Company Quick10K Filing
Quick10K
Bio-En
10-K 2018-12-31 Annual: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-09-30 Quarter: 2018-09-30
10-Q 2018-06-30 Quarter: 2018-06-30
10-Q 2018-03-31 Quarter: 2018-03-31
10-K 2017-12-31 Annual: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-09-30 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-Q 2017-06-30 Quarter: 2017-06-30
10-Q 2017-03-31 Quarter: 2017-03-31
10-K 2016-12-31 Annual: 2016-12-31
10-Q 2016-09-30 Quarter: 2016-09-30
10-Q 2016-06-30 Quarter: 2016-06-30
10-Q 2016-03-31 Quarter: 2016-03-31
10-K 2015-12-31 Annual: 2015-12-31
10-Q 2015-09-30 Quarter: 2015-09-30
10-Q 2015-06-30 Quarter: 2015-06-30
10-Q 2015-03-31 Quarter: 2015-03-31
10-K 2014-12-31 Annual: 2014-12-31
10-Q 2014-09-30 Quarter: 2014-09-30
10-Q 2014-06-30 Quarter: 2014-06-30
10-Q 2014-03-31 Quarter: 2014-03-31
10-K 2013-12-31 Annual: 2013-12-31
8-K 2018-03-16 Enter Agreement, Control, Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2018-01-08 Enter Agreement, Exhibits
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FBC Flagstar Bancorp 2,020
EAT Brinker 1,590
DFIN Donnelley Financial Solutions 527
SRET Sterling Real Estate Trust 193
USAP Universal Stainless & Alloy Products 148
ATIS Attis Industries 7
BENH 2018-12-31
Part I
Item 1. Business
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.
Item 2. Properties
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Part II
Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6. Selected Financial Data
Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Note 1 - Nature of Business and Basis of Presentation
Note 2 - Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Note 3 - Purchased Intangible Assets, Net
Note 4 - Loan From Related Party
Note 5 - Other Payable
Note 6 - Stockholder's Equity
Note 7 - Income Taxes
Note 8- Related Party Transactions
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures
Item 9B. Other Information
Part III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11. Executive Compensation
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services
Part IV
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules
EX-31.1 tv515802_ex31-1.htm
EX-31.2 tv515802_ex31-2.htm
EX-32.1 tv515802_ex32-1.htm
EX-32.2 tv515802_ex32-2.htm

Bio-En Earnings 2018-12-31

BENH 10K Annual Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

10-K 1 tv515802_10k.htm 10-K

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

Form 10-K

 

(Mark One)

 

xANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018

 

or

 

¨TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from ______________ to ________________

 

Commission file number 333-186629

 

BIO-EN HOLDINGS CORP.

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware   990369776
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
     
1 County Road, Unit B6    
 Secaucus, New Jersey   07094
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

 

(845) 364-7151

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

N/A   N/A
Title of each class   Name of each exchange on which
registered

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

 

Shares of Common Stock, $0.0001 par value

Title of Class

 

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ¨  No x

 

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes x  No ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ¨  No x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes x  No ¨

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ¨ 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer   ¨ Accelerated filer ¨
Non-accelerated filer x Smaller reporting company   x
    Emerging growth company ¨

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes x  No ¨

 

There was no active public trading market as of the last business day of the Company’s second fiscal quarter, so there was no aggregate market value of common stock held by non-affiliates. 

 

As March 1, 2019 there were 77,350,003 shares of common stock issued and outstanding.

  

Documents Incorporated By Reference: None.

 

 

 

 

 

  

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

  PART I  
     
Item 1. Business 4
Item 1A. Risk Factors 7
Item 2. Properties 14
Item 3. Legal Proceedings 14
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 14
     
  PART II  
     
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities 15
Item 6. Selected Financial Data 15
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 16
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 18
Item 8.  Financial Statements and Supplementary Data F-1
Item 9. Changes In and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure 19
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures 19
Item 9B. Other Information 19
     
  PART III  
     
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance 20
Item 11. Executive Compensation 22
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters 24
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence. 25
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services 26
     
  PART IV  
     
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules 27
Signatures   28

 

 2 

 

  

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K (this “Report”) contains “forward-looking statements.” Forward-looking statements discuss matters that are not historical facts. Because they discuss future events or conditions, forward-looking statements may include words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “intend,” “could,” “should,” “would,” “may,” “seek,” “plan,” “might,” “will,” “expect,” “predict,” “project,” “forecast,” “potential,” “continue” negatives thereof or similar expressions. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are made, are based on various underlying assumptions and current expectations about the future and are not guarantees. Such statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, level of activity, performance or achievement to be materially different from the results of operations or plans expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements.

 

We cannot predict all of the risks and uncertainties. Accordingly, such information should not be regarded as representations that the results or conditions described in such statements or that our objectives and plans will be achieved, and we do not assume any responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of any of these forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are found at various places throughout this Report and include information concerning possible or assumed future results of our operations, including statements about potential acquisition or merger targets; business strategies; future cash flows; financing plans; plans and objectives of management; any other statements regarding future acquisitions, future cash needs, future operations, business plans and future financial results, and any other statements that are not historical facts.

  

These forward-looking statements represent our intentions, plans, expectations, assumptions and beliefs about future events and are subject to risks, uncertainties and other factors. Many of those factors are outside of our control and could cause actual results to differ materially from the results expressed or implied by those forward-looking statements. In light of these risks, uncertainties and assumptions, the events described in the forward-looking statements might not occur or might occur to a different extent or at a different time than we have described. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this Report. All subsequent written and oral forward-looking statements concerning other matters addressed in this Report and attributable to us or any person acting on our behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by the cautionary statements contained or referred to in this Report.

 

Except to the extent required by law, we undertake no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events, a change in events, conditions, circumstances or assumptions underlying such statements, or otherwise.

  

CERTAIN TERMS USED IN THIS REPORT

 

As used in this Annual Report, the terms “Company”, "W(w)e," "U(u)s," "O(o)ur," "Bio-En Holdings Corp., “Bio-En”, “BHC”," and “Issuer” mean Bio-En Holdings Corp., unless the context clearly requires otherwise.

 

 3 

 

  

PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

 

Overview

 

Bio-En Holdings Corp. (formerly Olivia Inc.) is a Delaware corporation, incorporated on August 2, 2011. The Company initially intended to participate in the bio-fuel technology industry. The Company held a license agreement for a portfolio of patents including Gravity Pressure Vessels and supporting appurtenances (“Licensed Technology”).

 

The Company planned to design and execute agreements to build, operate and maintain a bio-mass to energy facility on the Island of Malta, utilizing the Licensed Technology (“Facility”). 

 

The Company was not successful in obtaining the full funding required to establish the Facility. The Company is no longer seeking to exploit the Licensed Technology and/or pursuing the establishment of the Facility.

 

As a result of discontinuing its prior operations relating to the proposed building of the Facility and exploitation of the Licensed Technology, the Company became a shell company. As discussed below, the Company’s current business plan is to seek and identify a privately-held operating company desiring to become a publicly held company by combining with the Company through a reverse merger or acquisition type transaction. Private companies wishing to have their securities publicly traded may seek to merge or effect an exchange transaction with a shell company that is reporting and eligible for quotation on the over-the-counter market. As a result of the merger or exchange transaction, the stockholders of the private company will hold a majority of the issued and outstanding shares of the shell company. Typically, the directors and officers of the private company become the directors and officers of the shell company. Often the name of the private company becomes the name of the shell company.

 

Although the Company has not yet determined what private company, business or assets to acquire, the Company’s Chief Executive Officer is involved in several business ventures and may ask the board to consider acquiring one or more of such business ventures. Alternatively, the Company may seek to acquire a private company, business or assets from an unrelated third party.

  

 

Our Corporate History and Background 

 

The Company, through its merger (“Merger”) with Bio-En Corp (“BEC”), entered into the development stage and devoted substantially all of its efforts to the development of its business plan, whereby Company intended to participate in the waste to bio-fuel technology industry. The Company intended to plan, design, and execute agreements to build, operate and maintain a bio-mass to energy operation at the Facility, the same contingent on sufficient capital funding.  The Company’s fiscal year-end is December 31.

  

 4 

 

   

New Opportunities

 

With the inability to raise the necessary funds we have been forced to reevaluate our business plans. As such, our principal business objective for the next 12 months and beyond will be to achieve long-term growth potential through starting up a new business or a combination with an existing business. We will not restrict our potential candidate target companies to any specific business, industry or geographical location and, thus, may acquire any type of business. Furthermore, we will consider both businesses and opportunities that are under the control of our chief executive officer, Baruch Adika, and also businesses and opportunities that are under the control of unrelated third parties.

 

The analysis of new business opportunities has and will be undertaken by or under the supervision of our officers and directors. We have unrestricted flexibility in seeking, analyzing and participating in potential business opportunities. In our efforts to analyze potential acquisition targets, we will consider the following kinds of factors:

 

·Potential for growth, indicated by new technology, anticipated market expansion or new products;
·Competitive position as compared to other firms of similar size and experience within the industry segment as well as within the industry as a whole;
·Strength and diversity of management, either in place or scheduled for recruitment;
·Capital requirements and anticipated availability of required funds, to be provided by us or from operations, through the sale of additional securities, through joint ventures or similar arrangements or from other sources;
·The cost of participation by us as compared to the perceived tangible and intangible values and potentials;
·The extent to which the business opportunity can be advanced;
·The accessibility of required management expertise, personnel, raw materials, services, professional assistance and other required items; and
·Other relevant factors.

 

In applying the foregoing criteria, no one of which will be controlling, we will attempt to analyze all factors and circumstances and make a determination based upon reasonable investigative measures and available data. Potentially available business opportunities may occur in many different industries, and at various stages of development, all of which will make the task of comparative investigation and analysis of such business opportunities extremely difficult and complex. Due to our limited capital available for investigation, we may not discover or adequately evaluate adverse facts about the opportunity to be acquired.

 

 5 

 

  

Form of Acquisition

 

The manner in which we participate in an opportunity will depend upon the nature of the opportunity, the respective needs and desires of us and the potential candidates, and our relative negotiating strength with such candidates. It is likely that we will require its participation in a business opportunity through the issuance of our common stock or other securities. Although the terms of any such transaction cannot be predicted, it should be noted that in certain circumstances the criteria for determining whether or not an acquisition is a so-called "tax free" reorganization under Section 368(a) (1) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the "Code"), depends upon whether the owners of the acquired business will own 80% or more of the voting stock of the surviving entity. If a transaction were structured to take advantage of these provisions rather than other "tax free" provisions provided under the Code, all prior stockholders would, in such circumstances, retain 20% or less of the total issued and outstanding shares. Under other circumstances, depending upon the relative negotiating strength of the parties, prior stockholders may retain substantially less than 20% of the total issued and outstanding shares of the surviving entity. This could result in substantial additional dilution to the equity of those who were our stockholders prior to such transaction.

  

Our present stockholders may not be left with control of a majority of our voting shares following the formation of a new business or an acquisition. As part of such a transaction, all or a majority of our directors and officers may resign and new directors may be appointed.

  

In the case of an acquisition, the transaction may be accomplished upon determination of the Company’s Board of Directors (“Board”), without any vote or approval by stockholders. In the case of a statutory merger or consolidation directly involving us, it may be necessary to call a stockholders' meeting and obtain the approval of the holders of a majority of the outstanding shares. The necessity to obtain such stockholder approval may result in delay and additional expense in the consummation of any proposed transaction and will also give rise to certain appraisal rights to dissenting stockholders. Most likely, we will seek to structure any such transaction so as not to require stockholder approval.

  

It is anticipated that the investigation of specific business opportunities and the negotiation, drafting and execution of relevant agreements, disclosure documents and other instruments will require substantial time and attention and substantial cost for accountants, attorneys and others. If a decision were made not to participate in a specific business opportunity, the costs theretofore incurred in the related investigation would not be recoverable. Furthermore, even if an agreement is reached for the participation in a specific business opportunity, the failure to consummate that transaction may result in the loss to us of the related costs incurred.

 

Our chief executive officer, Baruch Adika, is involved in several different business ventures and may propose to the Company that it acquire the assets or entities that own one or more of these ventures although no such proposal has been made and Mr. Adika may determine not to make any such proposal and, instead we may seek to acquire a private company, assets or business from an unrelated third party. Other than as discussed above, none of our officers or our directors have yet had any preliminary contact or discussions with any representative of any other entity regarding a business combination with us. Any target business that is selected may be a financially unstable company or an entity in its early stages of development or growth, including entities without established records of sales or earnings. In that event, we will be subject to numerous risks inherent in the business and operations of financially unstable and early stage or potential emerging growth companies. In addition, we may affect a business combination with an entity in an industry characterized by a high level of risk, and, although our management will endeavor to evaluate the risks inherent in a particular target business, there can be no assurance that we will properly ascertain or assess all significant risks.

 

We anticipate that the selection of a business combination will be complex and extremely risky. Because of general economic conditions, rapid technological advances being made in some industries and shortages of available capital, our management believes that there are numerous firms seeking even the limited additional capital that we will have and/or the perceived benefits of becoming a publicly traded corporation. Such perceived benefits of being a publicly traded corporation include, among other things, facilitating or improving the terms on which additional equity financing may be obtained, providing liquidity for the principals of and investors in a business, creating a means for providing incentive stock options or similar benefits to key employees, and offering greater flexibility in structuring acquisitions, joint ventures and the like through the issuance of stock. Potentially available business combinations may occur in many different industries and at various stages of development, all of which will make the task of comparative investigation and analysis of such business opportunities extremely difficult and complex.

 

Employees

 

We presently have no employees apart from our management.  We have several consultants who currently provide services to us. Some of them are compensated for their services through the issuance of Company shares, which may result in further dilution to our stockholders.  We may hire additional employees, consultants, and recruit senior executive members as officers and directors, as needed, which persons/entities may be instrumental in forming a new business or we may acquire another business with a full management team already on board.

 

 6 

 

  

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

In addition to the other information in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, stockholders or prospective investors should carefully consider the following risk factors:

 

An investment in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the risks described below, together with all of the other information included in this Report, before making an investment decision. If any of the following risks actually occurs, our business, financial condition or results of operations could suffer. In that case, the trading price of our shares of common stock could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment. You should read the section entitled “Special Note Regarding Forward Looking Statements” above for a discussion of what types of statements are forward-looking statements, as well as the significance of such statements in the context of this Report.

 

Risks Related to Our Company

 

We are a shell company that is seeking to acquire an operating business and may fail to do so and, even if we are successful, that business may never achieve profitability. We need additional capital to maintain our company as a public reporting company and to seek acquisition opportunities and the failure to raise additional capital could place our continued viability in question.

 

We currently have no operations. We are a shell company and we are incurring expenses relating to maintaining our status as a reporting company under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. We will require capital to maintain our current status as a reporting shell company and to cover expenses relating to the investigation of acquisition opportunities and the failure to raise additional capital could place our continued viability in question. Our chief executive officer, Baruch Adika, has been paying our day-to-day expenses; however, he has no obligation to continue to do so. If he were to stop covering such expenses, we would need to raise capital from external sources. In particular we would try to raise additional capital from external sources to carry out our pursued business plan of combining with an operating business. If we are unable to generate the required additional capital, our ability to meet our financial obligations and to implement our business plan may be adversely affected.  We currently have no commitments to obtain additional capital, and there can be no assurance that any financing will be available in amounts or on terms acceptable to us, if at all.  If we are not successful in raising additional working capital to support our operations and implement our business plan, we may be forced to curtail our operations, take additional measures to reduce costs, modify our business plan, and consider strategic alternatives that could include a sale of our business or filing for bankruptcy protection.

 

We have no agreement for a business combination and we do not have any minimum requirements for a business combination.

 

We have no current arrangement, agreement or understanding with respect to engaging in a business combination with a specific entity. We may not be successful in identifying and evaluating a suitable merger candidate or in consummating a business combination. We have not selected a particular industry or specific business within an industry for a target company. We have not established a specific length of operating history or a specified level of earnings, assets, net worth or other criteria which we will require a target company to have achieved, or without which we would not consider a business combination with such business entity.

 

The loss of the services of Baruch Adika, our chief executive officer and director, would adversely affect our ability to implement our business plan.

 

Mr. Adika is primarily responsible for conducting our day-to-day operations and implementing our business plan. We will rely solely on the judgment of Mr. Adika when selecting a target company. Mr. Adika will only devote a limited amount of his time each month to our business. Mr. Adika has not entered into a written employment agreement with us and he is not expected to do so. The loss of the services of Mr. Adika would adversely affect our ability to implement our business plan.

 

 7 

 

 

Conflicts of interest may arise between us and our stockholders, and our chief executive officer, Mr. Adika, during the implementation of our business plan which may have a negative impact on our ability to consummate a business transaction.

 

Our President, Mr. Adika, is not required to commit his full time to our affairs, which may result in a conflict of interest in allocating his time between our operations and other businesses. We do not intend to have any full time employees prior to the consummation of a business combination. Mr. Adika is engaged in several other business endeavors and is not obligated to contribute any specific number of hours to our affairs. If his other business affairs require him to devote more substantial amounts of time to such interests, it could limit his ability to devote time to our affairs and could have a negative impact on our ability to consummate a business combination.

  

Although no determination has been made regarding the operating business that we plan to require, it is possible that we may acquire an operating company that Mr. Adika has an ownership interest in or that he is an officer or director of. Mr. Adika is involved in several different business ventures and he may propose to our company that we acquire one or more of such ventures. If we do acquire any business affiliated with Mr. Adika, we may not be able to do so on terms that would be arrived at if the transaction were negotiated on an arms-length basis. As a result, the stockholders of our company may be adversely affected as compared to a similar transaction with an independent third party.

 

Depending upon the nature of a proposed transaction, our stockholders, other than Mr. Adika, may not be afforded the opportunity to approve or consent to a particular transaction.

 

The stockholders of our company will likely not have the right to vote in favor of or against a proposed business combination. In most cases, a business combination will not require stockholder approval. Accordingly, stockholders will be relying on the determination of Mr. Adika regarding a business combination.

 

To implement our business plan we may be required to employ accountants, technical experts, appraisers, attorneys, or other consultants or advisors. The selection of any such advisors will be made by Mr. Adika and their fees will be paid by Mr. Adika if he is willing to do so at the time. We anticipate that such persons may be engaged on an as needed basis without a continuing fiduciary or other obligation to us.

 

If Mr. Adika considers it necessary to hire outside advisors, he may elect to hire persons who are affiliates of his. Such advisors because of their relationship with Mr. Adika may not fully consider our best interest in rendering advice and services to us.

 

We have no cash and no operations and may not have access to sufficient capital to consummate a business combination.

 

Mr. Adika has been responsible for payment of our operating expenses and expenses of implementing our business plan however he is not required to continue to do so. We may not be able to take advantage of any available business opportunities because of the limited and uncertain availability of capital. There is no assurance that Mr. Adika will have sufficient capital to provide us with the necessary funds to successfully implement our plan of operation or that he will continue to provide us with capital in the future.

 

There may be a scarcity of and/or significant competition for business opportunities and combinations, which may impede our ability to consummate a merger or acquisition.

 

We are and will continue to be an insignificant participant in the business of seeking mergers with and acquisitions of privately-held business entities. A large number of established and well-financed entities, including private equity and venture capital firms, are active in seeking potential merger and acquisition candidates for their clients and investors. Substantially all such entities have significantly greater financial resources, technical expertise and managerial capabilities than we have and, consequently, we will be at a competitive disadvantage in identifying possible business opportunities and successfully completing a business combination. Moreover, we will also compete in seeking merger or acquisition candidates with other public shell companies who may have more available funds or other assets that make them a more attractive candidate for a merger than we are.

 

 8 

 

 

Reporting requirements under the Exchange Act may delay or preclude a merger or acquisition.

 

The rules and regulations of the SEC require a reporting shell company to timely provide in a Current Report on Form 8-K financial and other information, including audited financial statements, of the acquired company if we engage in a business combination, or if there is a change in our control. The additional time and costs that may be incurred by the potential target company to prepare audited financial statements and other information may significantly delay or essentially preclude consummation of an otherwise desirable acquisition.

 

A business combination will result in a change in control of our company and significantly reduce the ownership interest of our current stockholders.

  

In conjunction with completion of a business acquisition, we anticipate that we will issue an amount of our authorized but unissued common stock that will represent a significant majority of the voting power and equity of our company, which will, in all likelihood, result in stockholders of a target company obtaining a controlling interest in us and thereby reducing the ownership interest of our current stockholders. We may also issue preferred stock to the stockholders of a target company. Holders of preferred stock may have rights, preferences and privileges senior to those of our existing holders of common stock. As a condition of the business combination, persons holding a majority of our common stock may agree to sell or transfer all or a portion of the common stock they own to provide the target company with majority control. The resulting change in control will likely result in the removal of our present officers and directors and a corresponding reduction in, or elimination of, their participation in future business activities.

 

We may engage in a business combination with a foreign entity which will subject us to additional business risks.

 

We may effectuate a business combination with a merger target whose business operations or even headquarters, place of formation or primary place of business are located outside the United States of America. In such event, we may face the significant additional risks associated with doing business in that country. In addition to the language barriers, different presentations of financial information, different business practices, and other cultural differences and barriers that may make it difficult to evaluate such a merger target, we may encounter ongoing business risks associated with uncertain legal systems and applications of law, prejudice against foreigners, corrupt practices, uncertain economic policies and potential political and economic instability that may be exacerbated in various foreign countries.

 

We may engage in a business combination that may have tax consequences to us and our stockholders.

 

Federal and state tax consequences will, in all likelihood, be major considerations in any business combination that we may undertake. Currently, such transactions may be structured so as to result in tax-free treatment to both companies and their stockholders, pursuant to various federal and state tax provisions. We intend to structure any business combination so as to minimize the federal and state tax consequences to both our company and the target entity and their stockholders. However, there can be no assurance that such business combination will meet the statutory requirements of a tax-free reorganization or that the parties will obtain the intended tax-free treatment upon a transfer of stock or assets. A non-qualifying reorganization could result in the imposition of both federal and state taxes, which may have an adverse effect on both parties to the transaction.

 

 9 

 

  

Our management will be subject to greater demands and we will incur increased costs as a result of being a public company, which could affect our profitability and operating results.  Our accounting, internal audit and other management systems and resources may not be adequately prepared for these demands.

 

We are a public reporting company in the United States subject to the information and reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and the compliance obligations of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. As a public reporting company, we incur significant legal, accounting, investor relations and other expenses. These significant expenses could affect our profitability and our results of operations.

 

Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires annual management assessment of the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting and a report by our independent auditors addressing these assessments. These reporting and other obligations will place significant demands on our management, administrative, operational, internal audit and accounting resources. We anticipate that we will eventually need to upgrade our systems; implement additional financial and management controls, reporting systems and procedures; implement an internal audit function; and hire additional accounting, internal audit and finance staff. If we are unable to then accomplish these objectives in a timely and effective fashion, our ability to comply with our financial reporting requirements and other rules that apply to reporting companies could be impaired. Any failure to maintain effective internal controls could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results and stock price.

 

 10 

 

  

We are dependent upon our officers for management and direction, and the loss of any of these persons could adversely affect our operations and results.

 

We are dependent upon our officers for the successful management for our operations and the execution of our business plan(s). We do not have employment agreements with our officers or other key personnel.   The loss of any of our officers could delay or prevent the achievement of our business objectives, which could have a material adverse effect upon our results of operations and financial position.

 

It may be more difficult for us to retain or attract officers and directors due to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 was enacted in response to public concerns regarding corporate accountability in connection with certain accounting scandals. The stated goals of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act are to increase corporate responsibility, to provide for enhanced penalties for accounting and auditing improprieties at publicly traded companies, and to protect investors by improving the accuracy and reliability of corporate disclosures pursuant to the securities laws. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act generally applies to all companies that file or are required to file periodic reports with the SEC under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.  The enactment of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 led to a series of rules and regulations by the SEC that significantly increases the responsibilities and potential liabilities of directors and executive officers.   Because of the perceived increased personal risk associated with acting as an executive officer or director of a public company, we may be unable, or it may be significantly more expensive, to attract and retain qualified executive officers and directors.

 

Our directors and officers devote time to other ventures, which may adversely impact the time they can devote to our Company and its operations.

 

Some of our officers and directors also serve as officers and/or directors of other companies, and they devote only that portion of their time, which, in their judgment and experience, is reasonably required for the management and operation of our Company and our business.   Executive management may have conflicts of interest in allocating management time, services and functions among our Company and any current and future ventures in which they are engaged.  If our officers and directors are unable to devote adequate time to manage our operations successfully, our potential to succeed as a business and the value of your shares may be adversely affected.

 

 11 

 

 

The market price of our common stock may be particularly volatile and our stockholders may be unable to sell their common stock at or above their purchase price, which may result in substantial losses to a stockholder.

 

If we are successful in acquiring an operating business and if a public market for our common stock develops, it may be characterized by significant price volatility when compared to seasoned issuers. We expect that if we succeed in acquiring an operating business our share price will continue to be more volatile than a seasoned issuer for the indefinite future.   Fluctuations in share price could be based on various factors in addition to those otherwise described in this report, including:

 

  The operating performance of the business we acquire and the performance of its competitors;

  The public’s reaction to our press releases, our other public announcements and our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission;

  Changes in earnings estimates of the business that we acquire or recommendations by research analysts who follow us or other companies in industry of the business that we acquire;

  Variations in general economic conditions;

  The number of shares of our company’s common stock that are publicly traded in the future;

  Actions of our existing stockholders, including sales of common stock by our directors and executive officers;

  The arrival or departure of key personnel; and

  Other developments affecting us, the industry of the company we may acquire or its competitors.

  

 12 

 

  

Many of these factors are beyond our control and may decrease the market price of our common stock, regardless of our operating performance and financial condition.

 

The market price of our common stock may decline if a substantial number of shares of our common stock are sold at once or in large blocks.

 

There is presently no active public market for our common stock.   If an active public market for our shares develops in the future, many of our stockholders may, subject only to the volume, manner of sale and notice requirements of Rule 144 of the Securities Act of 1933 in the case of some stockholders, desire to sell their shares. Sales of a substantial number of these shares in the public market, or the perception that these sales could occur, could cause the market price of our common stock to decline. In addition, the sale of these shares could impair our ability to raise capital through the sale of additional equity securities.

 

Future issuance of our common stock could dilute the interests of existing stockholders.

 

We may issue additional shares of our common stock in the future. The issuance of a substantial amount of common stock could have the effect of substantially diluting the interests of our stockholders. In addition, the sale of a substantial amount of common stock in the public market, either in the initial issuance or in a subsequent resale by the target company in an acquisition which received such common stock as consideration or by investors who acquired such common stock in a private placement could have an adverse effect on the market price of our common stock.

 

We have no plans to pay dividends.

 

To date, we have paid no cash dividends on our common shares. For the foreseeable future, earnings generated from the operations of any business that we may acquire in the future will be retained for use in our business and not to pay dividends.

 

The application of the Securities and Exchange Commission’s “penny stock” rules to our common stock could limit trading activity in the market, and our stockholders may find it more difficult to sell their stock.

 

It is expected our common stock will be trading at less than $5.00 per share and is therefore subject to the SEC penny stock rules. Penny stocks generally are equity securities with a price of less than $5.00. Penny stock rules require a broker-dealer, prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from the rules, to deliver a standardized risk disclosure document that provides information about penny stocks and the risks in the penny stock market. The broker-dealer also must provide the customer with current bid and offer quotations for the penny stock, the compensation of the broker-dealer and its salesperson in the transaction, and monthly account statements showing the market value of each penny stock held in the customer’s account. The broker-dealer must also make a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser and receive the purchaser’s written agreement to the transaction. These requirements may have the effect of reducing the level of trading activity, if any, in the secondary market for a security that becomes subject to the penny stock rules. The additional burdens imposed upon broker-dealers by such requirements may discourage broker-dealers from effecting transactions in our securities, which could severely limit their market price and liquidity of our securities. These requirements may restrict the ability of broker-dealers to sell our common stock and may affect the ability of a stockholder to resell our common stock.

 

 13 

 

  

We incur increased costs as a public company which may affect the profitability of any business we may acquire in the future.

 

As a public company, we incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses that we did not incur as a private company. We are subject to the SEC’s rules and regulations relating to public disclosure. SEC disclosures generally involve a substantial expenditure of financial resources. Compliance with these rules and regulations will significantly increase our legal and financial compliance costs and some activities will become more time-consuming and costly.  Management may need to increase compensation for senior executive officers, engage additional senior financial officers who are able to adopt financial reporting and control procedures, allocate a budget for an investor and public relations program, and increase our financial and accounting staff in order to meet the demands and financial reporting requirements as a public reporting company. Such additional personnel, public relations, reporting and compliance costs may negatively impact our financial results.

 

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.

 

Not applicable.

  

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

 

Our Principal Executive Offices

 

We do not own any real property. Our executive offices are located at 1 Country Road, Unit B6, Secaucus, New Jersey 07094. Our officers currently work from their homes and the Company does not pay any rent. The mailing address is a private address and is provided at no cost to the Company.  

 

We believe our current facilities are sufficient for our current needs and will be adequate, or that suitable additional or substitute space will be available on commercially reasonable terms, for the foreseeable future.

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

We are currently not involved in any litigation that we believe could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations. There is no action, suit, proceeding, inquiry or investigation before or by any court, public board, government agency, self-regulatory organization or body pending or, to the knowledge of the executive officers of our company or any of our subsidiaries, threatened against or affecting our company, our common stock, any of our subsidiaries or of our companies or our subsidiaries’ officers or directors in their capacities as such, in which an adverse decision could have a material adverse effect. 

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Not applicable.

 

 14 

 

  

PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

a)Market Information

 

Market for our common stock

 

Our common stock is currently quoted on the OTC Markets under the symbol BENH.  There is not active trading market for our common stock.

 

(b)Record Holders

 

As of March 1, 2019, we had 52 shareholders of our common stock.

 

(c)Dividends

 

Since our inception, we have not declared nor paid any cash dividends on our capital stock and we do not anticipate paying any cash dividends in the foreseeable future. Our current policy is to retain any earnings in order to finance our operations. Our Board will determine future declarations and payments of dividends, if any, in light of the then-current conditions it deems relevant and in accordance with applicable corporate law.

 

(d)Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

 

We have no existing equity compensation plan.

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities; Use of Proceeds from Sale of Registered Securities

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company engaged in the following sales of unregistered securities.

 

On March 12, 2018, our company and Baruch Adika and Shlomi Shany finalized the closing of a Stock Sale Agreement, dated January 8, 2018, pursuant to which Mr. Adika and Mr. Shany acquired 40,000,000 shares of our common stock. After giving effect to the acquisition of these shares, Messrs. Adika and Shany collectively owned approximately 55% of the issued and outstanding shares of the Company. The aggregate purchase price for the shares was $210,000.00. The proceeds were allocated and distributed to pay or otherwise settle certain accounts payables of Company. The sales were exempt from the registration requirements of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended as the result of the exemption provided under Section 4(a)(2) thereof. 

  

Rule 10B-18 Transactions

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, there were no repurchases of the Company’s common stock by the Company.

  

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

Smaller reporting companies are not required to provide the information required by this item.

 

 15 

 

  

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

The following discussion and analysis of the results of operations and financial condition of Bio-En Holdings Corp. for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2018 should be read in conjunction with the Company’s financial statements, and the notes to those financial statements that are included elsewhere in this Annual Report. Our discussion includes forward-looking statements based upon current expectations that involve risks and uncertainties, such as our plans, objectives, expectations and intentions. Actual results and the timing of events could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of a number of factors, including those set forth under the Cautionary Notice Regarding Forward-Looking Statements and Business sections in this Annual Report. We use words such as “anticipate,” “estimate,” “plan,” “project,” “continuing,” “ongoing,” “expect,” “believe,” “intend,” “may,” “will,” “should,” “could,” and similar expressions to identify forward-looking statements.

 

Overview and Plan of Operation

 

The Company was incorporated under the laws of the State of Delaware on August 2, 2011 as Olivia, Inc. On March 27, 2014, the Company filed with the State of Delaware a Certificate of Amendment to the Articles of Incorporation changing the Company’s name from Olivia, Inc. to Company.

 

The Company has been unsuccessful in obtaining the full funding required for its business plan. Consequently, the Company is searching/researching for new investments opportunities, as discussed below. 

 

The Company’s fiscal year-end is December 31.

 

Results of Operations

 

For the year ended December 31, 2018 and 2017

 

Revenue

 

Company has generated no revenues from January 6, 2014 (Inception) through December 31, 2018.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Our operating expenses for the year ended December 31, 2018, were minus $308,683 as compared to a profit of $308,683 for the same period at December 31, 2017 which was net of write back of Directors’ Compensation and other adjustments arising on the Transfer of Ownership. Our operating expenses consist of general and administrative expenses comprised mainly of consulting, accounting and legal expenses.

 

Net loss

 

Our loss for the year ended December 31, 2018 was $88,535 as compared to a profit of $308,683 for the same period at December 31, 2017. As we did not generate any revenues during the year ended December 31, 2018, our net profit or loss equaled our operating expenses

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

As reflected in the accompanying financial statements, the Company had a net loss of $88,535 as of December 31, 2018, and a working capital deficit of $62,617 and accumulated deficit of $483,566 at December 31, 2018. These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. 

 

 16 

 

 

Net cash used in our operating activities during the year ended December 31, 2018 was $230,891 as compared to minus $13,077 for the same period ended December 31, 2017.

  

Net cash provided by financing activities in the year ended December 31, 2018 was $236,250. As compared to minus $14,153.

 

The ability of the Company to continue its operations is dependent on Management's plans, which may include the raising of capital through debt and/or equity markets with some additional funding from other traditional financing sources, which may include term notes, until such time that funds provided by operations are sufficient to fund working capital requirements. The Company may need to incur liabilities with certain related parties to sustain the Company’s existence.

 

The Company will require additional funding to finance the growth of its current and expected future operations as well as to achieve its strategic objectives. There can be no assurance that financing will be available in amounts or terms acceptable to the Company, if at all.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We have no off-balance sheet arrangements as of December 31, 2018.

 

Inflation

 

We do not believe that inflation has had a material effect on our results of operations.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts or revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Intangible Assets

Identifiable intangible assets with indefinite lives are not amortized, but instead are tested for impairment annually, or more frequently if circumstances indicate a possible impairment may exist. Intangible assets with estimable useful lives are amortized over their respective estimated useful lives, generally on a straight-line basis, and are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may not be recoverable.

 

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

Under Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") Accounting Standards Codification ("ASC") 310, “Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long-lived Assets”, the Company periodically reviews whether changes have occurred that would require revisions to the carrying amounts of its definite lived, long-lived assets. When the sum of the expected future cash flows is less than the carrying amount of the asset, an impairment loss is recognized based on the fair value of the asset.

 

 17 

 

  

Share Based Payments

 

The Company recognizes compensation expense for all equity–based payments in accordance with ASC 718 “Share-Based Payments". Under fair value recognition provisions, the Company recognizes equity–based compensation net of an estimated forfeiture rate and recognizes compensation cost only for those shares expected to vest over the requisite service period of the award.

 

Share-Based Payments to employees, including grants of employee stock options, are recognized as compensation expense in the financial statements based on their fair values. That expense is recognized over the period during which an employee is required to provide services in exchange for the award, known as the requisite service period (usually the vesting period).

 

The Company accounts for Share–Based Payments granted to non–employees in accordance with ASC 505, “Equity Based Payments to Non–Employees”. The Company determines the fair value of the Share–Based Payment as either the fair value of the consideration received or the fair value of the equity instruments issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. If the fair value of the equity instruments issued is used, it is measured using the stock price and other measurement assumptions as of the earlier of either (1) the date at which a commitment for performance by the counterparty to earn the equity instruments is reached, or (2) the date at which the counterparty’s performance is complete.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

 

None.

 

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

Not applicable.

 

 18 

 

  

ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

BIO-EN HOLDINGS CORP

 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

For the year ended DECEMBER 31, 2018

 

CONTENTS:  
   
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm F-2
   
Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2018 and 2017 F-3
   
Statement of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 F-4
   
Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the years ended December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 F-5
   
Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 F-6
   
Notes to the Financial Statements F-7

 

 F-1 

 

  

REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Shareholders and the Board of Directors of Bio-En Holdings Corp

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

We have audited the accompanying balance sheets of Bio-En Holdings Corp (“the Company”) as of December 31, 2018 and 2017 and the related statements of operations, changes in stockholders’ deficit and cash flows, for each of the periods ended December 31, 2018, and the related notes and schedules (collectively referred to as the "financial statements"). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2018 and 2017, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the periods ended December 31, 2018, in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America.

 

Basis for Opinion

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company's financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) ("PCAOB") and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company's internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

Going Concern

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 2 to the financial statements, the Company has not established a source of revenue sufficient to cover its operating costs. As of December 31, 2018, the Company does not have sufficient working capital and cash resources to meet its planned business objectives. These and other factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plan regarding these matters is also described in Note 2 to the financial statements. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

/s/ Weinstein & Co. C.P.A. (Isr)  

 

We have served as the Company's auditor since 2014.

 

Jerusalem, Israel

 

March 18, 2019

 

 F-2 

 

  

BIO-EN HOLDINGS CORP

BALANCE SHEETS

(in US Dollars)

 

   December 31
2018
   December 31
2017
 
    $    $ 
ASSETS          
Current assets:          
Cash and cash equivalents   5,420    60 
Sundry Receivables   6,220      
Total current assets   11,640    60 
           
           
TOTAL ASSETS   11,640    60 
           
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT          
           
Current liabilities:          
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities   37,370    139,500 
Loans from related parties   35,845    70,000 
Total current liabilities   73,215    209,500 
           
           
Total liabilities   73,215    209,500 
           
Stockholders' Deficit          
Preferred stock; $0.0001 par value; 50,000,000 shares authorized; no shares issued and outstanding        - 
Common stock, $0.0001 par value; 250,000,000 shares authorized; 77,350,003 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2018 and 32,350,003 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2017   7,735    3,235 
Additional paid-in capital   352,681    120,931 
Accumulated deficit   (421,991)   (333,606)
Total Stockholders’ Equity   (61,575)   (209,440)
           
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT   11,640    60 

   

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

 F-3 

 

  

BIO-EN HOLDINGS CORP

STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS

(in US Dollars)

  

  

Year ended
December 31,

2018

  

Year ended
December 31,

2017

 
    $    $ 
           
Revenue   -    - 
           
Operating (Income) expenses :          
           
General and administrative (income) expenses:          
Directors' compensation   -    (187,500)
Filing fees   21,053    9,062 
Secretarial expenses   9,614    17,821 
Other costs   239    168 
Professional fees:-          
- Accounting   24,000    (21,000)
- Auditing   29,000    (2,027)
- Legal fees   4,479    (39,177)
Total operating (income) expenses   88,385    (222,653)
           
Other (income) expenses          
Profit on Write Back of Related Party Loan   -    (33,137)
Profit on Cancellation of Technology Agreement   -    (53,573)
Interest expenses   -    680 
           
Net profit (loss)   (88,385)   308,683 
           
Net loss per common share  - basic and diluted:          
           
Net Profit (loss) per common share attributable to common stockholders   0.00    (0.01)
           
Weighted average number of common shares outstanding   77,350,003    32,350,003 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

 F-4 

 

  

BIO-EN HOLDINGS CORP

STATEMENT OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

(in US Dollars)

 

   Preferred
Stock
   Common Stock   Additional
Paid-in
   Accumulated   Total Stockholders’ 
   Shares   Amount   Shares   Amount   Capital   Deficit   Deficit 
         $         $    $    $    $ 
                                    
Balance at January 1, 2017   -    -    32,350,003    3,235    120,931    (642,289)   (518,123)
                                    
Profit for the year   -    -    -    -    -    308,683    308,683 
                                    
Balance at December 31, 2017             32,350,003    3,235    120,931    (333,606)   (209,440)
Stocks Issuance             45,000,000    4,500    231,750         236,250 

Loss for the year

   -    -    -    -    -    (88,385)   (88,385)
                                    
Balance at December 31, 2018   -    -    77,350,003    7,735    352,681    (421,991)   (61,575)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

 F-5 

 

  

BIO-EN HOLDINGS CORP

STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

 

    For the year ended  
    December 31,
2018
   

December 31,

2017

 
    $        
Cash Flows from Operating Activities                
                 
Net profit (loss)     (88,385)       308,683  
                 
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash provided by operating activities:                
                 
Profit Arising on Cancellation of Technology License     -       (53,573 )
                 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:                
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities     (102,130 )     (54,533 )
Accounts payable - related party     -       (187,500 )
Sundry Receivable     (6,220      
Net cash used in operating activities     (196,735 )     (13,077 )
                 
Cash Flows from Investing Activities                
Share Capital Issued     236,250        
                 
Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities                
Proceeds from loan with related party     (34,155 )     (14,153 )
                 
Movement in cash and cash equivalents     5,360       (1,076 )
                 
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the year     60       1,136  
                 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of the year     5,420       60  

  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

 F-6 

 

  

BIO-EN HOLDINGS CORP

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

NOTE 1 – NATURE OF BUSINESS AND BASIS OF PRESENTATION 

 

Company, formerly Olivia Inc., is a Delaware company, incorporated under the laws of the State of Delaware on August 2, 2011.

 

Effective August 21, 2014, the Company filed with the State of Delaware a Certificate of Amendment to the Articles of Incorporation changing the Company’s name from Olivia, Inc. to Bio-En Holdings Corp.

 

On August 21, 2014, Bio-En Corp. merged with, and into Company with Company being the surviving entity of the merger.

  

Basis of Presentation

The Company maintains its accounting records on an accrual basis in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”).

 

These financial statements are presented in US dollars.

 

Fiscal Year End

The Corporation has adopted a fiscal year end of December 31.

 

NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

The principal accounting policies are set out below, these policies have been consistently applied to the period presented, unless otherwise stated:

 

Going Concern

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and the liquidation of liabilities in the normal course of business. As at December 31, 2018, the Company has a working capital deficit of $61,575 and has not earned any revenues to cover its operating costs. The Company intends to fund future operations through equity financing arrangements, which may be insufficient to fund its capital expenditures, working capital and other cash requirements for the year ending December 31, 2018.

 

The ability of the Company to realize its business plan is dependent upon, among other things, obtaining additional financing to continue operations, and development of its business plan. In response to these problems, management intends to raise additional funds through public or private placement offerings.

 

These factors, among others, raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. The accompanying financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts or revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Risks and Uncertainties

The Company may operate in industries that are subject to rapid change. The Company's operations will be subject to significant risk and uncertainties including financial, operational, technological, regulatory and other risks, including the potential of business failure.

 

Business Segments

The Company operates in one segment and therefore segment information is not presented.

 

Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and equivalents include investments with initial maturities of three months or less. The Company maintains its cash balances at credit-worthy financial institutions that are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation ("FDIC") up to $250,000.

 

Property, Plant and Equipment

The Company does not own any property, plant and equipment.

 

 F-7 

 

  

Intangible Assets

Identifiable intangible assets with indefinite lives are not amortized, but instead are tested for impairment annually, or more frequently if circumstances indicate a possible impairment may exist. Intangible assets with estimable useful lives are amortized over their respective estimated useful lives, generally on a straight-line basis, and are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may not be recoverable.

 

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

Under Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") Accounting Standards Codification ("ASC") 310, “Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long-lived Assets”, the Company periodically reviews whether changes have occurred that would require revisions to the carrying amounts of its definite lived, long-lived assets. When the sum of the expected future cash flows is less than the carrying amount of the asset, an impairment loss is recognized based on the fair value of the asset.

 

Accounts payable and accrued expenses

Accounts payable and accrued expenses are carried at amortized cost and represent liabilities for goods and services provided to the Company prior to the end of the financial year that are unpaid and arise when the Company becomes obliged to make future payments in respect of the purchase of these goods and services.

 

Share Based Payments

The Company recognizes compensation expense for all equity–based payments in accordance with ASC 718 “Share-Based Payments". Under fair value recognition provisions, the Company recognizes equity–based compensation net of an estimated forfeiture rate and recognizes compensation cost only for those shares expected to vest over the requisite service period of the award.

 

Share-Based Payments to employees, including grants of employee stock options, are recognized as compensation expense in the financial statements based on their fair values. That expense is recognized over the period during which an employee is required to provide services in exchange for the award, known as the requisite service period (usually the vesting period).

 

The Company accounts for share–based payments granted to non–employees in accordance with ASC 505, “Equity Based Payments to Non–Employees”. The Company determines the fair value of the stock–based payment as either the fair value of the consideration received or the fair value of the equity instruments issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. If the fair value of the equity instruments issued is used, it is measured using the stock price and other measurement assumptions as of the earlier of either (1) the date at which a commitment for performance by the counterparty to earn the equity instruments is reached, or (2) the date at which the counterparty’s performance is complete.

 

Earnings per share

The Company computes net loss per share in accordance with ASC 260, "Earnings Per Share" ASC 260 requires presentation of both basic and diluted earnings per share (“EPS”) on the face of the income statement. Basic EPS is calculated by dividing the profit or loss attributable to common shareholders of the Company by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted EPS is determined by adjusting the profit or loss attributable to common shareholders and the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the effects of all potential dilutive common shares, which comprise convertible compensation to employees.

 

Income taxes

The Company accounts for income taxes under FASB Codification Topic 740-10-25 (“ASC 740-10-25”). Under ASC 740-10-25, deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. Under ASC 740-10-25, the effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The Company measures assets and liabilities at fair value based on an expected exit price as defined by the authoritative guidance on fair value measurements, which represents the amount that would be received on the sale of an asset or paid to transfer a liability, as the case may be, in an orderly transaction between market participants. As such, fair value may be based on assumptions that market participants would use in pricing an asset or liability. The authoritative guidance on fair value measurements establishes a consistent framework for measuring fair value on either a recurring or nonrecurring basis whereby inputs, used in valuation techniques, are assigned a hierarchical level.

 

The following are the hierarchical levels of inputs to measure fair value:

- Level 1: Quoted prices in active markets for identical instruments;

- Level 2: Other significant observable inputs (including quoted prices in active markets for similar instruments);

- Level 3: Significant unobservable inputs (including assumptions in determining the fair value of certain investments).

 

 F-8 

 

  

NOTE 3 – PURCHASED INTANGIBLE ASSETS, NET

 

On March 23, 2014, the Company entered into an Exclusive License Agreement with GeneSyst International, Inc., a Delaware corporation (“Genesyst”), for the acquisition of the rights to patents for the conversion of cellulose material into energy producing Ethanol. The purchase price included a partial initial payment of 10% of the common stock of the Company and $330,000 (including VAT) payable in cash.

 

On November 16, 2018 the Exclusive License Agreement was cancelled by mutual consent. Consequently, the Net Carrying Amount was written off and the Accumulated Amortization up to that date was written back. In addition, a loan repayable to GeneSyst was also cancelled. This resulted in a net overall profit of $53,573.

  

NOTE 4 – LOAN FROM RELATED PARTY

 

   December 31,   December 31, 
   2018   2017 
   $   $ 
Loan from related party   35,845    70,000 

 

The above loans are unsecured and have no set terms of repayment. These loans are repayable on demand.

 

 F-9 

 

  

NOTE 5 – OTHER PAYABLE

 

    December 31,     December 31,  
    2018     2017  
    $     $  
             
License rights     -       -  
                 
The above payable arose from the acquisition of License Rights purchase from GeneSyst International, Inc. a Delaware Corporation and licensor of exclusive rights to patents for the conversion of cellulose material into energy producing Ethanol. The above loan is unsecured, bears no interest and is repayable once the Company has raised $10,000,000. As described earlier, the loan was cancelled as part of the agreement to cancel the related Exclusive License Agreement with GeneSyst International, Inc.                

 

NOTE 6 – STOCKHOLDER’S EQUITY

 

Merger

On August 21, 2014 the Company entered into a Share Exchange/Merger Agreement, between Company, Serena B. Potash (the “Principal Shareholder”) and Bio-En Corp., a Delaware corporation. On August 21, 2014, we filed a Certificate of Merger in the State of Delaware whereby Bio-En Corp. merged with Company, with Company the surviving entity.

  

In conjunction with the Share Exchange/Merger Agreement, all of the issued and outstanding shares of Bio-En Corp. at August 21, 2014 were exchanged for 28,980,000 shares of Company common stock.

 

Common Stock

For the period from January 6, 2014 to March 31, 2014, the Company issued 4,409,196 shares of common stock at $0.0001 per share for $441.00, for professional services.

 

On March 23, 2014 the Company issued 2,548,853 shares of common stock at $0.0001 per share for $255.00, as consideration to purchase license rights to develop and use patented intellectual property as described in note 3.

 

For the period between January 6, 2014 and March 31, 2014 the Company issued 23,041,951 shares of common stock to related parties at $0.0001 per share for $2,304.00 to related parties for services.

 

On March 12, 2018 the Company completed the issuance of 45,000,000 shares of common stock to related parties at $0.00525 per share for $236,250.

 

Cancellation of Shares

On August 21, 2014, pursuant to the Share Exchange/Merger Agreement, Ms. Potash, the then principal shareholder of Company owning an aggregate of 7,894,625 shares of Company common stock, agreed to cancel 6,024,601 of her shareholdings. All cancelled shares of common stock were returned to the Company’s pool of authorized but unissued shares.

  

 F-10 

 

  

NOTE 7 – INCOME TAXES

 

The provision/benefit for income taxes for the year ended December 31, 2018 differs from the amount which would be expected as a result of applying the statutory tax rates to the losses before income taxes due primarily to changes in the valuation allowance to fully reserve net deferred tax assets.

 

Realization of deferred tax assets is dependent upon sufficient future taxable income during the period that deductible temporary differences and carry-forwards are expected to be available to reduce taxable income.

 

   December 31,   December 31, 
   2018   2017 
   $   $ 
Deferred tax assets:          
Pre-tax profit/(loss) as reported   (421,991)   (333,606)
U.S. statutory tax rate   34%   34%
Expected tax expense (benefit)   143,477    113,426 
Total deferred tax assets   143,477    113,426 
Less: Valuation allowance   (143,477)   (113,426)
Net deferred tax assets   -    - 

 

The Company has provided a valuation allowance against the full amount of the deferred tax asset due to management’s uncertainty about its realization. As of December 31, 2018, the Company had approximately $421,991 in tax loss carryforwards that can be utilized in future periods to reduce taxable income, and expire by the year 2038.

 

NOTE 8– RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

Details of transactions between the Company and related parties are disclosed below:

 

The following entities, as of December 31, 2018, have been identified as related parties:

 

Mr. Baruch Adika - President/Director and greater than 10% stockholder
Mr. Bruce Minsky - Company Secretary
Mr. Shlomi Shany - Vice President and greater than 10% stockholder

 

   December 31,   December 31, 
   2018   2017 
   $   $ 
The following transactions were carried out with related parties:          
           
Balance sheets:          
Loan from related party – Director   35,845    70,000 

From time to time, the president and stockholder of the Company provides advances to the Company for its working capital purposes. These advances bear no interest and are due on demand.

          
           
Accounts payable - Directors   -    - 
On December 1, 2014, the Company implemented a Director Compensation package paying each Director $30,000 per calendar year, payable in equal payments on the first day of each calendar quarter. Under the terms of the Transfer of Ownership the directors agreed to waive their unpaid compensation.          
           
Income Statement:          
Compensation (income) expense - Directors   -    (187,500)

 

 F-11 

 

  

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

 

None.

 

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

(a) Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

Disclosure controls and procedures are the controls and other procedures that are designed to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed by the issuer in the reports that it files or submits under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”) is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by an issuer in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to the issuer’s management, including the principal executive and principal financial officer, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving the desired control objectives.

 

We have carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures, as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) of the Exchange Act as of the end of the fiscal year covered by this Annual Report.

 

Based on that evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of the end of the fiscal year covered by this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

(b) Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as defined in Securities Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(f). Internal control over financial reporting is designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with U.S. GAAP. This annual report does not include a report of management's assessment regarding internal control over financial reporting due to a transition period established by rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission for newly public companies.

 

(c) Change in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

There were no significant changes to our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act) during our fourth fiscal quarter, that could materially affect, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION

 

None.

 

 19 

 

  

PART III

 

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

Directors And Executive Officers

 

The following table sets forth the names and ages of all of our directors, executive officers and key employees; and all positions and offices held as of the date of this Report. The directors will hold such office until the next annual meeting of shareholders and until his or her successor has been elected and qualified. Executive officers are elected by the Board and serve at the discretion of the Board.

 

Name   Age   Position
Baruch Adika   40  

President, Chief Executive Officer, Chairman of the Board of Directors

Shlomi Shani   51   Executive Vice President & Director
Ossie Weitzman   64   Chief Financial Officer
Bruce Minsky   55   Corporate Secretary

 

Business Experience

 

The following summarizes the occupation and business experience during the past five years for our officers, directors and key employees as of the date of this Report:

 

Officers

 

Baruch Adika, 40, President, Chief Executive Officer and Director.

 

Baruch Adika has an extensive track record of effective and multifaceted turnaround strategies for globally recognized brands with up to $500 million in revenue. Mr. Adika has comprehensive experience working with heritage brands, spearheading growth in retail and wholesale, managing P&L, sales and multi-channel marketing, corporate restructuring, talent management and investor relations. Mr. Adika has a deep knowledge of national customer bases and broad industry network, driving profitability, audience engagement and brand coherence. Mr. Adika’s core competencies are: attracting, assessing and developing talent, building high-performance management teams; creating innovative turnaround strategies and reinvigorating brand competitiveness; navigating omni-channel retail environments with a hands-on approach; high-impact presentation skills for both internal and external audiences; and broad industry network and in-depth knowledge of supply chain and product. Mr. Adika is currently the President and Chief Executive Officer of W. Showroom, Inc., Sourcing Society Inc. and a corporate gifting company he established in 2008. Mr. Adika is also the Co-Founder of Brand Defender Inc. CyberMinds Inc., and Bio-En Holdings Corp.  

   

Shlomi Shany, 51, Executive Vice-President and Director.

 

Shlomi Shany has been active in the Israeli stock market for over 20 years as a financial advisor and consultant in the field of mergers and acquisitions, specializing in merging private companies into public companies. Shany also heads an investors group focusing on start-up companies in the technology and medical field, including Safe-T Group, Ltd., an Israeli cyber company.

 

Ossie Weitzman, 64, Chief Financial Officer

 

Ossie Weitzman is a UK Chartered Accountant based in Israel. He qualified as a Chartered Accountant in 1978 at Stoy Hayward (now BDO) becoming a manager in the corporate finance and investigations department. In 1983 Mr. Weitzman founded Neville Weitzman & Co a London based firm of Chartered Accountants. Mr. Weitzman immigrated to Israel in 1991 and from 1992 to 1994 was Investment Manager at Concept Investment Services. Since 1995 Mr. Weitzman has been an independent consultant providing financial, economic and venture marketing services to technology and other companies in Israel. Mr. Weitzman holds a B.Soc.Sc in Political Science from the University of Birmingham.

 

Bruce Minsky, 55, Corporate Secretary

 

Bruce W. Minsky, Company’s Corporate Secretary since the Company was acquired, is a graduate of Boston University (B.A., 1985), Southwestern University School of Law (J.D., 1988), and Boston University – Morin Center for Banking Law Studies (LLM in American Banking, 1989). Mr. Minsky is the managing partner of Law Offices of Bruce W. Minsky, P.C., a private law firm specializing in individual business/in-house legal counseling and has held this position for over ten years. Previously Mr. Minsky was Vice-President/House Counsel for Banco Popular North America, a multi-billion dollar domestic bank, from 1991 to 2004, and a trial/litigation/appellate associate of business matters at Quirk & Bakalor, P.C. from 1989 to 2001. Mr. Minsky has years of experience in the gamut of legal services ranging from Consumer/Commercial finance products/services, Corporate Governance, Real Estate, Business/Portfolio transactions, as well as acquisitions matters, to Advertising, Technology, Marketing, Labor, SEC, Finance and Tax scenarios, along with an array of Operational, Compliance and Regulatory oversights. Mr. Minsky is currently the Village Attorney for the Village of New Hempstead. 

  

 20 

 

  

Committees

 

The Board has no standing committees.

 

Family Relationships

 

No family relationship has ever existed between any director, executive officer of the Company, and any person contemplated to become such.

 

Audit Committee Financial Expert

 

Our Board does not currently have any member who qualifies as an audit committee financial expert. We believe that the cost related to retaining such a financial expert at this time is prohibitive. Further, because we are in the start-up stage of our business operations, we believe the services of an audit committee financial expert are not warranted at this time.

 

 21 

 

   

Involvement in Legal Proceedings

 

To the best of our knowledge, during the past ten years, none of the following occurred with respect to our present or former director, executive officer, or employee: (1) any bankruptcy petition filed by or against any business of which such person was a general partner or executive officer either at the time of the bankruptcy or within two years prior to that time; (2) any conviction in a criminal proceeding or being subject to a pending criminal proceeding (excluding traffic violations and other minor offenses); (3) being subject to any order, judgment or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any court of competent jurisdiction, permanently or temporarily enjoining, barring, suspending or otherwise limiting his or her involvement in any type of business, securities or banking activities; and (4) being found by a court of competent jurisdiction (in a civil action), the SEC or the Commodities Futures Trading Commission to have violated a federal or state securities or commodities law, and the judgment has not been reversed, suspended or vacated.

  

Board Leadership Structure

 

The Company has chosen to combine the principal executive officer and Board chairman positions. The Company believes that this Board leadership structure is the most appropriate for the Company for the following reasons. First, the Company is a shell company and at this early stage it is more efficient to have the leadership of the Board in the same hands as the principal executive officer of the Company. The challenges faced by the Company at this stage – identifying an operating business to acquire – are most efficiently dealt with by having one person intimately familiar with both the operational aspects as well as the strategic aspects of the Company’s business.

  

Potential Conflict of Interest

 

Since we do not have an audit or compensation committee comprised of independent Directors, the functions that would have been performed by such committees are performed by our Board. Thus, there is a potential conflict of interest in that our Directors have the authority to determine issues concerning management compensation, in essence their own, and audit issues that may affect management decisions. We are not aware of any other conflicts of interest with any of our executives or Directors.

 

Board’s Role in Risk Oversight

 

The Board assesses on an ongoing basis the risks faced by the Company. These risks include financial, technological, competitive, and operational risks. The Board dedicates time at each of its meetings to review and consider the relevant risks faced by the Company at that time. In addition, since the Company does not have an Audit Committee, the Board is also responsible for the assessment and oversight of the Company’s financial risk exposures.

 

Code of Ethics and Business of Conduct

 

The Company does not currently have a written code of ethics and business of conduct policy.

 

ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

Executive Compensation 

 

The following table shows for the period ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, the compensation awarded (earned) or paid by the Company to its named executive officers or acting in a similar capacity as that term is defined in Item 402(a)(2) of Regulation S-K. There are no understandings or agreements regarding compensation that our management will receive after a business combination that is required to be included in this table, or otherwise.

 

Name and Principal Position   Fiscal
Year
  Salary ($)     Bonus     Option
Awards
    All Other
Compensation
    Total ($)  
Ossie Weitzman, Chief Financial Officer   2017   $ (21,000 )                                
    2018   $ 24,000                                  
Bruce Minsky, Secretary   2017   $ 17,821                                  
    2018   $ 9,614                                  

 

 22 

 

  

Directors Compensation

 

On December 1, 2014, the Company implemented a Director Service Agreement, whereby the Company will pay each Director $30,000 per calendar year, payable in equal payments on the first day of each calendar quarter. In lieu of the Directors receiving quarterly fees in cash, the Company may, at the election of the Directors, pay the Directors in shares of the Company’s common stock. The conversion price of each issuance is calculated by the average of the closing price per share of the Company’s common stock on the five consecutive days trading days ending on the trading day immediately preceding end of the quarter discounted by 30%.

 

As part of the Transfer of Ownership Agreement effective January 8, 2018 Serena B. Potash, Geoffrey Maclaran and Joseph Micallef agreed to waive unpaid salaries in the combined sum of $270,000 and the Director Service Agreements were terminated.

  

Employment Contracts, Termination of Employment, Change-in-Control Arrangements

 

On May 1, 2015 the Company appointed Ossie Weitzman as its Chief Financial Officer and entered into an Independent Contractor Agreement which terms called for an annual compensation of $24,000 per calendar year.

 

As of December 31, 2018, other than the Independent Contractor Agreement with Ossie Weitzman, its Chief Financial Officer, there was no employment or other contracts or arrangements with officers. There are no compensation plans or arrangements, including payments to be made by us, with respect to our officers or consultants that would result from the resignation, retirement or any other termination of such officers or consultants from us. There are no arrangements for officers, employees or consultants that would result from a change-in-control.

 

 23 

 

  

ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS 

 

The following table sets forth certain information as of the date hereof with respect to the beneficial ownership of our ordinary shares, the sole outstanding class of our voting securities, by (i) each stockholder known to be the beneficial owner of 5% or more of the outstanding ordinary shares of the Company, (ii) each executive officer and director, and (iii) all executive officers and directors as a group. Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission and generally includes voting or investment power with respect to securities. ordinary shares subject to options, warrants or convertible securities exercisable or convertible within 60 days as of the date hereof are deemed outstanding for computing the percentage of the person or entity holding such options, warrants or convertible securities but are not deemed outstanding for computing the percentage of any other person and is based on shares issued and outstanding as of March 1, 2019.

  

The following table provides the names and addresses of each person known to us to own more than 5% of our outstanding shares of common stock as of March 12, 2018 and by the officers and directors, individually and as a group. Except as otherwise indicated, all shares are owned directly and the shareholders listed possesses sole voting and investment power with respect to the shares shown. 

 

Name of Beneficial Owner and Address (1)  Amount and Nature of
Beneficial Ownership of
Common Stock
   Percent of Common
Percentage of
Class (2)
 
5% Shareholders          
Applied Bio-Fuels Limited (3)   4,424,118    5.72%
Meyer Feiler   3,935,560    5.088%
           
Directors and Executive Officers          
Baruch Adika   12,150,000    15.708%
Shlomi Shany   12,000,000    15.514%
           
Ossie Weitzman   0    0%
Bruce Minsky   0    0%
           
All directors and officers as a group (5 people)        31.222%

 

(1)Unless otherwise noted, the address of each beneficial owner is c/o Unit 2, Secaucus, New Jersey 07094
(2)

Applicable percentages are based on 77,850,00 shares outstanding as of March 1, 2018, adjusted as required by rules of the SEC. Beneficial ownership is determined under the rules of the SEC and generally includes voting or investment power with respect to securities. Shares of common stock subject to options, warrants and convertible notes currently exercisable or convertible, or exercisable or convertible within 60 days are deemed outstanding for computing the percentage of the person holding such securities but are not deemed outstanding for computing the percentage of any other person. Unless otherwise indicated in the footnotes to this table, the Company believes that each of the shareholders named in the table has sole voting and investment power with respect to the shares of common stock indicated as beneficially owned by them.

(3)Serena B. Potash is the beneficial owner of all shares held by Applied Bio-Fuels Limited.

 

 24 

 

   

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE.

 

Except as disclosed below, since the beginning of the fiscal year preceding the last fiscal year none of the following persons has had any direct or indirect material interest in any transaction to which our Company was or is a party, or in any proposed transaction to which our Company proposes to be a party:

 

·any Director or officer of our Company;

 

·any proposed Director of officer of our Company;

 

·any person who beneficially owns, directly or indirectly, shares carrying more than 5 percent of the voting rights attached to our common stock; or

 

·any member of the immediate family of any of the foregoing persons (including a spouse, parents, children, siblings, and in-laws).

 

On March 12, 2018, our company and Baruch Adika and Shlomi Shany, who are officers and directors of our company, finalized the closing of a Stock Sale Agreement, dated January 8, 2018, pursuant to which Mr. Adika and Mr. Shany acquired 40,000,000 shares of our common stock. After giving effect to the acquisition of these shares, Messrs. Adika and Shany collectively owned approximately 55% of the issued and outstanding shares of the Company. The aggregate purchase price for the shares was $210,000.00. The proceeds were allocated and distributed to pay or otherwise settle certain accounts payables of Company. The sales were exempt from the registration requirements of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended as the result of the exemption provided under Section 4(a)(2) thereof. 

 

 25 

 

  

Director Independence

 

We are not subject to listing requirements of any national securities exchange or national securities association and, as a result, we are not at this time required to have our Board comprised of a majority of “Independent Directors.” We do not believe that our directors currently meet the definition of “independent” as promulgated by the rules and regulations of NASDAQ.

 

ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES

 

Audit Fees

 

The aggregate fees billed since incorporation for professional services rendered by the principal accountant for the audit of our financial statements and review of financial statements included in our quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and services that are normally provided by the accountant in connection with statutory and regulatory filings or engagements for these fiscal periods were as follows:

 

   December 31,
2018
   December 31,
2017
 
Audit Fees  $10,000   $10,000 
Audit Related Fees   -   $- 
Tax Fees   -    - 
All Other Fees       $  

  

Notes:

(1)For the year ended December 31, 2018, principal accountants of the Company were Dov Weinstein & Co. (CPA (Isr).

 

Since incorporation and as of the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018, there were no fees billed for assurance and related services by the principal accountant that are reasonably related to the performance of the audit or review of our financial statements and are not reported under Item 9(e)(1) of Schedule 14A, for professional services rendered by the principal account for tax compliance, tax advice, and tax planning, for products and services provided by the principal accountant, other than the services reported in Item 9(e)(1) through 9(d)(3) of Schedule 14A.

 

Audit Committee Pre-Approval of Audit and Permissible Non-Audit Services of Independent Auditors

 

Given the small size of our Board as well as the limited activities of our Company, our Board acts as our Audit Committee. Our Board pre-approves all audit and permissible non-audit services. These services may include audit services, audit-related services, tax services, and other services. Our Board approves these services on a case-by-case basis.

 

 26 

 

  

PART IV

 

ITEM 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

 

(1) Financial Statements and Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm.

 

(2) Financial Statement Schedule: None.

 

(3) Exhibits

 

Exhibit
No.
  Description
2.1   Merger Agreement, dated August 21, 2014 by and among Bio-En Holdings Corp, Bio-En Corp., and Serena B. Potash, (1)
     
3.1   Certificate of Incorporation of Bio-En Holdings Corp. (f/k/a Olivia, Inc.) (2)
     
3.2   Certificate of Amendment of the Certificate of Incorporation of Bio-En Holdings Corp., filed April 1, 2014. (1).
     
3.3   Certificate of Amendment of the Certificate of Incorporation of Bio-En Holdings Corp., filed August 5, 2014. (1)
     
3.4   Amended and Restated Bylaws of Bio-En Holdings Corp. (1)
     
10.1   Cancellation Agreement, dated August 20, 2014 by and between Bio-En Holdings Corp. and Serena B. Potash (1)
     
10.2   License Agreement and independent contractor agreement, dated March 23, 2014, by and between Bio-En Corp. and GeneSyst International, Inc. (1)

     
10.3   Stock Sale Agreement, dated December 27, 2017 by and among the Company and the Purchasers (3)
     
31.1*   Certification of Principal Executive Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350 as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
     
31.2*   Certification of Principal Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350 as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
     
32.1*   Certification of Principal Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(b) of the Exchange Act and Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
     
32.2*   Certification of Principal Financial Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(b) of the Exchange Act and Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
     
101.INS*   XBRL Instance Document
     
101.SCH*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
     
101.CAL*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
     
101.DEF*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
     
101.LAB*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
     
101.PRE*   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

   

(1) Incorporated by reference as an Exhibit to our Form 8-K filed with the SEC on September 11, 2014.

 

(2) Incorporated by reference as an Exhibit to our Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed with the SEC on February 13, 2013.

 

(3) Incorporated by reference as Exhibit 10.1 to our Form 8-K filed with the SEC on March 19, 2018.

 

* Filed herewith

 

 27 

 

  

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

Bio-En Holdings Corp  
(Registrant)  
     
By: /s/ Baruch Adika  
  Name: Baruch Adika  
  Title: President (Duly authorized. Principal Executive Officer)  
 
Dated: March 19, 2019  

 

  /s/ Ossie Weitzman  
  Name: Ossie Weitzman  
  Title: Chief Financial Officer (Duly authorized Principal Financial Officer)  
     
Dated: March 19, 2019  

  

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the Registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

By: /s/ Baruch Adika  
  Name: Baruch Adika  
  Title: President (Duly authorized. Principal Executive Officer and, Chairman of the Board of Directors)  
 
Dated: March 19, 2019  

 

  /s/ Ossie Weitzman  
  Name: Ossie Weitzman  
  Title: Chief Financial Officer (Duly authorized Principal Financial Officer)  
     
Dated: March 19, 2019  

   

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