior. We perform annual, company-wide training on our Code of Conduct, as well as for all new hires. The CEO personally provides instruction on the Three Rules during leadership training conducted each year throughout the organization. To further reinforce our expectations, the CEO internally publishes anonymized quarterly reports of Code of Conduct violations and their consequences. In addition, we strictly apply principles of non-discrimination, which are foundational to our non-negotiable expectations of integrity and professionalism, in all employment-related decisions.

Health and Safety

We take pride in our strong and continually improving health and safety programs, which we view as important aspects of our economic health and core values. We expect each employee to actively participate in and contribute to this philosophy. Examples of actions taken to demonstrate our commitment and progress toward achieving our goal of providing a safe workplace include: (i) Corporate Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) Department oversight of safety and compliance matters at all Company facilities; (ii) periodic EHS audits conducted at Company facilities by third parties at the direction of the Corporate Legal Department to determine the state of facility compliance with applicable safety laws and regulations; (iii) implementation of “best-practice” programs and management systems across all business units worldwide; (iv) ongoing capital investments aimed at continually improving standards for environment, health, and safety in each of our plants around the world; (v) meaningful use of metrics to apply leading and lagging indicators toward incremental improvement and sustainable results; (vi) regular communication and engagement with employees on safety topics through safety committee meetings, plant-wide communication meetings, and “tool box” meetings; and (vii) root cause analysis of all injuries and near misses to ensure that lessons learned can be applied across the entire organization. We also maintain a corporate physical security program led by a retired Secret Service Agent. The physical security program aims to secure our facilities, protect our employees from workplace violence, ensure proper training and monitoring of travelers, and provide regular assessments of the security situations in the countries where we operate.

Regulation

The production, packaging, labeling, and distribution of certain of the products of the Company in the U.S. are subject to the regulations of various federal, state, and local governmental agencies, in particular the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The Company is subject to similar regulations in many international markets, particularly Europe. Compliance with government laws, rules, and regulations did not have, and is not currently expected to have, a material adverse effect on our capital expenditures, results of operations, and competitive position.

Item 1A.
Risk Factors.

As with any business, the Company’s business and operations involve risks and uncertainties. In addition to the other discussions in this report, particularly those under the headings “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” below and “Forward-Looking Statements” above, the following factors should be considered:

Business Risks

Intense competition with our competitors may result in reduced sales and profitability.
 
We develop, manufacture, and sell flavors, flavor enhancers, ingredients, extracts, and bionutrients; essential oils; natural ingredients, including dehydrated vegetables and other food ingredients; natural and synthetic food and beverage colors; personal care colors and ingredients; pharmaceutical and nutraceutical excipients and ingredients; and technical colors, specialty colors, and specialty dyes and pigments. We sell these products to customers in industries and markets that are highly competitive. We face intense competition from multiple competitors in each of our business lines. These competitors range from large multinational flavor companies with broad and sophisticated product portfolios and outstanding technological capabilities to smaller more specialized regional companies that focus on a single product line or offering. Our success against these competitors depends upon our ability to continually develop and manufacture safe, high quality, innovative, and legally compliant products across each of our product lines in varying batch sizes, at varying frequencies, and at acceptable prices. We also must provide outstanding product development support, on time delivery, regulatory assistance, and after-sale product support to all of our customers, wherever they are located. If we are unable to do these tasks, or if competitors do any of these tasks better than we do, we may lose part or all of our business with some customers. We do lose business to competitors from time to time. Competition can reduce both our sales and the prices at which we are able to sell our products, or cause us to incur additional costs to remain competitive, which can negatively affect our results.
 
Our business is impacted by adverse developments in economic, political, and capital market conditions, which could negatively affect our financial performance and our ability to grow or sustain the growth of our business.
 
We compete around the world in various geographic regions and product markets. Global economic and political conditions affect our businesses and the businesses of our customers and suppliers. Economic downturns, changes in interest rates, lower consumer confidence, decreasing employment levels, price instability, inflation, slowing economic growth, and social and political instability in the industries and/or markets where we compete could negatively affect our financial performance in future periods and adversely impact our ability to grow or sustain our business. For example, current macroeconomic and political instability caused by rising interest rates, global supply chain disruptions, inflation, ongoing conflicts between Russia and Ukraine as well as Israel and Hamas and related disruptions in the Red Sea and region, geopolitical tensions, and the strengthening of the U.S. dollar, have adversely impacted, and could continue to adversely impact, our results of operations.

10

We have experienced, and could continue to experience, increased raw material and energy cost inflation, as well as disruptions and delays in our supply chain, as a result of global macroeconomic trends, including increased global demand, labor shortages, geopolitical and economic tensions, including the conflicts between Russia and Ukraine and in the Middle East, which has grown out of the Israel and Hamas conflict. For example, suppliers located in Ukraine are our main source of sunflower oil, which is primarily used in our savory and beverage businesses. We have encountered difficulties, and may continue to encounter difficulties, in finding favorable pricing and reliable alternative sources or substitutes for certain of the raw materials we need (including sunflower oil) for certain products. If these difficulties persist, accelerate, or expand, our operations could be adversely affected.

These increased costs, or any potential shortage of energy or raw materials, could adversely affect our profitability. The military conflicts may also increase the risk of cybersecurity incidents, including the risk of cyberattacks in retaliation based upon the United States’ and/or European Union’s support for Ukraine or Israel. Such attacks, whether on us or on critical infrastructure and financial institutions globally, could also adversely affect our operations.

In addition, the credit markets provide us with liquidity to operate and grow our business beyond the liquidity that our cash flows provide. A worldwide economic downturn and/or disruption of the credit markets could reduce our access to capital or significantly increase our costs of capital, which may negatively impact our financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows. We have seen our interest expense rise as a result of increased interest rates, and a continued increase in such rates may negatively affect our results.

A disruption in our manufacturing operations could adversely affect our profitability.
 
We develop, manufacture, and distribute our products around the world. Generally, our labs and plants are dedicated to particular product lines. For example, many (but by no means all) of our food colors products are developed and manufactured in our St. Louis facility. While we have redundant capabilities across labs and plants for many product lines, in some cases, we only manufacture particular products at one facility. To establish a new manufacturing capability at a plant could require substantial time, money, and numerous governmental and customer approvals. Additionally, because of the complexity and highly specialized nature of many of the products we produce, it would require a tremendous amount of technical, engineering, and management time and effort to establish the new capability. Manufacturing involves inherent risks such as industrial accidents, environmental events, labor disputes, labor shortages, product quality control issues, safety issues, licensing, and regulatory compliance requirements, as well as natural disasters, conflicts, terrorist acts, civil unrest, ERP software issues, cyber-attacks, and other events that we cannot control. If one of our development or manufacturing facilities is disrupted or impaired, we could cause a supply disruption to our customers, which could cause short and long-term damage to our customer relationships. Such disruption would have an adverse effect on our financial performance and future growth.

Intense competition among our customers and their competitors may result in reduced sales and profitability for our customers and us.
 
Generally, we do not sell products directly to consumers. The customers to whom we sell our products incorporate our products into their own products. Our customers face intense competition. This competitive pressure has caused some of our customers to change or reduce ordering patterns, to resist price increases, to discontinue or reduce existing product offerings, and to introduce fewer new products and reduce or eliminate traditional limited time offerings. Some of our large, multinational customers may increasingly become vertically integrated as a result of cost pressures, supply chain disruptions, or other reasons. We would lose business to the extent any of our customers are able to produce the products that we otherwise supply them. Additionally, the commercial outlets for many of our customers are also under intense competitive pressure, which has caused many such commercial outlets to be resistant to price increases from their suppliers. Ultimately, our ability to sell our products to customers depends upon our customers’ ability to succeed against their competitors and to respond effectively to the demands of their own customers, including pressure to reduce prices. When our customers do not successfully compete, as happens from time to time, it can impact our sales and the prices at which we sell our products, which can negatively affect our results.

In some product lines, most of our sales are made to a relatively small number of customers; if we lose any of those customers, sales and operating results could decline.
 
In some of our product lines, our sales are concentrated with a small number of customers. While we do not currently have any single customer that we consider to be significant to us as a whole, the loss of a significant customer for a particular product line could substantially affect the sales and profitability of that line or the business unit that sells that product line, which may cause us to re-evaluate that line. Those developments could negatively affect our results.

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Consolidation has resulted in customers with increased buying power, which can affect our profitability.
 
Many of our customers have consolidated in recent years and we expect the combination trend to continue in many business lines. These consolidations have often produced large, sophisticated customers with increased buying power who are more capable of resisting price increases or vertically integrating. If the larger size or greater buying power of those customers results in additional negotiating strength, the prices we are able to charge could be negatively affected and our profitability could decline. In addition, if any of these large customers are able to produce the products that we otherwise supply them, our results of operations may be adversely impacted.

Our sales and profitability are affected by changing consumer preferences, changing regulations and technologies, and our ability and our customers’ ability to make and sell to consumers in highly competitive markets.
 
Although we do not generally make or sell proprietary consumer products, many of our products are sold to companies that develop and market consumer products, either directly or through other commercial and retail outlets. Sales of flavors, colors, personal care ingredients, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical excipients and ingredients, and many of our other products depend in part upon our customers’ ability to create and sell products to consumers in highly competitive markets, all of which are beyond our control. Our sales could also be affected by changing regulations or technologies (including, for example, off-label prescription drug use for weight loss) that could impact consumer demand for products that contain our products. Therefore, we depend upon our customers’ ability to create markets for the consumer products that incorporate the products that we manufacture. In addition, if we cannot adequately anticipate and respond to the needs of our customers as they evolve in response to changing consumer preferences, new technologies (including advancements such as artificial intelligence and machine learning, which may become critical in understanding consumer preferences in the future), and price demands, our results could be adversely affected. The COVID-19 pandemic and ongoing economic uncertainty have impacted consumer behavior in numerous ways and it is difficult to predict whether these changes will persist over the long term and how they will impact our customers. Additionally, the market pressures on our customers may adversely affect the willingness of these customers to launch new products, to introduce limited time offerings, and to grow or continue to produce existing product lines. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, we have seen a reduction in the size of new product launches and fewer limited time offerings from some of our customers. Any of these actions by our customers can adversely affect our results.

If we do not maintain an efficient cost structure, our profitability could decrease.
 
Our success depends in part on our ability to maintain an efficient cost structure. We regularly initiate cost-reduction measures that could impact our manufacturing, sales, operations, and information systems functions. If we do not continue to manage costs and achieve additional efficiencies, or we do not successfully implement related strategies, our competitiveness and our profits could decrease. As discussed above, the price pressures in our markets make such cost reduction efforts particularly important. For example, in 2023, the Company began the execution of a portfolio optimization plan to optimize certain production facilities, centralize and eliminate certain production and selling and administrative positions, and improve efficiencies globally within the Company. These types of activities have required, and may continue to require, the devotion of significant resources and management attention and may pose business risks. In addition, these actions may result in a deterioration of employee relations at the impacted locations in our business. Our ability to realize anticipated cost savings may be affected by a number of factors, including our ability to effectively reduce overhead, rationalize manufacturing capacity, and effectively produce products at the consolidated facilities. Furthermore, our cost reduction efforts may not be as effective as we had anticipated, which could have an adverse effect on our financial condition.

A disruption in our supply chain could adversely affect our profitability.
 
We generally rely on third party suppliers for various raw materials that we use to make our products. We use many different chemical products, natural products, and other commodities as raw material ingredients. We also use raw materials whose production is energy intensive and dependent on successful farming techniques and favorable climatic and environmental conditions. As the demand for natural products continues to grow, the risks associated with agriculture, such as reduced crop yields, reduced crop availability, water shortages, increased water costs, reduced access to water, droughts, and other potentially more severe weather events, are becoming increasingly important. In addition, we obtain some raw materials from a single supplier or a limited number of suppliers. Disruptions or other issues with those suppliers could affect the availability of those materials. Even if there are multiple suppliers of a particular raw material, there are occasionally shortages. Constrictions in supply of raw materials can lead to increased costs. We may not be able to pass these costs to customers for a variety of reasons, including the fact that some of our competitors may not be subject to the increased costs. Additionally, government regulatory action against any of our suppliers or particular raw materials could also cause a supply disruption. We have, in the past, dealt with regulators shutting down suppliers that provided the Company with raw materials.

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 This adversely impacted the supply of raw materials for the affected products and, therefore, impacted our ability to produce products containing these raw materials. Additionally, our yields from harvests for onion were adversely impacted in 2021 and 2022 by both drought and flooding, resulting in reduced availability of onion products for our Natural Ingredients business in recent prior years. We increased the amount of onion and garlic planted in 2023, but there is no certainty that we will achieve greater yields or, if we do increase our yields, that there will be a market for such products. Any future unavailability or shortage of a raw material, however caused, could negatively affect our operations using that raw material and thus adversely affect our results.

We may not be able to manage inventory as effectively as anticipated, which may adversely impact our performance.
 
Efficient inventory management is essential to our performance. We must maintain appropriate inventory levels and product mix to meet customer demand, without incurring costs related to storing and holding excess inventory. If our inventory management decisions do not accurately predict demand or otherwise result in excess inventory, as has happened in the past, our financial results may be adversely impacted by markdowns, impairment charges, or other costs related to disposal of excess or obsolete inventory. For example, the shelf-life for natural products is generally shorter than synthetic products, so if the demand for natural products slows, it becomes more likely that any excess inventory could need to be written off or subject to markdowns and would have an adverse impact on our revenue and profitability. Additionally, if we do not maintain enough inventory to satisfy the demand of our customers, we may lose business to our competitors, which could adversely affect our results. During the COVID-19 pandemic, we held large quantities of raw material and finished goods inventory to minimize disruptions to our customers. As we continue to emerge from the pandemic, we may not be as effective as we intend in reducing our inventory to more normal levels. As we saw starting at the end of 2022 and continuing through 2023, many of our customers are also reducing their inventory to more normal levels. This has had an adverse impact on our ability to reduce our inventory at an optimal rate and may continue to have such an impact in the future.

Raw material, energy, labor, and transportation cost volatility, including inflation in prices due to ongoing supply chain challenges and other macroeconomic forces, may reduce our profitability.
 
We have experienced challenges as a result of ongoing domestic and global supply chain issues, particularly with respect to raw materials, logistics, and labor. In addition, we have experienced inflationary increases in the costs of raw materials, energy, transportation, and labor. Although we attempt to manage these challenges through pricing and other actions, we may not be able to increase our product prices enough to offset these increased costs. Increasing our prices also may reduce sales volume and related profitability and cause us to lose customers. If inflationary conditions persist, accelerate, or expand, it will become more difficult to manage these challenges without adverse impacts to our revenues and profitability.

We use various energy sources in our production and distribution processes. Commodity and energy prices are subject to significant volatility caused by market fluctuations, supply and demand, currency fluctuation, production and transportation disruption, disruptive world events (such as the Russia-Ukraine and Middle Eastern conflicts and related disruptions in the Red Sea and Arabian Sea discussed above), and changes in governmental regulations, particularly related to carbon reduction. Commodity, transportation, and energy price increases will raise both our raw material costs and operating costs. Additionally, as many areas move away from using carbon-based sources of energy, we would initially anticipate increases in the cost of energy generated from renewable energy sources as well as potential reliability and continuity issues related to electrical power generation, distribution, and supply. While the long-term environment impact of these moves is favorable, the shorter and medium-term impact in increased energy prices could adversely affect our profitability.

The financial condition of our customers may adversely affect their ability to buy products from us at current levels, to accept price increases, or to pay for products that they have already purchased.
 
As mentioned above, our customers are under intense pressure in their markets from competitors and their end customers and as a result of changing consumer preferences. Historically, these combined pressures have resulted in some of the Company’s customers entering bankruptcy or receivership. There is risk that other customers of the Company could enter bankruptcy or receivership in the near-term. Once in bankruptcy or receivership, these customers are restricted from paying certain outstanding invoices to the Company until later in the bankruptcy process and even when able to pay, may not be able to pay the full amounts owed. Additionally, certain payments made to us prior to a customer declaring for bankruptcy may be, and have been, subject to clawback during the bankruptcy or receivership process. Financially distressed customers may change or reduce ordering patterns, reduce willingness to accept price increases, discontinue or reduce existing product offerings, and introduce fewer new products. Those developments could adversely affect our results.

In addition, if any of our suppliers become financially insolvent and fail to perform their obligations under arrangements with us, we may be forced to replace the underlying commitment at current or above market prices or on other terms that are less favorable to us with little recourse against such supplier. In such events, we may incur losses, or our results of operations, financial condition, or liquidity could otherwise be adversely affected.

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The impact of currency exchange rate fluctuation may negatively affect our results.
 
We report the results of our foreign operations in the applicable local currency and then translate those results into U.S. dollars at applicable exchange rates. We are therefore subject to non-U.S. currency risks and non-U.S. exchange exposure. The applicable exchange rates between and among foreign currencies and the U.S. dollar have fluctuated and will continue to do so in the future. These fluctuations have impacted our results of operations in recent periods as discussed below in more detail under the heading “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” Such currency exchange rate volatility may also adversely impact our financial condition or liquidity. While we may use forward exchange contracts and foreign currency denominated debt to manage our exposure to foreign exchange risk, such risk management strategies do not insulate us completely from those exposures and may not be effective, and our results of operations could be adversely affected. Exchange rates can be volatile and a substantial weakening of foreign currencies against the U.S. dollar could reduce our profit margin in certain of our businesses outside of the U.S. and adversely impact the comparability of results from period to period. The continued strength of the U.S. dollar could continue to adversely impact our revenue and profit in non-U.S. jurisdictions.

Operating in foreign countries and emerging markets exposes us to increased risks, including economic, political, security, and international operation risks.
 
We operate, manufacture, and sell our products and obtain raw materials in many foreign countries and emerging markets. This subjects us to risks that could materially impact our operating results, including: difficulties in staffing and managing foreign personnel in diverse cultures; transportation and other supply chain delays or interruptions; sometimes unpredictable regulatory changes; physical security risks, including the potential for violence, civil and labor unrest, and possible terrorist attacks; difficulties in enforcing rights, collecting revenues, and protecting assets in foreign jurisdictions; and the effects of international political developments and political and economic instability. For example, we have a flavors manufacturing facility in Celaya, Mexico; this city continues to experience increased levels of political and criminal violence by narcotics trafficking cartels. While the instability in Mexico has not yet materially adversely impacted our business there, it could do so in the future, and our results of operations could be adversely affected.

In addition, changes in policies by the United States or foreign governments could negatively affect our operating results due to changes in duties, tariffs, trade regulations, employment regulations, taxes, or limitations on currency or fund transfers. For example, changes in the trade relationship between the U.S. and China as well as potential regulatory actions by the Chinese government may affect the availability and cost of our raw materials and products originating in China, the demand for, as well as the supply of, our products manufactured in China or containing raw materials from China, and the demand from Chinese customers for our products.

These kinds of restrictions could be adopted with little to no advanced notice, and we may not be able to effectively mitigate the adverse impacts from such measures. Any of these events could increase the cost of our products, create disruptions to our supply chain, and impair our ability to effectively operate and compete in the countries where we do business.

The impact of tariffs and other trade barriers may negatively affect our results.
 
The Company has manufacturing facilities located around the world. The Company sells to customers located both inside and outside the countries in which products are manufactured. The Company also depends upon suppliers both inside and outside the countries in which products are manufactured. Tariffs and other trade barriers imposed by the U.S. or other countries have affected and could continue to adversely affect our manufacturing costs, our ability to source and import raw materials, our ability to export our products to other markets, and our ability to compete successfully against other companies that are not impacted by tariffs to the same extent as the Company. Additionally, the uncertainties created by tariffs and other trade barriers have also affected and could continue to affect our customers’ demand for our products because, for example, the customers decide to delay product launches or destock inventory due to these uncertainties. It is difficult to predict the effects of current or future tariffs and other trade barriers and disputes, and the Company’s efforts to reduce the effects of tariffs through pricing and other measures may not be effective. In some cases, our products, such as U.S. grown garlic and onion, benefit from tariffs levied against foreign products. If these beneficial tariffs were reduced or eliminated, it could adversely affect our business and financial condition.

Various stakeholders’ increasing and changing expectations and new laws and regulations with respect to Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) matters may impose additional costs on us or expose us to additional risks.
 
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Stakeholder expectations in connection with ESG matters have been, and continue to be, rapidly evolving and increasing. The enhanced stakeholder and regulatory focus on ESG matters requires us to continuously monitor various developing standards and reporting requirements and make continuous progress in our efforts to reduce our, as well as our suppliers, energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, water usage, and waste generation. Implementing such monitoring, reporting, and improved sustainability could be costly. Even where we make progress, our ESG practices still may not meet the standards of all of our stakeholders. For example, many of our large, global customers are committing to long-tern1 targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions within their supply chains. If we are unable to achieve these reductions, our customers may seek out alternative suppliers who are better able to support such reductions. Certain of our customers have also indicated that they will require that their suppliers meet a certain score or grade on one or more sustainability platforms. If we are unable to meet such criteria, we may be unable to win new business or lose existing business with those customers. We are also experiencing certain of our customers requesting that we undertake specific sustainability initiatives, some of which may impose significant costs on the Company. If we fail to undertake such initiatives, we may lose business with those customers or, if we do undertake such initiatives and are unable to pass on the additional costs, our profitability could be adversely impacted. In addition, some of our customers and other stakeholders are requiring us to provide information on our plans relating to certain ESG matters, such as greenhouse gas emissions (including carbon scores for particular products we supply), and we expect this trend to continue as more regulations are being adopted. If we are unable to respond, or we are perceived to be responding inadequately, to the expectations of our stakeholders, our business and reputation could be harmed, our profit and revenue could decline, and it could have a negative impact on the trading price of our common stock.

In addition, the increased focus on ESG matters may result in new or increased regulations, laws, and demands, such as carbon tax and tariff programs and enhanced sustainability reporting regimes, which could cause us to incur additional costs or to make changes to our operations to comply with any such regulations, laws, or demands. These actions are likely to increase costs associated with our operations, including costs for energy, raw materials, production, transportation, and labor. We are also likely to incur additional third-party service provider costs, including sustainability platform fees, audit costs, and other service fees from sustainability professionals in order to remain compliant with newly enacted regulations, laws, and demands, including the European Union Corporate Sustainability Reporting Directive and California SB 253 and SB 261. If we are unable to pass on these costs, our profit could decline. Further, our customers and the markets we serve may impose standards, regulations, market-based policies, or preferences that we may not be able to timely meet due to the required level of capital investment or technological advancement, which in the case of the availability of sustainable energy to support our operations is generally outside our control. If we fail to keep up with changing regulations and preferences, or if we fail to innovate or operate in ways that maximize sustainability, our customers may choose more sustainable suppliers. Failing to quickly and cost-efficiently adapt to stakeholder ESG expectations and standards could adversely affect our business and financial condition. Additionally, consumers who buy food and personal care products from our customers may be unwilling to pay the higher prices that could result from the increased costs of products as a result of the increased costs engendered by these sustainability efforts, which could adversely affect our business and financial condition.

World events and natural disasters are beyond our control and could affect our results.
 
World events can adversely affect national, international, and local economies. Economies can also be affected by conflicts, natural disasters, changes in climate, severe weather (including droughts and flooding), epidemics, pandemics, or other catastrophic events. Such events and conditions, as well as uncertainty in or impairment of financial markets, have adversely affected and could continue to affect our revenues and profitability, particularly if they occur in locations in which we or our customers have significant operations. Our natural colors, flavors, extracts, and essential oils businesses are dependent on favorable climatic conditions and the non-occurrence of natural disasters. Adverse weather events could impact our or our growers’ ability to plant, grow, and harvest crops, and such events could also increase the presence of disease and pests on such crops, which may negatively affect our ability to supply certain products. For example, our Natural Ingredients business has significant operations in California, which has been dealing with drought conditions, flooding, and water supply issues, which such issues had negatively impacted certain of our yields from onion harvests in prior years as discussed above. In the event that there is an insufficient supply of water for our operations or the operations of the growers that we contract with, our Natural Ingredients business may be materially impacted and could have an adverse effect on our results in future periods. While we make efforts to diversify where we grow products, these efforts may be insufficient to mitigate all adverse effects. In addition, while we have manufacturing facilities throughout the world, certain of our facilities are the sole manufacturer of a specific product, and a disruption in manufacturing could lead to increased costs of relocating or replacing the production of a product, or reformulating a product, which could have an adverse effect on our results.

Litigation and Regulatory Risks

Many of our products are used in items for human consumption and contact. We may be subject to product liability claims and product recalls, which could negatively impact our profitability and corporate image.
 
We sell flavors, colors, and other specialty ingredients that are used in foods, beverages, pharmaceuticals, personal care, nutraceuticals, and other items for human consumption or contact. These products involve risks such as contamination or spoilage, tampering, defects, and other adulteration. If the consumption or use of our products causes product damage, injury, illness, or death, we may be subject to liability, including class action lawsuits and other civil and governmental litigation. We are also subject to product liability claims involving products containing diacetyl and related chemicals as well as cosmetic ingredients that may have utilized talc in the past. From time to time, we or our customers have withdrawn or recalled products in the event of contamination, product defects, or perceived quality problems. If our customers withdraw or recall products related to ingredients that we provide to them, as has occurred in the past, they may make claims against us.

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Although we vigorously defend against claims when they are made, there can be no assurance that any claims or recalls will not be material. While we maintain liability insurance against these risks, coverage may be unavailable or incomplete. A significant product defect, product recall, or product liability judgment can negatively impact our profitability for a period of time depending on the insurance coverage, costs, adverse publicity, product availability, scope, competitive reaction, and consumer attitudes. Even if a product liability claim is unsuccessful or is not fully pursued, the cost of defense and the negative publicity surrounding any assertion that our products caused illness, injury, or death or any recall involving our products could adversely affect our reputation with existing and potential customers and our corporate image and thereby adversely impact our profitability.

There are an enormous number of laws and regulations applicable to us, our suppliers, and our customers across all of our business lines. Compliance with these legal requirements is costly to us and can affect our operations as well as those of our suppliers and customers. Failure to comply could also be costly and disruptive.
 
Our facilities and products are subject to many laws and regulations relating to the environment, health, safety, and the content, processing, packaging, storage, distribution, quality, and safety of food, drugs, personal care, other consumer products, and industrial colors. These laws and regulations are administered in the United States by the Department of Agriculture, the Food and Drug Administration, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Labor, and other federal and state governmental agencies. In addition, individual states may also enact regulations prohibiting or limiting the manufacturing and/or sale of goods containing certain of our products (such as the California Food Safety Act’s prohibition on red dye 3), which could cause a decrease in our sales of such products and negatively impact our results of operations. We, our suppliers, and our customers are subject to similar governmental regulation and oversight abroad. Compliance with these laws and regulations can be complex and costly and affect our, our suppliers’, and our customers’ operations. Also, if we, our suppliers, or our customers fail to comply with applicable laws and regulations, we could be subject to administrative penalties and injunctive relief, civil and criminal remedies, fines, recalls of products, and private civil lawsuits. Regulatory action against a supplier or customer can create risk for us and negatively affect our operations. As discussed above, actions by regulatory agencies against us and our suppliers can also adversely impact the availability of raw materials. Whenever raw materials become more costly or unavailable due to legal, regulatory, or other governmental actions, our profitability could be adversely impacted.

Environmental compliance may be costly to us.
 
Our operations are subject to extensive and stringent laws and regulations that pertain to the discharge of materials into the environment, handling of materials, and disposition of wastes and air emissions. These rules operate or will operate at both the federal and state levels in the United States, and there are analogous laws at most of our overseas locations. Environmental regulations, and the potential failure to comply with them, can have serious consequences, including the costs of compliance and defense; interference with our operations or the ability to obtain required permits; civil, criminal, and administrative penalties; and negative publicity. Additionally, the ability of our suppliers to comply with environmental regulations may cause adverse effects on us by reducing or eliminating the availability of necessary raw materials or increasing the cost of raw materials. These factors might adversely impact our ability to make certain products as well as our profitability on the products that can be made.

We could be adversely affected by violations of anti-bribery and anti-corruption laws and regulations.
 
Our business is subject to the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the United Kingdom Bribery Act, and similar anti-bribery and anti-corruption laws and regulations in other countries where we operate. While we maintain robust policies to prevent violations of these laws and to monitor third party risks, investigating and resolving actual or alleged violations of anti-bribery and anti-corruption laws is expensive and could negatively impact our results of operations or financial condition. Under these laws, companies may be held liable for the corrupt actions taken by their directors, officers, employees, agents, or other representatives. We could be subject to substantial civil and/or criminal fines and penalties if we or any of our representatives fail to comply with these laws, which could have a material adverse effect on our business and reputation.

Changes in tax rates or tax laws could expose us to additional tax liabilities that may negatively affect our results.
 
We are subject to taxes in the U.S. and numerous foreign jurisdictions. Our future effective tax rates could be affected by changes in the mix of earnings in countries with differing statutory tax rates; changes in the valuation of deferred tax assets and liabilities; changes in liabilities for uncertain tax positions; the costs of repatriations; or changes in tax laws or their interpretation. Any of these changes could negatively impact our results. In addition, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development published a statement updating and finalizing the key components of a two-pillar plan on global tax reform that has now been agreed upon by the majority of OECD members. Pillar Two imposes a global minimum corporate tax rate of 15%. Certain countries in which we operate have enacted legislation to adopt the Pillar Two framework, and several other countries are also considering changes to their tax laws to implement this framework. The Pillar Two framework is expected to be effective in fiscal year 2024. When and how this framework is adopted or enacted by the various countries in which we do business could increase tax complexity and uncertainty and may adversely affect our results of operations.

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We are also subject to the routine examination of our income tax returns by tax authorities in those countries in which we operate, and we may be subject to assessments or audits in the future in any of these countries. The results of such assessments or audits, if adverse to us, could negatively impact our results.

We have transfer pricing policies that are a significant component of the management and compliance of our operations across international boundaries and overall financial results. Many countries routinely examine transfer pricing policies of taxpayers subject to their jurisdiction, challenge transfer pricing policies aggressively where there is potential non-compliance, and impose significant interest charges and penalties where non-compliance is determined. However, governmental authorities could challenge these policies more aggressively in the future and, if challenged, we may not prevail. We could suffer significant costs related to one or more challenges to our transfer pricing policies.

Structural and Organizational Risks

We depend on certain key personnel, and the loss of these persons may harm our business, including the loss of trade secrets.
 
Our success depends in large part on the continued service and availability of our key management and technical personnel, and on our ability to attract and retain qualified new personnel. The competition for these individuals can be significant and if we are unable to successfully integrate, motivate, and reward our employees, we may not be able to retain them. The loss of key employees or inability to attract new employees in the future could harm our business. In addition, we need to provide for smooth transitions when replacing key management and technical personnel positions. Our operations and results may be negatively affected if we are not able to do so.

Additionally, many of our key personnel must have access to the Company’s trade secrets to effectively perform their job responsibilities. Although we seek to impose confidentiality, non-solicitation, loyalty, and non-competition obligations on many employees through agreements and our Code of Conduct, these efforts may not be successful. Furthermore, litigation to enforce departing employees’ legal obligations may not be, and has not always been, successful as the legal systems in many jurisdictions disfavor or prohibit restrictions on an employee’s right to change jobs as well as on preemptive measures to prevent the disclosure of a company’s trade secrets and intellectual property before it occurs. It may become more difficult to obtain and enforce non-competition agreements in the future, as there are various federal and state efforts ongoing in the U.S. that would prohibit or limit them. As a result, there is a possibility that certain competitors could attempt to exploit the Company’s trade secrets and confidential information to the Company’s competitive detriment, which could adversely impact our profitability.

We face risks associated with strategic transactions that we have completed and may pursue in the future, which could adversely affect our operating results.
 
Our business strategy includes acquiring businesses, making investments that complement our existing businesses, and, based on an evaluation of our business portfolio, divesting existing businesses. We have acquired many companies and operations in the past and may continue to grow by acquisition in the future. We continue to analyze and evaluate acquisition opportunities with the potential to strengthen our industry position or enhance our existing product offerings. We may not be able to identify suitable acquisition candidates or have sufficient financing and/or cash available to successfully complete acquisitions in the future. Our future growth through acquisitions could involve significant risks that may have a material adverse effect on us.

In addition, strategic transactions may present operational, financial, and managerial challenges, including diversion of management attention from existing businesses, difficulty with integrating or separating personnel and financial and other systems, increased expenses and raw material costs, assumption of unknown liabilities and indemnities that may not be discovered before an acquisition or fully reflected in the price we pay, and potential disputes with the buyers or sellers. If we are unable to consummate such transactions, or successfully integrate and grow acquisitions and achieve contemplated revenue synergies and cost savings, our financial results could be adversely affected. Divestitures have inherent risks, including potential post-closing liabilities and claims for indemnification, that may impact our ability to fully realize the anticipated benefits of a given divestiture. If any additional post-closing risks materialize, the benefits of such divestitures may not be fully realized, if at all, and our business, financial condition, and results of operations could be negatively impacted.

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We may also need to finance future acquisitions, and the terms of any financing, and the need to ultimately repay or refinance any indebtedness, may have negative effects on us. Acquisitions also could have a dilutive effect on our financial results. Acquisitions also generally result in goodwill, which would need to be written off against earnings in the future if it becomes impaired. Acquisitions and investments may involve significant cash expenditures, debt incurrences, equity issuances, operating losses, and expenses.

Technology and Cybersecurity Risks

Our ability to protect our intellectual property rights is key to our performance.
 
We protect our intellectual property rights as trade secrets, through patents, under confidentiality agreements, and through internal and external physical and cyber-security policies and systems. We could incur significant costs in asserting our intellectual property rights or defending ourselves from third party intellectual property claims. The laws of some of the countries in which we operate do not protect intellectual property rights to the same extent as the laws of the United States. Our failure to obtain or adequately protect our intellectual property rights (including in response to developments in artificial intelligence technologies), or any change in law or other changes that serve to lessen or remove the current legal protections of our intellectual property, may diminish our competitiveness and could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations. In addition, if other parties were to infringe on our intellectual property rights, or if a third party successfully asserted that we had infringed on their intellectual property rights, it could have an adverse impact on our business.

Our ability to successfully maintain and upgrade our information technology systems, and to respond effectively to failures, disruptions, compromises, or breaches of our information technology systems, may adversely affect our competitiveness and profitability.
 
Our success depends in part on our ability to maintain current information technology platforms, including some managed by third-party providers, for our businesses to operate effectively, reliably, and securely. We routinely review and upgrade our information technology and cybersecurity systems in order to better manage, report, and protect the information related to our formulas, research and development, manufacturing processes, trade secrets, sales, products, customers, personnel, and other operations. If we do not continue to maintain our information technology and cybersecurity platforms and successfully implement upgrades to systems to protect our vital information as well as our facilities and IT systems, our competitiveness and profits could decrease. In addition, as artificial intelligence capabilities and other new and evolving technologies improve and gain widespread use, we may experience cyber-attacks created using artificial intelligence or other new and evolving technologies, which may be difficult to detect and mitigate against. These attacks could be designed to directly attack information systems with increased speed and/or efficiency or create more effective phishing techniques. It is also possible for a threat to be introduced as a result of our customers and third-party providers using the output of an artificial intelligence tool or other new and evolving technologies that includes a threat, such as introducing malicious code by incorporating artificial intelligence-generated source code.

Because of the nature of our business, and the importance of our proprietary information and manufacturing facilities, we face threats and experience cybersecurity incidents and attempts from time to time, not only from hackers’ intent on theft and disruption, but also from malicious insiders that may attempt to steal Company information or negligent employees. Furthermore, our and our third-party providers’ information technology systems are susceptible to failures, disruptions, breaches, ransomware, theft, employee carelessness in the face of social engineering and phishing threats and attacks, and other similar cybersecurity events. We and third parties we utilize as vendors to support our business and operations have experienced such attacks in the past and while there has been no material impact on our business, any such attacks in the future could have an adverse impact on our business. The impact of any such event and the effectiveness of our response thereto may adversely affect our operations and subject us to lost business opportunities, increased operating costs, regulatory consequences, and reputational harm. While we take substantial steps to protect our information and systems through cyber security systems, monitoring, auditing, and training, these efforts are not always successful. And, while we maintain liability insurance against these risks, coverage may be unavailable or incomplete.

In addition, the Company is subject to a variety of laws and regulations in the United States and other jurisdictions regarding privacy, data protection, and data security, including those related to the collection, storage, handling, use, disclosure, transfer, and security of personal data. Compliance with and interpretation of various data privacy regulations continue to evolve and any violation could subject the Company to legal claims, regulatory penalties, and damage to its reputation. Our failure to comply with these evolving regulations, whether as a result of a cyber-attack or otherwise, could expose us to fines, sanctions, penalties, and other costs that could harm our reputation and adversely impact our financial results.

Item 1B.
Unresolved Staff Comments.

None.

18

Item 1C.
Cybersecurity.

Risk Management and Strategy

The Company recognizes the importance of assessing, identifying, and managing material risks associated with cybersecurity threats in order to safeguard our information systems and protect the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of our information systems and the information residing therein. We have implemented several cybersecurity processes to aid in our efforts to assess, identify, and manage such material risks.

Our risk management program considers cybersecurity threat risks alongside other risks as part of our overall risk assessment process. We believe that integrating our cybersecurity risk management into our broader risk management framework promotes a company-wide culture of cybersecurity risk management and ensures that cybersecurity considerations are an integral part of decision-making at every level.

We employ a wide range of tools, policies, and services, including but not limited to penetration testing, network and endpoint monitoring, vulnerability assessments, information segregation, and tabletop exercises to inform our risk identification and assessment. We routinely review and upgrade our information technology and cybersecurity systems in order to better manage, report, and protect the information related to our formulas and processes, research and development, trade secrets, products, customers and suppliers, employees, and other sensitive information. We also have a cybersecurity specific risk assessment process that helps us identify our cybersecurity threat risks and maturity level by comparing our processes to standards set by the International Organization for Standardization.

To provide for the availability of critical data and systems, maintain regulatory compliance, manage our material risks from cybersecurity threats, and to protect against, detect, and respond to cybersecurity incidents, we:


Run tabletop exercises with our executive team to simulate a response to a cybersecurity incident and use the findings to improve our processes and technologies;

Conduct regular third-party assessments of our cybersecurity program;

Undertake regular reviews of our incident response plan and other policies related to cybersecurity;

Run regular cyber penetration testing;

Through policy and practice, classify information, restrict access, and require employees to treat sensitive data with care; and

Conduct an annual employee training program, including regular phishing email simulations for all employees with access to corporate email systems to enhance awareness and responsiveness to such possible threats.
 
Our incident response plan coordinates the activities we take to prepare for, detect, respond to, and recover from cybersecurity incidents, which include processes to triage, assess severity of, escalate, contain, investigate, and remediate the incident, as well as to comply with potentially applicable legal obligations.

Recognizing the complexity and evolving nature of cybersecurity threats, the Company engages third-party experts, including assessors, auditors, and consultants, in evaluating and testing our risk management systems. Such engagements include: managed security services, regular audits, penetration testing, threat assessments, and consultation on security enhancements. The Company has processes in place to oversee and manage its use of third-party vendors. We conduct security assessments of third-party vendors engaged, limit the information systems of the Company available to the third party, and maintain monitoring to ensure compliance with our cybersecurity standards.

From time to time, we experience cybersecurity incidents and threats to our systems and information. Through the date hereof, no risks from identified cybersecurity threats, including as a result of any previous cybersecurity incidents, have materially affected, and we do not believe are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company, including our business strategy, results of operations, or financial condition. However, we cannot guarantee that we will not be materially affected in the future. Cybersecurity threats rapidly evolve and are complex, so we must continually adapt and enhance our processes. As we do this, we must make judgments about where and how to invest resources to most effectively protect ourselves from threats. These are inherently challenging processes, and we can provide no assurance that the processes that we implement will be effective. For more information regarding cybersecurity risks that could impact the Company, see our risk factor disclosures at Item 1A of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, which such disclosures are incorporated by reference herein.

19

Governance

Cybersecurity is an important part of our risk management processes and an area of focus for our Board and management. Our entire Board is responsible for the oversight of risks from cybersecurity threats. At least twice annually, the entire Board receives an overview from management of our cybersecurity progress and effectiveness, covering topics such as current cybersecurity landscape and emerging threats, data security posture, results from third-party assessments, status of ongoing initiatives and strategies, and material cybersecurity threat risks or, if any, incidents and developments. In these sessions, the Board receives materials and discusses such matters with our Chief Information Officer. The Board also receives annual training on cybersecurity. In addition, we have formed an executive level steering committee (including the CEO, CFO, Group Presidents, General Counsel, VP, Human Resources, Controller/Chief Accounting Officer, and Chief Information Officer) that provides oversight and routinely discusses cybersecurity matters.

Our cybersecurity risk management and strategy processes, which are discussed in greater detail above, are led by our Chief Information Officer, our Director of Information Security, and our Director of Infrastructure. These individuals collectively have over 85 years of prior work experience in various roles in the information security field, including managing and implementing effective information technology and cybersecurity programs, as well as relevant degrees and certifications, including a Certified Information Systems Security Professional certification. These members of management are informed about and monitor the prevention, mitigation, detection, and remediation of cybersecurity incidents through their management of, and participation in, the cybersecurity risk management and strategy processes described above, including the operation of our incident response plan. As discussed above, our Chief Information Officer reports to the entire Board about cybersecurity threat risks, among other cybersecurity matters, at least twice annually or more frequently as circumstances may require.

Item 2.
Properties.

We lease our corporate headquarters offices, which are located at 777 East Wisconsin Avenue, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. We own our Color Group headquarters offices located in St. Louis, Missouri. We lease our Asia Pacific Group headquarters offices located in Singapore. We own a part, and lease a part, of our Flavors & Extracts Group headquarters offices located in Hoffman Estates, Illinois. As of December 31, 2023, the locations of our production properties by reportable segment are as follows:

Color Group:
U.S. – St. Louis, Missouri.
International – Jundiai, Brazil*; Delta, British Columbia, Canada*; Kingston, Ontario, Canada; Saint Ouen L’Aumone, France; Geesthacht, Germany; Reggio Emilia, Italy; Lerma, Mexico; Lima, Peru*; Johannesburg, South Africa; Gebze, Turkey; and Kings Lynn, United Kingdom.

Flavors & Extracts Group:
U.S. – Livingston and Turlock, California; Amboy, Illinois; Harbor Beach, Michigan; Juneau, Wisconsin; and Deming, New Mexico.
International – Heverlee, Belgium; San Jose, Costa Rica*; Geesthacht, Germany; Celaya and Tlalnepantla*, Mexico; and Wales and Milton Keynes, United Kingdom.

Asia Pacific Group:
U.S. – None.
International – Keysborough, Australia; Guangzhou, China*; Mumbai, India*; Hitachi, Japan; Auckland, New Zealand; Manila, Philippines*; and Bangkok, Thailand*.

* Indicates a leased property at the location.

All properties are owned except as otherwise indicated above. All facilities are considered to be in good condition (ordinary wear and tear excepted) and suitable and adequate for the Company’s requirements.

Item 3.
Legal Proceedings.

See Part II, Item 8, Note 17, Commitments and Contingencies, of this report for information regarding legal proceedings in which we are involved.

Item 4.
Mine Safety Disclosure.

Not applicable.

20

Information About Our Executive Officers

The executive officers of the Company and their ages as of February 22, 2024 are as follows:

Name
Age
Position
Paul Manning
49
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Amy M. Agallar
46
Vice President and Treasurer
Michael C. Geraghty
62
President, Color Group
Thierry Hoang
43
Vice President, Asia Pacific Group
Amy Schmidt Jones
54
Vice President, Human Resources and Senior Counsel
John J. Manning
55
Senior Vice President, General Counsel, and Secretary
Steve Morris
60
President, Flavors & Extracts Group
Stephen J. Rolfs
59
Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Tobin Tornehl
50
Vice President, Controller and Chief Accounting Officer

The Company has employed all of the individuals named above, in substantively their current positions, for at least the past five years except as follows:
 

Mr. Morris has held his present office since January 1, 2024, and previously served as General Manager, Sweet and Beverage Flavors North America (August 2017 – December 2023).

Mr. Paul Manning (Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer) and Mr. John J. Manning (Senior Vice President, General Counsel, and Secretary) are brothers.

21

PART II

Item 5.
Market for the Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters, and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

The Company’s common stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol “SXT.” The number of shareholders of record of the Company’s common stock on February 8, 2024 was 1,932.

Since 1962, the Company has paid, without interruption, a quarterly cash dividend. During fiscal 2023, the Company paid aggregate cash dividends of $1.64 per share to our shareholders, and the Company most recently declared a dividend of $0.41 per share payable on March 1, 2024 to shareholders of record on February 6, 2024. The timing, declaration, and payment of future dividends to holders of the Company’s common stock will depend upon many factors, including the Company’s financial condition and results of operations, the capital requirements of the Company’s businesses, industry practice, and any other relevant factors.

On October 19, 2017, the Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to three million shares (2017 Authorization). As of December 31, 2023, 1,267,019 shares had been repurchased under the 2017 Authorization. There were no repurchases of shares by the Company during 2023. There is no expiration date for the 2017 Authorization. The 2017 Authorization may be modified, suspended, or discontinued by the Board of Directors at any time. As of December 31, 2023, the maximum number of shares that may be purchased under publicly announced plans is 1,732,981.

This graph compares the cumulative total shareholder return for the Company’s common stock over the last five years to the total returns on the Standard & Poor’s Midcap Specialty Chemicals Index (S&P Midcap Specialty Chemicals Index), the Standard & Poor’s Midcap Food Products Index (S&P Midcap Food Products Index), and the Standard & Poor’s 500 Stock Index (S&P 500 Index). The graph assumes a $100 investment made on December 31, 2018, and reinvestment of dividends. The stock performance shown on the graph is not necessarily indicative of future price performance. The stock performance graph and related information presented below is not deemed to be “soliciting material” or to be “filed” with the Securities and Exchange Commission or subject to Regulation 14A or 14C under the Exchange Act or to the liabilities of Section 18 of the Exchange Act, and will not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into any filing under the Securities Act of 1933 or the Exchange Act, except to the extent the Company specifically incorporates it by reference into such a filing.

graphic

 
 
December
31, 2018
   
December
31, 2019
   
December
31, 2020
   
December
31, 2021
   
December
31, 2022
   
December
31, 2023
 
Sensient Technologies Corporation
 
$
100
   
$
121
   
$
139
   
$
192
   
$
143
   
$
132
 
S&P Midcap Specialty Chemicals Index
   
100
     
118
     
127
     
151
     
135
     
151
 
S&P Midcap Food Products Index
   
100
     
117
     
128
     
150
     
147
     
134
 
S&P 500 Index
   
100
     
131
     
156
     
200
     
164
     
207
 
Standard & Poor’s and S&P are registered trademarks of Standard & Poor’s Financial Services, LLC.

Item 6.
[Reserved]

22

Item 7.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

The following discussion and analysis of the Company’s financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with our audited consolidated financial statements and the notes to those statements (Part II, Item 8 of this Form 10-K). This section generally discusses the results of our operations for the year ended December 31, 2023, compared to the year ended December 31, 2022. For a discussion of the year ended December 31, 2022, compared to the year ended December 31, 2021, please refer to Part II, Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on February 17, 2023, which is incorporated herein by reference.

OVERVIEW

Sensient Technologies Corporation (the Company or Sensient) is a leading global manufacturer and marketer of colors, flavors, and other specialty ingredients. The Company uses advanced technologies at facilities around the world to develop specialty food and beverage systems; personal care, essential oils, pharmaceutical, and nutraceutical systems; specialty colors; and other specialty and fine chemicals. The Company’s three reportable segments are the Flavors & Extracts Group and the Color Group, which are both managed on a product line basis, and the Asia Pacific Group, which is managed on a geographic basis. The Company’s corporate expenses, divestiture & other related costs and income, share-based compensation, restructuring and other charges, including operational improvement plan costs and portfolio optimization plan costs, and other costs are included in the “Corporate & Other” category.

The Company’s diluted earnings per share were $2.21 in 2023 and $3.34 in 2022. 2023 results were negatively impacted by $27.8 million ($27.4 million after tax, $0.65 per share) of portfolio optimization plan costs. 2022 results were positively impacted by $2.5 million ($1.9 million after tax, $0.04 per share) of divestiture & other related income. Adjusted diluted earnings per share, which exclude the divestiture & other related income and the portfolio optimization plan costs, were $2.86 in 2023 and $3.29 in 2022 (see discussion below regarding non-GAAP financial measures).

Additional information on the results is included below.

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
2023 vs. 2022

Revenue
Sensient’s revenue was approximately $1.46 billion and $1.44 billion in 2023 and 2022, respectively.

Gross Profit
The Company’s gross margin was 31.6% in 2023 and 34.0% in 2022. The decrease in gross margin was primarily due to higher raw material costs, lower volumes, and portfolio optimization plan costs, which decreased gross margin 20 basis points in 2023, partially offset by higher selling prices in 2023.

Selling and Administrative Expenses
Selling and administrative expense as a percent of revenue was 21.0% in 2023 and 20.3% in 2022. Selling and administrative expenses in 2023 were increased by portfolio optimization plan costs totaling $24.7 million and in 2022 were reduced by divestiture & other related income totaling $2.5 million. Selling and administrative expense as a percent of revenue increased by approximately 170 basis points and decreased by approximately 20 basis points in 2023 and 2022, respectively, as a result of these expenses and income. See Divestitures and Portfolio Optimization Plan below for further information.

Selling and administrative expenses as a percent of revenue was further impacted by lower performance-based compensation in 2023.

Operating Income
Operating income was $155.0 million in 2023 and $196.8 million in 2022. Operating margins were 10.6% in 2023 and 13.7% in 2022. Portfolio optimization plan costs decreased operating margins by approximately 200 basis points in 2023 and divestiture & other related income improved operating margins by approximately 20 basis points in 2022.

Additional information on segment results can be found in the Segment Information section.

Interest Expense
Interest expense was $25.2 million in 2023 and $14.5 million in 2022. The increase in expense was primarily due to an increase in the average interest rate and average debt outstanding.

23

Income Taxes
The effective income tax rate was 28.1% in 2023 and 22.7% in 2022. The effective tax rates in both 2023 and 2022 were impacted by the release of valuation allowances related to the foreign tax credit carryover and net operating losses, changes in estimates associated with the finalization of prior year foreign and domestic tax items, audit settlements, and mix of foreign earnings. The effective tax rate in 2023 was also impacted by the limited tax deductibility of costs related to the portfolio optimization plan. See Note 11, Income Taxes, in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in this report for additional information.

 
 
2023
   
2022
 
Rate before portfolio optimization plan and discrete items
   
25.5
%
   
25.8
%
Portfolio optimization plan impact
   
4.7
%
   
-
 
Discrete items
   
(2.1
%)
   
(3.1
%)
Reported effective tax rate
   
28.1
%
   
22.7
%

The 2024 effective income tax rate is estimated to be between 24% and 25%.

Acquisitions
On October 3, 2022, the Company acquired Endemix Doğal Maddeler A.Ş. and Teknoloji Yatırımları ve Danışmanlık Sanayi ve Ticaret A.Ş. (collectively, Endemix), a natural colors business located in Turkey. The Company paid $23.3 million in cash for this acquisition, which is net of $1.3 million in debt assumed. This business is part of the Color segment.

See Note 2, Acquisitions, in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in this report for additional information.

Divestitures
In 2022, the Company received $2.5 million of net cash related to the previously completed sale of its yogurt fruit preparations product line.

See Note 14, Divestitures, in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in this report for additional information.

Portfolio Optimization Plan
During the fourth quarter of 2023, the board of directors of the Company approved a portfolio optimization plan (Portfolio Optimization Plan) to undertake an effort to optimize certain production facilities and improve efficiencies within the Company. As part of the Portfolio Optimization Plan, in the Flavors & Extracts segment, the Company is evaluating the potential closure of its manufacturing facility in Felinfach, Wales, United Kingdom, the potential closure of its sales office in Granada, Spain, and the potential centralization and elimination of certain selling and administrative positions, with such proposals remaining subject to information and consultation processes in certain countries. In addition, in the Color segment, the Company’s proposals include closing a manufacturing facility in Delta, British Columbia, Canada, closing a sales office in Argentina, and centralizing and eliminating certain production positions as well as potentially eliminating some selling and administrative positions, with such proposals remaining subject to information and consultation processes in certain countries. The Company reports all costs associated with the Portfolio Optimization Plan in the Corporate & Other segment.

See Note 16, Portfolio Optimization Plan, in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in this report for additional information.

NON-GAAP FINANCIAL MEASURES

Within the following tables, the Company reports certain non-GAAP financial measures, including: (1) adjusted operating income, adjusted net earnings, and adjusted diluted earnings per share, which exclude the divestiture & other related income and restructuring and other costs, including the portfolio optimization plan costs and (2) percentage changes in revenue, operating income, and diluted earnings per share on an adjusted local currency basis, which eliminate the effects that result from translating its international operations into U.S. dollars, the divestiture & other related income, and restructuring and other costs, including the portfolio optimization plan costs.

The Company has included each of these non-GAAP measures in order to provide additional information regarding our underlying operating results and comparable year-over-year performance. Such information is supplemental to information presented in accordance with GAAP and is not intended to represent a presentation in accordance with GAAP. These non-GAAP measures should not be considered in isolation. Rather, they should be considered together with GAAP measures and the rest of the information included in this report. Management internally reviews each of these non-GAAP measures to evaluate performance on a comparative period-to-period basis and to gain additional insight into underlying operating and performance trends, and the Company believes the information can be beneficial to investors for the same purposes. These non-GAAP measures may not be comparable to similarly titled measures used by other companies.

24

 
 
Twelve Months Ended December 31,
 
(In thousands except per share amounts)
 
2023
   
2022
   
% Change
 
Operating Income (GAAP)
 
$
155,023
   
$
196,751
     
(21.2
)%
Portfolio optimization plan costs – Cost of products sold
   
3,135
     
-
         
Divestiture & other related income – Selling and administrative expenses
   
-
     
(2,532
)
       
Portfolio optimization plan costs – Selling and administrative expenses
   
24,706
     
-
         
Adjusted operating income
 
$
182,864
   
$
194,219
     
(5.8
)%
 
                       
Net Earnings (GAAP)
 
$
93,394
   
$
140,887
     
(33.7
)%
Divestiture & other related income, before tax
   
-
     
(2,532
)
       
Tax impact of divestiture & other related income(1)
   
-
     
636
         
Portfolio optimization plan costs, before tax
   
27,841
                 
Tax impact of portfolio optimization plan costs(1)
   
(415
)
               
Adjusted net earnings
 
$
120,820
   
$
138,991
     
(13.1
)%
 
                       
Diluted Earnings Per Share (GAAP)
 
$
2.21
   
$
3.34
     
(33.8
)%
Divestiture & other related income, net of tax
   
-
     
(0.04
)
       
Portfolio optimization plan costs, net of tax
   
0.65
     
-
         
Adjusted diluted earnings per share
 
$
2.86
   
$
3.29
     
(13.1
)%

(1) Tax impact adjustments were determined based on the nature of the underlying non-GAAP adjustments and their relevant jurisdictional tax rates.
 
Divestiture & other related income is discussed under “Divestitures” above and Note 14, Divestitures, in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in this report. Portfolio optimization plan costs are discussed under “Portfolio Optimization Plan” above and Note 16, Portfolio Optimization Plan, in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in this report.
 
Note: Earnings per share calculations may not foot due to rounding differences.

The following table summarizes the percentage change in the 2023 results compared to the 2022 results in the respective financial measures.
 
   
Twelve Months Ended December 31, 2023
 
 
 
Total
   
Foreign
Exchange
Rates
   
Adjustments(1)
   
Adjusted Local
Currency
 
Revenue
                       
Flavors & Extracts
   
0.4
%    
1.2
%
   
N/A
     
(0.8
%)
Color
   
0.7
%    
1.6
%
   
N/A
     
(0.9
%)
Asia Pacific
   
1.7
%    
(1.8
%)
   
N/A
     
3.5
%
Total Revenue
   
1.4
%    
1.1
%
   
N/A
     
0.3
%
 
                               
Operating Income
                               
Flavors & Extracts
   
(16.7
%)
   
0.6
%
   
0.0
%
   
(17.3
%)
Color
   
(8.1
%)
   
1.5
%
   
0.0
%
   
(9.6
%)
Asia Pacific
   
4.4
 %    
(1.9
%)
   
0.0
%
   
6.3
%
Corporate & Other
   
30.6
 %    
0.0
%
   
56.3
%
   
(25.7
%)
Total Operating Income
   
(21.2
%)
   
1.0
%
   
(15.4
%)
   
(6.8
%)
Diluted Earnings per Share
   
(33.8
%)
   
0.9
%
   
(20.7
%)
   
(14.0
%)

 
(1)
For Operating Income and Diluted Earnings per Share, adjustments consist of divestiture & other related income in 2022 and portfolio optimization plan costs in 2023.

 
Note:
Refer to table above for a reconciliation of these non-GAAP measures.

25

SEGMENT INFORMATION

The Company determines its operating segments based on information utilized by its chief operating decision maker to allocate resources and assess performance. Segment performance is evaluated on operating income before any applicable divestiture & other related income, share-based compensation, acquisition, restructuring and other costs, including the portfolio optimization plan costs, and other costs (which are reported in Corporate & Other), interest expense, and income taxes.

The Company’s discussion below regarding its operating segments has been updated to reflect the Company’s disaggregation of revenue, as summarized in Part II, Item 8, Note 12, Segment and Geographic Information, of this report.

The Company’s reportable segments consist of the Flavors & Extracts, Color, and Asia Pacific segments.

Flavors & Extracts
Flavors & Extracts segment revenue was $741.1 million in 2023 and $738.0 million in 2022. The higher segment revenue was due to higher revenue in Natural Ingredients, partially offset by lower revenue in Flavors, Extracts & Flavor Ingredients. The higher revenue in Natural Ingredients was primarily due to higher selling prices, partially offset by lower volumes. The lower revenue in Flavors, Extracts & Flavor Ingredients was primarily due to lower volumes, partially offset by higher selling prices and the favorable impact of foreign exchange rates, which increased segment revenue by approximately 1%.

Flavors & Extracts segment operating income was $87.8 million in 2023 and $105.4 million in 2022, a decrease of approximately 17%. Foreign exchange rates increased segment operating income by approximately 1%. The lower segment operating income was a result of lower operating income in Natural Ingredients and Flavors, Extracts & Flavor Ingredients. The lower operating income in Natural Ingredients was primarily due to higher raw material costs, lower volumes, and an unfavorable product mix, partially offset by higher selling prices and lower manufacturing and other costs. The lower operating income in Flavors, Extracts & Flavor Ingredients was primarily due to higher raw material and manufacturing and other costs and lower volumes, partially offset by higher selling prices. Segment operating income as a percent of revenue was 11.8% and 14.3% for 2023 and 2022, respectively.

Color
Segment revenue for the Color segment was $608.0 million in 2023 and $604.0 million in 2022, an increase of approximately 1%. Foreign exchange rates increased segment revenue by approximately 2%. The higher segment revenue was a result of higher revenue in Food & Pharmaceutical Colors, partially offset by lower revenue in Personal Care. The higher revenue in Food & Pharmaceutical Colors was primarily due to higher selling prices, the acquisition of Endemix Doğal Maddeler A.Ş., and the favorable impact of foreign exchange rates, partially offset by lower volumes. The lower revenue in Personal Care was primarily due to lower volumes, partially offset by higher selling prices and the favorable impact of foreign exchange rates.

Segment operating income for the Color segment was $105.4 million in 2023 and $114.6 million in 2022, a decrease of approximately 8%. The lower segment operating income was a result of lower operating income in Personal Care, partially offset by higher operating income in Food & Pharmaceutical Colors. The lower operating income in Personal Care was primarily due to higher raw material and manufacturing and other costs and lower volumes, partially offset by higher selling prices. The higher operating income in Food & Pharmaceutical Colors was primarily due to higher selling prices and the favorable impact of foreign exchange rates, which increased segment operating income by approximately 2%, partially offset by higher raw material and manufacturing and other costs, lower volumes, and an unfavorable product mix. Segment operating income as a percent of revenue was 17.3% and 19.0% for 2023 and 2022, respectively.

Asia Pacific
Segment revenue for the Asia Pacific segment was $146.1 million and $143.6 million for 2023 and 2022, respectively, an increase of approximately 2%. Segment revenue was higher than the prior year primarily due to higher selling prices, partially offset by lower volumes and the unfavorable impact of foreign exchange rates, which decreased segment revenue by approximately 2%.

Segment operating income for the Asia Pacific segment was $30.8 million in 2023 and $29.5 million in 2022, an increase of approximately 4%. Foreign exchange rates decreased segment operating income by approximately 2%. The increase in segment operating income was a result of higher selling prices, partially offset by higher raw material costs and lower volumes. Segment operating income as a percent of revenue was 21.1% in 2023 and 20.5% in 2022.

26

Corporate & Other
The Corporate & Other operating loss was $68.9 million in 2023 and $52.8 million in 2022. The higher operating loss was primarily a result of portfolio optimization plan costs totaling $27.8 million negatively impacting 2023 and divestiture & other related income totaling $2.5 million favorably impacting 2022, partially offset by lower performance-based compensation in 2023. See the Divestitures and Portfolio Optimization Plan sections above for further information.

LIQUIDITY AND FINANCIAL POSITION

Financial Condition
The Company’s financial position remains strong. The Company is in compliance with its loan covenants calculated in accordance with applicable agreements as of December 31, 2023. The Company expects its cash flow from operations and its existing debt capacity can be used to meet anticipated future cash requirements for operations, capital expenditures, and dividend payments, as well as potential acquisitions and stock repurchases. The Company’s contractual obligations consist primarily of operational commitments, which we expect to continue to be able to satisfy through cash generated from operations, and debt. The Company has various series of notes outstanding that mature from 2024 through 2029, with approximately $82 million coming due in 2024. The Company believes that it has the ability to refinance or repay all of its obligations through a combination of cash flow from operations, issuance of additional notes, and substantial borrowing capacity of approximately $318 million under the Company’s revolving credit facility, which matures in 2026.

As a result of our ability to manage the impact of inflation through pricing and other actions, the impact of inflation was not material to the Company’s financial position and its results of operations in 2023. The Company has experienced increased costs for certain inputs, such as raw materials, shipping and logistics, and labor-related costs. We continue to expect to manage these impacts in the near term, but persistent, accelerated, or expanded inflationary conditions could exacerbate these challenges and impact our profitability.

In October 2017, the Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to three million shares. As of December 31, 2023, 1,732,981 shares were available to be repurchased under the existing authorization. The Company’s share repurchase program has no expiration date. These authorizations may be modified, suspended, or discontinued by the Board of Directors at any time. There were no shares of Company stock repurchased in 2023 or 2022.

Cash Flows from Operating Activities
Net cash provided by operating activities was $169.7 million and $12.1 million in 2023 and 2022, respectively. Operating cash flow provided the primary source of funds for operating needs, capital expenditures, and shareholder dividends. The increase in net cash provided by operating activities in 2023 was primarily due to a decrease in the cash used for inventory investments during 2023 compared to 2022 and an increase in cash provided by accounts receivable.

Cash Flows from Investing Activities
Net cash used in investing activities was $87.6 million and $98.4 million in 2023 and 2022, respectively. Capital expenditures were $87.9 million in 2023 and $79.3 million in 2022. In 2022, the Company received $2.5 million of proceeds from the divestiture of the yogurt fruit preparations product line. The Company paid $1.7 million and $21.7 million in 2023 and 2022, respectively, for the acquisition of Endemix Doğal Maddeler A.Ş. and Teknoloji Yatırımları ve Danışmanlık Sanayi ve Ticaret A.Ş. and $1.0 million in 2022 related to a purchase price holdback associated with the acquisition of Flavor Solutions, Inc.

Cash Flows from Financing Activities
Net cash used in financing activities was $82.0 million in 2023, and net cash provided by financing activities was $86.2 million in 2022. The Company had a net decrease in debt of $3.5 million in 2023 compared to a net increase in debt of $157.2 million in 2022. For the purposes of the cash flow statement, net changes in debt exclude the impact of foreign exchange rates. The Company has paid uninterrupted quarterly cash dividends since commencing public trading of its stock in 1962. Dividends paid per share were $1.64 in 2023 and 2022. Total dividends paid were $69.2 million and $68.9 million in 2023 and 2022, respectively.

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES

In preparing the financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the U.S., management is required to make estimates and assumptions that have an impact on the asset, liability, revenue, and expense amounts reported. These estimates can also affect supplemental information disclosures of the Company, including information about contingencies, risk, and financial condition. The Company believes, given current facts and circumstances, that its estimates and assumptions are reasonable, adhere to accounting principles generally accepted in the U.S., and are consistently applied. Inherent in the nature of an estimate or assumption is the fact that actual results may differ from estimates and estimates may vary as new facts and circumstances arise. The Company makes routine estimates and judgments in determining the net realizable value of accounts receivable, inventories, and property, plant, and equipment. Management believes the Company’s most critical accounting estimates and assumptions are in the following areas:

27

Revenue Recognition
The Company recognizes revenue at the transfer of control of its products to the Company’s customers in an amount reflecting the consideration to which the Company expects to be entitled. Revenue is recognized when control of the product is transferred to the customer, the customer is obligated to pay the Company, and the Company has no remaining obligations, which is typically at shipment. See Note 1, Summary of Significant Accounting Policies, in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in this report for additional details.

Goodwill Valuation
The Company reviews the carrying value of goodwill annually utilizing several valuation methodologies, including a discounted cash flow model. The Company completed its annual goodwill impairment test under Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) 350, Intangibles – Goodwill and Other, in the third quarter of 2023. In conducting its annual test for impairment, the Company performed a qualitative assessment of its previously calculated fair values for each of its reporting units. Fair value is estimated using both a discounted cash flow analysis and an analysis of comparable company market values. If the fair value of a reporting unit exceeds its net book value, no impairment exists. The Company’s three reporting units each had goodwill recorded and were tested for impairment. All three reporting units had fair values that were above their respective net book values by at least 75%. Changes in estimates of future cash flows caused by items such as unforeseen events or changes in market conditions could negatively affect the reporting units’ fair value and result in an impairment charge.

Income Taxes
The Company estimates its income tax expense in each of the taxing jurisdictions in which it operates. The Company is subject to a tax audit in each of these jurisdictions, which could result in changes to the estimated tax expense. The amount of these changes would vary by jurisdiction and would be recorded when probable and estimable. These changes could impact the Company’s financial statements. Management has recorded valuation allowances to reduce the Company’s deferred tax assets to the amount that is more likely than not to be realized. As of December 31, 2023, the Company recorded gross deferred tax assets of $117.4 million with an associated valuation allowance of $34.1 million. Examples of deferred tax assets include deductions, net operating losses, and tax credits that the Company believes will reduce its future tax payments. In assessing the future realization of these assets, management has considered future taxable income and ongoing tax planning strategies. An adjustment to the recorded valuation allowance as a result of changes in facts or circumstances could result in a significant change in the Company’s tax expense. The Company does not provide for deferred taxes on unremitted earnings of foreign subsidiaries, which are considered to be invested indefinitely.

Inventories
Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Cost is determined using the first-in, first-out (FIFO) method. Net realizable value is determined on the basis of estimated realizable values. Cost includes direct materials, direct labor, and manufacturing overhead.

The Company estimates any required write-downs for inventory obsolescence by examining inventories on a quarterly basis to determine if there are any damaged items or slow-moving products in which the carrying values could exceed net realizable value. Inventory write-downs are recorded as the difference between the cost of inventory and its estimated market value. The Company recorded non-cash charges of $3.1 million in 2023 in Cost of Products Sold related to the portfolio optimization plan. The charges reduced the carrying value of certain inventories, as they were determined to be excess. While significant judgment is involved in determining the net realizable value of inventory, the Company believes that inventory is appropriately stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value.

Commitments and Contingencies
The Company is subject to litigation and other legal proceedings arising in the ordinary course of its businesses or arising under applicable laws and regulations. Estimating liabilities and costs associated with these matters requires the judgment of management, who rely in part on information from Company legal counsel. When it is probable that the Company has incurred a liability associated with claims or pending or threatened litigation matters and the Company’s exposure is reasonably estimable, the Company records a charge against earnings. The Company recognizes related insurance reimbursement when receipt is deemed probable. The Company’s estimate of liabilities and related insurance recoveries may change as further facts and circumstances become known.

NEW PRONOUNCEMENTS

Refer to the “Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements” section within Note 1, “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies,” in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in this report for additional details.

28

Item 7A.
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk.

The Company is exposed to market risks, including changes in interest rates, currency exchange rates, and commodity prices. Where possible, the Company nets certain of these exposures to take advantage of natural offsets. For certain remaining exposures, the Company may enter into various derivative transactions pursuant to the Company’s hedging policies. The financial impacts of these hedging instruments are offset by corresponding changes in the underlying exposures being hedged.

The Company does not hold or issue derivative financial instruments for trading purposes. Note 1 and Note 7 to the Consolidated Financial Statements include discussions of the Company’s accounting policies for financial instruments.

Because the Company manufactures and sells its products throughout the world, it is exposed to movements in foreign currency exchange rates. The major foreign currency exposures include the markets in Western Europe, Latin America, Canada, and Asia. The primary purpose of the Company’s foreign currency hedging activities is to protect against the volatility associated with foreign currency sales, purchases of materials, and other assets and liabilities created during the normal course of business. The Company generally utilizes foreign exchange contracts with durations of less than 18 months that may or may not be designated as cash flow hedges under ASC 815, Derivatives and Hedging. The net fair value of these instruments, based on dealer quotes, was an asset of $1.0 million and a liability of $0.2 million as of December 31, 2023 and 2022, respectively. At December 31, 2023, the potential gain or loss in the fair value of the Company’s outstanding foreign exchange contracts, assuming a hypothetical 10% fluctuation in the currencies of such contracts, would be approximately $3.5 million. However, any change in the value of the contracts, real or hypothetical, would be significantly offset by a corresponding change in the value of the underlying hedged items. In addition, this hypothetical calculation assumes that each exchange rate would change in the same direction relative to the U.S. dollar.

The Company has certain debt denominated in Euros and British Pounds. These non-derivative debt instruments act as partial hedges of the Company’s Euro and British Pound net asset positions. The potential increase or decrease in the annual U.S. dollar equivalent interest expense of the Company’s outstanding foreign currency-denominated debt, assuming a hypothetical 10% fluctuation in the currencies of such debt, would be approximately $1.1 million at December 31, 2023. However, any change in interest expense from fluctuations in currency, real or hypothetical, would be significantly offset by a corresponding change in the value of the foreign income before interest. In addition, this hypothetical calculation assumes that each exchange rate would change in the same direction relative to the U.S. dollar.

The Company manages its debt structure and interest rate risk through the use of fixed rate and floating rate debt. The Company’s primary exposure is to interest rates in the U.S. and Europe. At December 31, 2023, the potential increase or decrease in annual interest expense of floating rate debt, assuming a hypothetical 10% fluctuation in interest rates, would be $1.0 million.

The Company is the purchaser of certain commodities, such as vanilla, corn, sugar, soybean meal, and fruits. The Company generally purchases these commodities based upon market prices that are established with the vendor as part of the purchase process. In general, the Company does not use commodity financial instruments to hedge commodity prices due to a high correlation between the commodity cost and the ultimate selling price of the Company’s products. On occasion, the Company may enter into non-cancelable forward purchase contracts, as deemed appropriate, to reduce the effect of price fluctuations on future manufacturing requirements.

29

Item 8.
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF EARNINGS

 
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
(In thousands except per share amounts)
 
2023
   
2022
   
2021
 
Revenue
 
$
1,456,450
   
$
1,437,039
   
$
1,380,264
 
Cost of products sold
   
996,153
     
947,928
     
925,603
 
Selling and administrative expenses
   
305,274
     
292,360
     
284,633
 
Operating income
   
155,023
     
196,751
     
170,028
 
Interest expense
   
25,172
     
14,547
     
12,544
 
Earnings before income taxes
   
129,851
     
182,204
     
157,484
 
Income taxes
   
36,457
     
41,317
     
38,739
 
Net earnings
 
$
93,394
   
$
140,887
   
$
118,745
 
 
                       
Earnings per common share:
                       
Basic
 
$
2.22
   
$
3.36
   
$
2.82
 
Diluted
 
$
2.21
   
$
3.34
   
$
2.81
 
 
                       
Weighted average number of common shares outstanding:
                       
Basic
   
42,027
     
41,888
     
42,077
 
Diluted
   
42,242
     
42,213
     
42,258
 

See notes to consolidated financial statements.

30


CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME


 
Years Ended December 31,
 
(In thousands)
 
2023
   
2022
   
2021
 
Net earnings
 
$
93,394
   
$
140,887
   
$
118,745
 
Cash flow hedges adjustment, net of tax benefit of $(984), $(471), and $(430), respectively
   
1,596
     
(805
)
   
(543
)
Pension adjustment, net of tax (benefit) expense of $(72), $(462), and $577, respectively
   
(287
)
   
(1,439
)
   
1,612
 
Foreign currency translation on net investment hedges
   
(11,378
)
   
19,340
     
17,937
 
Tax effect of current year activity on net investment hedges
   
2,826
     
(4,804
)
   
(4,455
)
Foreign currency translation on long-term intercompany loans
   
(1,813
)
   
(2,468
)
   
13,798
 
Tax effect of current year activity on long-term intercompany loans
   
1,820
     
(2,408
)
   
(3,990
)
Reclassification of cumulative translation to net earnings
   
-
     
-
     
10,203
 
Other foreign currency translation
   
35,807
     
(33,476
)
   
(50,099
)
Total comprehensive income
 
$
121,965
   
$
114,827
   
$
103,208
 

See notes to consolidated financial statements.

31


CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS


 
December 31,
 
(In thousands except share and per share amounts)
 
2023
   
2022
 
Assets
           
Current Assets:
           
Cash and cash equivalents
 
$
28,934
   
$
20,921
 
Trade accounts receivable
   
272,164
     
302,109
 
Inventories
   
598,399
     
564,110
 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
   
37,119
     
47,640
 
Total current assets
   
936,616
     
934,780
 
Other assets
   
94,873
     
96,609
 
Deferred tax assets
   
41,564
     
32,717
 
Intangible assets, net
   
12,112
     
18,600
 
Goodwill
   
424,065
     
415,715
 
Property, Plant, and Equipment:
               
Land
   
31,901
     
31,444
 
Buildings
   
343,594
     
322,268
 
Machinery and equipment
   
781,789
     
722,294
 
Construction in progress
   
59,091
     
65,809
 
 
   
1,216,375
     
1,141,815
 
Less accumulated depreciation
   
(711,098
)
   
(658,622
)
 
   
505,277
     
483,193
 
Total assets
 
$
2,014,507
   
$
1,981,614
 
 
               
Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity
               
Current Liabilities:
               
Trade accounts payable
 
$
131,114
   
$
142,365
 
Accrued salaries, wages, and withholdings from employees
   
26,412
     
43,738
 
Other accrued expenses
   
52,024
     
51,231
 
Income taxes
   
13,296
     
14,446
 
Short-term borrowings
   
13,460
     
20,373
 
Total current liabilities
   
236,306
     
272,153
 
Deferred tax liabilities
   
14,260
     
15,977
 
Other liabilities
   
37,817
     
37,191
 
Accrued employee and retiree benefits
   
27,715
     
26,364
 
Long-term debt
   
645,085
     
630,331
 
Shareholders’ Equity:
               
Common stock, par value $0.10 a share, authorized 100,000,000 shares; issued 53,954,874 shares
   
5,396
     
5,396
 
Additional paidin capital
   
115,941
     
124,043
 
Earnings reinvested in the business
   
1,726,872
     
1,702,700
 
Treasury stock, 11,885,398 and 12,058,773 shares, respectively, at cost
   
(622,768
)
   
(631,853
)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss
   
(172,117
)
   
(200,688
)
 
   
1,053,324
     
999,598
 
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity
 
$
2,014,507
   
$
1,981,614
 

See notes to consolidated financial statements.

32


CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS


 
Years ended December 31,
 
(In thousands)
 
2023
   
2022
   
2021
 
Cash Flows from Operating Activities
                 
Net earnings
 
$
93,394
   
$
140,887
   
$
118,745
 
Adjustments to arrive at net cash provided by operating activities:
                       
Depreciation and amortization
   
57,820
     
52,467
     
52,051
 
Share-based compensation expense
   
8,933
     
16,138
     
9,573
 
Net loss on assets
   
541
     
276
     
331
 
Net (gain) loss on divestitures and other charges
   
     
(2,532
)
   
14,021
 
Portfolio optimization plan costs
    24,089              
Deferred income taxes
   
(5,100
)
   
(11,010
)
   
(6,071
)
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:
                       
Trade accounts receivable
   
35,801
     
(46,086
)
   
(34,571
)
Inventories
   
(28,193
)
   
(159,014
)
   
(36,323
)
Prepaid expenses and other assets
   
5,767
     
(5,055
)
   
(6,057
)
Trade accounts payable and other accrued expenses
   
(5,978
)
   
17,489
     
21,326
 
Accrued salaries, wages, and withholdings from employees
   
(17,830
)
   
3,486
     
7,321
 
Income taxes
   
(1,175
)
   
4,422
     
4,275
 
Other liabilities
   
1,628
     
602
     
597
 
Net cash provided by operating activities
   
169,697
     
12,070
     
145,218
 
 
                       
Cash Flows from Investing Activities
                       
Acquisition of property, plant, and equipment
   
(87,868
)
   
(79,322
)
   
(60,788
)
Proceeds from sale of assets
   
156
     
264
     
216
 
Proceeds from divestiture of businesses
   
-
     
2,532
     
37,790
 
Acquisition of new businesses
   
(1,650
)
   
(22,714
)
   
(13,875
)
Other investing activities
   
1,741
     
792
     
1,097
 
Net cash used in investing activities
   
(87,621
)
   
(98,448
)
   
(35,560
)
 
                       
Cash Flows from Financing Activities
                       
Proceeds from additional borrowings
   
351,662
     
328,597
     
112,194
 
Debt payments
   
(355,161
)
   
(171,447
)
   
(110,168
)
Purchase of treasury stock
   
     
     
(42,511
)
Dividends paid
   
(69,222
)
   
(68,915
)
   
(66,694
)
Other financing activities
   
(9,278
)
   
(2,056
)
   
(582
)
Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities
   
(81,999
)
   
86,179
     
(107,761
)
 
                       
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
   
7,936
     
(4,620
)
   
(927
)
 
                       
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
   
8,013
     
(4,819
)
   
970
 
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year
   
20,921
     
25,740
     
24,770
 
 
                       
Cash and cash equivalents at end of year
 
$
28,934
   
$
20,921
   
$
25,740
 
 
                       
Cash paid during the year for:
                       
Interest
 
$
24,443
   
$
14,716
   
$
12,593
 
Income taxes
   
39,681
     
48,242
     
29,224
 
Capitalized interest
   
1,984
     
910
     
471
 

See notes to consolidated financial statements.

33


CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

(In thousands except
share and per share
 
Common
   
Additional
Paid-in
   
Earnings
Reinvested
in the