10-K 1 uamy_10k.htm FORM 10-K uamy_10k.htm

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

Form 10-K

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

 

For the fiscal year ended: December 31, 2023

 

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

 

For the transition period from_______________ to______________

 

Commission file number: 001-08675

 

UNITED STATES ANTIMONY CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Montana

 

81-0305822

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

 

 

P.O. Box 643, Thompson Falls, Montana

 

59873

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (406) 827-3523

 

Securities registered under Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act: 

  

Title of each class

 

Trading Symbol(s)

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common stock, $0.01 par value

 

UAMY

 

NYSE American

 

Securities registered under Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act:

 

Title of class

None 

 

Indicate by checkmark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ☐ No

 

Indicate by checkmark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ☐ No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated Filer

Smaller reporting company

Emerging Growth Company

 

 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by checkmark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.

 

If securities are registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act, indicate by check mark whether the financial statements of the registrant included in the filing reflect the correction of an error to previously issued financial statements. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether any of those error corrections are restatements requiring a recovery analysis of incentive-based compensation received by any of the registrant's executive officers during the relevant recovery period pursuant to §240.10D-1(b). ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes No ☒

 

As of June 30, 2023, which was the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter, the aggregate market value of the registrant’s common stock held by non-affiliates was $30,438,620, determined using the per share closing price of $0.31 on the NYSE American exchange on June 30, 2023. Common stock held by each executive officer and director has been excluded from this aggregate market value.

 

The number of shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock as of April 9, 2024 was 107,647,317.

 

 

 

 

UNITED STATES ANTIMONY CORPORATION

INDEX TO THE FORM 10-K

 FOR THE FISCAL YAER ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2023

 

PART I

 

 

 

 

ITEM 1.

BUSINESS

 

5

 

 

 

 

ITEM 1A.

RISK FACTORS

 

11

 

 

 

 

ITEM 1B.

UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

25

 

 

 

 

ITEM 1C.

CYBERSECURITY

 

25

ITEM 2.

PROPERTIES

 

26

 

 

 

 

ITEM 3.

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

35

 

 

 

 

ITEM 4.

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

35

 

 

 

 

PART II

 

 

 

 

ITEM 5.

MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

36

 

 

 

 

ITEM 6.

[RESERVED]

 

37

 

 

 

 

ITEM 7.

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

37

 

 

 

 

ITEM 7A.

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

45

 

 

 

 

ITEM 8.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

46

 

 

 

 

ITEM 9.

CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

 

47

 

 

 

 

ITEM 9A.

CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

47

 

 

 

 

ITEM 9B.

OTHER INFORMATION

 

48

 

 

 

 

ITEM 9C.

DISCLOSURE REGARDING FOREIGN JURISDICTIONS THAT PREVENT INSPECTIONS

 

48

 

 

 

 

 

 

PART III

 

 

 

 

ITEM 10.

DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

49

 

 

 

 

ITEM 11.

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

53

 

 

 

 

ITEM 12.

SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

54

 

 

 

 

ITEM 13.

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

 

55

 

 

 

 

ITEM 14.

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

 

56

 

 

 

 

PART IV

 

 

 

 

ITEM 15.

EXHIBIT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

 

57

 

 

 

 

ITEM 16.

FORM 10-K SUMMARY

 

57

 

 

 

 

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

58

   

 
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CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

Readers should note that, in addition to the historical information contained herein, this Annual Report and the exhibits attached hereto contain “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of, and intended to be covered by, the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such forward-looking statements are based upon current expectations and beliefs concerning future developments and their potential effects on the Company including matters related to the Company's operations, pending contracts and future revenues, financial performance, and profitability, ability to execute on its increased production and installation schedules for planned capital expenditures, and the size of forecasted deposits. Although the Company believes that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements and the assumptions upon which they are based are reasonable, it can give no assurance that such expectations and assumptions will prove to have been correct. The reader is cautioned not to put undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, as these statements are subject to numerous factors and uncertainties. In addition, other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially are discussed in the Company's most recent filings, including Form 10-K, Form 10-Q, and Form 8-K with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

Any statement that express or involve discussions with respect to predictions, expectations, beliefs, plans, projections, objectives, assumptions or future events or performance (often, but not always using words or phrases such as “believes”, “expects” or “does not expect”, “is expected”, “outlook”, “anticipates” or “does not anticipate”, “plans”, “estimates”, “forecast”, “project”, “pro forma”, or “intends”, or stating that certain actions, events or results “may” or “could”, “would”, “might” or “will” be taken, occur or be achieved) are not statements of historical fact and may be forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are subject to numerous assumptions, risks and uncertainties, which change over time. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are made and are subject to assumptions and uncertainties. Forward-looking statements are subject to a variety of known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which could cause actual events or results to differ from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements, including, without limitation, risks related to:

 

 

·

The Company’s properties being in the exploration stage;

 

·

Macroeconomic factors;

 

·

Continued operational losses;

 

·

The mineral operations being subject to government regulation;

 

·

The Company’s ability to obtain additional capital to develop the Company’s resources, if any;

 

·

Concentration of customers;

 

·

Increase in energy costs;

 

·

Mineral exploration and development activities;

 

·

Mineral estimates;

 

·

The Company’s insurance coverage for operating risks;

 

·

The fluctuation of prices for antimony and precious metals, such as gold and silver;

 

·

The competitive industry of mineral exploration;

 

·

The title and rights in the Company’s mineral properties;

 

·

Environmental hazards;

 

·

The possible dilution of the Company’s common stock from additional financing activities;

 

·

Metallurgical and other processing problems;

 

·

Unexpected geological formations;

 

·

Global economic and political conditions;

 

·

Staffing in remote locations;

 

·

Changes in product costing;

 

·

Inflation on operational costs and profitability;

 

·

Competitive technology positions and operating interruptions (including, but not limited to, labor disputes, leaks, fires, flooding, landslides, power outages, explosions, unscheduled downtime, transportation interruptions, war and terrorist activities);

 

·

Global pandemics or civil unrest;

 

·

Mexican labor and cartel issues regarding safety and organized control over our properties;

 

·

The positions and associated outcomes of Mexican and other taxing authorities;

 

·

The possible dilution of the Company’s common stock from additional financing activities;

 

·

Cybersecurity and business disruptions;

 

·

Potential conflicts of interest with the Company’s management;

 

·

Not realizing the value of its USAMSA assets in Mexico upon sale or disposal; and

 

·

The Company’s common stock.

      

 
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This list is not an exhaustive list of the factors that may affect the Company’s forward-looking statements. Some of the important risks and uncertainties that could affect forward-looking statements are described further under the sections titled “Risk Factors”, “Description of Business” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” of this Annual Report. If one or more of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or should underlying assumptions prove incorrect, actual results may vary materially from those anticipated, believed, estimated or expected. The Company cautions readers not to place undue reliance on any such forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date made. United States Antimony Corporation disclaims any obligation subsequently to revise any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date of such statements or to reflect the occurrence of anticipated or unanticipated events, except as required by law. The Company advises readers to carefully review the reports and documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”), particularly the Company’s Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and Current Reports on Form 8-K.

 

You should read this report with the understanding that our actual future results, levels of activity, performance and events and circumstances may be materially different from what we expect and from our historical results.

 

This report contains estimates, projections and other information concerning our industry, our business and the markets for our products. We obtained the industry, market and similar data set forth in this report from our own internal estimates and research and from industry research, publications, surveys and studies conducted by third parties, including governmental agencies. Information that is based on estimates, forecasts, projections, market research or similar methodologies is inherently subject to uncertainties, and actual events or circumstances may differ materially from events and circumstances that are assumed in this information. While we believe that the data we use from third parties is reliable, we have not separately verified this data. You are cautioned not to give undue weight to any such information, projections and estimates.

 

As a result of a number of known and unknown risks and uncertainties, including without limitation, the important factors described in Part I. Item 1A “Risk Factors” in this Annual Report, our actual results or performance may be materially different from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements.

 

As used in this Annual Report, the terms “we,” “us,” “our,” “United States Antimony Corporation,”, “US Antimony,” “USAC,” and the “Company”, mean United States Antimony Corporation and its subsidiaries, unless otherwise indicated. All dollar amounts in this Annual Report are expressed in U.S. dollars, unless otherwise indicated.

 

 
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Table of Contents

 

PART I

 

Item 1. Business.

 

History

 

United States Antimony Corporation was incorporated in Montana in January 1970 to mine and produce antimony products. In December 1983, the Company suspended its antimony mining operations in the U.S. but continued to produce antimony products using foreign sources of antimony ore. In April 1998, the Company formed US Antimony de Mexico, S.A. de C.V. (“USAMSA”) to smelt antimony in Mexico, and, in August 2005, the Company formed Antimonio de Mexico, S.A. de C.V. (“ADM”) to explore and develop antimony and precious metal deposits in Mexico. The Company formed Bear River Zeolite Company (“BRZ”) in 2000 for the purpose of mining and producing zeolite in Idaho. Our principal business is the production and sale of antimony, precious metals, primarily gold and silver, and zeolite products. In May 2012, our shares of common stock started trading on the NYSE MKT (now NYSE AMERICAN) under the symbol UAMY.

 

Although we extract minerals from the Bear River Zeolite property in Idaho that we later process and sell, we have not prepared a technical report summary for the Bear River Zeolite property making a determination on the property’s mineral resources or mineral reserves.

 

Recent Developments

 

The Company has two subsidiaries in Mexico, US Antimony de Mexico, S.A. de C.V. (“USAMSA”) and Antimonio de Mexico, S.A. de C.V. (“ADM”). On March 11, 2024, the Company shut down the operations of USAMSA, terminated a majority of USAMSA employees, the cost of which related to this employee termination was approximately $40,000, and announced its plans to sell, lease, or dispose of its USAMSA subsidiary, operations, or assets. The USAMSA subsidiary primarily includes the Company’s Madero antimony and precious metals plant in Parras de la Fuente Coahuila, Mexico and its Puerto Blanco antimony and precious metals plant in San Luis de la Paz Guanajuato, Mexico. The Company intends to sell or lease its USAMSA subsidiary, operations, or assets over the next year and has initiated an active search for buyers or leasing opportunities of its operations and/or existing assets. The Company will maintain its existing Los Juarez mining claims and concessions in Cadereyta de Montes Queretaro, Mexico, which are included in our ADM subsidiary. There are presently no active operations at Los Juarez. See Note 14 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in this Annual Report for further information.

 

In March 2024, the Company received a favorable ruling with no assessment due related to the audit of USAMSA’s 2013 income tax return by the Mexican tax authority (“SAT”) that began in 2015 and that had been under appeal since 2022. See Note 9 and Note 14 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in this Annual Report for further information.

 

Products, Markets, and Segments

 

Our products consist primarily of the following:

 

 

·

Antimony: includes antimony oxide, antimony metal, and antimony trisulfide;

 

 

 

 

·

Zeolite: includes coarse and fine zeolite crushed in various sizes; and

 

 

 

 

·

Precious metals: includes unrefined and refined gold and silver.

 

All sales of antimony, zeolite, and precious metals products are to customers in the United States and Canada.

 

The Company is organized and managed by the following four segments, which represent our operating units: United States antimony segment, Mexico antimony segment, zeolite segment, and precious metals segment.

 

 
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Table of Contents

 

United States Antimony Segment

 

Our United States antimony segment consists of an antimony plant in the Burns Mining District of Sanders County in Montana, which primarily produces antimony oxide, antimony metal, antimony trisulfide, and precious metals. Antimony oxide is a fine, white powder. Our antimony oxide is used in conjunction with a halogen to form a synergistic flame-retardant system for plastics, rubber, fiberglass, textile goods, paints, coatings, and paper. Our antimony oxide is also used as a color fastener in paint and as a phosphorescent agent in fluorescent light bulbs. Our antimony metal is used in bearings, storage batteries and ordnance. Our antimony trisulfide is used as a primer in ammunition. The precious metals processed at this plant in Montana are included in our Precious Metals Segment.

 

We closed our antimony mine and mill in Montana in December 1983 because antimony ore could be purchased more economically from foreign sources. Our mine and mill are approximately 1 mile from our current antimony smelter plant in Montana. We hold one patented claim at the mine. The environmental permitting process currently precludes mining at our mine in Montana.

 

As a result of the mine and mill closure, we have relied on sources outside the U.S. for antimony ore since 1983, and there are risks of interruption in procurement from these sources and volatile changes in world market prices for these materials that are not controllable by us. We anticipate continuing to receive antimony ore primarily from a supplier in Canada but will continue to explore Mexico and Central America for suppliers of antimony ore, assuming economics are profitable. The acquisition of antimony ore is technically complex and a function of the country’s laws and regulations. Our purchasing consequently requires flexibility regarding supply agreements and is tailored accordingly to specific suppliers.

 

We estimate (but have not independently confirmed) that our present share of the domestic and international markets for antimony oxide products is approximately 4% and less than 1%, respectively. We are the only significant U.S. producer of antimony products. We believe we are competitive both domestically and world-wide due to the following:

 

 

·

We are the only U.S. domestic producer of antimony products.

 

 

 

 

·

We can ship on short notice to domestic customers.

 

 

 

 

·

We have a reputation for quality products delivered on a timely basis.

 

 

 

 

·

We have the only operating, permitted antimony smelter in the U.S.

 

Mexico Antimony Segment

 

The Company has two subsidiaries in Mexico, USAMSA and ADM. As described in the “Recent Developments” section in this Annual Report, we shut down the operational activities of USAMSA on March 11, 2024, which primarily includes the following two antimony and precious metals processing plants in Mexico: (1) the Madero smelter in Coahuila, and (2) the Puerto Blanco flotation mill, oxide circuit, and cyanide leach circuit in Guanajuato. Our Madero smelter processes antimony ore primarily into antimony metal and an intermediate stage of antimony. Our Puerto Blanco plant includes crushing equipment, a flotation mill, and an oxide circuit to process and produce an intermediate stage of antimony and a cyanide leach circuit and settling pond that recovers precious metals after the ore goes through the crushing and flotation cycles. The intermediate stage of antimony produced at Madero and Puerto Blanco is shipped to our plant in Montana for further processing to produce antimony oxide and metal. The precious metals processed at Madero and Puerto Blanco, which were shut down as well, are included in our Precious Metals Segment. The Company intends to sell or lease its USAMSA subsidiary, operations, or assets over the next year and has initiated an active search for buyers or leasing opportunities of its operations and/or existing assets.

 

We will maintain our existing Los Juarez mining claims and concessions in Cadereyta de Montes Queretaro, Mexico, which are included in our ADM subsidiary. There are presently no active operations at Los Juarez.

 

 
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Combined United States and Mexico Antimony Segments

 

Combined Antimony Sales:  Following is a schedule of our antimony sales for the years ended December 31, 2023 and 2022:

 

Year

 

Antimony Sales ($)

 

 

Antimony Pounds Sold

 

 

Average Sales Price/Pound Sold

 

2023

 

$5,904,480

 

 

 

1,269,131

 

 

$4.65

 

2022

 

$7,631,670

 

 

 

1,394,036

 

 

$5.47

 

 

Antimony Price Fluctuations: We report our average antimony sales price per pound using the total antimony sales from all our antimony products, which primarily include metal, oxide, and trisulfide. However, our operating results from all our antimony products have been, and will continue to be, related to the Rotterdam antimony metal market price, which has fluctuated widely over the past several years. The Rotterdam average antimony metal market price per pound, as reported by Argus Metals, was $5.50 in 2023 and $5.99 in 2022.

 

The market price of antimony metal is determined by several variables out of our control. These variables include the availability and price of imported antimony metal, the quantity of new antimony metal supply, and industrial demand for antimony metal. If antimony metal prices decline and remain depressed, our revenues and profitability may be adversely affected.

 

Zeolite Segment

 

Our zeolite segment consists of a mine and mill in Preston, Idaho, Bear River Zeolite, Inc. (“BRZ”), which produces zeolite. Our zeolite is used for various purposes including soil amendment and fertilizer, water filtration, sewage treatment, nuclear waste and other environmental cleanup, odor control, gas separation, animal nutrition, and other miscellaneous applications.

 

BRZ has a lease with Zeolite, LLC that entitles BRZ to surface mine and process zeolite on property in Preston, Idaho, in exchange for a royalty payment. The annual royalty payment is the greater of: (1) the minimum annual royalty of $60,000, adjusted annually for the Consumer Price Index for all Urban Consumers, or (2) $11.00 per ton for the first ten thousand tons, $9.90 per ton for tons in excess of ten thousand up to twenty thousand, and $8.80 per ton for tons in excess of twenty thousand. This Zeolite LLC lease also requires BRZ to pay $10,000 to the lessor on March 1 of each year during the term of the lease, which ends March 1, 2025. BRZ also pays two other royalties on the sale of zeolite products. On a combined basis, BRZ pays royalties ranging from 8% to 13% on the sale of zeolite products. In addition, BRZ can surface mine and process zeolite on property owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management that is adjacent to the Company’s Preston, Idaho property after obtaining required permits.

 

“Zeolite” refers to a group of industrial minerals that consist of hydrated aluminosilicates that hold cations such as calcium, sodium, ammonium, various heavy metals, and potassium in their crystal lattice. Water is loosely held in cavities in the lattice. BRZ zeolite is regarded as one of the best zeolites in the world due to its high cation exchange capacity (CEC) of approximately 180-220 meq/100 gr. (which predicts plant nutrient availability and retention in soil), its hardness and high clinoptilolite content (which is an effective barrier to prevent problematic radionuclide movement), its absence of clay minerals, and its low sodium content. Our zeolite is used in:

 

 

·

Soil Amendment and Fertilizer: Zeolite has been successfully used to fertilize golf courses, sports fields, parks and common areas, and high value agricultural crops.

 

 

 

·

Water Filtration: Zeolite is used for particulate, heavy metal and ammonium removal in swimming pools, municipal water systems, fisheries, fish farms, and aquariums.

 

 

 

 

·

Sewage Treatment: Zeolite is used in sewage treatment plants to remove nitrogen and as a carrier for microorganisms.

 

 

 

 

·

Nuclear Waste and Other Environmental Cleanup: Zeolite has shown a strong ability to selectively remove strontium, cesium, radium, uranium, and various other radioactive isotopes from solutions. Zeolite can also be used for the cleanup of soluble metals such as mercury, chromium, copper, lead, zinc, arsenic, molybdenum, nickel, cobalt, antimony, calcium, silver and uranium.

 

 

 

 

·

Odor Control: A major cause of odor around cattle, hog, and poultry feed lots is the generation of the ammonium in urea and manure. The ability of zeolite to absorb ammonium prevents the formation of ammonia gas, which disperses the odor.

 

 

 

 

·

Gas Separation: Zeolite has been used for some time to separate gases, to re-oxygenate downstream water from sewage plants, smelters, pulp and paper plants, and fishponds and tanks, and to remove carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide from methane generators as organic waste, sanitary landfills, municipal sewage systems, animal waste treatment facilities, and is excellent in pressure swing apparatuses.

 

 

 

 

·

Animal Nutrition: According to certain third-party research, feeding up to 2% zeolite increases growth rates, decreases conversion rates, and prevents scours. Many cattle are currently being fed zeolite in feed lots located in the United States.

 

 

 

 

·

Miscellaneous Uses: Other uses include catalysts, petroleum refining, concrete, solar energy and heat exchange, desiccants, pellet binding, horse and kitty litter, floor cleaner, traction control, ammonia removal from mining waste, and carriers for insecticides, pesticides and herbicides.

 

 
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Precious Metals Segment

 

Our precious metals segment consists of three precious metals recovery plants, one that is operated in conjunction with the antimony processing plant in Montana and two that were shut down on March 11, 2024 that were operated in conjunction with the antimony processing plants at our Madero and Puerto Blanco operations in Mexico. Precious metals are recovered in the leach circuit and settling pond after the ore goes through the crushing and flotation cycles. When precious metals are contained in antimony source, the metallurgical techniques employed for the recovery of antimony are altered to also recover the precious metals.  In 2023, the principal source of antimony concentrates bearing precious metals came from our Canadian supplier, who also purchases precious metals from the Company.   

 

Concentration of Sales

 

During the years ended December 31, 2023 and 2022, the Company sold 10% or more of its product to the following customers:

 

 

 

For the year ended

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2023

 

 

2022

 

Customer A revenue

 

$1,548,283

 

 

$1,882,667

 

Customer B revenue

 

 

1,451,950

 

 

 

1,863,958

 

Customer C revenue

 

 

1,037,307

 

 

 

n/a

 

Total customer revenue

 

$4,037,540

 

 

$3,746,625

 

Customer revenue as a % of total revenues

 

 

46%

 

 

34%

 

Regulatory Matters

 

We are subject to the requirements of the Federal Mining Safety and Health Act of 1977, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s regulations, the states of Montana and Idaho, federal and state health and safety statutes and Sanders County, Montana and Franklin County, Idaho health ordinances. We also must obtain and maintain various licenses and permits from various governmental agencies to operate our mines and plants and to conduct exploration. The following is a summary of governmental regulation compliance areas which we believe are significant to our business and may have a material effect on our consolidated financial statements, earnings and/or competitive position, although other regulations could be issued and/or become more material to our business and have a material effect on our consolidated financial statements, earnings and/or competitive position.

 

Health and Safety

 

We are subject to the regulations of the Mine Safety and Health Administration (“MSHA”) in the United States and the Mexico Ministry of Economy and Mining in Mexico, and work with these agencies to address issues outlined in any investigations and inspections and continue to evaluate our safety practices. We strive to achieve excellent mine safety and health performance, and attempt to implement reasonable best practices with respect to mine safety and emergency preparedness. Achieving and maintaining compliance with regulations will be challenging and may increase our operating costs.

 

 
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Licenses, Permits and Claims/Concessions

 

We are required to obtain various licenses and permits to operate our mines and conduct exploration and reclamation activities. Targets at our Los Juarez exploration project in Mexico can only be developed if we are successful in obtaining the necessary permits. In addition, our operations and exploration activities in Mexico are conducted pursuant to claims or concessions granted by the host government, and otherwise are subject to claims renewal and minimum work commitment requirements, which are subject to certain political risks associated with foreign operations.

 

Environmental

 

Our operations are subject to various environmental laws and regulations at the federal and state level. Compliance with environmental regulations, and litigation based on environmental laws and regulations, involves significant costs and can threaten existing operations or constrain expansion opportunities. Mine closure and reclamation regulations impose substantial costs on our operations and include requirements that we provide financial assurance supporting those obligations. We have about $55,000 of financial assurances, primarily in the form of surety bonds, for reclamation company-wide.

 

Our exploration, development and production programs conducted in the United States are subject to local, state and federal regulations regarding environmental protection. Some of our production and mining activities are conducted on public lands. We believe that our current discharge of waste materials from our processing facilities is in material compliance with environmental regulations and health and safety standards. The U.S. Forest Service extensively regulates mining operations conducted in National Forests. Department of Interior regulations cover mining operations carried out on most other public lands. All operations by us involving the exploration for or the production of minerals are subject to existing laws and regulations relating to exploration procedures, safety precautions, employee health and safety, air quality standards, pollution of water sources, waste materials, odor, noise, dust and other environmental protection requirements adopted by federal, state and local governmental authorities. We may be required to prepare and present data to these regulatory authorities pertaining to the effect or impact that any proposed exploration for, or production of, minerals may have upon the environment. Any changes to our reclamation and remediation plans, which may be required due to changes in state or federal regulations, could have an adverse effect on our operations. The range of reasonably possible loss in excess of the amounts accrued, by site, cannot be reasonably estimated at this time.

 

We accrue environmental liabilities when the occurrence of such liabilities is probable, and the costs are reasonably estimable. The initial accruals for all our sites are based on comprehensive remediation plans approved by the various regulatory agencies in connection with permitting or bonding requirements. Our accruals are further based on presently enacted regulatory requirements and adjusted only when changes in requirements occur or when we revise our estimate of costs to comply with existing requirements. When remediation activity physically commences, we can refine and revise our estimates of costs required to fulfill future environmental tasks based on contemporaneous cost information, operating experience, and changes in regulatory requirements. In instances where the costs required to complete our remaining environmental obligations are clearly determined to be in excess of the existing accrual, we have adjusted the accrual accordingly. When regulatory agencies require additional tasks to be performed in connection with our environmental responsibilities, we evaluate the costs required to perform those tasks and adjust our accrual accordingly, as the information becomes available. In all cases, however, our accrual at year-end is based on the best information available at that time to develop estimates of environmental liabilities.

    

Retirement and Reclamation Obligations related to our US and Mexico Antimony and Precious Metals Segments

 

We have retirement and reclamation obligations at our closed antimony mine and mill (“the Stibnite Hill Mine Site”) and at our active smelter and precious metals plant, all of which are in the Burns Mining District of Sanders County, Montana, and have accrued $395,811 at December 31, 2023 related to these obligations. We are under the regulatory jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service and subject to the operating permit requirements of the Montana Department of Environmental Quality. Some reclamation activities have been performed under the supervision of the U.S. Forest Service and Montana Department of Environmental Quality.

 

We have retirement and reclamation obligations in Mexico and have accrued $571,330 at December 31, 2023 related to these obligations. These obligations are under The Secretary of Environment and Natural Resources (“SEMARNAT”) and The Federal Attorney for Environmental Protection (“PROFEPA”) based on the Program for Environmental Vigilance (“PVA”).

 

 
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Retirement and Reclamation Obligation related to our Zeolite Segment

 

We have a retirement and reclamation obligation accrual for BRZ of $670,886 at December 31, 2023 based on the retirement and reclamation requirements of BRZ’s lease with Zeolite LLC and the regulatory authorities.

 

General Environmental Remediation

 

We believe we have accrued adequate reserves to fulfill our environmental remediation responsibilities as of December 31, 2023. We have posted cash performance bonds with a bank and the U.S. Forest Service in connection with our reclamation activities. We have made significant reclamation and remediation progress on all our properties over thirty years and have complied with regulatory requirements in our environmental remediation efforts.

 

Competition

 

We compete with other mineral resource exploration and development companies for financing and for the acquisition of new mineral properties and for equipment and labor related to exploration and development of mineral properties. Many of the mineral resource exploration and development companies with whom we compete have greater financial and technical resources. Accordingly, competitors may be able to spend greater amounts on acquisitions of mineral properties of merit, on exploration of their mineral properties and on development of their mineral properties. In addition, they may be able to afford greater geological expertise in the targeting and exploration of mineral properties. This competition could result in competitors having mineral properties of greater quality and interest to prospective investors who may finance additional exploration and development. This competition could adversely impact our ability to finance further exploration and to achieve the financing necessary to develop its mineral properties.

 

We provide no assurance we will be able to effectively compete in any of our business areas with current or future competitors or that the competitive pressures faced by us will not have a material adverse effect on the business, financial condition and operating results.

 

Employees

 

As of December 31, 2023, we employed 83 full-time employees, 16 in Montana, 23 in Idaho, 3 in Missouri, and 41 in Mexico. The number of full-time employees may vary seasonally. None of our employees are covered by any collective bargaining agreement.

 

Intellectual Property

 

We hold no material patents, licenses, franchises or concessions. However, we consider our antimony processing plants proprietary in nature.

 

Available Information

 

We file annual, quarterly and current reports, proxy statements and other information with the SEC. Our SEC filings are available to the public over the internet at the SEC’s website at http://www.sec.gov. Our SEC filings are also available free of charge on the Investors portion of our website at https://www.usantimony.com as soon as reasonably practicable after they are filed with or furnished to the SEC. Our website and the information contained on or through that site are not incorporated into this report. All website addresses in this report are intended to be inactive textual references only.

 

 
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Item 1A. Risk Factors.

 

The following risks and uncertainties, together with the other information set forth in this report, should be carefully considered by those who invest in our securities. Any of the following material risk factors could adversely affect our business, financial condition or operating results and could decrease the value of our common or preferred stock or other outstanding securities. These are not all of the risks we face, and other factors not presently known to us or that we currently believe are immaterial may also affect our business materially if they occur.

 

Financial Risks

 

We have experienced losses in recent years and may continue to incur losses.

 

We have experienced a loss from operations and a net loss in each of the fiscal years ended December 31, 2019 to December 31, 2023 other than the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022. We may continue to experience losses in the future. Many of the factors affecting our operating results are beyond our control, including, but not limited to, the volatility of metals prices; smelter terms; rock and soil conditions; seismic events; availability of hydroelectric power; diesel fuel prices; interest rates; foreign exchange rates; global or regional political or economic policies; inflation; availability and cost of labor; economic developments and crises; governmental regulations; continuity of orebodies; ore grades; recoveries; performance of equipment; pandemics; global conflicts; price speculation by certain investors; and purchases and sales by central banks and other holders and producers of gold and silver in response to these factors. We cannot assure you that we will not experience net losses in the future. Continued losses may have an adverse effect on our cash balances, require us to curtail certain activities and investments, or may require us to raise additional capital or sell assets.

 

Macroeconomic factors, including inflation, high interest rates, recession risks, unemployment rates, rising labor costs, fiscal policy, geopolitical events, and the lagging effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, have caused downturns in key markets and created other commercial disruptions, which have and could further adversely impact our businesses.

 

Many macroeconomic factors affect our business and the industries and companies that purchase our products. As a result, these macroeconomic factors have and could cause further changes to demand for our products. These factors include: (i) inflation; (ii) high interest rates; (iii) recession risks; (iv) rising labor costs; (v) disruptions to supply chains; (vi) fiscal policy, (vii) geopolitical events, (viii) interruptions of international and regional commerce; and (ix) the lagging effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Price erosion may occur as competitors become more aggressive in pricing practices. To the extent that these factors increase our costs and/or reduce demand for our products and/or increase competition due to their effects on our customers and vendors, our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows could be adversely impacted.

 

We may seek or require additional financing, which may not be available on acceptable terms, if at all.

 

We may seek to source additional financing by way of private or public offerings of equity or debt or the sale of project or property interests in order to have sufficient capital to engage in acquisitions, investments and for general working capital. We can give no assurance that financing will be available to it or, if it is available, that it will be offered on acceptable terms. If additional financing is raised by the issuance of our equity securities, control of our company may change, security holders will suffer additional dilution and the price of the common stock may decrease. If additional financing is raised through the issuance of indebtedness, we will require additional financing in order to repay such indebtedness. Failure to obtain such additional financing could result in the delay or indefinite postponement of further acquisitions, investments, exploration and development, curtailment of business activities or even a loss of property interests.

 

Metal prices are volatile. A substantial or extended decline in metals prices would have a material adverse effect on us.

 

Our revenue is derived primarily from the sale of antimony and zeolite products, and to a lesser extent silver and gold products, and, as a result, our earnings are directly related to the prices of these metals and products. Antimony, zeolite, silver and gold prices fluctuate widely and are affected by numerous factors, including:

 

 

·

speculative activities;

 

 

 

 

·

relative exchange rates of the U.S. dollar;

 

 

 

 

·

global and regional demand and production;

 

 

 

 

·

political instability;

 

 

 

 

·

inflation, recession or increased or reduced economic activity; and

 

 

 

 

·

other political, regulatory and economic conditions.

 

 
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These factors are largely beyond our control and are difficult to predict. If the market prices for these metals and products fall below our production, exploration or development costs for a sustained period of time, we will experience losses and may have to discontinue exploration, development or operations, or incur asset write-downs at one or more of our properties.

 

An extended decline in metals prices, an increase in operating or capital costs, mine accidents or closures, increasing regulatory obligations, or our inability to convert resources or exploration targets to reserves may cause us to record write-downs, which could negatively impact our results of operations.

 

When events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value of our long-lived assets may not be recoverable, we review the recoverability of the carrying value by estimating the future undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use and eventual salvage values related to the disposition of the assets. Impairment must be recognized when the carrying value of the asset exceeds these cash flows. Recognizing impairment write-downs could negatively impact our results of operations. Metals price estimates are a key component used in the evaluation of the carrying values of our assets, as the evaluation involves comparing carrying values to the average estimated undiscounted cash flows resulting from operating plans using various metals price scenarios. Our estimates of undiscounted cash flows for our long-lived assets also include an estimate of the market value of the resources and exploration targets beyond the current operating plans.

 

If the prices of antimony or zeolite decline for an extended period of time, if we fail to control production or capital costs, if regulatory issues increase costs or decrease production, if the commercial value of fixed assets declines, or if we do not realize the mineable ore reserves, resources or exploration targets at our mining properties, we may be required to recognize asset write-downs in the future. In addition, the perceived market value of the resources and exploration targets of our properties is dependent upon prevailing metals prices as well as our ability to discover economic ore. A decline in metals prices for an extended period of time or our inability to convert resources or exploration targets to reserves could significantly reduce our estimates of the value of the resources or exploration targets at our properties and result in asset write-downs.

 

Our profitability could be affected by the prices of other commodities.

 

Our profitability is sensitive to the costs of commodities such as fuel, steel, and cement. While the recent prices for such commodities have been stable or in decline, prices have been historically volatile, and material increases in commodity costs could have a significant effect on our results of operations.

 

We are subject to the risk of fluctuations in the relative values of the U.S. and Canadian Dollar and Mexican Peso.

 

We may be adversely affected by foreign currency fluctuations. Certain of our assets are located in Mexico.  Our expenses relative to our Mexico assets, and in certain cases those assets themselves, may be denominated in Mexican Pesos. Fluctuations in the exchange rates between the U.S. Dollar and the Mexican Peso may therefore have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial results.  Mexico has experienced periods of significant inflation.  If Mexico experiences substantial inflation in the future, the Company’s costs in peso terms will increase significantly, subject to movements in applicable exchange rates. Also, we sell zeolite to customers in Canada in Canadian dollars. Significant fluctuations in the exchange rates between the U.S. Dollar and the Canadian Dollar may therefore have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial results.

 

Our liabilities for environmental reclamation and retirement and safety may exceed the amounts accrued on our financial statements.

 

Our research, development, manufacturing and production processes involve the controlled use of hazardous materials, and we are subject to various environmental and occupational safety laws and regulations governing the use, manufacture, storage, handling, and disposal of hazardous materials and some waste products. The risk of accidental contamination or injury from hazardous materials cannot be completely eliminated. In the event of an accident, we could be held liable for any damages that result and any liability could exceed our financial resources. We also have ongoing reclamation and retirement projects at our facilities. Adequate financial resources may not be available to ultimately finish the reclamation and retirement activities if changes in environmental laws and regulations occur, and these changes could adversely affect our cash flow and profitability. We do not have environmental liability insurance now, and we do not expect to be able to obtain insurance at a reasonable cost. If we incur liability for environmental damages while we are uninsured, it could have a harmful effect on our financial condition and results of operations. The range of reasonably possible losses from our exposure to environmental liabilities in excess of amounts accrued to date cannot be reasonably estimated at this time.

 

 
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Our accounting and other estimates may be imprecise.

 

Preparing consolidated financial statements requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts and related disclosure of assets, liabilities, revenue and expenses at the date of the consolidated financial statements and reporting periods. The more significant areas requiring the use of management assumptions and estimates relate to:

 

 

·

mineral reserves, resources, and exploration targets that are the basis for future income and cash flow estimates and units-of-production depreciation, depletion and amortization calculations;

 

 

 

 

·

environmental reclamation and retirement obligations;

 

 

 

 

·

permitting and other regulatory considerations;

 

 

 

·

asset impairments;

 

 

 

 

·

valuation of business combinations;

 

 

 

 

·

asset valuations;

 

 

 

 

·

future foreign exchange rates, inflation rates and applicable tax rates;

 

 

 

 

·

reserves for contingencies and litigation; and

 

 

 

 

·

deferred tax asset and liability valuation allowance.

 

Future estimates and actual results may differ materially from these estimates as a result of using different assumptions or conditions. For additional information, see Critical Accounting Estimates in Item 7. Managements Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and Note 2 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in this Annual Report.

 

Operational and Mining Industry Risks

 

Mining is an inherently speculative business. The properties on which we have the right to mine are not known to have any proven and probable reserves. We extracted zeolite without completing the technical work required to declare a mineral reserve.  If we are unable to extract zeolite at a profit, our business could fail.

 

Mining is a business that by its nature is speculative.  We have not completed an S-K 1300 technical report summary, nor have we declared proven and probable mineral reserves at our BRZ plant where we are extracting zeolite. Unusual or unexpected geological formations, geological formation pressures, fires, power outages, labor disruptions, flooding, explosions, cave-ins, landslides and the inability to obtain suitable or adequate machinery, equipment or labor are just some of the many risks involved in mineral exploration programs. If we are unable to extract zeolite at a profit, our zeolite business could fail.

 

We are substantially dependent on a few significant customers and the ordering levels for our products may vary based on customer needs. Further, we face significant risks associated with changes in our relationship with these significant customers.

 

Historically, most of our revenues are concentrated with a limited number of customers. Some of the markets we serve have a limited number of customers. In 2023, three customers accounted for more than 10% of our consolidated revenues, and our three largest customers accounted for 46% of our consolidated revenues. Additionally, not all our customers make purchases every year. Because of this variability, we believe that comparisons of our operating results in any quarterly period may not be a reliable indicator of future performance.

 

 
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Additionally, if our relationships with our significant customers should change materially, it could be difficult for us to immediately and profitably replace lost sales in a market with such concentration, which could have a material adverse effect on our operating and financial results. We could be adversely impacted by decreased customer demand for our products due to (i) the impact of current or future economic conditions on our customers, (ii) our customers’ loss of market share to their competitors that do not use our products, and (iii) our loss of market share with our customers. We could lose market share with our customers to our competitors or to our customers themselves, should they decide to become more vertically integrated and produce the products that we currently provide.

 

In addition, even if our customers continue to do business with us, we could be adversely affected by a number of other potential developments with our customers. For example:

 

 

·

The inability or failure of our customers to meet their contractual obligations could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position and results of operations.

 

 

 

 

·

If we are unable to deliver products to our customers in accordance within the timeframe outlined in the order, the revenue associated with that order as well as future orders from that customer may not occur, which could have an adverse affect on the results of our operations and financial condition.

 

 

 

 

·

A material change in payment terms with a significant customer could have a material adverse effect on our short-term cash flows.

 

 

 

 

·

The concentration of our customer base may enable our customers to demand certain pricing and other terms unfavorable to us and make us more vulnerable to changes in demand by or issues with a given customer.

 

Natural disasters, public health crises, political crises, and other catastrophic events or other events outside of our control may materially and adversely affect our business or financial results.

 

If any of our facilities or the facilities of our suppliers, third-party service providers, or customers is affected by natural disasters, such as earthquakes, floods, fires, power shortages or outages, public health crises (such as pandemics and epidemics), political crises (such as terrorism, war, political instability or other conflict), or other events outside of our control, our operations or financial results could suffer. Any of these events could materially and adversely impact us in a number of ways, including through decreased production, increased costs, decreased demand for our products due to reduced economic activity or other factors, or the failure by counterparties to perform under contracts or similar arrangements.

 

Our business could be materially and adversely affected by the risks, or the public perception of the risks, related to a pandemic or other health crisis, such as the recent outbreak of novel coronavirus. A significant outbreak of contagious diseases in the human population could result in a widespread health crisis that could adversely affect our planned operations. Such events could result in the complete or partial closure of our operations, as well as the domestic and global economies and financial markets, resulting in an economic downturn that could impact our ability to raise capital.

 

Increases in energy costs may adversely affect our business, financial position, results of operations and liquidity.

 

Energy costs, including electrical power costs, represent one of the larger components of our cost of goods sold. As a result, the availability of electricity and other energy costs at competitive prices is critical to the profitability of our operations.

 

In the U.S., our facilities receive all their electricity requirements under market-based electricity contracts. These market-based contracts expose us to price volatility and fluctuations due to factors beyond our control and without any direct relationship to the price of our products. For example, extreme weather events throughout 2022 across the United States resulted in increases to power prices More recently, market disruptions in global energy markets related to the war in Ukraine caused significant increases in market-based power prices. Market-based electricity contracts expose us to market price volatility and fluctuations driven by, among other things, coal and natural gas prices, renewable energy production, regulatory changes and weather events, in each case, without any direct relationship to the price of our products. There can be no assurance that our market-based power supply arrangements will result in favorable electricity costs. Any increase in our electricity and other energy prices not tied to corresponding increases in the prices for the commodities we sell could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position, results of operations and liquidity.

 

 
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Mining accidents or other adverse events at an operation could decrease our anticipated production or otherwise adversely affect our operations.

 

Production may be reduced below our historical or estimated levels for many reasons, including, but not limited to, mining accidents; unfavorable ground or shaft conditions; work stoppages or slow-downs; lower than expected ore grades; unexpected regulatory actions; if the metallurgical characteristics of ore are less economic than anticipated; or because our equipment or facilities fail to operate properly or as expected. Our operations are subject to risks relating to ground instability, including, but not limited to, pit wall failure, crown pillar collapse, seismic events, backfill and stope failure or the breach or failure of a tailings impoundment. The occurrence of an event such as those described above could result in loss of life or temporary or permanent cessation of operations, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. Other closures or impacts on operations or production may occur at any of our mines at any time, whether related to accidents, changes in conditions, changes to regulatory policy, or as precautionary measures.

 

In addition, our operations are typically in remote locations, where conditions can be inhospitable, including with respect to weather, surface conditions, interactions with wildlife or otherwise in or near dangerous conditions. In the past we have had employees, contractors, or employees of contractors get injured, sometimes fatally, while working in such challenging locations. An accident or injury to a person at or near one of our operations could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

 

We may not be able to maintain the infrastructure necessary to conduct mining activities.

 

Our mining activities depend upon adequate infrastructure. Reliable roads, bridges, power sources and water supply are important factors which affect capital and operating costs. Unusual or infrequent weather phenomena, sabotage, government or other interference in the maintenance or provision of such infrastructure could adversely affect our mining activities and financial condition.

 

Our mining activities may be adversely affected by the local climate.

 

The local climate sometimes affects our mining activities on our properties. Earthquakes, heavy rains, snowstorms, and floods could result in serious damage to or the destruction of facilities, equipment or means of access to our property, or could occasionally prevent us temporarily from conducting mining activities on our property. Because of their rural location and the lack of developed infrastructure in the area, our mineral properties in Montana and Idaho are occasionally impassable during the winter season. During this time, it may be difficult for us to access our property, maintain production rates, make repairs, or otherwise conduct mining activities on them.

 

Certain operations are in Mexico and may be subject to geo-political risk.

 

Certain operations are in Mexico.  Any political or social disruptions unique to Mexico would have a material impact on our operations, financial performance and stability. Additionally, our properties and projects are subject to the laws of Mexico, and we may be negatively impacted by the existing laws and regulations of that country, as they apply to mineral exploration, land ownership, royalty interests and taxation, and by any potential changes of such laws and regulations.

 

Any changes in regulations or shifts in political conditions are beyond our control or influence and may adversely affect our business, or if significant enough, may result in the impairment or loss of mineral concessions or other mineral rights.

 

Our operations are subject to hazards and risks normally associated with the exploration and development of mineral properties.

 

Our operations are subject to hazards and risks normally associated with the exploration and development of mineral properties, any of which could cause delays in the progress of our exploration and development plans, damage or destruction of property, loss of life and/or environmental damage. Some of these risks include, but are not limited to, unexpected or unusual geological formations, rock bursts, cave-ins, flooding, fires, earthquakes; unanticipated changes in metallurgical characteristics and mineral recovery; unanticipated ground or water conditions; changes in the regulatory environment; industrial or labor disputes; hazardous weather conditions; cost overruns; land claims; and other unforeseen events. A combination of experience, knowledge and careful evaluation may not be able to overcome these risks.

 

The nature of these risks is such that liabilities may exceed any insurance policy coverages; the liabilities and hazards might not be insurable, or the Company might not elect to insure itself against such liabilities due to excess premium costs or other factors. Such liabilities may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and operations and could reduce or eliminate any future profitability and result in increased costs and a decline in the value of our securities.

 

 
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Our non-extractive properties may not be brought into the state of commercial production. 

 

Development of mineral properties involves a high degree of risk and few properties that are explored are ultimately developed into producing mines. The commercial viability of a mineral deposit depends on factors beyond our control, including the deposit's attributes, commodity prices, government policies and regulation and environmental protection. Fluctuations in the market prices of minerals may render reserves and deposits containing relatively lower grades of mineralization uneconomic. The development of our non-extractive properties will require obtaining land use consents, permits and the construction and operation of mines, processing plants and related infrastructure. We are subject to all the risks associated with establishing new mining operations, including:

 

 

·

the timing and cost, which can be considerable, of the construction of mining and processing facilities and related infrastructure;

 

 

 

 

·

the availability and cost of skilled labor and mining equipment;

 

 

 

 

·

the availability and cost of appropriate smelting and/or refining arrangements;

 

 

 

 

·

the need to obtain and maintain necessary environmental and other governmental approvals and permits, and the timing of those approvals and permits;

 

 

 

 

·

in the event that the required permits are not obtained in a timely manner, mine construction and ramp-up will be delayed and the risks of government environmental authorities issuing directives or commencing enforcement proceedings to cease operations or administrative, civil and criminal sanctions being imposed on our company, directors and employees;

 

 

 

 

·

delays in obtaining, or a failure to obtain, access to surface rights required for current or future operations;

 

 

 

 

·

the availability of funds to finance construction and development activities;

 

 

 

 

·

potential opposition from non-governmental organizations, environmental groups or local community groups which may delay or prevent development activities; and

 

 

 

 

·

potential increases in construction and operating costs due to changes in the cost of fuel, power, materials and supplies and foreign exchange rates.

 

It is common in new mining operations to experience unexpected costs, problems and delays during development, construction and mine ramp-up. Accordingly, there are no assurances that our non-extractive properties will be brought into a state of commercial production.

 

Actual capital costs, operating costs, production and economic returns may differ significantly from those we have anticipated and there are no assurances that any future development activities will result in profitable mining operations.

 

The capital costs to take projects into commercial production may be significantly higher than anticipated.  Capital costs, operating costs, production and economic returns and other estimates may prove to differ significantly from those used by us to decide to commence extraction, and there can be no assurance that our actual capital and operating costs will not be higher than currently anticipated. Due to higher capital and operating costs, production and economic returns may differ significantly from those we anticipated.

 

We may face equipment shortages, access restrictions and lack of infrastructure.

 

Natural resource exploration, development and mining activities are dependent on the availability of mining, drilling and related equipment in the areas where such activities are conducted. A limited supply of such equipment or access restrictions may affect the availability of such equipment to us and may delay exploration, development or extraction activities.  Certain equipment may not be immediately available or may require long lead-time orders. A delay in obtaining necessary equipment for mineral exploration, including drill rigs, could have a material adverse effect on our operations and financial results.

 

Mining, processing, development and exploration activities also depend, to one degree or another, on the availability of adequate infrastructure. Reliable roads, bridges, power sources, fuel and water supply and the availability of skilled labor and other infrastructure are important determinants that affect capital and operating costs. The establishment and maintenance of infrastructure, and services are subject to several risks, including risks related to the availability of equipment and materials, inflation, cost overruns and delays, political or community opposition and reliance upon third parties, many of which are outside our control. The lack of availability of acceptable terms or the delay in the availability of any one or more of these items could prevent or delay the development or ongoing operation of our projects.

 

 
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Exploration of mineral properties is less intrusive and requires fewer surface and access rights than properties developed for mining. No assurances can be provided that we will be able to secure required surface rights on favorable terms, or at all. Any failure by us to secure surface rights could prevent or delay the development of our projects.

 

Insurance may not be available to us.

 

Mineral exploration and processing is subject to risks of human injury, environmental and legal liability and loss of assets. We may elect not to have insurance for certain risks because of the high premiums associated with insuring those risks or, in some cases, insurance may not be available for certain risks. The occurrence of events for which we are not insured could have a material adverse effect on our financial position or results of operations.

 

Our business depends on the availability of skilled personnel and good relations with employees.

 

We are dependent upon the ability and experience of our executive officers, managers, employees, contractors and their employees, and other personnel, and we cannot assure you that we will be able to attract or retain such employees or contractors. We may at times have insufficient executive or operational personnel, or personnel whose skills require improvement.  We compete with other companies both in and outside the mining industry in recruiting and retaining qualified employees and contractors knowledgeable about the mining business. From time to time, we have encountered, and may in the future encounter, difficulty recruiting skilled mining personnel at acceptable wage and benefit levels in a competitive labor market, and may be required to utilize contractors, which can be more costly. Temporary or extended lay-offs due to mine closures may exacerbate such issues and result in vacancies or the need to hire less skilled or efficient employees or contractors. The loss of skilled employees or contractors or our inability to attract and retain additional highly skilled employees and contractors could have an adverse effect on our business and future operations.

 

A significant disruption to our information technology could adversely affect our business, operating result and financial position.

 

We rely on a variety of information technology and automated systems to manage and support our operations. For example, we depend on our information technology systems for financial reporting, database management, operational and investment management and internal communications. These systems contain our proprietary business information and personally identifiable information of our employees. The proper functioning of these systems and the security of this data is critical to the efficient operation and management of our business. In addition, these systems could require upgrades as a result of technological changes or growth in our business. These changes could be costly and disruptive to our operations and could impose substantial demands on management time. Our systems and those of third-party providers, could be vulnerable to damage or disruption caused by catastrophic events, power outages, natural disasters, computer system or network failures, viruses, ransomware or malware, physical or electronic break-ins, unauthorized access, or cyber-attacks.

 

We have experienced cybersecurity incidents, primarily related to phishing emails, and may in the future experience, whether directly or indirectly, cybersecurity incidents. While prior incidents have not materially affected our business strategy, results of operations, or financial condition, there is no guarantee that a future cyber incident would not materially affect our business strategy, results of operations, or financial condition.

 

Any security breach could compromise our networks, and the information contained therein could be improperly accessed, disclosed, lost or stolen. Because techniques used to sabotage, obtain unauthorized access to systems or prohibit authorized access to systems change frequently and generally are not detected until successfully launched against a target, we may not be able to anticipate these attacks nor prevent them from harming our business or network. Any unauthorized activities could disrupt our operations, damage our reputation, be costly to fix or result in legal claims or proceedings, any of which could adversely affect our business, reputation or operating results.

 

 
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 Competition from other mining companies may harm our business.

 

We compete with other mining companies, some of which have greater financial resources than we do or other advantages, in various areas which include:

 

 

·

attracting and retaining key executives, skilled labor, and other employees;

 

 

 

 

·

for the services of other skilled personnel and contractors and their specialized equipment, components and supplies, such as drill rigs, necessary for exploration and development;

 

 

 

 

·

for contractors that perform mining and other activities and milling facilities which we lease or toll mill through; and

 

 

 

 

·

for rights to mine properties.

 

Organizational and Common Stock Risks

 

Our Articles of Incorporation allow for our board to create new series of preferred stock without further approval by our stockholders, which could adversely affect the rights of the holders of our common stock.

 

Our board of directors (the “Board”) has the authority to fix and determine the relative rights and preferences of preferred stock. Our Board also has the authority to issue preferred stock without further stockholder approval. As a result, our Board could authorize the issuance of a series of preferred stock that would grant to holders the preferred right to our assets upon liquidation, the right to receive dividend payments before dividends are distributed to the holders of common stock and the right to the redemption of the shares, together with a premium, prior to the redemption of our common stock. In addition, our Board could authorize the issuance of a series of preferred stock that has greater voting power than our common stock or that is convertible into our common stock, which could decrease the relative voting power of our common stock or result in dilution to our existing stockholders.

 

If we lose any of our key personnel, we may encounter difficulty replacing their expertise, which could impair our ability to implement our business plan successfully.

 

We believe that our ability to implement our business strategy and our future success depends on the continued employment of our management team. The loss of the technical knowledge and mining industry expertise of these key employees could make it difficult for us to execute our business plan effectively and could cause a diversion of resources while we seek replacements.

 

In addition, our operations require employees, consultants, advisors and contractors with a high degree of specialized technical, management and professional skills, such as engineers, trades people, geologists and equipment operators. We compete both locally and internationally for such professionals. We may be unsuccessful in attracting and maintaining key employees. If we are unable to acquire the talents we seek, we could experience higher operating costs, poorer results, and an overall lack of success in implementing our business plans.

 

The price of our common stock has a history of volatility and could decline in the future.

 

Shares of our common stock are listed on NYSE American. The market price for our common stock has been volatile, often based on:

 

 

·

changes in metals prices, particularly antimony;

 

 

 

 

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our results of operations and financial condition as reflected in our public news releases or periodic filings with the SEC;

 

 

 

 

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factors unrelated to our financial performance or prospects, such as global economic developments, market perceptions of the attractiveness of industries, or the reliability of metals markets;

 

 

 

 

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political and regulatory risk;

 

 

 

 

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the success of our exploration, pre-development, and capital programs;

 

 

 

 

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ability to meet production estimates;

 

 

 

 

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environmental, safety and legal risk;

 

 

 

 

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the extent and nature of analytical coverage concerning our business;

 

 

 

 

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the trading volume and general market interest in our securities; and

 

 

 

 

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delayed financial filings with the Securities Exchange Commission.

 

 
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The market price of our stock at any given point in time may not accurately reflect our value, and may prevent stockholders from realizing a profit on, or recovering, their investment.

 

If we were liquidated, our common stockholders could lose part, or all, of their investment.

 

In the event of our dissolution, the proceeds, if any, realized from the liquidation of our assets will be distributed to our stockholders only after the satisfaction of the claims of our creditors and preferred stockholders. The ability of a purchaser of shares to recover all, or any portion, of the purchase price for the shares, in that event, will depend on the amount of funds realized and the claims to be satisfied by those funds.

 

Our Series B preferred stock has a liquidation preference of $1.00 per share or $750,000 plus accumulated dividends.

 

If we were liquidated, holders of our preferred stock would be entitled to receive approximately $750,000 plus any accumulated and unpaid dividends from any liquidation proceeds before holders of our common stock would be entitled to receive any proceeds.

 

Our Series C preferred stock has a liquidation preference of $0.55 per share or $97,847.

 

If we were liquidated, holders of our preferred stock would be entitled to receive approximately $97,847 from any liquidation proceeds before holders of our common stock would be entitled to receive any proceeds.

 

We do not expect to pay dividends to our stockholders in the foreseeable future.

 

We have no plans to pay dividends in the foreseeable future. Our directors will determine if and when dividends should be declared and paid in the future based on our financial position at the relevant time.

 

The issuance of additional equity securities in the future could adversely affect holders of our common stock.

 

The market price of our common stock may be influenced by any preferred or common stock or options, warrants, convertible debt or other rights to acquire any preferred or common stock we may issue. Our Board is authorized to issue additional classes or series of preferred stock without any action on the part of our stockholders. This includes the power to set the terms of any such classes or series of preferred stock that may be issued, including voting rights, dividend rights and preferences over common stock with respect to dividends or upon the liquidation, dissolution or winding up of the business and other terms. If we issue preferred stock in the future that has preference over our common stock with respect to the payment of dividends or upon liquidation, dissolution or winding up, or if we issue preferred stock with voting rights that dilute the voting power of our common stock, the rights of holders of the common stock or the market price of the common stock could be adversely affected.  Our Board is also authorized to issue additional shares of common stock and rights to acquire common stock.

 

We cannot predict the number of additional equity securities that will be issued or the effect, if any, that future issuances and sales of the securities will have on the market price of the common stock. Any transaction involving the issuance of previously authorized but unissued equity securities would result in dilution, possibly substantial, to stockholders. Based on the need for additional capital to fund expected expenditures and growth, it is likely that we will issue securities to provide such capital. Such additional issuances may involve the issuance of a significant number of equity securities at prices less than the current market price. Sales of substantial amounts of securities, or the availability of the securities for sale, could adversely affect the prevailing market prices for the securities and dilute investors’ earnings per share. A decline in the market prices of the securities could impair our ability to raise additional capital through the sale of additional securities should we desire to do so.

 

 
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The provisions in our certificate of incorporation, our by-laws and Montana law could delay or deter tender offers or takeover attempts.

 

Certain provisions in our restated certificate of incorporation, our by-laws and Montana law could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire control of us, even if that transaction could be beneficial to stockholders. These impediments include:

 

 

·

the classification of our Board into three classes serving staggered three-year terms, which makes it more difficult to quickly replace board members;

 

 

 

 

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the ability of our Board to issue shares of preferred stock with rights as it deems appropriate without stockholder approval;

 

 

 

 

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a provision that special meetings of our board of directors may be called only by our chief executive officer or a majority of our Board;

 

 

 

 

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a provision that special meetings of stockholders may only be called pursuant to a resolution approved by a majority of our Board;

 

 

 

 

·

a prohibition against action by written consent of our stockholders;

 

 

 

 

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a provision that our directors may only be removed for cause and by an affirmative vote of at least 80% of the outstanding voting stock;

 

 

 

 

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a provision that our stockholders comply with advance-notice provisions to bring director nominations or other matters before meetings of our stockholders;

 

 

 

 

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a prohibition against certain business combinations with an acquirer of 15% or more of our common stock for three years after such acquisition unless the stock acquisition or the business combination is approved by our Board prior to the acquisition of the 15% interest, or after such acquisition our Board and the holders of two-thirds of the other common stock approve the business combination; and

 

 

 

 

·

a prohibition against our entering into certain business combinations with interested stockholders without the affirmative vote of the holders of at least 80% of the voting power of the then outstanding shares of voting stock.

 

In addition, amendment of most of the provisions described above requires approval of at least 80% of the outstanding voting stock.

 

Legal, Regulatory, and Compliance Risks

 

As a public company, we are obligated to develop and maintain proper and effective internal control over financial reporting. If we fail to develop and maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting, our ability to produce timely and accurate financial statements and other required disclosures and to comply with applicable laws and regulations could be impaired. Also, if deficiencies in our internal control over financial reporting are not properly remediated, it could adversely affect our business and results of operations.

 

As a public company, we are subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”), the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010, the listing requirements of NYSE American, and other applicable securities rules and regulations. Compliance with these rules and regulations may be difficult, time-consuming, or costly, and compliance may increase demand on processes, systems, and resources. The Exchange Act requires, among other things, that we file annual, quarterly, and current reports with respect to our business and operating results. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires, among other things, that we maintain effective internal control over financial reporting. Management reviews the Company’s internal control over financial reporting to determine if it is effective. A control deficiency exists when the design, operation, or lack of a control does not allow management or employees to prevent, or detect, and correct, misstatements on a timely basis. A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. As described in “Item 9A. Controls and Procedures” of this Annual Report, we have concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was ineffective as of December 31, 2023 due to material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting. The identified material weaknesses related primarily to lack of segregation of duties. We intend to take the necessary steps to remediate these material weaknesses. However, we cannot assure you that we will be successful in implementing effective internal control over financial reporting during 2024 or that, once implemented, such controls will remain effective.

 

 
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It may require significant resources and management oversight to effectively comply with our regulatory obligations and to avoid future violations. In addition, significant resources and management oversight may also be required to maintain and, if necessary, improve our disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting. As a result of our efforts to comply with the above rules and regulations, management’s attention may be diverted from other business concerns, which could adversely affect our business and operating results. To comply with these requirements, we may need to hire more employees in the future or engage outside consultants, which would increase our costs and expenses. We may be unable to comply despite such efforts. Any failure to comply with applicable regulations could adversely affect our stock price and our ability to make accurate and timely financial and other disclosures to investors, attract and maintain key personnel and investors, and use our funds for intended purposes. It may also subject us to the risk of litigation or regulatory enforcement actions against us.

 

We may be unable to comply with NYSE American continued listing standards and our common stock may be delisted from the NYSE American market, which would likely cause the liquidity and market price of the common stock to decline.

 

Our common stock is currently listed on the NYSE American. We are subject to the continued listing standards of the NYSE American and such exchange will consider suspending dealings in, or delisting, securities of an issuer that does not meet its continued listing standards. We may not be able to satisfy these requirements. In the past, NYSE American has notified us of certain alleged violations by our company of the NYSE American continued listing requirements. In addition, in early fiscal year 2023, we determined that one of the members of our Board’s Audit Committee, Joseph Bardswich, did not satisfy the SEC and NYSE American independence requirements applicable to an Audit Committee member, because he was concurrently receiving compensation for serving as our geologic and investor relations consultant. We believe that we have regained compliance with the Audit Committee independence requirements by replacing Mr. Bardswich with Dr. Aguirre on the Audit Committee. However, we cannot assure you that our past deficiencies will not affect the continued listing of our common stock on the NYSE American.

 

To maintain our NYSE American listing, we must maintain certain standards, such as various corporate governance standards as well as minimum levels or values related to share price, shareholders’ equity balance, market capitalization value, and various share distribution levels.  In addition to objective standards, the NYSE American may delist the securities of any issuer, among other reasons, if the issuer sells or disposes of principal operating assets, ceases to be an operating company or has discontinued a substantial portion of its operations or business for any reason or the NYSE American otherwise determines that the securities are unsuitable for continued trading. We may not be able to satisfy these standards and remain listed on the NYSE American.

 

A delisting of our common stock could also adversely affect our reputation, ability to raise funds through the sale of equity or securities convertible into equity and the terms of any such fundraising, the liquidity and market price our common stock and the ability of broker-dealers to purchase the common stock.

 

We face substantial governmental regulations, including the Mine Safety and Health Act, various environmental laws and regulations and the 1872 Mining Law.

 

Our business is subject to extensive U.S. and foreign federal, state, and local laws and regulations governing environmental protection, natural resources, prospecting, development, production, post-closure reclamation, taxes, labor standards and occupational health and safety laws and regulations, including mine safety, toxic substances and other matters. The costs associated with compliance with such laws and regulations are substantial. Possible future laws and regulations, or more restrictive interpretations of current laws and regulations by governmental authorities, could cause additional expense, capital expenditures, restrictions on or suspensions of operations and delays in the development of new properties.

 

U.S. surface and underground mines like those at our Preston Operations are inspected periodically by MSHA, which inspections often lead to notices of violation under the Mine Safety and Health Act. Our facilities or mines at Preston Idaho could be subject to a temporary or extended shutdown due to a violation alleged by MSHA. For more information on the status of inspections by MSHA, see Note 10 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in this Annual Report for the status of MSHA inspections.

 

Some mining laws prevent mining companies that have been found to (i) have engaged in environmentally harmful conduct or (ii) be responsible for environmentally harmful conduct engaged in by affiliates or other third parties, including in other jurisdictions, from maintaining current or obtaining future permits until remediation or restitution has occurred. If we are found to be responsible for any such conduct, our ability to operate existing projects or develop new projects might be impaired until we satisfy costly conditions.

 

 
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We cannot assure you that we will always be in compliance with applicable laws, regulations and permitting requirements. Failure to comply with applicable laws, regulations and permitting requirements may result in lawsuits or regulatory actions, including orders issued by regulatory or judicial authorities causing operations to cease or be curtailed, which may require corrective measures including capital expenditures, installation of additional equipment or remedial actions. Any one or more of these liabilities could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition.

 

In addition to existing regulatory requirements, legislation and regulations may be adopted, regulatory procedures modified, or permit limits reduced at any time, any of which could result in additional exposure to liability, operating expense, capital expenditures or restrictions and delays in the mining, production or development of our properties. Mining accidents and fatalities or toxic waste releases, whether at our mines or related to metals mining, may increase the likelihood of additional regulation or changes in law or enhanced regulatory scrutiny. In addition, enforcement or regulatory tools and methods available to regulatory bodies such as MSHA or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”), which have not been or have infrequently been used against us or the mining industry, in the future could be used against us or the industry in general.

 

 From time to time, the U.S. Congress considers proposed amendments to the 1872 Mining Law, which governs mining claims and related activities on federal lands. The extent of any future changes is not known and the potential impact on us because of U.S. Congressional action is difficult to predict. Changes to the 1872 Mining Law, if adopted, could adversely affect our ability to economically develop mineral reserves on federal lands. For example, in 2021 the U.S. Congress debated imposing royalties on minerals extracted from federal lands. Although legislation was not passed as of the date of this report, it is possible that in the future royalties or taxes will be imposed on mining operations conducted on federal land, which could adversely impact our financial results.

 

Our operations are subject to complex, evolving and increasingly stringent environmental laws and regulations. Compliance with environmental regulations, and litigation based on such regulations, involves significant costs and can threaten existing operations or constrain expansion opportunities.

 

Our operations, both in the United States and internationally, are subject to extensive environmental laws and regulations governing wastewater discharges; remediation, restoration and reclamation of environmental contamination; the generation, storage, treatment, transportation and disposal of hazardous substances; solid waste disposal; air emissions; protection of endangered and protected species and designation of critical habitats; mine closures and reclamation; and other related matters. In addition, we must obtain regulatory permits and approvals to start, continue and expand operations. New or revised environmental regulatory requirements are frequently proposed, many of which result in substantially increased costs for our business.

 

Our U.S. operations are subject to the Clean Water Act, which requires permits for certain discharges into waters of the United States. Such permitting has been a frequent subject of litigation and enforcement activity by environmental advocacy groups and the EPA, respectively, which has resulted in declines in such permits or extensive delays in receiving them, as well as the imposition of penalties for permit violations. In 2015, the regulatory definition of “waters of the United States” that are protected by the Clean Water Act was expanded by the EPA, thereby imposing significant additional restrictions on waterway discharges and land uses. However, in 2018, implementation of the relevant rule was suspended for two years, and in December 2019 a revised definition that narrows the 2015 version was implemented. In late 2021, the EPA and US Army Corps of Engineers proposed to revise the definition again, moving it back to its more inclusive, pre-2018 definition. If this rule change were to take effect or states take action to address a perceived fall-off in protection under the Clean Water Act, litigation involving water discharge permits could increase, which may result in delays in, or in some instances preclude, the commencement or continuation of development or production operations. Enforcement actions by the EPA or other federal or state agencies could also result. Adverse outcomes in lawsuits challenging permits or failure to comply with applicable regulations or permits could result in the suspension, denial, or revocation of required permits, or the imposition of penalties, any of which could have a material adverse impact on our cash flows, results of operations, or financial condition.

 

Some of the mining wastes from our U.S. mines currently are exempt to a limited extent from the extensive set of EPA regulations governing hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (“RCRA”). If the EPA were to repeal this exemption, and designate these mining wastes as hazardous under RCRA, we would be required to expend additional amounts on the handling of such wastes and to make significant expenditures to construct hazardous waste storage or disposal facilities. In addition, if any of these wastes or other substances we release or cause to be released into the environment cause or has caused contamination in or damage to the environment at a U.S. mining facility, that facility could be designated as a “Superfund” site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (“CERCLA”). Under CERCLA, any present owner or operator of a Superfund site or the owner or operator at the time of contamination may be held jointly and severally liable regardless of fault and may be forced to undertake extensive remedial cleanup action or to pay for the cleanup efforts. The owner or operator also may be liable to federal, state and tribal governmental entities for the cost of damages to natural resources, which could be substantial. Additional regulations or requirements also are imposed on our tailings and waste disposal areas under the federal Clean Water Act.

 

 
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Legislative and regulatory measures to address climate change and greenhouse gas emissions are in various phases of consideration. If adopted, such measures could increase our cost of environmental compliance and also delay or otherwise negatively affect efforts to obtain permits and other regulatory approvals with regard to existing and new facilities. Proposed measures could also result in increased cost of fuel and other consumables used at our operations.

 

Adoption of these or similar new environmental regulations or more stringent application of existing regulations may materially increase our costs, threaten certain operating activities and constrain our expansion opportunities.

 

Some of our facilities are located in or near environmentally sensitive areas such as salmon fisheries, endangered species habitats, wilderness areas, national monuments and national forests, and we may incur additional costs to mitigate potential environmental harm in such areas.

 

Laws in the U.S. such as CERCLA and similar state laws may expose us to joint and several liability or claims for contribution made by the government (state or federal) or private parties. Moreover, exposure to these liabilities arises not only from our existing but also from closed operations, operations sold to third parties, or operations in which we had a leasehold, joint venture, or other interest. Because liability under CERCLA is often alleged on a joint and several basis against any property owner or operator or arranger for the transport of hazardous waste, and because we have been in operation since around 1968, our exposure to environmental claims may be greater because of the bankruptcy or dissolution of other mining companies which may have engaged in more significant activities at a mining site than we but which are no longer available for governmental agencies or other claimants to make claims against or obtain judgments from. Similarly, there is also the potential for claims against us based on agreements entered into by certain affiliates and predecessor companies relating to the transfer of businesses or properties, which contained indemnification provisions relating to environmental matters. In each of the types of cases described in this paragraph, the government (federal or state) or private parties could seek to hold the Company liable for the actions of their subsidiaries or predecessors.

 

The laws and regulations, changes in such laws and regulations, and lawsuits and enforcement actions described in this risk factor could lead to the imposition of substantial fines, remediation costs, penalties and other civil and criminal sanctions against us. Further, substantial costs and liabilities, including for restoring the environment after the closure of mines, are inherent in our operations. There is no assurance that any such law, regulation, enforcement or private claim, or reclamation activity, would not have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

 

We are required by U.S. federal and state laws and regulations and by laws and regulations in the foreign jurisdictions in which we operate to reclaim our mining properties. The specific requirements may change and vary among jurisdictions, but they are similar in that they aim to minimize long term effects of exploration and mining and processing disturbance by requiring the control of possible deleterious effluents and re-establishment to some degree of pre-disturbance land forms and vegetation. In some cases, we are required to provide financial assurances as security for reclamation costs, which may exceed our estimates for such costs. Conversely, our reclamation costs may exceed the financial assurances in place and those assurances may ultimately be unavailable to us.

 

The EPA and other state, provincial or federal agencies may also require financial assurance for investigation and remediation actions that are required under settlements of enforcement actions under CERCLA or equivalent state regulations. Currently there are no financial assurance requirements for active mining operations under CERCLA, and a lawsuit filed by several environmental organizations which sought to require the EPA to adopt financial assurance rules for mining companies with active mining operations was dismissed by a federal court. In the future, financial assurance rules under CERCLA, if adopted, could be financially material and adverse to us.

 

We are required to obtain governmental permits and other approvals in order to conduct mining operations.

 

In the ordinary course of business, mining companies are required to seek governmental permits and other approvals for continuation or expansion of existing operations or for the commencement of new operations. Obtaining the necessary governmental permits is a complex, time-consuming and costly process. The duration and success of our efforts to obtain permits are contingent upon many variables not within our control. Obtaining environmental permits, including the approval of reclamation plans, may increase costs and cause delays or halt the continuation of mining operations depending on the nature of the activity to be permitted and the interpretation of applicable requirements established by the permitting authority. Interested parties, including governmental agencies and non-governmental organizations or civic groups, may seek to prevent issuance of permits and intervene in the process or pursue extensive appeal rights. Past or ongoing violations of laws or regulations involving obtaining or complying with permits could provide a basis to revoke existing permits, deny the issuance of additional permits, or commence a regulatory enforcement action, each of which could have a material adverse impact on our operations or financial condition. In addition, evolving reclamation or environmental concerns may threaten our ability to renew existing permits or obtain new permits in connection with future development, expansions and operations. We cannot assure you that all necessary approvals and permits will be obtained and, if obtained, that the costs involved will not exceed those that we previously estimated. It is possible that the costs and delays associated with the compliance with evolving standards and regulations could become such that we would not proceed with a particular development or operation.

 

 
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We are often required to post surety bonds or cash collateral to secure our reclamation obligations and we may be unable to obtain the required surety bonds or may not have the resources to provide cash collateral, and the bonds or collateral may not fully cover the cost of reclamation and any such shortfall could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition. Further, when we use the services of a surety company to provide the required bond for reclamation, the surety companies often require us to post collateral with them, including letters of credit. In the event that we are unable to obtain necessary bonds or to post sufficient collateral, we may experience a material adverse effect on our operations or financial results.

 

New federal and state laws, regulations and initiatives could impact our operations.

 

In recent years there have been several proposed or implemented ballot initiatives that sought to directly or indirectly curtail or eliminate mining in certain states including Montana. While a water treatment initiative in Montana was defeated by voters in November 2018, in the future similar or other initiatives that could impact our operations may be on the ballot in these states or other jurisdictions (including local or international) in which we currently or may in the future operate. To the extent any such initiative was passed and became law, there could be a material adverse impact on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

 

We cannot guarantee title to all of our properties.

 

We cannot guarantee title to all our properties as the properties may be subject to prior mineral rights applications with priority, prior unregistered agreements or transfers or indigenous peoples' land claims, and title may be affected by undetected defects. Certain of the mineral rights held by us are held under applications for mineral rights or are subject to renewal applications and, until final approval of such applications is received, our rights to such mineral rights may not materialize and the exact boundaries of the Company's properties may be subject to adjustment. For our operations in Mexico, we hold mining claims, mineral concession titles and mining leases that are obtained and held in accordance with the laws of the country, which provide the Company the right to exploit and explore the properties. The validity of the claims, concessions and leases could be uncertain and may be contested. Although we have conducted title reviews of our property holdings, title review does not necessarily preclude third parties (including governments) from challenging our title. In accordance with mining industry practice, we do not generally obtain title opinions until we decide to develop a property. Therefore, while we have attempted to acquire satisfactory title to our undeveloped properties, some titles may be defective.  We do not maintain title insurance on our properties.

 

There is uncertainty as to the termination and renewal of our mining concessions.

 

Under the laws of Mexico, mineral resources belong to the state, and therefore, concessions are required to explore or exploit mineral reserves. In Mexico, mineral rights derive from concessions granted, on a discretionary basis, by the Ministry of Economy, pursuant to Mexican mining law and regulations thereunder.

 

Mining concessions in Mexico may be terminated if the obligations of the concessioner are not satisfied. In Mexico, we are obligated, among other things, to explore or exploit the relevant concession, to pay any relevant fees, to comply with all environmental and safety standards, to provide information to the Ministry of Economy and to allow inspections by the Ministry of Economy. Any termination or unfavorable modification of the terms of one or more of our concessions, or failure to obtain renewals of such concessions subject to renewal or extensions, could have an adverse effect on our financial condition and prospects.

 

Mexican economic and political conditions, as well as drug-related violence, may have an adverse impact on our business.

 

The Mexican economy is highly sensitive to economic developments in the United States, mainly because of its high level of exports to this market. Other risks in Mexico are increases in taxes on the mining sector, higher royalties, and increased government regulations, requirements, and restrictions on Value Added Tax (“VAT” or “IVA”) refunds. As has occurred in other metal producing countries, the mining industry may be perceived as a source of additional fiscal revenue.

 

In addition, public safety organizations in Mexico are under significant stress, because of drug-related violence. This situation creates potential risks, particularly for transportation of minerals and finished products, which may affect a small portion of our production. Drug-related violence has had a limited impact on our operations, as it has tended to concentrate outside of our areas of production. The potential risks to our operations might increase if the violence spreads to our areas of production.

 

 
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As described in the “Recent Developments” section in this Annual Report, the Company announced the shutdown of the operational activities of USAMSA, which primarily includes USAMSA’s Madero and Puerto Blanco antimony and precious metals plants in Mexico. The Company intends to sell or lease its USAMSA entity, operations, or assets over the next year. However, we cannot provide any assurance that political developments and economic conditions in Mexico, including any changes to economic policies, changes to government regulations, requirements, and restrictions on VAT refunds, the adoption of other reforms proposed by existing or future administrations in Mexico, or the advent of drug-related violence in the country, will have no material adverse effect on the price of our securities, our ability to obtain financing, and our results of operations or financial condition.

 

Mexican inflation, restrictive exchange control policies and fluctuations in the peso exchange rate may adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

 

Although all our Mexican operations’ sales of metals are priced and invoiced in U.S. dollars, a substantial portion of its costs are denominated in pesos. Accordingly, when inflation in Mexico increases without a corresponding depreciation of the peso, the net income generated by our Mexican operations is adversely affected. The peso has been subject in the past to significant volatility, which may not have been proportionate to the inflation rate and may not be proportionate to the inflation rate in the future.

 

Currently, the Mexican government does not restrict the ability of Mexican companies or individuals to convert pesos into dollars or other currencies. While we do not expect the Mexican government to impose any restrictions or exchange control policies in the future, it is an area we closely monitor. We cannot assure you the Mexican government will maintain its current policies with regard to the peso or that the peso’s value will not fluctuate significantly in the future. The imposition of exchange control policies could impair our ability to obtain imported goods and to meet its U.S. dollar-denominated obligations and could have an adverse effect on our business and financial condition.

 

Not realizing the value of our USAMSA assets in Mexico upon sale, lease, or disposal may adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

 

The Company may not be able to obtain the value it expects or the net book value of its USAMSA assets upon sale or lease and the Company may not be able to sell or lease the assets of USAMSA, which would adversely affect the results of operations and financial condition.

 

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.

 

As a smaller reporting company, we are not required to provide disclosure under this item.

 

Item 1C. Cybersecurity.

 

Risk Management and Strategy

 

Our cybersecurity strategy prioritizes detection, analysis and response to known, anticipated or unexpected threats, effective management of security risks, and resiliency against incidents. Our cybersecurity risk management processes include accessing security controls, monitoring systems, tools and related services from third-party providers, and management oversight to assess, identify and manage material risks from cybersecurity threats. We engage a third-party information security officer who maintains, monitors, and ensures the security of our digital assets. We implement risk-based controls to protect our information, the information of our customers, suppliers, and other third parties, our information systems, our business operations, and our products. We maintain security programs that include physical and technical safeguards. We monitor cybersecurity vulnerabilities and potential attacks, and we evaluate the potential operational and financial effects of any threat and of cybersecurity countermeasures made to defend against such threats. We continue to integrate our cyber practices into our enterprise risk management practices, which is overseen by our Board of Directors. In addition, we assess the risks from cybersecurity threats, periodically engage third-party tools to assist us in enhancing and monitoring our cybersecurity risks, primarily spam and suspicious email filters, and regularly back up company information.

 

We have experienced cybersecurity incidents, primarily related to phishing emails, and may in the future experience, whether directly or indirectly, cybersecurity incidents. While prior incidents have not materially affected our business strategy, results of operations, or financial condition, there is no guarantee that a future cyber incident would not materially affect our business strategy, results of operations, or financial condition. See risks related to cybersecurity and business disruptions in “Risk Factors” in this Form 10-K.

 

 
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Governance

 

Our Board of Directors is responsible for risk oversight. Our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, with input from and potentially attendance by our third-party information security officer, provide presentations to the Board of Directors on cybersecurity risks or threats as necessary. In the event of a potentially material cybersecurity event, the Chairman of the Board is notified and briefed, and a meeting of the full Board of Directors would be held, as appropriate.

 

Management and the Company’s third-party information security officer discuss information technology needs and activity and assess and manage material cybersecurity risks and the Company’s practices for the prevention, detection, mitigation, and remediation of cybersecurity incidents, as necessary and appropriate. Our third-party information security officer has 30 years of experience in the IT management field and has consulted with large and mid-size corporations on proper IT processes and security. Our CEO during the year ended December 31, 2023 and our CFO have managed information technology departments during their careers. Our CFO was trained as an auditor and an information technology auditor at the public accounting firm of Ernst & Young LLP and audited public companies, information technology departments, and third-party information technology service providers for 12 years.

 

Item 2. Properties.

 

The following table provides a summary of the properties we were affiliated with at December 31, 2023:

 

Segment

Location

Owned or Leased

Mine, Mill, Processing Plant, or Warehouse

Active or Inactive

Own Mining Claims

Executed Surface Rights Agreement

US Antimony

Sanders County, Montana

Owned

Processing Plant

Active

n/a

n/a

US Antimony

Sanders County, Montana

Owned

Mine and Mill

Inactive

Yes

n/a

Mexico Antimony

Madero in Coahuila, Mexico

Owned

Processing Plant

Active (A)

n/a

n/a

Mexico Antimony

Puerto Blanco in Guanajuato, Mexico

Owned

Processing Plant

Active (A)

n/a

n/a

Mexico Antimony

Los Juarez, Mexico

Leased

Mine

Active

(B)

(B)

Zeolite

Preston, Idaho

Leased

Mine and Processing Plant

Active

Yes

Yes

Precious Metals

Sanders County, Montana

Owned

Processing Plant

Active

n/a

n/a

Precious Metals

Puerto Blanco and Madero in Mexico

Owned

Processing Plant

Active (A)

n/a

n/a

Zeolite

Lethbridge, Canada

Leased

Warehouse

Active

n/a

n/a

 

(A) As described in the “Recent Developments” section in this Annual Report, the Company announced the shutdown of the operational activities of USAMSA, which primarily includes USAMSA's Madero and Puerto Blanco antimony and precious metals plants in Mexico. The Company intends to sell or lease its USAMSA entity, operations, or assets over the next year and has initiated an active search for buyers or leasing opportunities of its operations and/or existing assets.

 

(B) Mining claims are owned by ADM other than two mining claims that have been purchased by ADM, but ownership has not transferred to ADM. Executed surface rights agreements exist with ADM other than one surface rights agreement that has lapsed, and a new agreement will be negotiated.

 

Although we extract minerals from the Bear River Zeolite property in Idaho that we later process and sell, we have not prepared a technical report summary for the Bear River Zeolite property making a determination on the property’s mineral resources or mineral reserves.

 

There are no material encumbrances on any of our properties.

 

 
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Also, we own the following properties that are not material:

 

 

·

A house in Preston, Idaho, which is used to house workers who are working at our zeolite operation; and

 

·

Our corporate office is at our plant in Sanders County, Montana.

 

DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTIES

 

Properties in Sanders County, Montana

 

We own 14 acres of land in the Burns Mining District in Sanders County, Montana, where we operate a plant that includes our antimony smelter plant, which is our US Antimony Segment, and our precious metals equipment, which is in our Precious Metals Segment. The plant was built in 1971 and started operating in 1972. We built the road system, but it was purchased and is currently operated and maintained by the USFS. The antimony smelter plant includes furnaces of a proprietary design to produce antimony metal, antimony oxide, antimony trisulfide, and various other antimony products. We have 6 operational Small Rotary Furnaces (SRF’s) and 2 operational electric furnaces and have permits for up to 9 SRF’s and 4 electrical furnaces. The SRF’s are used to roast various antimony ore inputs and can produce either finished antimony oxide or finished antimony metal in the form of ingots. The electrical furnaces are used to produce antimony trisulfide. The furnaces are maintained to modern standards. Annual antimony production was approximately 1,181,000 pounds in 2023 and approximately 1,291,000 pounds in 2022. This plant is also equipped for the treatment and production of precious metals. Annual gold production was approximately 36 ounces in 2023 and approximately 44 ounces in 2022. Annual silver production was approximately 21,400 ounces in 2023 and approximately 25,100 ounces in 2022. We do not mine at this plant but rather process ore only.

 

Our mine and mill in Montana, which are approximately 1.5 miles (3 miles by USFS roads) northwest of our smelter and precious metals plant on National Forest Road 2179 and approximately 4,100 feet north of Prospect Creek, hold one five-acre patented mill site that we own in fee-simple. Our mine was an underground antimony mine known as the Stibnite Hill Mine (Operating Permit #00045). Our mine and mill operated from approximately 1968 to 1983 when they suspended operations because antimony ore could be purchased more economically from foreign sources. As a result, since 1983, we have relied on sources outside the U.S. for antimony ore, which is used by our smelter and precious metals plant. There are no plans to resume mining, although the mineral rights have been retained on the patented mining claims. Currently, the environmental permitting process precludes any mining at this site.

 

Our antimony smelter plant is approximately 16 miles west of Thompson Falls on Montana Secondary Highway 471 with GPS coordinates latitude 47.548077 north and longitude 115.591828 west. Our plant is approximately 850 feet north-northeast of Prospect Creek in Cox Gulch, which resides in the northern Bitterroot Mountain range. This Highway 471 is asphalt, and the property is accessible by car or truck. There is a smaller airport, Sanders Airport, that is about 2 hours from our plant and a major airport in Spokane, WA, that is about 2 and a half hours from our plant. The plant is serviced with electricity from Northwestern Energy, and water is pumped from a well. Personnel are sourced from nearby cities like Belknap, Plains, and Missoula. Our plant is considered a large quantity generator (“LQG”) of hazardous waste and must comply with the Montana Hazardous Waste Act, which is regulated by the Montana Department of Environmental Quality (“DEQ”). Following are location maps related to this property:

 

 
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uamy_10kimg13.jpg

uamy_10kimg14.jpg

 

 
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Properties in Mexico

 

The Company has two subsidiaries in Mexico, USAMSA and ADM. As described in the “Recent Developments” section in this Annual Report, we shut down the operational activities of USAMSA on March 11, 2024, which primarily includes our two antimony and precious metals processing plants in Mexico as follows: (1) the Madero smelter in Coahuila, and (2) the Puerto Blanco flotation mill, oxide circuit, and cyanide leach circuit in Guanajuato. The Company intends to sell or lease its USAMSA entity, operations, or assets over the next year and has initiated an active search for buyers or leasing opportunities of its operations and/or existing assets. The Company will maintain its existing Los Juarez mining claims and concessions in Cadereyta de Montes Queretaro, Mexico, which are included in our ADM subsidiary. There are presently no active operations at Los Juarez.

 

The following map shows the location of the properties in Mexico we are affiliated with at December 31, 2023, including the location of our freight forwarder and the Wadley mine, both of which we have no affiliation:

 

uamy_10kimg15.jpg

   

Los Juarez Antimony Mine in Queretaro, Mexico

 

The Los Juarez Property is in the state of Queretaro, Mexico. In 2019, we commenced open pit mining on our Los Juarez property and extracted 2,000 metric tons to test at our Puerto Blanco flotation mill in Mexico.  However, extraction was halted in 2020 to conduct several rounds of geological study. Further study is ongoing, and depending on the results, the Company will decide what course of action to take. There has been no mining of the Los Juarez property since 2020. Some of the major equipment at the site includes an excavator, an older Cat D-6, a gas welder/generator, a small break shack, and an explosives magazine, all of which are functional.

 

The Los Juarez property consists of:

 

1.

San Miguel I and II mining claims, which were purchased by ADM for $1,480,500 and paid in full as of December 31, 2018. The transfer of ownership of the mining claims to ADM is still in process. The property consists of 100 acres (40 hectares);

 

 

2.

San Juan I and II mining concessions, which are concessions owned by ADM and include 1,152 acres (466 hectares); and

 

 

3.

San Juan III mining concession, which is held by a lease agreement by ADM, the terms of which include a monthly payment of $1,000 and a 10% royalty based on the net smelter returns of USAMSA. It consists of 529 acres (214 hectares). 

 

 
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The concessions collectively constitute 1,780 acres (720 hectares). The claims are accessed by roads that lead to highways. The Los Juarez property is approximately 40 kms (about 24.85 mi) by road from the town of Vizzaron. It is located within 4 kms of the ejido of Los Juarez situated near the top of the mountain.  GPS coordinates at the center of the Los Juarez property are 20.86528, -99.67590. The property is accessible by truck by paved road except for the last 4 kms which is a dirt road made by the Company. Following are location maps related to this property:

uamy_10kimg16.jpg

 

uamy_10kimg17.jpg

 

 

 
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Puerto Blanco Flotation Mill and Precious Metals Processing Plant in Guanajuato, Mexico

 

The flotation mill known as Puerto Blanco is in Guanajuato, Mexico. The Puerto Blanco property is owned by USAMSA. Construction started on the property in 2010 and the plant was shut down on March 11, 2024, as described in the “Recent Developments” section in this Annual Report. The Puerto Blanco property is about 100 acres. The flotation mill and oxide circuit are part of the Mexico Antimony Segment, and the cyanide leach circuit is part of the Mexico portion of the Precious Metals Segment.  The flotation mill has a capacity of 100 metric tons per day and can be used for the processing of ore from Los Juarez and other third-party properties. An oxide circuit was added to the plant in 2013 and 2014 to mill oxide ores from Los Juarez and other properties. The capacity of the oxide circuit is 50 tons per day. In 2019 a cyanide leach circuit for recovery of precious metals was built and permits were obtained for this circuit. This cyanide leach circuity is not yet in operation and has not been used. Puerto Blanco processed approximately 20,000 pounds of antimony ore in 2023, which contained antimony of an average of approximately 25%, and approximately 40,000 pounds of antimony ore in 2022, which contained antimony of an average of approximately 32%.

 

The Puerto Blanco property is approximately 15 kms (about 9.32 mi) north of the city of San Jose Iturbide along state highway 57 in the state of Guanjuato, Mexico with GPS coordinates of 21.07827, -100.54144 and is located approximately 144 kms (about 89.48 mi) from our Los Juarez property. It is accessible by highway to all vehicles. Following are location maps related to this property:

 

uamy_10kimg18.jpg

 

 
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uamy_10kimg19.jpg

 

 

Madero Smelter and Precious Metals Processing Plant in Coahuila, Mexico

 

The Madero antimony smelter at Estacion Madero, in the Municipio of Parras de la Fuente, Coahuila, Mexico, is part of the Mexico Antimony Segment. The Madero property is owned by USAMSA. Construction started on the property in 2009 and the plant was shut down on March 11, 2024, as described in the “Recent Developments” section in this Annual Report. The property is about 16 acres with seventeen small rotating furnaces (“SRF’s”) and four large rotating furnaces (“LRF”) with an associated stack and scrubbers. The plant has a feed capacity of 14 to 25 metric tons of ore per day depending on the grade of the feedstock. If the feedstock is 45% antimony, we believe the smelter could produce as much as 10 million pounds of contained antimony annually. The Madero antimony production is sold as metal or crude oxide, the oxide of which is shipped to our plant in Montana to produce finished antimony products. In 2019, we completed the installation of a caustic leach circuit to process concentrates from the Puerto Blanco cyanide leach plant containing any precious metals from our Los Juarez Mining property, which is part of the Mexico portion of the Precious Metals Segment and which has not been used. Annual antimony finished goods production was 189,965 pounds of antimony metal and oxide in 2023 and 352,949 pounds of antimony metal and oxide in 2022.

 

This property is about 7 kms north of the gas station known as Paila Coahuila and less than 1 km from a railroad and the ejido Estacion Madero, Coahuila. Paila is about halfway between Torreon and Saltillo, both in the state of Coahila on state highway 40, and is accessible by truck. Electricity is supplied by CFE, the socialized electricity provider in Mexico and provides adequate and fairly reliable power.  Water is sourced from a well at the smelter.  Personnel are sourced mainly from the nearby community of about 100 people. Following is a location map related to this property:

 

 
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uamy_10kimg20.jpg

   

Bear River Zeolite Mine and Processing Plant in Preston, Idaho

 

Bear River Zeolite (“BRZ”), which represents our Zeolite Segment, has operated a mine and processing plant on private land owned by Zeolite, LLC since 2000. BRZ leases 320 acres from Zeolite, LLC that entitles BRZ to surface mine and process zeolite on property in Preston, Idaho, in exchange for a royalty payment. The annual royalty payment is the greater of: (1) the minimum annual royalty of $60,000, adjusted annually for the Consumer Price Index for all Urban Consumers, or (2) $11.00 per ton for the first ten thousand tons, $9.90 per ton for tons in excess of ten thousand up to twenty thousand, and $8.80 per ton for tons in excess of twenty thousand. This Zeolite LLC lease also requires BRZ to pay $10,000 to the lessor on March 1 of each year during the term of the lease, which ends March 1, 2025. BRZ also pays two other royalties based on the sale of zeolite products. On a combined basis, BRZ pays royalties ranging from 8% to 13% on the sale of zeolite products. BRZ has all necessary MSHA and operational permits and is regularly inspected by MSHA for compliance with State and Federal requirements. See Note 10 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in this Annual Report for the status of inspections by MSHA. Annual zeolite production was approximately 10,100 tons in 2023 and approximately 13,000 tons in 2022. In addition, BRZ can surface mine and process zeolite on the 480 acres of property owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and held by our 24, 20-acre Placer claims, that is adjacent to the Company’s Preston, Idaho property, after obtaining required permits.

 

The deposit on the land owned by Zeolite, LLC is a thick, sedimentary deposit of zeolitized volcanic ash of Tertiary age known as the Salt Lake Formation. The sedimentary interval where the clinoptilolite occurs is over 1,000 feet thick. Thick intervals of the zeolite are separated by thin limestone and sandstone beds deposited in the freshwater lake where the volcanic ash accumulated. The deposit includes an 800-foot mountain. Zeolite can be sampled over a vertical extent of 800 feet on more than 700 acres. The current pit covers more than 3 acres.

 

Depending on the location, the zeolite is overlain by 1 to 12 feet of zeolite-rich soil. On the ridges, the cover is very little, and in the draws, the soil is thicker. The overburden is stripped using a tractor dozer, moved to the toe of the pit, and will eventually be dozed back over the pit for reclamation.

 

Although near-surface rock is easily ripped, it is more economical to drill and blast it as breakage is generally good. Initial benches are 20 feet high, and each bench is accessed by a road.

 

Haulage is over approximately 4,000 feet of road on an uphill grade of 2.5% to the mill. On higher benches, the grade will eventually be downhill. Rock trucks are being used to haul 18 to 20 tons per load, and the cycle time is approximately 30 minutes.

 

 
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BRZ is in the southeast corner of Idaho and is accessible by seven miles of paved road and about l/4 mile of gravel road from Preston, Idaho. Preston is a city in Franklin County, Idaho and is near the major north-south Interstate Highway 15 to Salt Lake City, UT or Pocatello, ID. Water is sourced from the landowner during the early spring and summer months.  Late summer, water is generally scarcer but is obtained from the same source. Electricity is provided by the local electric company and is fairly reliable.  Personnel are sourced, mainly from Preston, but also from North Logan. Following are location maps related to this property:

 

Location Map

 

uamy_10kimg21.jpg

uamy_10kimg22.jpg

 

 
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Item 3. Legal Proceedings.

 

United States Antimony Corporation is not a party to any pending material legal proceedings. No director, officer or affiliate of United States Antimony Corporation and no owner of record or beneficial owner of more than 5% of the Company’s securities or any associate of any such director, officer or security holder is a party adverse to United States Antimony Corporation or has a material interest adverse to United States Antimony Corporation in reference to pending litigation.

 

Historically, from time to time, the Company is assessed fines and penalties by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (“MSHA”). Using appropriate regulatory channels, management may contest these proposed assessments. At December 31, 2023 and December 31, 2022, the Company had no accrued liabilities relating to such assessments. However, in 2023, Bear River Zeolite Company (“BRZ”), a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company, received fourteen significant and substantial citations and three orders from MSHA, all of which have been rectified by BRZ prior to the filing of this Annual Report. BRZ works to create a safe environment for its employees at its plant; however, there can be no assurances that future MSHA inspections will not have a material adverse impact on the Company’s results of operations and financial condition.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.

 

Information concerning mine safety violations or other regulatory matters required by section 1503(a) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and Item 104 of Regulation S-K is included in Exhibit 95 to this Annual Report.

 

 
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PART II 

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

 

Market information

 

The principal market for our common stock is the NYSE American where it is traded under the symbol UAMY.

 

Holders of Record

 

The approximate number of shareholders of record of our common stock at December 31, 2023 is 10,956. The number of record holders is based upon the actual number of holders registered on our books at such date and does not include holders of shares in street name or persons, partnerships, associations, corporations or other entities identified in security position listings maintained by depository trust companies.

 

Dividend Policy

 

We have not declared or paid any cash dividends to our common stockholders during the last five years and do not anticipate paying cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. Instead, we expect to retain earnings for the operation, improvement, and expansion of our business.

 

On November 28, 2022, the Company declared a dividend on the Series D Preferred Stock in the aggregate amount of $787,730, which was included in “dividends payable” in the Consolidated Balance Sheet at December 31, 2022 and was paid on January 18, 2023.  

 

Sales of Unregistered Equity Securities

 

On August 24, 2022, the Company issued 132,980 shares of common stock to the board of directors to satisfy the stock payable to directors for their board services of $62,501 that were outstanding and accrued at December 31, 2021.

 

On November 28, 2022, the holders of 1,692,672 outstanding shares of Series D Preferred stock, which represents all outstanding shares of Series D Preferred Stock, agreed to convert their preferred shares for 1,692,672 shares of common stock of the Company. As of December 31, 2022, common shares had not yet been issued in conversion of the preferred shares. On January 25, 2023, the holders of such shares of Series D Preferred stock converted their respective preferred shares and the Company issued 1,692,672 shares of common stock.

 

 
36

Table of Contents

 

Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans

 

Information regarding our equity compensation plans as of December 31, 2023 is described in Item 12 “Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters” of this Annual Report.

 

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

There were no repurchases of the Company’s common stock during the quarter ended December 31, 2023.

 

Item 6. [Reserved]

 

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

The following discussion and analysis of the Company’s financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with our audited consolidated financial statements and the notes related thereto which are included in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Annual Report. Certain information contained in the discussion and analysis set forth below includes forward-looking statements. Our actual results may differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of many factors, including those set forth under “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements,” “Item 1A. Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this Annual Report.

 

Overview

 

Our Company has been building its business strategy since inception around 1970. This strategy started with its antimony and precious metals operations in Montana and then continued with the antimony and precious metals operations in Mexico and the zeolite operations in Idaho. Antimony mining was halted in the U.S., including our antimony mining in Montana, in the 1980’s due to less expensive antimony ore imported into the U.S. from other countries, primarily China. However, the Company continues to process antimony ore into finished antimony oxide, metal, trisulfide, and other products at its plant in Montana.

 

Since the 1980s, our Company has been attempting to secure antimony mining and processing operations in Mexico to restore a vertically integrated antimony mining to marketing process. The building of operations in Mexico since 2009 has been costly with expenditures on fixed assets of approximately $13 million. Along with this capital spent on fixed assets, our Mexico operations have generated losses cumulatively since inception. As a result, the Company shut down the operational activities in Mexico on March 11, 2024, as described in the “Recent Developments” section of this Annual Report.

 

Our zeolite operations are vertically integrated from mining to selling zeolite. We review initiatives to ensure an adequate return on our investment. We also review the performance of our segments and our Company with a focus on generating positive cash flow. In addition, we are focused on improving our customer service based on the needs of our customers. A cornerstone of our strategy is the well-being of our employees as they are our most valuable asset. Our mission is to service our employees, customers, and vendors well and grow our business profitably both organically as well as through strategic acquisitions to increase shareholder value. Recently, our Company added some key elements and personnel to its strategy related to customer service, finance, and plant management along with several new board members to help achieve our goals and our mission.

 

 
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Consolidated Financial Information

Comparison of the Years Ended December 31, 2023 and 2022

 

Consolidated Statements of Operations Information:

 

For the year ended

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2023

 

 

2022

 

Revenues

 

$8,693,155

 

 

$11,044,707

 

Costs of revenues

 

 

12,037,939

 

 

 

9,048,517

 

Gross profit (loss)

 

$(3,344,784)

 

$1,996,190

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

3,724,217

 

 

 

1,647,985

 

Income (loss) from operations

 

$(7,069,001)

 

$348,205

 

Total other income (expense)

 

 

720,714

 

 

 

96,529

 

Income tax expense

 

 

-

 

 

 

16,073

 

Net income (loss)

 

$(6,348,287)

 

$428,661

 

Weighted average shares of common stock (basic)

 

 

107,551,931

 

 

 

106,287,359

 

Weighted average shares of common stock (diluted)

 

 

107,551,931

 

 

 

106,287,359

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Balance Sheet Information:

 

December 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2023

 

 

2022

 

Working capital

 

$12,642,282

 

 

$19,397,489

 

Total assets

 

 

28,094,995

 

 

 

34,700,450

 

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(39,418,619)

 

 

(33,070,332)

Total stockholders’ equity

 

 

25,520,968

 

 

 

31,869,255

 

 

Revenues

 

Revenue decreased by $2.4 million, or 21%, in fiscal year 2023 compared to fiscal year 2022 primarily due to: (1) the lower average antimony sales price per pound in 2023, which accounted for approximately $1 million of the revenue decrease, (2) less pounds of antimony sold in 2023, which accounted for approximately $0.6 million of the revenue decrease, and (3) less tons of zeolite sold in 2023, which accounted for approximately $0.7 million of the revenue decrease.

 

Our average antimony sales price per pound is impacted by the market price for antimony, which fluctuates widely based on variables out of our control. These variables, which can change in the future, include the availability and price of imported antimony metal, the quantity of new antimony metal supply, and the industrial demand for antimony metal. As a result, the results of our operations and financial condition could be materially affected, positively or negatively, going forward by changes in the market price of antimony.

 

Our zeolite business sold less tons of its product in 2023 compared to 2022 primarily due to production downtime in 2023. BRZ experienced 18 weeks of unexpected production downtime in 2023 primarily due to machinery and equipment inadequacies or failures. We remain vigilant in improving or replacing our fixed assets, including machinery, equipment, and vehicles, that can cause production downtime as our production of zeolite products is contingent on the proper functioning of our fixed assets. However, our fixed assets may be inadequate or fail in the future, which could affect our ability to produce finished zeolite products to sell to our customers and generate revenue and could have a material adverse impact on the results of our operations and financial condition.

 

 
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Gross Profit (Loss)

 

In fiscal year 2023, there was a gross loss of ($3.3 million) compared to a gross profit of $2 million in fiscal year 2022. This decrease between the years was primarily due to the following:

 

 

·

Higher plant processing costs at our Mexico antimony segment caused finished goods inventory cost to be higher than its sales value. As a result, our Mexico antimony segment recorded an expense to write-down its inventory cost to its net realizable value, which was higher in 2023 compared to 2022. The higher plant processing costs were primarily due to the low percentage of antimony contained in the ore purchased in Mexico.

 

·

Lower average antimony sales price per pound in 2023, as described above in the “Revenues” section above,

 

·

Production downtime at our zeolite operations in 2023 not only caused lower revenues, as described above in the “Revenues” section above, but also caused increased maintenance costs and inefficient facility-related costs in rectifying these production downtime issues, both of which caused lower gross profit,

 

·

Higher reserve on Mexico Value Added Tax (“VAT” or “IVA”) receivable primarily due to increased government regulations and restrictions,

 

·

Fixed production costs with lower sales volume at our Montana and Idaho plants lowered gross profit and gross margin, and

 

·

Lower gross profit and gross margin on sales of purchased finished antimony trioxide.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Operating expense increased by $2.1 million in fiscal year 2023 compared to fiscal year 2022 primarily due to:

 

 

·

Increased asset retirement obligation (“ARO”) and other expenses in the Mexico antimony segment primarily due to the announced shutdown of Mexico operations on March 11, 2024, as described in the “Recent Developments” of this Annual Report.

 

·

Increased professional fees relating primarily to Mexico legal matters and regaining compliance with SEC filings,

 

·

Increased Board fees associated with market pay comparability and adjustments,

 

·

Increased bad debt expense due primarily to one customer who received an antimony product from our Montana location,

 

·

Loss on the disposal of Wadley assets due to the termination of the Wadley acquisition agreement.

 

Other Income (Expense)

 

Other income increased by $0.6 million in fiscal year 2023 compared to fiscal year 2022 primarily due to increased investment income in 2023.

 

Working Capital

 

Working capital decreased by $6.8 million during the year ended December 31, 2023 primarily due to inventory, production, and operational costs at our Mexico antimony segment, which decreased working capital by approximately $4.5 million.

 

 
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Segment Financial Information

Comparison of the Years Ended December 31, 2023 and 2022

 

US and Mexico Antimony Segment

 

Financial and operational metrics of our antimony segment for the years ended December 31, 2023 and 2022 was as follows:

 

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

 

 

 

 

Antimony - Combined USA and Mexico

 

2023

 

 

2022

 

 

$ Change

 

 

% Change

 

Revenue

 

$5,904,480

 

 

$7,631,670

 

 

$(1,727,190)

 

 

-22.6%

Gross profit (loss)

 

$(3,064,606)

 

$1,505,116

 

 

$(4,569,722)

 

 

-303.6%

Pounds of antimony sold

 

 

1,269,131

 

 

 

1,394,036

 

 

 

(124,905)

 

 

-9.0%

Average sales price per pound

 

$4.65

 

 

$5.47

 

 

$(0.82)

 

 

-15.0%

Average cost per pound

 

$7.06

 

 

$4.39

 

 

$2.67

 

 

 

60.8%

Average gross profit per pound

 

$(2.41)

 

$1.08

 

 

$(3.49)

 

 

-323.2%

 

The average antimony sales price per pound decreased by $0.82, or 15%, in 2023 compared to 2022 primarily due to the: (1) decrease in the antimony market price, and (2) lower demand and increased competition during various periods in 2023 resulting from national or international developments (e.g., auto strike).

 

The average antimony gross profit per pound decreased by $3.49 in 2023 compared to 2022 primarily due to:

 

 

·

Higher plant processing costs at our Mexico antimony segment caused finished goods inventory cost to be higher than its sales value. As a result, our Mexico antimony segment recorded an expense to write-down its inventory cost to its net realizable value, which was higher in 2023 compared to 2022. The higher plant processing costs were primarily due to the low percentage of antimony contained in the ore purchased in Mexico.

 

·

Lower average antimony sales price per pound in 2023, as described above in the “Revenues” section above,

 

·

Higher reserve on Mexico IVA receivable primarily due to increased government regulations and restrictions,

 

·

Fixed production costs with lower sales volume at our Montana plant lowered gross profit and gross margin, and

 

·

Lower gross margin on sales of purchased finished antimony trioxide.

 

Zeolite Segment

 

Financial and operational metrics of our zeolite segment for the years ended December 31, 2023 and 2022 was as follows:

 

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

 

 

 

 

Zeolite

 

2023

 

 

2022

 

 

$ Change

 

 

% Change

 

Revenue

 

$2,462,179

 

 

$3,151,330

 

 

$(689,151)

 

 

-21.9%

Gross profit (loss)

 

$(495,981)

 

$339,907

 

 

$(835,888)

 

 

-245.9%

Tons of zeolite sold

 

 

10,145

 

 

 

13,047

 

 

 

(2,902)

 

 

-22.2%

Average sales price per ton

 

$242.70

 

 

$241.54

 

 

$1.16

 

 

 

0.5%

Average cost per ton

 

$291.59

 

 

$215.49

 

 

$76.10

 

 

 

35.3%

Average gross profit per ton

 

$(48.89)

 

$26.05

 

 

$(74.94)

 

 

-287.7%

 

The average zeolite gross profit per ton decreased by $74.94 in 2023 compared to 2022 primarily due to:

 

 

·

Production downtime in 2023, which not only caused lower revenues, but also caused increased maintenance costs and inefficient facility-related costs in rectifying these production downtime issues, both of which caused lower gross profit, and

 

·

Fixed production costs with lower sales volume at our Idaho plant lowered gross profit and gross margin.

 

 
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Table of Contents

 

Precious Metals Segment   

 

Financial and operational metrics of our precious metals segment for the years ended December 31, 2023 and 2022 was as follows:

 

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

 

 

 

 

Precious metals

 

2023

 

 

2022

 

 

$ Change

 

 

% Change

 

Revenue

 

$326,496

 

 

$261,707

 

 

$64,789

 

 

 

24.8%

Gross profit (loss)

 

$215,803

 

 

$151,167

 

 

$64,636

 

 

 

42.8%

Ounces sold - gold

 

 

36.45

 

 

 

43.77

 

 

 

(7.32)

 

 

-16.7%

Ounces sold - silver

 

 

21,426

 

 

 

25,122

 

 

 

(3,696)

 

 

-14.7%

 

Non-GAAP Financial Measure

 

In addition to our results determined in accordance with GAAP, we believe Earnings Before Interest, Tax, Depreciation and Amortization (“EBITDA”), a non-GAAP financial measure, is a useful measure of our operating performance because it eliminates non-cash expenses that do not reflect our underlying business performance. We use this measure to facilitate a comparison of our operating performance on a consistent basis from period to period and to analyze the factors and trends affecting our business.

 

EBITDA is intended as a supplemental measure of our performance that is neither required by, nor presented in accordance with, GAAP. We believe that the use of EBITDA provides an additional tool for investors to use in evaluating ongoing operating results and trends and in comparing our financial measures with those of comparable companies, which may present similar non-GAAP financial measures to investors. EBITDA should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for performance measures calculated in accordance with GAAP.

 

We had an EBITDA loss of ($5,387,063) for the year ended December 31, 2023, compared to positive EBITDA of $1,369,095 for the year ended December 31, 2022.

 

EBITDA by segment for the years ended December 31, 2023 and 2022 was as follows:

 

Antimony – Combined USA and Mexico

 

Year ended December 31,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2023

 

 

2022

 

 

$ Change

 

 

% Change

 

Revenue

 

$5,904,480

 

 

$7,631,670

 

 

$(1,727,190)

 

 

-22.6%

Cost of sales

 

 

(8,969,086)

 

 

(6,126,554)

 

 

(2,842,532)

 

 

46.4%

Gross profit (loss)

 

$(3,064,606)

 

$1,505,116

 

 

$(4,569,722)

 

 

-303.6%

Total operating expenses

 

 

(3,455,592)

 

 

(1,482,526)

 

 

(1,973,066)

 

 

133.1%

Income (loss) from operations

 

$(6,520,198)

 

$22,590

 

 

$(6,542,788)

 

 

-28963.2%

Total other income (expense)

 

 

736,378

 

 

 

129,481

 

 

 

606,897

 

 

 

468.7%

Income tax expense

 

 

-

 

 

 

16,073

 

 

 

(16,073)

 

 

-100.0%

Net income (loss) - antimony

 

$(5,783,820)

 

$135,998

 

 

$(5,919,818)

 

 

-4352.9%

Interest expense

 

 

(6,504)

 

 

6,884

 

 

 

(13,388)

 

 

-194.5%

Income tax expense

 

 

-

 

 

 

16,073

 

 

 

(16,073)

 

 

-100.0%

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

590,011

 

 

 

630,855

 

 

 

(40,844)

 

 

-6.5%

EBITDA - antimony

 

$(5,200,313)

 

$789,810

 

 

$(5,990,123)

 

 

-758.4%

 

 
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Zeolite

 

Year ended December 31,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2023

 

 

2022

 

 

$ Change

 

 

% Change

 

Revenue

 

$2,462,179

 

 

$3,151,330

 

 

$(689,151)

 

 

-21.9%

Cost of sales

 

 

(2,958,160)

 

 

(2,811,423)

 

 

(146,737)

 

 

5.2%

Gross profit (loss)

 

$(495,981)

 

$339,907

 

 

$(835,888)

 

 

-245.9%

Total operating expenses

 

 

(268,625)

 

 

(165,459)

 

 

(103,166)

 

 

62.4%

Income (loss) from operations

 

$(764,606)

 

$174,448

 

 

$(939,054)

 

 

-538.3%

Total other income (expense)

 

 

(15,664)

 

 

(32,952)

 

 

17,288

 

 

 

-52.5%

Income tax expense

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

n/a

 

Net income (loss) - zeolite

 

$(780,270)

 

$141,496

 

 

$(921,766)

 

 

-651.4%

Interest expense

 

 

8,283

 

 

 

8,257

 

 

 

26

 

 

 

0.3%

Income tax expense

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

n/a

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

258,741

 

 

 

167,825

 

 

 

90,916

 

 

 

54.2%

EBITDA - zeolite

 

$(513,246)

 

$317,578

 

 

$(830,824)

 

 

-261.6%

 

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Precious Metals

 

2023

 

 

2022

 

 

$ Change

 

 

% Change

 

Revenue

 

$326,496

 

 

$261,707

 

 

$64,789

 

 

 

24.8%

Cost of sales

 

 

(110,693)

 

 

(110,540)

 

 

(153)

 

 

0.1%

Gross profit (loss)

 

$215,803

 

 

$151,167

 

 

$64,636

 

 

 

42.8%

Total operating expenses

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

n/a

 

Income (loss) from operations

 

$215,803

 

 

$151,167

 

 

$64,636

 

 

 

42.8%

Total other income (expense)

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

n/a

 

Net income (loss) - precious metals

 

$215,803

 

 

$151,167

 

 

$64,636

 

 

 

42.8%

Interest expense

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

n/a

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

110,693

 

 

 

110,540

 

 

 

153

 

 

 

0.1%

EBITDA - precious metals

 

$326,496

 

 

$261,707

 

 

$64,789

 

 

 

24.8%

 

 
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Table of Contents

  

Consolidated

 

Year ended December 31,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2023

 

 

2022

 

 

$ Change

 

 

% Change

 

Revenue

 

$8,693,155

 

 

$11,044,707

 

 

$(2,351,552)

 

 

-21.3%

Cost of sales

 

$(12,037,939)

 

$(9,048,517)

 

 

(2,989,422)

 

 

33.0%

Gross profit (loss)

 

$(3,344,784)

 

$1,996,190

 

 

$(5,340,974)

 

 

-267.6%

Total operating expenses

 

$(3,724,217)

 

$(1,647,985)

 

 

(2,076,232)

 

 

126.0%

Income (loss) from operations

 

$(7,069,001)

 

$348,205

 

 

$(7,417,206)

 

 

-2130.1%

Total other income (expense)

 

$720,714

 

 

$96,529

 

 

 

624,185

 

 

 

646.6%

Income tax expense

 

$-

 

 

$16,073

 

 

 

(16,073)

 

 

-100.0%

Net income (loss) - consolidated

 

$(6,348,287)

 

$428,661

 

 

$(6,776,948)

 

 

-1581.0%

Interest expense

 

$1,779

 

 

$15,141

 

 

 

(13,362)

 

 

-88.3%

Income tax expense

 

$-

 

 

$16,073

 

 

 

(16,073)

 

 

-100.0%

Depreciation and amortization

 

$959,445

 

 

$909,220

 

 

 

50,225

 

 

 

5.5%

EBITDA - consolidated

 

$(5,387,063)

 

$1,369,095

 

 

$(6,756,158)

 

 

-493.5%

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Our Mexico Antimony Segment has generated significant negative cash flow cumulatively since starting construction in 2009. In fiscal year 2023, our Mexico Antimony Segment had negative cash flow of approximately $4.1 million. On March 11, 2024, the Company shut down the operations of its Mexico Antimony Segment, as described in the “Recent Developments” section of this Annual Report. Also, the Company intends to sell or lease its USAMSA entity, operations, or assets over the next year and has initiated an active search for buyers or leasing opportunities of its operations and/or existing assets. Such sale or lease would provide additional cash.

 

In the past, the Company has been successful in raising necessary capital from the sale of common stock and warrants and, to a lesser extent, from debt issuance. However, our ability to access capital when needed is not assured and, if capital is not available when, and in the amounts and terms needed, or if capital is not available at all, the Company could be required to significantly curtail its operations, modify existing strategic plans, and/or dispose of certain operations or assets, which could materially harm our business, prospects, financial condition, and operating results.

 

Our cash and cash equivalents balance at December 31, 2023 was $11,899,574. We believe that our cash and cash equivalents should be sufficient to fund our operations and meet our working capital, capital expenditure, and contractual obligations for the next 12 months.

 

Material Cash Requirements

 

We plan to continue reviewing the operations and financial results of each segment to make informed decisions that benefit the Company. Also, we intend to continue to invest in people, customers, infrastructure, and operations with the goals of increasing production, decreasing costs, and growing revenue profitably and, we intend to fund our cash requirements in 2024 with our cash and cash equivalents. We may use cash to acquire businesses. The nature of these investments and transactions, however, makes it difficult to predict the amount and timing of such cash requirements.

 

 
43

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Cash Flows Summary

 

WORKING CAPITAL

 

December 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2023

 

 

2022

 

Current assets

 

$14,076,206

 

 

$21,617,359

 

Current liabilities

 

 

(1,433,924)

 

 

(2,219,870)

Working Capital

 

$12,642,282

 

 

$19,397,489

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the year ended

 

CASH FLOWS

 

December 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2023

 

 

2022

 

Cash provided (used) by operations

 

$(4,750,026)

 

$(249,277)

Cash provided (used) by investing

 

 

(1,341,713)

 

 

(1,785,661)

Cash provided (used) by financing

 

 

(1,071,292)

 

 

(267,725)

Net change in cash and restricted cash for the year ended period

 

$(7,163,031)

 

$(2,302,663)

 

Cash and restricted cash decreased by $7.2 million during the year ended December 31, 2023 primarily due to: 1) $4.1 million of negative cash flow of our Mexico Antimony Segment, 2) $1.3 million on fixed asset purchases for our Zeolite Segment, 3) $0.8 million on a payment to the holders of Series D Preferred Stock, and 4) $0.4 million towards a payment on a royalty obligation that had been accumulating since 2016. 

 

Cash flows used by operating activities increased by $4.5 million in 2023 compared to 2022 primarily due to the differential between the net loss generated during 2023 compared to the net income generated during 2022 as well as the increase in the use of cash for inventory in 2023, both of which were primarily due to our Mexico Antimony Segment. The increase was partially offset by increases in non-cash charges related to the write-down of our Mexico inventory to net realizable value and reserves recorded on our Mexico VAT receivable and on one customer receivable in our US Antimony Segment.

 

Cash flow used by investing activities decreased by $0.4 million in 2023 compared to 2022 primarily due to lower purchases of fixed assets in 2023. Purchases of property, plant, and equipment, which were primarily for our Zeolite Segment, were $1.5 million in 2023 and $1.7 million in 2022, which excludes $0.2 million of fixed assets purchased with equipment financing for our Mexico antimony segment in 2022.

 

Cash flow used by financing activities increased by $0.8 million in 2023 compared to 2022 primarily due to the payment of dividends of $787,730 on January 25, 2023 to the holders of Series D Preferred Stock.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

The Company has no significant off-balance sheet arrangements as defined by the SEC regulations.

 

 
44

Table of Contents

 

Critical Accounting Estimates

 

We have the following critical accounting estimates: 

 

 

·

The Company reviews and evaluates the net carrying value of its long-lived assets for impairment upon the occurrence of events or changes in circumstances that indicate that the related carrying amounts may not be recoverable. A test for recoverability is performed based on the estimated undiscounted future cash flows that will be generated from operations at each property and the estimated salvage value of asset. There are many assumptions underlying future cash flows that are subject to significant risks and uncertainties, which include the estimated value of the assets. Estimates of undiscounted future cash flows and salvage values are dependent upon, among other factors, estimates of: (i) product and metals to be recovered from identified mineralization and other resources, (ii) future production and capital costs, (iii) estimated selling prices over the estimated remaining life of the asset and (iv) market values of assets. The Company reviews its business and operations for indications of impairment and, when indications are present, performs an impairment test. The Company will involve a third-party expert when needed. However, it is possible that changes could occur in the near term that could adversely affect the estimate of future cash flows and salvage values to be generated from operating assets resulting in an impairment loss.

 

 

 

 

·

The asset retirement obligation in our Consolidated Balance Sheet is based on an estimate of future costs to reclaim properties and retire fixed assets as required by permits, government regulations, and lease or other contractual requirements upon cessation of our operations. Determination of any amounts included in the determination of the fair value of the asset retirement obligation can change periodically as the calculation of the fair value of the asset retirement obligation is based upon numerous estimates and assumptions, including, among others, future retirement costs, future inflation rate, and the Company’s credit-adjusted risk-free interest rate. Also, there are uncertainties associated with the nature, timing, and extent of costs associated with asset retirement obligations, including, among others, the extent of environmental contamination, revisions to laws and regulations by regulatory authorities, and changes in remediation technology. As a result, the ultimate cost as well as the timing of the retirement obligation could change in the future. The Company continually reviews its asset retirement obligations for indications that its asset retirement obligation cost or timing has changed and, when indications are present, recalculates its asset retirement obligation. Also, there are many technical components of an asset retirement obligation. Therefore, the Company will involve a third-party expert when needed to recalculate its asset retirement obligations. However, actual costs to reclaim and retire property and fixed assets when we cease operations may differ from our estimates.

 

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

 

Not applicable.

 

 
45

Table of Contents

 

Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.

 

Index to Financial Statements:

 

1.

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm; PCAOB ID - 444

 

F-1

 

2.

Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2023 and 2022;

 

F-2

 

3.

Consolidated Statements of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2023 and 2022

 

F-3

 

4.

Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders’ Equity

 

F-4

 

5.

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2023 and 2022

 

F-5

 

6.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

F-6

 

 

 
46

Table of Contents

 

uamy_10kimg23.jpg

    

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the shareholders and the board of directors of United States Antimony Corporation

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of United States Antimony Corporation (the "Company") as of December 31, 2023 and 2022, the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in stockholders’ equity and cash flows for each of the years then ended, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the "financial statements"). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of  December 31, 2023 and 2022, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the years then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

    

Basis for Opinion

 

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company's financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) ("PCAOB") and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB. 

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company's internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

Critical Audit Matter

 

Critical audit matters are matters arising from the current-period audit of the financial statements that were communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that (1) relate to accounts or disclosures that are material to the financial statements and (2) involved our especially challenging, subjective, or complex judgments. We determined that there are no critical audit matters.

 

We have served as the Company's independent auditor since 1998.

uamy_10kimg24.jpg

 

Assure CPA, LLC

Spokane, WA

April 12, 2024

 

 
F-1

Table of Contents

  

UNITED STATES ANTIMONY CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

December 31, 2023 and 2022

 

 

December 31,

2023

 

 

December 31,

2022

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

CURRENT ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$11,899,574

 

 

$19,060,378

 

Certificates of deposit

 

 

72,898

 

 

 

259,857

 

Accounts receivable, net

 

 

625,256

 

 

 

784,457

 

Inventories, net

 

 

1,386,109

 

 

 

1,375,068

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

92,369

 

 

 

137,599

 

Total current assets

 

 

14,076,206

 

 

 

21,617,359

 

Properties, plants and equipment, net

 

 

13,454,491

 

 

 

12,128,124

 

Restricted cash for reclamation bonds

 

 

55,061

 

 

 

57,288

 

IVA receivable and other assets, net

 

 

509,237

 

 

 

897,679

 

Total assets

 

$28,094,995

 

 

$34,700,450

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CURRENT LIABILITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$456,935

 

 

$628,803

 

Accrued liabilities

 

 

133,841

 

 

 

201,149

 

Accrued liabilities - directors

 

 

124,810

 

 

 

72,963

 

Royalties payable

 

 

153,429

 

 

 

435,075

 

Dividends payable

 

 

-

 

 

 

787,730

 

Long-term debt, current portion

 

 

28,443

 

 

 

94,150

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

897,458

 

 

 

2,219,870

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long-term debt, net of current portion

 

 

-

 

 

 

217,855

 

Stock payable to directors

 

 

38,542

 

 

 

61,459

 

Asset retirement obligations and accrued reclamation costs

 

 

1,638,027

 

 

 

332,011

 

Total liabilities

 

 

2,574,027

 

 

 

2,831,195

 

COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Note 10)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock $0.01 par value, 10,000,000 shares authorized:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Series A: 0 shares issued and outstanding

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Series B: 750,000 shares issued and outstanding (liquidation preference $967,500 and $960,000, respectively)

 

 

7,500

 

 

 

7,500

 

Series C: 177,904 shares issued and outstanding (liquidation preference $97,847 both years)

 

 

1,779

 

 

 

1,779

 

Series D: 0 and 1,692,672 shares issued and outstanding (liquidation preference $0 and $5,019,410, respectively)

 

 

-

 

 

 

16,926

 

Common stock, $0.01 par value, 150,000,000 shares authorized; 107,647,317 and 106,373,341 shares issued and outstanding, respectively

 

 

1,076,472

 

 

 

1,063,732

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

63,853,836

 

 

 

64,052,630

 

Shares to be returned to treasury

 

 

-

 

 

 

(202,980)

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(39,418,619)

 

 

(33,070,332)

Total stockholders' equity

 

 

25,520,968

 

 

 

31,869,255

 

Total liabilities and stockholders' equity

 

$28,094,995

 

 

$34,700,450

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 
F-2

Table of Contents

    

UNITED STATES ANTIMONY CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

For the years ended December 31, 2023 and 2022

 

 

For the years ended December 31,

 

 

 

2023

 

 

2022

 

REVENUES

 

$8,693,155

 

 

$11,044,707

 

COST OF REVENUES

 

 

12,037,939

 

 

 

9,048,517

 

GROSS PROFIT (LOSS)

 

 

(3,344,784)

 

 

1,996,190

 

OPERATING EXPENSES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General and administrative

 

 

1,642,269

 

 

 

658,242

 

Salaries and benefits

 

 

639,172

 

 

 

481,106

 

Professional fees

 

 

643,208

 

 

 

302,901

 

Loss on disposal of property, plant & equipment

 

 

217,921

 

 

 

-

 

Other operating expenses

 

 

581,647

 

 

 

205,736

 

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES

 

 

3,724,217

 

 

 

1,647,985

 

INCOME (LOSS) FROM OPERATIONS

 

 

(7,069,001)

 

 

348,205

 

OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest and investment income

 

 

618,762

 

 

 

103,800

 

Change in fair value of investments

 

 

-

 

 

 

(37,882)

Trademark and licensing income

 

 

32,007

 

 

 

70,502

 

Other miscellaneous income (expense)

 

 

69,945

 

 

 

(39,891)

TOTAL OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE)

 

 

720,714

 

 

 

96,529

 

INCOME (LOSS) BEFORE INCOME TAX

 

 

(6,348,287)

 

 

444,734

 

Income tax expense

 

 

-

 

 

 

16,073

 

NET INCOME (LOSS)

 

 

(6,348,287)

 

 

428,661

 

Preferred dividends

 

 

(7,500)

 

 

(47,278)

Net income (loss) available to common stockholders

 

$(6,355,787)

 

$381,383

 

Net income (loss) per share of common stock:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

$(0.06)

 

Nil

 

Diluted

 

$(0.06)

 

Nil

 

Weighted average shares outstanding:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

 

107,551,931

 

 

 

106,287,359

 

Diluted

 

 

107,551,931

 

 

 

106,287,359

 

 

 The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 
F-3

Table of Contents

    

UNITED STATES ANTIMONY CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

For the years ended December 31, 2023 and 2022

 

 

Total Preferred Stock

 

 

Common stock

 

 

Additional Paid In 

 

 

Shares to be returned to

 

 

Accumulated

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shares

 

 

Amount

 

 

Shares

 

 

Amount

 

 

Capital

 

 

treasury

 

 

 Deficit

 

 

Total

 

Balances, December 31, 2021

 

 

2,620,576

 

 

$26,205

 

 

 

106,240,361

 

 

$1,062,402

 

 

$63,991,459

 

 

$-

 

 

$(32,711,263)

 

$32,368,803

 

Issuance of common stock for directors' fees

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

132,980

 

 

 

1,330

 

 

 

61,171

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

62,501

 

Series D preferred dividends declared

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(787,730)

 

 

(787,730)

Repurchase of common stock

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(202,980)

 

 

-

 

 

 

(202,980)

Net income

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

428,661

 

 

 

428,661

 

Balances, December 31, 2022

 

 

2,620,576

 

 

$26,205

 

 

 

106,373,341

 

 

$1,063,732

 

 

$64,052,630

 

 

$(202,980)

 

$(33,070,332)

 

$31,869,255

 

Common stock buyback and retirement

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(418,696)

 

 

(4,187)

 

 

(198,793)

 

 

202,980

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Conversion of Preferred Series D to Common Stock

 

 

(1,692,672)

 

 

(16,926)

 

 

1,692,672

 

 

 

16,927

 

 

 

(1)

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Net loss

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(6,348,287)

 

 

(6,348,287)

Balances, December 31, 2023

 

 

927,904

 

 

$9,279

 

 

 

107,647,317

 

 

$1,076,472

 

 

$63,853,836

 

 

$-

 

 

$(39,418,619)

 

$25,520,968

 

 

  The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 
F-4

Table of Contents

    

UNITED STATES ANTIMONY CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

For the years ended December 31, 2023 and 2022

 

 

2023

 

 

2022

 

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

 

$(6,348,287)

 

$428,661

 

Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

used by operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

959,445

 

 

 

909,220

 

Accretion of asset retirement obligation

 

 

13,471

 

 

 

17,766

 

Changes in asset retirement obligation estimates

 

 

324,984

 

 

 

-

 

Stock payable to directors

 

 

(22,917)

 

 

61,459

 

Loss on disposal of property, plant & equipment

 

 

217,921

 

 

 

-

 

Write down of inventory to net realizable value

 

 

2,073,404

 

 

 

277,146

 

Allowance for doubtful accounts on accounts receivable

 

 

239,772

 

 

 

59,350

 

Reserve on IVA receivable

 

 

687,534

 

 

 

-

 

Change in fair value of investments

 

 

-

 

 

 

59,246

 

Other non-cash items

 

 

(7,500)

 

 

(647)

Change in:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts receivable, net

 

 

(80,571)

 

 

47,507

 

Inventories, net

 

 

(2,084,445)

 

 

(596,794)

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

45,230

 

 

 

(137,599)

IVA receivable and other assets, net

 

 

(299,092)

 

 

(654,958)

Accounts payable

 

 

(171,868)

 

 

(756,949)

Accrued liabilities

 

 

(67,308)

 

 

(72,636)

Accrued liabilities – directors

 

 

51,847

 

 

 

21,118

 

Royalties payable

 

 

(281,646)

 

 

88,833

 

Net cash used by operating activities

 

 

(4,750,026)

 

 

(249,277)

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from redemption of certificates of deposit

 

 

186,959

 

 

 

-

 

Purchase of investments

 

 

-

 

 

 

(16,184,893)

Proceeds from sale of investments

 

 

-

 

 

 

16,125,647

 

Purchases of properties, plants and equipment

 

 

(1,528,672)

 

 

(1,726,415)

Net cash used by investing activities

 

 

(1,341,713)

 

 

(1,785,661)

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Payments on Dividends Payable

 

 

(787,730)

 

 

-

 

Principal payments on long-term debt

 

 

(283,562)

 

 

(64,745)

Repurchase of common stock

 

 

-

 

 

 

(202,980)

Net cash used by financing activities

 

 

(1,071,292)

 

 

(267,725)

NET DECREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS AND RESTRICTED CASH

 

 

(7,163,031)

 

 

(2,302,663)

|CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS AND RESTRICTED CASH AT BEGINNING OF YEAR

 

 

19,117,666

 

 

 

21,420,329

 

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS AND RESTRICTED CASH AT END OF YEAR

 

$11,954,635

 

 

$19,117,666

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF CASH FLOW INFORMATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest paid in cash

 

$10,521

 

 

$15,141

 

NON-CASH FINANCING AND INVESTING ACTIVITIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equipment purchased with note payable

 

$-

 

 

$161,600

 

Issuance of common stock for directors

 

$-

 

 

$62,501

 

Preferred Series D dividends payable declared

 

$-

 

 

$787,730

 

Common stock buyback and retirement

 

$202,980

 

 

$-

 

Conversion of Preferred Series D to Common Stock

 

$16,926

 

 

$-

 

 

  The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 
F-5

Table of Contents

  

UNITED STATES ANTIMONY CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

NOTE 1 - NATURE OF OPERATIONS

 

United States Antimony Corporation and its subsidiaries in the U.S. and Mexico (“USAC”, the “Company”, “Our”, “Us”, or “We”) sell processed antimony, zeolite, and precious metals products in the U.S. and Canada. The Company processes antimony ore primarily into antimony oxide, antimony metal, and antimony trisulfide. Our antimony oxide is used to form a flame-retardant system for plastics, rubber, fiberglass, textile goods, paints, coatings and paper, as a color fastener in paint, and as a phosphorescent agent in fluorescent light bulbs. Our antimony metal is used in bearings, storage batteries, and ordnance. Our antimony trisulfide is used as a primer in ammunition. In its operations in Idaho, the Company mines and processes zeolite, a group of industrial minerals used in soil amendment and fertilizer, water filtration, sewage treatment, nuclear waste and other environmental cleanup, odor control, gas separation, animal nutrition, and other miscellaneous applications. We recover precious metals, primarily gold and silver, at our plant in Montana from antimony concentrates.

 

NOTE 2 – BASIS OF PRESENTATION AND SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The Company’s consolidated financial statements include the accounts of its wholly owned subsidiaries, Bear River Zeolite Company (“BRZ”), AGUA Mines, Inc., Stibnite Holding Company US Inc., Antimony Mining and Milling US LLC, and Lanxess Laurel de Mexico, S.A. de C.V., and its majority owned subsidiaries, USAMSA and ADM. All intercompany balances and transactions are eliminated in consolidation. AGUA Mines, Inc., Stibnite Holding Company US Inc., Antimony Mining and Milling US LLC, and Lanxess Laurel de Mexico, S.A. de C.V. are inactive.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Critical accounting estimates include impairment of long-lived assets, antimony content of mineral resources, and asset retirement obligations. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Reclassifications

 

Certain reclassifications have been made to conform prior period amounts to the current presentation. These reclassifications have no effect on the results of operations, stockholders’ equity and cash flows as previously reported.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers cash in banks and investments with original maturities of three months or less when purchased to be cash and cash equivalents. At December 31, 2023 and 2022, restricted cash for reclamation bonds of $55,061 and $57,288 is included with the cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash balances in the statements of cash flows.

 

Restricted Cash

 

Restricted cash at December 31, 2023 and 2022 consists of cash held for reclamation performance bonds and is held in certificates of deposit with financial institutions.

 

 
F-6

Table of Contents

  

UNITED STATES ANTIMONY CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

 

Accounts Receivable

 

Accounts receivables are stated at the amount the Company expects to collect from outstanding balances. The Company provides for probable uncollectible amounts through an allowance for doubtful accounts. Changes to the allowance for doubtful accounts are based on the Company’s judgment, considering historical write-offs, collections, and current credit conditions. Balances which remain outstanding after the Company has made reasonable collection efforts are written off through a charge to the allowance for doubtful accounts and a credit to the applicable accounts receivable. Payments received on receivables after being written off are considered a bad debt recovery.

 

Inventories

 

Inventories at December 31, 2023 and 2022 consisted of finished antimony products (oxide and metal), antimony concentrates, antimony ore, and finished zeolite products, and are stated at the lower of first-in, first-out weighted average cost or estimated net realizable value, whichever is lower. Finished antimony products (oxide and metal) and finished zeolite products costs include direct materials, direct labor, facility overhead costs, depreciation, and freight allocated based on production quantity. Stockpiled ore is carried at the lower of average cost or net realizable value. Since the Company’s antimony inventory is a commodity with a sales value that is subject to world prices for antimony that are beyond the Company’s control, a significant change in the world market price of antimony could have a significant effect on the net realizable value of inventories. The Company periodically reviews its inventories to identify excess and obsolete inventories and to estimate reserves for obsolete inventories as necessary to reflect inventories at net realizable value.

 

Foreign Currency Transactions

 

All amounts in the financial statements are presented in U.S. dollars, which is the functional currency of the Company and its subsidiaries. Foreign currency transaction gains and losses are recognized as a foreign currency exchange gain or loss in “other miscellaneous income (expense)” in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.

 

 
F-7

Table of Contents

 

UNITED STATES ANTIMONY CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

 

Properties, Plants and Equipment

 

Properties, plants, and equipment are stated at historical cost and are depreciated using the straight-line method over estimated useful lives ranging from three to forty years. The estimated useful life of plant and equipment ranges from three to twenty years and buildings ranges from twenty to forty years. Maintenance and repairs are charged to operations as incurred. Expenditures for property, plant, equipment, and improvements that extend the useful life or functionality of the asset are capitalized. When assets are retired or sold, the costs and related accumulated depreciation are eliminated from the accounts and any resulting gain or loss is reflected in the results of operations.

 

The costs to obtain the legal right to explore, extract and retain at least a portion of the benefits from mineral deposits are capitalized as mineral rights in the year of acquisition. These capitalized costs are amortized in the statement of operations using the units-of-production method, based upon estimated the units of mineral resource, or the straight-line method, based upon the estimated lives of the properties.

 

The Company expenses costs as incurred during the mine exploration stage. The mine development stage begins once the Company has determined an ore body is feasible. Expenditures incurred during the development stage are capitalized as deferred development costs and amortized using the units-of-production method, based upon estimated the units of mineral resource, or the straight-line method, based upon the estimated lives of the properties. Costs to improve, alter, or rehabilitate primary development assets which appreciably extend the life, increase capacity, or improve the efficiency of such assets are also capitalized. The development stage ends when the production stage of mining begins.

 

Impairment of Long-lived Assets

 

The Company reviews and evaluates the net carrying value of its long-lived assets for impairment upon the occurrence of events or changes in circumstances that indicate that the related carrying amounts may not be recoverable. A test for recoverability is performed based on the estimated undiscounted future cash flows that will be generated from operations at each property and the estimated salvage value of asset. Although management has made what it believes to be a reasonable estimate of factors based on current conditions and information, assumptions underlying future cash flows, which includes the estimated value of assets, are subject to significant risks and uncertainties. Estimates of undiscounted future cash flows and salvage values are dependent upon, among other factors, estimates of: (i) product and metals to be recovered from identified mineralization and other resources (ii) future production and capital costs, (iii) estimated selling prices (considering current, historical, and future prices) over the estimated remaining life of the asset and (iv) market values of assets. It is possible that changes could occur in the near term that could adversely affect the estimate of future cash flows and salvage values to be generated from operating assets. If estimated undiscounted cash flows or salvage values are less than the carrying value of an asset, an impairment loss is recognized for the difference between the carrying value and fair value of the asset.

 

Prepaid Expenses and Other Long-Term Assets

 

Prepaid expenses relate to goods or services that have been paid for but for which the good or service has not been received yet. These expenses are recorded as an asset in the Consolidated Balance Sheet and expensed in the Consolidated Statement of Operations as the asset's benefits are realized. Prepaid expenses are recorded as a current asset in the Consolidated Balance Sheet if the benefits will be realized within twelve months from the date of the Consolidated Balance Sheet or as a long-term asset if the benefits will be realized after twelve months from the date of the Consolidated Balance Sheet.

 

 
F-8

Table of Contents

 

UNITED STATES ANTIMONY CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

   

 

Asset Retirement Obligations

 

The Company’s mining operations are subject to retirement requirements, which include mine retirement standards that have been established by various governmental agencies and retirement requirements included in certain Company contracts, including contracts related to the leasing of certain of the Company’s properties. There are costs that will be incurred to satisfy these retirement requirements upon cessation of our operations. The Company records the fair value of these costs as an asset retirement obligation in its Consolidated Balance Sheet in the period in which the Company has both a legal obligation and an obligating event for the retirement of long-lived assets if it is probable, meaning it can reasonably be expected or believed, that such costs will be incurred and if the costs are reasonably estimable. A corresponding asset is also recorded and amortized over the life of the assets on a units-of-production or straight-line basis. After the initial measurement of the asset retirement obligation, this liability will be adjusted to reflect changes in the estimated costs or timing of the future cash flows underlying the obligation. Determination of any amounts included in the determination of the fair value of the asset retirement obligation can change periodically as the calculation of the fair value of the asset retirement obligation is based upon numerous estimates and assumptions, including, among others, future retirement costs, future inflation rate, and the Company’s credit-adjusted risk-free interest rate. The asset retirement obligation is classified as current or noncurrent based on the expected timing of expenditures.

 

There are uncertainties associated with the nature, timing, and extent of costs associated with asset retirement obligations, including, among others, the extent of environmental contamination, revisions to laws and regulations by regulatory authorities, and changes in remediation technology. As a result, the ultimate cost as well as the timing of the retirement obligation could change in the future. The Company continually reviews its asset retirement obligations for indications that its asset retirement obligation cost or timing has changed and, when indications are present, recalculates its asset retirement obligation.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

Products consist primarily of the following:

 

 

 

Antimony: includes antimony oxide, antimony metal, and antimony trisulfide

 

 

Zeolite: includes coarse and fine zeolite crushed in various sizes

 

 

Precious Metals: includes unrefined and refined gold and silver

 

For antimony, zeolite, and precious metals products, revenue is recognized when the following have been satisfied: 1) the completion of the contractual performance obligations, in which rarely will there be more than one performance obligation, that being shipment of the specified quantity of the specified product per the customer’s sales order or similar document, 2) the amount of consideration or price for the transaction can be reasonably estimated, 3) legal title to and risk and rewards of ownership of the product are transferred to the customer, which typically occurs either upon shipment of the product from the Company’s warehouse locations or upon receipt of the product by the customer as specified in individual sales orders and/or shipping documents, 4) it is assessed as very unlikely product will be rejected by the customer, and 5) the Company has the right to payment for the product. Shipping costs related to sales of our products are recorded to cost of sales as incurred. For zeolite products, royalty expenses due to a third party by the Company are also recorded to cost of sales upon sale in accordance with terms of underlying royalty agreements. Refining related to sales of precious metals are recorded to cost of sales as incurred.

 

The Company has determined that its customer contracts do not include a significant financing component. Prepayments from customers, which are not common, received prior to satisfaction of revenue recognition criteria are recorded as deferred revenue. The Company does not have warranty obligations and sales returns have been historically immaterial. For precious metals sales, a provisional payment of 75% is typically received within 45 days of the date the product is delivered to the customer. After an exchange of assays, a final payment is normally received within 90 days of product delivery.

 

 
F-9

Table of Contents

 

UNITED STATES ANTIMONY CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

 

Common Stock Issued for Consideration Other than Cash

 

All transactions in which goods or services are received for the issuance of shares of the Company’s common stock are accounted for based on the fair value of the common stock issued.

 

Treasury Stock

 

When the Company’s stock is acquired, it is initially valued at cost and presented as treasury stock. Other than formal or constructive retirement or when ultimate disposition has not yet been decided, the cost of the acquired stock is presented as treasury stock separately as a deduction from the total of common stock, additional paid-in capital and accumulated deficit. Gains on sales of treasury stock not previously accounted for as constructively retired are credited to additional paid-in capital, and losses are charged to additional paid-in capital to the extent that previous net gains from sales or retirements of the same class of stock are included therein, with the remainder charged to accumulated deficit. When the Company's stock is purchased for constructive retirement, any excess purchase price over par value is allocated between additional paid-in capital to the extent that previous net gains from sales or retirements are included therein, and the remainder to accumulated deficit.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company’s income tax expense and deferred tax assets and liabilities reflect the Company’s best assessment of estimated future taxes to be paid or refunded. Significant judgments and estimates are required in determining the consolidated income tax expense. Deferred income taxes arise from temporary differences between the tax and financial statement recognition of revenue and expense. In evaluating the Company’s ability to recover its deferred tax assets, the Company considers all available positive and negative evidence, including scheduled reversals of deferred tax liabilities, projected future taxable income, tax planning strategies and recent financial operations. In projecting future taxable income, the Company develops assumptions including the amount of future state and federal pretax operating income, the reversal of temporary differences, and the implementation of feasible and prudent tax planning strategies. These assumptions require significant judgment about the forecasts of future taxable income and the assumptions are consistent with the plans and estimates that the Company is using to manage its underlying businesses. The Company provides a valuation allowance for deferred tax assets that the Company does not consider more likely than not to be realized. Changes in tax laws and rates could also affect recorded deferred tax assets and liabilities in the future and are reflected on a prospective nature in the period of the enactment. The Company’s policy is to recognize interest and penalties related to income tax matters in income tax expense. The Company evaluates its tax positions taken or expected to be taken while preparing its tax returns to determine whether the tax positions will more likely than not be sustained by the applicable tax authority. Tax positions not deemed to meet the more-likely-than-not threshold are not recorded as a tax benefit or expense in the current year. No reserve for uncertain tax positions has been recorded.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The Company’s financial instruments include cash and cash equivalents, certificates of deposits, restricted cash, and long-term debt. The carrying value of these instruments approximates fair value based on their contractual terms.

 

 
F-10

Table of Contents

 

UNITED STATES ANTIMONY CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

    

 

Fair Value Measurements

 

When required to measure assets or liabilities at fair value, the Company uses a fair value hierarchy based on the level of independent, objective evidence surrounding the inputs used. The Company determines the level within the fair value hierarchy in which the fair value measurements in their entirety fall. The categorization within the fair value hierarchy is based on the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. Level 1 uses quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities, Level 2 uses significant other observable inputs, and Level 3 uses significant unobservable inputs. The amount of the total gains or losses for the period are included in earnings that are attributable to the change in unrealized gains or losses relating to those assets and liabilities still held at the reporting date. At December 31, 2023 and 2022, the Company has no financial assets or liabilities that are adjusted to fair value on a recurring basis.

 

Contingencies

 

In determining accruals and disclosures with respect to loss contingencies, the Company evaluates such accruals and contingencies for each reporting period. Estimated losses from loss contingencies are accrued by a charge to income when information available prior to issuance of the financial statements indicates that it is probable that a liability could be incurred, and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. Legal expenses associated with the contingency are expensed as incurred. If a loss contingency is not probable or reasonably estimable, disclosure of the loss contingency is made in the financial statements when it is at least reasonably possible that a material loss could be incurred.

 

New Accounting Pronouncements

 

The Company does not believe that issued, but not yet effective, accounting pronouncements, if currently adopted, would have a material effect on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In June 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2016-13, “Financial Instruments – Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments”, which requires entities to use a forward-looking approach based on expected losses to estimate credit losses on certain types of financial instruments, including trade receivables. The FASB has subsequently issued updates to the standard to provide additional clarification on specific topics. The Company adopted the ASU on January 1, 2023, and determined that it had no material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements and disclosures.

 

In November 2023, the FASB issued ASU 2023-07, Segment Reporting (Topic 280): Improvements to Reportable Segment Disclosures, amending reportable segment disclosure requirements to include disclosure of incremental segment information on an annual and interim basis. Among the disclosure enhancements are new disclosures regarding significant segment expenses that are regularly provided to the chief operating decision-maker and included within each reported measure of segment profit or loss, as well as other segment items bridging segment revenue to each reported measure of segment profit or loss. The amendments in ASU 2023-07 are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2023, and for interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2024, and are applied retrospectively. Early adoption is permitted. We are currently evaluating the impact of this update on our consolidated financial statements and disclosures.

 

In December 2023, the FASB issued ASU 2023-09, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Improvement to Income Tax Disclosures, amending income tax disclosure requirements for the effective tax rate reconciliation and income taxes paid. The amendments in ASU 2023-09 are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2024 and are applied prospectively. Early adoption and retrospective application of the amendments are permitted. We are currently evaluating the impact of this update on our consolidated financial statements and disclosures.

 

 
F-11

Table of Contents

 

UNITED STATES ANTIMONY CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

    

NOTE 3 – EARNINGS PER SHARE

 

Basic Earnings Per Share (“EPS”) is computed as net income (loss) available to common stockholders divided by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted EPS reflects the potential dilution that could occur from common shares issuable through convertible preferred stock and warrants.

 

At December 31, 2023 and 2022, the potentially dilutive common stock equivalents not included in the calculation of diluted earnings per share as their effect would have been anti-dilutive were as follows:

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2023

 

 

2022

 

Warrants

 

 

12,346,215

 

 

 

12,346,215

 

Convertible preferred stock

 

 

-

 

 

 

1,692,672

 

TOTAL POSSIBLE DILUTIVE SHARES

 

 

12,346,215

 

 

 

14,038,887

 

 

NOTE 4 – REVENUE RECOGNITION

 

Products consist of the following:

 

·

Antimony: includes antimony oxide, antimony metal, and antimony trisulfide

 

·

Zeolite: includes coarse and fine zeolite crushed in various sizes

 

·

Precious metals: includes unrefined and refined gold and silver

 

Sales by product for the years ended December 31, 2023 and 2022 were as follows:

 

 

 

For the year ended

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2023

 

 

2022

 

Antimony product revenue

 

$5,904,480

 

 

$7,631,670

 

Zeolite product revenue

 

 

2,462,179

 

 

 

3,151,330

 

Precious metals product revenue

 

 

326,496

 

 

 

261,707

 

TOTAL REVENUES

 

$8,693,155

 

 

$11,044,707

 

 

The Company also received royalties related to a trademark and licensing agreement in its antimony business segment, which is recorded in “Trademark and licensing income” under the caption “Other Income (Expense)” in its Consolidated Statements Operations.

 

 
F-12

Table of Contents

 

UNITED STATES ANTIMONY CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

    

The following is sales information by geographic area based on the location of customers for the years ended December 31, 2023 and 2022:

 

 

 

For the year ended

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2023

 

 

2022

 

United States revenue

 

$6,854,740

 

 

$9,272,698

 

Canada revenue

 

 

1,838,415

 

 

 

1,772,009

 

TOTAL REVENUES

 

$8,693,155

 

 

$11,044,707

 

 

Sales to customers representing more than 10% of our total revenues during the years ended December 31, 2023 and 2022 were as follows:

 

 

 

For the year ended

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2023

 

 

2022

 

Customer A revenue

 

$1,548,283

 

 

$1,882,667

 

Customer B revenue

 

 

1,451,950

 

 

 

1,863,958

 

Customer C revenue

 

 

1,037,307

 

 

 

-

 

Total significant customer revenue

 

$4,037,540

 

 

$3,746,625

 

Customer revenue as a % of total revenues

 

 

46%

 

 

34%

 

All precious metals sales of $326,496 and $261,707 for the years ended December 31, 2023 and 2022, respectively were to one customer, Teck American, Inc.

 

Customer receivables representing more than 10% of our net accounts receivable balance as of December 31, 2023 and 2022 were as follows:

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2023

 

 

2022

 

Customer B receivables

 

$202,382

 

 

$-

 

Customer A receivables

 

 

194,007

 

 

 

-

 

Customer E receivables

 

 

-

 

 

 

188,187

 

Total significant customer receivables

 

$396,389

 

 

$188,187

 

Customer receivables as a % of net accounts receivable

 

 

63%

 

 

24%

 

The Company’s net accounts receivable balance related to contracts with customers was $625,256 at December 31, 2023 and $784,457 at December 31, 2022. The Company’s allowance for doubtful accounts related to accounts receivable was $271,212 at December 31, 2023 and $31,440 at December 31, 2022, the increase of which was primarily included in our U.S. Antimony Segment. The Company’s products do not involve any warranty agreements and product returns are not typical.

 

 
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UNITED STATES ANTIMONY CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

   

NOTE 5 – INVENTORIES

 

Inventories by type at December 31, 2023 and 2022 were as follows:

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2023

 

 

2022

 

Antimony oxide

 

$354,431

 

 

$142,230

 

Antimony metal

 

 

454,748

 

 

 

509,643

 

Antimony ore and concentrates

 

 

71,884

 

 

 

545,373

 

Total antimony inventory

 

$881,063

 

 

$1,197,246

 

Zeolite

 

 

505,046

 

 

 

177,822

 

TOTAL INVENTORIES

 

$1,386,109

 

 

$1,375,068

 

 

As of December 31, 2023 and 2022, inventories were valued at cost except for the portion of the inventory related to our Mexico Antimony Segment operations, which was valued at net realizable value because the cost of our Mexico inventory was greater than the amount the Company expected to receive upon the sale of the inventory. The adjustment to inventory to net realizable value was $2,073,404 and $277,146 for the years ended December 31, 2023 and 2022, respectively.

 

Antimony oxide and metal inventory consisted of finished product held at the Company’s plants in Montana and Mexico.  Antimony concentrates and ore were held primarily at sites in Mexico.  The Company’s zeolite inventory consists primarily of saleable zeolite material in Idaho.

 

 
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Table of Contents

 

UNITED STATES ANTIMONY CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

   

NOTE 6 – PROPERTIES, PLANTS AND EQUIPMENT

 

The components of the Company’s properties, plants and equipment (“PP&E”) by segment at December 31, 2023 and December 31, 2022 were as follows:

 

December 31, 2023

 

Antimony Segment

 

 

Zeolite Segment

 

 

Precious Metals

 

 

 

 

 

USAC

 

 

USAMSA

 

 

BRZ

 

 

Segment

 

 

TOTAL

 

Plant and equipment

 

$1,675,444

 

 

$9,395,022

 

 

$5,336,808

 

 

$1,347,912

 

 

$17,755,186

 

Buildings

 

 

243,248

 

 

 

875,024

 

 

 

2,025,043

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

3,143,315

 

Land and other

 

 

2,727,198

 

 

 

2,764,401

 

 

 

687,639

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

6,179,238

 

Construction in progress

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

8,951

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

8,951

 

PP&E, gross

 

$4,645,890

 

 

$13,034,447

 

 

$8,058,441

 

 

$1,347,912

 

 

$27,086,690

 

Accumulated depreciation

 

 

(2,661,719)

 

 

(6,785,041)

 

 

(3,524,130)

 

 

(661,309)

 

 

(13,632,199)

PP&E, net

 

$1,984,171

 

 

$6,249,406

 

 

$4,534,311

 

 

$686,603

 

 

$13,454,491

 

 

December 31, 2022

 

Antimony Segment

 

 

Zeolite Segment

 

 

Precious Metals

 

 

 

 

 

USAC

 

 

USAMSA

 

 

BRZ

 

 

Segment

 

 

TOTAL

 

Plant and equipment

 

$1,760,926

 

 

$9,090,860

 

 

$4,996,216

 

 

$1,347,912

 

 

$