Company Quick10K Filing
58.com
20-F 2019-12-31 Filed 2020-04-29
20-F 2018-12-31 Filed 2019-04-19
20-F 2017-12-31 Filed 2018-04-30
20-F 2016-12-31 Filed 2017-05-01
20-F 2015-12-31 Filed 2016-05-13
20-F 2014-12-31 Filed 2015-04-29
20-F 2013-12-31 Filed 2014-04-23

WUBA 20F Annual Report

Part I
Item 1. Identity of Directors, Senior Management and Advisers
Item 2. Offer Statistics and Expected Timetable
Item 3. Key Information
Item 4. Information on The Company
Item 4A. Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects
Item 6. Directors, Senior Management and Employees
Item 7. Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions
Item 8. Financial Information
Item 9. The Offer and Listing
Item 10. Additional Information
Item 11. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 12. Description of Securities Other Than Equity Securities
Part II
Item 13. Defaults, Dividend Arrearages and Delinquencies
Item 14. Material Modifications To The Rights of Security Holders and Use of Proceeds
Item 15. Controls and Procedures
Item 16A. Audit Committee Financial Expert
Item 16B. Code of Ethics
Item 16C. Principal Accountant Fees and Services
Item 16D. Exemptions From The Listing Standards for Audit Committees
Item 16E. Purchases of Equity Securities By The Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers
Item 16F. Change in Registrant's Certifying Accountant
Item 16G. Corporate Governance
Item 16H Mine Safety Disclosure
Part III
Item 17. Financial Statements
Item 18. Financial Statements
Item 19. Exhibits
EX-2.4 wuba-20191231xex2d4.htm
EX-4.24 wuba-20191231xex4d24.htm
EX-4.25 wuba-20191231xex4d25.htm
EX-4.26 wuba-20191231xex4d26.htm
EX-4.27 wuba-20191231xex4d27.htm
EX-8.1 wuba-20191231xex8d1.htm
EX-12.1 wuba-20191231xex12d1.htm
EX-12.2 wuba-20191231xex12d2.htm
EX-13.1 wuba-20191231xex13d1.htm
EX-13.2 wuba-20191231xex13d2.htm
EX-15.1 wuba-20191231xex15d1.htm
EX-15.2 wuba-20191231xex15d2.htm

58.com Earnings 2019-12-31

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

Form 20-F

(Mark One)

    REGISTRATION STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OR 12(g) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

OR

    ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019.

OR

    TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                     to                    

OR

    SHELL COMPANY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Date of event requiring this shell company report                    

For the transition period from                     to                    

Commission file number: 001-36140

58.com Inc.

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

N/A

(Translation of Registrant’s name into English)

Cayman Islands

(Jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

Building 105, 10 Jiuxianqiao North Road Jia

Chaoyang District, Beijing 100015

People’s Republic of China

(Address of principal executive offices)

Wei Ye, Chief Financial Officer

Telephone: +86 10 5956-5858

Building 105, 10 Jiuxianqiao North Road Jia

Chaoyang District, Beijing 100015

People’s Republic of China

(Name, Telephone, Email and/or Facsimile number and Address of Company Contact Person)

Table of Contents

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class

    

Trading Symbol(s)

    

Name of each exchange on which registered

American depositary shares, each representing two Class A ordinary shares

WUBA

The New York Stock Exchange

Class A ordinary shares, par value US$0.00001 per share*

The New York Stock Exchange*

*    Not for trading, but only in connection with the listing on the New York Stock Exchange of American depositary shares.

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None

(Title of Class)

Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act:

None

(Title of Class)

Indicate the number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer’s classes of capital or common stock as of the close of the period covered by the annual report. 299,277,413 ordinary shares, par value US$0.00001 per share, being the sum of 254,045,293 Class A ordinary shares (not including 1,676,910 Class A ordinary shares issued to the depositary bank of the Issuer and reserved for future exercise or vesting of equity incentive awards) and 45,232,120 Class B ordinary shares as of December 31, 2019.

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. ⌧ Yes   No

If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Yes   ⌧ No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. ⌧ Yes   No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). ⌧ Yes   No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or an emerging growth company. See definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer 

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer

Emerging growth company 

If an emerging growth company that prepares its financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards† provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

† The term “new or revised financial accounting standard” refers to any update issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board to its Accounting Standards Codification after April 5, 2012.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management's assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.⌧

Indicate by check mark which basis of accounting the registrant has used to prepare the financial statements included in this filing:

U.S. GAAP 

International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board

Other

If “Other” has been checked in response to the previous question, indicate by check mark which financial statement item the registrant has elected to follow. Item 17   Item 18

If this is an annual report, indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes   ⌧ No

(APPLICABLE ONLY TO ISSUERS INVOLVED IN BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDINGS DURING THE PAST FIVE YEARS)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed all documents and reports required to be filed by Sections 12, 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 subsequent to the distribution of securities under a plan confirmed by a court. Yes   No

Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

1

 

SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

1

 

PART I

3

Item 1.

Identity of Directors, Senior Management and Advisers

3

Item 2.

Offer Statistics and Expected Timetable

3

Item 3.

Key Information

3

Item 4.

Information on the Company

48

Item 4A.

Unresolved Staff Comments

85

Item 5.

Operating and Financial Review and Prospects

85

Item 6.

Directors, Senior Management and Employees

110

Item 7.

Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions

119

Item 8.

Financial Information

123

Item 9.

The Offer and Listing

124

Item 10.

Additional Information

125

Item 11.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

135

Item 12.

Description of Securities Other Than Equity Securities

136

 

PART II

138

Item 13.

Defaults, Dividend Arrearages and Delinquencies

138

Item 14.

Material Modifications to the Rights of Security Holders and Use of Proceeds

138

Item 15.

Controls and Procedures

138

Item 16A.

Audit Committee Financial Expert

139

Item 16B.

Code of Ethics

139

Item 16C.

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

139

Item 16D.

Exemptions from the Listing Standards for Audit Committees

139

Item 16E.

Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers

139

Item 16F.

Change in Registrant’s Certifying Accountant

139

Item 16G.

Corporate Governance

140

Item 16H

Mine Safety Disclosure

140

 

PART III

141

Item 17.

Financial Statements

141

Item 18.

Financial Statements

141

Item 19.

Exhibits

141

i

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INTRODUCTION

In this annual report, unless otherwise indicated or the context otherwise requires, references to:

“ADSs” refers to our American Depositary Shares, each of which represents two Class A ordinary shares of 58.com Inc.;

“58.com,” “we,” “us,” “our company,” and “our” refer to 58.com Inc., its subsidiaries and its consolidated variable interest entities;
“China” or “PRC” refers to the People’s Republic of China, excluding, for purposes of this annual report only, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau;
“Renminbi” or “RMB” refers to the legal currency of China;
“U.S. GAAP” refers to generally accepted accounting principles in the United States; and
“US$,” “dollars” or “U.S. dollars” refers to the legal currency of the United States.

Unless otherwise noted, all translations from Renminbi to U.S. dollars and from U.S. dollars to Renminbi in this annual report were made at a rate of RMB6.9762 to US$1.00, the middle rate published by the State Administration of Foreign Exchange, or SAFE, on December 31, 2019. We make no representation that any Renminbi or U.S. dollar amounts could have been, or could be, converted into U.S. dollars or Renminbi, as the case may be, at any particular rate, or at all.

SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This annual report on Form 20-F contains forward-looking statements that relate to our current expectations and views of future events. The forward-looking statements are contained principally in the items entitled “Information on the Company,” “Risk Factors,” “Operating and Financial Review and Prospects,” “Financial Information” and “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.” Our forward-looking statements relate to events that involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, including those listed under “Risk Factors,” which may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. These statements are made under the “safe harbor” provisions of the U.S. Private Securities Litigations Reform Act of 1995. You can identify some of these forward-looking statements by words or phrases such as “may,” “will,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “aim,” “estimate,” “intend,” “plan,” “believe,” “is/are likely to,” “potential,” “continue” or other similar expressions, although not all forward-looking statements contain these words. Forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements relating to:

our goals and strategies;
our expansion plans;
our future business development, financial condition and results of operations;
the expected growth of the online marketing services, mobile services and e-commerce industries;
our expectations regarding demand for, and market acceptance of, our services;
our expectations regarding keeping and strengthening our relationships with customers;
our plans to invest in research and development to enhance our solution and service offerings; and
general economic and business conditions in the regions where we provide our solutions and services.

Table of Contents

We would like to caution you not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements and you should read these statements in conjunction with the risk factors disclosed in “Item 3. Key Information — D. Risk Factors.” Those risks are not exhaustive. We operate in an emerging and evolving environment. New risk factors emerge from time to time and it is impossible for our management to predict all risk factors, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statement. We do not undertake any obligation to update or revise the forward-looking statements except as required under applicable law. You should read this annual report and the documents that we reference in this annual report completely and with the understanding that our actual future results may be materially different from what we expect.

Table of Contents

PART I

Item 1.              Identity of Directors, Senior Management and Advisers

Not applicable.

Item 2.              Offer Statistics and Expected Timetable

Not applicable.

Item 3.              Key Information

A.           Selected Financial Data

Selected Consolidated Financial Data

The following table presents the selected consolidated financial information of our company. Our selected data of consolidated statements of comprehensive income and selected consolidated cash flow data presented below for the years ended December 31, 2017, 2018 and 2019 and our selected consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2018 and 2019 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this annual report. Our selected data of consolidated statements of comprehensive income/(loss), and selected consolidated cash flow data presented below for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2016 and our selected consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2015, 2016 and 2017 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements not included in this annual report. Our audited consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP.

You should read the selected consolidated financial information in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and related notes and “Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects” included elsewhere in this annual report. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of our results expected for future periods.

For the Year Ended December 31,

    

2015(1)

    

2016

    

2017

    

2018

    

2019(3)

RMB

RMB

RMB

RMB

RMB

    

US$

(in thousands)

Selected Data of Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income/(Loss):

Revenues:

Membership

 

1,859,987

 

2,951,135

 

3,789,524

 

4,399,058

 

4,470,916

640,881

Online marketing services

 

2,414,906

 

4,363,777

 

5,978,491

 

8,282,593

 

10,158,442

1,456,157

E-commerce service

 

144,930

 

166,753

 

73,941

 

72,596

 

266,848

38,251

Other revenues

 

58,275

 

110,462

 

226,824

 

383,568

 

680,317

97,520

Total revenues

 

4,478,098

 

7,592,127

 

10,068,780

 

13,137,815

 

15,576,523

2,232,809

Cost of revenues (2)

 

(322,016)

 

(707,237)

 

(925,497)

 

(1,437,795)

 

(1,798,407)

(257,792)

Gross profit

 

4,156,082

 

6,884,890

 

9,143,283

 

11,700,020

 

13,778,116

1,975,017

Operating expenses (2):

Sales and marketing expenses

 

(4,316,217)

 

(4,941,380)

 

(5,212,360)

 

(6,861,845)

 

(8,049,662)

(1,153,875)

Research and development expenses

 

(760,796)

 

(1,107,897)

 

(1,368,441)

 

(1,702,748)

 

(2,058,663)

(295,098)

General and administrative expenses

 

(659,284)

 

(601,906)

 

(766,017)

 

(748,766)

 

(817,302)

(117,156)

Total operating expenses

 

(5,736,297)

 

(6,651,183)

 

(7,346,818)

 

(9,313,359)

 

(10,925,627)

(1,566,129)

Income/(loss) from operations

 

(1,580,215)

 

233,707

 

1,796,465

 

2,386,661

 

2,852,489

408,888

Net income/(loss)

(1,648,583)

(772,963)

1,389,242

2,129,058

8,445,226

1,210,577

Net loss/(income) attributable to noncontrolling interests

 

80,705

 

4,916

 

(4,667)

 

139

 

8,033

1,151

Net income/(loss) attributable to 58.com Inc.

 

(1,567,878)

 

(768,047)

 

1,384,575

 

2,129,197

 

8,453,259

1,211,728

Deemed dividend to mezzanine classified noncontrolling interests

 

(5,762)

 

(15,717)

 

(99,507)

 

(132,202)

 

(175,045)

(25,092)

Net income/(loss) attributable to 58.com Inc. ordinary shareholders

 

(1,573,640)

 

(783,764)

 

1,285,068

 

1,996,995

 

8,278,214

1,186,636

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For the Year Ended December 31,

    

2015

    

2016

    

2017

    

2018

    

2019(3)

RMB

RMB

RMB

RMB

RMB

    

US$

(in thousands, except for share, per share and per ADS data)

Net income/(loss)

(1,648,583)

(772,963)

1,389,242

2,129,058

8,445,226

1,210,577

Foreign currency translation adjustment, net of nil tax

 

(69,708)

 

(76,027)

 

82,926

 

15,486

 

137,371

19,691

Unrealized gain/(loss) on available-for-sale securities

 

16,919

 

(13,104)

 

 

 

Reclassification into investment loss, net of nil tax

 

 

2,989

 

 

 

Total comprehensive income/(loss)

 

(1,701,372)

 

(859,105)

 

1,472,168

 

2,144,544

 

8,582,597

1,230,268

Net income/(loss) per ordinary share attributable to ordinary shareholders – basic

 

(6.70)

 

(2.73)

 

4.41

 

6.77

 

27.79

3.98

Net income/(loss) per ordinary share attributable to ordinary shareholders – diluted

 

(6.70)

 

(2.73)

 

4.35

 

6.66

 

27.46

3.94

Net income/(loss) per ADS attributable to ordinary shareholders – basic

 

(13.40)

 

(5.46)

 

8.82

 

13.54

 

55.59

7.97

Net income/(loss) per ADS attributable to ordinary shareholders – diluted

 

(13.40)

 

(5.46)

 

8.70

 

13.33

 

54.92

7.87

Weighted average number of ordinary shares used in computing basic earnings/(losses) per share

 

234,811,986

 

286,975,068

 

291,475,725

 

294,902,518

 

297,836,268

297,836,268

Weighted average number of ordinary shares used in computing diluted earnings/(losses) per share

 

234,811,986

 

286,975,068

 

295,304,995

 

299,711,258

 

301,449,100

301,449,100

Notes:

(1)For the year ended December 31, 2015, the financial statements include the results of significant business combinations and acquisitions, deconsolidation of 58 Home and Guazi, and other related significant transactions, please refer to “Item 4. Information on the Company — A. History and Development of the Company.”
(2)Share-based compensation expenses were allocated in cost of revenues and operating expenses as follows:

For the Year Ended December 31,

    

2015

    

2016

    

2017

    

2018

    

2019

RMB

RMB

RMB

RMB

RMB

    

US$

(in thousands)

Cost of revenues

760

490

3,278

6,354

7,743

1,110

Sales and marketing expenses

 

44,049

 

59,017

 

69,926

 

90,919

 

109,011

15,626

Research and development expenses

 

59,314

 

98,515

 

126,116

 

182,410

 

208,273

29,855

General and administrative expenses

 

72,482

 

108,553

 

151,249

 

183,191

 

219,675

31,489

Total

 

176,605

 

266,575

 

350,569

 

462,874

 

544,702

78,080

(3)

For the year ended December 31, 2019, “Net income” and “Net income attributable to 58.com Inc. ordinary shareholders” included a realized gain of RMB4,760.5 million from the sale of a portion of equity stake in Che Hao Duo and an unrealized gain of RMB1,381.1 million arising from remeasuring the fair value of the remaining equity stake in Che Hao Duo, and income tax expenses of RMB524.2 million related to aforementioned transactions. If the gain from the sale of a portion of equity stake and revaluation of the remaining equity stake in Che Hao Duo and the related income tax expenses were excluded, “Net income” and “Net income attributable to 58.com Inc. ordinary shareholders” for the year ended December 31, 2019 would have been RMB2,827.8 million and RMB2,660.8 million, respectively, and the basic and diluted earnings per share attributable to ordinary shareholders were RMB8.93 and RMB8.83 for the year ended December 31, 2019, respectively.

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As of December 31,

    

2015

    

2016

    

2017

    

2018

    

2019

RMB

RMB

RMB

RMB

RMB

    

US$

(in thousands)

Selected Data of Consolidated Balance Sheets:

Cash, cash equivalents, and term deposits

 

3,138,387

 

1,226,818

 

1,524,982

 

2,387,478

 

5,363,206

768,786

Restricted cash

 

31,436

 

1,151,940

 

885,350

 

812,000

 

477,099

68,390

Shor-term investments

 

267,650

 

833,480

 

3,437,707

 

4,587,610

 

8,414,348

1,206,151

Total assets

 

26,380,294

 

25,326,006

 

28,266,512

 

31,830,845

 

43,362,211

6,215,735

Deferred revenues

 

1,344,563

 

1,845,846

 

2,123,755

 

2,348,333

 

2,154,920

308,896

Customer advances

 

981,429

 

1,236,076

 

1,365,437

 

1,465,169

 

1,986,108

284,698

Total liabilities

 

7,989,037

 

7,473,830

 

6,714,970

 

7,569,685

 

8,353,686

1,197,456

Total mezzanine equity

 

97,647

 

86,457

 

1,736,405

 

1,944,397

 

3,668,876

525,913

Total shareholders’ equity

 

18,293,610

 

17,765,719

 

19,815,137

 

22,316,763

 

31,339,649

4,492,366

Number of ordinary shares outstanding

 

283,068,677

 

289,670,997

 

293,965,131

 

296,444,579

 

299,277,413

299,277,413

Selected Data of Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows:

Net cash provided by operating activities

 

198,538

 

1,887,849

 

2,779,880

 

3,799,581

 

4,354,420

624,184

Cash used in purchase of property and equipment and intangible assets

 

(1,261,025)

 

(213,116)

 

(121,278)

 

(183,679)

 

(116,812)

(16,745)

Cash paid for business acquisitions of Anjuke and Ganji, net of acquisition of cash

 

(4,044,962)

 

(1,659,973)

 

(91,867)

 

 

Net cash used in investing activities

 

(2,781,242)

 

(2,799,529)

 

(3,210,290)

 

(3,086,965)

 

(1,769,651)

(253,671)

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

4,930,710

 

58,631

 

571,076

 

46,920

 

19,300

2,766

Change in Reporting Currency

Starting from December 31, 2016, we changed our reporting currency from U.S. dollars to Renminbi. The change in reporting currency is to facilitate investors to evaluate our financial results as most of our business operations are conducted in the PRC. Assets and liabilities of entities with functional currencies other than Renminbi are translated into Renminbi using the exchange rate on the balance sheet date. Revenues and expenses of entities with functional currencies other than Renminbi are translated into Renminbi using the average rate prevailing during the reporting period. Prior periods’ financial information has been recasted as if we always used Renminbi as our reporting currency.

B.           Capitalization and Indebtedness

Not applicable.

C.           Reasons for the Offer and Use of Proceeds

Not applicable.

D.           Risk Factors

Risks Related to Our Business

We operate in a fast-evolving industry, which makes it difficult to evaluate our business and prospects.

We commenced operations in 2005 and many of the elements of our business are evolving and some are relatively unproven. The markets for our technology and products and services are relatively new and rapidly developing and are subject to significant challenges. Our business plan relies heavily upon growing our user base and exploring new market opportunities, and we may not succeed in any of these respects.

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As the online marketing services and mobile services industries in China are relatively young and untested, there are few proven methods of projecting user demand or available industry standards on which we can rely. We cannot assure you that our attempts to expand our user base and products and services will be successful, profitable or widely accepted and therefore the future revenue and income potential of our business are difficult to evaluate. You should consider our prospects in light of the risks and uncertainties fast-growing companies with limited operating histories may encounter.

The markets for online marketing services and mobile services in China are constantly evolving and may not grow as quickly as expected or at all.

Our business and prospects are affected by the development of emerging internet business models in China, including those for online marketing services and mobile services. Our membership services and other online marketing services have distinct business models which may differ from models for these businesses in other markets, such as the United States, and that are in varying stages of development and monetization. Our future success will depend on our ability to respond to rapidly changing technologies, adapt our products and services to evolving industry standards and improve the performance and reliability of our products and services. Our failure to adapt to such changes could harm our business. In addition, changes in user behavior resulting from technological developments may also adversely affect us. We cannot assure you that the online marketing services and mobile services industries in China will continue to grow as rapidly as they have in the past or at all. With the development of technology, new internet services may emerge which are not a part of our service offerings and which may render online marketing services or mobile services less attractive to users. The growth and development of these industries are affected by numerous factors, such as the macroeconomic environment, regulatory changes, technological innovations, development of internet and internet-based services, users’ general online experience, cultural influences and changes in tastes and preferences. If the online marketing services and mobile services industries in China do not grow as quickly as expected or at all, or if we fail to benefit from such growth by successfully implementing our business strategies, our business and prospects may be adversely affected.

Our business, financial condition and results of operations, as well as our ability to obtain financing, may be adversely affected by the downturn in the global or Chinese economy.

The online marketing services and mobile services industries may be affected by economic downturns. Thus, our business and prospects may be affected by the macroeconomic environment in China. A prolonged slowdown in the Chinese economy may lead to a reduced amount of activities on our platforms, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, our products and services may be viewed as discretionary by our users, who may choose to discontinue or reduce spending on such products and services during an economic downturn. In a slower economy, businesses might scale back their recruitment budget or even their total size of employees, which will negatively impact the performance of our jobs vertical. In such an event, our ability to retain existing paying members and customers, and recruiting new paying members and customers and encouraging them to spend more on our services will be adversely affected, which would in turn negatively impact our business and results of operations.

Moreover, a slowdown or disruption in the global or China’s economy may have a material and adverse impact on financings available to us. The weakness in the economy could erode investors’ confidence, which constitutes the basis of the credit market. The recent financial turmoil affecting the financial markets and banking system may significantly restrict our ability to obtain financing in the capital markets or from financial institutions on commercially reasonable terms, or at all.

COVID-19 had a severe and negative impact on the Chinese and the global economy in the first quarter of 2020. Whether this will lead to a prolonged downturn in the economy is still unknown. Even before the outbreak of COVID-19, the global macroeconomic environment was facing numerous challenges. The growth rate of the Chinese economy had already been slowing since 2010. There is considerable uncertainty over the long-term effects of the expansionary monetary and fiscal policies which had been adopted by the central banks and financial authorities of some of the world’s leading economies, including the United States and China, even before 2020. Unrest, terrorist threats and the potential for war in the Middle East and elsewhere may increase market volatility across the globe. There have also been concerns about the relationship between China and other countries, including the surrounding Asian countries, which may potentially have economic effects. In particular, there is significant uncertainty about the future relationship between the United States and China with respect to trade policies, treaties, government regulations and tariffs. Any severe or prolonged slowdown in the global or Chinese economy may materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

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Our real estate vertical is susceptible to fluctuations in China’s real estate industry, and if we are unable to continue to obtain listings from our key real estate market participants, the results of operations and financial performance of our real estate vertical could be materially and adversely affected.

We derive a significant portion of our revenues from the real estate content category, or vertical. Our 58 and Ganji platforms have mainly secondary property sales and rental listings, while our Anjuke platform has both primary and secondary property sales listings.

Our real estate vertical is susceptible to fluctuations in China’s real estate industry. Demand for private residential real estate in China has grown rapidly in recent years but such growth is often coupled with volatility and fluctuations in real estate transaction volume and prices. Fluctuations of supply and demand in China’s real estate industry are caused by economic, social, political and other factors. Over the years, governments at both national and local levels have announced and implemented various policies and measures aimed to regulate the real estate market, during certain period to stimulate further development and more purchase of residential real estate units and during other period to restrict these activities from growing too rapidly. These measures can affect real estate buyers’ eligibility to purchase additional units, their down payment requirements and financing, as well as availability of land to developers and their ability to obtain financing. These measures have affected and continue to affect the conditions of China’s real estate market and cause fluctuations especially in real estate pricing and transaction volume, which will impact our real estates’ customers’ commission revenues and their marketing spending. To the extent fluctuations in China’s real estate industry adversely affect spending on real estate marketing, the results of operations and financial performance of our real estate vertical may be materially and adversely affected.

The success of our real estate vertical depends on our ability to persuade real estate agents, brokers, developers and property owners to list their properties on our 58, Anjuke and Ganji platforms. We believe having large numbers of high-quality listings from such real estate market participants attracts users to our platforms, thereby enhancing our attractiveness to advertisers and other real estate market participants. However, our real estate listing agreements are typically non-exclusive, which we believe is generally consistent with industry practice. Our listing customers may stop using our listing services and may choose to use the services of one or more of our competitors or alternative means of marketing, such as real estate magazines or newspapers. If owners of large numbers of property listings, such as major developers or large brokers or property owners in key real estate markets choose not to list their properties on our platforms, our platforms could become less attractive to users. If we experience reduced user traffic on our platforms, advertisers and other real estate market participants may discontinue the use of or be unwilling to pay for our services. In such an event, the competitive position of our real estate vertical could be significantly weakened and our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

We face intense competition, and if we do not compete successfully against existing and new competitors, we may lose market share and suffer losses.

We face intense competition. Our competitors in the online marketing space include other smaller multi-category online classifieds companies as well as industry or content-specific vertical platforms whose information serve the same underlying industries as certain content categories of our online platforms. For example, Anjuke, our online real estate listing platform, competes with other listing platforms in the real estate industry as well as traditional real estate agencies that develop their own online platforms. We may also face competition from other internet or other companies, who may enter the online classifieds market in China. We compete primarily on the basis of user traffic, effectiveness of services in reaching targeted users, ability to demonstrate marketing results and customer service capabilities.

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We believe that our competitiveness depends upon many factors both within and beyond our control, including our ability to increase our brand recognition and continue to develop user loyalty, our ability to keep up with the technological developments and users’ changing demands and our ability to raise sufficient capital to sustain and expand our business. For example, we may have to increase our sales and marketing expenses from time to time to promote our brand, especially when the competition is intense. Some of our current and potential competitors may have greater financial, marketing, user traffic and other resources than we have. In addition, local content providers may be acquired by, receive investments from or enter into strategic relationships with larger, well-established and well-financed companies or investors. Certain of our competitors may be able to devote greater resources to marketing and promotional campaigns and devote substantially more resources to website and system development than us. Online user acquisition cost and cost of hiring and retaining good talent might continue to increase due to the supply and demand of user and talent pool in China. Increased competition may reduce our market share and require us to increase our marketing and promotion efforts, which could negatively affect our operating margins or force us to incur losses. There can be no assurance that we will be able to compete successfully against current and future competitors or maintain our leading position or level of user traffic in the online marketing services market in China, and competitive pressures may have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations.

If we fail to continually anticipate user preferences and provide attractive services on our online platforms, we may not be able to grow and retain our user base.

Our success depends on our ability to grow and retain our user base. In order to attract and retain users and compete against our competitors and other industry or content-specific vertical companies, we must continue to innovate and introduce services that our users find useful and attract them to use our online platforms more frequently and continue to develop our paying users. For example, we must continue to enhance the content on our online platforms that appeal to our users. The popularity of online marketing services and other internet services is difficult to predict, and we cannot be certain that the services we offer will continue to be popular with our users or sufficiently successful to offset the costs incurred to acquire these users and offer these services. Given that we operate in a rapidly evolving industry in China, we need to continually anticipate user preferences and industry changes and respond to such changes in a timely and effective manner. If we fail to anticipate and meet the needs of our users, the size of our user base or the user engagement may decrease. A decrease in our user base or user engagement would render our online platforms less attractive to business users and may reduce our membership and online marketing revenues, which may have a material and adverse effect on our marketing business, financial condition and results of operations.

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If we fail to retain existing or attract new business users to use our online platforms and pay for our membership and online marketing services, our business, financial condition and prospects may be materially and adversely affected.

The success of our business depends on our ability to attract and retain business users that provide information on our online platforms to consumers and pay for our membership and online marketing services. If we are unable to grow and maintain a healthy ecosystem of business users, our users may find our online platforms to be less useful than expected and may not continue to use our online platforms. This in turn may affect our ability to attract new business users and convince existing business users to renew their paid memberships or increase their level of spending on our services. Our membership contracts primarily have terms ranging from one month to one year. A significant portion of our paying business users are small and medium-sized local businesses who fail to renew their membership contracts upon expiration for a number of reasons, including reasons beyond our control such as discontinuation of their business. There is no assurance that we could successfully drive the increase in paying business users using our platforms going forward. The competitive landscape for such local business users changes quickly and they may have only temporary or occasional recruiting or marketing needs. In addition, our efforts to provide greater incentives for our existing paying business users to use our online marketing services, including marketing activities to highlight the value of differentiated paying business users-only services, may not be successful. Our customers may terminate their memberships or other spending on our online marketing services because we no longer serve their needs or because their demands can be better fulfilled by our competitors or other service providers. Our ability to maintain or grow our membership base may also be affected by changes in China’s macro economy. For example, largely due to unfavorable real estate policies, memberships in the real estate vertical suffered a negative impact, resulting in a slower growth in our paying business users in 2018 and 2019, as compared with the previous years. Furthermore, we have used our own sales teams to replace third-party sales agencies in selected industry verticals and may continue to do so. As a result of this transition, we may lose paying business users who have established relationships with the third-party agencies or who are not satisfied with the performance of our own teams. We have also encouraged customers to purchase, pay for membership and online marketing services and resolve their issues they come across when using our services through self-serve online interfaces instead of interacting with our sales and customer service teams in person or over the phone. Decisions by our customers not to renew their memberships or not to use our online marketing services as a result of these initiatives could reduce our revenues, as well as cause us to incur additional cost in attracting new paying business users and other customers. A significant increase in local subscription-based business users’ attrition or decrease in local business users’ spending on our services would have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

If we fail to keep up with the technological developments and users’ changing requirements or to successfully capture and retain a significant portion of the growing number of users that access online marketing services, we may be unable to meet our growth expectations and our results of operation may be adversely affected.

The internet industries in China are subject to rapid and continuous changes in technology, user preferences, the nature of services offered and business models. Our success will depend on our ability to keep up with the changes in technology and user behavior resulting from technological developments. If we do not adapt our services to such changes in an effective and timely manner, we may suffer from decreased user traffic, which may result in a reduction of revenues from our membership services or a decrease in spending on our other services.

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Our online marketing services are now accessible to users from many internet-enabled devices, and we offer versions of our services for mobile operating systems, including Android and iOS. An important element of our strategy is to continue to develop our online platforms and services for mobile devices to capture a greater share of the growing number of users that access online marketing services and other internet services through smartphones and other mobile devices. The lower resolution, functionality and memory associated with some mobile devices make the use of services through such devices more difficult and the services we develop for these devices may fail to prove compelling to users. Manufacturers or distributors may establish unique technical standards for their devices, and our services may not work or be viewable on these devices as a result. As new devices and new services are continually being released, it is difficult to predict the problems we may encounter in developing our services for use on these devices and we may need to devote significant resources to the creation, support and maintenance of such services. Devices providing access to our products and services are not manufactured and sold by us, and we cannot assure you that the companies who manufacture or sell these devices would always ensure that their devices perform reliably and are maximally compatible with our systems. Any faulty connection between these devices and our products and services may result in consumer dissatisfaction with us, which could damage our brand and have a material and adverse effect on our financial results. Furthermore, new online marketing services may emerge which are specifically created to function on mobile platforms, as compared to our online marketing services that were originally designed to be accessed through personal computers, or PCs, and such new services may operate more effectively through mobile devices than our own. If we are unable to attract and retain a substantial number of mobile device users to our services, or if we are slower than our competitors in developing attractive services that are adapted for such devices, we may fail to capture a significant share of an increasingly important portion of the market for our services or lose existing users, either of which may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Furthermore, changes in technologies may require substantial capital expenditures in development of new features, applications and services as well as in modification of existing features, applications, services or infrastructure. We may not successfully execute our business strategies due to a variety of reasons such as technical hurdles, misunderstandings or erroneous predictions of market demand or lack of necessary resources. Failure in keeping up with technological developments may result in our online platforms being less attractive, and as a result we may be unable to meet our revenue growth expectations and our results of operations may be adversely affected.

We may not be able to effectively manage our growth and expansion or implement our business strategies, in which case our business and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.

We have experienced a period of rapid growth and expansion, which has placed, and continues to place, significant strain on our management and resources. We cannot assure you that this level of significant growth and expansion will be sustainable or achieved at all in the future. We believe that our continued growth and expansion will depend on our ability to develop new sources of revenue, attract new users, paying members and customers, retain and expand paying members and customers, encourage additional spending by our customers, continue developing innovative technologies in response to user demand, increase brand awareness through marketing and promotional activities, react to changes in user access to and use of the internet, expand into new market segments, integrate new devices, platforms and operating systems and take advantage of any growth in the relevant markets. We cannot assure you that we will achieve any of the above.

To manage our growth and expansion, and to attain and maintain profitability, we anticipate that we will need to implement a variety of new and upgraded operational and financial systems, procedures and controls, including the improvement of our accounting and other internal management systems. We will also need to further expand, train, manage and motivate our workforce and manage our relationships with our paying members and customers. All of these endeavors involve risks and will require substantial management efforts and skills and significant additional expenditures. Our further expansion may divert our management, operational or technological resources from our existing business operations. In addition, our expansion may require us to operate in new cities and towns in China, including a number of small cities and towns in China, where we may have difficulty in satisfying local market demands and regulatory requirements. We cannot assure you that we will be able to effectively manage our growth and expansion or implement our future business strategies effectively, and failure to do so may materially and adversely affect our business and results of operations.

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Our business depends substantially on the continuing efforts of our executive officers and key employees, and our business may be severely disrupted if we lose their services.

We currently depend on the continued services and performance of the key members of our management team, in particular Mr. Jinbo Yao, our chairman and chief executive officer. Mr. Yao is our founder and his leadership has played an integral role in our growth. Our future success depends substantially on the continued efforts of our executive officers and key employees. If one or more of our executive officers or key employees were unable or unwilling to continue their service, we might not be able to replace them in a timely manner, or at all, and our business may be severely disrupted, our financial conditions and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected and we may incur additional expenses to recruit, train and retain personnel. If any of our executive officers or key employees joins a competitor or forms a competing company, we may lose users, know-how and key professionals and staff members. Each of our executive officers and key employees has entered into an employment agreement and a confidentiality and non-competition agreement with us. However, if any dispute arises between our executive officers and key employees, on one hand, and us on the other, we cannot assure you that we would be able to enforce these non-compete provisions in China, where these executive officers reside, in light of uncertainties with the PRC legal system. See “— Risks Related to Doing Business in China — Uncertainties in the interpretation and enforcement of PRC laws and regulations could limit the legal protections available to you and us.”

If we are unable to attract, train and retain qualified personnel, our business may be materially and adversely affected.

Our future success depends, to a significant extent, on our ability to attract, train and retain qualified personnel, particularly management, product, research, developing and marketing personnel with expertise in the online marketing industry. Our field sales and customer service teams are also critical to maintaining the quality of our services as they interact with business users on a regular basis. We must continue to attract qualified personnel at a fast pace to keep up with our growing user base and the scale of our operations. Since our industry is characterized by high demand and intense competition for talent, there can be no assurance that we will be able to attract or retain qualified staff or other highly skilled employees that we will need to achieve our strategic objectives. As we are still a relatively young company, our ability to train and integrate new employees into our operations may not meet the growing demands of our business. If we are unable to attract, train, and retain qualified personnel, our business may be materially and adversely affected.

We have incurred significant costs on a variety of marketing efforts, including significant advertising expenses, designed to attract users, and some marketing campaigns and methods may turn out to be ineffective.

We have invested significantly in marketing to promote public awareness of our platforms, enhance our brand recognition and drive user growth, including incurring RMB2.1 billion, RMB3.3 billion and RMB3.7 billion in advertising expenses in 2017, 2018 and 2019, respectively. Such advertising expenses represented 40.0%, 48.2% and 46.2% of our total sales and marketing expenses and 20.7%, 25.2% and 23.9% of our revenues in the corresponding periods. Our marketing activities may not be well received by users and may not attract the additional traffic that we anticipated. The evolving marketing approaches and tools require us to enhance our marketing approaches and experiment with new marketing methods to keep pace with industry developments and user preferences. However, tracking the return on investment of online and offline advertising and user acquisition expenses requires complex data tracking technology, involves certain assumption and estimate in the calculation and is typically retrospective with historic data. Failure to refine our existing marketing approaches or to introduce new effective marketing approaches in a cost-effective manner could reduce our market share, cause our revenues to decline and negatively impact our profitability.

Any damage to our reputation and brands or failure to enhance our brand recognition may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our major brands include 58.com, Anjuke, Ganji, Zhuan Zhuan and 58 Town. We believe that the market recognition and reputation of our brands have significantly contributed to the success of our business. Maintaining and enhancing our brands is critical to our success and ability to compete. Many factors, some of which are beyond our control, may negatively impact our brand and reputation, such as:

any failure to maintain a pleasant and reliable experience for users as their preferences evolve and as we expand into new services;
any decrease in brand awareness among our existing and potential users; and

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any negative publicity about us or user experience in general, including any actual or perceived security or product or service quality problems involving online marketing service providers in China.

Although all of our paying users and a growing number of registered users go through certain verification procedures, fraudulent transactions and sale of counterfeit or pirated or illegal, as well as faulty or defective, items through our online platforms have occurred in the past and may occur in the future. In the past, Chinese media reported some incidents of consumers having unpleasant experiences with services on our platform or offline experiences with service providers selected from our online platform and accused us of failure to safeguard consumer rights on our platforms. In addition, we face risks with respect to fictitious postings such as fake job openings, false listings of real estate, and fraudulent used goods information that take place on our online platforms. For example, certain business users may fabricate job openings to misrepresent the nature and compensation level of jobs that they post on our platforms. False sales and rental listings containing misleading pictures and false availability of real estate may also be posted by certain real participants such as property owners and unqualified real estate agents and brokers to inflate the popularity and search results rankings on our platforms. Further, certain users may post false descriptions of used goods on our platforms. Any reports and media coverage, whether verified or not, of fake postings on our platforms could result in significant negative publicity, and severely diminish user confidence in us and the value of our brands. Even though we have been increasing investment and capability in improving the platform information quality and enhancing the standards of services provided offline, these incidents and any similar incidents or true or untrue claims of such incidents could continue to happen and harm our reputation, impair our ability to attract and retain users and grow our base of paying customers. If we are unable to maintain a good reputation, further enhance our brand recognition, continue to develop our user loyalty and increase positive awareness of our platforms, our results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.

In addition, any claims or negative publicity about our company, our services, our employees, our business practices, regardless of their veracity, could harm our brand image and in turn adversely affect our business and results of operations. We cannot assure you that we will be able to defuse negative publicity to the satisfaction of our investors, users, customers and business partners. From time to time, there have been claims or negative publicities about our company and our business practice, which adversely affected our public image and reputation during the period of such negative publicities. Intense negative publicities may divert our attention and may adversely impact our business, and we cannot assure you that our brands, public image and reputation will not be materially and adversely affected.

The proper functioning of our platforms, network infrastructure and information technology systems is essential to our business, and any failure to maintain the satisfactory performance, security and integrity of our systems will materially and adversely impair our ability to provide services and affect our business, reputation, financial condition and results of operations.

The proper functioning of our platforms is essential to our business. Specifically, the satisfactory performance, reliability and availability of our platforms and mobile apps, our transaction-processing systems and our network infrastructure are critical to our success and our ability to attract and retain users and provide adequate services. Our revenues depend on the user traffic on our platforms and the volume of activities that traffic creates.

In addition, our ability to provide consumers and business users with a high-quality online experience depends on the continuing operation and scalability of our network infrastructure and information technology systems. The risks we face in this area include:

our systems are potentially vulnerable to damage or interruption as a result of earthquakes, floods, fires, extreme temperatures, power loss, telecommunications failures, technical error, computer viruses, hacking and similar events;
we may encounter problems when upgrading our systems or services and undetected programming errors could adversely affect the performance of the software we use to provide our services. The development and implementation of software upgrades and other improvements to our internet services is a complex process, and issues not identified during pre-launch testing of new services may only become evident when such services are made available to our entire user base; and
we rely on servers, data centers and other network facilities provided by third parties, and the limited availability of third-party providers with sufficient capacity to house additional network facilities and broadband capacity in China may lead to higher costs or limit our ability to offer certain services or expand our business. In particular, electricity, temperature control or other failures at the data centers we use may adversely affect the operation of our servers or result in service interruptions or data loss.

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These and other events in the past occasionally led to and may in the future lead to interruptions, decreases in connection speed, degradation of our services or the permanent loss of user data and uploaded content. Any system interruptions caused by telecommunications failures, computer viruses, or hacking or other attempts to harm our systems that result in the unavailability of our platforms and mobile apps or reduced performance would reduce the attractiveness of the services offered on our online platforms. If we experience frequent or persistent service disruptions, whether caused by failures of our own systems or those of third-party service providers, our reputation or relationships with our users may be damaged and our users may switch to our competitors, which may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We face risks related to natural disasters, health epidemics, terrorist acts or acts of war, social unrest or other public safety concerns or hostile events, which could significantly disrupt our operations.

Our business could be materially and adversely affected by natural disasters. Fire, floods, typhoons, earthquakes, power loss, telecommunications failures, break-ins, terrorist acts or acts of war, social unrest or other public safety concerns or hostile events may give rise to server interruptions, breakdowns, system failures, technology platform failures or internet failures, which could cause the loss or corruption of data, malfunctions of software or hardware, disruption to operation, as well as adversely affect our ability to operate our platform and provide our services. Our business could also be adversely affected by the effects of Ebola virus disease, H1N1 flu, H7N9 flu, avian flu, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS, COVID-19, or other epidemics. Our business operations could be disrupted if any of our employees is suspected of having Ebola virus disease, H1N1 flu, H7N9 flu, avian flu, SARS, COVID-19 or other epidemics or pandemics, since it could require our employees to be quarantined and/or our offices to be disinfected. Activity level, especially those relating to marketing and hiring business, across our platforms may also experience a declining tend during such outbreak period as a result of governmental precaution measures taken including temporary workplace shutdown. In addition, our results of operations could be adversely affected to the extent that any such event harms the economic condition in general.

Since January 2020 the outbreak of COVID-19 has widely spread and was quickly declared as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern and subsequently a pandemic by the World Health Organization. To control the spread of COVID-19, PRC government has implemented a series of strict measures, including travel restrictions, quarantines, and a temporary shutdown of businesses which resulted in a decrease in activity level among our paying business users. In particular, paying business users that require in-person meetings to conduct their business, including those in the secondary housing and rental real estate sector, used auto dealers, local service providers, and recruiters, have been adversely and materially affected by these interruptions and delayed business resumption. As our revenues are generated primarily from these paying business users, most of whom are small and medium-sized local businesses, the outbreak of COVID-19 and subsequent prevention and control measures have adversely affected our business operations and financial conditions in the first quarter of 2020. For instance, our revenues for the first quarter of 2020 were estimated to decline significantly compared to the same period in 2019. We also scaled back certain expenses, particularly some discretionary advertising expenses to mitigate the adverse impact on our profit. During February 2020, a majority of our employees worked from home. As our customers, many of whom are migrant workers, took longer to resume normal businesses due to these quarantine measures, we also delayed hiring for our sales and customer services teams. The outbreak of COVID-19 also adversely affected the business operations of our investees, which will likely result in downward adjustments to our long-term investments, and if the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic become other than temporary, impairment losses will be recognized for our long-term investments. Since the end of February 2020, the number of daily new cases of COVID-19 in China have been contained at a relatively low level, the quarantine measures have been gradually relaxed or lifted. Offline business activities have been recovering and our employees are going back to offices. Despite the recovering trend we have observed till the date of this report, there is still high uncertainty as to how the ongoing pandemic will develop and its impact on our business going forward. If the pandemic continues to impact economic activity subsequent to the date of this report, the uncertainty may continue to have adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations for the remainder of the fiscal year ending December 31, 2020, which cannot be reasonably estimated at the current stage. We will regularly assess and adopt measures to offset any challenges created by the ongoing pandemic.

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Our operations depend on the performance of the internet infrastructure, the fixed telecommunications networks and certain cloud service providers in China.

Almost all access to the internet in China is maintained through state-owned telecommunication operators under the administrative control and regulatory supervision of the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, or the MIIT. Moreover, we primarily rely on a limited number of telecommunication service providers and cloud service providers to provide us with data communications capacity through local telecommunications lines and internet data centers to host our servers. In addition, our field sales and centralized customer service team rely heavily on call center systems which are built on third-party telecommunication networks offered by a limited number of service providers in China. Such telecommunication service providers may also take actions that may affect their service quality and availability from time to time as required by fast changing industry rules and regulations. We have limited access to alternative networks or services in the event of disruptions, failures or other problems with the PRC internet infrastructure or the fixed telecommunications networks provided by telecommunication service providers or cloud service providers. With the expansion of our business, we may be required to upgrade our technology and infrastructure or those of third-party telecommunication or cloud service providers to keep up with the increasing traffic on our platforms. We cannot assure you that the internet infrastructure and the fixed telecommunications networks in China will be able to support the demands associated with the continued growth in internet usage.

In addition, we have no control over the costs of the services provided by telecommunication or cloud service providers. If the prices we pay for those services rise significantly, our results of operations may be materially and adversely affected. Furthermore, if internet access fees or other charges to internet users increase, our user traffic may decline and our business may be harmed.

We rely on WeChat and other third-party payment service providers to conduct payment processing and escrow services on our platforms. If those services are limited, restricted, curtailed or degraded in any way or become unavailable to us or our users for any reason, our business may be materially and adversely affected.

Our users make payments through a variety of methods, including payment on our platforms or through our third-party online payment service partners, such as WeChat. For example, the payment solution for Zhuan Zhuan is a WeChat payment-based escrow payment process co-developed by 58 and Tencent. This is a convenient and secure payment method with an escrow payment process. These services are critical to our platforms. We rely on the convenience and ease of use that WeChat provides to our users. If the quality, utility, convenience or attractiveness of WeChat’s services declines for any reason, the attractiveness of our platforms could be materially and adversely affected.

Business involving online payment services is subject to a number of risks that could materially and adversely affect third-party online payment service providers’ ability to provide payment processing and escrow services to us, including:

dissatisfaction with these online payment services or decreased use of their services by users and merchants;
increasing competition, including from other established Chinese internet companies, payment service providers and companies engaged in other financial technology services;
changes to rules or practices applicable to payment systems that link to third-party online payment service providers;
breach of users’ personal information and concerns over the use and security of information collected from buyers;
service outages, system failures or failures to effectively scale the system to handle large and growing transaction volumes;
increasing costs to third-party online payment service providers, including fees charged by banks to process transactions through online payment channels, which would also increase our costs of revenues; and
failure to manage funds accurately or loss of funds, whether due to employee fraud, security breaches, technical errors or otherwise.

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In addition, certain commercial banks in China impose limits on the amounts that may be transferred by automated payment from customers' bank accounts to their linked accounts with third-party payment services. Although we believe the impact of these restrictions has not been and will not be significant in terms of the overall volume of payments processed for our China retail platforms, and automated payment services linked to bank accounts represent only one of many payment mechanisms that consumers may use to settle transactions, we cannot predict whether these and any additional restrictions that could be put in place would have a material adverse effect on our platforms.

In addition, we cannot assure you that we will be successful to enter into and maintain amicable relationships with online payment service providers. Identifying, negotiating and maintaining relationships with these providers require significant time and resources. They could choose to terminate their relationships with us or propose terms that we cannot accept. In addition, these service providers may not perform as expected under our agreements with them, and we may have disagreements or disputes with such payment service providers, any of which could adversely affect our brand and reputation as well as our business operations.

We may be subject to liability for placing advertisements with content that is deemed inappropriate or misleading.

In July 2016, the State Administration for Industry and Commerce of the People’s Republic of China (currently known as State Administration for Market Regulation, or the SAMR), promulgated the Interim Administrative Measures for Internet Advertisements, or the Interim Measures, which became effective on September 1, 2016. The Interim Measures provide for, among other things, a more detailed definition of online advertising and the obligations and liabilities of online adverting operators and distributors. Certain parts of our business which were not specified as forms of advertising under previous regulations, such as priority listing in the yellow page business may now be deemed as online advertising business under the Interim Measures and subject to the Interim Measures and other PRC advertising laws and regulations.

The PRC advertising laws and regulations, including the Interim Measures, prohibit advertising operators and distributors from producing, distributing or publishing any advertisement with content that violates PRC laws and regulations, impairs the national dignity of the PRC, involves designs of the PRC national flag, national emblem or national anthem or the music of the national anthem, is considered reactionary, obscene, superstitious or absurd, is fraudulent, or disparages similar products. We, as a platform for online classifieds and listings, have higher obligations with respect to the advertisements placed on our platforms than to other information posted on our platforms. For example, under the Interim Measures, internet advertisement shall be labeled visibly and distinguishably as “advertisement” for identification by the consumers. We are obligated to monitor the advertising content and examine the supporting documents for advertisements provided by advertisers to ensure that the content is accurate and in compliance with applicable law. In addition, where a special government review is required for specific categories of advertisements before posting, we are obligated to confirm that such review has been performed and approval, if required, has been obtained. We are also required to employ personnel familiar with the advertising laws to review advertisements or set up a special Internet advertisement review department. We have adopted policies and procedures and have provided training to our content review team to ensure our compliance with these new measures. However, PRC advertising laws and regulations do not provide clear guidance on the content standards. If we are found in violation of these regulations, we will be subject to penalties such as fines and confiscation of advertising income. We may also be ordered to cease dissemination of the advertisements. In circumstances involving serious violations, the SAMR or its local branches has the authority to suspend the violators’ advertising business or revoke the violators’ business licenses. Furthermore, we may be subject to claims by consumers misled by advertisements placed on our platforms.

We may be held liable to third parties for information or content displayed on, retrieved from or linked to our platforms, which could harm our reputation and business.

Our online marketing services enable users to post local business or service information, generate content, market products and services, conduct business and engage in various other online activities. Claims may be brought against us for defamation, libel, negligence, copyright, patent or trademark infringement, tort (including personal injury), fraud, other unlawful activity or other theories and claims based on the nature and content of information to which we link or that may be posted on our platforms, generated by our users, or delivered or shared hypertext links to third-party platforms, or video or image services, if appropriate licenses and/or third-party consents have not been obtained. Third parties have sought, and they may in the future seek to assert claims against us alleging unfair competition or violations of privacy rights or failure to maintain the confidentiality of user data. Our defense of any such actions could be costly and involve significant time and attention of our management and other resources.

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We are also regularly approached and asked to remove content uploaded by users on the grounds of alleged copyright or personal rights infringement. In such cases, we investigate the claims and remove any uploads that appear to infringe the rights of a third-party after our reasonable investigation and determination. Our corporate policy requires a user to enter into a user agreement in the registration process before posting any content on our platforms. Pursuant to the user agreement, a user makes certain representations and warranties relating to the user generated content on our platforms. See “Item 4. Information on the Company — B. Business Overview — Content Management and Monitoring.” However, we have been, and in the future may be, subject to intellectual property infringement claims or other allegations by third parties for services provided or content displayed on our platforms. Although we believe that we will have recourse to indemnification from alleged infringing users on the basis of the user agreement, such right to recourse is subject to the enforcement mechanism of PRC legal system, which may not be effective. Our data security team also screens our platforms to eliminate content that we believe may infringe copyrights. Although our internal policy, terms of our user agreements and the screening system are designed to help limit the occurrences and impact of infringing activities, they may not be effective in eliminating such occurrences or dissemination of infringing materials on our platforms.

Pursuant to PRC national and Beijing local regulations and judicial interpretations, online service providers that provide information storage space for users to upload works or link services may be held liable for damages if such providers know or have reason to know that the works uploaded or linked infringe others’ copyrights. The Supreme People’s Court of China promulgated a judicial interpretation on infringement of the right of dissemination through internet in December 2012. This judicial interpretation, like certain court rulings and certain other judicial interpretations, provides that the courts will place the burden on internet service providers to remove not only links or contents that have been specifically mentioned in the notices of infringement from right holders, but also links or contents they should have known to contain infringing content. This interpretation could subject us and other online service providers to significant administrative burdens and litigation risks

Privacy concerns relating to our products and services and the use of user information could damage our reputation, deter current and potential users and customers from using our products and services, and negatively impact our business.

Concerns about the collection, use, disclosure or security of personal information or other privacy-related matters, even if unfounded, could damage our reputation, cause us to lose users and customers and adversely affect our operating results. While we strive to comply with applicable data protection laws and regulations, as well as our own posted privacy policies and other obligations we may have with respect to privacy and data protection, the failure or perceived failure to comply may result, and in some cases has resulted, in inquiries and other proceedings or actions against us by government agencies or others, as well as negative publicity and damage to our reputation and brand, each of which could cause us to lose users and customers, which could have an adverse effect on our business.

Any systems failure or compromise of our security that results in the unauthorized access to or release of our users’ or customers’ data could significantly limit the adoption of our products and services, as well as harm our reputation and brand and, therefore, our business. We strictly limit third-parties’ access to user privacy and user data, and we expend significant resources on technology and product development to protect against leakage of user information and other security breaches. Nonetheless, given its great commercial value, our user data may still be misused by third parties, which could expose us to legal and regulatory risks and seriously harm our business.

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The PRC regulatory and enforcement regime with regard to data security and data protection is evolving. On November 7, 2016, the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress issued the Cyber Security Law, which came into effect on June 1, 2017. The Cyber Security Law sets high requirements for the operational security of facilities deemed to be part of the PRC’s “critical information infrastructure” and the security protection obligations of the operators of the “critical information infrastructure.” In Hong Kong, however, the Hong Kong Personal Data Ordinance provides that an internet company may not collect information about its users, analyze the information for a profile of the user’s interests and sell or transmit the profiles to third parties for direct marketing purposes without the user’s consent. In the European Union, or EU, the General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR, which came into effect on May 25, 2018, presents increased challenges and risks in relation to policies and procedures relating to data collection, storage, transfer, disclosure, protection and privacy, and will impose significant penalties for non-compliance, including for example, penalties calculated as a percentage of global revenue under the GDPR. Other jurisdictions may have similar regulations. New laws or regulations concerning data protection, or the interpretation and application of existing consumer and data protection laws or regulations, which is often uncertain and in flux, may be inconsistent with our practices. If so, in addition to the possibility of fines, this could result in an order requiring that we change our practices, which could have an adverse effect on our business and operating results. Complying with new laws and regulations could cause us to incur substantial costs or require us to change our business practices in a manner materially adverse to our business.

Security breaches and attacks against our systems and network, and any potentially resulting breach, could damage our reputation and negatively impact our business.

Maintaining complete security for the storage and transmission of confidential information on our systems is essential to maintaining user confidence. To that end, we have adopted security policies and measures. However, advances in technology, the expertise of hackers, new discoveries in the field of cryptography or other events or developments could result in a compromise or breach of the technology that we use to protect confidential information. We may not be able to prevent third parties, especially hackers or other individuals or entities engaging in similar activities, from illegally obtaining such confidential or private information we hold with respect to our users. Individuals or entities obtaining our users’ confidential or private information illegally may further engage in various other illegal activities using such information, which may cause losses to our users and undermine their trust in us. There can be no assurance that the measures we have taken are sufficient and effective to ensure the confidentiality and integrity of our data and confidential information stored or transmitted through our systems. Any negative publicity on our systems’ safety or privacy protection mechanisms and policies, and any claims asserted against us or fines imposed upon us as a result of actual or perceived failures, could have a material adverse effect on our public image, reputation, business, financial condition and results of operations.

We could be liable for any breach of security relating to the third-party online payment platforms we use, and concerns about the security of internet transactions could damage our reputation, deter current and potential users from using our online platforms and have other adverse consequences to our business.

Users may conduct transactions on our online platforms through third-party online payment platforms. In these online payment transactions, secured transmission of confidential information, such as customers’ credit card numbers and expiration dates, personal information and billing addresses, over public networks is essential to maintain consumer confidence. In addition, we expect that an increasing amount of our sales and transactions conducted on our online platforms will be conducted over the internet as a result of the growing use of online payment platforms. As the prevalence of using online payment methods increases, associated online crimes will likely increase as well. Our current security measures and those of the third-party online payment platform service providers may not be adequate. We must be prepared to increase and enhance our security measures and efforts so that our users have confidence in the reliability of the online payment platforms that we use, which will impose additional costs and expenses and may still not guarantee complete safety. In addition, we do not have control over the security measures of our third-party online payment platform service providers. Security breaches of the online payment platforms that we use could expose us to litigation and possible liability for failing to secure confidential user information and could, among other things, damage our reputation.

A significant barrier to financial transactions or other electronic payment processing platforms over the internet in general has been public concern over the security of online payments. If these concerns are not adequately addressed, they may inhibit the growth of paid online services generally. If an internet or mobile network security breach were to occur and get publicized, the perceived security of the online payment platforms may be damaged, and users concerned about the security of their transactions may become reluctant to purchase our services even if the publicized breach did not involve payment platforms or methods used by us.

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If any of the above were to occur and damage our reputation or the perceived security of the online payment platforms that we use, we may lose users and user traffic, and users may be discouraged from purchasing our services, which may have an adverse effect on our business. Any significant reduction in user traffic could lead to lower revenues from membership and online marketing services.

We may not be able to successfully halt the operations of websites that aggregate our data as well as data from other companies, including social networks, or “copycat” websites that have misappropriated our data in the past or may misappropriate our data in the future.

From time to time, third parties have misappropriated our data through website scraping, robots or other means and aggregated this data on their websites. In addition, “copycat” websites have misappropriated data on our platforms and attempted to imitate our brand or the functionality of our platforms. We have been increasing our investment and research in our technology to detect such behavior. When we have become aware of such websites, we have taken measures to halt such conduct. However, we may not be able to detect all such websites in a timely manner and the measures we take may be insufficient to stop their conduct. In those cases, our available remedies may not be adequate to protect us against such websites. Regardless of whether we can successfully enforce our rights against these websites, any measures that we may take could require us to expend significant financial or other resources.

We may not be able to prevent others from unauthorized use of our intellectual property, which could harm our business and competitive position.

We regard our trademarks, service marks, domain names, trade secrets, proprietary technologies and similar intellectual property as critical to our success, and we rely on trademark law, trade secret protection and confidentiality and license agreements with our employees, partners and others to protect our proprietary rights. As of March 31, 2020, we and our consolidated variable interest entities had registered 43 domain names that are material to our business, including www.58.com, www.58.com.cn, www.ganji.com, www.ganji.com.cn, www.anjuke.com and www.anjuke.cn, and 2,173 trademarks in China, excluding those relating to 58 Home. However, trademarks may also be invalidated, circumvented or challenged. For example, under PRC law, certain graphics may not be registered as a trademark and if a registered trademark is found to violate such prohibition, the relevant authority can invalidate the trademark; third parties may challenge such registered trademarks and apply to the authority for invalidation. In addition, if a registered trademark is identical or similar to a well-known trademark or prejudices the existing right obtained by others, it may be invalidated by the relevant authority upon request by the right holder. Trade secrets are difficult to protect, and our trade secrets may be leaked or otherwise become known or be independently discovered by competitors. Confidentiality agreements may be breached, and we may not have adequate remedies for any breach.

It is often difficult to enforce intellectual property rights in China. Even where adequate laws exist in China, it may not be possible to obtain prompt and equitable enforcement of such laws, or to obtain enforcement of a court judgment or an arbitration award delivered in another jurisdiction, and accordingly, we may not be able to effectively protect our intellectual property rights in China. Policing any unauthorized use of our intellectual property is difficult and costly and the steps we have taken may be inadequate to prevent the misappropriation of our technologies.

Spammers and malicious applications may make our services less user-friendly and discourage users from using our platforms or services.

Spammers may use our platforms and services to send targeted and untargeted spam messages to users, which may embarrass or annoy users and make usage of our platforms and services more time-consuming and less user-friendly. As a result, our users may use our services less or stop using them altogether. As part of fraudulent spamming activities, spammers typically create multiple user accounts, such as accounts being set-up for the purposes of sending spam messages. Although we have technologies and employees that attempt to identify and delete accounts created for spamming purposes, we are not able to eliminate all spam messages from being sent on our platforms.

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We may be subject to intellectual property infringement claims or other allegations by third parties for services we provide or for information or content displayed on, retrieved from or linked to our platforms, or distributed to our users, which may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and prospects.

Internet, technology and media companies are frequently involved in litigation based on allegations of infringement of intellectual property rights, unfair competition, invasion of privacy, defamation and other violations of other parties’ rights. The validity, enforceability and scope of protection of intellectual property rights in internet-related industries, particularly in China, are uncertain and still evolving. We face, from time to time, and expect to face in the future, allegations that we have infringed the trademarks, copyrights, patents and other intellectual property rights of third parties, including our competitors, or allegations that we are involved in unfair competition against our competitors. As we face increasing competition and sometimes have to take defensive measures in response to competitive pressure and as litigation become more common in China in resolving commercial disputes, we face a higher risk of being the subject of intellectual property infringement and unfair competition claims. Intellectual property and unfair competition claims and litigation may be expensive and time-consuming to investigate and defend and may divert resources and management attention from the operation of our business. Such claims, even if they do not result in liability, may harm our reputation. Any resulting liability or expenses, or changes required to be made to our platforms to reduce the risk of future liability, may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and prospects.

We utilize software that selectively identifies classified information listings on other platforms in certain content categories for which our certification procedure is not required and replicates such listings on our platforms. These replicated listings are not given individualized registered user accounts and are not counted as listings for purposes of calculating the listings per day posted by our users as disclosed in this annual report. If an original poster wants to delete a replicated listing on our platforms, the poster can either use our online self-help functions or contact our customer service online to delete the listing. We do not explicitly indicate the replicated listings on our platforms, although we notify our users of the replicated nature of the listings upon inquiry. We believe this is a widespread practice in our industry in China. However, the practice may be deemed to be in violation of the PRC Anti-Unfair Competition Law. If other market participants bring legal claims against us for conducting unfair competition, we may be held liable by the court and be required to pay damages to the plaintiffs equal to the losses suffered by the market participants as a result of the unfair competition practices or, if it is difficult to calculate the losses, equal to the aggregate profits earned through the unfair competition practices and the reasonable expenses incurred by the plaintiffs to investigate the unfair competition practices. We have never generated revenue from replicated listings. In addition, if the replicated listings are protected under copyright law, the practice of replicating listings may be deemed to be copyright infringement. In such case, we may be required to cease the act of infringement, eliminate any influence caused, apologize to and pay damages to the copyright owners and be subject to penalties including confiscation of illegal gains and imposition of fines by the relevant governmental authorities. In addition, we have from time to time been the subject of critical media coverage due to this practice, which could harm our reputation and business.

Strategic acquisition of businesses and assets, and the subsequent integration of newly acquired businesses into our own, create significant challenges that may have a material adverse effect on our business, reputation, results of operations and financial condition.

Since our IPO in October 2013, we have made a number of acquisitions and investments, two of which are most significant in value. In March 2015, we acquired Anjuke, a major online real estate listing platform in China, through the purchase of a 100% equity interests in Anjuke Inc., a company incorporated under the laws of the Cayman Islands, for 4.8 million newly issued Class A ordinary shares of our company and US$160.2 million in cash. We also issued 0.2 million fully vested restricted share units of our company to former Anjuke employees as part of the share consideration.

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In September 2017, Ganji, another major online classifieds platform in China, became our wholly owned subsidiary through a series of transactions. In April 2015, we acquired less than 50% equity stake in Ganji, for 34.0 million newly issued Class A ordinary shares of our company and US$412.2 million in cash. Concurrently with this acquisition, we issued 15.4 million Class A ordinary shares to Tencent for US$400.0 million. Later in 2015, we committed an aggregate of 46.5 million newly issued ordinary shares and US$406.7 million in cash to several private equity funds as a limited partner. These funds, together with Tencent, acquired all the remaining equity interests in Ganji in August 2015. Since August 6, 2015, we started to consolidate the financial results of Ganji in accordance with U.S. GAAP on the basis of our equity stake in Ganji as well as our controlling financial interests under the voting interest model over these funds. We also transferred an aggregate of 4.4 million fully vested restricted share units of our company and approximately US$51.0 million in cash to former Ganji employees as part of the total consideration of step acquisition of Ganji. In September 2017, these funds distributed all their equity interests in Ganji to their respective limited partners, and we acquired those equity interests as well as the remaining equity interests in Ganji held by Tencent.

The addition of Anjuke has strengthened our market position in the online secondary property sales markets and has allowed us to enter the primary home sales market. The acquisition of Ganji and our subsequent business cooperation and integration have allowed us to increase our market share in the job, real estate, yellow page local services, used car and used goods categories and better control marketing costs and expenses. The integration of Ganji and Anjuke has largely been completed and we gradually realized more synergies. However, Anjuke and Ganji continue to be separate consumer-facing platforms and have their own respective user bases and paying business user networks that might not overlap much with those of 58, even though the paying user related services have been integrated or being integrated in most content categories. We might experience unexpected loss of users and customers from the integration after our acquisition or investment. These acquisitions and investments expose us to potential risks, including risks associated with unforeseen or hidden liabilities, diversion of management attention and resources from our existing business and inability to generate sufficient revenues to offset the costs and expenses of the acquisition or investment.

Other than Anjuke and Ganji, we have made various other acquisitions and investments since our IPO in 2013. For example, in June 2018, we acquired a minority stake of approximately 8.3% in 5I5J Holding Group Co., Ltd., or 5I5J, a major secondary and rental brokerage company in China, for a consideration of approximately RMB1.1 billion in cash. In 2019, we jointly established Shanghai Gengying Information Technology Co., Ltd., or Ai Fang, with a publicly traded company and a private company in China to engage in the promotion and sale of primary property for real estate developers. If we fail to integrate these acquired businesses or the companies in which we invested fail to grow as we expect or continue to generate losses, we may experience losses in our acquisitions and investments.

If we are presented with appropriate opportunities in the future, we may acquire or invest in additional businesses or assets that are complementary to our business. However, strategic acquisitions and the subsequent integration of new businesses and assets into our own would require significant attention from our management and could result in a diversion of resources from our existing business, which in turn could have an adverse effect on our business operations. In addition, acquisitions could result in potential dilutive issuances of equity securities, use of substantial amounts of cash, and exposure to potential ongoing financial obligations and unforeseen or hidden liabilities of the acquired businesses. The cost and duration of, and difficulties in, integrating newly acquired businesses and managing a larger overall business could also materially exceed our expectations. Moreover, we may not be able to achieve our intended strategic synergies and may record substantial impairment charges to goodwill, if we fail to successfully integrate the newly acquired businesses or manage a larger business. Our equity investees may generate significant losses, a portion of which will be shared by us in accordance with U.S. GAAP. In addition, we may incur impairment losses if the financial or operating results of those investees fail to meet the expectations. Any such negative developments could have a material adverse effect on our business, reputation, results of operations and financial condition.

Future strategic alliances, acquisitions or business disposals may have a material and adverse effect on our business, reputation and results of operations.

We may enter into strategic alliances with various third parties to further our business purposes from time to time. Strategic alliances with third parties could subject us to a number of risks, including risks associated with sharing proprietary information, non-performance by the counter-party, and an increase in expenses incurred in establishing new strategic alliances, any of which may materially and adversely affect our business. In addition, to the extent the strategic partner suffers negative publicity or harm to their reputation from events relating to their business, we may also suffer negative publicity or harm to our reputation by virtue of our association with such third parties, and we may have little ability to control or monitor their actions.

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Investments and acquisitions and the subsequent integration of new assets and businesses into our own require significant attention from our management and may divert resources from our existing business, which in turn could have an adverse effect on our business operations. Invested or acquired assets or businesses may not generate the financial results we expect and may adversely affect our results of operations. Furthermore, investments and acquisitions could result in the use of substantial amounts of cash, potentially dilutive issuances of equity securities, the occurrence of significant goodwill impairment charges, amortization expenses for other intangible assets and exposure to potential unknown liabilities of the acquired businesses. Moreover, the costs of identifying and consummating acquisitions may be significant.

Furthermore, the legal requirements on acquisitions by us and our PRC subsidiaries are different from acquisitions by our consolidated variable interest entities. Most importantly, if we or our PRC subsidiaries acquire any domestic companies in China, such acquisition will be subject to PRC laws and regulations on foreign investment. We and our PRC subsidiaries are restricted or prohibited from directly acquiring interests in companies in certain industries under PRC laws and regulations. See “Item 4. Information on the Company — B. Business Overview — Regulation — Regulations on Value-Added Telecommunication Services.” Our consolidated variable interest entities are not subject to PRC laws and regulations on foreign investment and may acquire PRC companies operating in industries where foreign investments are restricted or prohibited. However, there are uncertainties with respect to the interpretation and application of PRC laws and regulations regarding indirect foreign investments in such industries. See “— Risks Related to Our Corporate Structure and Restrictions on Our Industry — Substantial uncertainties and restrictions exist with respect to the interpretation and application of PRC laws and regulations relating to online commerce and the distribution of internet content in China. If the PRC government finds that the structure we have adopted for our business operations does not comply with PRC laws and regulations, we could be subject to severe penalties, including the shutting down of our platforms.”

On December 31, 2015, we divested our controlling ownership stake in Che Hao Duo (formerly known as Guazi), a subsidiary that operated our C2C used car trading platform, to Mr. Mark Haoyong Yang, ex-founder and ex-CEO of Ganji and co-chairman of our board of directors at the time. We had a 45.6% stake in Guazi immediately after the spin-off and have deconsolidated the financial results of Guazi from ours in accordance with U.S. GAAP since then. As a result of this transaction, we reduced the pressure on our cash flows and profitability and were able to better focus on our core classifieds business. In addition, we expected that a more independent Che Hao Duo would grow its business faster with support from new investors. They have conducted several rounds of private equity financing since December 2015. In 2019, we sold certain percentage of our equity stake in Che Hao Duo to a third-party investor for a total purchase price of US$713.6 million. As of December 31, 2019, we held approximately 8.0% equity interests in Che Hao Duo.

In 2019, we jointly established Ai Fang, with a publicly traded company and a private company in China to engage in the promotion and sale of primary property for real estate developers. We invested RMB153 million in cash and held 30% of the equity interests in Ai Fang as of December 31, 2019. To support the fast growth of Ai Fang’s business, in March 2020, we further invested RMB139.1 million in Ai Fang’s equity and RMB370.9 million in Ai Fang’s convertible notes. Upon completion of this further investment, our equity interest in Ai Fang was increased to 45%. As of December 31, 2019, we accounted for our investment in Ai Fang using equity method.

We may dispose of other businesses that we control, particularly ones that are not closely related to our core focus areas or might require more resources or financial capital than we can allocate to them. These decisions are largely based on our management’s assessment of the business models and likelihood of success of these businesses. Our judgment could be inaccurate and divesting ownership of these businesses might negatively affect our operations or long-term value.

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Uncertainty resulting from the non-binding proposal letter and other related matters may adversely affect our business.

On April 2, 2020, we received a preliminary non-binding proposal letter, or the Proposal Letter, from Ocean Link Partners Limited to acquire all of the outstanding ordinary shares of our Company, including Class A ordinary shares represented by American depositary shares, for US$27.5 in cash per Class A or Class B ordinary share. On April 20, 2020, our board of directors formed a special committee consisting of two independent and disinterested directors, Mr. Robert Frank (Bob) Dodds Jr. and Ms. Li (Lily) Dong, to evaluate and consider the Proposal Letter or any alternative strategic option that the Company may pursue. As of the date of this annual report, no decisions have been made with respect to the Proposal Letter or any alternative strategic option that the Company may pursue. There can be no assurance that any definitive offer will be received, that any definitive agreement will be executed relating to the transaction contemplated by the Proposal Letter or that any other transaction will be approved or consummated. Moreover, the proposal or any alternative strategic option, whether or not consummated, presents a risk of diverting management focus, employee attention and resources from other strategic opportunities and from operational matters. Also, certain events and developments relating to the proposal may increase the volatility of the trading price of the ADSs. Furthermore, we could be subject to potential lawsuits in connection with the proposed transaction.

We may not be able to maintain profitability.

We incurred losses in 2015 and 2016, but made profits in 2017, 2018 and 2019. Our loss in 2015 was attributable to increased competition and the fact that we had new initiatives such as 58 Daojia Inc., or 58 Home, a mobile-based closed-loop transactional platform for home services, and Guazi.com Inc., or Guazi, a subsidiary that operated our consumer-to-consumer (C2C) used car trading platform, that were still in early stages of development. We have ceased consolidating 58 Home’s financial results in our consolidated financial statements since its completion of Series A equity financing on November 27, 2015, and we divested Guazi on December 31, 2015. However, as we account for 58 Home as our equity investee, we share our portion of its income or loss. We may also decide to provide additional capital to support our incubated businesses. In 2016, our net loss primarily resulted from our share of 58 Home’s loss.

Our future profitability may also be significantly impacted by the success of our recent and new service and product offerings, such as our new mobile apps. If competition in these new services intensifies in China, we may choose to invest heavily to gain or protect market share, which may adversely affect our profitability. We expect that we will continue to incur marketing and sales, research and development and other expenses to launch new services and grow our user base, which may affect our profitability and operating cash flow in the future. For example, we launched a new mobile app, Zhuan Zhuan (转转), which targets the C2C used goods market in 2015. We also launched 58 Town (58 同镇), a rural version of 58 targeting the rural population in 2017. We have invested, and may continue to invest, in the marketing of Zhuan Zhuan, 58 Town and our other new service and product offerings. Our results of operations will be adversely affected if our new product initiatives including Zhuan Zhuan, 58 Town and other services fail to generate sufficient revenue to recoup our investment and expenses.

In addition, our ability to achieve or maintain profitability is affected by various factors that are beyond our control. For example, our revenues and profitability depend on the continuous development of the online marketing industry in China and business users’ allocation of more of their budgets to online marketing services. We cannot assure you that online marketing services will become more widely accepted in China or that business users will increase their spending on online marketing services.

If we are unsuccessful in addressing any of these risks and uncertainties, our business may be materially and adversely affected, and we may incur net loss in the future. If we are unable to maintain positive operating cash flows, we may need to seek debt or equity financing or may cease to operate as a going concern. Further equity financings may dilute our existing shareholders.

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We may need additional capital, and the sale of additional ADSs or other equity securities could result in additional dilution to our shareholders.

As of December 31, 2019, we had cash and cash equivalents, term deposits and short-term investments totaling RMB13.8 billion. Our ability to continue as a going concern is dependent on our ability to successfully execute our business plan, which includes increasing revenues while controlling operating expenses, as well as generating cash flows from operating activities and continuing to gain support from outside sources of financing. We can adjust the pace of our operation expansion and control our operating expenses. Although we believe that we have sufficient funds to meet our working capital requirements and debt obligations in the ordinary course of business for the next 12 months from the date of this annual report, we may require additional cash resources due to changed business conditions or other future developments, including to make any investments or acquisitions we may decide to pursue or to pay down loans from financial institutions. If these resources are insufficient to satisfy our cash requirements, we may seek to sell additional equity or debt securities or obtain a credit facility. For example, in June 2014 and April 2015, we issued 36.8 million ordinary shares at the equivalent of US$20.00 per ordinary share and 15.4 million ordinary shares at the equivalent of US$26.00 per ordinary share, respectively, to a holding vehicle of Tencent. The sale of additional equity securities could result in additional dilution to our shareholders. The incurrence of indebtedness would result in increased debt service obligations and could result in operating and financing covenants that would restrict our operations. It is uncertain whether financing will be available in amounts or on terms acceptable to us, if at all.

If we fail to implement and maintain an effective system of internal controls, we may be unable to accurately or timely report our results of operations or prevent fraud, and investor confidence and the market price of our ADSs may be materially and adversely affected.

We are subject to reporting obligations under the U.S. securities laws. The SEC, as required under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, adopted rules requiring every public company to include a management report on such company’s internal control over financial reporting in its annual report, which contains management’s assessment of the effectiveness of the company’s internal control over financial reporting. In addition, an independent registered public accounting firm must attest to and report on the effectiveness of the company’s internal control over financial reporting. Our management has concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of December 31, 2019. See “Item 15. Controls and Procedures.”

However, if we fail to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting in the future, our management and our independent registered public accounting firm may not be able to conclude that we have effective internal control over financial reporting at a reasonable assurance level. This could in turn result in the loss of investor confidence in the reliability of our financial statements and negatively impact the trading price of our ADSs. Furthermore, we have incurred and may need to incur additional costs and use additional management and other resources in an effort to comply with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and other requirements going forward.

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We have granted restricted share units and other share-based awards in the past and will continue to do so in the future. We recognize share-based compensation expenses in our consolidated statement of comprehensive income/(loss) in accordance with U.S. GAAP. Any additional grant of restricted share units and other share-based awards in the future may have a material adverse effect on our results of operation.

We adopted an employee stock option plan in 2010, or the 2010 Plan, and a share incentive plan in 2013, or the 2013 Plan, for the purpose of granting share-based compensation awards to employees, directors and consultants to incentivize their performance and align their interests with ours. Under the 2010 Plan, we are permitted to issue options to purchase up to 20,173,225 ordinary shares. Under the 2013 Plan, we are authorized to grant options, restricted shares, restricted share units or other awards to purchase up to 35,622,530 ordinary shares, consisting of 28,622,530 Class A ordinary shares and 7,000,000 Class B ordinary shares, including the automatic increase of 4,489,161 ordinary shares at the beginning of 2020 pursuant to the evergreen provision of the 2013 Plan. As of March 31, 2020, restricted share units to receive and options to purchase an aggregate of 9,959,690 ordinary shares and 1,440,820 ordinary shares were issued and outstanding under the 2013 Plan and 2010 Plan, respectively. 58 Home, our equity investee accounted for under equity method, adopted a share incentive plan in 2015 and granted options and restricted shares under that plan to certain employees of 58 Home and our company. In addition, Zhuan Spirit Holdings Limited, or Zhuan Zhuan Holding, our consolidated subsidiary, adopted its 2017 Share Incentive Plan and 2019 Share Incentive Plan, and granted restricted share units, options and restricted shares under that plan to certain employees of Zhuan Zhuan Holding. See “Item 6. Directors, Senior Management and Employees — B. Compensation.” We have granted substantial additional share-based awards in connection with our acquisition of Ganji and may grant more as part of future acquisition and integrations of other companies. As a result of these grants and potential future grants, we incurred in the past and expect to continue to incur in future periods significant share-based compensation expenses. The amount of share-based compensation expenses is based on the fair value of the share-based awards. We account for compensation costs for all share-based awards using a fair-value based method and recognize expenses in our consolidated statement of comprehensive income/(loss) in accordance with U.S. GAAP. The expenses associated with share-based compensation will increase our net loss or decrease our net income, perhaps materially, and the additional securities issued under share-based compensation plans will dilute the ownership interests of our shareholders, including holders of our ADSs. However, if we limit the scope of our share-based compensation plan, we may not be able to attract or retain key personnel who are expected to be compensated by incentive shares or options.

We are subject to changing law and regulations regarding regulatory matters, corporate governance and public disclosure that have increased both our costs and the risk of non-compliance.

We are subject to rules and regulations by various governing bodies, including, for example, the Securities and Exchange Commission, which is charged with the protection of investors and the oversight of companies whose securities are publicly traded, and the various regulatory authorities in China and the Cayman Islands, and to new and evolving regulatory measures under applicable law. Our efforts to comply with new and changing laws and regulations have resulted in and are likely to continue to result in, increased general and administrative expenses and a diversion of management time and attention from revenue-generating activities to compliance activities.

Moreover, because these laws, regulations and standards are subject to varying interpretations, their application in practice may evolve over time as new guidance becomes available. This evolution may result in continuing uncertainty regarding compliance matters and additional costs necessitated by ongoing revisions to our disclosure and governance practices. If we fail to address and comply with these regulations and any subsequent changes, we may be subject to penalty and our business may be harmed.

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We may be subject to claims, lawsuits, litigation and other regulatory proceedings that may adversely affect our reputation, business and results of operations based on the nature of our business.

We are subject to claims, lawsuits, arbitration proceedings, government investigations and other legal and regulatory proceedings in the ordinary course of business relating, including those involving securities law class actions, contract disputes involving business users and consumer users on our platforms, consumer protection claims, intellectual property disputes, data and privacy protection claims, labor and employment, compliance with regulatory requirements and other matters. We also face potential claims relating to the information published on our platforms, including claims for defamation, libel, negligence, copyright, patent or trademark infringement, fraud, or other unlawful activities based on the nature and content of information to which we link or that may be posted on platforms, generated by users, or shared hypertext links to third-party websites, if appropriate licenses or third-party consents have not been obtained. Further, we are subject to claims, lawsuits, arbitration proceedings, government investigations and other legal and regulatory proceedings seeking to hold us liable for the activities of users on our platforms. Potentially, the frequency of claims against us could increase in proportion to the growth of users on our platforms. In addition, we may become subject to additional types of claims, lawsuits, government investigations and legal or regulatory proceedings as our business expands and as we deploy new business offerings.

The results of any such claims, lawsuits, arbitration proceedings, government investigations or other legal or regulatory proceedings cannot be predicted with certainty. Any claims against us, whether meritorious or not, could be time-consuming, result in costly litigation, be harmful to our reputation and brand, require significant management attention and divert significant resources. A resolution of one or more such proceedings could result in substantial damages, settlement costs, fines and penalties that could adversely affect our reputation and brand, business, financial condition and results of operations. We may also elect or be compelled to remove certain contents from our platforms, In addition, a determination in, or settlement of, any legal proceeding, whether we are party to such legal proceeding or not, that involves our industry, could also harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We have limited business insurance coverage.

Insurance companies in China currently do not offer as extensive an array of insurance products as insurance companies do in more developed economies. Except for the property insurance, platform liability insurance, third-party liability insurance, professional liability insurance, insurance for the protection of users, and certain other insurance policies purchased by certain PRC entities in our group, we do not have any disruption insurance to cover our operations. We have determined that the costs of insuring for these risks and the difficulties associated with acquiring such insurance on commercially reasonable terms make it impractical for us to have such insurance. Any uninsured occurrence of business disruption may result in our incurring substantial costs and the diversion of resources, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

Failure to renew our current leases or locate desirable alternatives for our facilities could materially and adversely affect our business.

Our company corporate headquarters are located in office buildings we acquired in 2014 in Chaoyang District, Beijing. We have purchased a smaller office space in Tianjin in 2015 as well. However, outside of Beijing and Tianjin, all of our offices in the other 57 cities and data centers were located on leased premises as of December 31, 2019. At the end of each lease term, we may not be able to negotiate an extension of the leases and may therefore be forced to move to different locations, or the rents we pay may increase significantly. This could disrupt our operations and adversely affect our profitability. We compete with other businesses for premises with certain characteristics or in desirable locations and some landlords may have entered into long-term leases with our competitors for such premises. As a result, we may not be able to obtain new leases at desirable locations or renew our existing leases on acceptable terms or at all, which could materially and adversely affect our business.

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Risks Related to Our Corporate Structure and Restrictions on Our Industry

Substantial uncertainties and restrictions exist with respect to the interpretation and application of PRC laws and regulations relating to online commerce and the distribution of internet content in China. If the PRC government finds that the structure we have adopted for our business operations does not comply with PRC laws and regulations, we could be subject to severe penalties, including the shutting down of our platforms.

Foreign ownership of internet-based businesses is subject to significant restrictions under current PRC laws and regulations. The PRC government regulates internet access, the distribution of online information and the conduct of online commerce through strict business licensing requirements and other government regulations. These laws and regulations also include limitations on foreign ownership in PRC companies that provide internet content distribution services. The State Council amended the Provisions on Administration of Foreign Invested Telecommunications Enterprises in February 2016 under which foreign investors are not allowed to own more than 50% of the equity interests in any entity providing value-added telecommunication services, except for e-commerce business, domestic multi-party communication business, information storage and re-transmission business and call center business, in which foreign investors are allowed to have more than 50% ownership in accordance with an announcement by the MIIT in June 2015, and the Special Administrative Measures (Negative List) for Foreign Investment Access issued in 2019. The Circular on Strengthening the Administration of Foreign Investment in and Operation of Value-added Telecommunications Business, or the MIIT Circular, issued by the MIIT in July 2006, reiterated the regulations on foreign investment in telecommunications businesses, which require foreign investors to set up foreign-invested enterprises and obtain business operating licenses for internet content provisions to conduct any value-added telecommunications business in China. Under the MIIT Circular, a domestic company that holds a value-added telecommunications business license, is prohibited from leasing, transferring or selling the license to foreign investors in any form, and from providing any assistance, including providing resources, sites or facilities, to foreign investors that conduct value-added telecommunications business illegally in China. Furthermore, the relevant trademarks and domain names that are used in the value-added telecommunications business must be owned by the local value-added telecommunications business license holder or its shareholders. Due to a lack of interpretation from MIIT, it is unclear what impact the MIIT Circular will have on us or the other PRC internet companies that have adopted the same or similar corporate and contractual structures as ours. Beijing 58 and certain other consolidated variable interest entities of us hold value-added telecommunications business license, and own all domain names used in our value-added telecommunications businesses. Beijing 58 and certain other consolidated variable interest entities of us are also the owners of all registered trademarks used in our value-added telecommunications businesses and are the applicants of all our applications for registration of trademarks used for our value-added telecommunications businesses.

We are a Cayman Islands company and our PRC subsidiary, Wanglin, is considered a foreign invested enterprise. To comply with PRC laws and regulations, we conduct our operations in China through a series of contractual arrangements entered into among Wanglin, Beijing 58 and Beijing 58’s shareholders. As a result of these contractual arrangements, we exert control over our Beijing 58 and its subsidiaries and consolidate their financial results in our financial statements under U.S. GAAP. In addition, Tianjin Zhuanzhuan World Technology Co., Ltd., or Tianjin Zhuanzhuan, entered into contractual arrangements with Beijing Zhuanzhuan Spirit Technology Co., Ltd., or Beijing Zhuanzhuan, and Beijing Zhuanzhuan’s shareholders. As a result of these contractual arrangements, Zhuan Spirit Holdings Limited, or Zhuan Zhuan Holding, exert control over Beijing Zhuanzhuan. For a detailed description of these contractual arrangements, see “Item 4. Information on the Company — C. Organizational Structure — Our Contractual Arrangements.”

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In the opinion of our PRC counsel, Han Kun Law Offices, our current ownership structure, the ownership structure of our PRC subsidiaries and our consolidated variable interest entities, the contractual arrangements relating to our consolidated variable interest entities, and, except as otherwise disclosed in this annual report, our business operations, are not in violation of any existing PRC laws, rules and regulations. There are, however, substantial uncertainties regarding the interpretation and application of current or future PRC laws and regulations. In particular, on March 15, 2019, the National People’s Congress approved the Foreign Investment Law, which came into effect on January 1, 2020 and replaced the trio of existing laws regulating foreign investment in China, namely, the Sino-foreign Equity Joint Venture Enterprise Law, the Sino-foreign Cooperative Joint Venture Enterprise Law and the Wholly Foreign-invested Enterprise Law, together with their implementation rules and ancillary regulations. Under the Foreign Investment Law, “foreign investment” refers to the investment activities directly or indirectly conducted by foreign individuals, enterprises or other entities in China. Although the definition does not explicitly classify contractual arrangements as a form of foreign investment, there is no assurance that foreign investment via contractual arrangement would not be interpreted as a type of indirect foreign investment activities under the definition in the future. In addition, the definition contains a catch-all provision which includes investments made by foreign investors through means stipulated in laws or administrative regulations or other methods prescribed by the State Council. Therefore, it still leaves leeway for future laws, administrative regulations or provisions promulgated by the Stale Council to provide for contractual arrangements as a form of foreign investment. On December 26, 2019, the Supreme People’s Court issued the Interpretations on Certain Issues Regarding the Applicable of Foreign Investment Law, or the FIL Interpretations, which came into effect on January 1, 2020. In accordance with the FIL Interpretations, where a party concerned claims an investment agreement to be invalid based on that it is for investment in prohibited industries under the negative list or it is for investment in restricted industries under the negative list and violates the restrictions set out therein, the courts should support such claim. There remains uncertainty as to whether our contractual arrangement will be deemed as investment agreements under the FIL Interpretations. See “—Uncertainties exist with respect to the interpretation and implementation of the newly enacted PRC Foreign Investment Law and how it may impact the viability of our current corporate structure, corporate governance and business operations.” Accordingly, we cannot assure you that PRC government authorities will not ultimately take a view contrary to the opinion of our PRC legal counsel in the future.

Accordingly, if our ownership structure, contractual arrangements and businesses of our company, our PRC subsidiaries or our consolidated variable interest entities are found to be in violation of any existing or future PRC laws or regulations, or we fail to obtain or maintain any of the required permits or approvals, the relevant governmental authorities would have broad discretion in dealing with such violation, including levying fines, confiscating our income or the income of our PRC subsidiaries or consolidated variable interest entities, revoking the business licenses or operating licenses of our PRC subsidiaries or consolidated variable interest entities, shutting down our servers or blocking our platforms, discontinuing or placing restrictions or onerous conditions on our operations, requiring us to undergo a costly and disruptive restructuring, and taking other regulatory or enforcement actions that could be harmful to our business. Any of these actions could cause significant disruption to our business operations and severely damage our reputation, which would in turn materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. If any of these occurrences results in our inability to direct the activities of any of our consolidated variable interest entities that most significantly impact its economic performance, and/or our failure to receive the economic benefits from any of our consolidated variable interest entities, we may not be able to consolidate the entity in our consolidated financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP.

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We rely on contractual arrangements with our consolidated variable interest entities and their shareholders for the operation of our business, which may not be as effective as direct ownership. If we are unable to maintain control, we would not be able to continue to consolidate the financial results of these entities with our financial results. If our consolidated variable interest entities and their shareholders fail to perform their obligations under these contractual arrangements, we may have to resort to litigation or arbitration to enforce our rights, which may be time-consuming, unpredictable, expensive and damaging to our operations and reputation.

Because of PRC restrictions and qualification requirements on foreign ownership of value-added telecommunications services in China, we depend on contractual arrangements with our consolidated variable interest entities, in which we have no ownership interest, to conduct our business. These contractual arrangements are intended to provide us with control over these entities and allow us to obtain economic benefits from them. Although we have been advised by our PRC counsel, Han Kun Law Offices, that these contractual arrangements are valid, binding and enforceable under current PRC laws, these contractual arrangements may not be as effective in providing control as direct ownership. For example, our consolidated variable interest entities and their shareholders could breach their contractual arrangements with us by, among other things, failing to conduct their operations, including maintaining our platforms and using the domain names and trademarks for which they have exclusive right to use, in an acceptable manner or taking other actions that are detrimental to our interests. If we were the controlling shareholder of our consolidated variable interest entities with direct ownership, we would be able to exercise our rights as shareholders to effect changes to their board of directors, which in turn could implement changes at the management and operational levels. Furthermore, each of our consolidated variable interest entities’ company chops are held by each company’s legal or accounting department. Our ability to ensure the consolidated variable interest entities’ performance under the contractual agreements may be limited if we were unable to secure control of the company chops in the event of a dispute with the entity’s management or shareholders as many official documents require affixation of company chops to become fully effective. As a result, if our consolidated variable interest entities or their shareholders fail to perform their obligations under these contractual arrangements we may have to incur substantial costs to enforce such arrangements, and rely on legal remedies under PRC law, including contract remedies, which may not be sufficient or effective. If we are unable to maintain control, we would not be able to continue to consolidate the financial results of these entities with our financial results.

These contractual arrangements are governed by PRC law and provide for dispute resolution through arbitration in China. Accordingly, these contracts would be interpreted in accordance with PRC law and any disputes would be resolved in accordance with PRC legal procedures. Under PRC law, if parties to a contract have agreed to resolve disputes arising from the contract by arbitration, a PRC court will not accept a lawsuit initiated at the court by any contract party, unless the agreement for arbitration is invalid. An arbitration award issued by the arbitration commission chosen in accordance with the agreement is final, binding and enforceable against the parties. If any party fails to comply with the arbitration award, the other party has the right to apply with a competent court for enforcement. However, the legal environment in China is not as developed as other jurisdictions such as the United States. As a result, uncertainties in the PRC legal system could limit our ability to enforce these contractual arrangements, which may make it difficult to exert control over our consolidated variable interest entities, and our ability to conduct our business may be negatively affected. In addition, a PRC court or arbitration tribunal may refuse to enforce the contractual arrangements on the grounds that they are designed to circumvent PRC foreign investment restrictions and therefore are against PRC public policy.

If we are unable to enforce these contractual arrangements, or if we suffer significant delay or other obstacles in the process of enforcing these contractual arrangements, our business and operations could be severely disrupted, which could materially and adversely affect our results of operations and damage our reputation. See “— Risks Related to Doing Business in China — Uncertainties in the interpretation and enforcement of PRC laws and regulations could limit the legal protections available to you and us.”

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The shareholders of our consolidated variable interest entities have potential conflicts of interest with us, which may adversely affect our business.

Mr. Jinbo Yao is the founder, chairman and chief executive officer of our company, having beneficial ownership of 10.2% of the total outstanding shares of our company as of March 31, 2020. See “Item 7. Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions — A. Major Shareholders.” He is also the sole director, general manager and a shareholder of Beijing 58, our consolidated affiliated entity, holding a 46.8% equity interests in the entity. In addition, Mr. Yao is the sole director and a 16.7% shareholder of Beijing Wanglintong Information Technology Co., Ltd., or Beijing Wanglintong, an entity that holds a 13.4% equity interests in Beijing 58. Conflicts of interest between his duties to our company, his duties to Beijing 58 and his interests as a shareholder of Beijing 58 may arise. We cannot assure you that he will act entirely in our interests when conflicts of interest arise or that conflicts of interest will be resolved in the favor of our company. Furthermore, in the context of Mr. Yao’s acting as the director and an executive officer of Beijing 58, PRC law would not require him to consider our company’s best interests. We rely on Mr. Yao to abide by the laws of China, which provide that directors and executive officers owe a duty of loyalty and duty of care to the company and require them to avoid conflicts of interest and not to take advantage of their positions for personal gains, and the laws of Cayman Islands, which provide that directors owe a duty of care and duty of loyalty to the company. The respective legal framework of China and the Cayman Islands does not provide guidance in the event of a conflict with another corporate governance regime. If we cannot resolve any conflict of interest or dispute between us and the shareholders of our consolidated variable interest entities should one arise, we would have to rely on legal proceedings, which could result in disruption of our business and subject us to substantial uncertainty as to the outcome of any such legal proceedings. In addition, Mr. Yao could violate his non-competition or employment agreements with us or his legal duties by diverting business opportunities from us, resulting in our loss of corporate opportunities. If we are unable to resolve any such conflicts, or if we suffer significant delays or other obstacles as a result of such conflicts, our business and operations could be severely disrupted, which could materially and adversely affect our results of operations and damage our reputation. See “— Risks Related to Doing Business in China — Uncertainties in the interpretation and enforcement of PRC laws and regulations could limit the legal protections available to you and us.”

We may lose the ability to use and enjoy assets held by our consolidated variable interest entities that are material to the operation of our business if any of such entities goes bankrupt or becomes subject to a dissolution or liquidation proceeding.

As part of our contractual arrangements with Beijing 58 and other consolidated variable interest entities, these entities hold certain assets that are material to the operation of our business, including the value-added telecommunications business license, and the domain names and trademarks for which Beijing 58 or any of the other consolidated variable interest entities has exclusive right to use. If any of our consolidated variable interest entities goes bankrupt and all or part of its assets become subject to liens or rights of third-party creditors, we may be unable to continue some or all of our business activities, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Under the contractual arrangements, our consolidated variable interest entities may not, in any manner, sell, transfer, mortgage or dispose of their assets or legal or beneficial interests in the business without our prior consent. If any of our consolidated variable interest entities undergoes a voluntary or involuntary liquidation proceeding, the unrelated third-party creditors may claim rights to some or all of these assets, thereby hindering our ability to operate our business, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our contractual arrangements with our consolidated variable interest entities may result in adverse tax consequences to us.

Under PRC laws and regulations, arrangements and transactions among related parties may be subject to audit or challenge by the PRC tax authorities within ten years after the taxable year when the transactions are conducted. The PRC enterprise income tax law requires every enterprise in China to submit its annual enterprise income tax return together with a report on transactions with its related parties to the relevant tax authorities. The tax authorities may impose reasonable adjustments on taxation if they have identified any related party transactions that are inconsistent with arm’s length principles. We may be subject to adverse tax consequences if the PRC tax authorities were to determine that the contracts between our PRC subsidiaries and our consolidated variable interest entities were not on an arm’s length basis and therefore constitute favorable transfer pricing arrangements. If this occurs, the PRC tax authorities could request that our consolidated variable interest entities adjust their taxable income, if any, upward for PRC tax purposes. Such a pricing adjustment could adversely affect us by increasing our consolidated variable interest entities’ tax expenses without reducing our tax expenses, and by subjecting our consolidated variable interest entities to late payment fees and other penalties for underpayment of taxes.

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We may be adversely affected by the complexity, uncertainties and changes in China’s regulation of internet business and companies.

The internet industry in China is highly regulated by the PRC government and numerous regulatory authorities of the central PRC government are empowered to issue and implement regulations governing various aspects of the internet industry including foreign ownership of and licensing and permit requirements pertaining to companies in the internet industry. See “Item 4. Information on the Company — B. Business Overview — Regulation.” These internet-related laws and regulations are relatively new and evolving, and their interpretation and enforcement involve significant uncertainty. As a result, in certain circumstances, it may be difficult to determine what actions or omissions may be deemed to be in violation of applicable laws and regulations. Our consolidated variable interest entities are required to obtain and maintain applicable licenses or approvals from different regulatory authorities in order to provide their current services, including but not limited to the Value-Added Telecommunications Business License, the Surveying and Mapping Qualification Certificate for internet mapping, the Employment Agency License and the Internet Culture Business Permit.

Pursuant to the relevant regulations promulgated by the State Administration of Press Publication, Radio, Film and Television, or the SAPPRFT (currently known as National Radio and Television Administration, or the NRTA), any company engaged in internet broadcasting activities must obtain an Online Audio/Video Program Transmission License issued by the NRTA and operate in accordance with the scope as stipulated in such license. Since February 2008, only wholly state-owned or state-controlled enterprises are qualified to apply for new Online Audio/Video Program Transmission License. Beijing 58 Auto Technology Co., Ltd. or Beijing 58 Auto (formerly known as Beijing Leftbrain Network Technology Co., Ltd.), one of our consolidated affiliates, provides on its website certain audio/video programs on third-party platforms, which have the Online Audio/Video Program Transmission Licenses. Beijing 58 Auto had fines imposed for an amount of RMB6,000, RMB6,000 and RMB3,000 in 2015, 2016 and 2017, respectively, for providing internet broadcasting activities without an Online Audio/Video Program Transmission License. No relevant fine or penalty was imposed on Beijing 58 Auto in 2018 and 2019. Beijing 58 Auto may be subject to additional penalties and be required to change its way to provide audio/video programs if the local authorities still consider the existing way that Beijing 58 Auto provides the audio/video programs to be an internet broadcasting activity.

Furthermore, our consolidated variable interest entities may be required to obtain additional licenses. If any of them fails to obtain or maintain any of the required licenses or approvals, its continued business operations in the internet industry may subject it to various penalties, such as confiscation of illegal net sales, fines and the discontinuation or restriction of its operations. Any such disruption in the business operations of our consolidated variable interest entities will materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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Regulation and censorship of information distribution over the internet in China may adversely affect our business, and we may be liable for information displayed on, retrieved from or linked to our platforms.

The PRC government has adopted regulations governing internet access and the distribution of information over the internet. Under these regulations, internet content providers and internet publishers are prohibited from posting or displaying over the internet content that, among other things, violates PRC laws and regulations, impairs the national dignity of China or the public interest, contains terrorism or extremism content, or is reactionary, obscene, superstitious, fraudulent or defamatory. Failure to comply with these requirements may result in the revocation of licenses to provide internet content and other licenses, the closure of the concerned platforms and reputational harm. A website operator may also be held liable for such censored information displayed on or linked to its website. In particular, the Cyberspace Administration of China has issued rules from time to time to enhance the internet service provider’s obligations to monitor the information displayed on the information platform and prevent dissemination of illegal contents. At the end of 2019, the Cyberspace Administration of China issued the Provisions on the Management of Network Information Content Ecology, or the CAC Order No.5, which became effective on March 1, 2020, to further strengthen the regulation and management of network information content.  Pursuant to the CAC Order No.5, each network information content service platform is required, among others, (i) not to disseminate any information prohibited by laws and regulations, such as information jeopardizing national security; (ii) to strengthen the examination of advertisements published on such network information content service platform; (iii) to promulgate management rules and platform convention and improve user agreement, such that such network information content service platform could clarify users’ rights and obligations and perform management responsibilities required by laws, regulations, rules and convention; (iv) to establish convenient means for complaints and reports; and (v) to prepare annual work report regarding its management of network information content ecology. In addition, a network information content service platform must not, among others, (i) utilize new technologies such as deep-learning and virtual reality to engage in activities prohibited by laws and regulations; (ii) engage in online traffic fraud, malicious traffic rerouting and other activities related to fraudulent account, illegal transaction account or maneuver of users’ account; and (iii) infringe a third party’s legitimate rights or seek illegal interests by way of interfering with information display. For a detailed discussion, see “Item 4. Information on the Company — B. Business Overview — Regulation — Regulations on Value-Added Telecommunication Services” and “Item 4. Information on the Company — B. Business Overview — Regulation — Regulations on Information Security and Censorship.” We have a team within our data security department which implements internal procedures to review the content in our system for compliance with applicable laws and regulations, aided by a program designed to periodically sweep our platforms and the data being conveyed in our system for sensitive keywords or questionable materials. In spite of this screening system, we may have difficulty identifying and removing all illegal content or transactions involving illegal sales of goods and services, which could expose us to the penalties described above.

We are subject to changing law and regulations regarding regulatory matters, corporate governance and public disclosure that have increased both our costs and the risk of non-compliance.

We are subject to rules and regulations by various governing bodies, including, for example, the Securities and Exchange Commission, which is charged with the protection of investors and the oversight of companies whose securities are publicly traded, and the various regulatory authorities in China and the Cayman Islands, and to new and evolving regulatory measures under applicable law. Our efforts to comply with new and changing laws and regulations have resulted in and are likely to continue to result in, increased general and administrative expenses and a diversion of management time and attention from revenue-generating activities to compliance activities.

Moreover, because these laws, regulations and standards are subject to varying interpretations, their application in practice may evolve over time as new guidance becomes available. This evolution may result in continuing uncertainty regarding compliance matters and additional costs necessitated by ongoing revisions to our disclosure and governance practices. If we fail to address and comply with these regulations and any subsequent changes, we may be subject to penalty and our business may be harmed.

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Risks Related to Doing Business in China

Uncertainties in the interpretation and enforcement of PRC laws and regulations could limit the legal protections available to you and us.

The PRC legal system is based on written statutes. Unlike common law systems, it is a system in which legal cases have limited value as precedents. In the late 1970s, the PRC government began to promulgate a comprehensive system of laws and regulations governing economic matters in general. The overall effect of legislation over the past three decades has significantly increased the protections afforded to various forms of foreign or private-sector investment in China. Our PRC subsidiaries, Wanglin, 58 Technology and Shanghai Ruiting, are foreign-invested enterprises and are subject to laws and regulations applicable to foreign-invested enterprises as well as various PRC laws and regulations generally applicable to companies in China. However, since these laws and regulations are relatively new and the PRC legal system continues to rapidly evolve, the interpretations of many laws, regulations and rules are not always uniform and enforcement of these laws, regulations and rules involve uncertainties.

From time to time, we may have to resort to administrative and court proceedings to enforce our legal rights. However, since PRC administrative and court authorities have significant discretion in interpreting and implementing statutory and contractual terms, it may be more difficult to evaluate the outcome of administrative and court proceedings and the level of legal protection we enjoy than in more developed legal systems. Furthermore, the PRC legal system is based in part on government policies and internal rules (some of which are not published in a timely manner or at all) that may have retroactive effect. As a result, we may not be aware of our violation of these policies and rules until sometime after the violation. Such uncertainties, including uncertainty over the scope and effect of our contractual, property (including intellectual property) and procedural rights, and any failure to respond to changes in the regulatory environment in China could materially and adversely affect our business and impede our ability to continue our operations.

Changes in China’s economic, political or social conditions or government policies could have a material adverse effect on our business and operations.

Substantially all of our assets and almost all of our users are located in China. Accordingly, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may be influenced to a significant degree by political, economic and social conditions in China generally and by continued economic growth in China as a whole.

China’s economy differs from the economies of most developed countries in many respects, including the level of government involvement, level of development, growth rate, control of foreign exchange and allocation of resources. Although the PRC government has implemented measures since the late 1970s emphasizing the utilization of market forces for economic reform, the reduction of state ownership of productive assets, and the establishment of improved corporate governance in business enterprises, a substantial portion of productive assets in China is still owned by the PRC government. In addition, the PRC government continues to play a significant role in regulating industry development by imposing industrial policies. The PRC government also exercises significant control over the PRC economic growth through allocating resources, controlling payment of foreign currency-denominated obligations, setting monetary policy, and providing preferential treatment to particular industries or companies.

While China’s economy has experienced significant growth over the past decades, growth has been uneven, both geographically and among various sectors of the economy, and may slow down in the future. Some of the government measures may benefit the overall Chinese economy, but may have a negative effect on us. For example, our financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected by government control over capital investments or changes in tax regulations. Any stimulus measures designed to boost the Chinese economy may contribute to higher inflation, which could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition. For example, certain operating costs and expenses, such as employee compensation and office operating expenses, may increase as a result of higher inflation.

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Uncertainties exist with respect to the interpretation and implementation of the new PRC Foreign Investment Law and its Implementation Regulations and how it may impact the viability of our current corporate structure, corporate governance and business operations.

On January 1, 2020, the Foreign Investment Law and the Regulations for Implementation of the Foreign Investment Law of the People’s Republic of China, or the Implementation Regulations, came into effect and replaced the trio of prior laws regulating foreign investment in China, namely, the Sino-foreign Equity Joint Venture Enterprise Law, the Sino-foreign Cooperative Joint Venture Enterprise Law and the Wholly Foreign-invested Enterprise Law, together with their implementation rules and ancillary regulations. The Foreign Investment Law and the Implementation Regulations embody an expected PRC regulatory trend to rationalize its foreign investment regulatory regime in line with prevailing international practice and the legislative efforts to unify the corporate legal requirements for both foreign and domestic investments. However, since they are relatively new, uncertainties still exist in relation to their interpretation and implementation. For instance, under the Foreign Investment Law, “foreign investment” refers to the investment activities directly or indirectly conducted by foreign individuals, enterprises or other entities in China. Although the definition does not explicitly classify contractual arrangements as a form of foreign investment, there is no assurance that foreign investment via contractual arrangement would not be interpreted as a type of indirect foreign investment activities under the definition in the future. In addition, the definition contains a catch-all provision which includes investments made by foreign investors through means stipulated in laws or administrative regulations or other methods prescribed by the State Council. Therefore, it still leaves leeway for future laws, administrative regulations or provisions promulgated by the Stale Council to provide for contractual arrangements as a form of foreign investment. On December 26, 2019, the Supreme People’s Court issued the FIL Interpretations, which came into effect on January 1, 2020. In accordance with the FIL Interpretations, where a party concerned claims an investment agreement to be invalid based on that it is for investment in prohibited industries under the negative list or it is for investment in restricted industries under the negative list and violates the restrictions set out therein, the courts should support such claim. In any of these cases, it will be uncertain whether our contractual arrangements will be deemed to be in violation of the market access requirements for foreign investment under the PRC laws and regulations and will be held invalid by the courts. Furthermore, if future laws, administrative regulations or provisions prescribed by the State Council mandate further actions to be taken by companies with respect to existing contractual arrangements, we may face substantial uncertainties as to whether we can complete such actions in a timely manner, or at all. Failure to take timely and appropriate measures to cope with any of these or similar regulatory compliance challenges could materially and adversely affect our current corporate structure, corporate governance and business operations.

Under the Enterprise Income Tax Law, we may be classified as a PRC “resident enterprise” for PRC enterprise income tax purposes. Such classification would likely result in unfavorable tax consequences to us and our non-PRC shareholders and have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and the value of your investment.

Under the PRC Enterprise Income Tax Law, an enterprise established outside the PRC with “de facto management bodies” within China is considered a “resident enterprise” for PRC enterprise income tax purposes and is generally subject to a uniform 25% enterprise income tax rate on its worldwide income. Under the implementation rules to the Enterprise Income Tax Law, a “de facto management body” is defined as a body that has material and overall management and control over the manufacturing and business operations, personnel and human resources, finances and properties of an enterprise. In addition, a circular known as SAT Circular 82, issued in April 2009 and as amended in December 2017 by the State Administration of Taxation specifies that certain offshore incorporated enterprises controlled by PRC enterprises or PRC enterprise groups will be classified as PRC resident enterprises if the following are located or resident in China: senior management personnel and departments that are responsible for daily production, operation and management; financial and personnel decision making bodies; key properties, accounting books, company seal, and minutes of board meetings and shareholders’ meetings; and half or more of the senior management or directors having voting rights. Further to SAT Circular 82, the State Administration of Taxation issued a bulletin, known as SAT Bulletin 45, which took effect in September 2011 and as recently amended in June 2018, to provide more guidance on the implementation of SAT Circular 82 and clarify the reporting and filing obligations of such “Chinese-controlled offshore incorporated resident enterprises.” SAT Bulletin 45 provides procedures and administrative details for the determination of resident status and administration on post-determination matters. Although both SAT Circular 82 and SAT Bulletin 45 only apply to offshore enterprises controlled by PRC enterprises or PRC enterprise groups, not those controlled by PRC individuals or foreign individuals, the determining criteria set forth in SAT Circular 82 and SAT Bulletin 45 may reflect the State Administration of Taxation’s general position on how the “de facto management body” test should be applied in determining the tax resident status of offshore enterprises, regardless of whether they are controlled by PRC enterprises, PRC enterprise groups or by PRC or foreign individuals.

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We do not believe that 58.com Inc., China Classified Network Corporation, China Classified Information Corporation Limited, or any of our other offshore subsidiaries meet all of the conditions above and thus we do not believe that 58.com Inc., China Classified Network Corporation, China Classified Information Corporation Limited or any of our other offshore subsidiaries is a PRC resident enterprise, although some of the members of our management team as well as the management team of our offshore holding companies are located in China. However, if the PRC tax authorities determine that 58.com Inc., China Classified Network Corporation, China Classified Information Corporation Limited or any of our other offshore subsidiaries is a PRC resident enterprise for PRC enterprise income tax purposes, a number of unfavorable PRC tax consequences could follow. First, we and/or our offshore subsidiaries will be subject to the uniform 25% enterprise income tax on our world-wide income, which could materially reduce our net income. In addition, we will also be subject to PRC enterprise income tax reporting obligations.

Furthermore, although dividends paid by one PRC tax resident enterprise to an offshore incorporated PRC resident enterprise controlled by PRC enterprises or PRC enterprise groups should qualify as “tax-exempt income” under the Enterprise Income Tax Law and Bulletin 45, we cannot assure you that dividends paid by any of our PRC subsidiaries to their shareholder in Hong Kong such as China Classified Information Corporation Limited will not be subject to a PRC withholding tax, as the PRC foreign exchange control authorities, which enforce the withholding tax on dividends, and the PRC tax authorities have not yet issued guidance with respect to the processing of outbound remittances to entities that are treated as resident enterprises for PRC enterprise income tax purposes but not controlled by PRC enterprises or PRC enterprise groups.

Finally, dividends payable by us to our investors and gains on the sale of our shares may become subject to PRC withholding tax, each at a rate of 10% for foreign enterprise holders and at a rate of 20% for foreign individual holders of the ADSs or ordinary shares.

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We may not be able to obtain certain benefits under relevant tax treaty on dividends paid by our PRC subsidiaries to us through China Classified Information Corporation Limited or other Hong Kong subsidiaries.

We are a holding company incorporated under the laws of the Cayman Islands and as such rely on dividends and other distributions on equity from our PRC subsidiaries to satisfy part of our liquidity requirements. Pursuant to the Enterprise Income Tax Law, a withholding tax rate of 10% currently applies to dividends paid by a PRC “resident enterprise” to a foreign enterprise investor, unless any such foreign investor’s jurisdiction of incorporation has a tax treaty with China that provides for preferential tax treatment. Pursuant to a Notice 112 issued by the State Administration of Taxation in January 2008 and the Arrangement between the Mainland China and the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region on the Avoidance of Double Taxation and Prevention of Fiscal Evasion, or the Double Taxation Arrangement (Hong Kong), such withholding tax rate may be lowered to 5% if the PRC enterprise is at least 25% held by a Hong Kong enterprise at all times within the 12-month period immediately prior to distribution of the dividends and is determined by the relevant PRC tax authority to have satisfied other conditions and requirements under the Double Tax Avoidance Arrangement (Hong Kong) and other applicable PRC laws. Pursuant to SAT Notice 9 issued by the State Administration of Taxation in February 2018, which took effect on April 1, 2018 and superseded SAT Circular 601 issued by the State Administration of Taxation in October 2009 and an announcement released by the State Administration of Taxation in June 2012, non-resident enterprises that cannot provide valid supporting documents as “beneficial owners” may not be approved to enjoy tax treaty benefits. “Beneficial owners” are residents who have ownership and the right to dispose of the income or the rights and properties giving rise to the income. These rules also set forth certain adverse factors against the recognition of a “beneficial owner,” such as not carrying out substantive business activities. Whether a non-resident company may obtain tax benefits under the relevant tax treaty will be subject to approval of the relevant PRC tax authority and will be determined by the PRC tax authority on a case-by-case basis. SAT Notice 9 further provides that a comprehensive analysis should be made when determining the beneficial owner status based on various factors supported by documents including the articles of association, financial statements, records of cash movements, board meeting minutes, board resolutions, staffing and materials, relevant expenditures, functions and risk assumption as well as relevant contracts and other information. In August 2015, the State Administration of Taxation promulgated the Administrative Measures for Non-Resident Taxpayers to Enjoy Treatments under Tax Treaties, or SAT Circular 60, which became effective on November 1, 2015. SAT Circular 60 provides that non-resident enterprises are not required to obtain pre-approval from the relevant tax authority in order to enjoy the reduced withholding tax rate. Instead, non-resident enterprises and their withholding agents may, by self-assessment and upon their confirmation that the prescribed criteria are met, directly apply the reduced withholding tax rate, and file necessary forms and supporting documents when conducting tax filings, which will be subject to post-filing examinations by the relevant tax authorities. In October 2019, SAT issued the Administrative Measures for Non-Resident Taxpayers to Enjoy Treatments under Tax Treaties, or SAT Circular 35, which took effect on January 1, 2020 and superseded SAT Circular 60. SAT Circular 35 abolished the record-filing procedure for justifying the tax treaty eligibility of taxpayers, and stipulates that non-resident taxpayers can enjoy tax treaty benefits via the “self-assessment of eligibility, claiming treaty benefits, retaining documents for inspection” mechanism. Non-resident taxpayers can claim tax treaty benefits after self-assessment provided that relevant supporting documents shall be collected and retained by the taxpayers for post-filing inspection by the tax authorities. None of our Hong Kong subsidiaries has applied for the approval for a withholding tax rate of 5% from the local tax authority prior to SAT Circular 35, nor has any of our PRC subsidiaries applied the 5% tax rate directly to any dividend payment after the SAT Circular 35, as our PRC subsidiaries have not paid dividends to us. We plan to have our Hong Kong subsidiaries assume some managerial and administrative functions, as well as conduct other business functions in the future. Once we implement such a plan, our Hong Kong subsidiaries may be qualified as beneficial owners as defined under SAT Notice 9 and will enjoy treaty benefits such as preferential dividend withholding tax rates.  However, our Hong Kong subsidiaries as currently situated may be considered non-beneficial owners and we cannot assure you that the relevant PRC tax authority will agree with our view when any of our PRC subsidiaries directly applies reduced withholding tax rate under the relevant tax treaty in the future. As a result, we may not be able to enjoy the preferential withholding tax rate of 5% under the Double Taxation Arrangement (Hong Kong) and therefore be subject to withholding tax at a rate of 10% with respect to dividends to be paid by our PRC subsidiaries to their shareholders in Hong Kong such as China Classified Information Corporation Limited.

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Enhanced scrutiny over acquisition transactions by the PRC tax authorities may have a negative impact on potential acquisitions we may pursue in the future.

On February 3, 2015, the State Administration of Tax issued a Public Notice Regarding Certain Corporate Income Tax Matters on Indirect Transfer of Properties by Non-Tax Resident Enterprises, or SAT Notice 7, which partially replaced and supplemented previous rules under the Notice on Strengthening Administration of Enterprise Income Tax for Share Transfers by Non-PRC Resident Enterprises, or SAT Circular 698, issued by the State Administration of Taxation, on December 10, 2009. SAT Notice 7 extends its tax jurisdiction to not only indirect transfers set forth under SAT Circular 698 but also transactions involving transfer of other taxable assets, through the offshore transfer of a foreign intermediate holding company. SAT Notice 7 also brings challenges to both the foreign transferor and transferee (or other person who is obligated to pay for the transfer) of the taxable assets. Where a non-resident enterprise conducts an “indirect transfer” by transferring the taxable assets indirectly by disposing of the equity interests of an overseas holding company, the non-resident enterprise being the transferor, or the transferee, or the PRC entity which directly owned the taxable assets may report to the relevant tax authority such indirect transfer. Using a “substance over form” principle, the PRC tax authority may re-characterize such indirect transfer as a direct transfer of the equity interests in the PRC tax resident enterprise and other properties in China. As a result, gains derived from such indirect transfer may be subject to PRC enterprise income tax, and the transferee or other person who is obligated to pay for the transfer is obligated to withhold the applicable taxes, currently at a rate of up to 10% for the transfer of equity interests in a PRC resident enterprise. However, SAT Notice 7 has introduced safe harbors for internal group restructurings and the purchase and sale of equity through a public securities market. On October 17, 2017, the SAT issued the Announcement of the State Administration of Taxation on Issues Concerning the Withholding of Non-resident Enterprise Income Tax at Source, or SAT Bulletin 37, which came into effect on December 1, 2017, and concurrently abolished SAT Circular 698. The SAT Bulletin 37 further clarifies the practice and procedure of the withholding of non-resident enterprise income tax. Pursuant to SAT Notice 7 and SAT Bulletin 37, both the transferor and the transferee may be subject to penalties under PRC tax laws if the transferee fails to withhold the taxes and the transferor fails to pay the taxes.

We face uncertainties on the reporting and consequences of private equity financing transactions, share exchange or other transactions involving the transfer of shares in our company by investors that are non-PRC resident enterprises outside a public securities market, which means that an investor obtains or sells our shares outside a public securities market, or sale or purchase of shares in other non-PRC resident companies or other taxable assets by us. Our company and other non-resident enterprises in our group may be subject to filing obligations or taxation if our company or other non-resident enterprises in our group are transferors in such transactions, and may be subject to withholding obligations if our company or other non-resident enterprises in our group are transferees in such transactions, under SAT Notice 7 and/or SAT Bulletin 37. For the transfer of shares in our company by investors that are non-PRC resident enterprises outside a public securities market, our PRC subsidiaries may be requested to assist in the filing under SAT Notice 7 and/or SAT Bulletin 37. As a result, we may be required to expend valuable resources to comply with SAT Notice 7 and SAT Bulletin 37 or to request the relevant transferors from whom we purchase taxable assets to comply with these circulars, or to establish that our company and other non-resident enterprises in our group should not be taxed under these circulars, which may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

The PRC tax authorities have the discretion under SAT Notice 7 and SAT Bulletin 37 to make adjustments to the taxable capital gains based on the difference between the fair value of the taxable assets transferred and the cost of investment. If the PRC tax authorities make adjustments to the taxable income of the transactions under SAT Notice 7 and SAT Bulletin 37, our income tax costs associated with such potential sales or acquisitions will be increased, which may have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. We have conducted acquisitions or sales in the past and may conduct additional acquisitions or sales in the future. We cannot assure you that the PRC tax authorities will not, at their discretion, adjust any capital gains and impose tax return filing obligations on us or require us to provide assistance for the investigation by PRC tax authorities with respect thereto. Heightened scrutiny over acquisition transactions by the PRC tax authorities may have a negative impact on potential acquisitions we may pursue in the future.

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PRC regulations establish complex procedures for mergers and acquisitions, including acquisitions of PRC companies by foreign investors, which could make it more difficult for us to pursue growth through acquisitions in China.

Six PRC regulatory agencies promulgated regulations effective on September 8, 2006, with subsequent amendment in June 2009, which is commonly referred to as the M&A Rules. See “Item 4. Information on the Company — B. Business Overview — Regulation.” The M&A Rules establish procedures and requirements that could make some acquisitions of PRC companies by foreign investors more time-consuming and complex, including that the approval of the Ministry of Commerce must be obtained in circumstances where overseas companies established or controlled by PRC enterprises or residents acquire domestic companies affiliated with PRC enterprises or residents. After the PRC Foreign Investment Law and its Implementation Regulations became effective on January 1, 2020, the provisions of the M&A Rules remain effective to the extent they are not inconsistent with the PRC Foreign Investment Law and its Implementation Regulations. In addition, national security review rules issued by the PRC governmental authorities in 2011 require acquisitions by foreign investors of domestic companies engaged in military-related or certain other industries that are crucial to national security to be subject to prior security review. Moreover, the Anti-Monopoly Law requires that the Administration for Market Regulation shall be notified in advance of any concentration of undertaking, occurring inside or outside China, if certain thresholds are triggered. We may expand our business in part by acquiring complementary businesses. Complying with the requirements of the M&A Rules, security review rules and other PRC regulations to complete such transactions could be time-consuming, and any required approval processes, including obtaining approval from PRC governmental authorities, may delay or inhibit our ability to complete such transactions, which could affect our ability to expand our business or maintain our market share. In addition, due to lack of clarity under some PRC laws and regulations, it is unclear in some circumstances whether an approval is required for a merger or acquisition transaction and we cannot assure you that the PRC governmental authorities will agree with our view on whether the approval is required for transactions conducted or to be conducted by us.

PRC regulations relating to offshore investment activities by PRC residents may limit our PRC subsidiaries’ ability to increase their registered capital or distribute profits to us, limit our ability to inject capital into our PRC subsidiaries, or otherwise expose us to liability and penalties under PRC law.

SAFE promulgated the Circular on Relevant Issues Relating to Domestic Resident’s Investment and Financing and Roundtrip Investment through Special Purpose Vehicles, or SAFE Circular 37, in July 2014, to replace the Notice on Relevant Issues Concerning Foreign Exchange Administration for PRC Residents Engaging in Financing and Roundtrip Investments via Overseas Special Purpose Vehicles, or SAFE Circular 75. SAFE Circular 37 requires PRC residents, including PRC individuals and entities, to register with SAFE or its local branch in connection with their establishment or control of an offshore entity established for the purpose of overseas investment or financing. In addition, such PRC residents must update their SAFE registrations when the offshore special purpose vehicle undergoes material events relating to any change of basic information (including change of such PRC residents, name and operation term), increases or decreases in investment amount, transfers or exchanges of shares, or mergers or divisions. In February 2015, SAFE promulgated the Notice on Further Simplifying and Improving Foreign Exchange Administration Policy on Direct Investment, or SAFE Notice 13, which became effective on June 1, 2015. Pursuant to SAFE Notice 13, instead of applying for approvals regarding foreign exchange registrations of foreign direct investment and overseas direct investment from SAFE as required under current laws, entities and individuals are required to apply for such foreign exchange registrations, including those required under the SAFE Circular 37, from qualified banks. The qualified banks, under the supervision of SAFE, will examine the applications and conduct the registration. If a PRC resident fails to make the required SAFE registration with the local SAFE branches, the PRC subsidiaries of such offshore company may be prohibited from distributing their profits and proceeds from any reduction in capital, share transfer or liquidation to the offshore company, and the offshore company may be restricted in its ability to contribute additional capital to its PRC subsidiaries. Moreover, failure to comply with SAFE registration and amendment requirements described above could result in liability under PRC law for evasion of applicable foreign exchange restrictions.

Furthermore, it is unclear how these regulations, and any future regulation concerning offshore or cross-border transactions, will be interpreted, amended and implemented by the relevant government authorities. We cannot predict how these regulations will affect our business operations or future strategy. For example, we may be subject to a more stringent review and approval process with respect to our foreign exchange activities, such as remittance of dividends and foreign-currency-denominated borrowings, which may adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. In addition, if we decide to acquire a PRC domestic company, either we or the owners of such company, as the case may be, may not be able to obtain the necessary approvals or complete the necessary filings and registrations required by the foreign exchange regulations. This may restrict our ability to implement our acquisition strategy and could adversely affect our business and prospects.

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Failure to comply with PRC regulations regarding the registration requirements for employee share ownership plans or share option plans may subject the PRC plan participants or us to fines and other legal or administrative sanctions.

In February 2012, SAFE promulgated the Notices on Issues Concerning the Foreign Exchange Administration for Domestic Individuals Participating in Stock Incentive Plans of Overseas Publicly Listed Companies, or the Stock Option Rules, replacing the previous rules issued by SAFE in March 2007. Under the Stock Option Rules and other relevant rules and regulations, PRC residents who participate in stock incentive plan in an overseas publicly listed company are required to register with SAFE or its local branches and complete certain other procedures. Participants of a stock incentive plan who are PRC residents must retain a qualified PRC agent, which could be a PRC subsidiary of the overseas publicly listed company or another qualified institution selected by the PRC subsidiary, to conduct the SAFE registration and other procedures with respect to the stock incentive plan on behalf of its participants. The participants must also retain an overseas entrusted institution to handle matters in connection with their exercise of stock options, the purchase and sale of corresponding stocks or interests and fund transfers. In addition, the PRC agent is required to amend the SAFE registration with respect to the stock incentive plan if there is any material change to the stock incentive plan, the PRC agent or the overseas entrusted institution or other material changes. See “Item 4. Information on the Company — B. Business Overview — Regulation —Regulations on Employee Stock Option Plans.” We and our PRC employees who have been granted share options and restricted shares are subject to these regulations. Failure of our PRC share option holders or restricted shareholders to complete their SAFE registrations may subject these PRC residents to fines and legal sanctions and may also limit our ability to contribute additional capital into our PRC subsidiaries, limit our PRC subsidiaries’ ability to distribute dividends to us, or otherwise materially adversely affect our business.

PRC regulation of direct investment and loans by offshore holding companies to PRC entities and governmental control of currency conversion may delay or limit us from using the proceeds of our securities offerings to make additional capital contributions or loans to our PRC subsidiaries.

Any capital contributions or loans that we, as an offshore entity, make to our PRC subsidiaries, including from the proceeds of our securities offerings, are subject to PRC regulations. Under PRC laws and regulations, we are permitted to utilize the proceeds from our securities offerings to fund our PRC subsidiaries only through loans or capital contributions, subject to applicable government registration and approval requirements. None of our loans to a PRC subsidiary can exceed the maximum amount that such PRC subsidiary is allowed to borrow from foreign creditors under relevant PRC laws, and the loans must be registered with the local branch of SAFE. If we finance our PRC subsidiaries by means of capital contributions, such PRC subsidiaries are required to apply for registrations with SAMR or its local branches, submit a change report to the Ministry of Commerce or its local counterpart through the online enterprise registration system, and complete the exchange registration with qualified banks. We cannot assure you that we will be able to complete the necessary registration or information reporting on a timely basis, or at all. If we fail to complete the necessary registration or information reporting, our ability to make loans or equity contributions to our PRC subsidiaries may be negatively affected, which could adversely affect our PRC subsidiaries’ liquidity and their ability to fund their working capital and expansion projects and meet their obligations and commitments.

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In March 2015, SAFE promulgated SAFE Circular 19, which took effective and replaced SAFE Circular 142 from June 1, 2015. On June 9, 2016, SAFE promulgated SAFE Circular 16. Although SAFE Circular 19 and SAFE Circular 16 removed certain restrictions previously provided under SAFE Circular 142 for conversion by a foreign-invested enterprise of foreign currency registered capital into RMB and use of such RMB capital and allows foreign invested enterprises to settle their foreign exchange capital on a discretionary basis according to the actual needs of their business operation, they continue to prohibit foreign-invested enterprises from, among other things, using RMB fund converted from its foreign exchange capital for expenditure beyond its business scope, or providing loans to non-associated enterprises. In addition, SAFE Circular 19 and SAFE Circular 16 are still unclear whether a foreign-invested enterprise whose business scope does not include equity investment or similar activities may use Renminbi converted from the foreign currency-denominated capital for equity investments in the PRC. On October 23, 2019, the SAFE issued SAFE Circular 28, which expressly allows foreign-invested enterprises that do not have equity investments in their approved business scope to use their capital obtained from foreign exchange settlement to make domestic equity investments as long as the investments are real and in compliance with the foreign investment-related laws and regulations. For example, the business scopes of Wanglin and 58 Technology include, among others, research and development of online classified information technology and software systems, information technology consulting, technical services and marketing and promotional services, enterprise management, business consultation and office renting service. Each of Wanglin, 58 Technology and our other PRC subsidiaries that are foreign-invested enterprises may only use Renminbi converted from foreign exchange capital contribution for activities within its approved business scope or equity investment in compliance with the foreign investment-related laws and regulations. Violations of these circulars and rules could result in severe monetary or other penalties. If we convert the net proceeds we receive from our securities offerings into Renminbi pursuant to the applicable laws and regulations, our use of Renminbi funds for general corporate purposes will be within the business scope of our PRC subsidiaries.

PRC regulation of loans by offshore holding companies to PRC entities and governmental control of currency conversion may limit our ability to fund the operations of our consolidated variable interest entities.

Due to the restrictions imposed on loans in foreign currencies extended to any PRC domestic companies, any loans from our Cayman Islands holding company or other offshore entities to PRC domestic company are required to be registered with local SAFE and cannot exceed the maximum amount that such company is allowed to borrow from foreign creditors under the applicable PRC laws and complete record-filling procedures with local SAFE on an item-by-item basis. In addition, loans to a PRC company with a term of one year or a longer term are also subject to filings with the National Development and Reform Commission and/or its local branches. Therefore, we are not likely to have our Cayman Islands holding company or other offshore entities to use the proceeds from our securities offerings to extend loans to our consolidated variable interest entities or their subsidiaries, each of which is a PRC domestic company. Meanwhile, we are not likely to finance the activities of our consolidated variable interest entities by means of capital contributions due to regulatory restrictions relating to foreign investment in PRC domestic enterprises engaged in value-added telecommunications services. In addition, due to the restrictions on a foreign-invested enterprise’s use of Renminbi converted from foreign-currency registered capital under PRC regulations, including SAFE Circular 19, SAFE Circular 16 and SAFE Circular 28, as described under the foregoing risk factor, our PRC subsidiaries may be unable to use the Renminbi converted from their registered capital to provide loans or financial support to our consolidated variable interest entities. We currently do not plan to use the proceeds from our securities offerings to fund the operations of our consolidated variable interest entities and their subsidiaries. Additionally, our PRC subsidiaries are not prohibited under PRC laws and regulations from using their capital generated from their operating activities to provide entrusted loans or other forms of financial support to consolidated variable interest entities. We will assess the working capital requirements of our consolidated variable interest entities on an ongoing basis and, if needed, may have our PRC subsidiaries to use their capital from operating activities to provide financial support to our consolidated variable interest entities.

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Our PRC subsidiaries are subject to restrictions on paying dividends or making other payments to us, which may restrict our ability to satisfy our liquidity requirements.

We are a holding company incorporated in the Cayman Islands. We may need dividends and other distributions on equity from our PRC subsidiaries to satisfy our liquidity requirements. Current PRC regulations permit our PRC subsidiaries to pay dividends to us only out of their accumulated profits, if any, determined in accordance with PRC accounting standards and regulations. In addition, our PRC subsidiaries are required to set aside at least 10% of their respective accumulated profits each year, if any, to fund certain reserve funds until the total amount set aside reaches 50% of their respective registered capital. Our PRC subsidiaries may also allocate a portion of its after-tax profits based on PRC accounting standards to employee welfare and bonus funds at their discretion. These reserves are not distributable as cash dividends. As of the date of this annual report, our PRC subsidiaries have not paid dividends to us. Further, if any of our PRC subsidiaries incurs debt on its own behalf in the future, the instruments governing the debt may restrict its ability to pay dividends or make other payments to us, which may restrict our ability to satisfy our liquidity requirements. As of March 31, 2020, the registered capital of our PRC subsidiaries Wanglin and 58 Technology was US$280 million and approximately US$107 million, respectively. See “Item 4. Information on the Company — B. Business Overview — Regulation — Regulations on Foreign Currency Exchange.”

Discontinuation of any of the preferential tax treatments and government subsidies or imposition of any additional taxes and surcharges could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

The Enterprise Income Tax Law and its implementing rules impose a uniform statutory enterprise income tax rate of 25% on all enterprises in China. The Enterprise Income Tax Law and its implementing rules also permit qualified “high and new technology enterprises” to enjoy a preferential enterprise income tax rate of 15% upon filing with relevant tax authorities. This qualification generally has a valid term of three years and the renewal of the qualification is subject to review by the relevant authorities in China.

Beijing 58, Wanglin, Shanghai Ruiting, 58 Technology, 58 Co., Ltd. and Shanghai Ruijia Information Technology Co., ltd (“Shanghai Ruijia”) have all obtained the “high and new technology enterprise” certificate and maintained the “high and new technology enterprise” status and are eligible for a preferential tax rate of 15%, as long as they maintain the “high and new technology enterprise” status and have taxable income under the Enterprise Income Tax Law. Wanglin obtained its software enterprise qualification in 2014 and was entitled to a two-year exemption from 2014 to 2015 and enjoyed a 12.5% preferential tax rate from 2016 to 2018 as it passed the annual assessment for software enterprise qualification for each of the five years. 58 Technology was qualified as a software enterprise in 2014 and was granted a two-year exemption from 2015 to 2016 and enjoyed a 12.5% preferential tax rate from 2017 to 2019. If any of Beijing 58, Wanglin, Shanghai Ruiting, 58 Technology, 58 Co., Ltd. or Shanghai Ruijia fails to maintain its qualification as a “high and new technology enterprises” or a “software enterprise,” as the case may be, or if any of them fails to renew its qualification when its current term expires, its applicable enterprise income tax rate may increase to 25%, which could have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, our PRC subsidiaries and consolidated variable interest entities have received various financial subsidies from PRC local government authorities. The financial subsidies are discretionary incentives and policies adopted by PRC local government authorities. Local governments may decide to change or discontinue such financial subsidies at any time. The discontinuation of such financial subsidies or imposition of any additional taxes could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Fluctuations in exchange rates could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and the value of your investment.

As the functional currency for our PRC subsidiaries and consolidated variable interest entities is Renminbi, fluctuations in the exchange rate may cause us to incur foreign exchange losses on any foreign currency holdings they may have. If we decide to convert our Renminbi into U.S. dollars for the purpose of making payments for dividends on our ordinary shares or for repayment of our bank loans denominated in U.S. dollars, appreciation of the U.S. dollar against the Renminbi would increase our amount of repayment in Renminbi.

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The conversion of Renminbi into foreign currencies, including U.S. dollars, is based on rates set by the People’s Bank of China. The Renminbi has fluctuated against the U.S. dollar, at times significantly and unpredictably. The value of the Renminbi against the U.S. dollar and other currencies is affected by changes in China’s political and economic conditions and by China’s foreign exchange policies, among other things. We cannot assure you that Renminbi will not appreciate or depreciate significantly in value against the U.S. dollar in the future.  It is difficult to predict how market forces or PRC or U.S. government policy may impact the exchange rate between the Renminbi and the U.S. dollar in the future.

Any significant appreciation or depreciation of the Renminbi may materially and adversely affect our earnings and financial position, and the value of, and any dividends payable on, our ADSs in U.S. dollars. Conversely, a significant depreciation of the Renminbi against the U.S. dollar may significantly reduce the U.S. dollar equivalent of our earnings, which in turn could adversely affect the price of our ADSs.

Very limited hedging options are available in China to reduce our exposure to exchange rate fluctuations. To date, we have not entered into any hedging transactions in an effort to reduce our exposure to foreign currency exchange risk. While we may decide to enter into hedging transactions in the future, the availability and effectiveness of these hedges may be limited and we may not be able to adequately hedge our exposure or at all. In addition, our currency exchange losses may be magnified by PRC exchange control regulations that restrict our ability to convert Renminbi into foreign currency. As a result, fluctuations in exchange rates may have a material adverse effect on your investment.

Our failure to make adequate contributions to various employee benefit plans as required by PRC regulations may subject us to penalties.

Companies operating in China are required to participate in social insurance and housing fund plans. We have not fully contributed to such plans as required by applicable PRC regulations. As of December 31, 2019, with regards to the outstanding contributions, including historical underpayments to such plans, we made a provision of RMB53.2 million, which is reflected in our audited financial statements included in this annual report. While we believe this provision is adequate, our failure to make sufficient payments to such plans does not fully comply with applicable PRC laws and regulations and we may be required to make up the contributions for such plans as well as to pay late fees and fines.

Registered public accounting firms in China, including our independent registered public accounting firm, are not inspected by the U.S. Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, which deprives us and our investors of the benefits of such inspection.

Auditors of companies whose shares are registered with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC, and traded publicly in the United States, including our independent registered public accounting firm, must be registered with PCAOB, and are subject to laws in the United States pursuant to which PCAOB conducts regular inspections to assess their compliance applicable professional standards. Our independent registered public accounting firm is located in, and organized under the laws of PRC, which is a jurisdiction where PCAOB, has been unable to conduct inspections without the approval of the Chinese authorities. In May 2013, PCAOB announced that it had entered into a Memorandum of Understanding on Enforcement Cooperation with the China Securities Regulatory Commission, or the CSRC and the PRC Ministry of Finance, which establishes a cooperative framework between the parties for the production and exchange of audit documents relevant to investigations undertaken by PCAOB, the CSRC or the PRC Ministry of Finance in the United States and the PRC, respectively. PCAOB continues to be in discussions with the CSRC and the PRC Ministry of Finance to permit joint inspections in the PRC of audit firms that are registered with PCAOB and audit Chinese companies that trade on U.S. exchanges.

On December 7, 2018, the SEC and PCAOB issued a joint statement highlighting continued challenges faced by the U.S. regulators in their oversight of financial statement audits of U.S.-listed companies with significant operations in China. On April 21, 2020, the SEC and the PCAOB issued another joint statement reiterating the greater risk that disclosures will be insufficient in many emerging markets, including China, compared to those made by U.S. domestic companies. In discussing the specific issues related to the greater risk, the statement again highlights the PCAOB's inability to inspect audit work paper and practices of accounting firms in China, with respect to their audit work of U.S. reporting companies. However, it remains unclear what further actions, if any, the SEC and PCAOB will take to address the problem.

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This lack of PCAOB inspections in China prevents PCAOB from fully evaluating audits and quality control procedures of any auditors operating in China, including our independent registered public accounting firm. As a result, we and investors in our common stock are deprived of the benefits of such PCAOB inspections. The inability of PCAOB to conduct inspections of auditors in China makes it more difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of our independent registered public accounting firm’s audit procedures or quality control procedures as compared to auditors outside of China that are subject to PCAOB inspections, which could cause investors and potential investors in our common stock to lose confidence in our audit procedures and reported financial information and the quality of our financial statements.

As part of a continued regulatory focus in the United States on access to audit and other information currently protected by national law, in particular China’s, in June 2019, a bipartisan group of lawmakers introduced bills in both houses of the U.S. Congress, which if passed, would require the SEC to maintain a list of issuers for which PCAOB is not able to inspect or investigate an auditor report issued by a foreign public accounting firm. The proposed Ensuring Quality Information and Transparency for Abroad-Based Listings on our Exchanges (EQUITABLE) Act prescribes increased disclosure requirements for these issuers and, beginning in 2025, the delisting from U.S. national securities exchanges such as the New York Stock Exchange/Nasdaq Stock Market of issuers included on the SEC’s list for three consecutive years. Enactment of this legislation or other efforts to increase U.S. regulatory access to audit information could cause investor uncertainty for affected issuers, including us, and the market price of our ADSs could be adversely affected. It is unclear if this proposed legislation would be enacted. Furthermore, there have been recent media reports on deliberations within the U.S. government regarding potentially limiting or restricting China-based companies from accessing U.S. capital markets. If any such deliberations were to materialize, the legislation or policy passed by the U.S. government may have material and adverse impact on the stock performance, liquidity, and the ability to raise capital of China-based issuers listed in the United States.

If additional remedial measures are imposed on the Big Four PRC-based accounting firms, including our independent registered public accounting firm, in administrative proceedings brought by the SEC alleging the firms’ failure to meet specific criteria set by the SEC, we could unable to timely file future financial statements in compliance with the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act.

In December 2012, the SEC instituted administrative proceedings against the Big Four PRC-based accounting firms, including our independent registered public accounting firm, alleging that these firms had violated U.S. securities laws and the SEC’s rules and regulations thereunder by failing to provide to the SEC the firms’ audit work papers with respect to certain PRC-based companies that are publicly traded in the United States.

On January 22, 2014, the administrative law judge, or the ALJ, presiding over the matter rendered an initial decision that each of the firms had violated the SEC’s rules of practice by failing to produce audit papers and other documents to the SEC. The initial decision censured each of the firms and barred them from practicing before the SEC for a period of six months.

On February 6, 2015, the four China-based accounting firms each agreed to a censure and to pay a fine to the SEC to settle the dispute and avoid suspension of their ability to practice before the SEC and audit U.S.-listed companies. The settlement required the firms to follow detailed procedures and to seek to provide the SEC with access to Chinese firms’ audit documents via the CSRC. Under the terms of the settlement, the underlying proceeding against the four China-based accounting firm was deemed dismissed with prejudice four years after entry of the settlement. The four-year mark occurred on February 6, 2019. While we cannot predict if the SEC will further challenge the four China-based accounting firms’ compliance with U.S. law in connection with U.S. regulatory requests for audit work papers or if the results of such a challenge would result in the SEC imposing penalties such as suspensions, if the accounting firms are subject to additional remedial measures, our ability to file our financial statements in compliance with SEC requirements could be impacted. A determination that we have not timely filed financial statements in compliance with SEC requirements could ultimately lead to the delisting of our ordinary shares from Nasdaq or the termination of the registration of our ordinary shares under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, or both, which would substantially reduce or effectively terminate the trading of our ordinary shares in the United States.

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Risks Related to Our ADSs

The trading prices of our ADSs have fluctuated and may be volatile.

The trading prices of our ADSs have fluctuated since we first listed our ADSs. Since our ADSs became listed on the NYSE on October 31, 2013, the trading price of our ADSs has ranged from US$17.00 to US$89.90 per ADS, and the last reported trading price on April 27, 2020 was US$51.88 per ADS. The prices for our ADSs may continue to fluctuate because of broad market and industry factors, like the performance and fluctuation of the market prices of other companies with business operations located mainly in China that have listed their securities in the United States. In recent years, the widespread negative publicity of alleged fraudulent accounting practices and poor corporate governance of certain U.S. public companies with operations in China were believed to have negatively affected investors’ perception and sentiment towards companies with connection with China, which significantly and negatively affected the trading prices of some companies’ securities listed in the United States. Any similar negative publicity or sentiment may affect the performances of our ADSs. The securities of some PRC companies that have listed their securities on U.S. stock markets have experienced significant volatility. The trading performances of these PRC companies’ securities after their offerings may affect the attitudes of investors toward PRC companies listed in the United States in general and consequently may impact the trading performance of our ADSs, regardless of our actual operating performance.

In addition to market and industry factors, the price and trading volume for our ADSs may be highly volatile for factors specific to our own operations, including the following:

actual or anticipated fluctuations in our quarterly results of operations;
reports published by short sellers with negative accusations against us;
the financial projections that we may choose to provide to the public, any changes in those projections or our failure for any reason to meet those projections;
variations in our net sales, earnings and cash flow;
conditions in markets we operate in;
announcements of new investments, acquisitions, strategic partnerships, or joint ventures;
announcements of new services and expansions by us or our competitors;
changes in financial estimates by securities analysts;
additions or departures of key personnel;
release or expiry of lock-up or other transfer restrictions on our outstanding equity securities or sales of additional equity securities;
sales or perceived potential sales of additional ordinary shares or ADSs;
detrimental negative publicity about us, our competitors or our industry;
potential litigation or regulatory investigations or other proceedings involving us;
fluctuations in market prices for our products;
fluctuations of exchange rates between RMB and the U.S. dollar;

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proceedings instituted recently by the SEC against five PRC-based accounting firms, including our independent registered public accounting firm;
outbreaks of health epidemics, natural disasters, and other extraordinary events; and
general economic or political conditions in China or elsewhere in the world

Any of these factors may result in large and sudden changes in the volume and price at which our ADSs will trade.

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports about our business, or if they adversely change their recommendations regarding our ADSs, the market price for our ADSs and trading volume could decline.

The trading market for our ADSs will be influenced by research or reports that industry or securities analysts publish about our business. If one or more analysts who cover us downgrade our ADSs, or publish unfavorable research about us, the market price for our ADSs would likely decline. If one or more of these analysts cease to cover us or fail to regularly publish reports on us, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which, in turn, could cause the market price or trading volume for our ADSs to decline.

Our dual class share structure with different voting rights will limit your ability to influence corporate matters and could discourage others from pursuing any change of control transactions that holders of our Class A ordinary shares and ADSs may view as beneficial.

Our ordinary shares are divided into Class A ordinary shares and Class B ordinary shares. Holders of Class A ordinary shares are entitled to one vote per share, while holders of Class B ordinary shares are entitled to ten votes per share, with Class A and Class B ordinary shares voting together as one class on all matters subject to a shareholders’ vote. As of March 31, 2020, holders of our Class B ordinary shares collectively owned approximately 15.1% of our outstanding ordinary shares, representing 64.0% of our total voting power. As of March 31, 2020, our founder, chairman and chief executive officer, Mr. Jinbo Yao, and Tencent beneficially owned an aggregate of 32.6% of our outstanding shares.

As a result of the dual class share structure and the concentration of ownership, holders of our Class B ordinary shares have substantial influence over our business, including decisions regarding mergers, consolidations and the sale of all or substantially all of our assets, election of directors and other significant corporate actions. They may take actions that are not in the best interest of us or our other shareholders. This concentration of ownership may discourage, delay or prevent a change in control of our company, which could deprive our shareholders of an opportunity to receive a premium for their shares as part of a sale of our company and may reduce the price of our ADSs. This concentrated control will limit your ability to influence corporate matters and could discourage others from pursuing any potential merger, takeover or other change of control transactions that holders of Class A ordinary shares and ADSs may view as beneficial. For more information regarding our principal shareholders and their affiliated entities, see “Item 7. Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions.”

The sale or availability for sale of substantial amounts of our ADSs could adversely affect their market price.

Sales of substantial amounts of our ADSs in the public market, or the perception that these sales could occur, could adversely affect the market price of our ADSs and could materially impair our ability to raise capital through equity offerings in the future. We cannot predict what effect, if any, market sales of securities held by our significant shareholders or any other shareholder or the availability of these securities for future sale will have on the market price of our ADSs.

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We may be classified as a passive foreign investment company for United States federal income tax purposes, which could result in adverse United States federal income tax consequences to United States investors in the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares.

Depending upon the value of our assets, which may be determined based, in part, on the market value of our Class A ordinary shares and ADSs, and the nature of our assets and income over time, we could be classified as a “passive foreign investment company,” or PFIC, for United States federal income tax purposes. Under United States federal income tax law, we will be classified as a PFIC for any taxable year if either (i) at least 75% of our gross income for the taxable year is passive income or (ii) at least 50% of the value of our assets (based on the average quarterly value of our assets during the taxable year) is attributable to assets that produce or are held for the production of passive income. Based on our income and assets and the value of our ADSs and Class A ordinary shares, we do not believe that we were a PFIC for the taxable year ended December 31, 2019 and, although no assurances can be made in this regard, we do not expect to be a PFIC for the current taxable year or any subsequent taxable year. While we do not anticipate being a PFIC, changes in the nature of our income or assets or the value of our assets may cause us to become a PFIC for the current or any subsequent taxable year.

Although the law in this regard is not entirely clear, we treat Beijing 58 and other consolidated variable interest entities as being owned by us for United States federal income tax purposes, because we control their management decisions and we are entitled to substantially all of the economic benefits associated with them, and, as a result, we consolidate their results of operations in our consolidated U.S. GAAP financial statements. If it were determined, however, that we are not the owner of Beijing 58 and other consolidated variable interest entities for United States federal income tax purposes, we would likely be treated as a PFIC for our taxable year ending December 31, 2020 and for subsequent taxable years. Because of the uncertainties in the application of the relevant rules and because PFIC status is a factual determination made annually after the close of each taxable year on the basis of the composition of our income and the value of our active versus passive assets, there can be no assurance that we will not be a PFIC. Under circumstances where revenues from activities that produce passive income significantly increase relative to our revenues from activities that produce non-passive income or where we determine not to deploy significant amounts of cash for active purposes, our risk of becoming classified as a PFIC may substantially increase.

If we were to be or become a PFIC, a U.S. Holder (as defined in “Item 10. Additional Information — E. Taxation — United States Federal Income Tax Considerations”) may incur significantly increased United States federal income tax on gain recognized on the sale or other disposition of the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares and on the receipt of distributions on the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares to the extent such gain or distribution is treated as an “excess distribution” under the United States income tax rules. Further, if we were a PFIC for any year during which a U.S. Holder held our ADSs or Class A ordinary shares, we generally would continue to be treated as a PFIC with respect to such U.S. Holder for all succeeding years during which such U.S. Holder held our ADSs or Class A ordinary shares. Each U.S. Holder is urged to consult its tax advisor concerning the United States federal income tax consequences of purchasing, holding and disposing of ADSs or Class A ordinary shares if we are or become treated as a PFIC.

The voting rights of holders of ADSs are limited by the terms of the deposit agreement, and you may not be able to exercise your right to vote your Class A ordinary shares.

As a holder of our ADSs, you will only be able to exercise the voting rights with respect to the underlying Class A ordinary shares in accordance with the provisions of the deposit agreement. Under the deposit agreement, you must vote by giving voting instructions to the depositary. Upon receipt of your voting instructions, the depositary will vote the underlying Class A ordinary shares in accordance with these instructions. You will not be able to directly exercise your right to vote with respect to the underlying shares unless you withdraw the shares. Under our current memorandum and articles of association, the minimum notice period required for convening a general meeting is ten clear days. When a general meeting is convened, you may not receive sufficient advance notice to withdraw the shares underlying your ADSs to allow you to vote with respect to any specific matter. If we ask for your instructions, the depositary will notify you of the upcoming vote and will arrange to deliver our voting materials to you. We cannot assure you that you will receive the voting materials in time to ensure that you can instruct the depositary to vote your shares. In addition, the depositary and its agents are not responsible for failing to carry out voting instructions or for their manner of carrying out your voting instructions. This means that you may not be able to exercise your right to vote and you may have no legal remedy if the shares underlying your ADSs are not voted as you requested.

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We are a foreign private issuer within the meaning of the rules under the Exchange Act, and as such we are exempt from certain provisions applicable to United States domestic public companies.

Because we qualify as a foreign private issuer under the Exchange Act, we are exempt from certain provisions of the securities rules and regulations in the United States that are applicable to U.S. domestic issuers, including:

the rules under the Exchange Act requiring the filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC, of quarterly reports on Form 10-Q or current reports on Form 8-K;
the sections of the Exchange Act regulating the solicitation of proxies, consents, or authorizations in respect of a security registered under the Exchange Act;
the sections of the Exchange Act requiring insiders to file public reports of their share ownership and trading activities and liability for insiders who profit from trades made in a short period of time; and
the selective disclosure rules by issuers of material nonpublic information under Regulation FD.

We are required to file an annual report on Form 20-F within four months of the end of each fiscal year. In addition, we intend to publish our results on a quarterly basis as press releases, distributed pursuant to the rules and regulations of the NYSE. Press releases relating to financial results and material events will also be furnished to the SEC on Form 6-K. However, the information we are required to file with or furnish to the SEC are less extensive and less timely as compared to that required to be filed with the SEC by United States domestic issuers. As a Cayman Islands company listed on the NYSE, we are subject to the NYSE corporate governance listing standards. Among other things, Section 303A.08 of the NYSE Listed Company Manual requires shareholder approval of material revisions to equity-compensation plans and Section 312.03(c) of the NYSE Listed Company Manual requires shareholder approval of new share issuances above the 20% threshold specified therein. However, NYSE rules permit a foreign private issuer like us to follow the corporate governance practices of its home country. We have elected to follow the Cayman Islands practices with respect to the amendment of our 2013 share incentive plan to increase the total number of ordinary shares that may be issued pursuant to awards granted under the plan. In addition, we have also elected to follow the Cayman Islands practices with respect to the issuance of new ordinary shares above the 20% threshold as specified in Section 312.03(c).

You may not receive dividends or other distributions on our ordinary shares and you may not receive any value for them, if it is illegal or impractical to make them available to you.

The depositary of our ADSs has agreed to pay to you the cash dividends or other distributions it or the custodian receives on Class A ordinary shares or other deposited securities underlying our ADSs, after deducting its fees and expenses. You will receive these distributions in proportion to the number of Class A ordinary shares your ADSs represent. However, the depositary is not responsible if it decides that it is unlawful or impractical to make a distribution available to any holders of ADSs. For example, it would be unlawful to make a distribution to a holder of ADSs if it consists of securities that require registration under the Securities Act but that are not properly registered or distributed under an applicable exemption from registration. The depositary may also determine that it is not feasible to distribute certain property through the mail. Additionally, the value of certain distributions may be less than the cost of mailing them. In these cases, the depositary may determine not to distribute such property. We have no obligation to register under U.S. securities laws any ADSs, ordinary shares, rights or other securities received through such distributions. We also have no obligation to take any other action to permit the distribution of ADSs, ordinary shares, rights or anything else to holders of ADSs. This means that you may not receive distributions we make on our ordinary shares or any value for them if it is illegal or impractical for us to make them available to you. These restrictions may cause a material decline in the value of our ADSs.

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You may not be able to participate in rights offerings and may experience dilution of your holdings.

We may, from time to time, distribute rights to our shareholders, including rights to acquire securities. Under the deposit agreement, the depositary will not distribute rights to holders of ADSs unless the distribution and sale of rights and the securities to which these rights relate are either exempt from registration under the Securities Act with respect to all holders of ADSs, or are registered under the provisions of the Securities Act. The depositary may, but is not required to, attempt to sell these undistributed rights to third parties, and may allow the rights to lapse. We may be unable to establish an exemption from registration under the Securities Act, and we are under no obligation to file a registration statement with respect to these rights or underlying securities or to endeavor to have a registration statement declared effective. Accordingly, holders of ADSs may be unable to participate in our rights offerings and may experience dilution of their holdings as a result.

You may be subject to limitations on transfer of your ADSs.

Your ADSs are transferable on the books of the depositary. However, the depositary may close its books at any time or from time to time when it deems expedient in connection with the performance of its duties. The depositary may close its books from time to time for a number of reasons, including in connection with corporate events such as a rights offering, during which time the depositary needs to maintain an exact number of ADS holders on its books for a specified period. The depositary may also close its books in emergencies, and on weekends and public holidays. The depositary may refuse to deliver, transfer or register transfers of our ADSs generally when our share register or the books of the depositary are closed, or at any time if we or the depositary thinks it is advisable to do so because of any requirement of law or of any government or governmental body, or under any provision of the deposit agreement, or for any other reason.

We incur increased costs as a result of being a public company.

As a public company, we incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses that we did not incur as a private company. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as well as rules subsequently implemented by the SEC and NYSE, imposes various requirements on the corporate governance practices of public companies. For example, as a public company, we need to retain a certain number of independent directors and adopt policies regarding internal controls and disclosure controls and procedures. We have incurred additional costs in obtaining director and officer liability insurance. In addition, we also incur additional costs associated with our public company reporting requirements. It may also be more difficult for us to find qualified persons to serve on our board of directors or as executive officers. We expect these rules and regulations to increase our legal and financial compliance costs and to make some corporate activities more time-consuming and costly. We are currently evaluating and monitoring developments with respect to these rules and regulations, and we cannot predict or estimate with any degree of certainty the amount of additional costs we may incur or the timing of such costs.

In addition, we have ceased to be an “emerging growth company” as of December 31, 2014, and therefore are no longer able to take advantage of certain exemptions from various requirements applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies including, most significantly, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. We have incurred significant expenses and devoted substantial management effort, and expect to continue to do so to ensure compliance with the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and the other rules and regulations of the SEC.

In the past, shareholders of a public company often brought securities class action suits against the company following periods of instability in the market price of that company’s securities. If we were involved in a class action suit, it could divert a significant amount of our management’s attention and other resources from our business and operations, which could harm our results of operations and require us to incur significant expenses to defend the suit. Any such class action suit, whether or not successful, could harm our reputation and restrict our ability to raise capital in the future. In addition, if a claim is successfully made against us, we may be required to pay significant damages, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

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Item 4.            Information on the Company

A.           History and Development of the Company

We began our operations in China in 2005 through Beijing 58, a PRC limited liability company, which has become our consolidated affiliated entity through a series of contractual arrangements. Our current holding company, 58.com Inc., was incorporated in May 2011 as a limited liability company in the Cayman Islands.

On November 5, 2013, we raised US$200.0 million in net proceeds from the initial public offering of our ADSs and another US$15.0 million from a concurrent private placement of Class A ordinary shares to DCM Hybrid RMB Fund, L.P., a fund affiliated with DCM V, L.P., one of our existing shareholders. Our ADSs trade on the New York Stock Exchange, or the NYSE, under the symbol “WUBA.”

On April 2, 2014, we and certain selling shareholders completed a follow-on public offering of ADSs. Our net proceeds, after deducting underwriting commissions, amounted to approximately US$73.0 million. We did not receive any proceeds from the sale of the ADSs by the selling shareholders.

In June 2014, Tencent invested US$736.1 million in our company and acquired 36.8 million Class A and Class B ordinary shares, representing a 19.9% equity interests in our company on a fully diluted basis at that time. We applied part of the proceeds from this transaction to repurchase 27.6 million ordinary shares of our company from certain pre-IPO shareholders.

Anjuke. Anjuke, operating a major online real estate listing platform in China, is our wholly owned subsidiary. In March 2015, we acquired Anjuke through the purchase of a 100% equity interests in Anjuke Inc., a company incorporated under the laws of the Cayman Islands, for 4.8 million newly issued Class A ordinary shares of our company and US$160.2 million in cash. We also issued 0.2 million fully vested restricted share units of our company to former Anjuke employees as part of the share consideration.

Ganji. Ganji, operating another major online classifieds platform in China, is currently our wholly owned subsidiary. In April 2015, we acquired less than 50% equity stake in Ganji, for 34.0 million newly issued Class A ordinary shares of our company and US$412.2 million in cash. Concurrently with this acquisition, we issued 15.4 million Class A ordinary shares to Tencent for US$400.0 million. Later in 2015, we committed an aggregate of 46.5 million newly issued ordinary shares and US$406.7 million in cash to several private equity funds as a limited partner. These funds, together with Tencent, acquired all the remaining equity interests in Ganji in August 2015. Since August 6, 2015, we started to consolidate the financial results of Ganji with ours in accordance with U.S. GAAP on the basis of our equity stake in Ganji as well as our controlling financial interest under the voting interest model over the funds. We also transferred an aggregate of 4.4 million fully vested restricted share units of our company and approximately US$51.0 million in cash to former Ganji employees as part of the total consideration of step acquisition of Ganji. In September 2017, these funds distributed all their equity interests in Ganji to their respective limited partners, and we acquired those equity interests as well as the remaining equity interests in Ganji held by Tencent. The consolidation of Ganji reduced the level of unnecessary competition for us in the online classifieds space market in China. Post the consolidation, Ganji was deeply integrated to materialize the synergies and increase profitability of our Company.

58 Home (58到家). On November 27, 2015, 58 Home raised US$300.0 million in its Series A preferred shares equity financing, with participation from Alibaba Group Holding Limited, or Alibaba, global investment firm KKR, and Ping An Group, among which US$10.0 million was contributed by 58.com Inc. The transaction was intended to reduce the pressure on our cash flows and profitability, enable us to better focus on our core classifieds business, and further fuel the growth of 58 Home and test the new business model with its more independent operation and support from new investors. Following the closing of the Series A financing of 58 Home, 58.com Inc. held majority equity interests in 58 Home. However, as certain rights provided to the noncontrolling Series A preferred shareholders of 58 Home would be viewed as substantive participating rights under U.S. GAAP, we have ceased consolidating the financial results of 58 Home in our consolidated financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP since November 27, 2015. Since the spin-off, 58 Home has been operating independently.

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In 2018, 58 Home pushed down the majority of its businesses into its two subsidiaries, 58 Daojia Limited (“58 Daojia”) and 58 Freight Inc. (“58 Freight”). Subsequently, Alibaba exchanged certain equity interests in 58 Home for that in 58 Freight. Since then 58 Home has largely become a holding company of the two subsidiaries. 58 Daojia is a platform that focuses on home services. 58 Freight is a platform that focuses on cargo and freight logistics and delivery services. In 2019 and 2020, 58 Daojia completed a series of equity financing from outside investors. As of December 31, 2019 and the date of this annual report, 58 Home held 89.7% and 81.9% of equity interests in 58 Daojia on an as-converted basis, respectively. In 2018 and 2019, 58 Freight completed a series of equity financing from outside investors. As of December 31, 2019 and the date of this annual report, 58 Home held 56.4% equity interests in 58 Freight on an as-converted basis.

As of December 31, 2019 and the date of this annual report, we held 68.8% equity interests in 58 Home on an as-converted basis, including 87.9% of the total outstanding ordinary shares and 5.0% of the total outstanding preferred shares.

Che Hao Duo (车好多). On December 31, 2015, we divested our controlling ownership stake in Che Hao Duo (formerly known as Guazi), a subsidiary that operated our C2C used car trading platform, to Mr. Mark Haoyong Yang, ex-founder and ex-CEO of Ganji and co-chairman of our board of directors at the time. We had a 45.6% stake in Guazi immediately after the spin-off and have deconsolidated the financial results of Guazi from ours in accordance with U.S. GAAP since then. As a result of this transaction, we reduced the pressure on our cash flows and profitability and were able to better focus on our core classifieds business. In addition, we expected that a more independent Che Hao Duo would grow its business faster and further test the new business model with support from new investors. Since the spin-off, Che Hao Duo has been operating independently. They have conducted several rounds of private equity financing and gone through a series of business model evolutions since December 2015. In 2019, we sold a certain percentage of our equity stake in Che Hao Duo to a third-party investor for a total purchase price of RMB4,978.2 million (US$713.6 million). We have received all the cash consideration as of the date of this report and recorded RMB6,141.6 million investment income and RMB524.2 million associated current and deferred income tax expenses for this transaction in 2019. As of December 31, 2019, we held approximately 8.0% equity interests in Che Hao Duo.

Zhuan Zhuan. In April 2017, Tencent invested US$200.0 million in cash and additional business resources in Zhuan Zhuan Holding in exchange for a minority equity ownership. Zhuan Zhuan Holding is an entity we created and into which we transferred our business relating to the Zhuan Zhuan app and certain used goods related listing channels from the 58 and Ganji classified platforms. We continue our direct traffic and other business support to Zhuan Zhuan Holding. In September 2019, Zhuan Zhuan Holding entered into definitive agreements with a group of investors, including our Company, Tencent and certain new investors for its series B round of financing for a combination of cash and additional business resources amounted to approximately US$300 million. As of December 31, 2019, US$170 million cash consideration of this financing were received, and we owned 63.5% of equity interests in Zhuan Zhuan on an issued and outstanding basis and continued to consolidate the businesses.

Finance Business. In September 2017, as another effort to reduce the pressure on our cash flows and profitability and better focus on our core classifieds business, we disposed our financial services and other finance related business, or the Finance Business, to Mr. Jinbo Yao, who in return contributed RMB150 million to the Finance Business subsequent to the disposal. We agreed to provide to the Finance Business, among other things, some traffic support and the right to use certain intellectual property rights. In return, we are entitled to a certain fixed percentage of profit participation rights in the Finance Business. The divestiture brought the Finance Business flexibility to apply for financial services licenses, attract talents and test new business models. It also freed our Group from accommodating two sets of different cultures, business models and financial implication of the internet business and financial business, respectively. In September 2019, in order to provide the Finance Business with more flexibility in future fund raising and acquisitions, we entered into definitive agreements to convert such profit participation rights to a certain number of shares of Golden Pacer, the newly established ultimate holding company of the Finance Business. In parallel, Golden Pacer entered into definitive agreements with Uxin Limited, a Nasdaq-listed leading national online used car dealer in China, pursuant to which Golden Pacer will acquire the loan facilitation related business from Uxin Limited. The two transactions abovementioned were completed when Golden Pacer and Uxin entered into supplementary agreements to modify their transactions in light of the changes in the regulatory environment and the impact of COVID-19 outbreak in April 2020. We currently hold 40% of the share capital of Golden Pacer on a fully diluted basis.

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Uxin. On May 29, 2019, we purchased a convertible note in a principal amount of US$100 million issued by Uxin Limited, which bears interest at a rate of 3.75% per annum from the issuance date and mature in five years thereafter. Such note is convertible into class A ordinary shares of Uxin Limited at an initial conversion price of US$1.03 per share, subject to certain adjustments, after a 180-day period following the date of issuance. We are entitled to registration rights with respect to all the class A ordinary shares of Uxin Limited that the note may convert into. As of the date of this annual report, we have not converted such note into class A ordinary shares of Uxin Limited. We are also entitled to nominate one director to the board of directors of Uxin Limited. On March 24, 2020, we entered into definitive agreements with Uxin Limited to purchase certain assets and liabilities related to Uxin's B2B online used car auction business for a total cash consideration of US$105 million. The transactions contemplated under the definitive agreements are subject to customary closing conditions, and are currently expected to close by the first half of 2020.

On April 2, 2020, we received a preliminary non-binding proposal letter, or the Proposal Letter, from Ocean Link Partners Limited to acquire all of the outstanding ordinary shares of our Company, including Class A ordinary shares represented by American depositary shares, for US$27.5 in cash per Class A or Class B ordinary share. On April 20, 2020, our board of directors formed a special committee consisting of two independent and disinterested directors, Mr. Robert Frank (Bob) Dodds Jr. and Ms. Li (Lily) Dong, to evaluate and consider the Proposal Letter or any alternative strategic option that the Company may pursue. As of the date of this annual report, no decisions have been made with respect to the Proposal or any alternative strategic option that the Company may pursue.

Our principal executive offices are located at Building 105, 10 Jiuxianqiao North Road Jia, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100015, the People’s Republic of China. Our telephone number at this address is +86 10 5956-5858. Our registered office in the Cayman Islands is located at the offices of Conyers Trust Company (Cayman) Limited, Cricket Square, Hutchins Drive, PO Box 2681, Grand Cayman, KY1-1111, Cayman Islands. Our agent for service of process in the United States is Law Debenture Corporate Services Inc., located at 400 Madison Avenue, 4th Floor, New York, New York 10017.

B.           Business Overview

We enable consumers and local businesses to connect, share information, address local services needs and conduct local business in China.

We continue to leverage business and product innovation and technology to grow our platform and increase our user engagement in various ways. We better connect our users through in-App tools such as instant messaging. Other than the consumer facing apps, we have developed and been upgrading various businesses apps to improve the response and communication between consumers and businesses. We continue to raise the bar on lister validation and content quality control and invest more in our database. We introduce mediums through which content can be better displayed and disseminated such as pictures, video, three-dimension, VR, etc. We increasingly enable transactions on our platforms where they make senses. To improve consumer satisfaction, our teams engage in deeper research and discussions with our consumer users and business customers so that we bring more and often higher standards and disciplines to industries through our product/business model upgrades. We continue to apply AI and big data technology to more proactively recommend content to our users.

Our business currently consists of 58 core businesses and incubated new businesses.

The 58 core businesses are comprised principally of 58 and Ganji (赶集网), our multi-content category online classifieds platforms, Anjuke (安居客), our real estate listing platform, ChinaHR (中华英才网), our online recruitment platform that focuses on white-collar jobs and Jia Xiao Yi Dian Tong (驾校一点通), an online platform for drivers’ license examination preparation and other related services.

The incubated new businesses currently mainly include Zhuan Zhuan (转转), an online used goods trading and service platform, and 58 Town (58), a rural version of 58.com. These platforms provide more vertically integrated services to users in their respective content categories. Although Zhuan Zhuan and 58 Town are both in relatively early stage of their platform growth and monetization and require our continued investment, we see great market and growth potential in them. Prior to incubating Zhuan Zhuan and 58 Town, 58 Home and Che Hao Duo were initially incubated within 58 or Ganji, and have completed fund raisings from additional outside investors. We have deconsolidated the financial results of 58 Home and Che Hao Duo from ours in accordance with U.S. GAAP since 2015.

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We primarily conduct our business in mainland China. Our online services currently covered 338 cities (), 382 counties (), and approximately 13,000 towns and villages (乡镇) in mainland China. We have our direct sales team in 70 cities in mainland China. While we continue to see growth in first tier cities, we continue to push and make progress in our lower tier cities strategies both in terms of traffic acquisition and revenue growth.

Our users refer to all participants on our platforms, including consumer users and business users.

Consumer users browse and search information on our online platforms without the need to register an account with us. However, after completing a user registration process, a user can post information, access more content and use our communication tools and other services. We increasingly encourage more users to register and log into their accounts before utilizing our services.

Business users are typically those who attempt to attract customer leads or recruit employees. Business users can post information on our platform for free, however, they may choose to pay for our premium services to enhance the marketing effectiveness.

Over 580 million users used our mobile apps in 2019, an increase of 11.4% from 2018. The number of users in a given period is defined as the number of accesses by unique mobile device IDs to our mobile apps in a given period, which is calculated as the aggregate of the number of unique mobile device IDs that accessed each of our mobile apps in that period.

In 2019, approximately 92% of our traffic, which is defined as average monthly page views in listing and landing pages, is from mobile apps and mobile web browsers.

The following table sets forth the number of paying business users for the periods indicated:

   

Mar. 31,

   

June 30,

   

Sept. 30,

   

Dec. 31,

   

Mar. 31,

   

June 30,

   

Sept. 30,

   

Dec. 31,

   

Mar. 31,

   

June 30,

   

Sept. 30,

   

Dec. 31,

2017

2017

2017

2017

2018

2018

2018

2018

2019

2019

2019

2019

 

(in thousands)

Paying Business Users

2,670

3,087

3,152

2,994

3,154

3,540

3,517

3,157

3,389

3,617

3,622

3,290

Note: We define paying business users who are identified as business users with unique identity information such as business licenses or personal identification information and who used our subscription-based membership services or purchased at least one type of online marketing services in a given period. One paying business user can open up several paying user accounts on one or multiple online platforms. The number does not include paying business users on Ganji as the Company stopped selling stand-alone Ganji subscription-based membership services in 2018 or earlier in all of its content categories.

58 Core Business Service Offerings

58 core business services for consumer users

We provide platforms for consumer users to browse, search and post information, get connected and communicate with services providers to ultimately address these consumer users’ needs for local services. We continue to invest in technology such as big data and artificial intelligence (AI) to enhance the relevance of our information and the effectiveness of our services. 58, together with other internally developed and acquired platforms, are well positioned to serve Chinese consumers with respect to provision of local service information. Some consumer users also pay to better promote their own listings, but it is free for consumer users to browse, search and use other features on our platforms.

The following platforms can be accessed through PC, mobile browsers, as well as mobile apps.

58 was launched in 2005 when our company was first founded. It is currently the largest online classifieds platform in China measured by traffic and revenues. It contains various content categories such as real estates, jobs, automotive, used goods, yellow pages and other local services categories.

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Ganji (赶集) was launched in 2005. It was consolidated into our company in August 2015. It contains similar content categories as 58. Post the acquisition, Ganji has been strategically de-emphasized especially in terms of user acquisition, to maximize investment and return on investment for 58 and other major apps. Although on a standalone basis, user traffic of Ganji has declined in recent years, overall synergies between Ganji and 58 have been maximized as a result of such conscious integration strategy.

Anjuke (安居客) was launched in 2007 and acquired by us in March 2015. It is currently one of the leading real estate listing platforms and is focused mainly on real estate sales, both secondary and primary, whereas the real estate categories on 58 mainly focus on rental and secondary real estate sales.

ChinaHR (英才网) was launched in 1997 and acquired by us in May 2015. It is currently one of the leading online recruitment platforms and is focused on white-collar jobs and offers career information and various other recruitment related services.

Jia Xiao Yi Dian Tong (驾校一点通) was launched in 2005 and acquired by us in April 2015. It is currently one of the leading platforms that offer drivers’ license examination preparation and other related services.

58 core business services for business users

Business users use our platform to upload and promote their services, attract customer leads and recruit employees. Business users can validate themselves through a range of individual and business background validation tools on the platform to enhance their profiles online.

We provide business users with a series of services for free. They can post information within certain limit for free. In most key categories, they have a basic storefront page and access to PC and mobile apps to manage their listings and communicate with consumer users for free.

We also launched category-specific mobile apps tailor-made for business users with more mobile-friendly features for them to manage listings on our platforms, get leads and communicate with consumer users. We also increasingly generate more data insights on marketing effectiveness and provide relevant feedback to our business users to increase the efficiency of their online marketing effort and overall business activities. We plan to continue to expand the features and enhance the user experience for these software as-a- service (SaaS) tools. With the help of these enhanced tools, we hope to increase engagement and interaction between consumer users and business users, which in turn provides us with larger amount of data for us to better understand, profile and serve our users. By leveraging our AI and big data capabilities, we hope that our platforms become increasingly intelligent to match consumer users with business users, leading to more diversified lead-generation revenue models, higher traffic monetization efficiency and improved quality of the information and overall user experience.

Our mobile apps developed for business users primarily consists of the following:

Zhao Cai Mao (招才猫) is a dedicated recruitment mobile app particularly for small and micro business users. This app allows employers to upload descriptions of their business, post jobs and search for and chat with potential job seekers. Its location-based services help identify job seekers that are potentially more geographically suitable for the open positions. Its chat function provides a convenient alternative to phone calls to conduct job search related communication. It enables employer to better connect with job seekers on 58 and Ganji platforms. These features make the hiring process more efficient and help employers recruit on the go. Business users can pay for more leads or enhanced online marketing services on this app. In addition to the Zhao Cai Mao app, business users also use 58 as an important tool to access and manage their listing and conduct various recruitment related services, which can be accessed through PC, mobile browsers, as well as mobile apps.

Mobile Real Estate Agent (动经纪人) is a dedicated mobile app for individual secondary and rental real estate agent users. It helps real estate agents to upload and manage listings, contribute content to the platform and connect more effectively with consumer users.

Wei Liao Ke (微聊客) is a dedicated mobile app for individual primary real estate agent users. It helps real estate agents to upload and manage listings, contribute content to the platform and connect more effectively with consumer users.

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Shang Jia Tong (商家通) is a dedicated mobile app for yellow page business users. It helps business users to upload and manage listings and connect more effectively with consumer users.

Che Shang Tong (车商通) is a dedicated mobile app for used car dealer users. It helps used car dealers to upload and manage listings, access useful information such as maintenance or pricing through integrated third-party tools, and connect more effectively with consumer users.

Paid Premium Services to Business Users

A large majority of our paying users are business users as opposed to consumer users, even though consumer users can also pay for enhancement of their listing exposure. The paying users include members who used our subscription-based membership services and other paying users who have not used our subscription-based membership services but have purchased at least one type of our various online marketing services or other services.

Subscription-based membership services

Even though business users can participate in our platforms for free, some business users pay for additional premium services to enhance their marketing effectiveness. Our subscription-based membership is a basic service package consisting mainly of merchant certification, display of an online storefront on our platforms, preferential listing benefits such as daily priority listings and a higher limit for daily listings, and access to our dedicated customer service support team and online account management system. Members who subscribe to our membership can get access to more services and obtain more effective marketing than non-paying business users on our platforms. 58, Ganji and Anjuke offer subscription-based membership packages that include similar types of services, although the specific details of the services, such as the quotas for daily listings, may vary from platform to platform. In some cases, we merge memberships on multiple platforms into a single subscription-based membership package, which enables business users to more easily market on multiple platforms.

We offer memberships of varying lengths across different content categories. Memberships in the yellow pages, jobs and used auto categories are primarily 12-month packages. In China, due to relatively high employee turnover among migrant workers, many businesses have ongoing hiring needs. Memberships in the real estate category are primarily one-month to three-month packages, because membership services are provided on an individual real estate agent basis and the turnover of real estate agents is quite high.

We acquire a majority of subscription-based members through our field sales teams and our sales agent network, even though we have started to make more membership services packages available online and encourage more business users to select and purchase them online. Our centralized and dedicated tele-customer service team supports our members during their membership period to enhance the marketing effectiveness and improve membership renewals. The roles and responsibilities of the field sales and customer services teams may vary by content category, as we constantly optimize our team structure and functions to best develop and serve our business users. The majority of our subscription-based paying members are small and medium-sized local businesses.

Online Marketing Services (OMS)

In addition to subscription-based membership services, which we position as a basic entry-level package services for business users, we aspire to provide various additional online marketing services to meet the customers’ various needs typically beyond what have already been addressed by subscription-based membership services. Online marketing services are generally more flexible to meet needs for customers of different scales, at different times and in different ways. Some online marketing services types are available for most content categories, whereas others are tailor made for certain content categories only.

Members who purchase our subscription-based membership services can also purchase online marketing services, in addition to subscription-based membership, typically at a discount compared to non-subscription-based paying users. However, one does not have to be a member to purchase most types of online marketing services. It is an important strategy for us to continue to upsell more online marketing services to members who have already purchased the subscription-based membership services.

Our online marketing services primarily include real-time bidding, priority listing, various other lead-generation services and display advertising. Some types of online marketing services are similar across different content categories, whereas others are tailored to one or some specific content category based on the nature of the content category and our insights and know-how.

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Business users use our real-time bidding services to bid for the most prominent placement of their listings in specific categories and locations on a cost-per-click (CPC) basis. We have developed a user-friendly bidding system through which business users can create text- and graphic-based descriptions for their listings and bid on the placements of their listings. In some categories, instead of a dynamic market-based bidding pricing system, we set fixed CPC price that is subject to regular reviews and adjustment. We made decisions as to which bidding systems to use based on our experience and know-how about each specific content category. Through bidding services, we typically generate much higher revenues than we otherwise could with the same amount of listing space as it maximizes the traffic monetization efficiency.

Business users also purchase our priority listing services, which typically place their listings below real-time bidding listings but above the area where regular paying business users' listings are displayed. Business users can purchase listing placements of varying durations ranging from several hours to several days to several weeks depending on their needs.

We continue to provide users more innovated ways to connect on our platforms in addition to phone calls, such as online chat through instant messaging tools, a quote for a specific service item, submissions of resumes to an open job posting in which users are interested. As a result, we are increasingly capable of passing leads directly to our business users. In addition, as we accumulate more user data and build better user profiles, we are also able to improve the quality of the leads we provide. Therefore, we are providing more innovative lead-generations based online market services to our business users to replace the traditional listing-position-based services. We offer business users a simpler way to market their services with clear measures of returns on investment, or ROI, of their marketing investment. This also allows us more flexibility to utilize our traffic and to leverage technology to better match the needs of consumer and business users. As we monitor the effectiveness and gather feedback from our customers, our AI and big data algorithm helps improve both monetization and user experience.

We provide display advertisement mainly for major business users, such as primary real estate developers on our Anjuke platform, companies who hire more white-collar staff on our ChinaHR platform and auto manufacturers on our 58Che (58 车) platform. These business users purchase display advertisements to enhance their brand recognition and attract consumer attention. These display advertisements are either text- or graphic-based displays for varying time periods ranging from several days to several months.

Most of the online marketing services customers are required to make payment in advance before purchasing our services, in the form of purchasing virtual online currencies of our platforms. Paying members can log into our account management webpage or mobile apps and purchase various online marketing services through an easy-to-use interface.

Incubated New Businesses (Consolidated Businesses)

Zhuan Zhuan (转转) is an online used goods trading and service platform launched in the fourth quarter of 2015. Zhuan Zhuan's vision of business is to bring pleasant online used goods trading experience for more users through providing simple and trustworthy services. It started with a primary focus on consumer to consumer, or C2C, used goods transactions. With a growing user base and increasing variety of value-added services on the platform, small business users, also became important participants in the marketplace. Zhuan Zhuan has established featured online marketplace rules and developed customized service capabilities, so that small business users can provide individual buyers (also known as C2B buyers) with more diversified goods and better values. Zhuan Zhuan allows buyers to search and trade a wide variety of used goods and features picture-taking and video-shooting to make listing used goods much easier. The payment solution for Zhuan Zhuan is a WeChat payment-based escrow payment process co-developed by 58 and Tencent. This is a convenient and secure payment method with an escrow payment process. Under this process, funds transferred through online payment will not be released to the sellers until the buyers confirm receipt. The use of WeChat account log-in and exclusive WeChat friends’ relations data has given the platform an extra level of security and social interest. Users can opt to transact offline face-to-face as well as using Zhuan Zhuan to arrange logistic service providers to come to sellers’ place to pick up the goods and track shipment status through intuitive user interface.

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For some specific product categories, such as mobile phones, tablets, laptops, consumer electronic devices and books, Zhuan Zhuan provides further value-added services to enhance confidence and trust in transactions. Zhuan Zhuan has a technology team specialized in mobile phone authentication and quality control. It also established standards for mobile phone assessment and grading, which have become industry-wide recognized standards. Leveraging our increasing knowledge of the marketplace, Zhuan Zhuan also recommends price ranges for different product categories. Standardized authentication services and algorism-based prices recommendation provide both buyers and sellers with more definitive and transparent experience, hence strongly promoting market activates.

Zhuan Zhuan also developed varieties of tools to further promote transactions. It developed auction and bidding platforms so that a seller can sometimes sell a Zhuan Zhuan authenticated mobile phone in one hour with a price premium of more than 20% to his/her starting price. It leverages live streaming technology to help business user to promote their non-standard goods such as used phones, tablets and jewels. We also developed online marketing tools for used goods business users, through which such users can post and manage their traffic of a used goods listing in real time so they can connect, share information and operate business in a more focused and efficient manner. These innovative value-added services help to boost transaction volume and strengthen our brand recognition through word of mouth marketing among users and merchandise network. At the same time, Zhuan Zhuan charges fees for authentication services provided to buyers as well as online marketplace services provided to sellers.

Zhuan Zhuan has experienced rapid growth in user traffic since its launch in 2015. Zhuan Zhuan has more than 200 million registered users currently including users through app activation and WeChat registration. Zhuan Zhuan launched its first WeChat mini-program in 2017 which serves as a new access point beside its mobile app. Mini-program is a light feature embedded in WeChat to facilitate discovery, fast access and download of stand-alone mobile apps. It is an enhancement of a WeChat official accounts and is designed to connect service providers with mobile users. The features within our mini-programs are largely similar to our own mobile app but will recommend different content based on different user profile and algorithm. Some mini programs offer special features relevant to unique WeChat eco-system data and user experience. Users can view, chat, post new listing items and make purchases via Zhuan Zhuan mini-programs within WeChat directly. Based on a business cooperation agreement between Zhuan Zhuan and Tencent, the Zhuan Zhuan mini-programs can also be accessed through the “Used goods” shortcut on WeChat Pay index page.

We currently own 63.5% of equity stake in the Zhuan Zhuan Entities on an issued and outstanding basis and continue to consolidate the financial results of Zhuan Zhuan in our consolidated financial statements. See “–A. History and Development of the Company.”

58 Town (58同镇) is a rural version of 58 in smaller towns and rural areas in China that we launched in the summer of 2017.

Even though the urbanization rate has been increasing, there are still several hundred millions of people living in smaller towns and rural areas in China. In recent years, smart phone and social network, such as WeChat has been increasingly popular in rural China but information is still largely offline there. 58 Town aims to provide users in those areas an online platform to access local information that is useful and interesting. We send our teams or leverage distributors to visit these small towns, recruit local “town partners” and provide them with apps to upload and manage information. These town partners are not our full-time employees, but they are typically people who show an interest in and have the basic skills for helping us to develop local users and manage content mostly on part time basis. Our core teams in the Beijing headquarters maintain most ongoing interaction with the town partners through apps and other online systems to provide operational training and instructions to grow the platform locally. We also offer individually relatively minor monetary incentive to town partners to reward good results. We believe that this is a good marketing investment to promote the 58 brand and acquire new users and content. The content categories we cover on 58 Town are largely similar to those on 58. Local community forum, jobs, real estate, auto are the major ones. However, there are also categories that are more local and unique to lives in small towns, such as car sharing for users who travel to neighboring towns and areas due to the lack of taxi and public transportation like in big cities. Most users today browse content in WeChat groups or WeChat public accounts created by town partners, however since the content is also synchronized to 58 and 58 Town (58本地版) apps, there is growing number of users who access information through our apps, where we can better retain and serve our users. 58 Town (58本地版) app was launched in April 2018. During 2019, we focused more on growing the app. Over 15 millions of users accessed 58 Town app in 2019, which was 2,885% up from 2018.

58 Town has experienced rapid growth since its launch in the summer of 2017. As of March 31, 2020, 58 Town covered approximately 13,000 out of a total of approximately 40,000 towns in China. Even though monetization is not a near-term focus in 2019, we believe this is the initial stage of a very valuable user network with plausible revenue models.

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Furthermore, as there are many migrant workers in China that go back and forth between cities, small towns and rural areas, 58 Town is very complementary to our existing platforms in that we not only reach out to more users with 58 Town, but with a bigger portfolio of platforms now, we can also serve our users better as they move between geographies. The integration of data from 58 Town and other existing 58 platforms will further enable us to generate more insights into our users, disseminate information better across various platforms and provide better marketing services for business users leveraging big data and AI capability.

Incubated New Businesses (Deconsolidated Businesses)

58 Home is a platform that enables users to search and purchase various home services, including domestic services, freight delivery services and platform services. Consumer users can select individual service providers online without going through middleman agency companies. For its core service categories, in addition to its online platform, 58 Home engages various offline operations, such as finding and certifying individual service providers and providing them with a mobile app tailor made for them to receive order and connect with consumer users. 58 Home also operates a training program for services providers in an effort to raise the quality of their services and provide certification for their skills. 58 Home has customer service call center teams that collect customer feedback to enhance its customers’ operations. 58 Home also partners with other third-party vertically-dedicated service companies in order to widen its content categories. Currently, there are over 400 cities and counties in China where most of 58 Home’s online services are available.

On November 27, 2015, 58 Home conducted its Series A preferred shares equity financing, which was intended to reduce the pressure on our cash flows and profitability, enable us to better focus on our core classifieds business, and further fuel the growth and test the new business model of 58 Home with its more independent operation and support from new investors. As certain rights provided to the noncontrolling Series A preferred shareholders of 58 Home would be viewed as substantive participating rights under U.S. GAAP, we have ceased consolidating the financial results of 58 Home in our consolidated financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP since November 27, 2015. Since the spin-off, 58 Home has been operating independently.

As of December 31, 2019 and the date of this annual report, we held 68.8% of equity interests in 58 Home on an as-converted basis, including 87.9% of the total outstanding ordinary shares and 5.0% of the total outstanding preferred shares. See “–A. History and Development of the Company.”

Che Hao Duo (车好多), previously known as Guazi, is one of the leading innovative automotive retail groups in China. Its business mainly consists of Guazi (瓜子), an online C2C used car trading platform, which was launched in 2015 and Mao Dou (毛豆), an online new car trading platform, which was launched in 2017. These platforms provide consumers with a great selection of used and new car inventory and a hassle-free one-stop-shop experience with various post-sales maintenance services, financing and insurance solutions. They continue to optimize the efficiency of the overall automotive retail industry with strong big data capability, strong brand recognition, major online mobile apps and offline sales and technician teams.

We currently have a minority equity interests in Che Hao Duo, and we do not consolidate its financial results. Che Hao Duo has been accounted for using cost method since we divested it on December 31, 2015, and measurement alternative after we adopted ASU 2016-01 since January 1, 2018. Since the spin-off in December 2015, Che Hao Duo has been operating independently. See “–A. History and Development of the Company.” As of December 31, 2019, we held approximately 8% equity interests in Che Hao Duo on fully diluted basis.

Content Categories

We organize listings on our platforms by content categories in an intuitive and easy-to-use directory to facilitate browsing and viewing. Currently, the major content categories in terms of number of listings and user traffic on our platforms are the following:

Real estate. Real estate is sorted into subgroups of residential rental, secondary and primary property sales, office space, retail space and industrial real estate rental. 58 and Ganji platforms have mainly rental and secondary property sales listings, while our Anjuke platform has mainly secondary and primary property sales listings.

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Listings are mostly uploaded by real estate agents, although consumers can upload their own homes for lease or sale as well. We have been continuously working on enriching the content and improving the quality of our listings. For instance, for residential properties, a listing not only covers the home itself, but also increasingly covers floor plan and description of the neighborhood community. The format of the listing includes text, picture and increasingly video, virtual 3-D depiction or bird’s-eye view of the property and neighborhood. We also provide useful tools such as maps, property pricing index, mortgage calculators, housing policy interpretations and industry news to further assist consumers’ decision-making. Besides, we also provide insurance coverage for both consumers and real estate agents. In 2019, we upgraded the process of displaying the housing resources on our platforms to improve the listing efficiency and developed new product features to allow real estate agents to share the listings among their private WeChat social network to effectively grow their businesses. We provided instant communication service which covers nearly all the listings on our platform and supports various types of contents such as text, pictures, voice, video and live streaming to further enhance user experience. Big data and AI have been applied to match houses and customers more accurately. Furthermore, we introduced the feature of virtual reality (VR) and have been continuously improving the coverage of VR-enabled listings, which enables remote house viewing and online decoration design display.

In primary property, our key products in 2019 were a series of products called “Yunjuke 3.0”, aiming at solving the marketing needs of different customers in various sales stages. Relying primarily on its mobile app, Yunjuke 3.0 help reduce marketing costs, improve service efficiency and conversion rate and enable diversified intelligent service marketing through Anjuke’s big data technology and smart matching system. At the beginning of 2020, the “VR Real-time on the Same Screen” function debuted, which enables real-time online interaction between real estate consultants and home seekers in different physical locations while sharing the same house viewing experience online. Through this function, the efficiency of consumer users’ home searching process as well as that of real estate consultants’ customers acquisition have both increased.

In June 2018, we acquired a minority stake in 5I5J, a major secondary and rental brokerage company in China, whose business is complementary to our real estate content category. In 2019, we jointly established Ai Fang, with a publicly traded company and a private company in China to engage in the promotion and sale of primary property sales for real estate developers, which could generate synergistic effects with our existing real estate business. Ai Fang connects real estate agents and property developers and provides them with the resources for business cooperation, including but not limited to housing resources, customer resources and transaction information, which makes primary property sales more efficient and helps real estate agents expand their businesses, as well as generates synergistic effects with our existing real estate business.

Jobs. Jobs currently covers a wide range of job categories, such as sales, customer service, manufacturing, human resources and administrative, homecare, cleaning, security, logistics. Employers on our platforms come from diverse industries, such as dining, recreation and entertainment, internet, retail and e-commerce, healthcare, education, finance and insurance, real estate, renovation and construction. We also have recruitment agencies, which represents a minority of all listings under the jobs category. Our 58 and Ganji platforms have largely mid-to-lower-level income job listings and resumes. ChinaHR, on the other hand, focuses on white-collar jobs from larger and more reputable companies. Job applicants can prepare a resume online, browse open positions and apply for jobs online. They can also join an online community to share job search experience and access career advices or industry news. Employers can upload job listings, purchase resumes and use our background check and assessment services. Job applicants and employers can communicate in various ways on our platforms through various consumer and business facing mobile apps.

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Automotive. Automotive includes listings of used and new cars, car leasing services, driving school services, automotive repairs and maintenance services, and other car-related services. Our platforms primarily focus on listing of used cars. Listings are uploaded by either used car dealers or individual consumers. In 2019, we improved our dealer credit system. By collecting consumers’ real-time feedback by calls, messages, and visits on the used car dealers, we developed a performance-based credit-rating system, which affects exposure opportunities and pricing scheme of the dealer’s listings. With the adoption of this new system, the quality of the dealers’ service was significantly improved. Our platform also provides insurance coverage for consumers, regarding online listing information and offline transaction, to ensure a trusted trading environment. For selected vehicles, we also provide vehicle valuation and inspection services, quality guaranty and extended warranty solutions as well as financial services, mostly through qualified third-party partners, in an effort to better facilitate the used car transaction. Consumer users and business users can communicate on our platform through various tools, including phone calls, instant messages, and video chats. Besides, we provide advertising services for automakers to help them with brand and sales promotions. Furthermore, by acquiring certain assets of a used car auction business, we expand the business of our platform from used car listing to used car transactions. On top of internet traffic services, this new practice provides our customers used car sourcing services, which enhanced our platform’s capability of binding with our existing clients and growing our customer base.
Used goods. Used goods covers a wide range of used consumer products such as computers and peripherals, mobile phones, digital cameras, furniture, household appliances and goods, books, artwork, sporting goods and musical instruments. On 58 and Ganji platforms, listings are uploaded by either professional used goods resellers or individual consumers. On Zhuan Zhuan, listings are largely uploaded by individual consumers. Consumers can browse and communicate with businesses or other consumers on 58 and Ganji. In addition, consumers can directly transact on Zhuan Zhuan.
Yellow pages local services. This category covers a variety of services such as homecare, enterprise services, renovation, education and training, vehicle rental, franchise licensing services, wedding and filming, and travel. On 58 and Ganji platforms, consumer users can search and browse local services information. Listings are primarily uploaded by business users and communicate with business users or other consumer users. We engage more user reviews and developing more information tags on businesses and their service offerings to further facilitate decision-making. For certain categories, we also launched enhanced services named “Premium Home Services” (到家精), which focuses on partnering with high quality service providers to further standardize their service quality and integrate service protection plans while establishing closed-loop transactions through our platform. Premium Home Services allow consumers to directly purchase services from us at fixed prices and receive services from our certified service providers.

Content Monitoring and Quality

We are committed to offering authentic and high-quality information across our platforms and complying with applicable laws and regulations. We believe information quality is critical to superior user experience. However, we are subject to spam, poor quality information and fraudulent activities as many other large internet companies are.

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We have adopted a multiple-level detective, protective and preventive system to manage our content and safeguard information quality.

Information screening, removal and user feedback collection and follow-up processes. We utilize proprietary technologies such as text or picture-based content screening analysis technologies together with manual screening conducted by teams of several hundred people to ensure content that contains certain inappropriate keywords cannot be successfully posted, viewed or and that they will be taken down once identified on our online platforms. We have a comprehensive set of policies regarding content management and we regularly and rigorously update and implement these policies to safeguard interest of our users. In addition to the actions taken with respect to the content, we also have a set of rules and processes to trace back to the users who post the respective information. The user accounts that violate these rules will be temporarily suspended or permanently terminated based on the severity of the violation. If it is a paying business user introduced by our sales and customer services teams, we also hold our teams accountable for the violations and have and implement internal disciplinary policies accordingly. We encourage users to report information quality issues or fraudulent activities and provide multiple entrances to facilitate the issue reporting process. We are able to respond within 24 hours upon receiving of an issue report and provide specific solutions resolving differentiated complaints. We have also established effective working relationship with relevant government agencies who also receive consumer feedback and complaints about services found on 58 platforms. We have increased our internal resources to process, validate and follow up on these reports and claims. We encourage business users to make a deposit for information quality in exchange of more traffic support. In the event of violation, the deposit will be deducted and paid to the users who report the violation. In other cases, where the business users or the platforms have paid for premiums to ensure information quality, the insurance company will compensate the users. We may compensate or reward the users even if it is not legally required.
Lister account management and control. Many information quality issues arise from insufficient verification and control over the listers’ account set-up and management. We have been raising the bars on authorization of individuals and businesses, and increasing the authorization requirement and verification procedure during the account opening process. For instance, in our rental home category in most major cities in China, to claim to be the owner of the property, the lister needs to either upload the property ownership certificate or put down an information quality guarantee deposit. We work with increasing number of third parties and used more advanced technologies such as facial recognition to validate the account owner. We have completed the identity validation for substantial all of our active listers that are subject to relevant property owner identity validation requirements. Users who have their personal identification linked with the lister account typically is a lot less likely to upload low quality listings.
Ongoing online monitoring powered by big data and technology. We used our proprietary systems and technology to analyze information, track user traffic and detect irregular user behaviors, spams or potential fraud. Our big data capability allows us to analyze a huge amount of data per second in real time, and analyze multiple forms of data including text, photo, video and voice. We are also building large databases on our content categories such as real estate and automotive to further regulate the posting and detect irregular information uploads. We are becoming more experienced at detecting fraudulent individuals and offenders and developing more comprehensive blacklists and whitelists. Features such as VR, livestreaming and instant message can also increase user engagement and improve fraud prevention. For example, leveraging on 58 Blog, hiring and interviews can be conducted by business users through livestreaming, the process of resume submission and communication between job seekers and employer have been speeded up, and the information quality has been improved.