Company Quick10K Filing
Energous
Price3.32 EPS-1
Shares31 P/E-2
MCap102 P/FCF-5
Net Debt-23 EBIT-41
TEV80 TEV/EBIT-2
TTM 2019-09-30, in MM, except price, ratios
10-Q 2020-03-31 Filed 2020-05-11
10-K 2019-12-31 Filed 2020-03-13
10-Q 2019-09-30 Filed 2019-11-12
10-Q 2019-06-30 Filed 2019-08-09
10-Q 2019-03-31 Filed 2019-05-10
10-K 2018-12-31 Filed 2019-02-28
10-Q 2018-09-30 Filed 2018-11-09
10-Q 2018-06-30 Filed 2018-08-09
10-Q 2018-03-31 Filed 2018-05-10
10-K 2017-12-31 Filed 2018-03-16
10-Q 2017-09-30 Filed 2017-11-09
10-Q 2017-06-30 Filed 2017-08-09
10-Q 2017-03-31 Filed 2017-05-10
10-K 2016-12-31 Filed 2017-03-16
10-Q 2016-09-30 Filed 2016-11-09
10-Q 2016-06-30 Filed 2016-08-09
10-Q 2016-03-31 Filed 2016-05-10
10-K 2015-12-31 Filed 2016-03-15
10-Q 2015-09-30 Filed 2015-11-12
10-Q 2015-06-30 Filed 2015-08-13
10-Q 2015-03-31 Filed 2015-05-13
10-K 2014-12-31 Filed 2015-03-30
10-Q 2014-09-30 Filed 2014-11-10
10-Q 2014-06-30 Filed 2014-08-13
10-Q 2014-03-31 Filed 2014-05-14
8-K 2020-07-24 Amend Bylaw, Shareholder Vote, Exhibits
8-K 2020-05-26
8-K 2020-05-06
8-K 2020-04-21
8-K 2020-02-26
8-K 2019-11-07
8-K 2019-10-11
8-K 2019-08-28
8-K 2019-08-15
8-K 2019-08-08
8-K 2019-05-15
8-K 2019-04-30
8-K 2019-03-28
8-K 2019-03-28
8-K 2019-02-27
8-K 2019-02-27
8-K 2018-10-30
8-K 2018-08-01
8-K 2018-05-16
8-K 2018-05-01
8-K 2018-03-21
8-K 2018-02-15
8-K 2018-01-11
8-K 2018-01-10

WATT 10Q Quarterly Report

Part I - Financial Information
Item 1. Financial Statements
Note 1 - Business Organization, Nature of Operations
Note 2 - Liquidity and Management Plans
Note 3 - Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Note 4 - Commitments and Contingencies
Note 5 - Stockholders' Equity
Note 6 - Stock - Based Compensation
Note 7 - Related Party Transactions
Note 8 - Customer Concentrations
Note 9 - Subsequent Event
Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosure About Market Risk
Item 4. Controls and Procedures
Part II - Other Information
Item 1. Legal Proceedings
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 2. Sales of Unregistered Securities; Use of Proceeds
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Item 5. Other Information
Item 6. Exhibits
EX-31.1 watt-ex311_8.htm
EX-31.2 watt-ex312_7.htm
EX-32.1 watt-ex321_6.htm

Energous Earnings 2020-03-31

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow
503214-4-22-402014201620182020
Assets, Equity
2.1-1.3-4.7-8.2-11.6-15.02013201520172020
Rev, G Profit, Net Income
4533219-3-152014201620182020
Ops, Inv, Fin

10-Q 1 watt-10q_20200331.htm 10-Q watt-10q_20200331.htm

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

(Mark One)

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

FOR THE QUARTERLY PERIOD ENDED MARCH 31, 2020

OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

COMMISSION FILE NUMBER 001-36379

ENERGOUS CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware

 

46-1318953

(State of incorporation)

 

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

3590 North First Street, Suite 210, San Jose, CA  95134

(Address of principal executive office)        (Zip code)

(408) 963-0200

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Trading

Symbol(s)

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, $0.00001 par value

 

WATT

 

The Nasdaq Stock Market

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes      No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).  Yes      No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.  

 

Large accelerated filer

 

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer

 

Smaller reporting company

Emerging growth company

 

 

 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).     Yes           No 

As of May 6, 2020, there were 41,324,493 shares of our Common Stock, par value $0.00001 per share, outstanding.

 

 

 

 


ENERGOUS CORPORATION

FORM 10-Q

FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2020

INDEX

 

 

 

 

 


PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1.  Financial Statements

Energous Corporation

BALANCE SHEETS

 

 

 

As of

 

 

 

March 31, 2020

 

 

December 31, 2019

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

19,963,917

 

 

$

21,684,089

 

Accounts receivable

 

 

59,173

 

 

 

63,144

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

352,019

 

 

 

450,231

 

Total current assets

 

 

20,375,109

 

 

 

22,197,464

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Property and equipment, net

 

 

504,825

 

 

 

626,524

 

Operating lease right-of-use assets

 

 

1,869,131

 

 

 

2,057,576

 

Other assets

 

 

2,410

 

 

 

2,410

 

Total assets

 

$

22,751,475

 

 

$

24,883,974

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

1,038,251

 

 

$

1,671,519

 

Accrued expenses

 

 

1,435,045

 

 

 

2,063,097

 

Operting lease liabilities, current portion

 

 

762,822

 

 

 

722,291

 

Deferred revenue

 

 

12,000

 

 

 

12,000

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

3,248,118

 

 

 

4,468,907

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating lease liabilities, long-term portion

 

 

1,191,981

 

 

 

1,402,193

 

Total liabilities

 

 

4,440,099

 

 

 

5,871,100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commitments and contingencies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred Stock, $0.00001 par value, 10,000,000 shares authorized

   at March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019; no shares issued or

   outstanding

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Stock, $0.00001 par value, 50,000,000 shares authorized

   at March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019; 37,952,017 and

   33,203,806 shares issued and outstanding at March 31, 2020

   and December 31, 2019, respectively.

 

 

381

 

 

 

333

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

290,049,391

 

 

 

282,153,201

 

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(271,738,396

)

 

 

(263,140,660

)

Total stockholders’ equity

 

 

18,311,376

 

 

 

19,012,874

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

 

$

22,751,475

 

 

$

24,883,974

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed financial statements.

 

3


Energous Corporation

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

For the Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

 

Revenue

 

$

61,475

 

 

$

66,500

 

 

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

 

4,575,303

 

 

 

6,800,678

 

 

 

Sales and marketing

 

 

1,447,909

 

 

 

1,599,452

 

 

 

General and administrative

 

 

2,652,394

 

 

 

2,761,911

 

 

 

Cost of services revenue

 

 

39,544

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

8,715,150

 

 

 

11,162,041

 

 

 

Loss from operations

 

 

(8,653,675

)

 

 

(11,095,541

)

 

 

Other income:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest income

 

 

55,939

 

 

 

76,073

 

 

 

Total other income

 

 

55,939

 

 

 

76,073

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(8,597,736

)

 

$

(11,019,468

)

 

 

Basic and diluted loss per common share

 

$

(0.25

)

 

$

(0.39

)

 

 

Weighted average shares outstanding, basic and diluted

 

 

34,816,553

 

 

 

27,939,166

 

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed financial statements.

 

4


Energous Corporation

CONDENSED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY

 

 

 

Common Stock

 

 

Additional

Paid-in

 

 

Accumulated

 

 

Total

Stockholders'

 

 

 

Shares

 

 

Amount

 

 

Capital

 

 

Deficit

 

 

Equity

 

Balance at January 1, 2020

 

 

33,203,806

 

 

$

333

 

 

$

282,153,201

 

 

$

(263,140,660

)

 

$

19,012,874

 

Stock-based compensation - restricted

   stock units ("RSUs")

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,321,820

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,321,820

 

Stock-based compensation - performance

   share units ("PSUs")

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(88,348

)

 

 

 

 

 

(88,348

)

Stock-based compensation - employee

   stock purchase plan ("ESPP")

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

42,827

 

 

 

 

 

 

42,827

 

Issuance of shares for RSUs

 

 

396,559

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

(4

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from contributions to the ESPP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

113,059

 

 

 

 

 

 

113,059

 

Issuance of shares in an at-the-market ("ATM")

   offering, net of $141,322 in issuance costs

 

 

4,351,652

 

 

 

44

 

 

 

5,506,836

 

 

 

 

 

 

5,506,880

 

Net loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(8,597,736

)

 

 

(8,597,736

)

Balance, March 31, 2020 (unaudited)

 

 

37,952,017

 

 

$

381

 

 

$

290,049,391

 

 

$

(271,738,396

)

 

$

18,311,376

 

 

 

 

 

Common Stock

 

 

Additional

Paid-in

 

 

Accumulated

 

 

Total

Stockholders'

 

 

 

Shares

 

 

Amount

 

 

Capital

 

 

Deficit

 

 

Equity

 

Balance at January 1, 2019

 

 

26,526,303

 

 

$

265

 

 

$

243,111,741

 

 

$

(224,741,571

)

 

$

18,370,435

 

Stock-based compensation - restricted

   stock units ("RSUs")

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,083,567

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,083,567

 

Stock-based compensation - employee

   stock purchase plan ("ESPP")

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

87,825

 

 

 

 

 

 

87,825

 

Issuance of shares for RSUs

 

 

434,522

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

(4

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shares withheld for payroll tax on RSUs

 

 

(1,329

)

 

 

 

 

 

(10,207

)

 

 

 

 

 

(10,207

)

Shares withheld for payroll tax on performance share units ("PSUs")

 

 

(44,481

)

 

 

 

 

 

(329,159

)

 

 

 

 

 

(329,159

)

Exercise of stock options

 

 

80,201

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

400,102

 

 

 

 

 

 

400,103

 

Proceeds from contributions to the ESPP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

173,167

 

 

 

 

 

 

173,167

 

Issuance of shares and warrant in a private

   placement, net of $1,680,844 in issuance costs

 

 

3,333,333

 

 

 

33

 

 

 

23,319,123

 

 

 

 

 

 

23,319,156

 

Net loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(11,019,468

)

 

 

(11,019,468

)

Balance, March 31, 2019 (unaudited)

 

 

30,328,549

 

 

$

303

 

 

$

269,836,155

 

 

$

(235,761,039

)

 

$

34,075,419

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed financial statements.

5


Energous Corporation

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

For the Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(8,597,736

)

 

$

(11,019,468

)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

121,699

 

 

 

235,368

 

Stock based compensation

 

 

2,276,299

 

 

 

3,171,392

 

Changes in operating lease right-of-use assets

 

 

188,445

 

 

 

127,293

 

Bad debt expense

 

 

33,000

 

 

 

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts receivable

 

 

(29,029

)

 

 

(22,100

)

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

98,212

 

 

 

147,413

 

Accounts payable

 

 

(633,268

)

 

 

(6,079

)

Accrued expenses

 

 

(628,052

)

 

 

80,170

 

Operating lease liabilities

 

 

(169,681

)

 

 

(83,166

)

Net cash used in operating activities

 

 

(7,340,111

)

 

 

(7,369,177

)

Cash flows from investing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchases of property and equipment

 

 

 

 

 

(161,249

)

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

(161,249

)

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Net proceeds from the sales of common stock

 

 

5,506,880

 

 

 

23,319,156

 

Proceeds from the exercise of stock options

 

 

 

 

 

400,103

 

Proceeds from contributions to employee stock purchase plan

 

 

113,059

 

 

 

173,167

 

Shares repurchased for tax withholdings on vesting of RSUs

 

 

 

 

 

(10,207

)

Shares repurchased for tax withholdings on vesting of PSUs

 

 

 

 

 

(329,159

)

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 

5,619,939

 

 

 

23,553,060

 

Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents

 

 

(1,720,172

)

 

 

16,022,634

 

Cash and cash equivalents - beginning

 

 

21,684,089

 

 

 

20,106,485

 

Cash and cash equivalents - ending

 

$

19,963,917

 

 

$

36,129,119

 

Supplemental disclosure of non-cash financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock issued for RSUs

 

$

4

 

 

$

4

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed financial statements.

6


Note 1 - Business Organization, Nature of Operations

Energous Corporation (the “Company”) was incorporated in Delaware on October 30, 2012. The Company has developed its WattUp® technology, consisting of proprietary semiconductor chipsets, software, hardware designs and antennas, that enables radio frequency (“RF”) based charging for electronic devices, providing wire-free contact and non-contact charging solutions, with the potential to enable charging with mobility. The Company believes its proprietary WattUp technology can be utilized in consumer electronics such as wearables, hearing aids, earbuds, Bluetooth headsets, Internet of Things (“IoT”) devices, smartphones, tablets, e-book readers, keyboards, mice, remote controls, rechargeable lights, cylindrical batteries, medical devices and other devices with charging requirements that would otherwise require battery replacement or wired power connection.

Note 2 – Liquidity and Management Plans

During the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, the Company recorded revenue of $61,475 and $66,500, respectively. During the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, the Company recorded net losses of $8,597,736 and $11,019,468, respectively. Net cash used in operating activities was $7,340,111 and $7,369,177 for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The Company is currently meeting its liquidity requirements through the proceeds of securities offerings that raised net proceeds of $23,319,156 in March 2019, $4,557,693 during the fourth quarter 2019 and $5,506,880 during the first quarter 2020, along with payments received under product development projects.

As of March 31, 2020, the Company had cash on hand of $19,963,917. The Company expects that cash on hand as of March 31, 2020, together with anticipated revenues and potential financing will be sufficient to fund the Company’s operations into May 2021.

Research and development of new technologies is by its nature unpredictable. Although the Company intends to continue its research and development activities, there can be no assurance that its available resources and revenue generated from its business operations will be sufficient to sustain its operations. Accordingly, the Company expects to pursue additional financing, which could include offerings of equity or debt securities, bank financings, commercial agreements with customers or strategic partners, and other alternatives, depending upon market conditions. There is no assurance that such financing would be available on terms that the Company would find acceptable, or at all.

The market for products using the Company’s technology is broad and evolving, but remains nascent and unproven, so the Company’s success is dependent upon many factors, including customer acceptance of its existing products, technical feasibility of future products, regulatory approvals, competition and global market fluctuations.

In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak of a novel coronavirus (COVID-19) as a pandemic which continues to spread throughout the United States and the world. The Company is monitoring the outbreak of COVID-19 and the related business and travel restrictions and changes to behavior intended to reduce its spread, and its impact on operations, financial position, cash flows, inventory, supply chains, purchasing trends, customer payments, and the industry in general, in addition to the impact on its employees. Due to the rapid development and fluidity of this situation, the magnitude and duration of the pandemic and its impact on the Company's operations and liquidity is uncertain as of the date of this report. While there could ultimately be a material impact on operations and liquidity of the Company, at the time of issuance, the impact could not be determined.

Note 3 – Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Basis of Presentation

The accompanying financial statements are presented in U.S. dollars and have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“US GAAP”), and pursuant to the accounting and disclosure rules and regulations of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”).

These unaudited condensed interim financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited financial statements and notes thereto for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019 included in the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019, filed with the SEC on March 13, 2020.  The accounting policies used in preparing these unaudited condensed interim financial statements are consistent with those described in the Company’s December 31, 2019 audited financial statements.

 

 

7


Note 3 – Summary of Significant Accounting Policies, continued

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with US GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and the disclosure of contingent liabilities at the date of the financial statements as well as the reported expenses during the reporting periods.  

The Company’s significant estimates and assumptions include the valuation of stock-based compensation instruments, recognition of revenue, the useful lives of long-lived assets, and income tax expense. Some of these judgments can be subjective and complex, and, consequently, actual results may differ from these estimates. Although the Company believes that its estimates and assumptions are reasonable, they are based upon information available at the time the estimates and assumptions were made. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

The Company considers all short-term, highly liquid investments with an original maturity at the date of purchase of three months or less to be cash equivalents. The Company maintains cash balances that may be uninsured or in deposit accounts that exceed Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation limits. The Company maintains its cash deposits with major financial institutions.

Revenue Recognition

On January 1, 2018, the Company adopted Accounting Standards Update No. 2014-09, "Revenue from Contracts with Customers" (Topic 606).

In accordance with Topic 606, the Company recognizes revenue using the following five-step approach:

 

 

1.

Identify the contract with a customer.

 

2.

Identify the performance obligations in the contract.

 

3.

Determine the transaction price of the contract.

 

4.

Allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract.

 

5.

Recognize revenue when the performance obligations are met or delivered.

The Company’s revenue currently consists of product development projects revenue and royalty revenue from Dialog. The Company also provides contract services for Dialog.  

The Company records revenue associated with product development projects that it enters into with certain customers. In general, these product development projects are complex, and the Company does not have certainty about its ability to achieve the project milestones. The achievement of a milestone is dependent on the Company’s performance obligation and requires acceptance by the customer. The Company recognizes this revenue at a point in time based on when the performance obligation is met. The payment associated with achieving the performance obligation is generally commensurate with the Company’s effort or the value of the deliverable and is nonrefundable. The Company records the expenses related to these product development projects in research and development expense, in the periods such expenses were incurred.

The Company records royalty revenue from its manufacturing partner, Dialog, and such royalty revenue is recognized at a point in time based on shipments from Dialog to its customers.

The Company recognizes contract services revenue from Dialog over a period of time as the services are performed. The costs associated with this revenue are recognized as the services are performed and are included in cost of services revenue.

 

Research and Development

Research and development expenses are charged to operations as incurred. For internally developed patents, all patent application costs are expensed as incurred as research and development expense. Patent application costs, which are generally legal costs, are expensed as research and development costs until such time as the future economic benefits of such patents become more certain. The Company incurred research and development costs of $4,575,303 and $6,800,678 for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

8


Note 3 – Summary of Significant Accounting Policies, continued

Stock-Based Compensation

The Company accounts for equity instruments issued to employees, board members and contractors in accordance with accounting guidance that requires awards to be recorded at their fair value on the date of grant and are amortized over the vesting period of the award. The Company recognizes compensation costs on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period of the award, which is typically the vesting term of the equity instrument issued.

Under the Company’s Employee Stock Purchase Plan (“ESPP”), employees may purchase a limited number of shares of the Company’s common stock at a 15% discount from the lower of the closing market prices measured on the first and last days of each half-year period. The Company recognizes stock-based compensation expense for the fair value of the purchase options, as measured on the grant date.

 

 

Income Taxes

Tax benefits are recognized only for tax positions that are more likely than not to be sustained upon examination by tax authorities. The amount recognized is measured as the largest amount of benefit that is greater than 50 percent likely to be realized upon settlement. A liability for “unrecognized tax benefits” is recorded for any tax benefits claimed in the Company’s tax returns that do not meet these recognition and measurement standards. As of March 31, 2020, no liability for unrecognized tax benefits was required to be reported. The guidance also discusses the classification of related interest and penalties on income taxes. The Company’s policy is to record interest and penalties on uncertain tax positions as a component of income tax expense. No interest or penalties were recorded during the three months ended March 31, 2020 or 2019. The Company files income tax returns with the United States and California governments.

Net Loss Per Common Share

Basic net loss per share is computed by dividing net loss available to common stockholders by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period. Diluted earnings per share is computed using the weighted average number of common shares and, if dilutive, potential common shares outstanding during the period. Potential common shares consist of the incremental common shares issuable upon the exercise of stock options and warrants (using the treasury stock method), the vesting of restricted stock units (“RSUs”) and performance stock units (“PSUs”) and the enrollment of employees in the ESPP. The computation of diluted loss per share excludes potentially dilutive securities of 7,206,004 and 7,601,654 for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively because their inclusion would be anti-dilutive.

Potentially dilutive securities outlined in the table below have been excluded from the computation of diluted net loss per share because the effect of their inclusion would have been anti-dilutive.  

 

 

 

For the Three Months

Ended March 31,

 

 

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

 

Warrant issued to private investors

 

 

3,938,802

 

 

 

4,702,354

 

 

 

Options to purchase common stock

 

 

550,985

 

 

 

576,293

 

 

 

RSUs

 

 

2,048,540

 

 

 

2,323,007

 

 

 

PSUs

 

 

667,677

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total potentially dilutive securities

 

 

7,206,004

 

 

 

7,601,654

 

 

 

 

 

9


Note 3 – Summary of Significant Accounting Policies, continued

 

Leases

 

As of January 1, 2019, the Company determines if an arrangement is a lease at the inception of the arrangement. The Company applies the short-term lease recognition exemption and recognizes lease payments in profit or loss at lease commencement for facility or equipment leases that have a lease term of 12 months or less and do not include a purchase option whose exercise is reasonably certain. Operating leases are included in operating lease right-of-use (ROU) assets and operating lease liabilities.

 

ROU assets represent the right to use an underlying asset for the lease term, and lease liabilities represent the obligation to make lease payments arising from the lease. Operating lease ROU assets and liabilities are measured and recorded at the later of the adoption date, January 1, 2019, or the service commencement date based on the present value of lease payments over the lease term. The Company uses the implicit interest rate when readily determinable; however, most leases do not establish an implicit rate, so the Company uses an estimate of the incremental borrowing rate based on the information available at the time of measurement. Lease expense for lease payments is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term. See Note 4 – Commitments and Contingencies, Operating Leases for further discussion of the Company’s operating leases.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In July 2019, the FASB issued ASU No. 2019-07, “Codification Updates to SEC Sections.” ASU 2019-07 updates the SEC portion of the FASB’s codification literature to reflect the changes the SEC made to simplify disclosures. It is effective immediately. The Company adopted ASU 2019-07 and its adoption had no material impact on its financial statements.

 

In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU No. 2019-12, “Income Taxes (Topic 740),” Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes. ASU 2019-12 removes certain exceptions under Topic 740 and improves consistent application by clarifying and amending existing guidance. This standard is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2020. The Company does not believe adoption of this standard will have a material impact on its financial statements.

 

Management’s Evaluation of Subsequent Events

The Company evaluates events that have occurred after the balance sheet date of March 31, 2020, through the date which the financial statements are issued.

Note 4 – Commitments and Contingencies

Operating Leases

San Jose Lease

On September 10, 2014, the Company entered into a lease agreement with Balzer Family Investments, L.P. (the “Landlord”) related to space located at Northpointe Business Center, 3590 North First Street, San Jose, California. The initial term of the lease was 60 months, with initial monthly base rent of $36,720 and the lease was subject to certain annual escalations as defined in the agreement. On March 13, 2019, the Company amended its lease agreement with the Landlord which combined both the first-floor space and the second-floor space for the final three months of the original lease term for the second floor, which expired on September 30, 2019. Effective July 1, 2019 through September 30, 2019, the new monthly rent payment was $48,372.

On February 26, 2015, the Company entered into a sub-lease agreement for space in its San Jose location on the first floor and was amended on August 25, 2015 to include additional space. The sub-lease agreement had a term which expired on June 30, 2019.

On July 1, 2019, the Company signed a new lease agreement for the lease of its office space at its corporate headquarters in San Jose, California for an additional three years. The lease agreement includes space on the first floor of the building that had been previously subleased. Upon expiration of the original lease on September 30, 2019, the new monthly lease payment starting October 1, 2019 was $52,970 and is subject to annual escalations up to a maximum monthly lease payment of $64,941.

 

10


Note 4 – Commitments and Contingencies, continued

 

Operating Leases, continued

Costa Mesa Lease

On May 31, 2017, the Company renewed a lease agreement for the Company’s space in Costa Mesa, California. The agreement had a term that expired on September 30, 2019 with initial monthly rent of $9,040 and was subject to certain annual escalations as defined in the agreement.

 

On July 15, 2019, the Company signed a new lease agreement for the lease of office space in Costa Mesa, California for an additional two years. Upon expiration of the original lease on September 30, 2019, the new monthly lease payment starting October 1, 2019 was $9,773 and is subject to an annual escalation up to a maximum monthly lease payment of $10,200.

 

Operating Lease Commitments

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued its final standard on lease accounting, ASU No. 2016-02, “Leases (Topic 842),” which superseded Topic 840, “Leases,” which was further modified in ASU No. 2018-10, “Codification Improvements” to clarify the implementation guidance. The new accounting standard was effective for the Company beginning on January 1, 2019 and required the recognition on the balance sheet of right-of-use assets and lease liabilities. The Company elected the optional transition method and adopted the new guidance on January 1, 2019 on a modified retrospective basis with no restatement of prior period amounts. The Company’s adoption of the new standard resulted in the recognition of right-of-use assets of $414,426 and operating lease liabilities of $485,747, with no material cumulative effect adjustment to equity as of the date of adoption. The Company anticipates having future total lease payments of $2,049,918 during the period from the second quarter of 2020 to the third quarter of 2022. As of March 31, 2020, the company has total operating lease right-of-use assets of $1,869,131, current portion operating lease liabilities of $762,822 and long-term portion of operating lease liabilities of $1,191,981. The weighted average remaining lease term is 2.4 years as of March 31, 2020.

A reconciliation of undiscounted cash flows to lease liabilities recognized as of March 31, 2020 is as follows:

 

 

 

Amount

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

2020

 

 

602,250

 

2021

 

 

863,199

 

2022

 

 

584,469

 

Total future lease payments

 

 

2,049,918

 

Present value discount (4% weighted average)

 

 

(95,115

)

Total operating lease liabilities

 

 

1,954,803

 

 

Hosted Design Solution Agreement

On June 25, 2015, the Company entered into a three-year agreement to license electronic design automation software in a hosted environment. Pursuant to the agreement, under which services began July 2015, the Company is required to remit quarterly payments in the amount of approximately $101,000 with the last payment due March 30, 2018. On December 18, 2015, the agreement was amended to redefine the hardware and software configuration and the quarterly payments increased to approximately $198,000. In July 2018, the Company renewed agreement for an additional three years, and the Company is required to remit quarterly payments of approximately $218,000, with the last payment due in March 2021.

 

Litigations, Claims, and Assessments

 

The Company is from time to time involved in various disputes, claims, liens and litigation matters arising in the normal course of business. While the outcome of these disputes, claims, liens and litigation matters cannot be predicted with certainty, after consulting with legal counsel, management does not believe that the outcome of these matters will have a material adverse effect on the Company's combined financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

11


Note 4 – Commitments and Contingencies, continued

MBO Bonus Plan

On March 15, 2018, the Company’s Board of Directors (“Board”), on the recommendation of the Board’s Compensation Committee (“Compensation Committee”), approved the Energous Corporation MBO Bonus Plan (“Bonus Plan”) for executive officers of the Company. To be eligible to receive a bonus under the Bonus Plan, an executive officer must be continuously employed throughout the applicable performance period, and in good standing, and achieve the performance objectives selected by the Compensation Committee.

Under the Bonus Plan, the Compensation Committee is responsible for selecting the amounts of potential bonuses for executive officers, the performance metrics used to determine whether any such bonuses will be paid and determining whether those performance metrics have been achieved.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2020, the Company accrued $284,591 in expense under the Bonus Plan, which will be paid during the second quarter of 2020. During the three months ended March 31, 2019, the Company accrued $314,513 in expense, which was paid during the second quarter of 2019.

Severance and Change in Control Agreement

On March 15, 2018, the Compensation Committee approved a form of Severance and Change in Control Agreement (“Severance Agreement”) that the Company may enter into with executive officers (“Executive”).

Under the Severance Agreement, if an Executive is terminated in a qualifying termination, the Company agrees to pay the Executive six to 12 months of that Executive’s monthly base salary. If Executive elects continued coverage under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985, as amended (“COBRA”) the Company will pay the full amount of Executive’s premiums under the Company’s health, dental and vision plans, including coverage for the Executive’s eligible dependents, for the six to 12 month period following the Executive’s termination.

Amended Employee Agreement – Stephen Rizzone

On April 3, 2015, the Company entered into an Amended and Restated Executive Employment Agreement with Stephen R. Rizzone, the Company’s President and Chief Executive Officer (“Employment Agreement”).

The Employment Agreement effective as of January 1, 2015, has an initial term of four years and automatically renews each year after the initial term. The Employment Agreement provides for an annual base salary of $365,000, and Mr. Rizzone is eligible to receive quarterly cash bonuses from the MBO Bonus Plan with a total target amount equal to 100% of his base salary based upon achievement of performance-based objectives established by the Board.

 

Mr. Rizzone is also eligible to receive all customary and usual benefits generally available to senior executives of the Company.

Strategic Alliance Agreement

In November 2016, the Company and Dialog Semiconductor plc (“Dialog”), a related party (see Note 7—Related Party Transactions), entered into a Strategic Alliance Agreement (“Alliance Agreement”) for the manufacture, distribution and commercialization of products incorporating the Company’s wire-free charging technology (“Licensed Products”). Pursuant to the terms of the Alliance Agreement, the Company agreed to engage Dialog as the exclusive supplier of the Licensed Products for specified fields of use, subject to certain exceptions (the “Company Exclusivity Requirement”). Dialog agreed to not distribute, sell or work with any third party to develop any competing products without the Company’s approval (the “Dialog Exclusivity Requirement”). In addition, both parties agreed on a revenue sharing arrangement and will collaborate on the commercialization of Licensed Products based on a mutually-agreed upon plan. Each party will retain all of its intellectual property.

The Alliance Agreement has an initial term of seven years and will automatically renew annually thereafter unless terminated by either party upon 180 days’ prior written notice. The Company may terminate the Alliance Agreement at any time after the third anniversary of the Agreement upon 180 days’ prior written notice to Dialog, or if Dialog breaches certain exclusivity obligations. Dialog may terminate the Alliance Agreement if sales of Licensed Products do not meet specified targets. The Company Exclusivity Requirement will terminate upon the earlier of January 1, 2021 or the occurrence of certain events relating to the Company’s pre-existing exclusivity obligations.

12


Note 5 – Stockholders’ Equity

Authorized Capital

The holders of the Company’s common stock are entitled to one vote per share. Holders of common stock are entitled to receive ratably such dividends, if any, as may be declared by the Board out of legally available funds. Upon the liquidation, dissolution or winding up of the Company, holders of common stock are entitled to share ratably in all assets of the Company that are legally available for distribution.

Financing

On August 9, 2018, the Company filed a shelf registration statement on Form S-3, which became effective on August 17, 2018. This shelf registration statement allows the Company to sell, from time to time, any combination of debt or equity securities described in the registration statement up to aggregate proceeds of $75,000,000. Pursuant to this registration statement, in March 2019 the Company raised $23,319,156 (net of $1,680,844 in issuance costs) from an offering of shares of its common stock and warrants to purchase 1,666,666 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $10.00 per share. The Company also raised $4,557,693 (net of $339,081 in issuance costs) and $5,506,880 (net of $141,322 in issuance costs), pursuant to this shelf registration statement, in an “at-the-market” equity offering during the fourth quarter of 2019 and the first quarter of 2020, respectively.

Common Stock Outstanding

In August 2019, an aggregate of 38,666 shares of common stock were returned to the Company and retired in connection with the rescission of restricted stock unit agreements.

Note 6 – Stock-Based Compensation

Equity Incentive Plans

2013 Equity Incentive Plan

Effective on May 16, 2018, the Company’s stockholders approved the amendment and restatement of the 2013 Equity Incentive Plan to increase the number of shares reserved for issuance thereunder by 1,600,000 shares, bringing to 6,085,967 the total number of shares approved for issuance under that plan. 

As of March 31, 2020, 649,695 shares of common stock remain eligible to be issued through equity-based instruments under the 2013 Equity Incentive Plan.

2014 Non-Employee Equity Compensation Plan

Effective on May 16, 2018, the Company’s stockholders approved the amendment and restatement of the 2014 Non-employee Equity Compensation Plan to increase the number of shares reserved for issuance through equity-based instruments thereunder by 250,000 shares, bringing to 850,000 the total number of shares approved for issuance under that plan.

As of March 31, 2020, 227,825 shares of common stock remain eligible to be issued through equity-based instruments under the 2014 Non-Employee Equity Compensation Plan.

2015 Performance Share Unit Plan

Effective on May 16, 2018, the Company’s stockholders approved the amendment and restatement of the 2015 Performance Share Unit Plan to increase the number of shares reserved for issuance through equity-based instruments thereunder by 1,400,000 shares, bringing to 2,710,104 the total number of shares approved for issuance under that plan.

 

As of March 31, 2020, 764,274 shares of common stock remain eligible to be issued through equity-based instruments under the 2015 Performance Share Unit Plan.

 

13


Note 6 – Stock-Based Compensation, continued

Equity Incentive Plans, continued

 

2017 Equity Inducement Plan

 

On December 28, 2017, the Board approved the 2017 Equity Inducement Plan. Under the plan, the Board reserved 600,000 shares for the grant of RSUs. These grants will be administered by the Board or a committee of the Board. These awards will be granted to individuals who (a) are being hired as an employee by the Company or any subsidiary and such award is a material inducement to such person being hired; (b) are being rehired as an employee following a bona fide period of interruption of employment with the Company or any subsidiary; or (c) will become an employee of the Company or any subsidiary in connection with a merger or acquisition.

 

As of March 31, 2020, 298,404 shares of common stock remain available to be issued through equity-based instruments under the 2017 Equity Inducement Plan.

Employee Stock Purchase Plan

In April 2015, the Company’s Board approved the ESPP, under which 600,000 shares of common stock have been reserved for purchase by the Company’s employees, subject to the approval by the stockholders. On May 21, 2015, the Company’s stockholders approved the ESPP. Under the ESPP, employees may designate an amount not less than 1% but not more than 10% of their annual compensation for the purchase of Company shares. No more than 7,500 shares may be purchased by an employee under the ESPP during an offering period. An offering period shall be six months in duration commencing on or about January 1 and July 1 of each year. The exercise price of the option will be the lesser of 85% of the fair market of the common stock on the first business day of the offering period and 85% of the fair market value of the common stock on the applicable exercise date.

As of March 31, 2020, 165,750 shares of common stock remain eligible to be issued under the ESPP. As of March 31, 2020, employees have contributed $113,509 through payroll withholdings to the ESPP for the current offering period. Shares will be deemed delivered on June 30, 2020 for the current offering period.

Stock Option Activity

The following is a summary of the Company’s stock option activity during the three months ended March 31, 2020:

 

 

 

Number of

Options

 

 

Weighted

Average

Exercise

Price

 

 

Weighted

Average

Remaining

Life In

Years

 

 

Intrinsic

Value

 

Outstanding at January 1, 2020

 

 

550,985

 

 

$

5.67

 

 

 

4.3

 

 

$

2,538

 

Granted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercised

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forfeited

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outstanding at March 31, 2020

 

 

550,985

 

 

$

5.67

 

 

 

4.3

 

 

$

 

Exercisable at January 1, 2020

 

 

550,985

 

 

$

5.67

 

 

 

4.3

 

 

$

2,538

 

Vested

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercised

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forfeited

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercisable at March 31, 2020

 

 

550,985

 

 

$

5.67

 

 

 

4.3

 

 

$

 

 

As of March 31, 2020, the unamortized value of options was $0.

 

14


 

Note 6 – Stock-Based Compensation, continued

Restricted Stock Units (“RSUs”)

During the three months ended March 31, 2020, the Compensation Committee granted various employees RSUs covering 645,031 shares of common stock under the 2013 Equity Incentive Plan. The awards vest over terms ranging from two to four years.

During the three months ended March 31, 2020, the Compensation Committee granted employees RSUs covering 20,000 shares of common stock under the 2017 Equity Inducement Plan. The awards vest over four years beginning on the anniversary of the grant date.

 

As of March 31, 2020, the unamortized value of the RSUs was $10,274,477. The unamortized amount will be expensed over a weighted average period of 1.5 years. A summary of the activity related to RSUs for the three months ended March 31, 2020 is presented below:

 

 

 

Total

 

 

 

Weighted

Average

Grant

Date Fair

Value

 

Outstanding at January 1, 2020

 

 

1,821,852

 

 

 

$

10.05

 

RSUs granted

 

 

665,031

 

 

 

$

1.27

 

RSUs forfeited

 

 

(41,784

)

 

 

$

2.09

 

RSUs vested

 

 

(396,559

)

 

 

$

11.62

 

Outstanding at March 31, 2020

 

 

2,048,540

 

 

 

$

6.93

 

 

 

Performance Share Units (“PSUs”)

Performance share units (“PSUs”) are grants that vest upon the achievement of certain performance goals. The goals are commonly related to the Company’s revenue, market capitalization or market share price of the common stock.

Amortization for all PSU awards was $(88,348) and $0 for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

A summary of the activity related to PSUs for the three months ended March 31, 2020 is presented below:

 

 

 

Total

 

 

Weighted

Average Grant

Date Fair Value

 

Outstanding at January 1, 2020

 

 

428,000

 

 

$

2.09

 

PSUs granted

 

 

267,677

 

 

 

1.27

 

PSUs forfeited

 

 

(28,000

)

 

 

6.38

 

PSUs vested

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outstanding at March 31, 2020

 

 

667,677

 

 

 

1.76

 

 

Employee Stock Purchase Plan (“ESPP”)

The current offering period under the ESPP started on January 1, 2020 and will conclude on June 30, 2020. During the year ended December 31, 2019, there were two offering periods for the ESPP. The first offering period started on January 1, 2019 and concluded on June 30, 2019. The second offering period started on July 1, 2019 and concluded on December 31, 2019.

The weighted-average grant-date fair value of the purchase option for each designated share purchased under this plan was approximately $0.57 and $2.43 for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively, which represents the fair value of the option, consisting of three main components: (i) the value of the discount on the enrollment date, (ii) the proportionate value of the call option for 85% of the stock and (iii) the proportionate value of the put option for 15% of the stock. The Company recognized compensation expense for the plan of $42,827 and $87,825 for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

15


Note 6 – Stock-Based Compensation, continued

Employee Stock Purchase Plan (“ESPP”), continued

The Company estimated the fair value of ESPP purchase options granted during the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019 using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. The fair values of stock options granted were estimated using the following assumptions:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

March 31, 2020

 

 

Three Months Ended

March 31, 2019

 

Stock price

 

$

1.77

 

 

$

5.79

 

Dividend yield

 

 

0

%

 

 

0

%

Expected volatility

 

 

61

%

 

 

96

%

Risk-free interest rate

 

 

1.57

%

 

 

2.51

%

Expected life

 

6 months

 

 

6 months

 

 

 

Stock-Based Compensation Expense

The following tables summarize total stock-based compensation costs recognized for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

 

RSUs

 

 

2,321,820

 

 

$

3,083,567

 

 

 

PSUs

 

 

(88,348

)

 

 

 

 

 

ESPP

 

 

42,827

 

 

 

87,825

 

 

 

Total

 

$

2,276,299

 

 

$

3,171,392

 

 

 

 

 

The total amount of stock-based compensation was reflected within the statements of operations as:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

 

Research and development

 

$

1,100,978

 

 

$

1,656,553

 

 

 

Sales and marketing

 

 

364,458

 

 

 

377,048

 

 

 

General and administrative

 

 

810,863

 

 

 

1,137,791

 

 

 

Total

 

$

2,276,299

 

 

$

3,171,392

 

 

 

 

 

Note 7 – Related Party Transactions

In November 2016, the Company and Dialog entered into an alliance agreement for the manufacture, distribution and commercialization of products incorporating the Company’s wire-free charging technology (See Note 4 – Commitments and Contingencies, Strategic Alliance Agreement). On November 7, 2016 and June 28, 2017, the Company and Dialog entered into securities purchase agreements under which Dialog acquired a total of 1,739,691 shares and received warrants to purchase up to 1,417,565 shares. As of March 31, 2020, a total of 654,013 of the warrants remain outstanding. As of March 31, 2020, Dialog owns approximately 4.6% of the Company’s outstanding common shares and could potentially own approximately 6.2% of the Company’s outstanding common shares if it exercised all of its warrants for common shares. The Company recorded $0 and $7,100 in royalty revenue pursuant to the Strategic Alliance Agreement for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. Additionally, the Company recorded $40,625 and $0 in contract services revenue performed for Dialog during the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The Company recorded $39,544 and $0 in cost of services revenue associated with the contract services performed for Dialog during the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

 

16


Note 8 – Customer Concentrations

 

Two customers accounted for approximately 82% of the Company’s revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and four customers accounted for approximately 98% of the Company’s revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2019. Two customers accounted for approximately 90% of the accounts receivable balance, one of which is Dialog, a related party, as of March 31, 2020. The accounts receivable balance for Dialog was $43,322 as of March 31, 2020. Four customers accounted for nearly 100% of the accounts receivable balance as of December 31, 2019.

 

Note 9 – Subsequent Event

 

During April 2020, the Company raised net proceeds of $9,216,621 through an “at-the-market” (ATM) offering, pursuant to the shelf registration statement on Form S-3 filed on August 9, 2018 disclosed in Note 5 – Stockholders’ Equity, Financing.

 

17


Item 2.  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Forward-Looking Statements

As used in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, unless the context otherwise requires the terms “we,” “us,” “our,” and “Energous” refer to Energous Corporation, a Delaware corporation.  This report contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, that are intended to be covered by the “safe harbor” created by those sections. Forward-looking statements, which are based on certain assumptions and describe our future plans, strategies and expectations, can generally be identified by the use of forward-looking terms such as “believe,” “expect,” “may,” “will,” “would,” “should,” “could,” “seek,” “intend,” “plan,” “continue,” “estimate,” “anticipate” or other comparable terms. All statements other than statements of historical facts included in this report regarding our strategies, prospects, financial condition, operations, costs, plans and objectives are forward-looking statements. Examples of forward-looking statements include, among others, statements we make regarding proposed business strategy; market opportunities; regulatory approval; expectations for current and potential business relationships; expectations for revenues, liquidity cash flows and financial performance, the anticipated results of our research and development efforts, the timing for receipt of required regulatory approvals and product launches. Forward-looking statements are neither historical facts nor assurances of future performance. Instead, they are based only on our current beliefs, expectations and assumptions regarding the future of our business, future plans and strategies, projections, anticipated events and trends, the economy and other future conditions. Forward-looking statements relate to the future and are subject to inherent uncertainties, risks and changes in circumstances that are difficult to predict and generally outside of our control, so actual results and financial condition may differ materially from those indicated in the forward-looking statements. Important factors that could cause our actual results and financial condition to differ materially from those indicated in the forward-looking statements include, among others: our ability to develop commercially feasible technology; timing of customer implementations of our technology in consumer products; timing and receipt of regulatory approvals in the United States and internationally; the impact of the COVID-19 on our business and our response to it; our ability to find and maintain development partners; market acceptance of our technology; competition in our industry; our ability to protect our intellectual property; competition; and other risks and uncertainties described in the Risk Factors and in Management's Discussion and Analysis sections of our most recently filed Annual Report on Form 10-K and subsequently filed Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q. We undertake no obligation to publicly update any of our forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise.

Overview

We have developed our WattUp® wireless power technology, consisting of proprietary semiconductor chipsets, software controls, hardware designs and antennas, that enables radio frequency (“RF”) based charging for electronic devices. The WattUp technology has a broad spectrum of capabilities, including contact-based wireless charging and wireless charging at various distances. We have demonstrated that, for non-contact applications, our transmitter technology is able to mesh into a wire-free charging network that is expected to allow users to charge their devices even as the devices are moved about in three-dimensional space (“mobility charging”). In November 2016 we entered into a Strategic Alliance Agreement with Dialog Semiconductor plc (“Dialog”), an industry leader in Bluetooth low energy semiconductors and power management semiconductors. In conjunction with the Strategic Alliance Agreement, Dialog manufactures and is the exclusive distributor of integrated circuit (“IC”) products that incorporate our designs and provides sales and logistic support to customers on a global basis. We believe our proprietary WattUp technology can be utilized in consumer electronics such as wearables, hearing aids, earbuds, Bluetooth headsets, Internet of Things (“IoT”) devices, smartphones, tablets, smartwatches, fitness bands, keyboards, mice, remote controls, rechargeable lights, batteries, medical devices, and other devices with charging requirements that would otherwise require battery replacement or a wired power connection.

We believe our technology is innovative in its approach, in that we are developing solutions that charge electronic devices by surrounding them with a focused RF energy pocket. We are engineering solutions that deliver wire-free energy for contact-based charging applications and are also developing non-contact charging at distances up to approximately three feet, as well as low-power charging for distances up to 15 feet and in some use cases mobility charging. To-date, we have developed multiple transmitters and receivers, including prototypes as well as partner production designs. The transmitters vary based on form factor, power specifications and frequencies, while the receivers are designed for applications including hearing aids, fitness bands, smartwatches, smartphones, smartglasses, sensors, industrial applications, keyboards, mice, headsets, earbuds, headphones, Bluetooth tracking tags and more. We are engaged with several consumer electronics (CE) and medical device companies that are in the pre-production stage of WattUp-based product development. In 2019, our first end customer product entered the market and we expect additional partner products to be announced and launched in 2020. We are also in discussion with potential customers in the consumer and industrial spaces that are considering our solutions to supply low power distance charging for products that could enter the market in 2021.

18


When the company was founded in 2012, we recognized the need to design and build an enterprise-class network management and control software (“NMS”) system that would be integral to supporting our customers’ rapid and cost-effective deployment of our wire-free charging technology. Our NMS system is robust and flexible enough to both scale up to control thousands of devices across an enterprise, or scale down to meet the needs of a home or IoT environment.

In December 2017, we announced Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) certification of our first-generation WattUp Mid Field transmitter, which simultaneously powers multiple devices at a distance of up to three feet. This transmitter underwent rigorous, multi-month testing to verify that it met consumer safety and regulatory requirements. We believe this was the first certification of a Part 18 FCC-approved non-contact wireless charging transmitter, and that it establishes engineering design precedents that can streamline future regulatory approvals for our technology and for our customers’ end-products that employ our technology. In April 2020, we announced an FCC certification for a new over-the-air charging transmitter technology which we believe will offer our partners a lower-cost, smaller size transmitter technology for lower power applications.

Our technology solution consists principally of transmitter controller ICs, power amplifier ICs and receiver ICs, as well as novel antenna designs, application prototypes and proprietary software algorithms. We submitted our first IC design for wafer fabrication in 2013 and have developed many generations of transmitter and receiver ICs, antenna designs, and software algorithms.  We have endeavored to optimize our technology by reducing size and cost, while at the same time increasing performance which enables our designs to be integrated into a broad range of devices. We have developed a “building block” approach that allows us to scale our product implementations by combining multiple transmitter building blocks or multiple receiver building blocks to meet the power, distance, size and cost requirements of customer applications requirements. Our technology is readily scalable because the same ICs that are used for contact-based charging can be used for distance-based charging solutions. We have developed two classes of chip solutions, a CMOS-based technology focused on low cost, small footprint and low power (less than 5 watts) and a GaAs/GAn-based technology capable of delivering higher power with greater efficiency. We intend to continue to invest in research and development with high power capabilities of 20 watts and beyond at high levels of efficiency. We also intend to continue to invest in improving product performance, efficiency, cost-performance and miniaturization as required to reach multiple markets and expand the power-at-a-distance ecosystem, while maintaining a technology lead on potential competitors.

We deliver evaluation kits to potential licensees of our technology, to allow their respective engineering and product management departments to test and evaluate the technology. Our customers’ product development, technology integration and product introduction cycles occur over multiple quarters and generally more than a year can elapse before first evaluation and final shipment of the customer’s product. Once our customers begin to sell products to end customers that incorporate our technology, we would expect the commercialization cycle to shorten over time as the technology matures and market acceptance grows.

We generally maintain exclusive rights to all intellectual property in our technology. We have implemented an aggressive intellectual property strategy and are continuing to pursue patent protection for new innovations. As of May 6, 2020, we had more than 110 pending patent applications in the U.S. and abroad. Additionally, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and international patent offices have issued 222 patents to us. In addition to the inventions covered by these patents, we have also identified specific inventions that we believe are novel and patentable. In addition to the inventions covered by these patents and patent applications, we have also identified specific inventions that we believe are novel and patentable. We intend to file for patent protection for the most valuable of these, and for other inventions that we expect to develop. This is a significant annual expense and we continually monitor the costs and benefits of each patent application and pursue those that we believe are most protective for our business and expand the core value of the Company.

Our seasoned management team has both private and public company experience, as well as relevant industry experience. In addition, we have identified and hired key engineering resources in the areas of IC development, antenna development, hardware, software and firmware engineering as well as integration and testing, which will allow us to continue to expand our technology and intellectual property and to meet our customers’ support requirements. 

The market for products using our technology is nascent and unproven, so our success is sensitive to many factors, including technological feasibility, regulatory approval, customer acceptance, competition and global market fluctuations.

Impact of COVID-19 on Our Business

In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak of COVID-19 as a pandemic which continues to spread throughout the United States and the world. We are monitoring the outbreak of COVID-19 and the related

19


business and travel restrictions and changes to behavior intended to reduce its spread, and its impact on our operations, financial position, cash flows, inventory, supply chains, purchasing trends, customer payments, and the industry in general, in addition to the impact on our employees.

The outbreak of COVID-19 has delayed adoption of our technology by potential customers who temporarily shut down their workforce and supply chain based in China. In one case, this outbreak delayed the launch of a new product that incorporates our technology. We have implemented work-from-home policies for our employees. The effects of the state executive order, local shelter-in-place orders, government-imposed quarantines and our work-from-home policies may negatively impact productivity, disrupt our research and development or other operations, and delay the launch of our customers’ new products that incorporate our technology, the magnitude of which will depend, in part, on the length and severity of the restrictions and other limitations on our ability to conduct our business in the ordinary course.  Due to the rapid development and fluidity of this situation, the magnitude and duration of the pandemic and its impact on our operations and liquidity is uncertain as of the date of this report. While there could ultimately be a material impact on our operations and liquidity, at the time of issuance, the impact could not be determined.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

Revenue Recognition

On January 1, 2018 we adopted Accounting Standards Update No. 2014-09, "Revenue from Contracts with Customers" (Topic 606).

In accordance with Topic 606, we recognize revenue using the following five-step approach:

 

 

1.

Identify the contract with a customer.

 

2.

Identify the performance obligations in the contract.

 

3.

Determine the transaction price of the contract.

 

4.

Allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract.

 

5.

Recognize revenue when the performance obligations are met or delivered.

Our revenue currently consists of product development projects revenue and royalty revenue from Dialog. We also provide contract services for Dialog.  

We record revenue associated with product development projects that we enter into with certain customers. In general, these product development projects are complex, and we do not have certainty about our ability to achieve the project milestones. The achievement of a milestone is dependent on our performance obligation and requires acceptance by the customer. We recognize this revenue at a point in time based on when the performance obligation is met. The payment associated with achieving the performance obligation is generally commensurate with our effort or the value of the deliverable and is nonrefundable. We record the expenses related to these product development projects in research and development expense, in the periods such expenses were incurred.

We record royalty revenue from our manufacturing partner, Dialog, and such royalty revenue is recognized at a point in time based on shipments from Dialog to its customers.

We recognize contract services revenue from Dialog over a period of time as the services are performed. The costs associated with this revenue are recognized as the services are performed and are included in cost of services revenue.

Results of Operations

Three Months Ended March 31, 2020 and 2019

Revenue.  During the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, we recorded revenue of $61,475 and $66,500, respectively.

Operating Expenses and Loss from Operations.  Operating expenses are made up of research and development, sales and marketing, general and administrative expenses and cost of services revenue. Losses from operations for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019 were $8,653,675 and $11,095,541, respectively.

20


Research and Development Costs.  Research and development costs were $4,575,303 and $6,800,678, respectively, for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019. The decrease of $2,225,375 is primarily due to a $1,653,885 decrease in compensation, consisting of a $1,098,310 decrease in payroll costs and a $555,575 decrease in stock-based compensation from a lower headcount within the department, a $528,894 decrease in engineering supplies, components and chip development costs due to project timing, a $90,439 decrease in depreciation and an $80,726 decrease in consulting fees, partially offset by a $249,909 increase in legal fees pertaining to patents and intellectual property.

Sales and Marketing Costs.  Sales and marketing costs for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019 were $1,447,909 and $1,599,452, respectively. The decrease of $151,543 is primarily due to a $116,526 decrease in compensation, consisting of a $103,936 decrease in payroll costs and a $12,590 decrease in stock-based compensation from a lower headcount within the department, a $123,124 decrease in supplies utilized for customer demonstrations and a $92,081 decrease in tradeshow expenses, partially offset by a $192,258 increase in consulting and third party services.

General and Administrative Expenses.  General and administrative expenses include costs for general and corporate functions, including personnel compensation, facility fees, travel, telecommunications, insurance, professional fees, consulting fees, general office expenses, and other overhead. General and administrative costs for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019 were $2,652,394 and $2,761,911, respectively. The decrease of $109,517 is primarily due to a $430,889 decrease in compensation, consisting of a $326,928 decrease in stock-based compensation due to certain equity awards reaching full expense amortization during the previous year and a $103,961 decrease in payroll costs and a $45,456 decrease in recruiting costs, partially offset by a $231,499 increase in accounting and auditing fees, a $75,143 increase in consulting fees and a $58,101 increase in insurance premiums.

Cost of Services Revenue. During the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, we recorded cost of services revenue of $39,544 and $0, respectively. These costs are related to our contract services performed for Dialog.

Interest Income. Interest income for the three months ended March 31, 2020 was $55,939 as compared to interest income of $76,073 for the three months ended March 31, 2019. The decrease of $20,134 is due to a lower average cash balance.

Net Loss. As a result of the above, net loss for the three months ended March 31, 2020 was $8,597,736 as compared to $11,019,468 for the three months ended March 31, 2019.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

During the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, we recorded revenue of $61,475 and $66,500, respectively. We incurred net losses of $8,597,736 and $11,019,468 for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. Net cash used in operating activities was $7,340,111 and $7,369,177 for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. We are currently meeting our liquidity requirements through the proceeds from securities offerings that raised net proceeds of $23,319,156 in March 2019, $4,557,693 during the fourth quarter 2019 and $5,506,880 during the first quarter 2020, along with payments received under product development projects.

We believe our current cash on hand, together with anticipated revenues and potential financing, will be sufficient to fund our operations into May 2021. Although we intend to continue our research and development activities, there can be no assurance that our available resources will be sufficient to enable us to generate revenues sufficient to sustain operations. Accordingly, we will likely pursue additional financing, which could include offerings of equity or debt securities, bank financings, commercial agreements with customers or strategic partners, and other alternatives, depending upon market conditions. There is no assurance that such financing would be available on terms that we would find acceptable, or at all.

During the three months ended March 31, 2020, cash flows used in operating activities were $7,340,111, consisting of a net loss of $8,597,736, less non-cash expenses aggregating $2,619,443 (principally stock-based compensation of $2,276,299, amortization of operating lease right-of-use assets of $188,445 and depreciation and amortization expense of $121,699), a $633,268 decrease in accounts payable, a $628,052 decrease in accrued expenses and a $169,681 decrease in operating lease liabilities, partially offset by a $98,212 decrease in prepaid expenses and other current assets.

21


During the three months ended March 31, 2019, cash flows used in operating activities were $7,369,177, consisting of a net loss of $11,019,468, less non-cash expenses aggregating $3,534,053 (principally stock-based compensation of $3,171,392 and depreciation and amortization expense of $235,368), a $147,413 decrease in prepaid expenses and other current assets and an $80,170 increase in accrued expenses.

During the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, cash flows used in investing activities were $0 and $161,249, respectively. The cash used in investing activities for the three months ended March 31, 2019 primarily consisted of leasehold improvements related to the construction of a regulatory testing chamber within our office space.

During the three months ended March 31, 2020, cash flows provided by financing activities were $5,619,939, which consisted of $5,506,880 in net proceeds from the sale of shares of our common stock to the public in an ATM offering and $113,059 in proceeds from contributions to the ESPP. During the three months ended March 31, 2019, cash flows provided by financing activities were $23,553,060, which consisted of $23,319,156 in net proceeds from a private offering of shares and warrants pursuant to a shelf registration, $400,103 in proceeds from the exercises of stock options and $173,167 in proceeds from contributions to the ESPP, partially offset by $339,366 in shares withheld for the payment of payroll taxes for the delivery of RSUs and PSUs.

Research and development of new technologies is, by its nature, unpredictable. Although we intend to continue our research and undertake development activities, there can be no assurance that our available resources will be sufficient to enable us to generate revenues sufficient to sustain operations.

Furthermore, since we have no committed source of financing, there can be no assurance that we will be able to raise capital as and when we need it to continue our operations.

Off Balance Sheet Transactions

As of March 31, 2020, we did not have any off-balance sheet transactions.

Material Changes in Specified Contractual Obligations

A table of our specified contractual obligations was provided in the Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation of our most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K. There were no material changes outside the ordinary course of our business in the specified contractual obligations during the three months ended March 31, 2020.

Item 3.  Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosure About Market Risk

There has been no material change in our exposure to market risk during the three months ended March 31, 2020. Please refer to "Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk" contained in Part II, Item 7A of our Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2019 for a discussion of our exposure to market risk.

Item 4.  Controls and Procedures

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

We have established disclosure controls and procedures to ensure that material information relating to us is made known to the officers who certify our financial reports and the Board.

Based on their evaluation as of March 31, 2020, our principal executive and principal financial and accounting officers have concluded that these disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act) were effective as of March 31, 2020 to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed by us in reports that we file under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported, within the time periods specified in Securities and Exchange Commission rules and forms and that information required to be disclosed by us in our reports filed or submitted under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to management, including our principal executive officer and our principal financial officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosures.

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

For the quarter ended March 31, 2020, there were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

22


PART II – OTHER INFORMATION

Item 1.  Legal Proceedings

We are not currently a party to any pending legal proceedings that we believe will have a material adverse effect on our business or financial condition. We may, however, be subject to various claims and legal actions arising in the ordinary course of business from time to time.

Item 1A.  Risk Factors

In addition to the other information set forth in this report, you should carefully consider the factors discussed under “Risk Factors” in our annual report on Form 10-K as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 13, 2020. These factors could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and capital position, and could cause our actual results to differ materially from our historical results or the results contemplated by any forward-looking statements contained in this report.  

We are subject to many risks that may harm our business, prospects, results of operations and financial condition. This discussion highlights some of the risks that might adversely affect our future operating results in material ways. We believe these are the risks and uncertainties that are the most important ones we face. We cannot be certain that we will successfully address these risks, and if we are unable to address them, our business may not grow, our stock price may suffer and you could lose the value of your investment in our company. Other risks and uncertainties that we do not currently recognize as material risks, or that are similar to risks faced by other companies in our industry, may also impair our business, prospects, results of operations and financial condition. The risks discussed below include forward-looking statements, and our actual results may differ substantially from what is in these forward-looking statements.

Risks Related to Our Business

We have no history of generating meaningful product revenue, and we may never achieve or maintain profitability.

We have a limited operating history upon which investors may rely in evaluating our business and prospects. We have generated limited revenues to date, and as of March 31, 2020, we had an accumulated deficit of approximately $272 million. Our ability to generate revenues and achieve profitability will depend on our ability to execute our business plan, complete the development and approval of our technology, incorporate the technology into products that customers wish to buy, and if necessary, secure additional financing. There can be no assurance that our technology will be adopted widely, that we will ever earn revenues sufficient to support our operations, or that we will ever be profitable. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that we will be able to raise capital as and when we need it to continue our operations. If we are unable to raise sufficient additional capital, we may be required to delay, reduce or severely curtail our research and development or other operations, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, financial condition, long-term prospects and ability to continue as a viable business. If we are unable to generate revenues of significant scale to cover our costs of doing business, our losses will continue and we may not achieve profitability, which could negatively impact the value of your investment in our securities.

We will need additional financing to achieve our long-term business plans, and there is no guarantee that it will be available on acceptable terms, or at all.

We do not have sufficient funds to fully implement our long-term business plans. It is likely that we will need to raise additional capital through new financings, even if we begin to generate meaningful commercial revenue. For example, new product development for business partners may require considerable expense in advance of substantial revenue for such products. Such financings could include equity financing, which may be dilutive to stockholders, or debt financing, which could restrict our ability to borrow from other sources. In addition, such securities may contain rights, preferences or privileges senior to those of current stockholders. As a result of economic conditions, general global economic uncertainty (including as a result of actual or perceived disruption caused by COVID-19, or other infectious diseases), political change, and other factors, we do not know whether additional capital will be available when needed, or that, if available, we will be able to obtain additional capital on reasonable terms. If we are unable to raise additional capital due to the volatile global financial markets, general economic uncertainty or other factors, we may be required to curtail development of our technology or reduce operations as a result, or to sell or dispose of assets. Any inability to raise adequate funds on commercially reasonable terms could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition, including the possibility that a lack of funds could cause our business to fail and liquidate with little or no return to investors.

23


We may not be able to develop all the features we seek to include in our technology.

We have developed commercial products, as well as working prototypes, that utilize our technology. Additional features and performance specifications we seek to include in our technology have not yet been developed. For example, some customer applications may require specific combinations of cost, footprint, efficiencies and capabilities at various frequencies, charging power levels and distances. We believe our research and development efforts will yield additional functionality and capabilities over time. However, there can be no assurance that we will be successful in achieving all the features we are targeting and our inability to do so may limit the appeal of our technology to consumers.

We may be unable to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the full capability of our technology.

We have developed both commercial products, as well as working prototypes, that use our technology at differing power levels and charging distances, but additional research and development is required to realize the potential of our technology for applications at increasing power levels and distances that can be successfully integrated into commercial products. Research and development of new technologies is, by its nature, unpredictable.  We could encounter unanticipated technical problems, the inability to identify products utilizing our technology that will be in demand with customers, getting our technology designed into those products, designing new products for manufacturability, regulatory hurdles and achieving acceptable price points for final products. Although we intend to undertake development efforts with commercially reasonable diligence, there can be no assurance that our available resources will be sufficient to enable us to develop our technology to the extent needed to create future revenues to sustain our operations.

Our technology must satisfy customer expectations and be suitable for them to use in consumer applications. Any delays in developing our technology that arise from factors of this sort would aggravate our exposure to the risk of having inadequate capital to fund the research and development needed to complete development of these products. Technical problems leading to delays would cause us to incur additional expenses that would increase our operating losses. If we experience significant delays in developing our technology and products based on it for use in potential commercial applications, particularly after incurring significant expenditures, our business may fail, and you could lose the value of your investment in our company. If we fail to develop practical and economical commercial products based on our technology, our business may fail and you could lose the value of your investment in our stock.

 

The outbreak of health epidemics, such as COVID-19, has and may further adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Any outbreaks of contagious diseases and other adverse public health developments in countries where we, our customers and suppliers operate could have a material and adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. For example, the outbreak of COVID-19, which was declared by the World Health Organization as a pandemic, has resulted in significant governmental measures being implemented to control the spread of the virus, including quarantines, travel restrictions, manufacturing restrictions, declarations of states of emergency, business shutdown and restrictions on the movement of employees in China, the United States and many other countries. A majority of our potential customers have a significant dependence on the Chinese manufacturing and supply chain infrastructure. We believe the outbreak of COVID-19 has delayed adoption of our technology by potential customers who temporarily shut down their workforce and supply chain based in China. In one case, this outbreak delayed the launch of a new product that incorporates our technology. In the United States, COVID-19 has resulted in travel and other restrictions in order to reduce the spread of the disease, including executive orders in California and several other state and local orders across the country, which, among other things, direct individuals to shelter at their places of residence, direct businesses and governmental agencies to cease non-essential operations at physical locations, prohibit certain non-essential gatherings, and order cessation of non-essential travel. As a result of these developments, we have implemented work-from-home policies for our employees. The effects of the state executive order, local shelter-in-place orders, government-imposed quarantines and our work-from-home policies may negatively impact productivity, disrupt our research and development or other operations and delay the launch of our customers’ new products that incorporate our technology, the magnitude of which will depend, in part, on the length and severity of the restrictions and other limitations on our ability to conduct our business in the ordinary course. Due to the rapid development and fluidity of this situation, the magnitude and duration of the pandemic and its impact on our operations and liquidity is uncertain as of the date of this report.

 

In addition, COVID-19 has resulted and may continue to result in a widespread health crisis that could adversely affect the economies and financial markets of many countries, resulting in a global economic downturn that could affect interest in our products or demand by potential customers. Any of these events could materially and

24


adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. The extent of the impact will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted.

It is difficult and costly to protect our intellectual property and our proprietary technologies, and we may not be able to ensure their protection.

Our success depends significantly on our ability to obtain, maintain and protect our proprietary rights to the technologies used in products incorporating our technologies. Patents and other proprietary rights provide uncertain protections, and we may be unable to protect our intellectual property. For example, we may be unsuccessful in defending our patents and other proprietary rights against third party challenges. If we do not have the resources to defend our intellectual property, the value of our intellectual property and our licensed technology will decline. In addition, some companies that integrate our technology into their products may acquire rights in the technology that limit our business or increase our costs.  If we are not successful in protecting our intellectual property effectively, our financial results may be adversely affected and the price of our common stock could decline.

 

We depend upon a combination of patent, trade secrets, copyright and trademark laws to protect our intellectual property and technology.

We rely on a combination of patents, trade secrets, copyright and trademark laws, nondisclosure agreements and other contractual provisions and technical security measures to protect our intellectual property rights. These measures may not be adequate to safeguard our technology. If they do not protect our rights adequately, third parties could use our technology, and our ability to compete in the market would be reduced. Although we are attempting to obtain patent coverage for our technology where available and where we believe appropriate, there are aspects of the technology for which patent coverage may never be sought or received. We may not possess the resources to or may not choose to pursue patent protection outside the United States or any or every country other than the United States where we may eventually decide to sell our future products. Our ability to prevent others from making or selling duplicate or similar technologies will be impaired in those countries in which we would have no patent protection. Although we have patent applications on file in the United States and elsewhere, the patents might not issue, might issue only with limited coverage, or might issue and be subsequently successfully challenged by others and held invalid or unenforceable.  

Similarly, even if patents are issued based on our applications or future applications, any issued patents may not provide us with any competitive advantages. Competitors may be able to design around our patents or develop products that provide outcomes comparable or superior to ours. Our patents may be held invalid or unenforceable as a result of legal challenges or claims of prior art by third parties, and others may challenge the inventorship or ownership of our patents and pending patent applications. In addition, if we secure protection in countries outside the United States, the laws of some foreign countries may not protect our intellectual property rights to the same extent as do the laws of the United States. In the event a competitor infringes upon our patent or other intellectual property rights, enforcing those rights may be difficult and time consuming. Even if successful, litigation to enforce our intellectual property rights or to defend our patents against challenge could be expensive and time consuming and could divert our management’s attention. We may not have sufficient resources to enforce our intellectual property rights or to defend our patents against a challenge.

Our strategy is to deploy our technology into the market by licensing patent and other proprietary rights to third parties and customers. Disputes with our licensees may arise regarding the scope and content of these licenses. Further, our ability to expand into additional fields with our technologies may be restricted by existing licenses or licenses we may grant to third parties in the future.

The policies we use to protect our trade secrets might not be effective in preventing misappropriation of our trade secrets by others. In addition, confidentiality agreements executed by our customers, employees, consultants and advisors might not be enforceable or might not provide meaningful protection for our trade secrets or other proprietary information in the event of unauthorized use or disclosure. Litigating a trade secret claim is expensive and time consuming, and the outcome is unpredictable. Moreover, our competitors may independently develop equivalent knowledge methods and know-how. If we are unable to protect our intellectual property rights, we may be unable to prevent competitors from using our own inventions and intellectual property to compete against us, and our business may be harmed.   

Domestic and international regulators may deny approval for our technology, and future legislative or regulatory changes may impair our business.

Our charging technology involves power transmission using radio frequency (RF) energy, which is subject to regulation by the Federal Communications Commission in the United States and by comparable regulatory agencies worldwide. It may also be subject to regulation by other agencies. Regulatory concerns include whether human

25


exposure to radio frequency emissions are below specified thresholds. Higher levels of exposure require separate approval.  For example, transmitting more power over a certain distance or transmitting power over a greater distance may require separate regulatory approvals. In addition, we design our technology to operate in a RF band that is also used for Wi-Fi routers and other wireless consumer electronics, and we also design it to operate at different frequencies as demanded for some customer applications. Applications at different frequencies may require separate regulatory approvals.  Efforts to obtain regulatory approval for devices using our technology is costly and time consuming, and there can be no assurance that requisite regulatory approvals will be forthcoming. If approvals are not obtained in a timely and cost-efficient manner, our business and operating results could be materially adversely affected. In addition, legal or regulatory developments could impose additional restrictions or costs on us that could require us to redesign our technology or future products, or that are difficult or impracticable to comply with, all of which would adversely affect our revenues and financial results.

We depend upon our strategic relationship with Dialog Semiconductor, a provider of electronics products, and there can be no assurance that we will achieve the expected benefits of this relationship.

We have entered into a strategic alliance agreement with Dialog Semiconductor, a provider of electronics products, pursuant to which we licensed our WattUp technology to Dialog and it became the exclusive provider of our technology. We intend to leverage Dialog’s sales and distribution channels and its operational capabilities to accelerate market adoption of our technology, while we focus our resources on research and development of our technology. There can be no assurance that Dialog will promote our technology successfully, or that it will be successful in producing and distributing related products to our customers’ specifications. Dialog may have other priorities or may encounter difficulties in its own business that interfere with the success of our relationship. If this strategic relationship does not work as we intend, then we may be required to seek an arrangement with another strategic partner, or to develop internal capabilities, which will require a commitment of management time and our financial resources to identify a replacement strategic partner, or to develop our own production and distribution capabilities. As a result, we may be unable without undue expense to replace this agreement with one or more new strategic relationships to promote and provide our technology which could increase our costs and delay revenues.

Terms of our existing or new development and license agreements could limit our ability to license our technology in specific markets.

The terms of our current development and license agreement with a tier-one consumer electronics company could limit our ability to do business in some industry verticals through December 2020, which could cause some potential customers not to choose, or delay using, our technology in their products, which could have a negative impact on our revenue opportunities and financial results.

Expanding our business operations as we intend will impose new demands on our financial, technical, operational and management resources.

To date we have operated primarily in the research and development phase of our business. If we are successful, we will need to expand our business operations, which will impose new demands on our financial, technical, operational and management resources. If we do not upgrade our technical, administrative, operating and financial control systems, or if unexpected expansion difficulties arise, including issues relating to our research and development activities, then retention of experienced scientists, managers and engineers could become more challenging and have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.  

If products incorporating our technology are launched commercially but do not achieve widespread market acceptance, we will not be able to generate the revenue necessary to support our business.

Market acceptance of a RF-based charging system as a preferred method for charging electronic devices will be crucial to our success. The following factors, among others, may affect the level of market acceptance of products in our industry:

 

the price of products incorporating our technology relative to other products or competing technologies;

 

user perceptions of the convenience, safety, efficiency and benefits of our technology;

 

the effectiveness of sales and marketing efforts of our commercialization partners;