Company Quick10K Filing
Xunlei
20-F 2020-12-31 Filed 2021-04-26
20-F 2019-12-31 Filed 2020-04-28
20-F 2018-12-31 Filed 2019-04-29
20-F 2017-12-31 Filed 2018-04-25
20-F 2016-12-31 Filed 2017-04-20
20-F 2015-12-31 Filed 2016-04-21
20-F 2014-12-31 Filed 2015-04-20

XNET 20F Annual Report

Item 17 ☐ Item 18 ☐
Part I
Item 1. Identity of Directors, Senior Management and Advisers
Item 2. Offer Statistics and Expected Timetable
Item 3. Key Information
Item 4. Information on The Company
Item 4A. Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects
Item 6. Directors, Senior Management and Employees
Item 7. Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions
Item 8. Financial Information
Item 9. The Offer and Listing
Item 10. Additional Information
Item 11. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 12.Description of Securities Other Than Equity Securities
Part II
Item 13.Defaults, Dividend Arrearages and Delinquencies
Item 14.Material Modifications To The Rights of Security Holders and Use of Proceeds
Item 15.Controls and Procedures
Item 16A. Audit Committee Financial Expert
Item 16B. Code of Ethics
Item 16C. Principal Accountant Fees and Services
Item 16D. Exemptions From The Listing Standards for Audit Committees
Item 16E. Purchases of Equity Securities By The Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers
Item 16F. Change in Registrant's Certifying Accountant
Item 16G. Corporate Governance
Item 16H. Mine Safety Disclosure
Part III
Item 17. Financial Statements
Item 18. Financial Statements
Item 19. Exhibits
EX-2.3 tmb-20201231xex2d3.htm
EX-2.4 tmb-20201231xex2d4.htm
EX-4.40 tmb-20201231xex4d40.htm
EX-8.1 tmb-20201231xex8d1.htm
EX-12.1 tmb-20201231xex12d1.htm
EX-12.2 tmb-20201231xex12d2.htm
EX-13.1 tmb-20201231xex13d1.htm
EX-13.2 tmb-20201231xex13d2.htm
EX-15.1 tmb-20201231xex15d1.htm
EX-15.2 tmb-20201231xex15d2.htm
EX-15.3 tmb-20201231xex15d3.htm

Xunlei Earnings 2020-12-31

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

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Table of Contents

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 20-F

(Mark One)

     REGISTRATION STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OR (g) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

OR

      ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended
December 31, 2020.

OR

     TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from __________ to __________.

OR

      SHELL COMPANY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
Date of event requiring this shell company report

Commission file number: 001-35224

Xunlei Limited

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

N/A

(Translation of Registrant’s name into English)

Cayman Islands

(Jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

21-23/F, Block B, Building No. 12

No.18 Shenzhen Bay ECO-Technology Park

Keji South Road, Yuehai Street,

Nanshan District, Shenzhen, 518057

The People’s Republic of China

(Address of principal executive offices)

Naijiang (Eric) Zhou, Chief Financial Officer

Telephone: +86-755-8633-8443

Email: zhounaijiang@xunlei.com

21-23/F, Block B, Building No. 12

No.18 Shenzhen Bay ECO-Technology Park

Keji South Road, Yuehai Street,

Nanshan District, Shenzhen, 518057

The People’s Republic of China

(Name, Telephone, Email and/or Facsimile number and Address of Company Contact Person)

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act.

Title of each class

    

Name of each exchange on which registered

    

Ticker symbol

American depositary shares,

each representing five common shares

 

The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC

(The NASDAQ Global Select Market)

XNET

Common shares, par value US$0.00025 per share*

 

The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC

(The NASDAQ Global Select Market)

*      Not for trading, but only in connection with the listing on The NASDAQ Global Select Market of American depositary shares.

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act.

NONE

(Title of Class)

Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act.

NONE

Table of Contents

(Title of Class)

Indicate the number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer’s classes of capital or common stock as of the close of the period covered by the annual report: 334,401,981 common shares (excluding (i) 24,956,080 common shares that are (a) issued to our depositary bank for the purpose of bulk issuance and (b) repurchased by the company, and (ii) 9,519,144 common shares held by Leading Advice Holdings Limited, a share incentive awards holding platform) as of December 31, 2020.

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

Yes No

If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

Yes No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).

Yes No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or an emerging growth company. See definition of “accelerated filer,” “large accelerated filer,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer 

Accelerated filer 

Non-accelerated filer 

Emerging growth company

If an emerging growth company that prepares its financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards† provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Securities Act.

Yes No

†   The term “new or revised financial accounting standard” refers to any update issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board to its Accounting Standards Codification after April 5, 2012.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management's assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.

Indicate by check mark which basis of accounting the registrant has used to prepare the financial statements included in this filing:

US GAAP

International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International

Accounting Standards Board

Other

If “Other” has been checked in response to the previous question, indicate by check mark which financial statement item the registrant has elected to follow.

Item 17 Item 18

If this is an annual report, indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

Yes No

(APPLICABLE ONLY TO ISSUERS INVOLVED IN BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDINGS DURING THE PAST FIVE YEARS)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed all documents and reports required to be filed by Sections 12, 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 subsequent to the distribution of securities under a plan confirmed by a court.

Yes No

Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

INTRODUCTION

1

FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION

2

PART I

3

Item 1.

Identity of Directors, Senior Management and Advisers

3

Item 2.

Offer Statistics and Expected Timetable

3

Item 3.

Key Information

3

Item 4.

Information on the Company

58

Item 4A.

Unresolved Staff Comments

99

Item 5.

Operating and Financial Review and Prospects

100

Item 6.

Directors, Senior Management and Employees

124

Item 7.

Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions

131

Item 8.

Financial Information

135

Item 9.

The Offer and Listing

137

Item 10.

Additional Information

137

Item 11.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

144

Item 12.

Description of Securities Other than Equity Securities

145

PART II

147

Item 13.

Defaults, Dividend Arrearages and Delinquencies

147

Item 14.

Material Modifications to the Rights of Security Holders and Use of Proceeds

147

Item 15.

Controls and Procedures

147

Item 16A.

Audit Committee Financial Expert

148

Item 16B.

Code of Ethics

148

Item 16C.

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

148

Item 16D.

Exemptions from the Listing Standards for Audit Committees

149

Item 16E.

Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers

149

Item 16F.

Change in Registrant’s Certifying Accountant

149

Item 16G.

Corporate Governance

150

Item 16H.

Mine Safety Disclosure

150

PART III

150

Item 17.

Financial Statements

150

Item 18.

Financial Statements

151

Item 19.

Exhibits

151

SIGNATURES

155

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INTRODUCTION

In this annual report, except where the context otherwise requires and for purposes of this annual report only:

·

“we,” “us,” “our company,” “our,” or “Xunlei” refers to Xunlei Limited, a Cayman Islands company, its subsidiaries, its variable interest entity, or VIE, and the VIE’s subsidiaries;

·

“China” or “PRC” refers to the People’s Republic of China, excluding, for the purpose of this annual report only, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan;

·

“daily active user”, refers to a user who accessed to Mobile Xunlei through a mobile device, on a given day;

·

“digital media content” refers to videos, music, games, software and documents transmitted in digital form;

·

“monthly unique visitors,” in relation to our platform, refers to the number of different individual visitors who accessed Xunlei products (including websites and software) on our platform from the same computer at least once within a month; under this method, a user who accessed Xunlei products from two different computers would count as two unique visitors;

·

“shares” or “common shares” refers to our common shares, par value US$0.00025 per share;

·

“subscriber,” refers to users who can access our premium acceleration services, including accounts temporarily suspended, but excluding sub-accounts and accounts on a trial basis.

·

“ADSs” refers to our American depositary shares, each representing five common shares, and “ADRs” refers to any American depositary receipts that evidence our ADSs;

·

“RMB” or “Renminbi” refers to the legal currency of China; and

·

“US$,” “dollars” or “U.S. dollars” refers to the legal currency of the United States.

We use U.S. dollar as reporting currency in our financial statements and in this annual report. Transactions in Renminbi are recorded at the rates of exchange prevailing when the transactions occur. Solely for the convenience of the reader, the translations of Renminbi amounts into U.S. dollars contained in this annual report were made at RMB6.5249 to US$1.00, the rate released by the State Administration of Foreign Exchange of the People’s Republic of China on December 31, 2020. We make no representation that any Renminbi or U.S. dollar amounts could have been, or could be, converted into U.S. dollars or Renminbi, as the case may be, at any particular rate, the rates stated below, or at all. The PRC government imposes control over its foreign currency reserves in part through direct regulation of the conversion of Renminbi into foreign exchange and through restrictions on foreign trade.

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FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION

This annual report on Form 20-F contains forward-looking statements that reflect our current expectations and views of future events. These statements are made under the “safe harbor” provisions of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. You can identify these forward-looking statements by words or phrases such as “may,” “could,” “should,” “would,” “will,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “aim,” “estimate,” “intend,” “plan,” “believe,” “likely to,” “project,” “continue,” “potential,” or other similar expressions. We have based these forward-looking statements largely on our current expectations and projections about future events and financial trends that we believe may affect our financial condition, results of operations, business strategy and financial needs. These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements about:

·

our business strategies, including the strategies to streamline our business and continue moving toward mobile internet;

·

our future business development, results of operations and financial condition;

·

our ability to maintain and strengthen our market position in China;

·

our ability to retain subscribers for our premium acceleration and other services;

·

our ability to develop new products and services and attract, maintain and monetize user traffic;

·

trends and competition in the internet industry in China;

·

rules and regulations governing the internet industry in China;

·

our ability to handle intellectual property rights-related matters; and

·

general economic and business conditions in China.

You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements and you should read these statements in conjunction with other sections of this annual report, in particular the risk factors disclosed in “Item 3. Key Information—D. Risk Factors.” These statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. Moreover, we operate in a rapidly evolving environment. New risks emerge from time to time and it is impossible for our management to predict all risk factors, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ from those contained in any forward-looking statement. The forward-looking statements made in this annual report relate only to events or information as of the date on which the statements are made in this annual report. We do not undertake any obligation to update or revise the forward-looking statements except as required under applicable law.

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Table of Contents

PART I

Item 1.  Identity of Directors, Senior Management and Advisers

Not applicable.

Item 2.  Offer Statistics and Expected Timetable

Not applicable.

Item 3.  Key Information

A.           Selected Financial Data

The following selected consolidated statements of operations data and the selected consolidated statements of cash flows data for the years ended December 31, 2018, 2019 and 2020 and the selected consolidated balance sheets data as of December 31, 2019 and 2020 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements, which are included in this annual report beginning on page F-1. The selected consolidated statements of operations data and the selected consolidated statements of cash flows data for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2017 and the selected consolidated balance sheets data as of December 31, 2016, 2017 and 2018 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements not included in this annual report.

The selected consolidated statements of operations data and cash flows data for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2017 and 2018 and the selected consolidated balance sheets data as of December 31, 2016, 2017 and 2018 have reflected the impact of retrospective adjustments for our divestiture of web game business in January 2018. The web game business has been classified as discontinued operations. In 2019, we started to operate web game business again under a different business model by cooperating with third parties. Revenues from new web game business have been included in the continuing operations.

Our audited consolidated financial statements are prepared and presented in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, or U.S. GAAP. Our historical results do not necessarily indicate results expected for any future period. You should read the following selected financial data in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and related notes and “Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects” included elsewhere in this annual report.

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Table of Contents

The following table presents our selected consolidated statements of comprehensive income/(loss) data for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020.

For the Year Ended December 31,

    

2016

    

2017

    

2018

    

2019

    

2020

 

(in thousands of US$, except for share, per share and per ADS data)

Selected Consolidated Statements of Operations Data:

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Revenues, net of rebates and discounts

 

140,985

 

201,911

 

232,132

 

181,267

 

186,683

Business tax and surcharges

 

(779)

 

(1,328)

 

(1,528)

 

(602)

 

(312)

Net revenues

 

140,206

 

200,583

 

230,604

 

180,665

 

186,371

Cost of revenues

 

(79,928)

 

(117,876)

 

(115,667)

 

(99,913)

 

(92,637)

Gross profit

 

60,278

 

82,707

 

114,937

 

80,752

 

93,734

Operating expenses(1)

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Research and development expenses

 

(61,169)

 

(66,947)

 

(76,763)

 

(68,571)

 

(55,463)

Sales and marketing expenses

 

(14,601)

 

(19,888)

 

(35,322)

 

(31,820)

 

(18,064)

General and administrative expenses

 

(26,010)

 

(36,517)

 

(40,833)

 

(38,930)

 

(33,910)

Asset impairment loss, net of recoveries

 

 

(13,556)

 

(6,348)

 

2,147

 

(5,090)

Total operating expenses

 

(101,780)

 

(136,908)

 

(159,266)

 

(137,174)

 

(112,527)

Operating loss

 

(41,502)

 

(54,201)

 

(44,329)

 

(56,422)

 

(18,793)

Interest income

 

2,158

 

1,967

 

1,183

 

1,897

 

1,471

Interest expense

 

(239)

 

(239)

 

(239)

 

(75)

 

(406)

Other income, net

 

6,503

 

7,880

 

2,810

 

5,861

 

4,737

Shares of loss from equity investees

 

(195)

 

(1,875)

 

(307)

 

 

0

Loss from continuing operations before income tax

 

(33,275)

 

(46,468)

 

(40,882)

 

(48,739)

 

(12,991)

Income tax benefit

 

2,469

 

2,252

 

89

 

(4,676)

 

(1,149)

Loss from continuing operations

 

(30,806)

 

(44,216)

 

(40,793)

 

(53,415)

 

(14,140)

Discontinued operations:

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Income from discontinued operations

 

7,791

 

7,538

 

1,533

 

 

Income tax expenses

 

(1,168)

 

(1,131)

 

(230)

 

 

Net income from discontinued operations

 

6,623

 

6,407

 

1,303

 

 

Net loss

 

(24,183)

 

(37,809)

 

(39,490)

 

(53,415)

 

(14,140)

Less: net loss attributable to the non-controlling interest

 

(72)

 

13

 

(212)

 

(246)

 

(300)

Net loss attributable to Xunlei Limited’s common shareholders

 

(24,111)

 

(37,822)

 

(39,278)

 

(53,169)

 

(13,840)

Weighted average number of common shares outstanding

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Basic

 

334,155,668

 

331,731,963

 

334,965,987

 

337,845,675

 

337,429,601

Diluted

 

334,155,668

 

331,731,963

 

334,965,987

 

337,845,675

 

337,429,601

Net loss per share attributable to Xunlei Limited from continuing operations

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Basic

 

(0.09)

 

(0.13)

 

(0.12)

 

(0.16)

 

(0.04)

Diluted

 

(0.09)

 

(0.13)

 

(0.12)

 

(0.16)

 

(0.04)

Net income per share attributable to Xunlei Limited from discontinued operations

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Basic

 

0.02

 

0.02

 

0.00

 

 

Diluted

 

0.02

 

0.02

 

0.00

 

 

Net loss attributable to holders of common shares of Xunlei Limited per ADS(2)

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Basic

 

(0.36)

 

(0.57)

 

(0.59)

 

(0.79)

 

(0.21)

Diluted

 

(0.36)

 

(0.57)

 

(0.59)

 

(0.79)

 

(0.21)

Notes:

We sold our web game business in January 2018. As a result, web game business is accounted for as discontinued operations and our consolidated statements of operations data in this annual report separate the discontinued operations from our remaining business operations for all years presented. In 2019, we started to operate web game business again under a different business model by cooperating with third parties. Revenues from web game business have been included in the continuing operations.

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(1)Share-based compensation expenses were allocated in operating expenses as follows:

For the Year Ended December 31,

    

2016

    

2017

    

2018

    

2019

    

2020

(in thousands of US$)

Research and development expenses

 

2,983

 

2,442

 

2,645

 

2,594

 

916

Sales and marketing expenses

 

98

 

88

 

404

 

381

 

185

General and administrative expenses

 

6,267

 

5,800

 

2,245

 

2,453

 

1,209

Total share-based compensation expenses

 

9,348

 

8,330

 

5,294

 

5,428

 

2,310

(2)

Each ADS represents five common shares. Net income/(loss) attributable to holders of common shares of Xunlei Limited per ADS is calculated based on net income/(loss) per share attributable to Xunlei Limited and multiplied by five.

The following table presents our selected consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020.

As of December 31,

    

2016

    

2017

    

2018

    

2019

    

2020

(in thousands of US$)

Selected Consolidated Balance Sheets Data:

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Cash and cash equivalents

 

199,504

 

233,479

 

122,930

 

162,465

 

137,248

Short-term investments

 

181,960

 

138,915

 

196,538

 

102,847

 

117,821

Total current assets

 

412,305

 

430,783

 

362,899

 

316,583

 

302,282

Total assets

 

509,795

 

533,437

 

455,431

 

424,687

 

415,605

Accounts payable

 

33,376

 

49,819

 

22,629

 

24,213

 

20,644

Total current liabilities

 

93,405

 

141,696

 

108,035

 

111,286

 

103,276

Total liabilities

 

103,545

 

150,600

 

111,251

 

129,144

 

125,232

Total shareholders’ equity

 

408,238

 

384,997

 

345,296

 

296,878

 

292,154

Non-controlling interest

 

(1,988)

 

(2,160)

 

(1,116)

 

(1,335)

 

(1,781)

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity

 

509,795

 

533,437

 

455,431

 

424,687

 

415,605

The following table presents our selected consolidated statements of cash flows data for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020.

For the Year Ended December 31,

    

2016

    

2017

    

2018

    

2019

    

2020

(in thousands of US$)

Selected Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows Data:

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Net cash generated from/(used in) operating activities

 

16,970

 

(14,216)

 

(35,608)

 

(45,649)

 

(13,911)

Net cash (used in)/generated from investing activities

 

(158,335)

 

35,208

 

(69,357)

 

79,260

 

(20,756)

Net cash (used in)/generated from financing activities

 

(11,041)

 

2,561

 

929

 

12,177

 

2,679

Net (decrease)/increase in cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash

 

(152,406)

 

23,553

 

(104,036)

 

45,788

 

(31,988)

Effect of exchange rates on cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash

 

(9,867)

 

10,422

 

(6,513)

 

(3,270)

 

5,329

Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at beginning of year

 

361,777

 

199,504

 

233,479

 

122,930

 

165,448

Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at end of year

 

199,504

 

233,479

 

122,930

 

165,448

 

138,789

B.          Capitalization and Indebtedness

Not applicable.

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C.          Reasons for the Offer and Use of Proceeds

Not applicable.

D.          Risk Factors

An investment in our ADSs involves significant risks. You should carefully consider all of the information in this annual report, including the risks and uncertainties described below, before making an investment in our ADSs. Any of the following risks could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In any such case, the market price of our ADSs could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment.

Risks Related to Our Business

Our business model is currently undergoing significant innovation and transition, and our historical growth rate may not be indicative of our future performance and our new business may not be successful.

We launched our then core product, Xunlei Accelerator, in 2004 and cloud acceleration subscription services in 2009 to enable users to quickly access and consume digital media content. Coupled with our core products and services, we also provide a range of internet value-added services. Our cloud acceleration products have maintained nationwide popularity in the past few years. Our business model currently is undergoing significant innovation and continued transition to mobile internet. We have launched several new services and products in recent years, such as cloud computing products and products based on blockchain technology. The evolving business model and expansion into the new services involve new risks and challenges. For example, although our mobile acceleration plug-in has been officially adopted by Xiaomi’s operating systems and installed on Xiaomi phones, we cannot assure you that we will be able to form significant business partnerships with major smartphone makers other than Xiaomi so as to achieve broader acceptance of the Xunlei mobile products. We may also not be able to maintain the rapid growth of revenues from our mobile advertising, from which we generated revenues for the first time in the fourth quarter of 2015. There are also substantial uncertainties with respect to our cloud computing business and blockchain business. The technologies supporting our cloud computing business and blockchain business are new and rapidly evolving. If we fail to explore these new technologies and apply them innovatively to keep our products and services competitive, we may experience immediate decline in the growth of our business. In addition, the regulatory environment surrounding these businesses may also be evolving and any unfavorable developments may adversely affect our businesses. Furthermore, the profitability of our new initiatives has yet to be proven. For example, although the blockchain technology is said to be of immeasurable potential, its commercial value is yet to be proved. Despite that we have devoted a significant amount of resources to the development of blockchain technology, we may not be able to realize our expected goals or create sufficient commercial values. As a result, our business, operating results, financial conditions may be significantly and adversely affected.

In addition to uncertainties of our new initiatives, our traditional PC-based download acceleration subscriptions also experienced declines in recent years, partly due to the change of our users’ online behaviors and the ongoing and intensified government scrutiny of internet content in China. Although we are continuously improving our existing products and services and rolling out new products and services to attract our subscribers, our efforts may not be successful. Our subscriber base generally declined from 4.4 million as of December 31, 2014 to 3.8 million as of December 31, 2020. See “—We may not be able to retain our large user base, convert our users into subscribers of our premium services or maintain our existing subscribers” and “—Risks Related to Doing Business in China—Regulation and censorship of information disseminated over the internet in China have adversely affected our business and may continue to adversely affect our business, and we may be liable for the digital media content on our platform.”

Due to the abovementioned factors, our historical growth rate may not be indicative of our future performance and our new business initiatives may not be successful, and we cannot assure you that we will grow at the same rate as we did in the past, if at all.

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The blockchain industry in China is an emerging industry. The laws and regulations governing the operation of blockchain products and services in China are developing and evolving and subject to changes. If we fail to comply with existing and future applicable laws, regulations or requirements of local regulatory authorities, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.

We launched ThunderChain, a blockchain infrastructure platform, in 2018. Currently, our strategic focus in the blockchain sector is on the development of blockchain infrastructure. The blockchain industry in China is an emerging industry. The PRC government has yet to establish a comprehensive regulatory framework. The laws and regulations governing the operation of blockchain products and services in China are also rapidly developing and evolving. On January 10, 2019, the Cyberspace Administration of China, or CAC, issued the Provisions on the Administration of Blockchain Information Services, or the Blockchain Provisions, which came into effect on February 15, 2019. Pursuant to the Blockchain Provisions, a blockchain information service provider is required to file particulars of such service provider including its name, service category, service form, application field, and server address with the blockchain information service filing management system managed by the CAC and go through filing procedures within ten business days after it starts to provide services. After completing the filing procedure, the blockchain information service provider should display the filing number in a conspicuous position on the service provider’s websites and applications through which it provides services. Our subsidiaries providing blockchain information services have completed these filing procedures with relevant regulatory authorities and obtained the filing numbers. In addition, the operations of our blockchain services are still at an early stage. We may be required to make additional filings if we make further adjustments to our business operations. We cannot assure you that we will always be able to timely obtain or renew relevant permits, approvals or licenses that may be viewed necessary for our blockchain operations. If we fail to maintain any of these required permits, approvals or licenses in a timely manner, or at all, we may be subject to various penalties, including fines and discontinuation of or restriction on our operations. Any such disruptions in our business operations may have a material and adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

In addition to filing requirements, the Blockchain Provisions also imposed an array of other requirements on the providers of blockchain information services. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—B. Business Overview—Regulation—Regulation on Blockchain Information Services” for more details. Failure to comply with relevant requirements in the Blockchain Provisions may subject us to administrative penalties such as warning, being ordered to temporarily suspend relevant business operations to rectify within prescribed time period, or fines, or criminal liabilities, depending on which provisions are violated.

Since the blockchain technology and other related technologies are evolving rapidly, new laws, regulations and governmental policies are expected to be adopted from time to time by relevant PRC authorities to impose additional restrictions or require licenses or permits for operating blockchain related business. We are unable to predict with certainty the impact, if any, that future legislation, judicial interpretations or regulations relating to the blockchain industry will have on our business, financial condition and results of operations. To the extent that we are not able to fully comply with any new laws or regulations when they are promulgated, our business, financial condition and results of operations as well as the price of our ADSs may be materially and adversely affected.

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Regulatory uncertainties exist with respect to our historical LinkToken operations, which may have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

LinkToken was developed in 2017. It was essentially a type of digital ticket. The underlying technology of LinkToken was blockchain technology. Users of OneThing Cloud could be rewarded with LinkTokens by voluntarily participating in OneThing Cloud reward program to share idle uplink bandwidth capacities and external storage to us. The amount of LinkTokens awarded depended on a number of factors including, but not limited to, the size of bandwidth and external storage users contribute, the length of time online, and the usage of computing resources. Rewarded LinkTokens could be used to redeem for a variety of products and services offered in the LinkToken Mall. In 2018, we disposed of the LinkToken operations and the related assets and liabilities to an independent third party. Upon the completion of the disposal in April 2019, the independent third party obtained the exclusive right to carry out LinkToken operations inside and outside mainland China, including without limitation, the formulation, amendment and execution of the rules governing the rewarding of LinkToken to users, operations of LinkToken Pocket and the LinkToken Mall. After the disposal, subject to rewarding rules determined by the independent third party, users of OneThing Cloud could still voluntarily participate in OneThing Cloud reward program to share idle uplink bandwidth capacities and external storage and be rewarded with LinkToken. In May 2019, we terminated our technical support to the independent third party with respect to its LinkToken operations. In April 2020, the independent third party terminated OneThing Cloud reward program, as a result of which users can no longer be rewarded with LinkTokens. Meanwhile, we launched our own reward program, which allows users to share idle uplink bandwidth capacities and external storage with us in exchange for a small amount of cash rewards. Although we have no longer been operating OneThing Cloud reward program since our disposal of LinkToken, we periodically receive user complaints regarding LinkToken, including the termination of OneThing Cloud reward program, which could cause reputational harm to our business operations and might also have a negatively impact on our business and results of operations.

Although we have no longer been operating LinkTokens after our disposal of such business to the independent third party, new laws, regulations and governmental policies regarding virtual coins may still be interpreted or even retroactively enforced against us regarding our previous dealings with LinkToken. On September 4, 2017, People’s Bank of China, the Office of the Central Leading Group for Cyberspace Affairs, the MIIT, the State Administration for Industry and Commerce, the China Banking Regulatory Commission, the China Securities Regulatory Commission, and the China Insurance Regulatory Commission jointly promulgated the Announcement on Prevention of Token Fundraising Risks to strengthen the administration of the initial coin offerings activities. Pursuant to the announcement, “fundraising through token offerings” is referred to as a type of fundraising activities where an issuer raises “virtual currencies” such as Bitcoin or Ether from investors through the illegal issuance and subsequent circulation of tokens. Pursuant to the announcement, token fundraising activity is essentially an illegal public fundraising activity without obtaining government’s approval. It is a suspected illegal offering of tokens, illegal offering of securities, illegal fundraising, financial fraud, pyramid scheme, which are criminal offenses under the PRC law. The announcement prohibits fundraising activities through token issuance. In addition, the announcement also provides that token trading platform should not be engaged in (i) the exchange between any statutory currency with tokens and “virtual currencies,” (ii) the trading, either as a central counterparty or not, of the tokens or “virtual currencies,” and (iii) token or “virtual currency” pricing, information intermediary services or other services for tokens or “virtual currencies.” To date, no governmental financial regulators have imposed any administrative penalties against us relating to LinkTokens on the basis that we engaged in token fundraising activities. However, we cannot assure you that going forward, relevant PRC authorities would have the same view with us and would not impose retroactive regulatory restrictions or penalties on us for our prior dealings with LinkToken. Were that to happen, we might be subject to additional regulatory risks, and our business and results of operations may be adversely affected.

We may not be able to retain our large user base, convert our users into subscribers of our premium services or maintain our existing subscribers.

Our platform had approximately 52.0 million monthly unique visitors in December 2020 according to our internal record. If we are unable to consistently provide our users with quality services and experience, if users do not perceive our service offerings to be of value, or if we introduce new or adjust existing features or change the mix of digital media content in a manner that is not favorably received by our users, we may not be able to retain our existing user base.

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Our number of subscribers experienced a decline in the past partly due to the intensified scrutiny over internet content from the Chinese government, and may experience further downward pressure in the future. With a government campaign against inappropriate internet content launched in April 2014, we have had to increase the monitoring of content on our platform. All the measures we adopt in response to increasing regulatory scrutiny may materially and adversely affect user experience on our platform and make our services less attractive to our subscribers, leading to a decline in the number of subscribers. We saw a reduction in the number of total subscribers of 4.4 million as of December 31, 2014, and permitted temporary suspension of services by about 350,000 existing subscribers as of December 31, 2014. Although the permitted temporary suspension of services gradually reduced to 175,000 existing subscribers as of December 31, 2020, such favorable trends may not sustain, and any increase in the number of subscribers may not necessarily lead to a corresponding increase in revenue. Similar government action or other forces may make it challenging for us to retain our user base, or may contribute to a further decline in our user base, in the future. See “—Risks Related to Doing Business in China—Regulation and censorship of information disseminated over the internet in China have adversely affected our business and may continue to adversely affect our business, and we may be liable for the digital media content on our platform.”

In the long term, even without taking into account the abovementioned government restrictions, we cannot assure you that we would be able to retain our large user or subscriber base. For example, our efforts to provide greater incentives for our users to subscribe, including marketing activities to highlight the value of differentiated subscriber-only services, such as Green Channel, may not continue to succeed. Our subscribers may stop their subscriptions or other spending on our products or services because we no longer serve their needs or if we are unable to offer a satisfying user experience or successfully compete with current and new competitors in both retaining our existing subscribers and attracting new subscribers, which would adversely impact our business, results of operations and prospects. In addition, the development of technologies may also render our acceleration technology obsolete. For example, the development of 5G technology significantly increased the speed of wireless mobile communications. Although people generally expect 5G technology would significantly change people’s life, when and how it will happen are yet to be fully demonstrated. The new technology will create new business opportunities, but it may also alter people’s online habits, which in turn may have a negative impact on our businesses such as our membership subscription and cloud computing products and services.

The intellectual property protection mechanism we have implemented may not always be effective or sufficient. The premium acceleration services, Xunlei Cloud Drive and other value-added services we provide to our users have exposed us to and may continue to expose us to copyright infringement claims and other related claims, which could be time-consuming and costly. Any damage awards, injunctive relief and/or court orders could materially and adversely affect our existing business model, divert our management’s attention and adversely impact our business and reputation.

Our success depends, in large part, on our ability to operate our business without infringing, misappropriating or otherwise violating third-party rights, including third-party intellectual property rights. Internet, technology and media companies are frequently involved in litigations based on allegations of infringement of intellectual property rights, unfair competition, invasion of privacy, defamation and other violations of third-party rights. In the ordinary course of our business, we receive, from time to time, written notices from third parties claiming that certain contents and games on our network, websites, products or services infringe their copyrights or the copyrights of third parties. These notices may contain threats to take legal actions against us or requests for cessation of distribution, marketing or displaying such contents or games on our network, websites, products or services. As of the date of this annual report, we are involved in 19 pending copyright lawsuits in China. Almost all of these claims alleged that contents on our network, products or services constitute infringements of the plaintiffs’ copyrights. The total amount of damages claimed in these pending copyright lawsuits is approximately RMB18.3 million (US$2.7 million). See also “Item 8. Financial Information—A. Consolidated Statements and Other Financial Information—Legal Proceedings.” While we believe that none of these pending lawsuits are likely to have a material adverse effect on our business, claims alleging copyright infringement or other claims arising from the content accessible through our distributed computing network, or on our websites or through our other services, with or without merit, may lead to damage awards and/or court orders, diversion of our management's attention and financial resources and negative publicity affecting our brand and reputation, and therefore may adversely affect our results of operations and business prospects.

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We provide subscribers with limited space to temporarily store content downloaded on our servers for optimal acceleration performance. Subscribers may also request our cloud servers to transmit a file on their behalf and download it to their local storage. We also provide users with cloud storage services through Xunlei Cloud Drive, which allows users to save documents, images, audios, videos and other files to cloud servers automatically upon completing the download at an accelerated speed. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—B. Business Overview—Our Platform.” In addition, certain of our services allow users to upload files and various media contents after they create accounts with us, converting the files into links and sharing such links with designated persons. We do not provide users with any links to third parties, nor do we download or save any contents from third parties for our users on our own initiative. Although we have made commercially reasonable efforts to request users to comply with applicable intellectual property laws, we cannot ensure that all of our users have the rights to use, transmit or share these contents if such content infringes third-party intellectual property rights. We have implemented internal procedures to meet the requirements under relevant PRC laws and regulations to monitor and review contents available on our platform, and remove contents promptly once we receive notice of infringement from the legitimate right holder. See also “Item 4. Information on the Company—B. Business Overview— Intellectual Property—Digital media data monitoring and copyright protection” for more details. However, due to the significant amount of digital media content accessible through our acceleration services and other value-added services, we cannot guarantee the effectiveness of our current implementation of intellectual property protection mechanisms and measures. We may be liable for temporarily storing or transmitting content or creating links representing content on behalf of our subscribers if such content infringes third-party intellectual property rights, and any such potential legal liabilities could materially and adversely affect our business.

The validity, enforceability and scope of protection of intellectual property in internet-related industries, particularly in China, are uncertain and still evolving. As we face increasing competition and as litigation becomes more common in China in resolving commercial disputes, we face a higher risk of intellectual property infringement claims. The Supreme People’s Court of China promulgated a judicial interpretation on infringement of the right of internet dissemination in December 2012 which was revised in December 2020 and became effective on January 1, 2021. This judicial interpretation provides that the courts will require service providers to remove not only links or content that have been specifically mentioned in the notices of infringement from rights holders, but also links or content they “should have known” to contain infringing content. The interpretation further provides that where an internet service provider has directly obtained economic benefits from any content made available by an internet user, it has a higher duty of care with respect to internet users’ infringement of third-party copyrights. This interpretation may subject us and other internet service providers to significant administrative burdens and litigation risks. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—B. Business Overview—Regulation— Regulation on Intellectual Property Rights.”. Interested parties may lobby for more robust intellectual property protection in jurisdictions in which we conduct business or may conduct business, and intellectual property laws in China and other such jurisdictions may become less favorable to our business. Intellectual property litigation may be expensive and time-consuming and could divert management attention and resources. If there is a successful claim of infringement, we may be required to discontinue the infringing activities, pay substantial fines and damages and/or seek royalty or license agreements that may not be available on commercially acceptable terms, if at all. Our failure to obtain the required licenses on a timely basis could harm our business. Any intellectual property litigation and/or any negative publicity by third parties alleging our intellectual property infringement could have a material adverse effect on our business, reputation, financial condition or results of operations. To address the risks relating to intellectual property infringement, we may have to substantially modify, limit or, in extreme cases, terminate some of our services. Any of such changes could materially affect our users’ experience and in turn have a material adverse impact on our business.

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If we are unable to successfully capture and retain the growing number of mobile internet users or if we are unable to successfully monetize our mobile products, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.

An increasing number of users access our products and services through mobile devices, and the transition to mobile internet is a key part of our current business strategies. Products such as Xunlei Accelerator are now available to users from PCs as well as mobile devices, and we intend to continue expanding the number of mobile products we offer. An important element of our strategy to transition to mobile internet is to continue to further develop features for our mobile products and to develop new mobile products to capture a greater share of the growing number of users that access internet services such as ours through mobile devices. For example, we developed Mobile Xunlei, which allows users to search, download and consume digital media content on their mobile devices in a user-friendly way. As new laptops, mobile devices and operating systems are continually being released, it is difficult to predict the problems we may encounter in developing our products for use on these devices and operating systems, and we may need to devote significant resources to create, support and maintain these services. Devices providing access to our products and services are not manufactured and sold by us, and we cannot assure you that companies manufacturing or selling these devices would always ensure that their devices perform reliably and are maximally compatible with our systems. Any faulty connection between these devices and our products may result in user dissatisfaction with our products, which could damage our brand and have a material and adverse effect on our financial results. In addition, the lower resolution, functionality and memory associated with some mobile devices may make the use of our products and services through such devices more difficult and the versions of our products and services we develop for these devices may fail to attract users. Manufacturers or distributors may establish unique technical standards for their devices and, as a result, our products may not work or work properly or be viewable on all devices on which they are installed. Furthermore, new, comparable products which are specifically created to function on mobile operating systems, as compared to some of our products that were originally designed to be accessed from PCs, and such new entrants may operate more effectively on mobile devices than our mobile products do.

In addition, if we are unable to attract and retain the increasing number of users who access our products through mobile devices, or if we are slower than our competitors in developing attractive services adaptable for mobile devices, we may fail to capture a significant share of an increasingly important portion of the market or may lose existing users. In addition, even if we are able to retain the increasing number of users who access our services through mobile devices, we may not be able to successfully monetize them in the future. For example, because of the inherent limitations of mobile devices, we may not be able to provide as many kinds of products on mobile devices as we do on PC, which may limit the monetization potential of our mobile products and services.

We may be subject to the risks of overseas expansion.

We have been exploring opportunities in overseas market. Operating business internationally may expose us to additional risks and uncertainties. As we have very limited experience in operating our business in overseas markets, we may be unable to attract a sufficient number of users, fail to anticipate competitive conditions or face difficulties in operating effectively in overseas markets. We may also fail to adapt our business models to the local market due to various legal requirements and market conditions. Our international operations and expansion efforts have resulted and may continue to result in increased costs and are subject to a variety of risks, including increased competition, fluctuations in foreign exchange rates, uncertain enforcement of our intellectual property rights, more complex distribution logistics and the complexity of compliance with foreign laws and regulations. Compliance with applicable Chinese and foreign laws and regulations, such as import and export requirements, anti-corruption laws, tax laws, foreign exchange controls and cash repatriation restrictions, data privacy requirements, environmental laws, labor laws, restrictions on foreign investment, and anti-competition regulations, increases the costs and risk exposure of doing business in foreign jurisdictions. Although we have strived to comply with these laws and regulations, a violation by our employees, contractors or agents could nevertheless occur, especially during the exploratory stages. In some cases, compliance with the laws and regulations of one country could violate the laws and regulations of another country. Violations of these laws and regulations could materially and adversely affect our brand, international growth efforts and business.

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We also could be significantly affected by other risks associated with international activities including, but not limited to, economic and labor conditions, increased duties, taxes and other costs and political instability. Margins on sales of our products in foreign countries, and on sales of products that include components obtained from foreign suppliers, could be materially and adversely affected by international trade regulations, including duties, tariffs and antidumping penalties. We are also exposed to credit and collectability risk on our trade receivables with customers in certain international markets. There can be no assurance that we can effectively limit our credit risk and avoid losses. In addition, political instability may also expose us to additional risks and uncertainties. If any of these economic or political risks materialize and we have failed to anticipate and effectively manage them, we may suffer a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

If we fail to keep up with the technological development in the internet industry and users’ changing demand, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.

The internet industry is rapidly evolving and subject to continual technological changes. As the internet infrastructure continues to develop, the internet may become more easily accessible through alternative technological innovations in the future, which may make our existing products and services less attractive to our users, and we may lose our existing users and fail to attract new users, which may further adversely impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, user demand for internet content may also shift over time. Currently, internet users appear to have significant demand for multimedia acceleration, online games and online streaming services, and we expect such demand to continue. However, we cannot assure you that the behavior of internet users will not change in the future. For example, it is expected that the development of 5G technology may have certain impacts on mobile internet user’s behavior. If 5G technology reduces our users’ demand for internet acceleration, our membership subscription and cloud computing services will be negatively affected unless we are able to successfully develop alternative products or services to take advantage of new opportunities created by this new technology. If we fail to upgrade our services in response to changes in user demand in an effective and timely manner, the number of our users and advertisers may decrease. Furthermore, changes in technologies and user demand may require substantial capital expenditures in product development and infrastructure. To further expand our user base and offer our users a wider range of access points, we are expanding our business to mobile devices in part through potentially pre-installed acceleration products in mobile phones. In addition, we are continually developing and upgrading products and services, including our cloud computing services, which is expected to utilize the idle capacity of our users, and seeking strategic cooperation with hardware manufacturers such as smartphone makers, which may require significant resources from us. However, if we are not able to perfect our new technologies or to achieve the intended results or if our innovations cannot respond to the needs of our users or if our users are not attracted to our upgraded or new products and services, we may not be able to maintain or expand our user base, and our business, results of operations and prospects may be materially and adversely affected.

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Our technologies, business methods and services, including those relating to our resource discovery network, may be subject to third-party patent claims or rights, such as issued patents or pending patent applications, that limit or prevent their use.

We cannot assure you that our technologies, business methods and services, including those relating to our resource discovery network, will be free from claims of patent infringements, and that holders of patents would not seek to enforce such patents against us in China, the United States or any other jurisdictions. For example, we were involved in a patent infringement case in China. The plaintiff alleged that our acceleration service infringed the plaintiff’s patent rights. In November 2018, the court dismissed the plaintiff’s all claims. The plaintiff subsequently appealed but its claims were dismissed by the appellate court as well. In March 2020, the plaintiff filed a petition to retrial case. As of the date of this annual report, the court has declined to retry the case. We are currently not involved in any patent infringement case in China. We believe that our products do not infringe any third-party patents of which we are aware. However, our analysis may have failed to identify all relevant patents and patent applications. For example, there may be currently pending applications, unknown to us, that may later result in issued patents that are infringed by our products, services or other aspects of our business. There could also be existing patents of which we are not aware that our products may inadvertently infringe. Third parties may attempt to enforce such patents against us. Further, the application and interpretation of China’s patent laws and the procedures and standards for granting patents in China are still evolving and are uncertain, and we cannot assure you that PRC courts or regulatory authorities would agree with our analysis. Any patent infringement claims, regardless of their merits, could be time-consuming and costly to us. If we were found to infringe third-party patents and were not able to adopt non-infringing technologies, we may be severely limited in our ability to operate our business, and our results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

We may be subject to claims or lawsuits outside of China, which could increase our risk of direct or indirect liabilities for our existing or future service offerings.

We may be subject to claims or lawsuits outside China, such as the United States, by virtue of our listing in the United States, the ownership of our ADSs by investors, the extraterritorial application of foreign law by foreign courts or for other reasons. We have attracted and expect to continue to attract attention from intellectual property owners outside of China, despite our efforts to control access to certain products by users outside China. For example, the Recording Industry Association of America filed a letter with the Office of the United States Trade Representative in November 2010 accusing certain of our divested or discontinued products of facilitating intellectual property infringement. Although we take steps to block users logging in from IP addresses that are located in certain jurisdictions, including the United States, from accessing certain of our services, due to technological limitations, such efforts may not be 100% successful, and any unintended access to our services may increase our risk of becoming subject to copyright laws in such jurisdictions. Even if our efforts to block IP addresses located in the United States or other jurisdictions are successful, the uncertainties surrounding the approach to intellectual property and online service providers that the new U.S. administration will take may increase our risk of becoming impacted by copyright laws in such jurisdictions. If we are ever held to be subject to United States copyright law, that could increase our risk of direct or indirect copyright liability for our resource discovery, acceleration or other services. If a claim of infringement brought against us in the United States or other jurisdictions is successful, we may be required to (i) pay substantial statutory or other damages and fines, (ii) remove relevant content from our website, (iii) discontinue products or services, (iv) disable access through our service to certain sites or content; (v) terminate users; and/or (vi) seek royalty or license agreements that may not be available on commercially reasonable terms or at all.

In addition, as a publicly listed company, we may be exposed to increased risk of litigation. For example, we were involved in shareholder class action lawsuits in the United States. See "Item 8. Financial Information-A. Consolidated Statements and Other Financial Information-Legal Proceedings." We may be involved in more class action lawsuits in the future. While we believe the claims in this lawsuit are without merit, such kinds of lawsuits could divert a significant amount of our management’s attention and other resources from our business and operations, which could harm our results of operations and require us to incur significant expenses to defend the lawsuits. Any such class action suit, whether or not successful, could harm our reputation and restrict our ability to raise capital in the future. In addition, if a claim is successfully made against us, we may be required to pay significant damages, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

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We may not be able to prevent unauthorized use of our intellectual property or disclosure of our trade secrets and other proprietary information, which could reduce demand for our services and have material and adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our patents, trademarks, trade secrets, copyrights and other intellectual property rights are important assets for us. Events that are outside of our control may pose a threat to our intellectual property rights. For example, effective intellectual property protection may not be available in China and some other jurisdictions in which our services are distributed or made available through the internet. Also, the efforts we have made to protect our proprietary rights may not be sufficient or effective. For example, the legal regimes relating to the recognition and enforcement of intellectual property rights in China and South America are particularly limited. Therefore, legal proceedings to enforce our intellectual property in these jurisdictions may progress slowly, during which time infringement may continue largely unimpeded. Countries that have relatively inefficient intellectual property protection and enforcement regimes represent a significant portion of the demand for our products. These factors may make it more challenging for us to enforce our intellectual property rights against infringement. The infringement of our intellectual property rights, particularly in these jurisdictions, may materially harm our business and competitiveness in these markets and elsewhere by reducing our sales, and adversely affecting our results of operations, and diluting our brand or reputation. Any significant impairment of our intellectual property rights could harm our business or our competitiveness. Also, protecting our intellectual property rights is costly and time consuming. Any increase in the unauthorized use of our intellectual property could make it more expensive to conduct our business and harm our results of operations.

We seek to obtain patent protection for our innovations. However, it is possible that patent protection may not be available for some of these innovations. In addition, given the costs of obtaining patent protection, we may choose not to protect certain innovations that later turn out to be important. Furthermore, there is always the possibility, despite our efforts, that the scope of the protection gained will be insufficient or that an issued patent may be deemed invalid or unenforceable.

We also seek to maintain certain intellectual property as trade secrets. We require our employees, consultants, advisors and collaborators to enter into confidentiality agreements in order to protect our trade secrets and other proprietary information. These agreements might not effectively prevent disclosure of our trade secrets, know-how or other proprietary information and might not provide an adequate remedy in the event of unauthorized disclosure of such confidential information. In addition, others may independently discover our trade secrets and proprietary information, in which case we cannot assert such trade secret rights against such parties. Any unauthorized disclosure or independent discovery of our trade secrets would deprive us of the associated competitive advantages. Costly and time-consuming litigation could be necessary to enforce and determine the scope of our proprietary rights, and failure to obtain or maintain trade secret protection could adversely affect our competitive position.

The revenue model for our live streaming may not remain effective and we cannot guarantee that our future monetization strategies will be successfully implemented or generate sustainable revenues and profit.

We launched our live video streaming services in February 2016. In May 2018, we expanded our live streaming business by launching a live audio streaming product, PeiWan. In September 2019, we started to operate another live video streaming product, BuOu Live, by cooperating with a third party. In 2020, revenue from live streaming business was US$20.9 million, accounting for 11.2% of our total revenues in 2020. The live streaming industry is highly competitive and there are several well-established and successful players in this market. We may not be able to compete effectively with them and realize the growth of our live streaming business continuously. We are not sure whether our products will be accepted by the market and generate/continue to generate revenues as we expected. The user demand may also change, decrease substantially or dissipate and we may fail to anticipate and serve user demands effectively and timely.

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Although we factor in industry standards and expected user demand in determining how to optimize virtual item merchandizing effectively, if we fail to properly manage the supply and timing of our virtual items and their appropriate prices, our users may be less likely to purchase these virtual items from us. In addition, if users’ spending habits change and they choose to only access our content for free without additional purchases, we may not be able to continue to successfully implement the virtual items-based revenue model for live streaming, in which case we may have to provide other value-added services or products to monetize our user base. We cannot guarantee that our attempts to monetize our user base and products and services will continue to be successful, profitable or widely accepted, and therefore the future revenue and income potential of our business are difficult to evaluate.

We may fail to offer attractive content for our live streaming services, or attract and retain talented and popular broadcasters, which may materially adversely affect the operation of our live streaming services and its results of operations.

We offer live streaming content. Our content library is constantly evolving and growing to meet users’ evolving interests. We actively track viewership growth and community feedback to identify trending content and encourage our broadcasters to create content that caters to users’ constantly changing taste. However, if we fail to continue to expand and diversify our content offerings, identify trending and popular genres, or maintain the quality of our content, we may experience decreased viewership and user engagement, which may materially and adversely affect our results of operations and financial conditions.

In addition, we largely rely on our broadcasters to create high-quality and fun live streaming content. Popular broadcasters are key to the success of our living streaming services. We have in place a comprehensive and effective incentive mechanism to encourage broadcasters to supply content that are attractive to our users. We have also entered into multi-year cooperation agreements that contain exclusivity clauses with popular broadcasters and the talent agencies they cooperate with. However, if any of those broadcasters and/or the talent agencies decides to breach the agreement or chooses not to continue the cooperation with us once the term of the agreement expires, or if we fail to attract new talented and productive broadcasters, the popularity of our platform may decline and the number of our users may decrease, which could materially and adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

We may be held liable for information or content displayed on, retrieved from or linked to our platforms, or distributed to our users, if such content is deemed to violate any PRC laws or regulations, or for improper or fraudulent activities conducted on our platform, and PRC authorities may impose legal sanctions on us and our reputation may be damaged.

Our live streaming services enable users to interact and chat with broadcasters and other users and engage in various other online activities. Although we require our broadcasters to register their real name, we are unable to independently verify the accuracy and authenticity of the identity information provided by them. For the registration of users before they become broadcasters, we rely on third-party organizations to verify their identities through mobile phone numbers or ID card number, which may not always be reliable. In addition, we have put in place measures to monitor content on our platform generated by our users, but it is impossible for us to detect every piece of inappropriate or illegal content on our platform due to the immense quantity of user-generated content on our platform. Therefore, it is possible that broadcasters and/or users may engage in illegal, obscene or incendiary conversations or activities, including the publishing of inappropriate or illegal content that may be deemed unlawful under PRC laws and regulations on our platforms. For example, we received a notice from CAC in 2020, pointing out that there was certain inappropriate information discovered on our platform. We promptly fixed the issue and managed to avoid the risk of being removed from app stores by regulatory authorities. If any content on our platforms is deemed illegal, obscene or incendiary, or if appropriate licenses and third-party consents have not been obtained, claims may also be brought against us for defamation, libel, negligence, copyright, patent or trademark infringement, other unlawful activities or other theories and claims based on the nature and content of the materials that are provided, uploaded, shared, published or otherwise accessed by users or us through our platforms. Defending any such actions could be costly and involve significant time and attention of our management and other resources. In addition, PRC authorities may impose legal sanctions on us, including, in serious cases, suspending or revoking the licenses necessary to operate our platforms if they find that we have not adequately managed the content on our platforms. Any such claims or sanctions against us could materially and adversely affect our business and our brand.

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We believe that maintaining and enhancing our Xunlei brand is of significant importance to the success of our business. A well-recognized brand is critical to increasing our user base and, in turn, enhancing our attractiveness to advertisers, subscribers and paying users. If we fail to sustain or improve the strength of our brand, we may subsequently experience difficulty in maintaining market share. We have developed our reputation and established a leading position by providing our users with superior acceleration services and cloud computing services. We will continue to conduct various marketing and brand promotion activities. We cannot assure you, however, that these activities will be successful and achieve the brand promotion effects we expect. In addition, any negative publicity in relation to our services or our marketing or promotion practices, regardless of its veracity, could harm our brand image and, in turn, result in a reduced number of users and advertisers. Historically, there has been negative publicity about our company, our products and services and certain key members of our management team, which has adversely affected our brand, public image and reputation. If we fail to maintain and enhance our brand, or if we incur excessive expenses in this effort, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.

System failure, interruptions and downtime, including those caused by cyber-attacks or security breaches, can result in user dissatisfaction, adverse publicity or leakage of confidential information of our users and customers, and our business, financial condition, results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.

Our operations rely on our networks and servers, which can suffer system failures, interruptions and downtime. Our network systems are vulnerable to damage from computer viruses, fires, floods, earthquakes, power losses, telecommunication failures, computer hacking, security breach, and similar events despite our implementation of security measures, which may cause interruptions to the services we provide, degrade the user experience, disclosure of our data or user data, such as personal information, names, accounts, user IDs and passwords, and payment or transaction related information, or cause users to lose confidence in our products. Our efforts to protect our company data and user data may also be unsuccessful due to software bugs or other technical malfunctions, employee error or malfeasance, government surveillance, or other factors.

The satisfactory performance, stability, security and availability of our websites and our network infrastructure are critical to our reputation and our ability to attract and retain users and advertisers. Our network and servers contain information regarding file index, advertising records, premium licensed digital media content and various other facets of the business to assist management and help ensure effective communication among various departments and offices of our company. Any failure to maintain the satisfactory performance, stability, security and availability of our network, website, servers or technology platform, whether such failure results from intentional cyber-attacks by hackers, from issues with our own technology and team or from other factors beyond our control, may cause significant harm to our reputation and impact our ability to attract and maintain users and business partners. We have put in place various measures to prevent such incidents from happening and internal reporting procedures with respect to such incidents. However, such prevention measures may not function in a way as we expect due to the evolution of the sophistication of cyber-attacks, advances in technology, an increased level of sophistication and diversity of our products and services, an increased level of expertise of hackers, new discoveries in the field of cryptography or others, software bugs or other technical malfunctions, or other evolving threats.

From time to time, our users in certain locations may not be able to gain access to our network or our websites for a period of time lasting from several minutes to several hours, due to server interruptions, power shutdowns, internet connection problems or other reasons. For example, in 2020, one of our products experienced a system failure due to an extremely high usage rate, which lasted for around three hours and affected a large portion of our users. Although we have fixed the server promptly, we cannot assure you that such instances will not occur in the future. Any server interruptions, break-downs or system failures, including failures which may be attributable to events within or outside our control that could result in a sustained shutdown of all or a material portion of our network or website, could reduce the attractiveness of our service offerings. In addition, any substantial increase in the volume of traffic on our network or website will require us to increase our investment in bandwidth, expand and further upgrade our technology platform. We do not maintain insurance policies covering losses relating to our network systems due to very limited available insurance products in the insurance market in China. As a result, any system failure, interruptions or network downtime for an extended period may have a material adverse impact on our revenues and results of operations.

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We rely on information technology systems to process, transmit and cache or store electronic information in our day-to-day operations, including customer, employee and company data. The secure processing, maintenance and transmission of this information is critical to our operations and the legal environment surrounding information security, storage, use, processing, disclosure and privacy is demanding with the frequent imposition of new and changing requirements. We also store certain information with third parties. Our information systems and those of our third-party vendors are subjected to computer viruses or other malicious codes, unauthorized access attempts, and cyber- or phishing-attacks and also are vulnerable to an increasing threat of continually evolving cybersecurity risks and external hazards, as well as improper or inadvertent staff behavior, all of which could expose confidential company and personal data systems and information to security breaches. Any such breach could compromise our networks, and the information stored therein could be accessed, publicly disclosed, lost or stolen. Such attacks could result in our intellectual property and other confidential information being lost or stolen, disruption of our operations, and other negative consequences, such as increased costs for security measures or remediation costs, and diversion of management attention. Any actual or perceived access, disclosure or other loss of information or any significant breakdown, intrusion, interruption, cyber-attack or corruption of customer, employee or company data or our failure to comply with federal, state, local and foreign privacy laws or contractual obligations with customers, vendors, payment processors and other third parties, could result in legal claims or proceedings, liability under laws or contracts that protect the privacy of personal information, regulatory penalties, disruption of our operations, and damage to our reputation, all of which could materially adversely affect our business, revenue and competitive position. For example, in 2020, a few individual users had taken advantage of a technical flaw of certain of our products to make fraudulent purchases and managed to cash out. We have promptly identified and patched the technical flaw. While we will continue to implement additional protective measures to reduce the risk of and detect cyber-incidents, cyber-attacks are becoming more sophisticated and frequent, and the techniques used in such attacks change rapidly. Our protective measures may not protect us against attacks and such attacks could have a significant impact on our business and reputation.

In addition, there has been a trend tightening the regulation of privacy and user data protection globally. We may become subject to new laws and regulations applying to the solicitation, collection, processing or use of personal or consumer information that could affect how we store, process and share data with our customers, suppliers and third-party sellers. For example, the National Information Security Standardization Technical Committee issued the latest Standard of Information Security Technology—Personal Information Security Specification, which came into effect in March 2020. Under such standard, the personal data controller refers to entities or persons who are authorized to determine the purposes and methods for using and processing personal information. The personal information controller should follow the principles of legality, justification and necessity in handling personal information. The personal information controller should obtain a consent from a personal information provider and provide such personal information provider an independent choice when the product or service offered by the personal information controller has multiple functions. On November 28, 2019, the Secretary Bureau of the Cyberspace Administration of China, the General Office of the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, the General Office of the Ministry of Public Security and the General Office of the State Administration for Market Regulation jointly promulgated the Identification Method of Illegal Collection and Use of Personal Information Through App, which provides guidance for regulatory authorities to identify illegal collection and use of personal information through mobile apps, for the app operators to conduct self-examination and self-correction, and for other participants to voluntarily monitor compliance. Moreover, the PRC Constitution, the PRC Criminal Law, the Civil Code of the PRC and the PRC Internet Security Law protect individual privacy in general, which require certain authorization or consent from internet users prior to collection, use or disclosure of their personal data and also protection of the security of the personal data of such users. In particular, Amendment 7 to the PRC Criminal Law prohibits institutions, companies and their employees in the telecommunications and other industries from selling or otherwise illegally disclosing a citizen's personal information obtained during the course of performing duties or providing services.

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In addition, we may need to comply with increasingly complex and rigorous regulatory standards enacted to protect business and personal data in the U.S., Europe and elsewhere. For example, the European Union adopted the General Data Protection Regulation, or the GDPR, which became effective on May 25, 2018. The GDPR imposes additional obligations on companies regarding the handling of personal data and provides certain individual privacy rights to persons whose data is stored. New privacy laws will continue to come into effect around the world in 2020, with one of the most significant being the California Consumer Privacy Act, or the CCPA, which became effective on January 1, 2020. Compliance with existing, proposed and recently enacted laws, including implementation of the privacy and process enhancements called for under GDPR, CCPA and regulations from other legislations, can be costly. Any failure to comply with these regulatory standards could subject us to legal and reputational risks. Any inability, or perceived inability, to adequately address privacy and data protection concerns, even if unfounded, or comply with applicable laws, regulations, policies, industry standards, contractual obligations, or other legal obligations could result in additional cost and liability to us or company officials, damage our reputation, inhibit sales, and otherwise adversely affect our business.

Our results of operations could be materially and adversely affected if our cooperation with Itui regarding online advertising is unsuccessful. We may also be subject to penalties from relevant authorities due to certain actions or inactions of Itui in connection with online advertising, which is beyond our control.

We realized growth of the revenue from our online advertising services from US$16.9 million in 2016 to US$27.8 million in 2018. However, revenue from our online advertising service decreased to US$15.6 million in 2019, and further decreased to US$13.2 million in 2020, primarily due to a generally decreased demand for our online advertising services. In May of 2020, we entered into an advertising revenue sharing agreement with a subsidiary of Itui International Inc., our largest shareholder. Itui provides Xunlei with online traffic monetization services, including the operation and placement of advertisements, research and technology support with respect to advertising systems, business algorithm platform as well as content recommendation and other optimization services. By outsourcing our advertising business to Itui, we hope to take advantage of Itui’s advanced precision targeting algorithm to achieve better placement of advertisement. However, we cannot assure you that we can improve the results of operations of regarding online advertising through such cooperation. In our cooperation with Itui, we require Itui to comply with all relevant laws and regulations regarding advertising business. However, we have no control over Itui and we cannot assure you that Itui will be able to operate the advertising business and its advertising platform legally and successfully. We may still be liable for certain circumstances in connection with Itui that are beyond our control, and our business may also be negatively affected. In addition, if we are unable to maintain our cooperation with Itui for whatever reasons and we are unable to find a suitable replacement in a timely manner, or at all, our advertising revenue may experience significant declines. As a result, our business and financial condition may be negatively affected.

We rely on third-party platforms to distribute our mobile applications. If we are unable to maintain a good relationship with such platform providers, if their terms and conditions or pricing were changed to our detriment, if we violate, or if a platform provider believes that we have violated, the terms and conditions of its platform, or if any of these platforms loses market share or falls out of favor or is unavailable for a prolonged period of time, our mobile strategy may suffer.

We are subject to the standard policies and terms of service of third-party platforms, which govern the distribution of our mobile application on the platform. Each platform provider has broad discretion to change and interpret its terms of service and other policies with respect to us and other users, and those changes and interpretation may be unfavorable to us. A platform provider may also change its fee structure, add fees associated with access to and use of its platform, alter how we are able to advertise or distribute on the platform, or change how the personal information of its users is made available to application developers on the platform. Such changes may decrease the visibility or availability of our applications, limit our distribution capabilities, prevent access to our applications, reduce the amount of downloads and revenue we may recognize from the applications, increase our costs to operate on these platforms or result in the exclusion or limitation of our application on such platforms. Any such changes could adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations.

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If we violate, or a platform provider believes we have violated its terms of service (or if there is any change or deterioration in our relationship with these platform providers), that platform provider could limit or discontinue our access to the platform. A platform provider could also limit or discontinue our access to the platform if it establishes more favorable relationships with one or more of our competitors or it determines that we are a competitor. Any limit of, or discontinuation to, our access to any platform could adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations. In September 2016, all of our mobile applications, including Mobile Xunlei, were removed from Apple’s iOS App Store as a result of alleged possible violations of the developer license agreement between Apple and us. After a prolonged negotiation, Apple agreed that we could re-launch our mobile applications, including Mobile Xunlei, on Apple’s iOS App Store as long as our mobile applications comply with Apple’s policies for launching mobile applications on App Store and pass Apple’s scrutinization. In July 2020, we successfully re-launched our mobile applications on Apple’s iOS App Store, which means new users can download our mobile applications again. Although we have re-launched our mobile applications on App Store, we cannot assure you the removal of our mobile applications from App Store will not happen again in the future. Furthermore, other app stores also have the right to update their store policies. If we are deemed to violate their policies, our mobile applications are removed from App Store again or other app stores at the same time, which may significantly harm our mobile strategy, materially and adversely affect our business operations, results of operations and financial condition.

We are strictly regulated in China. Any lack of requisite licenses or permits applicable to our businesses or to our third-party services providers and any changes in government policies or regulations may have a material and adverse impact on our businesses, financial conditions and results of operations.

Our business is subject to governmental supervision and regulations by the relevant PRC governmental authorities including the State Council, the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (formerly the Ministry of Information Industry), or MIIT, the State Administration of Radio and Television, or SAPPRFT, (formerly the General Administration of Press and Publication, Radio, Film and Television (established in March 2013 as a result of institutional reform integrating the State Administration of Radio, Film and Television, and the General Administration of Press and Publication), or GAPPRFT), Ministry of Culture and Tourism (established in March 2018 as a result of institutional reform integrating the Ministry of Culture, and the Ministry of Tourism), or MOCT and other relevant government authorities. Together these government authorities promulgate and enforce regulations that cover many aspects of operation of telecommunications and internet information services, including entry into the telecommunications industry, the scope of permissible business activities, licenses and permits for various business activities and foreign investment.

We are advised by our PRC legal counsel that a license for online transmission of audio-visual programs is required for the display of video content, including live streaming content, on our platform. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—B. Business Overview—Regulation—Regulation on online transmission of audio-visual programs.” We used to be a registered owner of such license when we were operating Xunlei Kankan business. However, when we disposed of Xunlei Kankan business to a purchaser in July 2015, the registered owner of such license was also changed to the purchaser. After the disposal, Shenzhen Wangwenhua started to operate a live streaming business and a short video business. As advised by our PRC legal counsel, a license for online transmission of audio-visual programs is required for operating short video business and live streaming business. In June 2018, Shenzhen Wangwenhua acquired 80% of the equity interest of Henan Tourism Information Co., Ltd., or Henan Tourism, from an independent third party. Henan Tourism is a registered owner of the license for online transmission of audio-visual programs. However, Shenzhen Wangwenhua, the entity that operates both license-required businesses, is not a registered owner of the license for online transmission of audio-visual programs. As a result, relevant PRC government authorities may find that we are operating license-required business without obtaining a proper license, and thus may issue warnings, order us to rectify our violating operations and impose fines on us. In the case of serious violations as determined by relevant authorities at its discretion, they may ban the violating operations, seize our equipment in connection with such operations and impose a penalty of one to two times of the amount of the total investment in such operations.

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The cloud computing services we provide to the internet users may be deemed to have included the content distribution network (CDN) services. Pursuant to the Notice of Ministry of Industry and Information Technology on Cleaning up and Standardizing the Internet Network Access Service Market, we have to update our existing value-added telecommunication services license, or VATS License, to specifically cover the CDN services. Shenzhen Onething Technologies Co., Ltd., or Shenzhen Onething, a subsidiary of Shenzhen Xunlei, and a subsidiary of Shenzhen Onething have obtained the VATS Licenses that cover the CDN services.

If the relevant PRC authority decides that we are operating certain business without the proper licenses or approvals, we may be warned, fined, ordered to rectify our violations or be imposed restrictions or even suspension on our relevant business. In addition to the above, if the PRC government promulgates new laws and regulations that require additional licenses or imposes additional restrictions on the operation of any part of our business, it has the power to, among other things, levy fines, confiscate our income, revoke our business licenses, and require us to discontinue our business or impose restrictions on the affected portion of our business. Any of these actions by the PRC government may have a material and adverse effect on our results of operations.

Furthermore, for our cloud computing business, we are operating under the shared economy business model and therefore face certain risks related to this business model. We cannot assure you that our cooperation with all third parties for our cloud computing business complies with all laws and regulations. For example, we cannot assure you that our third-party service providers have obtained or applied for all permits and licenses required for providing relevant services to us. We cooperate with various third-party service providers to provide Internet Data Center (IDC) and Internet Service Provider (ISP) services for our CDN services. As PRC laws and regulations require IDC and ISP service providers to obtain the corresponding IDC licenses and ISP licenses, we require our third-party service providers to obtain such licenses. However, we cannot assure you that these third-party services providers maintain or are able to obtain in a timely manner or at all the required licenses. If our third-party service providers fail to obtain or maintain relevant approvals, licenses or permits required for operating such businesses, our third-party service providers could be subject to liabilities, penalties and operational disruptions. Even if these service providers are able to maintain proper licenses, it is possible that the services and bandwidth resources they provide may not meet our requirements.

Violation of existing or future laws, regulations or regulations on collection and use of personal data could damage our reputation, deter current and potential users from using our services and substantially harm our business and results of operations.

Pursuant to the applicable PRC laws and regulations concerning the collection, use and sharing of personal data, our PRC subsidiaries, VIE and its subsidiaries are required to keep our users’ personal information confidential and are prohibited from disclosing such information to any third parties without such users’ consent. Relevant laws and regulations also require internet operators to take measures to ensure confidentiality of users’ information. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—B. Business Overview—Regulation—Regulation on internet privacy.” In November 2019, the MIIT issued the Notice on Carrying Out the Special Rectification of App Infringement on Users' Rights and Interests. Based on such notice, the MIIT required a number of mobile apps to be removed from application stores as these apps infringed users’ rights and interests and rectifications cannot be completed within a specified period of time. In early 2020, the MIIT also notified application stores to suspend downloading three mobile apps as these apps cannot complete rectification within a specified period of time.

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To comply with relevant laws and regulations, we periodically review our privacy policies and amend as needed based on the development and changes of our business to ensure that we collect, use or process any of our users’ personal information after we obtain users’ prior consent. While we strive to comply with our privacy guidelines as well as all applicable data protection laws and regulations, any failure or perceived failure to comply with relevant laws and regulations may result in proceedings or actions against us by government entities or others, and could damage our reputation. For example, one of our mobile applications received a notice from a regulatory authority for failing to explicitly inform users of the purpose, method, and scope of our personal data collection. In response, we have modified the privacy policies of the product to the regulator's satisfaction. However, we cannot guarantee you that regulatory authorities will not find our privacy policies insufficient again in the future, and we may be ordered to modify our privacy policies and make rectifications to meet the requirements of relevant laws or regulations. If we fail to make modifications or rectifications to the satisfaction of relevant regulatory authorities, we may subject to administrative penalties or even removals of our mobile applications.

In addition, user and regulatory attitudes towards privacy are evolving and concerns about the security of personal data could also lead to a decline in general usage of our products and services, which could lead to lower user numbers. For example, if the PRC government authorities require real-name registration by our users, our user numbers may decrease and our business, financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected. See “—Risks Related to Doing Business in China—We may be adversely affected by the complexity, uncertainties and changes in PRC regulations of internet-related business and companies.” In addition, we may become subject to the data protection or personal privacy laws of jurisdictions outside of China, where more stringent requirements may be imposed on us and we may have to allocate more resources to comply with the legal requirements, and our user numbers may further decrease. A significant reduction in user numbers could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may not be able to generate sufficient cash from operations or to obtain sufficient capital to meet the additional capital requirements of our changing business.

In order to implement our development strategies, including our strategies to transition to mobile internet and continuing efforts on our cloud computing business, we will make continual capital investments in terms of devoting more research and development efforts into investigating user needs and develop new mobile products and update existing ones, continue enhancing the technologies involved in our cloud computing business and provide more frequent updates to our existing products. Thus, we will continue to incur substantial capital expenditures on an ongoing basis, and it may become difficult for us to meet such capital requirements.

To date, we have financed our operations and the building of Xunlei Tower, our new headquarters, primarily by using our existing internal cash reserves and borrowing bank loans. If we fail to retain a sufficient number of users and continue to convert such users into paying users or subscribers, we may not be able to generate sufficient revenues to cover our business development strategies, including our continued transition to mobile internet and the continued expansion of our cloud computing business, and our business may be materially and adversely affected. Further, after the construction of Xunlei Tower is completed, we may operate the building ourselves, which may subject us to additional real estate related financial and operating risks.

We may obtain additional financing, including from equity offerings and debt financings in capital markets, to fund the operation and planned expansion of our business. Our ability to obtain additional financing in the future, however, is subject to a number of uncertainties, including:

·

our future business development, financial condition and results of operations;

·

general market conditions for financing activities by companies in our industry; and

·

macroeconomic, political and other conditions in China and elsewhere.

If we cannot obtain sufficient capital to meet our capital expenditure needs, we may not be able to execute our growth strategies and our business, results of operations and prospects may be materially and adversely affected.

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Our costs and expenses, such as research and development expenses, may increase and our results of operations may be adversely affected.

The operation of our extensive resource delivery network and cloud computing business as well as our exploration and implementation of our new business strategies require significant upfront capital expenditures as well as continual, substantial investment in content, technology and infrastructure. Since inception, we have invested substantially in research and development to maintain our technology leadership, and in equipment to increase our network capacity. We expect our research and development expenses to increase in the near term as we continue to expand our research and development team to develop new products and update existing products, particularly as we continue devoting resources in the development of our cloud computing business and the development and updating of our mobile products. Most of our capital expenditures, such as expenditures on servers and other equipment, are based upon our estimation of potential future demand and we are generally required to pay the entire purchase price and license fees upfront. As a result, our cash flow may be negatively affected in the periods in which such payments are made. We may not be able to quickly generate sufficient revenue from such expenditures, which may negatively affect our results of operations within certain periods thereafter; and if we overestimate future demand for our services, we may not be able to achieve expected rates of return on our capital expenditures, or at all.

In addition, bandwidth and other costs are subject to change and are determined by market supply and demand. For example, the market prices for professionally produced digital media content have increased significantly in China during the past few years, and there have been increases in the relevant license fees. In addition, if bandwidth and other providers cease their business with us or raise the prices of their products and services, we will incur additional costs to find alternative service providers or to accept the increased costs in order to provide our services. If we cannot maintain a cost-effective operation, or if our costs to deliver our services do not decline commensurate with any future declines in the prices we charge our users, our results of operations may be adversely affected and we may fail to achieve profitability.

If we are unable to collect accounts receivable in a timely manner or at all, our financial condition, results of operations and prospects may be materially and adversely affected.

We generated a large portion of our revenue from the sales of CDN in 2020. As of December 31, 2020, we have a considerable portion of accounts receivable arising from the sales of CDN. In addition, we have outsourced our advertising operations to Itui in 2020. As a result, we generated a considerable portion of revenues from the advertising revenue sharing agreement we entered into with Itui. As a result, the financial soundness of our customers purchasing CDN from us, Itui, advertising agencies, or advertisers may affect our collection of accounts receivable. In general, a credit assessment of our CDN purchasers will be made to evaluate the collectability of the service fees before entering into any business contracts, and we require Itui to do the same with advertising agencies or advertisers. However, we cannot assure you that we or Itui will always be able to accurately assess the creditworthiness of each CDN purchaser, advertising agency, or advertiser, as applicable. Any inability of Itui, advertisers, advertising agencies or CDN purchasers, especially those that accounted for a significant percentage of our accounts receivables in the past, to pay us in a timely manner may adversely affect our liquidity and cash flows. For example, we made a provision for our accounts receivable of US$7.6 million in 2018 due to a CDN purchaser’s prolonged overdue payment and its shutdown of operations. In addition, the online advertising market in China is dominated by a small number of large advertising agencies. If the large advertising agencies that Itui has business relationships with demand higher rebates for their agency services, our results of operations will be materially and adversely affected.

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We had net operating cash outflows in 2018, 2019, and 2020 and may be subject to liquidity pressure in the future if we cannot generate sufficient cash from our operating activities in the future.

We had net operating cash outflows of US$35.6 million, US$45.6 million and US$13.9 million in 2018, 2019 and 2020. See “Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects—B. Liquidity and Capital Resources—Operating activities” for reasons of such net operating cash outflows. We cannot guarantee we will be able to generate positive and sufficient cash flows from operating activities in the future. If we have negative cash flows from operating activities in the future, our business, results of operations and liquidity may be adversely affected.

In addition, we are constructing a building which will be used as our research and development center and headquarters. We planned to invest RMB600.0 (US$92.0 million) million at the beginning of the project planning. Based on our latest estimates, we expect to invest a total of RMB450.0 million (US$69.0 million) for this construction project. In 2019, we entered into a loan facility agreement with a commercial bank to finance the construction project. The land use right and the building under construction were mortgaged to the bank and one of our subsidiaries also provided a guarantee to the bank. The maximum amount of loans we are able to take out is RMB400.0 million (US$61.3million). As of December 31, 2020, we took out RMB130.0 million (US$19.9 million). We plan to take out another loan under this facility for no more than RMB120.0 million (US$17.4 million) in the near future depending on the progress of the construction project. As of the date of this report, we anticipate the construction project will be completed within our budget. Although we had cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments of US$255.1 million as of December 31, 2020, we may be under liquidity pressure if we are unable to generate sufficient cash from our operating activities in the future, unable to renew our bank loans, or if the actual cost of the construction project goes beyond our estimated costs. In addition, we plan to complete the construction by 2021 or early 2022 and relocate to the new building afterwards. However, we cannot assure you that we will definitely be able to complete the construction by then due to a number of factors that are beyond our control including outbreak of pandemic, weather conditions, force majeure, labor disputes and government regulations. For example, the completion of the construction project is subject to government approval. We cannot guarantee you that relevant government authorities will grant us approval in our expected timeline. If we are unable to move into the new building as in our expected timeline, we will have to continue to pay office rental expenses. In addition, we may lease certain floors of the building to other parties and use the rental we receive to pay loan interest. If the new building cannot be put into use in our expected timeline, we will have to pay loan interest from our existing cash, which will increase our liquidity pressure. In the worst-case scenario, if we are unable to repay the loan, the bank may foreclose our building. As a result, we may have to rent other office space to continue our business operations and incur additional costs. Furthermore, we engaged a reputable national construction company to construct the building and a professional real estate consulting firm to manage the process. Disputes between construction company/real estate consulting firm/other construction service providers and us have arisen and may continue to arise in the future, which may cause delay to the completion of the construction project. For example, we have a pending lawsuit with a constructing company of our headquarters construction project, which may adversely affect our financial condition if we lose the case. The lawsuit may also divert our management’s attention and subject us to additional costs.

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We may not be able to successfully address the challenges and risks we face in the online games market, such as a failure to operate popular, high-quality games or to obtain all the licenses required to operate online games, which may subject us to penalties from relevant authorities, including the discontinuance of our online game business.

We have cooperated with third parties to operate certain web games since 2019. See "Item 4. Information on the Company-B. Business Overview-Our platform-Online game services." Operating online games in China requires several permits and approvals. For example, as advised by our PRC legal counsel, a VATS License is required for operating online games and an internet publication license is required for operating internet publishing services, which is defined as offering internet publications to the public through the internet. Our online game operating subsidiaries have obtained the VATS License for operating our online games, but have not obtained the internet publishing services license. Based on our consultation with the responsible government authority, since our online game operating subsidiaries are only operators of online games or only provide a platform for online game operations, they are not required to obtain the internet publishing services license. Therefore, our online game operating subsidiaries have not obtained the internet publishing services license. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that relevant government authorities may in future take the view that our online game operating subsidiaries are required to obtain the internet publishing services license and thus penalize us for operating online game business without a proper license. If that were to happen, we would be subject to orders to the shut-up the website or delete all relevant online publications, confiscation of illegal income and major equipment or fines. In addition, according to relevant regulations, an online game has to be scrutinized by and obtain an approval number (ISBN number) from the SAPPRFT before it is allowed to be launched online. In our cooperation with online game providers, we require that ISBN numbers have to be obtained for the online games within the scope of our cooperation. However, as we are not the developers or publishers of those online games, we cannot assure you that the ISBN numbers of those online games are obtained strictly in compliance with relevant legal requirements and procedures without any defects or relevant amendment filings are made in compliance with relevant legal requirements. If the ISBN numbers are obtained not in compliance with relevant laws and regulations or amendment filings are not made timely, relevant government authorities may impose fines on us, confiscate our income generated from operating such online games and require us to delete all relevant online publications or discontinue our online game business.

In addition, relevant PRC laws and regulations require that contents of online games are prohibited to advocate cult, superstition, obscenity, pornography, gambling or violence, or abet commission of crime. As we are not the developers of the online games we operate, we cannot assure you that the contents of the online games we operate are fully in compliance with such requirement. Failure to comply with relevant PRC laws and regulations may subject us to liability, administrative actions or penalties imposed by relevant PRC authorities. The imposition of any of these penalties may result in a material and adverse effect on our ability to operate our online game business and our results of operations. As we do not have control over the contents of the online games we operate, we cannot assure you that we will not be subject to any intellectual property infringement claims or misappropriation claims. As of the date of this annual report, we were not involved in any lawsuits relating to the online games we operate. Defending those claims, with or without merits, could be costly and time-consuming, and diverge our management’s attention. If we or our third-party online game providers lose the cases, we may be required to compensate a large amount of damages or immediately discontinue the operation of relevant online games. If we are unable to find alternative solutions on commercially reasonable terms on a timely basis, our online game business, reputation and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.

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In October 2019, General Administration of Press and Publication issued the Notice by the General Administration of Press and Publication of Preventing Minors from Indulging in Online Games, or Anti-indulgence Notice, which imposed an array of restrictive measures to prevent underage users to indulge in online games. For example, game operators are not allowed to provide underage users with any form of access to online games during the period from 22:00 p.m. each day to 8:00 a.m. of the next day and the total length of time for game operators to provide underage users with access to online games cannot exceed three hours a day during statutory holidays or 1.5 hours a day on days other than statutory holidays. The Anti-indulgence Notice also requires game operators to implement the real-name registration system for players of online games and take effective measures to restrict underage players from using paid services that are inconsistent with their capacity for civil conduct. We have implemented a real-name registration system for our online games. Game operators or developers of the online games on our platform are able to access to our real-name registration system and implement their anti-indulgence measures based on the identify information in our system. We have also cooperated with third parties in developing an anti-indulgence system pursuant to the Anti-indulgence Notice and started to implement such system for new mobile games that we offered in collaboration with third parties since April 2020. In February 2021, Shenzhen Press and Publication Bureau issued the Notice on Interface Docking of Anti-indulgence and Real Name Registration System to Prevent Minors from Indulging in Online Games, which requires all the online game enterprises in Guangdong Province to file the application before April 30, 2021, and all such games to connect with the national anti-indulgence and real-name registration system established by Publication Bureau of the Publicity Department of the CPC Central Committee before June 1, 2021. Although we have been preparing the requisite application and working on connecting our online games to the national anti-indulgence and real-time registration system, we cannot assure you that we will meet the relevant requirements in time. If any third-party online game operators, developers or we fail to comply with the above requirements, we may have joint or several liabilities and thus be subject to administrative penalties. Penalties under the Anti-indulgence Notice include fines and other penalties such as taking corrective actions during specified periods, shutting down of our online games operations and license revocation due to the fact that we did not implement those restrictions pursuant to the Anti-indulgence Notice. If any of the above were to happen, our online game business and results of operations would be negatively affected.

We operate in a competitive market and may not be able to compete effectively.

We face significant competition in different areas of our business. Some of our existing or potential competitors have a longer operating history and significantly greater financial resources than we do, and in turn may be able to attract and retain more users and advertisers. Our competitors may compete with us in a variety of ways, including by conducting brand promotions and other marketing activities and making acquisitions. For example, in the cloud computing sector, we face existing intensive competition from leading Chinese internet companies such as Alibaba and Tencent. They generally have a stronger competitive position and have more resources and technological capability to compete in this sector. We cannot guarantee you that we will certainly be able to compete effectively with them and continuously increase our market share or maintain our existing market share. In the cloud acceleration sector, although we currently have a niche market in China for cloud acceleration products and services, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to maintain our established position in the future. We may face competition from leading Chinese internet companies if they start to allocate resources and focus on the development in this business sector or from startups who may develop similar or alternative products. With more entrants into the cloud acceleration business, aggressive price cutting by competitors may result in the loss of our existing subscribers. We may have to take actions to retain our user base and attract more subscribers at significant cost, including upgrading and developing existing and new products and services in order to meet users’ changing demand, but we cannot assure you that such efforts will succeed, especially given the tightening control over internet content by the Chinese government. See “—If we fail to keep up with the technological development in the internet industry and users’ changing demand, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected” and “—Regulation and censorship of information disseminated over the internet in China have adversely affected our business and may continue to adversely affect our business, and we may be liable for the digital media content on our platform.” If we are unable to effectively compete in any aspect of our business, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be materially and adversely effected.

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Undetected programming errors or flaws or failure to maintain effective customer service could harm our reputation or decrease market acceptance of our services, particularly our resource discovery network, which would materially and adversely affect our results of operations.

Our programs may contain programming errors that may only become apparent after their release, especially in terms of upgrades to, for example, Xunlei Accelerator or cloud acceleration subscription services. We receive user feedback in connection with programming errors affecting their user experience from time to time, and such errors may also come to our attention during our monitoring process. However, we cannot assure you that we will be able to detect and resolve all these programming errors effectively or in a timely manner. Undetected programming errors or defects may adversely affect user experience and cause our users to stop using our services and our advertisers to reduce their use of our services, any of which could materially and adversely affect our business and results of operations.

Advertisements displayed on our platform may subject us to penalties and other administrative actions.

Under PRC advertising laws and regulations, advertisement channels such as us are obligated to monitor the advertising content they display to ensure that such content is true, accurate and in full compliance with applicable laws and regulations. PRC advertising laws and regulations set forth certain content requirements for advertisements in the PRC including, among other things, prohibitions on false or misleading content, superlative wording, socially destabilizing content or content involving obscenities, superstition, violence, discrimination or infringement of the public interest. In April 2015 and October 2018, the SCNPC subsequently issued the amended Advertisement Law, which took effect on September 1, 2015 and October 26, 2018, to further strengthen the supervision and management of advertisement services. Pursuant to the Advertisement Law, any advertisement that contains false or misleading information to deceive or mislead consumers shall be deemed false advertising. Furthermore, the Advertisement Law explicitly stipulates detailed requirements for the content of several different kinds of advertisement, including advertisements for medical treatment, pharmaceuticals, medical instruments, health food, alcoholic drinks, education or training, products or services having an expected return on investment, real estate, pesticides, feed and feed additives, and some other agriculture-related advertisement. On July 4, 2016, SAIC issued the Interim Measures for the Administration of Internet Advertising to specifically regulate internet advertising activities. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—B. Business Overview—Regulation—Regulation on advertising business” for details. In providing advertising services, we are required to review the supporting documents provided to us by advertising agencies or advertisers for the relevant advertisements and verify that the content of the advertisements complies with applicable PRC laws and regulations. Prior to distributing advertisements that are subject to government censorship and approval, we are obligated to verify that such censorship has been performed and approval has been obtained. Violation of these regulations may result in penalties, including fines, confiscation of advertising income, orders to eliminate the effect of illegal advertisement and cessation of publishing the advertisement. In circumstances involving serious violations, the State Administration for Industry and Commerce, or the SAIC, or its local branches may revoke violators’ licenses or permits for their advertising business operations.

To fulfill these monitoring functions specified by the PRC laws and regulations set forth above, we have taken several measures. In almost all of our advertising agreements, we require the advertising agencies or advertisers that entered into agreements with us: (i) ensure the advertising content provided to us is true, accurate and in full compliance with PRC laws and regulations; (ii) ensure such content does not infringe any third-party’s rights and interests; and (iii) indemnify us for any liabilities arising from such advertising content. We have outsourced our advertising business to Itui in 2020 and required Itui to set up an effective review mechanism for each advertisement it placed on our websites and platform so as to ensure the contents are in full compliance with relevant legal requirements. However, we cannot assure you that all the contents contained in such advertisements are true and accurate as required by the advertising laws and regulations, especially given the uncertainty in the application of these laws and regulations. If we are found to be in violation of applicable PRC advertising laws and regulations in the future, we may be subject to penalties and our reputation may be harmed, which may have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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We face risks relating to third parties’ billing and payment systems.

The billing and payment systems of third parties such as online third-party payment processors help us maintain accurate records of payments of sales proceeds by certain subscribers and other paying users and collect such payments. Our business and results of operations could be adversely affected if these third parties fail to accurately account for or calculate the revenues generated from the sales of our products and services. Moreover, if there are security breaches or failure or errors in the payment process of these third parties, user experience may be affected and our business results may be negatively impacted.

The channels for the payment of our services and products typically comprise third-party online system, fixed phone line and mobile phone payment. A significant portion of the payments have been made through our online payment system since 2014. Although we have been able to control our payment handling charges by encouraging our subscribers to use the third-party online system which charges relatively lower levels of handling fees compared with other payment channels, the subscribers may change their habits to make payments through mobile phones or other distribution channels with higher costs. If more and more subscribers use the mobile phone as their payment channels and the cost remains unchanged or even increases in the future, or if we fail to minimize the associated payment handling charges, our results of operations may be adversely affected.

We also do not have control over the security measures of our third-party payment service providers, and security breaches of the online payment systems that we use could expose us to litigation and possible liability for failing to secure confidential customer information and could, among other things, damage our reputation and the perceived security of all of the online payment systems we use. In addition, there may be billing software errors that would damage customer confidence in these payment systems. If any of the above were to occur, we may lose paying users and users may be discouraged from purchasing our products, which may have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

We have granted, and may continue to grant, share awards under our share incentive plans, which may result in increased share-based compensation expenses.

We have granted share-based compensation awards, including share options and restricted shares, to various employees, key personnel and other non-employees to incentivize performance and align their interests with ours. In June 2020, we terminated our 2010 share incentive plan, 2013 share incentive plan and 2014 share incentive plan and adopted a 2020 share incentive plan, or the 2020 Plan. Upon the termination of our then-existing share incentive plans, the awards that are granted and outstanding under those share incentive plans and the evidencing original award agreements shall remain effective and binding under the 2020 Plan, subject to any amendment and modification to the original award agreements that we shall determine. Under the 2020 Plan, we are authorized to issue a maximum number of 31,000,000 common shares of our company upon exercise of the options or other types of awards. As of March 31, 2021, 10,862,500 restricted share units had been granted and outstanding under the 2020 Plan. As of March 31, there were also 1,036,000 unvested restricted shares that survived the termination of our previous share incentive plans and remained outstanding under the 2020 Plan. As of March 31, 2021, our unrecognized share-based compensation expenses relating to the awards outstanding under the 2020 Plan amounted to US$1.4 million. See “Item 6. Directors, Senior Management and Employees—B. Compensation—Share incentive plans” for details.

We will issue the equivalent number of common shares upon the vesting and exercise of these options. The amount of these expenses is based on the fair value of the share-based compensation award we granted. The expenses associated with share-based compensation have affected our net income and may reduce our net income in the future, and any additional securities issued under share-based compensation schemes will dilute the ownership interests of our shareholders, including holders of our ADSs. We believe the granting of incentive awards is of significant importance to our ability to attract and retain key personnel and employees, and we will continue to grant stock options, restricted shares and other share awards to employees in the future. As a result, our expenses associated with share-based compensation may increase, which may have an adverse effect on our results of operations.

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The continuing and collaborative efforts of our senior management and key employees are crucial to our success, and our business may be harmed if we were to lose their services.

Our success depends on the continual efforts and services of our senior management team. If one or more of our executives or other key personnel are unable or unwilling to continue to provide services to us for whatever reasons, we may not be able to find suitable replacements easily or at all. Competition for management and key personnel in our industry is intense and the pool of qualified candidates is limited. We may not be able to retain the services of our executives or key personnel or attract and retain experienced executives or key personnel in the future. If any of our executive officers or key employees joins a competitor or forms a competing company, we may lose advertisers, know-how and key professionals and staff members. Each of our executive officers has entered into an employment agreement (including a non-compete provision) with us. However, if any dispute arises between us and our executives or key employees, these agreements may not be enforceable in China, where these executives and key employees reside, in light of uncertainties with China’s legal system.

In addition, while we often grant additional incentive shares to management personnel and other key employees after their hire dates, the initial grants are usually much larger than subsequent grants. Employees may be more likely to leave us after their initial incentive share grant fully vests, especially if the value of the incentive shares has significantly appreciated in value relative to the exercise price. If any member of our senior management team or other key personnel leaves our company, our ability to successfully operate our business and execute our business strategy could be impaired.

Any misconduct of our employees may negatively affect our reputation and corporate image, which in turn may adversely affect our business and prospects.

We believe that maintaining and enhancing our reputation and corporate image is of significant importance to the success of our business. If any of our employees engaged in any misconduct, whether or not related to the employee's work at our company, it may negatively affect our reputation and corporate image. Historically, there has been negative publicity about our company and our management, which adversely affected our brand, public image and reputation. A member of our senior management team who is also our director was subject to certain legal sanctions in China in the past due to copyright infringement activities when working at another company unrelated to us. Even though the infringement activities took place a number of years before the executive joined our company and had nothing to do with us, the past misconduct of the executive and the sanctions he was subject to may negatively affect our reputation and corporate image, which in turn may adversely affect our business and prospects. As part of our internal compliance procedures, we routinely conduct internal audits and inspections, including exit interviews and audits, on current and former employees. Any misconduct by our current or former employees uncovered from such compliance procedures, whether the misconduct relates to the employees' work with us, would potentially have material adverse impact on our reputation, results of operations, financial performance or future prospects. For example, in October 2020, we received a notification from Shenzhen Municipal Public Security Bureau that the bureau has filed a case for investigation of our former CEO, Mr. Lei Chen, for alleged embezzlement of the Company's assets, which, although did not result in material adverse impact on our financial reporting, caused harm to our company. In addition, we may also face disputes with former or current disgruntled employees. Any allegations against us, with or without merits, may negatively affect our reputation and corporate image.

Strategic alliances, investments or acquisitions may have a material and adverse effect on our business, reputation, results of operations and financial condition.

We may enter into strategic alliances with various third parties to further our business purposes from time to time. Strategic alliances with third parties could subject us to a number of risks, including risks associated with sharing proprietary information, non-performance by the counterparty, and an increase in expenses incurred in establishing new strategic alliances, any of which may materially and adversely affect our business. We may have little ability to control or monitor their actions. To the extent the third parties suffer negative publicity or harm to their reputations from events relating to their business, we may also suffer negative publicity or harm to our reputation by virtue of our association with such third parties.

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We have in the past invested in or acquired additional assets, technologies or businesses that are complementary to our existing business. If we are presented with appropriate opportunities, we may continue to do so in the future. Investments or acquisitions and the subsequent integration of new assets and businesses into our own would require significant attention from our management and could result in a diversion of resources from our existing business, which in turn could have an adverse effect on our business operations. The costs of identifying and consummating investments and acquisitions may be significant. We may also incur significant expenses in obtaining necessary approvals from relevant government authorities in China and elsewhere in the world. In addition, investments and acquisitions could result in the use of substantial amounts of cash, potentially dilutive issuances of equity securities and exposure to potential unknown liabilities or legal risks of the acquired business. The cost and duration of integrating newly acquired businesses could also materially exceed our expectations. Even if we complete the desired acquisitions or investment, such acquisitions and investment may expose us to new operational, regulatory, market and geographic risks and challenges, including:

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our inability to maintain the key business relationships and the reputation of the businesses we acquire or invest in;

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our inability to retain key personnel of the acquired or invested company;

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uncertainty of entry into markets in which we have limited or no prior experience and in which competitors have stronger market positions;

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failure to comply with laws and regulations as well as industry or technical standards of the markets into which we expand;

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our dependence on unfamiliar affiliates and partners of the companies we acquire or invest in;

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unsatisfactory performance of the businesses we acquire or invest in;

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our responsibility for the liabilities associated with the businesses we acquire, including those that we may not anticipate;

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goodwill impairment risks associated with the businesses that we acquire;

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our inability to integrate acquired technology into our business and operations;

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our inability to develop and maintain a successful business model and to monetize and generate revenues from the businesses we acquire; and

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our inability to maintain internal standards, controls, procedures and policies.

Any of these events could disrupt our ability to manage our business. These risks could also result in our failure to derive the intended benefits of the acquisitions or investments, and we may be unable to recover our investment in such initiatives or may have to recognize impairment charges as a result.

Furthermore, the financing and payment arrangements we use in any acquisition could have a negative impact on you as an investor, because if we issue shares in connection with an acquisition, your holdings could be diluted. Moreover, if we take on significant debt to finance such acquisitions, we would incur additional interest expenses, which would divert resources from our working capital and potentially have a material adverse impact on our results of operations.

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Our business, financial condition and results of operations, as well as our ability to obtain financing, may be adversely affected by the downturn in the global or Chinese economy.

The industries in which we operate, including the mobile internet industry, may be affected by economic downturns. For example, a prolonged slowdown in the world economy, including in the Chinese economy, may lead to a reduced amount of mobile internet advertising, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, certain of our products and services may be viewed as discretionary by our users, who may choose to discontinue or reduce spending on such products and services during an economic downturn. In such an event, our ability to retain existing users and increase new users will be adversely affected, which would in turn negatively impact our business and results of operations.

Moreover, a slowdown or disruption in the global or Chinese economy may have a material and adverse impact on financings available to us. In addition, COVID-19 had a severe and negative impact on the Chinese and the global economy. Whether this will lead to a prolonged downturn in the economy is still unknown. Even before the outbreak of COVID-19, the global macroeconomic environment was facing numerous challenges. The growth rate of the Chinese economy had already been slowing since 2010. There is considerable uncertainty over the long-term effects of the expansionary monetary and fiscal policies which had been adopted by the central banks and financial authorities of some of the world’s leading economies, including the United States and China, even before 2020. The weakness in the economy could erode investor confidence, which constitutes the basis of the credit market. Unrest, terrorist threats and the potential for war in the Middle East and elsewhere may increase market volatility across the globe. There have also been concerns about the relationship between China and other countries, including the surrounding Asian countries, which may potentially have economic effects. In particular, there is significant uncertainty about the future relationship between the United States and China with respect to trade policies, treaties, government regulations and tariffs. Economic conditions in China are sensitive to global economic conditions, as well as changes in domestic economic and political policies and the expected or perceived overall economic growth rate in China. The unstable economy affecting the financial markets and banking system may significantly restrict our ability to obtain financing in the capital markets or from financial institutions on commercially reasonable terms, or at all. Although we are uncertain about the extent to which the global financial and economic fluctuations and slowdown of Chinese economy may impact our business in the short-term and long-term, there is a risk that our business, results of operations, financial condition, and prospects would be materially and adversely affected by any severe or prolonged slowdown in the global or Chinese economy.

Our operations depend on the performance of the internet infrastructure in China.

The successful operation of our business depends on the performance of the internet infrastructure and telecommunications networks in China. In China, almost all access to the internet is maintained through state-owned telecommunications operators under the administrative control and regulatory supervision of the MIIT. Moreover, we have entered into contracts with various subsidiaries of a limited number of telecommunications service providers in each province for network-related services. On the one hand, if the internet industry in China does not grow as quickly as expected, our business and operations will be negatively affected. We have limited access to alternative networks or services in the event of disruptions, failures or other problems with China’s internet infrastructure or the telecommunications networks provided by telecommunications service providers. In addition, our network and website regularly serve a large number of users and advertisers. With the expansion of our business, we may be required to upgrade our technology and infrastructure to keep up with the increasing traffic on our website. However, we have no control over the costs of the services provided by telecommunications service providers. If the prices we pay for telecommunications and internet services rise significantly, our results of operations may be materially and adversely affected. If internet access fees or other charges to internet users increase, our user traffic may decline and our business may be harmed. On the other hand, if the internet industry grows faster than expected and we cannot react to the market demand in a timely manner in terms of our research and development effort, the user experience and the attractiveness of our services may be harmed, which will negatively impact our business and results of operations.

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If we fail to maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting, we may be unable to accurately report our financial results or prevent fraud or fail to meet our reporting obligations, and investor confidence in our company and the market price of our ADSs may be adversely affected.

We are subject to reporting obligations under the U.S. securities laws. The SEC, as required under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, adopted rules requiring every public company to include a management report on such company’s internal control over financial reporting in its annual report, which contains management’s assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. As we are not an emerging growth company anymore, we are subject to the requirement to provide attestation by our independent registered public accounting firm on effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting.

Our management, with the participation of our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, has performed an evaluation of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) under the Exchange Act) as of the end of the period covered by this annual report, as required by Rule 13a-15(b) under the Exchange Act. Our management has concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of December 31, 2020. Our independent registered public accounting firm, PricewaterhouseCoopers Zhong Tian LLP, also attested that our internal control over financial reporting is effective. However, if we fail to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting in the future, we could suffer material misstatements in our financial statements and fail to meet our reporting obligations, which would likely cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information. This could in turn limit our access to capital markets, harm our results of operations, and lead to a decline in the trading price of our ADSs. Additionally, ineffective internal control over financial reporting could expose us to increased risk of fraud or misuse of corporate assets and subject us to potential delisting from the stock exchange on which we list, regulatory investigations and civil or criminal sanctions. We may also be required to restate our financial statements from prior periods.

We have limited business insurance coverage and any uninsured business disruption may have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

Insurance companies in China currently do not offer as extensive an array of insurance products as insurance companies do in more developed economies. We have limited business liability or disruption insurance to cover our operations. Any uninsured occurrence of business disruption may result in our incurring substantial costs and the diversion of resources, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

We face risks related to natural disasters such as earthquakes and health epidemics and other outbreaks, which could significantly disrupt our operations.

Our operations may be vulnerable to interruption and damage from natural and other types of catastrophes, including earthquakes, fire, floods, hail, windstorms, severe winter weather (including snow, freezing water, ice storms and blizzards), environmental accidents, power loss, communications failures, explosions, man-made events such as terrorist attacks and similar events. Due to their nature, we cannot predict the incidence, timing and severity of catastrophes. If any such catastrophe or extraordinary event occurs in the future, our ability to operate our business could be seriously impaired. Such events could make it difficult or impossible for us to deliver our services and products to our users and could decrease demand for our products. As we do not carry property insurance and significant time could be required to resume our operations, our financial position and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected in the event of any major catastrophic event.

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In addition, our business could be materially and adversely affected by the outbreak of pandemics such as influenza A (H1N1), avian influenza, H7N9, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or other epidemics. Any occurrence of these pandemic diseases or other adverse public health developments in China or elsewhere could severely disrupt our staffing or the staffing of our business partners, including our advertisers, and otherwise reduce the activity levels of our work force and the work force of our business partners, causing a material and adverse effect on our business operations. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we made remote working arrangement and suspended our offline work and all our business travels in early 2020 to ensure the safety and health of our employees. As a result, our customer service capacity was compromised which might have adversely affected our users’ experience. As of the end of April 2020, we had completely resumed our operations. Although COVID-19 has been largely contained in China, there are still uncertainties regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, including the duration of the pandemic, and the extent of local and worldwide social, political, and economic disruption it may cause. It is also uncertain whether or not COVID-19 or a mutated version of the coronavirus will return in the future. While the COVID-19 pandemic has not materially and adversely affected our business, operations, or financial results as of the date of this annual report, it may have far-reaching impact, directly and indirectly, on many aspects of our operations, including potential impact on our customers, product users, suppliers, employees, cooperation partners, and the market in general, and the scope and nature of the impact continue to evolve. Resurgence of confirmed cases have happened and could happened again in the future, which could lead to the re-imposition of various restrictions. We will continue to monitor and assess the development of the COVID-19 pandemic and intend to make adjustments to our business accordingly.

Risks Related to Our Corporate Structure

If the PRC government finds that the agreements that establish the structure for operating our businesses in China do not comply with PRC governmental restrictions on foreign investment in internet-related business and foreign investors’ mergers and acquisition activities in China, or if these regulations or the interpretation of existing regulations change in the future, we could be subject to severe penalties or be forced to relinquish our interests in those operations.

Current PRC laws and regulations place certain restrictions on foreign ownership of companies that engage in internet businesses, including the provision of online game and online advertising services. For example, foreign investors’ equity interests in value-added telecommunication service providers, other than e-commerce service providers, may not exceed 50%, and the Provisions on the Administration of Foreign-Invested Telecommunications Enterprises (2016 Revision) requires that the major foreign investor in a value-added telecommunication service provider in China must have experience in providing value-added telecommunications services overseas and maintain a good track record. In addition, foreign investors are prohibited from investing in or operating entities engaged in, among others, internet cultural operating service, internet news service, and online transmission of audio-visual programs service. We are a Cayman Islands exempted company and Giganology (Shenzhen) Ltd., or Giganology Shenzhen and Xunlei Computer (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd., or Xunlei Computer, our PRC subsidiaries, are considered foreign-invested enterprises. Accordingly, neither of these two PRC subsidiaries is eligible to provide value-added telecommunication services and the aforementioned internet related services in China. As a result, we conduct our operations in China principally through contractual arrangements among Giganology Shenzhen and Shenzhen Xunlei and its shareholders. Shenzhen Xunlei or its subsidiaries hold the licenses and permits necessary to conduct our resource discovery network, online advertising, online games, cloud computing and related businesses in China, and Shenzhen Xunlei hold various operating subsidiaries that conduct a majority of our operations in China. Our contractual arrangements with Shenzhen Xunlei and its shareholders enable us to exercise effective control over Shenzhen Xunlei and Shenzhen Xunlei’s operating subsidiaries and hence treat them as our consolidated entities and consolidate their results. For a detailed discussion of these contractual arrangements, see “Item 4. Information on the Company—C. Organizational Structure.”

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We cannot assure you, however, that we will be able to enforce these contracts. Although we have been advised by King & Wood Mallesons, our PRC legal counsel, that each contract under these contractual arrangements with Shenzhen Xunlei and its shareholders is valid, binding and enforceable under current PRC laws and regulations, we cannot assure you that the PRC government would agree that these contractual arrangements comply with PRC licensing, registration or other regulatory requirements, with existing policies or with requirements or policies that may be adopted in the future. PRC laws and regulations governing the validity of these contractual arrangements are uncertain and the relevant government authorities have broad discretion in interpreting these laws and regulations. If the PRC government determines that we do not comply with applicable laws and regulations, it could revoke our business and operating licenses, require us to discontinue or restrict our operations, impose fines, restrict our right to collect revenues, block our website, require us to restructure our operations, impose additional conditions or requirements with which we may not be able to comply, or take other regulatory or enforcement actions against us that could be harmful to our business. The imposition of any of these penalties would result in a material and adverse effect on our ability to conduct our business.

We rely on contractual arrangements with our variable interest entity in China and its shareholders for our operations, which may not be as effective as direct ownership in providing operational control the variable interest entity and its subsidiaries.

Since PRC laws restrict foreign equity ownership in companies engaged in internet business in China, we rely on contractual arrangements with Shenzhen Xunlei, our VIE, and the shareholders of Shenzhen Xunlei to operate our business in China. If we had direct ownership of Shenzhen Xunlei, we would be able to exercise our rights as a shareholder to effect changes in the board of directors of Shenzhen Xunlei, which in turn could effect changes at the management level, subject to any applicable fiduciary obligations. However, under the current contractual arrangements, we rely on Shenzhen Xunlei and its shareholders’ performance of their contractual obligations to exercise effective control. In addition, our operating contract with Shenzhen Xunlei has an initial term of ten years and an extended term of ten years since 2016. The operating contract is subject to Giganology Shenzhen’s unilateral termination right and may be extended as requested by Giganology Shenzhen. In general, none of Shenzhen Xunlei or its shareholders may terminate the contracts prior to the expiration date. However, the shareholders of Shenzhen Xunlei may not act in the best interests of our company or may not perform their obligations under these contracts, including the obligation to renew these contracts when their initial contract term expires. Such risks exist throughout the period in which we intend to operate our business through the contractual arrangements with Shenzhen Xunlei. We may replace the shareholders of Shenzhen Xunlei at any time pursuant to our contractual arrangements with Shenzhen Xunlei and its shareholders. However, if any dispute relating to these contracts remains unresolved, we will have to enforce our rights under these contracts through the operations of PRC law and courts and therefore will be subject to uncertainties in the PRC legal system. See “—Any failure by Shenzhen Xunlei or its shareholders to perform their obligations under our contractual arrangements with them may have a material adverse effect on our business” and “Item 4. Information on the Company—C. Organizational Structure.” Therefore, these contractual arrangements may not be as effective as direct ownership in providing us with control over Shenzhen Xunlei.

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Any failure by Shenzhen Xunlei or its shareholders to perform their obligations under our contractual arrangements with them may have a material adverse effect on our business.

Shenzhen Xunlei or its shareholders may fail to take certain actions required for our business or follow our instructions despite their contractual obligations to do so. If they fail to perform their obligations under their respective agreements with us, we may have to rely on legal remedies under PRC law, including seeking specific performance or injunctive relief, which may not be effective. As of the date of this annual report, Mr. Sean Shenglong Zou, our co-founder and director, owned 76% of the equity interest in Shenzhen Xunlei, our variable interest entity. Under the equity pledge agreement among Giganology Shenzhen and the shareholders of Shenzhen Xunlei, as amended, the shareholders of Shenzhen Xunlei have pledged all of their equity interests in Shenzhen Xunlei to Giganology Shenzhen to guarantee Shenzhen Xunlei and its shareholders’ performance of their respective obligations under the related contractual arrangements. In addition, the shareholders of Shenzhen Xunlei have completed the registration of equity pledge under the equity pledge agreement with the competent governmental authority. Pursuant to the contractual arrangements, we have the right to replace any shareholders of Shenzhen Xunlei at any time. For example, if any of the shareholders of Shenzhen Xunlei refuses or fails to perform his or her obligations under the contractual arrangements due to his or her significant equity interest in Shenzhen Xunlei and his or her relatively smaller percentage of equity interest in our Company, we can enforce the contractual arrangements and transfer his or her equity interests to another appointee of Giganology Shenzhen. However, we cannot assure you that such transfer can be implemented successfully or without significant costs. As a result, there are risks that we might not be able to have an effective control over our variable interest entity in the future.

Moreover, the exercise of call options under the equity interest disposal agreement, the intellectual properties purchase option agreement and certain other contractual arrangements will be subject to the review and approval of competent governmental authorities and incur additional expenses.

All of these contractual arrangements are governed by PRC law and provide for the resolution of disputes through arbitration in the PRC. Accordingly, these contracts would be interpreted in accordance with PRC law and any disputes would be resolved in accordance with PRC legal procedures. The legal environment in the PRC is not as developed as in certain other jurisdictions, such as the United States. As a result, uncertainties in the PRC legal system could limit our ability to enforce these contractual arrangements, which may make it difficult to exert effective control over our variable interest entity and its subsidiaries, and our ability to conduct our business may be adversely affected.

Contractual arrangements with our variable interest entity may result in adverse tax consequences to us.

Under applicable PRC tax laws and regulations, arrangements and transactions among related parties may be subject to audit or scrutiny by the PRC tax authorities within ten years after the taxable year when the arrangements or transactions are conducted. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—B. Business Overview—Regulation—Regulation on tax—PRC enterprise income tax.” We could face material and adverse tax consequences if the PRC tax authorities were to determine that the contractual arrangements among Giganology Shenzhen, our wholly owned subsidiary in China, and Shenzhen Xunlei, our variable interest entity in China and its shareholders, as well as the intellectual property framework agreement between Xunlei Computer and Shenzhen Xunlei were not entered into on an arm’s-length basis and therefore constituted unfavorable transfer pricing arrangements. Unfavorable transfer pricing arrangements could, among other things, result in an upward adjustment on taxation, and the PRC tax authorities may impose interest on late payments on Shenzhen Xunlei, for the adjusted but unpaid taxes. Our results of operations may be materially and adversely affected if Shenzhen Xunlei’s tax liabilities increase significantly or if it is required to pay interest on late payments.

The shareholders of Shenzhen Xunlei may have potential conflicts of interest with us, which may materially and adversely affect our business.

Sean Shenglong Zou, Hao Cheng, Fang Wang, Jianming Shi and Guangzhou Shulian Information Investment Co., Ltd. are shareholders of Shenzhen Xunlei. We provide no incentives to the shareholders of Shenzhen Xunlei for the purpose of encouraging them to act in our best interests in their capacity as the shareholders of Shenzhen Xunlei. We may replace the shareholders of Shenzhen Xunlei at any time pursuant to the currently effective equity option agreements between us and these shareholders.

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As a director and/or executive officer of our company, Mr. Zou and Mr. Cheng each has a duty of loyalty and care to us under Cayman Islands law. We are not aware that other publicly listed companies in China with a similar corporate and ownership structure as ours have brought conflicts of interest claims against the shareholders of their respective variable interest entities. However, we cannot assure you that when conflicts arise, the shareholders of Shenzhen Xunlei will act in the best interests of our company or that conflicts will be resolved in our favor. If we cannot resolve any conflicts of interest or disputes between us and the shareholders of Shenzhen Xunlei, we would have to rely on legal proceedings, which may be expensive, time-consuming and disruptive to our operations. There is also substantial uncertainty as to the outcome of any such legal proceedings.

We may rely principally on dividends and other distributions on equity paid by our PRC subsidiaries to fund any cash and financing requirements we may have. Any limitation on the ability of Giganology Shenzhen and Xunlei Computer to pay dividends to us could have a material adverse effect on our ability to conduct our business.

We are a holding company and we may rely principally on dividends and other distributions on equity paid by our wholly owned PRC subsidiaries including Giganology Shenzhen and Xunlei Computer, for our cash and financing requirements, including the funds necessary to pay dividends and other cash distributions to our shareholders and service any debt we may incur. If Giganology Shenzhen incurs debt on its own behalf in the future, the instruments governing the debt may restrict its ability to pay dividends or make other distributions to us. In addition, the PRC tax authorities may require us to adjust our taxable income under the contractual arrangements Giganology Shenzhen currently has in place with Shenzhen Xunlei, our variable interest entity, as well as the intellectual property framework agreement between Xunlei Computer and Shenzhen Xunlei, in a manner that would materially and adversely affect its ability to pay dividends and other distributions to us. As of December 31, 2020, we had cash or cash equivalents of approximately RMB312.1 million (US$47.8 million) and US$30.7 million located within the PRC, of which RMB89.6 million (US$13.7 million) and US$0.5 million is held by Shenzhen Xunlei and its subsidiaries. We also have restricted cash of RMB10.1 million (US$1.5 million) as of December 31, 2020. The transfer of all the cash or cash equivalents is subject to PRC government’s restrictions on currency conversion.

Under PRC laws and regulations, Giganology Shenzhen and Xunlei Computer, as wholly foreign-owned enterprises in the PRC, may pay dividends only out of its accumulated after-tax profits as determined in accordance with PRC accounting standards and regulations. In addition, wholly foreign-owned enterprises such as Giganology Shenzhen and Xunlei Computer are required to set aside at least 10% of their accumulated after-tax profits each year, if any, to fund certain statutory reserve funds, until the aggregate amount of such a fund reaches 50% of their respective registered capital. At their discretion, wholly foreign-owned enterprises may allocate a portion of their after-tax profits based on PRC accounting standards to staff welfare and bonus funds. These reserve funds and staff welfare and bonus funds are not distributable as cash dividends. Any limitation on the ability of Giganology Shenzhen and Xunlei Computer to pay dividends or make other distributions to us could materially and adversely limit our ability to grow, make investments or acquisitions that could be beneficial to our business, pay dividends, or otherwise fund and conduct our business. See also “—Risks related to doing business in China—Our global income may be subject to PRC taxes under the PRC EIT Law, which may have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.”

PRC regulation of loans to, and direct investment in, PRC entities by offshore holding companies and governmental control of currency conversion may restrict or prevent us from making loans to our PRC subsidiaries and variable interest entity and its subsidiaries or making additional capital contributions to our PRC subsidiaries, which may materially and adversely affect our liquidity and our ability to fund and expand our business.

We may (i) make additional capital contributions to our PRC subsidiaries, (ii) establish new PRC subsidiaries and make capital contributions to these new PRC subsidiaries, (iii) make loans to our PRC subsidiaries or variable interest entity and its subsidiaries, or (iv) acquire offshore entities with business operations in China in an offshore transaction. However, most of these uses are subject to PRC regulations and approvals. For example:

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·

loans by us to our PRC subsidiaries, which are foreign-invested enterprises, to finance their respective activities cannot exceed statutory limits and must be registered with the PRC State Administration of Foreign Exchange, or SAFE, or its local branches; and

·

loans by us to our variable interest entity, which is a domestic PRC entity, may not exceed the statutory limit, and any medium or long-term loan we extend to our variable interest entity must be recorded and registered by the National Development and Reform Commission and SAFE or its local branches.

On August 29, 2008, SAFE promulgated the Circular on the Relevant Operating Issues Concerning the Improvement of the Administration of the Payment and Settlement of Foreign Currency Capital of Foreign Invested Enterprises, or SAFE Circular No. 142, regulating the conversion by a foreign-invested enterprise of foreign currency registered capital into Renminbi by restricting how the converted Renminbi may be used. SAFE Circular No. 142 provides that the Renminbi capital converted from foreign currency registered capital of a foreign-invested enterprise may only be used for purposes within the business scope approved by the applicable governmental authority and unless otherwise provided by law, such Renminbi capital may not be used for equity investments within the PRC. SAFE also strengthened its oversight of the flow and use of the Renminbi capital converted from foreign currency registered capital of a foreign-invested company. The use of such Renminbi capital may not be altered without SAFE approval, and such Renminbi capital may not in any case be used to repay Renminbi loans if the proceeds of such loans have not been used. Violations of SAFE Circular No. 142 could result in severe monetary or other penalties. On March 30, 2015, SAFE issued SAFE Circular No. 19, which took effect and replaced SAFE Circular No. 142 as of June 1, 2015 and the Notice of the State Administration of Foreign Exchange on Reforming and Standardizing the Policy on the Management of Foreign Exchange Settlement under Capital Account, or SAFE Circular No. 16, which became effective on June 9, 2016. Although SAFE Circular No. 19 and SAFE Circular No. 16 allow for the use of RMB converted from the foreign currency denominated capital for equity investments in the PRC, the restrictions will continue to apply as to foreign-invested enterprises’ use of the converted RMB for purposes beyond the business scope, for the loans to non-associated companies or issuing inter-company RMB loans.

We may lose the ability to use and enjoy assets held by our variable interest entity and its subsidiaries that are important to the operation of our business if any of such entities goes bankrupt or becomes subject to a dissolution or liquidation proceeding.

As part of our contractual arrangements with our variable interest entity, our variable interest entity and its subsidiaries hold certain assets that are important to the operation of our business, including patents for the proprietary technology and related domain names and trademarks. If any of our variable interest entity or its subsidiaries goes bankrupt and all or part of its assets become subject to liens or rights of third-party creditors, we may be unable to continue some or all of our business activities, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Under the contractual arrangements, our variable interest entity and its subsidiaries may not, in any manner, sell, transfer, mortgage or dispose of their assets or legal or beneficial interests in the business without our prior consent. If our variable interest entity undergoes a voluntary or involuntary liquidation proceeding, the unrelated third-party creditors may claim rights to some or all of these assets, thereby hindering our ability to operate our business, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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Uncertainties exist with respect to the interpretation and implementation of the newly enacted PRC Foreign Investment Law and how it may impact the viability of our current corporate structure, corporate governance and business operations.

On March 15, 2019, the National People’s Congress enacted the Foreign Investment Law, which came into effect on January 1, 2020 and replace the trio of existing laws regulating foreign investment in China, namely, the Sino-foreign Equity Joint Venture Enterprise Law, the Sino-foreign Cooperative Joint Venture Enterprise Law and the Wholly Foreign-invested Enterprise Law, together with their implementation rules and ancillary regulations. The Foreign Investment Law embodies an expected PRC regulatory trend to rationalize its foreign investment regulatory regime in line with prevailing international practice and the legislative efforts to unify the corporate legal requirements for both foreign and domestic investments. However, since it is relatively new, uncertainties still exist in relation to its interpretation and implementation. For instance, under the Foreign Investment Law, “foreign investment” refers to the investment activities directly or indirectly conducted by foreign individuals, enterprises or other entities in China. Though it does not explicitly classify contractual arrangements as a form of foreign investment, there is no assurance that foreign investment via contractual arrangement would not be interpreted as a type of indirect foreign investment activities under the definition in the future. In addition, the definition contains a catch-all provision which includes investments made by foreign investors through means stipulated in laws or administrative regulations or other methods prescribed by the State Council. Therefore, it still leaves leeway for future laws, administrative regulations or provisions promulgated by the State Council to provide for contractual arrangements as a form of foreign investment. In any of these cases, it will be uncertain whether our contractual arrangements will be deemed to be in violation of the market access requirements for foreign investment under the PRC laws and regulations. Furthermore, if future laws, administrative regulations or provisions prescribed by the State Council mandate further actions to be taken by companies with respect to existing contractual arrangements, we may face substantial uncertainties as to whether we can complete such actions in a timely manner, or at all. Failure to take timely and appropriate measures to cope with any of these or similar regulatory compliance challenges could materially and adversely affect our current corporate structure, corporate governance and business operations.

Risks Related to Doing Business in China

Changes in China’s economic, political or social conditions or government policies could have a material adverse effect on our business and operations.

Substantially all of our assets and operations are located in China. Accordingly, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may be influenced to a significant degree by political, economic and social conditions in China generally and by continued economic growth in China as a whole.

The Chinese economy differs from the economies of most developed countries in many respects, including the level of government involvement, level of development, growth rate, control of foreign exchange and allocation of resources. Although the Chinese government has implemented measures emphasizing the utilization of market forces for economic reform, the reduction of state ownership of productive assets, and the establishment of improved corporate governance in business enterprises, a substantial portion of productive assets in China is still owned by the government. In addition, the Chinese government continues to play a significant role in regulating industry development by imposing industrial policies. The Chinese government also exercises significant control over China’s economic growth through allocating resources, controlling payment of foreign currency-denominated obligations, setting monetary policy, and providing preferential treatment to particular industries or companies, such as those qualified to operate in free trade zones designated in certain major cities in China.

While the Chinese economy has experienced significant growth over the past decades, growth has been uneven, both geographically and among various sectors of the economy and the rate of growth has been slowing. The Chinese government has implemented various measures to encourage economic growth and guide the allocation of resources. Some of these measures may benefit the overall Chinese economy, but may have a negative effect on us. For example, our financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected by government control over capital investments or changes in tax regulations. The growth rate of the Chinese economy has gradually slowed since 2010, and the impact of COVID-19 on the Chinese economy in 2020 is severe. Any prolonged slowdown in the Chinese economy may reduce the demand for our products and services and materially and adversely affect our business and results of operations.

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Regulation and censorship of information disseminated over the internet in China have adversely affected our business and may continue to adversely affect our business, and we may be liable for the digital media content on our platform.

China has strict regulations governing telecommunication service providers, internet and wireless access and the distribution of news and other information. Under these regulations, internet content providers, or ICPs, like us are prohibited from posting or displaying over the internet or wireless networks content that, among other things, violates PRC laws and regulations. If an ICP finds that prohibited content is transmitted on its website or stored in its system, it must terminate the transmission of such information or delete such information immediately and keep records and report to relevant authorities. Failure to comply with these requirements could lead to the revocation of the VATS License, which is required for our ICP services and other required licenses and the closure of the offending websites, and cloud network operators or website operators may also be held liable for prohibited content displayed on, retrieved from or linked to such network or website. We monitor digital media contents on our platform and periodically review and inspect whether there are contents that violate relevant PRC laws and regulations. However, we cannot assure you that we will always be able to identify and remove in a timely manner all digital media contents on our platform that violate relevant PRC laws and regulations. If we fail to timely remove relevant contents, we may be subject to relevant legal liabilities. In addition, efforts to constantly self-monitor in order to comply with these requirements could negatively impact user experience and lead to a decline in user numbers.

The Chinese government intensified its efforts to remove inappropriate content disseminated over the internet and wireless networks, and our efforts to monitor content on our platform and website led to a decline in subscriber numbers in the past few years. In April 2014, the Chinese government initiated a campaign to enhance and enforce its scrutiny on internet content in China, particularly for pornographic content, and various websites were subject to penalties and in some cases outright suspension of website operations. In December 2018, the Office of the Central Cyberspace Affairs Commission of China, or CAC, launched a campaign against illegal activities and inappropriate content on mobile apps and undertook restrictive measures against thousands of mobile apps, including suspension of mobile app operations for an indefinite period of time or permanently shutting down the mobile app operations. We regularly conducted internal compliance investigation to ensure that the content transmitted by our products is in compliance with the standards set out by the authorities. To date, we have deleted millions of cached files, blocked over one million digital files and added thousands of key words to our automatic keyword filtration system. In addition, we permitted temporary suspension of services by about 175,000 existing subscribers as of the end of 2020. We may experience further decline in user and subscriber numbers as we continue in our efforts to comply with the rules and regulations of the Chinese government.

We are subject to changing law and regulations regarding regulatory matters, corporate governance and public disclosure that have increased both our costs and the risk of non-compliance.

We are subject to rules and regulations by various governing bodies, including, for example, the Securities and Exchange Commission, which is charged with the protection of investors and the oversight of companies whose securities are publicly traded, and the various regulatory authorities in China and the Cayman Islands, and to new and evolving regulatory measures under applicable law. Our efforts to comply with new and changing laws and regulations have resulted in and are likely to continue to result in, increased general and administrative expenses and a diversion of management time and attention from revenue-generating activities to compliance activities.

Moreover, because these laws, regulations and standards are subject to varying interpretations, their application in practice may evolve over time as new guidance becomes available. This evolution may result in continuing uncertainty regarding compliance matters and additional costs necessitated by ongoing revisions to our disclosure and governance practices. If we fail to address and comply with these regulations and any subsequent changes, we may be subject to penalty and our business may be harmed.

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Uncertainties with respect to the PRC legal system could adversely affect us.

We conduct our business primarily through our PRC subsidiaries and variable interest entity and its subsidiaries in China. Our operations in China are governed by PRC laws and regulations. Giganology Shenzhen is a foreign-invested enterprise and is subject to laws and regulations applicable to foreign investment in China and, in particular, laws applicable to foreign-invested enterprises. The PRC legal system is a civil law system based on written statutes. Unlike the common law system, prior court decisions under the civil law system may be cited for reference but have limited precedential value.

Over the past three decades, the PRC government has enacted legislation that has significantly enhanced the protections afforded to various forms of foreign investments in China. However, China has not developed a fully integrated legal system, and recently enacted laws and regulations may not sufficiently cover all aspects of economic activities in China. In particular, the interpretation and enforcement of these laws and regulations involve uncertainties. Since PRC administrative and court authorities have significant discretion in interpreting and implementing statutory and contractual terms, it may be difficult to evaluate the outcome of administrative and court proceedings and the level of legal protection we enjoy. These uncertainties may affect our judgment on the relevance of legal requirements and our ability to enforce our contractual or tort rights. In addition, the regulatory uncertainties may be exploited through unmerited or frivolous legal actions or threats in attempts to extract payments or benefits from us.

Furthermore, the PRC legal system is based in part on government policies and internal rules, some of which are not published on a timely basis or at all and may have retroactive effect. Regulatory authorities may also stretch the interpretations of existing laws and regulations. As a result, we may not be aware of our violation of any of these policies and rules until sometime after the violation or the stretched interpretation, which may subject us to liabilities and can materially and adversely affect our business. In addition, any administrative and court proceedings in China may be protracted, resulting in substantial costs and diversion of resources and management attention.

We believe that our patents, trademarks, trade secrets, copyrights, and other intellectual property are important to our business. We rely on a combination of patent, trademark, copyright and trade secret protection laws in China and other jurisdictions, as well as confidentiality procedures and contractual provisions to protect our intellectual property and our brand. Protection of intellectual property rights in China may not be as effective as in the United States or other jurisdictions, and as a result, we may not be able to adequately protect our intellectual property rights, which could adversely affect our revenues and competitive position.

We may be adversely affected by the complexity, uncertainties and changes in PRC regulations of internet-related business and companies.

The PRC government extensively regulates the internet industry, including foreign ownership of, and the licensing and permit requirements pertaining to, companies in the internet industry. These internet-related laws and regulations are relatively new and evolving, and their interpretation and enforcement involve significant uncertainty. As a result, in certain circumstances it may be difficult to determine what actions or omissions may be deemed to be in violations of applicable laws and regulations. Issues, risks and uncertainties relating to PRC regulation of the internet business include, but are not limited to, the following:

·

We only have contractual control over our resource discovery network and cloud computing. We do not own the resource discovery network and cloud computing due to the restriction of foreign investment in businesses providing value-added telecommunication services in China, including internet content provision or CDN services. This may significantly disrupt our business, subject us to sanctions, compromise enforceability of related contractual arrangements, or have other harmful effects on us.

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·

There are uncertainties relating to the regulation of the internet business in China, including evolving licensing practices and the requirement for real-name registrations. This means that permits, licenses or operations at some of our companies may be subject to challenge, or we may fail to obtain permits or licenses that may be deemed necessary for our operations or we may not be able to obtain or renew certain permits or licenses. If we fail to maintain any of these required licenses or approvals, we may be subject to various penalties, including fines and discontinuation of or restriction on our operations. Any such disruption in our business operations may have a material and adverse effect on our results of operations.

·

New laws and regulations may be promulgated that will regulate internet activities, including live streaming, online games and online advertising businesses. If these new laws and regulations are promulgated, additional licenses may be required for our operations. If our operations do not comply with these new regulations after they become effective, or if we fail to obtain any licenses required under these new laws and regulations, we could be subject to penalties.

The interpretation and application of existing PRC laws, regulations and policies and possible new laws, regulations or policies relating to the internet industry have created substantial uncertainties regarding the legality of existing and future foreign investments in, and the businesses and activities of, internet businesses in China, including our business. For example, in September 2009, GAPPRFT and the National Office of Combating Pornography and Illegal Publications jointly published a notice, or Circular 13, which expressly prohibits foreign investors from participating in online game operating business via wholly owned, equity joint venture or cooperative joint venture investments in China, and from controlling and participating in such businesses directly or indirectly through contractual or technical support arrangements. Other government agencies with substantial regulatory authority over online game operations and foreign investment entities in China, such as MIIT and MOCT, did not join GAPPRFT in issuing Circular 13. While Circular 13 is applicable to us and our online game business on an overall basis, to date, GAPPRFT or SAPPRFT has not issued any interpretation of Circular 13 and, to our knowledge, has not taken any enforcement action under Circular 13 against any company that relies on contractual arrangements with affiliated entities to operate online games in China. We cannot assure you that we have obtained all the permits or licenses required for conducting our business in China or will be able to maintain our existing licenses or obtain any new licenses required under any new laws or regulations. There are also risks that we may be found to violate the existing or future laws and regulations given the uncertainty and complexity of China’s regulation of internet business.

Subject to interpretation by the relevant authorities, it may not be possible for us to determine in all cases the type of content that could result in liability for us, especially if the Chinese government continues to maintain or strengthen its heightened scrutiny on internet content in China. We may not be able to control or restrict all of the digital media content generated. transmitted or placed on our network by our users, despite our attempt to monitor and filter such content. To the extent that regulatory authorities find any portion of our content on our network or website objectionable or requiring any license or permit that we have not obtained, they may require us to limit or eliminate the dissemination of such information or otherwise curtail the nature of such content, and keep records and report to relevant authorities, which may reduce our user traffic. In addition, we may be subject to significant penalties for violations of those regulations arising from prohibited content displayed on, retrieved from or uploaded to our network or website, including a suspension or shutdown of our operations. The enforcement activities may be intensified in connection with any ongoing government campaigns. In addition, while we maintain a regular internal monitoring and compliance protocol, we cannot ascertain that we would not fall foul of any changing or new government regulations or standards in the future. If we receive a public warning from the relevant government authorities or our licenses for acceleration services are revoked, our reputation would be harmed and if the operation of our acceleration services or other products is suspended or shut down entirely or in part, our revenues and results of operation may be materially and adversely affected. Furthermore, the internal compliance investigation and the removal of content may have a material impact on our cloud acceleration services, which in turn may lead to a decrease in users and have an adverse effect on our revenues and results of operations. To date, we have not been able to quantify the magnitude and extent of such impact.

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We may be sued by our game players and held liable for losses of virtual assets by such players, which may negatively affect our reputation and business, financial condition and results of operations.

While playing online games or participating in other online activities, players acquire and accumulate some virtual assets, such as special equipment and other accessories. Such virtual assets may be important to online game players and have monetary value and, in some cases, are sold for actual money. In practice, virtual assets can be lost for various reasons, often through unauthorized use of the game account of one user by other users and occasionally through data loss caused by a delay of network service, a network crash or hacking activities.

Under the Civil Code of the People’s Republic of China, effective in January 2020, where any laws provide for the protection of data and network virtual property, such laws shall apply. However, currently, there is no PRC law or regulation specifically governing virtual asset property rights. As a result, there is uncertainty as to who the legal owner of virtual assets is, whether and how the ownership of virtual assets is protected by law, and whether an operator of online games such as us would have any liability to game players or other interested parties (whether in contract, tort or otherwise) for loss of such virtual assets. Based on recent PRC court judgments, the courts have typically held online game operators liable for losses of virtual assets by game players, and ordered online game operators to return the lost virtual items to game players or pay damages and losses, as well as required the game operators to provide well-developed security systems to protect such virtual assets owned by game players. In case of a loss of virtual assets, we may be sued by our game players or users and held liable for damages, which may negatively affect our reputation and business, financial condition and results of operations.

Non-compliance with the laws or regulations governing virtual currency may result in penalties that could have a material adverse effect on our live streaming business and results of operations.

The Notice on the Reinforcement of the Administration of Online Games issued by the Ministry of Culture and other governmental authorities on February 15, 2007 directs the People’s Bank of China to strengthen the administration of virtual currency to avoid any adverse impact on the PRC economic and financial system. This notice provides that the total amount of virtual currency issued by an operator and the amount of purchased by individual users should be strictly limited, with a strict and clear division between virtual transactions and real transactions carried out by way of electronic commerce. This notice also provides that virtual currency should only be used to purchase virtual items. We created virtual currency “Golden Coins” for the operation of our live streaming services. Users can purchase “Golden Coins” from us so that they can purchase virtual gifts on our living streaming platforms to reward broadcasters they like. “Golden Coins” can also be used to purchase other value-added services on our live streaming platforms. Other than virtual gifts and value-added services, “Golden Coins” cannot be used for any other purposes.

On June 4, 2009, the Ministry of Culture and the MOFCOM jointly issued the Notice on Strengthening the Administration of Online Game Virtual Currency, or the Virtual Currency Notice. The Virtual Currency Notice requires that the operators who engage in issuance of online game virtual currency or offering of online game virtual currency transaction services shall apply for approval from the MOC through its provincial branches. The term “virtual currency” is widely used in the live streaming industry, such term as used in the live streaming industry does not fall under the definition under the Virtual Currency Notice. Although we do not think Virtual Currency Notice applies to the operation of our live streaming platform, given the wide discretion of relevant governmental authorities and uncertainties in the regulatory environment, we cannot assure you that relevant governmental authorities will not in the future interpret the Virtual Currency Notice in a different way and subject our operation to the scope of the Virtual Currency Notice or issue new rules to regulate the virtual currency in our industry. In that case, our operation may be adversely affected.

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Intensified government regulation of the internet industry in China could restrict our ability to maintain or increase our user base.

The PRC government has, in recent years, intensified regulation on various aspects of the internet industry in China. For example, in January 2011, MIIT and seven other PRC central government authorities jointly issued a circular entitled Implementation Scheme regarding Parental Guardianship Project for Minors Playing Online Games, under which online game operators are required to adopt various measures to maintain a system to communicate with the parents or other guardians of minors playing their online games and are required to monitor online game activities of minors and suspend the accounts of minors if so required by their parents or guardians. In October 2019, General Administration of Press and Publication issued the Anti-indulgence Notice which imposed an array of restrictions on online game operators to prevent underage users from indulging in online games. The Anti-indulgence Notice also requires online game operators to take effective measures to restrict minors from using paid services that are inconsistent with their capacity for civil conduct. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—B. Business Overview—Regulation—Regulation on anti-fatigue system, real-name registration system and parental guardianship project.” While we support these measures, these restrictions could also limit our ability to grow our user base for our online game business. Furthermore, if these restrictions are expanded to apply to adult game players in the future, our ability to grow our user base could be further limited and online games business could be materially and adversely affected.

Further, the PRC government has tightened its regulation of internet cafes in recent years. In particular, a large number of unlicensed internet cafes have been closed. The PRC government has imposed higher capital and facility requirements for the establishment of internet cafes. Furthermore, the PRC government’s policy, which encourages the development of a limited number of national and regional internet cafe chains and discourages the establishment of independent internet cafes, may slow down the growth of internet cafes in China. In June 2002, the Ministry of Culture, together with other government authorities, issued a joint notice, and in February 2004, the State Administration for Industry and Commerce issued another notice, suspending the issuance of new internet cafe licenses. In May 2007, the State Administration for Industry and Commerce reiterated its position not to register any new internet cafes in 2007. In 2008, 2009 and 2010, the Ministry of Culture, the State Administration for Industry and Commerce and other relevant government authorities, individually or jointly, issued several notices that provide various ways to strengthen the regulation of internet cafes, including investigating and punishing internet cafes that accept minors, cracking down on internet cafes without sufficient and valid licenses, limiting the total number of internet cafes and approving internet cafes within the planning made by relevant authorities, screening unlawful and adverse games and websites, and improving the coordination of regulation over internet cafes and online games. Although currently most of our users access and consume our products and services from their own devices, if internet cafes become one of the main venues for our users to access our website or online games, any reduction in the number, or any slowdown in the growth, of internet cafes in China could limit our ability to maintain or increase our user base.

In addition, the Chinese government has in recent years intensified its efforts to remove inappropriate content disseminated over the internet and wireless networks. In April 2014, the Chinese government initiated a campaign to enhance and enforce its scrutiny over internet content in China, particularly for pornographic content, and various websites were subject to penalties and in some cases outright suspension of website operations. In August 2017, the CAC promulgated the Provisions on the Administration of Internet Comments Posting Services, and the Provisions on the Administration of Internet Forum and Community Services, both of which require providers of relevant services to establish information review and inspection mechanism. As we implemented programs to comply with these regulations, we saw our subscriber numbers decline and may see more subscriber or user decline in the future. See “—Regulation and censorship of information disseminated over the internet in China have adversely affected our business and may continue to adversely affect our business, and we may be liable for the digital media content on our platform.”

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Fluctuations in exchange rates may have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and the value of your investment.

Fluctuation in the value of the Renminbi may have a material adverse effect on the value of your investment. The conversion of Renminbi into foreign currencies, including U.S. dollars, is based on rates set by the People’s Bank of China. The Renminbi has fluctuated against the U.S. dollar, at times significantly and unpredictably. The value of the Renminbi against the U.S. dollar and other currencies may fluctuate and is affected by changes in political and economic conditions and by China’s foreign exchange policies, among other things. We cannot assure you that Renminbi will not appreciate or depreciate significantly in value against the U.S. dollar in the future. It is difficult to predict how market forces or PRC or U.S. government policy may impact the exchange rate between Renminbi and the U.S. dollar in the future.

Our financial statements are expressed in U.S. dollars, and most of our assets, costs and expenses are denominated in Renminbi. Substantially all of our revenues were denominated in Renminbi. Any significant appreciation or depreciation of the RMB may materially and adversely affect our revenues, earnings and financial positions, and the value of, and any dividends payable on, our ADSs in U.S. dollars. For example, to the extent that we need to convert U.S. dollars into RMB to pay our operating expenses, appreciation of the RMB against the U.S. dollar would have an adverse effect on the RMB amount we would receive from the conversion. Conversely, if we decide to convert our RMB into U.S. dollars for the purpose of making payments for dividends on our common shares or ADSs or for other business purposes, appreciation of the U.S. dollar against the RMB would have a negative effect on the U.S. dollar amount available to us. In addition, a significant appreciation or depreciation in the value of the RMB relative to U.S. dollars would significantly reduce the U.S. dollar equivalent of our earnings regardless of any underlying change in our business or results of operations, which in turn could adversely affect the price of our ADSs.

Very limited hedging options are available in China to reduce our exposure to exchange rate fluctuations. To date, we have not entered into any hedging transactions in an effort to reduce our exposure to foreign currency exchange risk. While we may decide to enter into hedging transactions in the future, the availability and effectiveness of these hedges may be limited and we may not be able to adequately hedge our exposure or at all. In addition, our currency exchange losses may be magnified by PRC exchange control regulations that restrict our ability to convert RMB into foreign currency. As a result, fluctuations in exchange rates may have a material adverse effect on your investment.

Governmental control of currency conversion may limit our ability to utilize our revenues effectively and affect the value of your investment.

The PRC government imposes controls on the convertibility of the Renminbi into foreign currencies and, in certain cases, the remittance of currency out of China. We receive substantially all of our revenues in Renminbi. Under our current corporate structure, our Cayman Islands holding company primarily relies on dividend payments from our wholly owned PRC subsidiaries, to fund any cash and financing requirements we may have. Under existing PRC foreign exchange regulations, payments of current account items, including profit distributions, interest payments and trade and service-related foreign exchange transactions, can be made in foreign currencies without prior SAFE approval by complying with certain procedural requirements. However, approval from or registration with appropriate government authorities is required where the Renminbi is to be converted into foreign currency and remitted out of China to pay capital expenses such as the repayment of loans denominated in foreign currencies. Specifically, under the existing exchange restrictions, without prior approval of SAFE, cash generated from the operations of our PRC subsidiaries in China may be used to pay dividends by our PRC subsidiaries to our company and pay employees of our PRC subsidiaries who are located outside China in a currency other than the Renminbi. With prior approval from or registration with SAFE, cash generated from the operations of our PRC subsidiaries and affiliated entity may be used to pay off debt in a currency other than the Renminbi owed by our PRC subsidiaries and variable interest entity and its subsidiaries to entities outside China, and make other capital expenditures outside China in a currency other than the Renminbi. If any of our variable interest entity or its subsidiaries liquidates, the proceeds from the liquidation of its assets may be used outside of the PRC or be given to investors who are not PRC nationals. However, we may not be able to do so due to foreign exchange control imposed by the PRC government, which may at its discretion restrict access to foreign currencies for current account transactions in the future. If the foreign exchange control system prevents us from obtaining sufficient foreign currencies to satisfy our foreign currency demand, we may not be able to pay dividends in foreign currencies to our shareholders, including holders of our ADSs.

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Certain regulations in the PRC may make it more difficult for us to pursue growth through acquisitions.

Among other things, the M&A Rules and certain regulations and rules concerning mergers and acquisitions established additional procedures and requirements that could make merger and acquisition activities by foreign investors more time-consuming and complex. For example, the M&A Rules require that the Ministry of Commerce be notified in advance of any change-of-control transaction in which a foreign investor takes control of a PRC domestic enterprise or a foreign company with substantial PRC operations, if certain thresholds under the Provisions on Thresholds for Prior Notification of Concentrations of Undertakings, issued by the State Council on August 3, 2008 and amended by the State Council on September 18, 2018, are triggered. Moreover, the Anti-Monopoly Law promulgated by the SCNPC on August 30, 2007 and took effect on August 1, 2008 requires that transactions which are deemed concentrations and involve parties with specified turnover thresholds (i.e., during the previous fiscal year, (i) the total global turnover of all operators participating in the transaction exceeds RMB10 billion and at least two of these operators each had a turnover of more than RMB400 million within China, or (ii) the total turnover within China of all the operators participating in the concentration exceeded RMB2 billion, and at least two of these operators each had a turnover of more than RMB400 million within China) must be cleared by the Ministry of Commerce before they can be completed. In addition, according to the Implementing Rules Concerning Security Review on the Mergers and Acquisitions by Foreign Investors of Domestic Enterprises issued by the Ministry of Commerce in August 2011, mergers and acquisitions by foreign investors involved in an industry related to national security are subject to strict review by the Ministry of Commerce. These rules also prohibit any transactions attempting to bypass such security review, including by controlling entities through contractual arrangements. We believe that our business is not in an industry related to national security. However, we cannot preclude the possibility that the Ministry of Commerce or other government agencies may publish interpretations contrary to our understanding or broaden the scope of such security review in the future. Although we have no current definitive plans to make any acquisitions, we may elect to grow our business in the future in part by directly acquiring complementary businesses in China. Complying with the requirements of these regulations to complete such transactions could be time-consuming, and any required approval processes, including obtaining approval from the Ministry of Commerce, may delay or inhibit our ability to complete such transactions.

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PRC regulations relating to the establishment of offshore SPVs by PRC residents may subject our PRC resident beneficial owners or our PRC subsidiaries to liability or penalties, limit our ability to inject capital into our PRC subsidiaries, limit our PRC subsidiaries’ ability to increase their registered capital or distribute profits to us, or may otherwise adversely affect us.

SAFE has promulgated several regulations that require PRC residents and PRC corporate entities to register with local branches of SAFE in connection with their direct or indirect offshore investment activities. These regulations apply to our shareholders who are PRC residents and may apply to any offshore acquisitions that we make in the future. SAFE promulgated the Circular on Relevant Issues Concerning Foreign Exchange Control on Domestic Residents’ Offshore Investment and Financing and Roundtrip Investment through Special Purpose Vehicles, or SAFE No. Circular No. 37, on July 4, 2014. SAFE Circular No. 37 requires PRC residents to register with local branches of SAFE in connection with their direct establishment or indirect control of an offshore entity, for the purpose of overseas investment and financing, with such PRC residents’ legally owned assets or equity interests in domestic enterprises or offshore assets or interests, referred to in SAFE Circular No. 37 as a “special purpose vehicle.” The term “control” under SAFE Circular No. 37 is broadly defined as the operation rights, beneficiary rights or decision-making rights acquired by the PRC residents in the offshore special purpose vehicles or PRC companies by such means as acquisition, trust, proxy, voting rights, repurchase, convertible bonds or other arrangements. SAFE Circular No. 37 further requires amendment to the registration in the event of any changes with respect to the basic information of the special purpose vehicle, such as changes in a PRC resident individual shareholder, name or operation period; or any significant changes with respect to the special purpose vehicle, such as increase or decrease of capital contributed by PRC individuals, share transfer or exchange, merger, division or other material event. If the shareholders of an offshore holding company who are PRC residents do not complete their registration with the local SAFE branches, the PRC subsidiaries of the offshore holding company may be prohibited from distributing their profits and proceeds from any reduction in capital, share transfer or liquidation to the offshore company, and the offshore company may be restricted in its ability to contribute additional capital to its PRC subsidiaries. Moreover, failure to comply with SAFE registration and amendment requirements described above could result in liability under PRC law for evasion of applicable foreign exchange restrictions. In addition, on February 13, 2015, SAFE issued SAFE Circular No. 13, which took effect on June 1, 2015. SAFE Circular No. 13 delegates to the qualified banks the authority to register all PRC residents’ investment in “special purpose vehicle” pursuant to SAFE Circular No. 37, except that those PRC residents who have failed to comply with SAFE Circular No. 37 will continue to fall within the jurisdiction of the relevant local SAFE branches and must continue to make their supplementary registration applications with the such local SAFE branches.

We have requested PRC residents holding direct or indirect interest in our company to our knowledge to make the necessary applications, filings and amendments as required under SAFE regulations. Mr. Sean Shenglong Zou, Mr. Hao Cheng and Ms. Fang Wang have completed the initial registration with the local SAFE branch as required by the SAFE regulations. However, we cannot assure you that these shareholders have completed and will complete all subsequent amendment registrations as required by the SAFE regulations as we do not have control over these shareholders. We may also not be informed of the identities of all the PRC residents holding direct or indirect interest in our company, and we cannot provide any assurances that these PRC residents will comply with our request to make or obtain any applicable registrations or comply with other requirements required by SAFE regulations since we do not have control over these the PRC resident shareholders. The failure or inability of our PRC resident shareholders or our future PRC resident shareholders to make any required registrations or comply with other requirements under SAFE regulations may subject such PRC residents or our PRC subsidiaries to fines and legal sanctions and may also limit our ability to raise additional financing and contribute additional capital into or provide loans to (including using the proceeds from our initial public offering) our PRC subsidiaries, limit our PRC subsidiaries’ ability to pay dividends or otherwise distribute profits to us, or otherwise adversely affect us.

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Furthermore, because of the uncertainty over how the SAFE regulations will be interpreted and implemented, and how SAFE will apply them to us, we cannot predict how these regulations will affect our business operations or future strategies. For example, we may be subject to a more stringent review and approval process with respect to our foreign exchange activities, such as remittance of dividends and foreign-currency-denominated borrowings, which may adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. In addition, if we decide to acquire a PRC domestic company, we cannot assure you that we or the owners of such company, as the case may be, will be able to obtain the necessary approvals or complete the necessary filings and registrations required by the foreign exchange regulations. This may restrict our ability to implement our acquisition strategy and could adversely affect our business and prospects.

Failure to comply with PRC regulations regarding the registration requirements for employee stock ownership plans or share option plans may subject the PRC plan participants or us to fines and other legal or administrative sanctions.

In December 2006, the People’s Bank of China promulgated the Administrative Measures of Foreign Exchange Matters for Individuals, which set forth the respective requirements for foreign exchange transactions by individuals (both PRC or non-PRC citizens) under either the current account or the capital account. On February 15, 2012, SAFE promulgated the Notices on Issues Concerning the Foreign Exchange Administration for Domestic Individuals Participating in Stock Incentive Plans of Overseas Publicly-Listed Companies, or the Stock Option Rules, which replaced the Application Procedures of Foreign Exchange Administration for Domestic Individuals Participating in Employee Stock Ownership Plans or Stock Option Plans of Overseas Publicly-Listed Companies issued by SAFE on March 28, 2007. Under the Stock Option Rules and other relevant rules and regulations, PRC residents who participate in stock incentive plan in an overseas publicly-listed company are required to register with SAFE or its local branches and complete certain other procedures. Participants of a stock incentive plan who are PRC residents must retain a qualified PRC agent, which could be a PRC subsidiary of such overseas publicly listed company or another qualified institution selected by such PRC subsidiary, to conduct the SAFE registration and other procedures with respect to the stock incentive plan on behalf of its participants. Such participants must also retain an overseas entrusted institution to handle matters in connection with their exercise of stock options, the purchase and sale of corresponding stocks or interests and fund transfers. In addition, the PRC agent is required to amend the SAFE registration with respect to the stock incentive plan if there is any material change to the stock incentive plan, the PRC agent or the overseas entrusted institution or other material changes. We and our PRC employees who have been granted stock options are subject to these regulations. Failure by us or our PRC stock option holders to comply with the SAFE regulations may subject us or these PRC residents to fines and legal sanctions and may also limit our ability to contribute additional capital into our PRC subsidiaries, limit our PRC subsidiaries’ ability to distribute dividends to us, or otherwise materially adversely affect our business.

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We face uncertainties with respect to indirect transfers of equity interests in PRC resident enterprises by their non-PRC holding companies.

The State Administration of Taxation, or the SAT, has issued several rules and notices to tighten its scrutiny over acquisition transactions in recent years, including the Notice on Strengthening Administration of Enterprise Income Tax for Share Transfers by Non-PRC Resident Enterprises issued in December 2009, or SAT Circular 698, the Notice on Several Issues Regarding the Income Tax of Non-PRC Resident Enterprises issued in March 2011, or SAT Circular 24, and the Notice on Certain Corporate Income Tax Matters on Indirect Transfer of Properties by Non-PRC Resident Enterprises issued in February 2015, or SAT Circular 7. Pursuant to these rules and notices, if a non-PRC resident enterprise indirectly transfers PRC taxable properties, which refer to properties of an establishment or a place in the PRC, real estate properties in the PRC or equity investments in a PRC tax resident enterprise, by disposing of equity interest in an overseas non-public holding company without a reasonable commercial purpose and resulting in the avoidance of PRC enterprise income tax, such indirect transfer should be deemed a direct transfer of PRC taxable properties, and gains derived from such indirect transfer may be subject to the PRC withholding tax at a rate of up to 10%. SAT Circular 7 sets out several factors to be taken into consideration by tax authorities in determining whether an indirect transfer has a reasonable commercial purpose. An indirect transfer satisfying all the following criteria will be deemed to lack reasonable commercial purpose and be taxable under PRC law: (i) 75% or more of the equity value of the intermediary enterprise being transferred is derived directly or indirectly from the PRC taxable properties; (ii) at any time during the one-year period before the indirect transfer, 90% or more of the asset value of the intermediary enterprise (excluding cash) is comprised directly or indirectly of investments in the PRC, or 90% or more of its income is derived directly or indirectly from the PRC; (iii) the functions performed and risks assumed by the intermediary enterprise and any of its subsidiaries that directly or indirectly hold the PRC taxable properties are limited and are insufficient to prove their economic substance; and (iv) the foreign tax payable on the gain derived from the indirect transfer of the PRC taxable properties is lower than the potential PRC enterprise income tax on the direct transfer of such assets. Nevertheless, the indirect transfer falling into the safe harbor available under SAT Circular 7 may not be subject to PRC tax and the scope of the safe harbor includes qualified group restructuring, public market trading and tax treaty exemptions. On October 17, 2017, the SAT issued the Public Notice on Issues Concerning the Withholding of Non-resident Enterprise Income Tax at Source, or SAT Public Notice 37, which took effect on December 1, 2017. SAT Public Notice 37 replaced a series of important circulars, including but not limited to SAT Circular 698 and amended the rules governing the administration of withholding tax on China-source income derived by the non-resident enterprise. SAT Public Notice 37 also introduced certain key changes to the current withholding regime, such as (i) non-resident enterprise’s withholding obligation for dividend was changed to arise on the date the payment is actually made as opposed to dividend declaration date; and (ii) non-resident enterprise’s obligation to self-report tax within seven days upon withholding agent’s failure to withhold was removed.

Under SAT Circular 7 and SAT Public Notice 37, the entities or individuals obligated to pay the transfer price to the transferor are the withholding agents and must withhold the PRC enterprise income tax from the transfer price. If the withholding agent fails to do so, the transferor should report to and pay the PRC enterprise income tax to the PRC tax authorities. In the event that neither the withholding agent nor the transferor fulfills their obligations under SAT Circular 7 and SAT Public Notice 37, apart from imposing penalties such as late payment interest on the transferor, the tax authority may also hold the withholding agent liable and impose a penalty of 50% to 300% of the unpaid tax on the withholding agent. The penalty imposed on the withholding agent may be reduced or waived if the withholding agent has submitted the relevant materials in connection with the indirect transfer to the PRC tax authorities in accordance with SAT Circular 7.

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However, there is a lack of clear statutory interpretation of these rules and notices, we face uncertainties on the reporting and consequences on future private equity financing transactions, share exchange or other transactions involving the transfer of shares in our company by investors that are non-PRC resident enterprises, or sale or purchase of shares in other non-PRC resident companies or other taxable assets by us. Our Cayman Islands holding company and other non-resident enterprises in our company may be subject to filing obligations or may be taxed if our Cayman Islands holding company and other non-resident enterprises in our company are transferors in such transactions, and may be subject to withholding obligations if our Cayman Islands holding company and other non-resident enterprises in our company are transferees in such transactions. For the transfer of shares in our Cayman Islands holding company by investors that are non-PRC resident enterprises, our PRC subsidiaries may be requested to assist in the filing under the rules and notices. As a result, we may be required to expend valuable resources to comply with these rules and notices or to request the relevant transferors from whom we purchase taxable assets to comply, or to establish that our Cayman Islands holding company and other non-resident enterprises in our company should not be taxed under these rules and notices, which may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. There is no assurance that the tax authorities will not apply the rules and notices to our offshore restructuring transactions where non-PRC resident investors were involved if any of such transactions were determined by the tax authorities to lack reasonable commercial purpose. As a result, we and our non-PRC resident investors may be at risk of being taxed under these rules and notices and may be required to comply with or to establish that we should not be taxed under such rules, which may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations or such non-PRC resident investors’ investments in us. We have conducted acquisition transactions in the past and may conduct additional acquisition transactions in the future. We cannot assure you that the PRC tax authorities will not, at their discretion, adjust any capital gains and impose tax return filing obligations on us or require us to provide assistance for the investigation of PRC tax authorities with respect thereto. Heightened scrutiny over acquisition transactions by the PRC tax authorities may have a negative impact on potential acquisitions we may pursue in the future.

Discontinuation or reduction of any of the preferential tax treatments or other government incentives available to us in the PRC, or imposition of any additional PRC taxes could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Under the PRC Enterprise Income Tax Law, or the EIT Law, the statutory enterprise income tax rate is 25%. Under certain circumstances, preferential tax rates may be applied if an enterprise meets the corresponding standards and qualifications and completes certain procedures. See “Item 5. Operating and Financial Overview and Prospects—A. Operating Results—Taxation” for details of tax benefits applicable to us. Preferential tax treatment and other government incentives granted to our VIE and subsidiaries are subject to review and may be adjusted or revoked at any time. The discontinuation or reduction of any preferential tax treatment currently available to us and our wholly owned PRC subsidiaries will cause our effective tax rate to increase, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. We cannot assure you that we will be able to maintain our current effective tax rate in the future.

Our global income may be subject to PRC taxes under the PRC EIT Law, which may have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

Under the EIT Law and its implementation rules, an enterprise established outside of the PRC with a “de facto management body” within the PRC is considered a resident enterprise and will be subject to the enterprise income tax at the rate of 25% on its global income. The implementation rules define the term “de facto management bodies” as “establishments that carry out substantial and overall management and control over the manufacturing and business operations, personnel, accounting, properties, etc. of an enterprise.” On April 22, 2009, the SAT issued a circular, or SAT Circular 82, which provides certain specific criteria for determining whether the “de facto management body” of a PRC-controlled enterprise that is incorporated offshore is located in China. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—B. Business Overview—Regulation—Regulation on Tax—PRC enterprise income tax.” Although SAT Circular 82 applies only to offshore enterprises controlled by PRC enterprises or PRC enterprise groups and not to those controlled by PRC individuals or foreigners, the determining criteria set forth in the SAT Circular 82 may reflect the SAT’s general position on how the “de facto management body” test should be applied in determining the tax resident status of all offshore enterprises.

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According to SAT Circular 82, an offshore incorporated enterprise controlled by a PRC enterprise or a PRC enterprise group will be regarded as a PRC tax resident by virtue of having its “de facto management body” in China and will be subject to PRC enterprise income tax on its worldwide income only if all of the following conditions set forth in the SAT Circular 82 are met: (i) the primary location of the day-to-day operational management is in the PRC; (ii) decisions relating to the enterprise’s financial and human resource matters are made or are subject to approval by organizations or personnel in the PRC; (iii) the enterprise’s primary assets, accounting books and records, company seals, and board and shareholder resolutions are located or maintained in the PRC; and (iv) at least 50% of voting board members or senior executives habitually reside in the PRC.

Xunlei Limited is not controlled by a PRC enterprise or PRC enterprise group and we do not believe that Xunlei Limited meets all of the conditions above. Xunlei Limited is a company incorporated outside the PRC. As a holding company, certain of Xunlei Limited’s key assets, including a significant amount of cash, are located, and records (including the resolutions of its board of directors and the resolutions of its shareholders) are maintained, outside the PRC. Therefore, we do not believe Xunlei Limited should be treated as a “resident enterprise” for PRC tax purposes if the criteria for “de facto management body” as set forth in the relevant SAT Circular 82 were deemed applicable to us. However, as the tax resident status of an enterprise is subject to determination by the PRC tax authorities and uncertainties remain with respect to the interpretation of the term “de facto management body” as applicable to Xunlei Limited, we may be considered a resident enterprise and may therefore be subject to the enterprise income tax at 25% on our global income. If we are considered a resident enterprise and earn income other than dividends from our PRC subsidiaries, a 25% enterprise income tax on our global income could increase our tax burden and adversely affect our cash flow and profitability. In addition to the uncertainty regarding how the new “resident enterprise” classification may apply, it is also possible that the rules may change in the future, possibly with retroactive effect.

Dividends paid by us to our foreign investors and gains on the sale of our ADSs or common shares by our foreign investors may be subject to taxes under PRC tax laws.

Under the EIT Law and its implementation regulations issued by the State Council, a 10% PRC withholding tax is applicable to dividends paid to investors that are “non-resident enterprises,” which do not have an establishment or place of business in the PRC or which have such establishment or place of business but the dividends are not effectively connected with such establishment or place of business, to the extent such dividends are derived from sources within the PRC. Any gain realized on the transfer of ADSs or common shares by such investors is subject to PRC tax, at a rate of 10% unless otherwise reduced or exempted by relevant tax treaties, if such gain is regarded as income derived from sources within the PRC. If we are deemed a “PRC resident enterprise,” dividends paid on our common shares or ADSs, and any gain realized from the transfer of our common shares or ADSs, may be treated as income derived from sources within the PRC and may as a result be subject to PRC taxation (which in the case of dividends would be withheld at source). It is unclear whether our non-PRC individual investors would be subject to any PRC tax in the event we are deemed a “PRC resident enterprise.” If any PRC tax were to apply to such dividends or gains of non-PRC individual investors, it would generally apply at a rate of 20% (unless a reduced rate is available under an applicable tax treaty). It is also unclear whether, if we are considered a PRC “resident enterprise,” holders of our ADSs or common shares would be able to claim the benefit of income tax treaties or agreements entered into between China and other countries or areas (and we do not expect to withhold at treaty rates if any withholding is required). If dividends payable to our non-PRC investors, or gains from the transfer of our common shares or ADSs by such investors are subject to PRC tax, the value of your investment in our common shares or ADSs may be adversely affected.

Increases in labor costs and enforcement of stricter labor laws and regulations in the PRC may adversely affect our business and our profitability.

China’s overall economy and the average wage in China have increased in recent years and are expected to continue to grow. The average wage level for our employees has also increased in recent years. We expect that our labor costs, including wages and employee benefits, will continue to increase. Unless we are able to pass on these increased labor costs to our users by increasing prices for our products or services, our profitability and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.

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In addition, we have been subject to stricter regulatory requirements in terms of entering labor contracts with our employees and paying various statutory employee benefits, including pensions, housing fund, medical insurance, work-related injury insurance, unemployment insurance and childbearing insurance to designated government agencies for the benefit of our employees. Pursuant to the PRC Labor Contract Law, or the Labor Contract law, that became effective in January 2008, as amended on December 28, 2012 and effective as of July 1, 2013, and its implementation rules that became effective in September 2008, employers are subject to stricter requirements in terms of signing labor contracts, minimum wages, paying remuneration, determining the term of employees’ probation and unilaterally terminating labor contracts. In the event that we decide to terminate some of our employees or otherwise change our employment or labor practices, the Labor Contract Law and its implementation rules may limit our ability to effect those changes in a desirable or cost-effective manner, which could adversely affect our business and results of operations. On October 28, 2010, the SCNPC promulgated the PRC Social Insurance Law, or the Social Insurance Law, which became effective on July 1, 2011. According to the Social Insurance Law, employees must participate in pension insurance, work-related injury insurance, medical insurance, unemployment insurance and maternity insurance and the employers must, together with their employees or separately, pay the social insurance premiums for such employees.

As the interpretation and implementation of labor-related laws and regulations are still evolving, we cannot assure you that our employment practice do not and will not violate labor-related laws and regulations in China, which may subject us to labor disputes or government investigations. If we are deemed to have violated relevant labor laws and regulations, we could be required to provide additional compensation to our employees and our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

Our ADSs may be delisted under the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act if the PCAOB is unable to inspect auditors who are located in China. The delisting of our ADSs, or the threat of their being delisted, may materially and adversely affect the value of your investment. Additionally, the inability of the PCAOB to conduct inspections deprives our investors with the benefits of such inspections.

The Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act, or the HFCA Act, was enacted on December 18, 2020. The HFCA Act states if the SEC determines that we have filed audit reports issued by a registered public accounting firm that has not been subject to inspection by the PCAOB for three consecutive years beginning in 2021, the SEC shall prohibit our shares or ADSs from being traded on a national securities exchange or in the over the counter trading market in the U.S.

Our auditor, the independent registered public accounting firm that issues the audit report included elsewhere in this annual report, as an auditor of companies that are traded publicly in the United States and a firm registered with the PCAOB, is subject to laws in the United States pursuant to which the PCAOB conducts regular inspections to assess its compliance with the applicable professional standards. Since our auditor is located in China, a jurisdiction where the PCAOB has been unable to conduct inspections without the approval of the Chinese authorities, our auditor is currently not inspected by the PCAOB.

On March 24, 2021, the SEC adopted interim final rules relating to the implementation of certain disclosure and documentation requirements of the HFCA Act. We will be required to comply with these rules if the SEC identifies us as having a “non-inspection” year under a process to be subsequently established by the SEC. The SEC is assessing how to implement other requirements of the HFCA Act, including the listing and trading prohibition requirements described above.

The SEC may propose additional rules or guidance that could impact us if our auditor is not subject to PCAOB inspection. For example, on August 6, 2020, the President’s Working Group on Financial Markets, or the PWG, issued the Report on Protecting United States Investors from Significant Risks from Chinese Companies to the then President of the United States. This report recommended the SEC implement five recommendations to address companies from jurisdictions that do not provide the PCAOB with sufficient access to fulfil its statutory mandate. Some of the concepts of these recommendations were implemented with the enactment of the HFCA Act. However, some of the recommendations were more stringent than the HFCA Act. For example, if a company was not subject to PCAOB inspection, the report recommended that the transition period before a company would be delisted would end on January 1, 2022.

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The SEC has announced that the SEC staff is preparing a consolidated proposal for the rules regarding the implementation of the HFCA Act and to address the recommendations in the PWG report. It is unclear when the SEC will complete its rulemaking and when such rules will become effective and what, if any, of the PWG recommendations will be adopted. The implications of this possible regulation in addition the requirements of the HFCA Act are uncertain. Such uncertainty could cause the market price of our ADSs to be materially and adversely affected, and our securities could be delisted or prohibited from being traded “over-the-counter” earlier than would be required by the HFCA Act. If our securities are unable to be listed on another securities exchange by then, such a delisting would substantially impair your ability to sell or purchase our ADSs when you wish to do so, and the risk and uncertainty associated with a potential delisting would have a negative impact on the price of our ADSs.

The PCAOB’s inability to conduct inspections in China prevents it from fully evaluating the audits and quality control procedures of our independent registered public accounting firm. As a result, we and investors in our ordinary shares are deprived of the benefits of such PCAOB inspections. The inability of the PCAOB to conduct inspections of auditors in China makes it more difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of our independent registered public accounting firm’s audit procedures or quality control procedures as compared to auditors outside of China that are subject to the PCAOB inspections, which could cause investors and potential investors in our stock to lose confidence in our audit procedures and reported financial information and the quality of our financial statements.

In May 2013, the PCAOB announced that it had entered into a Memorandum of Understanding on Enforcement Cooperation with the CSRC and the PRC Ministry of Finance, which establishes a cooperative framework between the parties for the production and exchange of audit documents relevant to investigations undertaken by the PCAOB in the PRC or by the CSRC or the PRC Ministry of Finance in the United States. The PCAOB continues to be in discussions with the CSRC and the PRC Ministry of Finance to permit joint inspections in the PRC of audit firms that are registered with the PCAOB and audit Chinese companies that trade on U.S. exchanges.

Proceedings instituted by the SEC against PRC affiliates of the “big four” accounting firms, including our independent registered public accounting firm, could result in financial statements being determined to not be in compliance with the requirements of the Exchange Act.

Starting in 2011 “big four” PRC-based accounting firms, including our independent registered public accounting firm, were affected by a conflict between U.S. and Chinese law. Specifically, for certain U.S.-listed companies operating and audited in mainland China, the SEC and the PCAOB sought to obtain from the Chinese firms access to their audit work papers and related documents. The firms were, however, advised and directed that under Chinese law, they could not respond directly to the U.S. regulators on those requests, and that requests by foreign regulators for access to such papers in China had to be channeled through the China Securities Regulatory Commission, or the CSRC.

In late 2012, this impasse led the SEC to commence administrative proceedings under Rule 102(e) of its Rules of Practice and also under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 against the Chinese accounting firms, including our independent registered public accounting firm. A first instance trial of the proceedings in July 2013 in the SEC’s internal administrative court resulted in an adverse judgment against the firms. The administrative law judge proposed penalties on the firms including a temporary suspension of their right to practice before the SEC, although that proposed penalty did not take effect pending review by the Commissioners of the SEC. On February 6, 2015, before a review by the Commissioner had taken place, the firms reached a settlement with the SEC. Under the settlement, the SEC accepted that future requests by the SEC for the production of documents will normally be made to the CSRC. The firms were to receive matching Section 106 requests, and were required to abide by a detailed set of procedures with respect to such requests, which in substance require them to facilitate production via the CSRC. If they failed to meet specified criteria, the SEC retained authority to impose a variety of additional remedial measures on the firms depending on the nature of the failure. Under the terms of the settlement, the underlying proceeding against the four China-based accounting firms was deemed dismissed with prejudice four years after entry of the settlement. The four-year mark occurred on February 6, 2019. While we cannot predict if the SEC will further challenge the four China-based accounting firms’ compliance with U.S. law in connection with U.S. regulatory requests for audit work papers or if the results of such a challenge would result in the SEC imposing penalties such as suspensions. If additional remedial measures are imposed on the “big four” PRC-based accounting firms, including our independent registered public accounting firm, we could be unable to timely file future financial statements in compliance with the requirements of the Exchange Act.

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In the event the “big four” PRC-based accounting firms become subject to additional legal challenges by the SEC or the PCAOB, depending upon the final outcome, listed companies in the United States with major PRC operations may find it difficult or impossible to retain auditors in respect of their operations in China, which could result in financial statements being determined to not be in compliance with the requirements of the Exchange Act, including possible delisting. Moreover, any negative news about any such future proceedings against these audit firms may cause investor uncertainty regarding China-based, U.S.-listed companies and the market price of our common stock may be adversely affected.

If our independent registered public accounting firm was denied, even temporarily, the ability to practice before the SEC and we were unable to timely find another registered public accounting firm to audit and issue an opinion on our financial statements, our financial statements could be determined not to be in compliance with the requirements of the Exchange Act. Such a determination could ultimately lead to the delisting of the ADSs from the U.S. national securities exchanges or deregistration from the SEC, or both, which would substantially reduce or effectively terminate the trading of the ADSs in the United States.

Risks Related to Our ADSs

The market price for our ADSs may be volatile.

The trading prices of our ADSs are likely to be volatile and could fluctuate widely due to factors beyond our control. This may happen because of broad market and industry factors, like the performance and fluctuation in the market prices or the underperformance or deteriorating financial results of other similarly situated companies in China that have listed their securities in the United States in recent years. The securities of some of these companies have experienced significant volatility since their initial public offerings, including, in some cases, substantial price declines in the trading prices of their securities. The trading performances of these Chinese companies’ securities after their offerings, including companies in the internet businesses, may affect the attitudes of investors toward Chinese companies listed in the United States, which consequently may impact the trading performance of our ADSs, regardless of our actual operating performance. In addition, any negative news or perceptions about inadequate corporate governance practices or fraudulent accounting or other practices at other Chinese companies may also negatively affect the attitudes of investors towards Chinese companies in general, including us, regardless of whether we have engaged in such practices. In addition, securities markets may from time to time experience significant price and volume fluctuations that are not related to our operating performance, which may have a material adverse effect on the market price of our ADSs.

The market price for our ADSs is likely to be highly volatile and subject to wide fluctuations in response to factors including the following:

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regulatory developments affecting us, our advertisers or our industry;

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announcements of studies and reports relating to our services or those of our competitors;

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changes in the economic performance or market valuations of other internet companies in China;

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actual or anticipated fluctuations in our quarterly results of operations and changes of our expected results;

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changes in financial estimates by securities research analysts;

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conditions in the internet or online advertising industry in China;

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announcements by us or our competitors of new services, acquisitions, strategic relationships, joint ventures or capital commitments;

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additions to or departures of our senior management;

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fluctuations of exchange rates between the Renminbi and the U.S. dollar;

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release or expiry of lock-up or other transfer restrictions on our outstanding shares or ADSs; and

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sales or perceived potential sales of additional shares or ADSs.

In addition, the securities market has from time to time experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that are not related to the operating performance of any particular companies. These market fluctuations may also have a material adverse effect on the market price of our ADSs.

If securities or industry analysts cease to publish research or reports about our business, or if they adversely change their recommendations regarding our ADSs, the market price for our ADSs and trading volume could decline.

The trading market for our ADSs will be influenced by research or reports that industry or securities analysts publish about our business. If one or more analysts who cover us downgrade our ADSs, the market price for our ADSs would likely decline. If one or more of these analysts cease to cover us or fail to regularly publish reports on us, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which, in turn, could cause the market price or trading volume for our ADSs to decline.

As we do not expect to pay dividends in the foreseeable future, you must rely on price appreciation of our ADSs for return on your investment.

We currently intend to retain most, if not all, of our available funds and any future earnings to fund the development and growth of our business. Subject to our ongoing financial performance, cash position, budget and business plan and market conditions, we may consider paying special dividends. However, we do not plan to pay dividends in the foreseeable future and you should not rely on an investment in our ADSs as a source for any future dividend income.

Our board of directors has discretion as to whether to distribute dividends, subject to applicable laws. In addition, our shareholders may by ordinary resolution declare dividends, but no dividend may exceed the amount recommended by our board of directors. Under Cayman Islands law, a Cayman Islands company may pay a dividend out of either profit or share premium account, provided that in no circumstances may a dividend be paid if this would result in the company being unable to pay its debts as they fall due in the ordinary course of business. Even if our board of directors decides to declare and pay dividends, the timing, amount and form of future dividends, if any, will depend on, among other things, our future results of operations and cash flow, our capital requirements and surplus, the amount of distributions, if any, received by us from our subsidiaries, our financial condition, contractual restrictions and other factors deemed relevant by our board of directors. Accordingly, the return on your investment in our ADSs will likely depend entirely upon any future price appreciation of our ADSs. There is no guarantee that our ADSs will appreciate in value or even maintain the price at which you purchased the ADSs. You may not realize a return on your investment in our ADSs and you may even lose your entire investment in our ADSs.

Substantial future sales or perceived potential sales of our ADSs in the public market could cause the price of our ADSs to decline.

Sales of our ADSs in the public market, or the perception that these sales could occur, could cause the market price of our ADSs to decline. As of March 31, 2021, we had 334,651,981 common shares outstanding, which excludes (i) 9,519,144 common shares held by Leading Advice Holdings Limited, a share incentive awards holding platform, and (ii) 24,706,080 common shares, consisting of shares issued to our depositary bank for bulk issuance of ADSs reserved for future issuances upon the exercise or vesting of awards granted under our share incentive plans and shares repurchased by us but not yet cancelled. All our outstanding common shares represented by ADSs were freely transferable by persons other than our “affiliates” without restriction or additional registration under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or Securities Act. The remaining common shares will be available for sale subject to volume and other restrictions as applicable under Rules 144 and 701 under the Securities Act. Certain holders of our common shares have the right to cause us to register under the Securities Act the sale of their shares. Registration of these shares under the Securities Act would result in ADSs representing these shares becoming freely tradable without restriction under the Securities Act immediately upon the effectiveness of the registration. Sales of these registered shares in the form of ADSs, in the public market could cause the price of our ADSs to decline.

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Your right to participate in any future rights offerings may be limited, which may cause dilution to your holdings, and you may not receive cash dividends if it is impractical to make them available to you.

We may from time to time distribute rights to our shareholders, including rights to acquire our securities. However, we cannot make rights available to you in the United States unless we register both the rights and the securities to which the rights relate under the Securities Act or an exemption from the registration requirements is available. Under the deposit agreement, the depositary will not make rights available to you unless both the rights and the underlying securities to be distributed to ADS holders are either registered under the Securities Act or exempt from registration under the Securities Act. We are under no obligation to file a registration statement with respect to any such rights or securities or to endeavor to cause such a registration statement to be declared effective and we may not be able to establish a necessary exemption from registration under the Securities Act. Accordingly, you may be unable to participate in our rights offerings and may experience dilution in your holdings.

The depositary of our ADSs has agreed to pay to you the cash dividends or other distributions it or the custodian receives on our common shares or other deposited securities after deducting its fees and expenses. You will receive these distributions in proportion to the number of common shares your ADSs represent. However, the depositary may, at its discretion, decide that it is inequitable or impractical to make a distribution available to any holders of ADSs. For example, the depositary may determine that it is not practicable to distribute certain property through the mail, or that the value of certain distributions may be less than the cost of mailing them. In these cases, the depositary may decide not to distribute such property to you.

You may be subject to limitations on transfer of your ADSs.

Your ADSs are transferable on the books of the depositary. However, the depositary may close its transfer books at any time or from time to time when it deems expedient in connection with the performance of its duties. In addition, the depositary may refuse to deliver, transfer or register transfers of ADSs generally when our books or the books of the depositary are closed, or at any time if we or the depositary deems it advisable to do so because of any requirement of law or of any government or governmental body, or under any provision of the deposit agreement, or for any other reason.

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The voting rights of holders of ADSs are limited by the terms of the deposit agreement, and you may not be able to exercise your right to direct how the common shares which are represented by your ADSs are voted.

Holders of ADSs do not have the same rights as our registered shareholders. As a holder of the ADSs, you will not have any direct right to attend general meetings of our shareholders or to cast any votes at such meetings. You will only be able to exercise the voting rights which are carried by the underlying common shares represented by your ADSs indirectly by giving voting instructions to the depositary in accordance with the provisions of the deposit agreement. Under the deposit agreement, you may vote only by giving voting instructions to the depositary. If we instruct the depositary to ask for your instructions, then upon receipt of your voting instructions, the depositary will try, as far as is practicable, to vote the underlying common shares which are represented by your ADSs in accordance with your instructions. If we do not instruct the depositary to ask for your instructions, the depositary may still vote in accordance with instructions you give under specific circumstances when it is not required to do so. You will not be able to directly exercise your right to vote with respect to the underlying common shares represented by your ADSs unless you withdraw such common shares and become the registered holder of such common shares prior to the record date for the general meeting. When a general meeting is convened, you may not receive sufficient advance notice of the meeting to withdraw the underlying common shares represented by your ADSs and become the registered holder of such common shares to allow you to attend the general meeting and to vote directly with respect to any specific matter or resolution to be considered and voted upon at the general meeting. In addition, under our memorandum and articles of association, for the purposes of determining those shareholders who are entitled to attend and vote at any general meeting, our directors may close our register of members and/or fix in advance a record date for such meeting, and such closure of our register of members or the setting of such a record date may prevent you from withdrawing the common shares underlying your ADSs and becoming the registered holder of such shares prior to the record date, so that you would not be able to attend the general meeting or to vote directly. If we ask for your instructions, the depositary will, at the sole discretion of the depositary and as soon as practicable, notify you of the upcoming vote and will arrange to deliver our voting materials to you. We have agreed to give the depositary at least 30 days’ prior notice of shareholder meetings. Nevertheless, we cannot assure you that you will receive the voting materials in time to ensure that you can instruct the depositary to vote the underlying common shares represented by your ADSs.

You may face difficulties in protecting your interests, and your ability to protect your rights through the U.S. federal courts may be limited because we are incorporated under Cayman Islands law, we conduct substantially all of our operations in China and substantially all of our directors and officers reside outside the United States.

We are incorporated in the Cayman Islands and conduct substantially all of our operations in China through our PRC subsidiaries and variable interest entity and its subsidiaries. Substantially all of our directors and officers reside outside the United States. As a result, it may be difficult or impossible for you to bring an action against us or against these individuals in the Cayman Islands or in the United States in the event that you believe that your rights have been infringed under the U.S. securities laws or otherwise. Even if you are successful in bringing an action of this kind, the laws of the Cayman Islands and of China may render you unable to enforce a judgment against our assets or the assets of our directors and officers.

There is uncertainty as to whether Cayman Islands courts or PRC courts would:

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recognize or enforce judgments of courts of the United States obtained against us based on certain civil liability provisions of U.S. securities laws; or

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entertain original actions brought in the Cayman Islands or the PRC against us, based on certain civil liability provisions of U.S. securities laws.

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Although there is no statutory enforcement in the Cayman Islands of judgments obtained in the federal or state courts of the United States, (and the Cayman Islands are not a party to any treaties for the reciprocal enforcement or recognition of such judgments), the courts of the Cayman Islands will, at common law, recognize and enforce a foreign money judgment of a foreign court of competent jurisdiction without any reexamination of the merits of the underlying dispute based on the principle that a judgment of a competent foreign court imposes upon the judgment debtor an obligation to pay the liquidated sum for which such judgment has been given, provided such judgment (i) is final and conclusive, (ii) is not in respect of taxes, a fine or a penalty; and (iii) was not obtained in a manner and is not of a kind the enforcement of which is contrary to natural justice or the public policy of the Cayman Islands. However, the Cayman Islands courts are unlikely to enforce a judgment obtained from the U.S. courts under civil liability provisions of the U.S. federal securities law if such judgment is determined by the courts of the Cayman Islands to give rise to obligations to make payments that are penal or punitive in nature. A Cayman Islands court may stay enforcement proceedings if concurrent proceedings are being brought elsewhere.

The recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments are provided for under the PRC Civil Procedures Law. PRC courts may recognize and enforce foreign judgments in accordance with the requirements of the PRC Civil Procedures Law based either on treaties between China and the country where the judgment is made or on principles of reciprocity between jurisdictions. China does not have any treaties with the United States or the Cayman Islands that provide for the enforcement of foreign judgments and PRC courts strictly adopt the principle of reciprocity in judicial practice. In addition, according to the PRC Civil Procedures Law, courts in the PRC will not enforce a foreign judgment against us or our directors and officers if they decide that the judgment violates the basic principles of PRC law or national sovereignty, security, or public interest. As a result, it is uncertain whether and on what basis a PRC court would enforce a judgment rendered by a court in the United States or in the Cayman Islands.

Our corporate affairs are governed by our memorandum and articles of association, as amended and restated from time to time, and by the Companies Act (As Revised) and common law of the Cayman Islands. The rights of shareholders to take legal action against us and our directors, actions by minority shareholders and the fiduciary duties of our directors to us under Cayman Islands law are to a large extent governed by the common law of the Cayman Islands. The common law of the Cayman Islands is derived in part from comparatively limited judicial precedent in the Cayman Islands as well as from English common law, which provides persuasive, but not binding, authority in a court in the Cayman Islands. The rights of our shareholders and the fiduciary duties of our directors under Cayman Islands law are not as clearly established as they would be under statutes or judicial precedents in the United States. In particular, the Cayman Islands has a less developed body of securities laws than the United States and provides significantly less protection to investors. In addition, shareholders in Cayman Islands companies may not have standing to initiate a shareholder derivative action in U.S. federal courts.

It is also difficult or impossible for you to bring an action against us or against our directors and officers in China. Under the PRC Civil Procedures Law, foreign shareholders may bring an action based on PRC law against a company in China for disputes if they can establish sufficient nexus to the PRC for a PRC court to have jurisdiction, and meet other procedural requirements, including, among others, the plaintiff must have a direct interest in the case, and there must be a concrete claim, a factual basis and a cause for the suit. It will be, however, difficult for U.S. shareholders to bring actions against us in the PRC in accordance with PRC laws because we are incorporated under the laws of the Cayman Islands and it will be difficult for U.S. shareholders, by virtue only of holding the ADSs or ordinary shares, to establish a connection to the PRC for a PRC court to have jurisdiction as required under the PRC Civil Procedures Law.

As a result, our public shareholders may have more difficulty in protecting their interests through actions against us, our management, our directors or our controlling shareholders than would shareholders of a corporation incorporated in a jurisdiction in the United States.

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Our memorandum and articles of association contains anti-takeover provisions that could adversely affect the rights of holders of our common shares and ADSs.

Our currently effective memorandum and articles of association contains certain provisions that could limit the ability of others to acquire control of our company, including a provision that grants authority to our board directors to establish from time to time one or more series of preferred shares without action by our shareholders. The provisions could have the effect of depriving our shareholders of the opportunity to sell their shares at a premium over the prevailing market price by discouraging third parties from seeking to obtain control of our company in a tender offer or similar transactions.

Our corporate actions are substantially controlled by our directors, executive officers and other principal shareholders, who can exert significant influence over important corporate matters, which may reduce the price of our ADSs and deprive you of an opportunity to receive a premium for your shares.

As of March 31, 2021, our directors, executive officers and existing principal shareholders beneficially owned approximately 47.7% of our outstanding common shares. These shareholders, if acting together, could exert substantial influence over matters such as electing directors and approving material mergers, acquisitions or other business combination transactions. This concentration of ownership may also discourage, delay or prevent a change in control of our company, which could have the dual effect of depriving our shareholders of an opportunity to receive a premium for their shares as part of a sale of our company and reducing the price of our ADSs. These actions may be taken even if they are opposed by our other shareholders. In addition, these persons could divert business opportunities away from us to themselves or others.

We incur increased costs as a result of being a public company, particularly after we have ceased to qualify as an “emerging growth company.”

As a public company in the United States, we incur significant accounting, legal and other expenses that we did not incur as a private company. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act, as well as rules subsequently implemented by the Securities and Exchange Commission and the NASDAQ Global Select Market, require significantly heightened corporate governance practices of public companies, including Section 404 relating to internal control over financial reporting. We expect these rules and regulations to increase our legal and financial compliance costs and to make some corporate activities more time-consuming and costly. In particular, as we are no longer an “emerging growth company,” we expect to incur significant expenses and devote substantial management efforts in assessing our internal control over financial reporting and comply with the auditor attestation requirement under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Compliance with these rules and requirements may be especially difficult and costly for us because we may have difficulty locating sufficient personnel in China with experience and expertise relating to U.S. GAAP and U.S. public company reporting requirements, and such personnel may command high salaries relative to similarly experienced personnel in the United States. If we cannot employ sufficient personnel to ensure compliance with these rules and regulations, we may need to rely more on outside legal, accounting and financial experts, which may be costly. If we fail to comply with these rules and requirements, or are perceived to have weaknesses with respect to our compliance, we could become the subject of a governmental enforcement action and investor confidence could be negatively impacted and the market price of our ADSs could decline. In addition, we will incur additional costs associated with our public company reporting requirements. We are currently evaluating and monitoring developments with respect to these rules and regulations, and we cannot predict or estimate with reasonable certainty the amount of additional costs we may incur or the timing of such costs.

We were named as a defendant in putative shareholder class action lawsuits in the United States, and we may be involved in more class action lawsuits in the future. Such lawsuits could divert a significant amount of our management’s attention and other resources from our business and operations, which could harm our results of operations and require us to incur significant expenses to defend the lawsuits. Any such class action suit, whether or not successful, could harm our reputation and restrict our ability to raise capital in the future. In addition, if a claim is successfully made against us, we may be required to pay significant damages, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

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We believe we were a passive foreign investment company for our taxable year ended December 31, 2020, which could subject United States investors in the ADSs or common shares to significant adverse United States federal income tax consequences.

Based on the market price of our ADSs and the composition of our assets (in particular the retention of a substantial amount of cash), we believe that we were a “passive foreign investment company,” (or a “PFIC”), for United States federal income tax purposes for our taxable year ended December 31, 2020, and we will very likely be a PFIC for our current taxable year ending December 31, 2021 unless the market price of our ADSs increases and/or we invest a substantial amount of the cash and other passive assets we hold in assets that produce or are held for the production of active income. In addition, it is possible that one or more of our subsidiaries may be or become classified as a PFIC for United States federal income tax purposes. A non-U.S. corporation will be classified as a PFIC for any taxable year if either (1) 75% or more of its gross income consists of certain types of passive income or (2) 50% or more of the value of its assets (generally determined on the basis of a quarterly average) during such year is attributable to assets that produce or are held for the production of passive income.

If we are classified as a PFIC for any taxable year during which a U.S. Holder (as defined in Item 10. Additional Information—E. Taxation—United States Federal Income Tax Considerations) holds our ADSs or common shares, such U.S. Holder may incur significantly increased United States federal income tax on gain recognized on the sale or other disposition of the ADSs or common shares and on the receipt of distributions on the ADSs or common shares to the extent such gain or distribution is treated as an “excess distribution” under the United States federal income tax rules. Further, if we are classified as a PFIC for any year during which a U.S. Holder holds our ADSs or common shares, we generally will continue to be treated as a PFIC for all succeeding years during which such U.S. Holder holds our ADSs or common shares (“PFIC Tainted Shares”) even if, we, in fact, cease to be a PFIC in subsequent taxable years. Accordingly, a U.S. Holder of our ADSs or common shares is urged to consult its tax advisor concerning the United States federal income tax considerations related to holding and disposing of ADSs or common shares (including, to the extent an election is available, making a “mark-to-market” election to avoid owning PFIC-Tainted Shares and the unavailability of an election to treat us as a qualified electing fund). For more information, see the section titled “Item 10. Additional Information—E. Taxation—United States Federal Income Tax Considerations—Passive Foreign Investment Company Considerations.”

Item 4.   Information on the Company

A.           History and Development of the Company

We commenced operations in January 2003 through the establishment of Shenzhen Xunlei, which currently, together with its various subsidiaries in the PRC, operates our Xunlei internet platform.

In February 2005, we established Xunlei Limited as our holding company in the Cayman Islands. Xunlei Limited directly owns Giganology Shenzhen, our wholly owned subsidiary in China established in June 2005. Giganology Shenzhen primarily engages in the research and development of new technologies.

Giganology Shenzhen has entered into a series of contractual arrangements with Shenzhen Xunlei and its shareholders. These contractual arrangements enable us to exercise effective control over Shenzhen Xunlei and receive substantially all of the economic benefits of Shenzhen Xunlei. As a result, Shenzhen Xunlei is our variable interest entity and we have consolidated the financial results of Shenzhen Xunlei and its subsidiaries in our consolidated financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP. The existing principal subsidiaries of Shenzhen Xunlei include the following:

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Shenzhen Xunlei Wangwenhua Co., Ltd. (formerly known as “Shenzhen Fengdong Networking Technologies Co., Ltd.”), or Wangwenhua, which was established in December 2005 and primarily engages in software development, technical consulting and other related technical services.

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Shenzhen Zhuolian Software Co., Ltd. (formerly known as “Xunlei Software (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd.”), which was established in January 2010 and primarily engages in the development of software technology and the development of computer software.

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Xunlei Games Development (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd., or Xunlei Games, which was established in February 2010 and primarily engages in the development of online game and computer software and advertising services.

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Shenzhen Onething Technologies Co., Ltd., or Shenzhen Onething, which was established in September 2013 and primarily engages in cloud computing technology development and related services.

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Beijing Xunjing Technology Co., Ltd. (formerly known as “Wangxin Century Technologies (Beijing) Co., Ltd.”), or Beijing Xunjing, which was established in October 2015 and currently a subsidiary of Wangwenhua. Beijing Xunjing primarily engages in technology development and related services.

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Shenzhen Crystal Interactive Technologies Co., Ltd., which was established in May 2016 and currently a subsidiary of Shenzhen Onething, and primarily engages in development of computer software and provision of information technology services.

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Beijing Onething Technologies Co., Ltd., which was established in January 2017 and primarily engages in development of computer software and provision of information technology service.