Company Quick10K Filing
Quick10K
Baker Hughes A Ge
Closing Price ($) Shares Out (MM) Market Cap ($MM)
$25.84 1,036 $26,780
10-K 2018-12-31 Annual: 2018-12-31
10-K 2018-12-31 Annual: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-09-30 Quarter: 2018-09-30
10-Q 2018-06-30 Quarter: 2018-06-30
10-Q 2018-03-31 Quarter: 2018-03-31
10-K 2017-12-31 Annual: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-09-30 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-Q 2017-06-30 Quarter: 2017-06-30
10-Q 2017-03-31 Quarter: 2017-03-31
10-K 2016-12-31 Annual: 2016-12-31
10-Q 2016-09-30 Quarter: 2016-09-30
10-Q 2016-06-30 Quarter: 2016-06-30
10-Q 2016-03-31 Quarter: 2016-03-31
10-K 2015-12-31 Annual: 2015-12-31
10-Q 2015-09-30 Quarter: 2015-09-30
10-Q 2015-06-30 Quarter: 2015-06-30
10-Q 2015-03-31 Quarter: 2015-03-31
10-K 2014-12-31 Annual: 2014-12-31
10-Q 2014-09-30 Quarter: 2014-09-30
10-Q 2014-06-30 Quarter: 2014-06-30
10-Q 2014-03-31 Quarter: 2014-03-31
10-K 2013-12-31 Annual: 2013-12-31
8-K 2019-01-31 Earnings, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2019-01-30 Enter Agreement, Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2018-11-13 Enter Agreement, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-11-13 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-11-13 Enter Agreement, Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-10-30 Earnings, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-09-06 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-07-20 Earnings, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-06-01 Officers
8-K 2018-04-20 Earnings, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-04-05 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-03-26 Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-01-24 Earnings, Regulation FD, Exhibits
8-K 2018-01-22 Officers
8-K 2018-01-03 Other Events, Exhibits
8-K 2018-01-02 Officers
TRIP Tripadvisor 7,210
COR Coresite Realty 3,980
CSOD Cornerstone Ondemand 3,210
XOG Extraction Oil & Gas 850
BANC Banc of California 758
ONDK On Deck Capital 401
FTEK Fuel Tech 57
ADMEN ADM Endeavors 0
GRMC Goldrich Mining 0
MNTM Mount Tam Biotechnologies 0
BHGE 2018-12-31
Part I
Item 1. Business
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 2. Properties
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Part II
Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6. Selected Financial Data
Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Note 1. Basis of Presentation and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Note 2. Revenue Related To Contracts with Customers
Note 3. Business Acquisition and Disposition
Note 4. Current Receivables
Note 5. Inventories
Note 6. Property, Plant and Equipment
Note 7. Goodwill and Intangible Assets
Note 8. Contract and Other Deferred Assets
Note 9. Progress Collections and Deferred Income
Note 10. Borrowings
Note 11. Employee Benefit Plans
Note 12. Income Taxes
Note 13. Stock-Based Compensation
Note 14. Equity
Note 15. Earnings per Share
Note 16. Financial Instruments
Note 17. Segment Information
Note 18. Related Party Transactions
Note 19. Commitments and Contingencies
Note 20. Restructuring, Impairment and Other
Note 21. Supplementary Information
Note 22. Quarterly Data (Unaudited)
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures
Item 9B. Other Information
Part III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11. Executive Compensation
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services
Part IV
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules
Item 16. Form 10-K Summary
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EX-31.2 fy18form10-kexhibit312.htm
EX-32 fy18form10-kexhibit32.htm
EX-95 fy2018form10-kminesafetydi.htm

Baker Hughes A Ge Earnings 2018-12-31

BHGE 10K Annual Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

10-K 1 fiscalyear2018form10-k.htm 10-K Document

        

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
Form 10-K
[X] ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2018
OR
[ ] TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
Commission file number 1-38143
Baker Hughes, a GE company
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
 
81-4403168
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 
 
17021 Aldine Westfield Road, Houston, Texas
 
77073-5101
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
Registrant's telephone number, including area code: (713) 439-8600
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Class A Common Stock, $0.0001 Par Value per Share
 
New York Stock Exchange
Class B Common Stock, $0.0001 Par Value per Share
 
-
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. YES [X] NO [ ]

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act. YES [ ] NO [X]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. YES [X] NO [ ]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). YES [X] NO [ ]

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. [ ]
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer" "smaller reporting company" and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
Large accelerated filer þ
Accelerated filer o
Non-accelerated filer o
Smaller reporting company o
Emerging growth company o
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. [ ]
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). YES [ ] NO [X]

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter (based on the closing price on June 30, 2018 reported by the New York Stock Exchange) was approximately $12,108,399,000.
As of February 8, 2019, the registrant had outstanding 514,871,270 shares of Class A Common Stock, $0.0001 par value per share and 521,543,095 shares of Class B Common Stock, $0.0001 par value per share.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of Registrant's Definitive Proxy Statement for the 2019 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Form 10-K.



Baker Hughes, a GE company
Table of Contents

 
 
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BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | i



PART I

ITEM 1. BUSINESS
Baker Hughes, a GE company (the Company, BHGE, we, us, or our), a Delaware corporation, was formed on October 28, 2016, for the purpose of facilitating the combination of Baker Hughes Incorporated, a Delaware corporation (Baker Hughes or BHI), and the oil and gas business (GE O&G) of General Electric Company (GE).
On July 3, 2017, we closed our business combination (the Transactions) to combine GE O&G and Baker Hughes creating a fullstream oilfield technology provider that has a unique mix of integrated equipment and service capabilities. As a result of the Transactions, substantially all of the business of GE O&G and of Baker Hughes was transferred to a subsidiary of the Company, Baker Hughes, a GE company, LLC (BHGE LLC) with GE having an economic interest of approximately 62.5% and the Company having an economic interest of approximately 37.5% of BHGE LLC. The Transactions were treated as a “reverse acquisition” for accounting purposes and, as such, the historical financial statements of the accounting acquirer, GE O&G, are the historical financial statements of the Company. The historical financial results in the combined financial statements presented may not be indicative of the results that would have been achieved had GE O&G operated as a separate, stand-alone entity during those periods.
As of December 31, 2018, GE held approximately 50.4% of the economic interest and the Company held approximately 49.6% of the economic interest in BHGE LLC. Although we hold a minority economic interest in BHGE LLC, we conduct and exercise full control over all its activities, without the approval of any other member. Accordingly, we consolidate the financial results of BHGE LLC and report a noncontrolling interest in our consolidated and combined financial statements for the economic interest in BHGE LLC not held by us. We are a holding company and have no material assets other than our ownership interest in BHGE LLC and certain intercompany and tax related balances. BHGE LLC is a Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Registrant with separate filing requirements with the SEC and its separate financial information can be obtained from www.sec.gov.

In June 2018, GE announced their intention to pursue an orderly separation from BHGE over time. On November 13, 2018, we entered into a Master Agreement and a series of related ancillary agreements and binding term sheets with GE (collectively, the Master Agreement Framework) designed to further solidify the commercial and technological collaborations between us and GE and to facilitate our ability to transition from operating as a controlled company. In particular, the Master Agreement Framework contemplates long-term agreements between us and GE on technology, fulfillment and other key areas to provide greater clarity to customers, employees and shareholders. For a discussion of certain risks associated with the separation, including risks related to our business, financial condition and results of operations, see “Item 1A. Risk Factors-Risks Factors Related to the Transactions and Separation from GE.” For further details on the Master Agreement Framework, see "Note 18. Related Party Disclosures" of the Notes to Consolidated and Combined Financial Statements in Item 8 herein.
Secondary Offering and LLC Units Repurchase

In November 2018, we also completed an underwritten secondary public offering in which GE and its affiliates (together, the selling stockholders) sold 101.2 million shares of our Class A common stock. We did not receive any proceeds from the shares sold by the selling stockholders in this offering. The offering included the exchange by the selling stockholders of common units of BHGE LLC (Units) (together with the corresponding shares of our Class B common stock) for our Class A common stock, which resulted in increases in capital in excess of par value, with offsetting reductions in noncontrolling interests and other comprehensive income.

Also, in November 2018, we repurchased 65 million BHGE LLC Units (together with the corresponding shares of our Class B common stock) from GE and its affiliates for $1.5 billion, or $22.48 per unit, which is the same per share price, net of discounts and commissions, paid by the underwriters to the selling stockholders in the offering (the repurchase). In connection with the repurchase, the corresponding shares of Class B common stock held by GE and its affiliates were canceled. As a result of the secondary offering and the repurchase, GE's economic interest in BHGE LLC was reduced from approximately 62.5% to approximately 50.4%. If GE's economic interest in BHGE LLC falls below 50%, they would not have a controlling interest. Any future declines in their ownership would be accounted for by us as equity transactions reducing their noncontrolling interests.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 1



OUR VISION
We are the industry’s only fullstream oilfield services company with an offering that spans the entire oil and gas value chain. In 2018, we generated revenue of $22.9 billion and conducted business in more than 120 countries. With the breadth of our portfolio, innovative technology solutions and unique business and partnership models, we are positioned to deliver outcome-based solutions across the industry. By integrating Health, Safety & Environment (HSE) into everything we do, we protect our people, our customers, and the environment. We believe in doing the right thing every time, and delivering the best quality and safest products, services, processes, solutions, and technologies in the industry.

The oil and gas macroeconomic environment continues to be dynamic, and we believe the industry is going through a transformation that requires a change in how we work. Irrespective of commodity prices, our customers are focused on reducing both capital and operating expenditures. Our customers expect new models and solutions to deliver sustainable productivity improvements and leverage economies of scale, with a lower carbon footprint. We have developed a comprehensive growth strategy to deliver the productivity improvements the industry needs for the next decade and beyond. Our strategy is based on three growth pillars:

We have market-leading product companies focused on reducing product and service costs, while improving equipment efficiency and reliability to reduce total project spend.

We strive to create value through integrated offerings by reducing the number of interfaces as we deliver projects and services. This reduces complexity, drives speed, and increases execution efficiency, and

We plan to continue to develop fullstream opportunities that drive value creation through improvements in total cost reduction and productivity increases for the industry.
Additionally, managing carbon emissions is an important strategic focus for our business. We believe we have an important role to play in society as an industry leader and partner. BHGE has a long legacy of pushing the boundaries of technology and operating efficiency. In January 2019, we made a commitment to reduce CO2 equivalent (eq.) emissions 50 percent by 2030, achieving net-zero CO2 eq. emissions by 2050.  We will also invest in our portfolio of advanced technologies to assist customers with reducing their carbon footprint. 
We have already achieved a 26% reduction in its emissions since 2012 through a commitment to new technology and operational efficiencies. We will continue to employ a broad range of emissions reduction initiatives across manufacturing, supply chain, logistics, energy sourcing and generation. We have established a global additive manufacturing technology network with a mission to bring commercial-scale production closer to customers, reducing transportation impact and associated emissions.
We expect to benefit from the following:
Complete fullstream portfolio. Leading portfolio of products, services and expertise capable of serving upstream, midstream/liquefied natural gas (LNG) and downstream sectors of the oil and gas industry, matching oilfield service and equipment leaders in many areas. We deliver across the value chain through our four product companies: Oilfield Services; Oilfield Equipment; Turbomachinery & Process Solutions; and Digital Solutions as discussed below under "Products and Services, and each are among the top four providers in their respective segments.

Technology. We have a culture built on a heritage of innovation and invention in research and development, with complementary capabilities. Technology remains a differentiator for us, and a key enabler to drive the efficiency and productivity gains our customers need. We also have a range of technologies that support our customers efforts to reduce their carbon footprint. We remain committed to investing in our products and services to maintain our leadership position across our offerings, including $700 million research & development spend in 2018.

Digital capabilities. We expect to be able to continue to develop software offerings on any operating platform, for new and extended applications in the oil and gas and other industrial ecosystems, such as machine and equipment health, reliability management and maintenance optimization.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 2




We believe our strategy coupled with our capabilities will help us compete and win in the current environment, while positioning us for the future.
ORDERS AND REMAINING PERFORMANCE OBLIGATIONS
We are a global business and generate revenue and orders from a combination of equipment sales and services. In 2018, 40% of revenue was generated from equipment sales and 60% from services, while 42% of orders were for equipment and 58% for services. In 2017 and 2016, 42% and 47% of revenue was generated from equipment sales, and 58% and 53% of revenue was from services, respectively. We recognized orders of $23,904 million, $17,159 million, and $11,066 million in 2018, 2017 and 2016, respectively. As of December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016, the aggregate amount of transaction price allocated to unsatisfied (or partially unsatisfied) performance obligations totaled $21.0 billion, $21.0 billion, and $21.8 billion, respectively.
Our statement of income (loss) displays sales and costs of sales in accordance with SEC regulations under which “goods” is required to include all sales of tangible products and “services” must include all other sales, including other services activities. For the amounts shown above, as well as in the orders included in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations included in Item 7 in this Form 10-K, we distinguish between “equipment” and “product services,” where product services refers to sales under product services agreements, including sales of both goods (such as spare parts and equipment upgrades) and related services (such as monitoring, maintenance and repairs), which is an important part of its operations. We refer to “product services” simply as “services” within this Business section and the Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations included in Item 7 in this Form 10-K.
Remaining performance obligations (RPO), a defined term under generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), are unfilled customer orders for products and product services excluding any purchase order that provides the customer with the ability to cancel or terminate without incurring a substantive penalty, even if the likelihood of cancellation is remote based on historical experience. For product services, an amount is included for the expected life of the contract.
PRODUCTS AND SERVICES    
We are a fullstream provider of oilfield products, services and digital solutions. Our reportable segments, which are the same as our operating segments, are organized based on the nature of our markets and customers. We report our operating results through our four operating segments that consist of similar products and services within each segment as described below.
Oilfield Services
The Oilfield Services (OFS) segment provides products and services for on and offshore operations across the lifecycle of a well, ranging from drilling, evaluation, completion, production, and intervention. The segment includes product lines that design and manufacture products and services to help operators find, evaluate, drill, and produce hydrocarbons.
Products and services include diamond and tri-cone drill bits, drilling services, including directional drilling technology, measurement while drilling and logging while drilling, wireline services, drilling and completions fluids, completions tools and systems, wellbore intervention tools and services, artificial lift systems, and oilfield and industrial chemicals. 
OFS’ core evaluation and drilling technologies provide greater understanding of the subsurface to enable smoother, faster drilling and precise wellbore placement, leading to improved recovery and project economics. With the industry’s broadest completions portfolio, OFS can provide tailored well integrity solutions for all well types. Drawing from a wide range of artificial lift technology, coupled with enterprise optimization software, OFS can help lower the cost per barrel for the life of an asset. 
Our customers include the large integrated major and super-major oil and natural gas companies, U.S. and international independent oil and natural gas companies and the national or state-owned oil companies as well as oilfield service companies.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 3



Oilfield Equipment
The Oilfield Equipment (OFE) segment provides a broad portfolio of products and services required to facilitate the safe and reliable flow of hydrocarbons from the subsea wellhead to the surface production facilities. The OFE operation designs and manufactures onshore and offshore drilling and production systems and equipment for floating production platforms and provides a full range of services related to onshore and offshore drilling activities.
The OFE segment includes deepwater drilling equipment, subsea production systems (SPS), flexible pipe systems, onshore wellheads, and related service solutions. The OFE drilling and production systems product line offers blowout preventers, control systems, marine drilling risers, wellhead connectors, diverters, and related services. OFE offers SPS, including trees, control systems, manifolds, connections, wellheads, specialty connectors & pipes, installation and decommissioning solutions, and related services. OFE also provides advanced flexible pipe products including risers, flowlines, fluid transfer lines and jumpers, for both subsea and FPSO (floating production storage & offloading) based production across a range of operating environments. Investment in composite technology is enabling BHGE to extend the capabilities of BHGE’s flexibles even further. In addition, OFE offers a full range of onshore wellhead products, flow equipment, valves, actuators, as well as related services. OFE also offers a range of comprehensive, worldwide services for installation, technical support, well access through subsea intervention systems, operating resources and tools, offshore products and brownfield asset integrity solutions.
OFE customers are oil and gas field developers, drilling and oil companies seeking to undertake new subsea projects, mid-life upgrades and maintenance, well interventions and workover campaigns. OFE differentiates itself in SPS and deepwater drilling systems. The key competitive areas in OFE are large-bore gas fields, deepwater oilfields and fields with long tieback distances. In addition to a robust presence in other subsea areas, including high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) fields, OFE’s product lines’ production systems are among the industry’s most reliable, with uptime of the critical control system exceeding 99.8%.
Turbomachinery & Process Solutions
The Turbomachinery & Process Solutions (TPS) segment provides equipment and related services for mechanical-drive, compression and power-generation applications across the oil and gas industry as well as products and services to serve the downstream segments of the industry including refining, petrochemical, distributed gas, flow and process control, and other industrial applications. The TPS segment is a leader in designing, manufacturing, maintaining and upgrading rotating equipment across the oil and gas, petrochemical, and industrial sectors.
The TPS segment includes drivers, driven equipment, flow control, and turnkey solutions. Drivers are comprised of aero-derivative gas turbines, heavy-duty gas turbines, small- to medium-sized steam turbines, slow speed and integrated gas engines, hot gas and turbo expanders, and synchronous, and induction electric motors. TPS’ driven equipment consists of electric generators, reciprocating, centrifugal, axial, direct-drive high speed, integrated and subsea compressors, and turbo-expanders. TPS’ flow control includes pumps, valves, regulators, control systems, and other flow and process control technologies. As part of its turnkey solutions, TPS offers power generation modules, waste heat/energy recovery, energy storage, modularized small and large liquefaction plants, carbon capture, and storage/use facilities. TPS also offers a variety of system upgrades and conversion solutions, from a single machine to full plant debottlenecking and modernization.
TPS’ products enable customers to increase upstream oil and gas production, liquefy natural gas, compress gas for transport via pipelines, generate electricity, store gas and energy, refine oil and gas and produce petrochemicals, while minimizing both operational and environmental risks in the most extreme service conditions. TPS’ customers are upstream, midstream and downstream, onshore and offshore, and small to large scale. Midstream and downstream customers include LNG plants, pipelines, storage facilities, refineries, and a wide range of industrial and engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) companies.
TPS’ value proposition is founded on its turbomachinery and flow control technology, a unique competence to integrate gas turbines and compressors in the most critical natural gas applications, best-in-class manufacturing and testing capabilities, reliable maintenance and service operations, and innovative real-time diagnostics and control systems, enabling condition-based maintenance and increasing overall productivity, availability, efficiency, and reliability for oil and gas assets. TPS differentiates itself from competitors with its expertise in technology and


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 4



project management, local presence and partnerships, as well as the deep industry know-how of its teams to provide fully integrated equipment and services solutions with state-of-art technology from design and manufacture through to operations.
Digital Solutions
The Digital Solutions (DS) segment provides operating technologies helping to improve the health, productivity, and safety of asset intensive industries and enable the Industrial Internet of Things. DS includes the measurement & controls business for industry-leading hardware technologies as well as our software businesses that leverage best-of-class cloud services, including GE's Predix application development platform.
The DS segment includes condition monitoring, inspection technologies, measurement, sensing, and pipeline solutions. Condition monitoring technologies include the Bently Nevada® and System 1® brands, providing rack-based vibration monitoring equipment, sensors, software cybersecurity solutions, and industrial controls primarily for power generation and oil and gas operations. The DS inspection technologies product line includes non-destructive testing technology, software, and services, including industrial radiography, ultrasonic sensors, testing machines and gauges, NDT film, and remote visual inspection.
The DS process and pipeline services product line (PPS) provides pre-commissioning and maintenance services to improve throughput and asset integrity for process facilities and pipelines while achieving the highest returns possible. In addition, the PPS product line provides inline inspection solutions to support pipeline integrity and includes nitrogen, bolting, torqueing and leak detection services, as well as the world’s largest fleet of air compressors to dry pipelines after hydrotesting. The DS measurement and sensing product line provides instrumentation to better detect and analyze pressure, flow, gas, and moisture conditions.
The DS segment helps companies monitor and optimize industrial assets while mitigating risk and boosting safety, by providing performance management, and condition and asset health monitoring. It also provides customers the technical capabilities to drive enterprise wide digital transformation of business processes and to focus on better production outcomes along the entire oil & gas value chain, using sensors, services and inspections to connect industrial assets to the Industrial Internet. The DS software business is built to handle data at an industrial scale, giving customers the power to innovate, and make faster, more confident decisions to maximize performance.
MARKETS AND COMPETITION
We sell to our customers through direct and indirect channels. Our primary sales channel is through our direct sales force, which has a strong regional focus with local teams close to the customer, who are able to draw support from centers of excellence in each of our major product lines. No single customer accounted for 10% or more of our revenue in the current year.
Our products and services are sold in highly competitive markets and the competitive environment varies by product line, as discussed below:
Oilfield Services
Our OFS segment believes that the principal competitive factors in the industries and markets it serves are product and service quality, reliability and availability, health, safety and environmental standards, technical proficiency, and price. Our products and services are sold in highly competitive markets and revenue and earnings are affected by changes in commodity prices, fluctuations in the level of drilling, workover and completion activity in major markets, general economic conditions, foreign currency exchange fluctuations and governmental regulations. While we may have contracts with customers that include multiple well projects and that may extend over a period of time ranging from two to four years, our services and products are generally provided on a well-by-well basis. Most contracts cover our pricing of the products and services, but do not necessarily establish an obligation to use our products and services. OFS segment competitors include Schlumberger, Halliburton, and Weatherford International.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 5



Oilfield Equipment
Our OFE segment believes that the principal competitive factors in the industries and markets it serves are product and service quality, reliability and on time delivery, health, safety and environmental standards, technical proficiency, availability of spare parts, and price. Its strong track record of innovation enables OFE to enter into long-term, performance-based service agreements with our customers. In the SPS product line, the primary competitors of OFE include Schlumberger, TechnipFMC, Aker Solutions ASA, Proserv, and Dril-Quip Inc. In the flexible pipe product line, competitors include TechnipFMC, National Oilwell Varco (NOV), Airborne, and Magma. In the drilling product line, competitors include NOV, Schlumberger, and Horn Equipment. In the surface pressure control product line the primary competitors include Cactus Wellhead, TechnipFMC, and Schlumberger.
Turbomachinery & Process Solutions
Our TPS segment believes that the principal competitive factors in the industries and markets it serves are product range (or power range measured in megawatts) coverage, efficiency, product reliability and availability, service capabilities, packages, references, emissions, and price. In upstream and midstream applications, our primary equipment competitors include Siemens (Power and Gas business unit), Solar (a Caterpillar company), MAN Turbo, and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. In downstream applications, TPS primarily competes with original equipment manufacturers and independent service providers, including Flowserve, Siemens, Elliott Ebara, and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. Our aftermarket equipment product line competes with smaller, independent local providers such as Masaood John Brown, Sulzer, MTU, and Chromalloy.
Digital Solutions
Our DS segment believes that the principal competitive factors in the industries and markets it serves are superior product technology, service, quality, and reliability. Our DS segment competes across a wide range of industries, including oil & gas, power generation, aerospace, and light and heavy industrials. The products and services are sold in a diversified, fragmented arena with a broad range of competitors. Although no single company competes directly with DS across all its product lines, various companies compete in one or more products. Competitors include Emerson, Honeywell Process Solutions, Olympus, Schneider Electric, and Siemens.
CONTRACTS
We conduct our business under various types of contracts in the upstream, midstream, and downstream segments, including fixed-fee or turnkey contracts, transactional agreements for products and services, and long-term aftermarket service agreements.
We enjoy stable relationships with many of our customers based on long-term project contracts and master service agreements. Several of those contracts require us to commit to a fixed price based on the customer’s technical specifications with little or no legal relief available due to changes in circumstances, such as changes in local laws or industry or geopolitical events. In some cases, failure to deliver products or perform services within contractual commitments may lead to liquidated damages claims. We seek to mitigate these exposures through close collaboration with our customers.
We strive to negotiate the terms of our customer contracts consistent with what we consider to be industry best practices. Our customers typically indemnify us for certain claims arising from: the injury or death of their employees and often their other contractors; the loss of or damage to their equipment and often that of their other contractors; pollution originating from their equipment or facility; and all liabilities related to the well and subsurface operations, including loss or damage to the well or reservoir, loss of well control, fire, explosion, or any uncontrolled flow of oil or gas. Conversely, we typically indemnify our customers for certain claims arising from: the injury or death of our employees and sometimes that of our subcontractors; the loss of or damage to our equipment (other than equipment lost in the hole); and pollution originating from our equipment above the surface of the earth while in our care, custody, and control. Where the above indemnities do not apply or are not consistent with industry best practices, we typically provide a capped indemnity for damages caused to the customer by our negligence or the negligence of our contractors, and include an overall limitation of liability clause. It is also our general practice to include a limitation of liability for consequential loss, including loss of profits and loss of revenue, in all customer contracts.


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Our indemnity structure may not protect us in every case. Certain U.S. states such as Texas, Louisiana, Wyoming, and New Mexico have enacted oil and natural gas specific anti-indemnity statutes. These statutes can void the allocation of liability agreed to in a contract, however, both the Texas and Louisiana anti-indemnity statutes include important exclusions. The Louisiana statute does not apply to property damage, and the Texas statute allows mutual indemnity agreements that are supported by insurance and has exclusions, which include, among other things, loss or liability for property damage that results from pollution and the cost of well control events. State law, laws or public policy in countries outside the U.S., or the negotiated terms of a customer contract may also limit indemnity obligations in the event of the gross negligence or willful misconduct. We sometimes contract with customers that are not the end user of our products. It is our practice to seek to obtain an indemnity from our customer for any end-user claims, but this is not always possible. Similarly, government agencies and other third parties, including in some cases other contractors of our customers, may make claims in respect of which we are not indemnified and for which responsibility is assessed proportionate to fault. In all cases, deviations from our standard contracting practices are examined through an established risk deviation process.
The Company maintains a commercial general liability insurance policy program that covers against certain operating hazards, including product liability claims and personal injury claims, as well as certain limited environmental pollution claims for damage to a third party or its property arising out of contact with pollution for which the Company is liable, however, clean up and well control costs are not covered by such program. All of the insurance policies purchased by the Company are subject to deductible and/or self-insured retention amounts for which we are responsible for payment, specific terms, conditions, limitations, and exclusions. There can be no assurance that the nature and amount of Company insurance will be sufficient to fully indemnify us against liabilities related to our business.
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
We engage in research and development activities directed primarily toward the development of new products, services, technology, and other solutions, as well as the improvement of existing products and services and the design of specialized products to meet specific customer needs. We continue to invest across all operating segments in products to develop capability, improve performance, and reduce costs. In OFS, we invested in a range of formation evaluation capabilities as well as drilling, completions, and production hardware. This included the introduction of Electrical Submersible Pumps (ESP’s) with permanent magnet motors for higher efficiency through reduced power consumption. In OFE, the recent focus has been to expand capability into deeper water, longer offsets and at higher pressures as well as modular designs that allow for simpler and more integrated subsea systems. Additionally, subsea power and processing is also an area in which we are investing, covering both pumping and compression. In TPS, we continue to invest in continuous product improvement of reciprocating and centrifugal compressors, using advanced fluid dynamic simulation and advanced aeromechanics to improve capability, operability and efficiency of its centrifugal compressors family. Further, we continue to invest in our latest generation of gas turbines for energy efficiency and reduced carbon footprint. DS continues to invest in advanced digital solutions designed to improve the efficiency, reliability and safety of oil and gas production operations. These systems integrate operational data and provide analytics from producing oil and gas facilities helping to prevent unplanned downtime and improve facility reliability. In addition, DS invests in a broad range of measurement and control solutions spanning multiple industries, including methane detection systems for oil and gas operations and inspection technology for consumer electronics.
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY
Our technology, brands and other intellectual property (IP) rights are important elements of our business. We rely on patent, trademark, copyright, and trade secret laws, as well as non-disclosure and employee invention assignment agreements to protect our intellectual property rights. Many patents and patent applications comprise the BHGE portfolio and are owned by us. Other patents and patent applications applicable to our products and services are licensed to us by GE and, in some cases, third parties. We do not consider any individual patent to be material to our business operations.
In connection with the Master Agreement Framework, GE has now entered into an amended and restated IP cross-license agreement (the IP Cross-License Agreement) with BHGE LLC. GE has agreed to perpetually license to BHGE LLC the right to use certain intellectual property owned or controlled by GE pursuant to the terms of the IP Cross-License Agreement. BHGE LLC has in return also agreed to perpetually license to GE the right to use certain intellectual property rights pursuant to the terms of the IP Cross-License Agreement. This


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license allows BHGE LLC to have continued and permanent rights to commercially utilize some GE intellectual property pursuant to the terms of the IP Cross-License Agreement.
We follow a policy of seeking patent and trademark protection in numerous countries and regions throughout the world for products and methods that appear to have commercial significance. We believe that protection of our patents, trademarks, and related intellectual property rights is central to the conduct of our business, and aggressively pursue protection of our intellectual property rights against infringement worldwide as we deem appropriate to protect our business. Additionally, we consider the quality and timely delivery of our products, the service we provide to our customers, and the technical knowledge and skills of our personnel to be other important components of the portfolio of capabilities and assets supporting our ability to compete.
SEASONALITY
Our operations can be affected by seasonal weather, which can temporarily affect the delivery and performance of our products and services, and our customers' budgetary cycles. Examples of seasonal events that can impact our business are set forth below:
The severity and duration of both the summer and the winter in North America can have a significant impact on activity levels. In Canada, the timing and duration of the spring thaw directly affects activity levels, which reach seasonal lows during the second quarter and build through the third and fourth quarters to a seasonal high in the first quarter.
Adverse weather conditions, such as hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico, may interrupt or curtail our coastal and offshore drilling, or our customers’ operations, cause supply disruptions and result in a loss of revenue and damage to our equipment and facilities, which may or may not be insured.
Severe weather during the winter months normally results in reduced activity levels in the North Sea and Russia generally in the first quarter and may interrupt or curtail our operations, or our customers’ operations, in those areas and result in a loss of revenue.
Scheduled repair and maintenance of offshore facilities in the North Sea can reduce activity in the second and third quarters.
Many of our international oilfield customers increase orders for certain products and services in the fourth quarter.
Our process & pipeline business in the DS segment typically experiences lower sales during the first and fourth quarters of the year due to the Northern Hemisphere winter.
Our broader DS business typically experiences higher customer activity as a result of spending patterns in the second half of the year.
RAW MATERIALS
We purchase various raw materials and component parts for use in manufacturing our products and delivering our services.  The principal raw materials we use include steel alloys, chromium, nickel, titanium, barite, beryllium, copper, lead, tungsten carbide, synthetic and natural diamonds, gels, sand and other proppants, printed circuit boards and other electronic components, and hydrocarbon-based chemical feed stocks.  Raw materials that are essential to our business are normally readily available from multiple sources, but may be subject to price volatility.  Market conditions can trigger constraints in the supply of certain raw materials, and we are always seeking ways to ensure the availability and manage the cost of raw materials.  Our procurement department uses its size and buying power to enhance its access to key materials at competitive prices.
In addition to raw materials and component parts, we also use the products and services of metal fabricators, machine shops, foundries, forge shops, assembly operations, contract manufacturers, logistics providers, packagers, indirect material providers, and others in order to produce and deliver products to customers.  These materials and services are generally available from multiple sources.


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EMPLOYEES
As of December 31, 2018, we had approximately 66,000 employees, of which the majority are outside the U.S. Approximately 11% of these employees are represented under collective bargaining agreements or similar-type labor arrangements.
ENVIRONMENTAL MATTERS
We are committed to the health and safety of people, protection of the environment and compliance with environmental laws, regulations and our policies. Our past and present operations include activities that are subject to extensive domestic (including U.S. federal, state and local) and international regulations with regard to air, land and water quality and other environmental matters. Regulations continue to evolve, and changes in standards of enforcement of existing regulations, as well as the enactment of new legislation, may require us and our customers to modify, supplement or replace equipment or facilities or to change or discontinue present methods of operation. Our environmental compliance expenditures and our capital costs for environmental control equipment may change accordingly.
We are, and may in the future be, involved in voluntary remediation projects at current and former properties. On rare occasions, our remediation activities are conducted as specified by a government agency-issued consent decree or agreed order. Remediation costs at these properties are accrued using currently available facts, existing environmental permits, technology and presently enacted laws and regulations. For sites where we are primarily responsible for the remediation, our cost estimates are developed based on internal evaluations and are not discounted. We record accruals when it is probable that we will be obligated to pay amounts for environmental site evaluation, remediation or related activities, and such amounts can be reasonably estimated. Accruals are recorded even if significant uncertainties exist over the ultimate cost of the remediation. Ongoing environmental compliance costs, such as obtaining environmental permits, installation and maintenance of pollution control equipment and waste disposal, are expensed as incurred.
The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (known as "Superfund") imposes liability for the release of a "hazardous substance" into the environment. Superfund liability is imposed without regard to fault, even if the waste disposal was in compliance with laws and regulations. We have been identified as a potentially responsible party (PRP) at various Superfund sites, and we accrue our share of the estimated remediation costs for the site. PRPs in Superfund actions have joint and several liability and may be required to pay more than their proportional share of such costs.
In some cases, it is not possible to quantify our ultimate exposure because the projects are either in the investigative or early remediation stage, or superfund allocation information is not yet available. Based upon current information, we believe that our overall compliance with environmental regulations, including remediation obligations, environmental compliance costs and capital expenditures for environmental control equipment, will not have a material adverse effect on our capital expenditures, earnings or competitive position because we have either established adequate reserves or our compliance cost, based on available information, is not expected to be material to our consolidated and combined financial statements. Our total accrual for environmental remediation was $84 million and $82 million at December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. We continue to focus on reducing future environmental liabilities by maintaining appropriate Company standards and by improving our assurance programs.
AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION FOR STOCKHOLDERS
Our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (Exchange Act), are made available free of charge on our Internet website at www.bhge.com as soon as reasonably practicable after these reports have been electronically filed with, or furnished to, the SEC. Information contained on or connected to our website is not incorporated by reference into this annual report on Form 10-K and should not be considered part of this annual report or any other filing we make with the SEC.
We have a Code of Conduct (The Spirit and The Letter) to provide guidance to our directors, officers and employees on matters of business conduct and ethics, including compliance standards and procedures. We have also required our principal executive officer, principal financial officer and principal accounting officer to sign a Code of Ethical Conduct Certification.


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The Spirit and The Letter and Code of Ethical Conduct Certifications are available on the Investor section of our website at www.bhge.com. We will disclose on a current report on Form 8-K or on our website information about any amendment or waiver of these codes for our executive officers and directors. Waiver information disclosed on our website will remain on the website for at least 12 months after the initial disclosure of a waiver. Our Governance Principles and the charters of our Audit Committee, Compensation Committee, Conflicts Committee and Governance and Nominating Committee are also available on the Investor section of our website at www.bhge.com. In addition, a copy of The Spirit and The Letter, Code of Ethical Conduct Certifications, Governance Principles, and the charters of the committees referenced above are available in print at no cost to any stockholder who requests them.

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF BAKER HUGHES, A GE COMPANY
The following table shows, as of February 19, 2019, the name of each of our executive officers, together with his or her age and office presently or previously held. There are no family relationships among our executive officers.
Name
 
Age
 
Position and Background
Lorenzo Simonelli
 
45
 
Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer
Lorenzo Simonelli has been the Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Company since October 2017, and a Director, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Company since July 2017. Before joining the Company in July 2017, Mr. Simonelli was Senior Vice President, GE and President and Chief Executive Officer, GE Oil & Gas from October 2013 to July 2017. Before joining GE Oil & Gas, he was the President and Chief Executive Officer of GE Transportation from July 2008 to October 2013. Mr. Simonelli joined GE in 1994 and held various finance and leadership roles from 1994 to 2008.
Brian Worrell
 
49
 
Chief Financial Officer
Brian Worrell is the Chief Financial Officer of the Company. Prior to joining the Company in July 2017, he served as Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of GE Oil & Gas from January 2014 to July 2017. He previously held the position of Vice President, Financial Planning & Analysis for GE from 2010 to January 2014 and Vice President Corporate Audit Staff for GE from 2006 to 2010.
Maria Claudia Borras

 
50
 
President, Oilfield Services
Maria Claudia Borras is the President and Chief Executive Officer, Oilfield Services of the Company. Before joining the Company in July 2017, she served as the Chief Commercial Officer of GE Oil & Gas from December 2014 to July 2017. Prior to joining GE Oil & Gas, she held various leadership positions at Baker Hughes Incorporated including President, Latin America from October 2013 to January 2015, President Europe Region from August 2011 to October 2013, Vice President, Global Marketing from May 2009 to July 2011 and other leadership roles at Baker Hughes Incorporated from 1994 to April 2009.
Kurt Camilleri

 
44
 
Vice President, Controller and Chief Accounting Officer
Kurt Camilleri is the Vice President, Controller and Chief Accounting Officer of the Company. Prior to joining the Company in July 2017, he served as the Global Controller for GE Oil & Gas from July 2013 to July 2017. Mr. Camilleri served as the Global Controller for GE Transportation from January 2013 to June 2013 and the Controller for Europe and Eastern and African Growth Markets for GE Healthcare from 2010 to January 2013. He began his career in 1996 with Pricewaterhouse in London, which subsequently became PricewaterhouseCoopers.
Roderick Christie

 
56
 
President, Turbomachinery and Process Solutions
Rod Christie is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Turbomachinery & Process Solutions of the Company.  Prior to joining the Company in July 2017, he served as the Chief Executive Officer of Turbomachinery & Process Solutions at GE Oil & Gas from January 2016 to July 2017. He served as the Chief Executive Officer of GE Oil & Gas’ Subsea Systems & Drilling Business from August 2011 to 2016 and held various other leadership positions within GE between 1999 to 2011.


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Name
 
Age
 
Position and Background
Matthias Heilmann
 
50
 
President, Digital Solutions
Matthias Heilmann is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Digital Solutions of the Company. Prior to joining the Company in July 2017, he served as the Chief Digital Officer, President & Chief Executive Officer of Digital Solutions within GE Oil & Gas from 2016 through July 2017. Prior to joining GE Oil & Gas, he led ABB’s Global Product Group Enterprise Software business from June 2014 to January 2016. He served as the Chief Operating Officer of Ryerson Holding Corporation from March 2010 until January 2012 and served as Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Ryerson Inc. from January 2009 to January 2012.
William D. Marsh

 
56
 
Chief Legal Officer
William D. Marsh is the Chief Legal Officer of the Company. Prior to joining the Company in July 2017, he served as the Vice President and General Counsel of Baker Hughes Incorporated from February 2013 to July 2017. He previously served as the Vice President-Legal for Western Hemisphere at Baker Hughes Incorporated from May 2009 to February 2013 and held various executive, legal and corporate roles within Baker Hughes Incorporated from 1998 to 2009.
Derek Mathieson
 
48
 
Chief Marketing and Technology Officer
Derek Mathieson is the Chief Marketing and Technology Officer of the Company. Prior to joining the Company in July 2017, he served in various leadership roles at Baker Hughes Incorporated including Chief Integration Officer from October 2016 to July 2017; Chief Commercial Officer from May 2016 to October 2016; Chief Technology and Marketing Officer from September 2015 to May 2016; Chief Strategy Officer from October 2013 to September 2015; President Western Hemisphere Operations from 2012 to 2013; President, Products and Technology from May 2009 to January 2012; and Chief Technology and Marketing Officer from December 2008 to May 2009.
Neil Saunders

 
49
 
President, Oilfield Equipment
Neil Saunders is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Oilfield Equipment of the Company. Prior to joining the Company in July 2017, he served as the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Subsea Systems & Drilling business at GE Oil & Gas from July 2016 to July 2017 and the Senior Vice President for Subsea Production Systems from August 2011 to July 2016. He served in various leadership roles within GE Oil & Gas from 2007 to August 2011.
Uwem Ukpong

 
47
 
Chief Global Operations Officer
Uwem Ukpong is the Chief Global Operations Officer of the Company. Prior to this role, he served as the Chief Integration Officer of the Company from July 2017 to January 2018. He served as Vice President, Baker Hughes Integration for GE Oil & Gas from October 2016 to July 2017 and President and CEO of the GE Oil & Gas Surface Business from January 2016 to October 2016. He held various technical and leadership roles at Schlumberger from 1993 to 2015.
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS
An investment in our common stock involves various risks. When considering an investment in the Company, one should carefully consider all of the risk factors described below, as well as other information included and incorporated by reference in this annual report. There may be additional risks, uncertainties and matters not listed below, that we are unaware of, or that we currently consider immaterial. Any of these may adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows and, thus, the value of an investment in the Company.
Risk Factors Related to Our Business
We operate in a highly competitive environment, which may adversely affect our ability to succeed.
We operate in a highly competitive environment for marketing oilfield products and services and securing equipment and trained personnel. Our ability to continually provide competitive products and services can impact our ability to defend, maintain or increase prices for our products and services, maintain market share, and negotiate acceptable contract terms with our customers. In order to be competitive, we must provide new


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technologies, reliable products and services that perform as expected and that create value for our customers, and successfully recruit, train and retain competent personnel.
In addition, our investments in new technologies and properties, plants and equipment may not provide competitive returns. Our ability to defend, maintain or increase prices for our products and services is in part dependent on the industry’s capacity relative to customer demand, and on our ability to differentiate the value delivered by our products and services from our competitors’ products and services. Managing development of competitive technology and new product introductions on a forecasted schedule and at a forecasted cost can impact our financial results. If we are unable to continue to develop and produce competitive technology or deliver it to our clients in a timely and cost-competitive manner in various markets in which we operate, or if competing technology accelerates the obsolescence of any of our products or services, any competitive advantage that we may hold, and in turn, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.
The high cost or unavailability of infrastructure, materials, equipment, supplies and personnel, particularly in periods of rapid growth, could adversely affect our ability to execute our operations on a timely basis.
Our manufacturing operations are dependent on having sufficient raw materials, component parts and manufacturing capacity available to meet our manufacturing plans at a reasonable cost while minimizing inventories. Our ability to effectively manage our manufacturing operations and meet these goals can have an impact on our business, including our ability to meet our manufacturing plans and revenue goals, control costs, and avoid shortages or over-supply of raw materials and component parts. Raw materials and components of particular concern include steel alloys (including chromium and nickel), titanium, barite, beryllium, copper, lead, tungsten carbide, synthetic and natural diamonds, gels, sand and other proppants, printed circuit boards and other electronic components and hydrocarbon-based chemical feed stocks. Our ability to repair or replace equipment damaged or lost in the well can also impact our ability to service our customers. A lack of manufacturing capacity could result in increased backlog, which may limit our ability to respond to orders with short lead times.
People are a key resource to developing, manufacturing and delivering our products and services to our customers around the world. Our ability to manage the recruiting, training, retention and efficient usage of the highly skilled workforce required by our plans and to manage the associated costs could impact our business. A well-trained, motivated workforce has a positive impact on our ability to attract and retain business. Periods of rapid growth present a challenge to us and our industry to recruit, train and retain our employees, while also managing the impact of wage inflation and the limited available qualified labor in the markets where we operate.
Likewise, if the economy or markets decline or other changes occur, we may have to reduce utilization of our assets or adjust our workforce to control costs, which may cause us to lose some of our skilled employees. Labor-related actions, including strikes, slowdowns and facility occupations can also have a negative impact on our business.
Our business could be impacted by geopolitical and terrorism threats in countries where we or our customers do business and our business operations may be impacted by civil unrest, government expropriations and/or epidemic outbreaks.
Geopolitical and terrorism risks continue to grow in a number of key countries where we currently or may in the future do business. Geopolitical and terrorism risks could lead to, among other things, a loss of our investment in the country, impairment of the safety of our employees and impairment of our or our customers’ ability to conduct operations.
In addition to other geopolitical and terrorism risks, civil unrest continues to grow in a number of key countries where we do business. Our ability to conduct business operations may be impacted by that civil unrest and our assets in these countries may also be subject to expropriation by governments or other parties involved in civil unrest. Epidemic outbreaks may also impact our business operations by, among other things, restricting travel to protect the health and welfare of our employees and decisions by our customers to curtail or stop operations in impacted areas.


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Compliance with and changes in laws could be costly and could affect operating results. In addition, government disruptions could negatively impact our ability to conduct our business.
We have operations in the United States and in more than 120 countries that can be impacted by expected and unexpected changes in the legal and business environments in which we operate. Compliance-related issues could also limit our ability to do business in certain countries and impact our earnings. Changes that could impact the legal environment include new legislation, new regulations, new policies, investigations and legal proceedings and new interpretations of existing legal rules and regulations, in particular, changes in export control laws or exchange control laws, additional restrictions on doing business in countries subject to sanctions, and changes in laws in countries where we operate. In addition, changes and uncertainty in the political environments in which our businesses operate can have a material effect on the laws, rules, and regulations that affect our operations. Government disruptions may also delay or halt the granting and renewal of permits, licenses and other items required by us and our customers to conduct our business. The continued success of our global business and operations depends, in part, on our ability to continue to anticipate and effectively manage these and other political, legal and regulatory risks.
Increased cybersecurity requirements, vulnerabilities, threats and more sophisticated and targeted computer crime could pose risks to our systems, networks, products, solutions, services and data.
Increased global cybersecurity vulnerabilities, threats and more sophisticated and targeted cyber-related attacks pose risks to our systems, networks, products, solutions, services and data. Cybersecurity attacks also pose risks to our customers’, partners’, suppliers’ and third-party service providers’ products, systems and networks and the confidentiality, availability and integrity of our and our customers’ data. While we attempt to mitigate these risks, we remain vulnerable to additional known or unknown threats. Given our global footprint, the large number of customers with which we do business, and the increasing sophistication of cyber attacks, a cyber attack could occur and persist for an extended period of time without detection. We expect that any investigation of a cyber attack would be inherently unpredictable and that it would take time before the completion of any investigation and before there is availability of full and reliable information. During such time we would not necessarily know the extent of the harm or how best to remediate it, and certain errors or actions could be repeated or compounded before they are discovered and remediated, all or any of which would further increase the costs and consequences of a cyber attack.
We also may have access to sensitive, confidential or personal data or information in certain of our businesses that is subject to privacy and security laws, regulations and customer-imposed controls. Despite our efforts to protect sensitive, confidential or personal data or information, we may be vulnerable to material security breaches, theft, misplaced or lost data, programming errors, employee errors and/or malfeasance that could potentially lead to the compromising of sensitive, confidential or personal data or information, improper use of our systems, software solutions or networks, unauthorized access, use, disclosure, modification or destruction of information, defective products, production downtimes and operational disruptions. In addition, a cyber-related attack could adversely impact our operating results and result in other negative consequences, including damage to our reputation or competitiveness, remediation or increased protection costs, litigation or regulatory action, fines and penalties.
Our failure to comply with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) and other similar laws could have a negative impact on our ongoing operations.
Our ability to comply with the FCPA, the U.K. Bribery Act and various other anti-bribery and anti-corruption laws depends on the success of our ongoing compliance program, including our ability to successfully manage our agents, distributors and other business partners, and supervise, train and retain competent employees. Our compliance program depends on the efforts of our employees, agents, distributors and other business partners to comply with applicable law and our internal policies. We could be subject to sanctions and civil and criminal prosecution, as well as fines and penalties, in the event of a finding of a violation of any of these laws by us or any of our employees.
Anti-money laundering and anti-terrorism financing laws could have significant adverse consequences for us.
We maintain an enterprise-wide program designed to enable us to comply with all applicable anti-money laundering and anti-terrorism financing laws and regulations, including the Bank Secrecy Act and the Patriot Act. This program includes policies, procedures, processes and other internal controls designed to identify, monitor, manage and mitigate the risk of money laundering or terrorist financing posed by our products, services, customers


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and geographic locale. These controls establish procedures and processes to detect and report suspicious transactions, perform customer due diligence, respond to requests from law enforcement, and meet all recordkeeping and reporting requirements related to particular transactions involving currency or monetary instruments. We cannot be sure our programs and controls are or will remain effective to ensure our compliance with all applicable anti-money laundering and anti-terrorism financing laws and regulations, and our failure to comply could subject us to significant sanctions, fines, penalties and reputational harm, all of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
Changes in tax laws, tax rates, tariffs, adverse positions taken by taxing authorities, and tax audits could impact operating results.
Changes in tax laws, tax rates, tariffs, changes in interpretation of tax laws, the resolution of tax assessments or audits by various tax authorities, and the ability to fully utilize tax loss carryforwards and tax credits could impact our operating results, including additional valuation allowances for deferred tax assets. In addition, we may periodically restructure our legal entity organization. If taxing authorities were to disagree with our tax positions in connection with any such restructurings, our effective tax rate could be materially impacted.
Our operations involve a variety of operating hazards and risks that could cause losses.
The products that we manufacture and the services that we provide are complex, and the failure of our equipment to operate properly or to meet specifications may greatly increase our customers’ costs. In addition, many of these products are used in inherently hazardous industries, such as the offshore oilfield business. These hazards include blowouts, explosions, nuclear-related events, fires, collisions, capsizings and severe weather conditions. We may incur substantial liabilities or losses as a result of these hazards. While we maintain insurance protection against some of these risks, and seek to obtain indemnity agreements from our customers requiring the customers to hold us harmless from some of these risks, our insurance and contractual indemnity protection may not be sufficient or effective to protect us under all circumstances or against all risks. The occurrence of a significant event, against which we were not fully insured or indemnified or the failure of a customer to meet its indemnification obligations to us, could materially and adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
Compliance with, and rulings and litigation in connection with, environmental and climate change regulations and the environmental and climate change impacts of our or our customers’ operations may adversely affect our business and operating results.
We and our business are impacted by material changes in environmental laws, regulations, rulings and litigation. Our expectations regarding our compliance with environmental laws and regulations and our expenditures to comply with environmental laws and regulations, including (without limitation) our capital expenditures for environmental control equipment, are only our forecasts regarding these matters. These forecasts may be substantially different from actual results, which may be affected by factors such as: changes in law that impose restrictions on air emissions, wastewater management, waste disposal, hydraulic fracturing, or wetland and land use practices; more stringent enforcement of existing environmental laws and regulations; a change in our share of any remediation costs or other unexpected, adverse outcomes with respect to sites where we have been named as a potentially responsible party, including (without limitation) Superfund sites; the discovery of other sites where additional expenditures may be required to comply with environmental legal obligations; and the accidental discharge of hazardous materials.
International, national, and state governments and agencies continue to evaluate and promulgate legislation and regulations that are focused on restricting emissions commonly referred to as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the United States, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has taken steps to regulate GHG emissions as air pollutants under the U.S. Clean Air Act of 1970, as amended. The EPA’s Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule requires monitoring and reporting of GHG emissions from, among others, certain mobile and stationary GHG emission sources in the oil and natural gas industry, which in turn may include data from certain of our wellsite equipment and operations. In addition, the U.S. government has proposed rules in the past setting GHG emission standards for, or otherwise aimed at reducing GHG emissions from, the oil and natural gas industry. Caps or fees on carbon emissions, including in the United States, have been and may continue to be established and the cost of such caps or fees could disproportionately affect the fossil-fuel energy sector. We are unable to predict whether and when the proposed changes in laws or regulations ultimately will occur or what they ultimately


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will require, and accordingly, we are unable to assess the potential financial or operational impact they may have on our business.
Other developments focused on restricting GHG emissions include the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, which includes the Paris Agreement and the Kyoto Protocol; the European Union Emission Trading System; Article 8 of the European Union Energy Efficiency Directive and the United Kingdom’s Carbon Reduction Commitment Energy Efficiency and Energy Savings Opportunity (ESOS) schemes; and, in the United States, the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, the Western Climate Action Initiative, and various state programs implementing the California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (known as Assembly Bill 32).
The potential for climate related changes may pose future risks to our operations and those of our customers. These changes can include extreme variability in weather patterns such as increased frequency of severe weather, rising mean temperature and sea levels, and long-term changes in precipitation patterns. Such changes have the potential to affect business continuity and operating results, particularly at facilities in coastal areas.
Uninsured claims and litigation against us could adversely impact our operating results.
We could be impacted by the outcome of pending litigation, as well as unexpected litigation or proceedings. While we have insurance coverage against operating hazards, including product liability claims and personal injury claims related to our products, to the extent deemed prudent by our management and to the extent insurance is available; no assurance can be given that the nature and amount of that insurance will be sufficient to fully indemnify us against liabilities arising out of pending and future claims and litigation. This insurance has deductibles or self-insured retentions and contains certain coverage exclusions. The insurance does not cover damages from breach of contract by us or based on alleged fraud or deceptive trade practices. In addition, the following risks apply with respect to our insurance coverage:
we may not be able to continue to obtain insurance on commercially reasonable terms;
we may be faced with types of liabilities that will not be covered by our insurance;
our insurance carriers may not be able to meet their obligations under the policies; or
the dollar amount of any liabilities may exceed our policy limits.
Control of oil and natural gas reserves by state-owned oil companies may impact the demand for our services and products and create additional risks in our operations.
Much of the world’s oil and natural gas reserves are controlled by state-owned oil companies. State-owned oil companies may require their contractors to meet local content requirements or other local standards, such as conducting our operations through joint ventures with local partners that could be difficult or undesirable for us to meet. The failure to meet the local content requirements and other local standards may adversely impact our operations in those countries. In addition, our ability to work with state-owned oil companies is subject to our ability to negotiate and agree upon acceptable contract terms.
Providing services on an integrated or turnkey basis could require us to assume additional risks.
We may enter into integrated contracts or turnkey contracts with our customers and we may choose to provide services outside our core business. Providing services on an integrated or turnkey basis may subject us to additional risks, such as costs associated with unexpected delays or difficulties in drilling or completion operations and risks associated with subcontracting arrangements.
Some of our customers require bids in the form of fixed pricing contracts.
Some of our customers require bids for contracts in the form of fixed pricing contracts that may require us to provide integrated project management services outside our normal discrete business and to act as project managers, as well as service providers, and may require us to assume additional risks associated with cost over-runs. These customers may provide us with inaccurate information in relation to their reserves. The estimation of reserves is a process that involves subjective judgment about likely location and volume, and estimates that prove


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 15



inaccurate may result in cost over-runs, delays, and project losses for us or our customers, which may adversely impact our business and our relationship with our customers.
The credit risks of having a concentrated customer base in the energy industry could result in losses.
Having a concentration of customers in the energy industry may impact our overall exposure to credit risk as our customers may be similarly affected by prolonged changes in economic and industry conditions. Some of our customers may experience extreme financial distress as a result of falling commodity prices and may be forced to seek protection under applicable bankruptcy laws, which may affect our ability to recover any amounts due from such customers. Furthermore, countries that rely heavily upon income from hydrocarbon exports have been and may in the future be negatively and significantly affected by a drop in oil prices, which could affect our ability to collect from our customers in these countries, particularly national oil companies. Laws in some jurisdictions in which we will operate could make collection difficult or time consuming. We will perform ongoing credit evaluations of our customers and do not expect to require collateral in support of our trade receivables. While we maintain reserves for potential credit losses, we cannot assure such reserves will be sufficient to meet write-offs of uncollectible receivables or that our losses from such receivables will be consistent with our expectations. Additionally, in the event of a bankruptcy of any of our customers, we may be treated as an unsecured creditor and may collect substantially less, or none, of the amounts owed to us by such customer.
Our Remaining Performance Obligations (RPO) are subject to modification, termination or reduction of orders, which could negatively impact our sales.
Our RPO is comprised of unfilled customer orders for products and product services (expected life of contract sales for product services). Our RPO can be significantly affected by the timing of orders for large projects. Although modifications and terminations of orders may be partially offset by cancellation fees, customers can, and sometimes do, terminate or modify orders. Our failure to replace canceled orders could negatively impact our sales and results of operations. The total dollar amount of the Company’s RPO as of December 31, 2018 was $21.0 billion.
We may not be able to satisfy technical requirements, testing requirements or other specifications required under our service contracts and equipment purchase agreements.
Our products are used in deepwater and other harsh environments and severe service applications. Our contracts with customers and customer requests for bids typically set forth detailed specifications or technical requirements for our products and services, which may also include extensive testing requirements. We anticipate that such testing requirements will become more common in our contracts. In addition, recent scrutiny of the offshore drilling industry has resulted in more stringent technical specifications for our products and more comprehensive testing requirements for our products to ensure compliance with such specifications. We cannot provide assurance that our products will be able to satisfy the specifications or that we will be able to perform the full-scale testing necessary to prove that the product specifications are satisfied in future contract bids or under existing contracts, or that the costs of modifications to our products to satisfy the specifications and testing will not adversely affect our results of operations. If our products are unable to satisfy such requirements, or we are unable to perform any required full-scale testing, our customers may cancel their contracts and/or seek new suppliers, and our business, results of operations, cash flows or financial position may be adversely affected.
Currency fluctuations or devaluations may impact our operating results.
Fluctuations or devaluations in foreign currencies relative to the U.S. dollar can impact our revenue and our costs of doing business, as well as the costs of doing business of our customers. Most of our products and services are sold through contracts denominated in U.S. dollars or local currency indexed to U.S. dollars, however, some of our revenue, local expenses and manufacturing costs are incurred in local currencies and therefore changes in the exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and foreign currencies can increase or decrease our revenue and expenses reported in U.S. dollars or revenue and expenses of our customers and, consequently, may impact the ability of our customers to satisfy their payment obligations and our results of operations.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 16



Changes in economic and/or market conditions may impact our ability to borrow and/or cost of borrowing.
The condition of the capital markets and equity markets in general can affect the price of our common stock and our ability to obtain financing, if necessary. If our credit rating is ever downgraded, it could increase borrowing costs under credit facilities and commercial paper programs, as well as increase the cost of renewing or obtaining, or make it more difficult to renew, obtain or issue new debt financing.
An inability to protect our intellectual property rights could adversely affect our business.
There can be no assurance that the steps we take to obtain, maintain and protect our intellectual property rights will be completely adequate. Our intellectual property rights may fail to provide us with significant competitive advantages, particularly in foreign jurisdictions where we have not invested in an intellectual property portfolio or that do not have, or do not enforce, strong intellectual property rights. The weakening of protection of our trademarks, patents and other intellectual property rights could also adversely affect our business.
We are a party to a number of licenses that give us rights to intellectual property that is necessary or useful to our business, including from GE following the Transactions. Our success depends in part on the ability of our licensors to obtain, maintain and sufficiently enforce the licensed intellectual property rights we have commercialized. Without protection for the intellectual property rights we license, other companies might be able to offer substantially identical products for sale, which could adversely affect our competitive business position and harm our business products. Also, there can be no assurances that we will be able to obtain or renew from third parties the licenses to use intellectual property rights we need in the future, and there is no assurance that such licenses can be obtained on reasonable terms. Specifically we are a party to several agreements with GE which provide for intellectual property rights to use and access. Access and use of intellectual property created solely or collaboratively with GE is an important part of our operations. We would be adversely affected in the event these agreements were terminated without the right to continue such access as we might continue to improve current products and services or develop new ones.
We may be subject to litigation if another party claims that we have infringed upon its intellectual property rights.
The tools, techniques, methodologies, programs and components we use to provide our products and services may infringe upon the intellectual property rights of others or be challenged on that basis. Regardless of the merits, infringement claims may result in significant legal and other costs and may distract management from running our core business. Resolving such claims could increase our costs, including through royalty payments to acquire licenses, if available, from third parties and through the development of non-infringing technologies. If a license to resolve a claim were not available, we might not be able to continue providing a particular service or product, which could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
The effects of Brexit may have a negative impact on our financial results and operations of the business.
In June 2016, United Kingdom (UK) voters approved the UK’s exit (Brexit) from the European Union (EU). The political and economic uncertainty surrounding Brexit, if it occurs or in whatever form it occurs, could harm our business and financial results due to fluctuations in the value of the British pound versus the U.S. dollar, euro and other currencies. In addition, Brexit could result in delayed deliveries, which may impact our internal supply chain and our customer projects.
Risk Factors Related to the Worldwide Oil and Natural Gas Industry
Volatility of oil and natural gas prices can adversely affect demand for our products and services.
Prices of oil and gas products are set on a commodity basis. As a result, the volatility in oil and natural gas prices can impact our customers’ activity levels and spending for our products and services. Current energy prices are important contributors to cash flow for our customers and their ability to fund exploration and development activities. Expectations about future prices and price volatility are important for determining future spending levels.
Lower oil and natural gas prices generally lead to decreased spending by our customers. While higher oil and natural gas prices generally lead to increased spending by our customers, sustained high energy prices can be an impediment to economic growth, and can therefore negatively impact spending by our customers. Our customers also take into account the volatility of energy prices and other risk factors by requiring higher returns for individual


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 17



projects if there is higher perceived risk. Any of these factors could affect the demand for oil and natural gas and could have a material effect on our results of operations.
Demand for oil and natural gas is subject to factors beyond our control, which may adversely affect our operating results. Changes in the global economy could impact our customers’ spending levels and our revenue and operating results.
Demand for oil and natural gas, as well as the demand for our services and products, is highly correlated with global economic growth, and in particular by the economic growth of countries such as the U.S., India, China, and developing countries in Asia and the Middle East, which are either significant users of oil and natural gas or whose economies are experiencing the most rapid economic growth compared to the global average. Weakness or deterioration of the global economy or credit markets could reduce our customers’ spending levels and reduce our revenue and operating results. Incremental weakness in global economic activity, particularly in China, India, Europe, the Middle East and developing countries in Asia, could reduce demand for oil and natural gas and result in lower oil and natural gas prices. Incremental strength in global economic activity in such areas will create more demand for oil and natural gas and support higher oil and natural gas prices. A prolonged reduction in oil and natural gas prices may require us to record additional asset impairments. Such a potential impairment charge could have a material adverse impact on our operating results.
Requirements and voluntary initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, as well as increased climate change awareness, are likely to result in increased costs for the oil and gas industry to curb greenhouse gas emissions and could have an adverse impact on demand for oil and natural gas.
International, national, and state governments, agencies and bodies continue to evaluate and promulgate regulations and voluntary initiatives that are focused on restricting GHG emissions.  These requirements and initiatives are likely to become more stringent over time and to result in increased costs for the oil and gas industry to curb GHG emissions.  In addition, these developments, and public perception relating to climate change, may curtail production and demand for hydrocarbons such as oil and natural gas by shifting demand towards and investment in relatively lower carbon energy sources such as wind, solar and other renewables.  The renewable energy industry is developing enhanced technologies and becoming more competitive with fossil-fuel energy. If renewable energy becomes more competitive than fossil-fuel energy, particularly during periods of higher oil and natural gas prices, it could have a material effect on our results of operations.
Supply of oil and natural gas is subject to factors beyond our control, which may adversely affect our operating results.
Productive capacity for oil and natural gas is dependent on our customers’ decisions to develop and produce oil and natural gas reserves and on the regulatory environment in which our customers and we operate. The ability to produce oil and natural gas can be affected by the number and productivity of new wells drilled and completed, as well as the rate of production and resulting depletion of existing wells. Advanced technologies, such as horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, improve total recovery but also result in a more rapid production decline and may become subject to more stringent regulation, particularly on the state or local level, in the future.
Productive capacity in excess of demand (spare productive capacity) is also an important factor influencing energy prices and spending by oil and natural gas exploration companies. Spare productive capacity and oil and natural gas storage inventory levels are an indicator of the relative balance between supply and demand. High or increasing storage, inventories, or spare productive capacity generally indicate that supply is exceeding demand and that energy prices are likely to soften. Low or decreasing storage, inventories, or spare productive capacity are generally an indicator that demand is growing faster than supply and that energy prices are likely to rise.
Access to prospects is also important to our customers, but such access may be limited because host governments do not allow access to the reserves. Government regulations and the costs incurred by oil and natural gas exploration companies to conform to and comply with government regulations may also limit the quantity of oil and natural gas that may be economically produced.
Supply can also be impacted by the degree to which individual OPEC nations and other large oil and natural gas producing countries are willing and able to control production and exports of oil, to decrease or increase supply and to support their targeted oil price while meeting their market share objectives. Any of these factors could affect the supply of oil and natural gas and could have a material effect on our results of operations.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 18



Our customers’ activity levels and spending for our products and services and ability to pay amounts owed us could be impacted by the reduction of their cash flow and the ability of our customers to access equity or credit markets.
Our customers’ access to capital is dependent on their ability to access the funds necessary to develop economically attractive projects based upon their expectations of future energy prices, required investments and resulting returns. Limited access to external sources of funding has caused and may continue to cause customers to reduce their capital spending plans to levels supported by internally generated cash flow. In addition, a reduction of cash flow resulting from declines in commodity prices, a reduction in borrowing bases under reserve-based credit facilities or the lack of available debt or equity financing may impact the ability of our customers to pay amounts owed to us and could cause us to increase our reserve for doubtful accounts.
Seasonal and weather conditions could adversely affect demand for our services and operations.
Variation from normal weather patterns, such as cooler or warmer summers and winters, can have a significant impact on demand for our services and operations. Adverse weather conditions, such as hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico, may interrupt or curtail our operations, or our customers’ operations, cause supply disruptions and result in a loss of revenue and damage to our equipment and facilities, which may or may not be insured. For example, extreme winter conditions in Canada, Russia or the North Sea may interrupt or curtail our operations, or our customers’ operations, in those areas and result in a loss of revenue.
Risk Factors Related to the Transactions and Separation from GE
We may experience challenges relating to the ongoing integration of Baker Hughes and GE O&G or the separation from GE that may result in a decline in the anticipated benefits of the Transactions and the Master Agreement Framework.
The Transactions involved the combination of two businesses that previously operated as independent businesses. The Company has been and will continue to be required to devote management attention and resources to integrating its business practices and operations, as well as to the separation from GE.
If we experience difficulties with the ongoing integration process or with the separation from GE, the anticipated benefits of the Transactions and the Master Agreement Framework may not be realized fully or at all, may take longer to realize than expected, or may be offset by the decrease in business from certain customers or other negative impacts. These integration matters and the impact of the separation from GE could have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition or other prospects on an ongoing basis.
We have incurred and will continue to incur costs in connection with the Transactions and the integration of the two businesses. We also have incurred and expect to continue to incur additional costs in connection with the Master Agreement Framework and the separation from GE.
The Transactions involved the combination of two businesses that previously operated as independent businesses. As a result of the Transactions, there are many systems that must be successfully integrated between the two businesses, including information management, purchasing, accounting and finance, sales, billing, payroll and benefits, fixed asset and lease administration systems and regulatory compliance.

Separately, on November 13, 2018, the Company, BHGE LLC and GE entered into the Master Agreement Framework designed to further solidify the commercial and technological relationships between the two companies and to facilitate BHGE’s ability to transition from operating as a controlled company. In particular, the Master Agreement Framework contemplates long-term agreements between the Company, BHGE LLC and GE on technology, fulfillment and other key areas to provide greater clarity to customers, employees and shareholders. Certain of the transactions contemplated by the Master Agreement Framework may be subject to regulatory approvals. The Company has been and will continue to be required to devote management attention and resources to integrating its business practices and operations, as well as to the separation from GE.

Our entry into the Master Agreement Framework with GE, the ongoing integration of Baker Hughes and GE O&G, the separation from GE and any necessary changes to complete integration efforts based on the new business arrangements contemplated by the Master Agreement Framework may result in additional costs and difficulties. Actual costs related to the separation and the implementation of the changes contemplated by the


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 19



Master Agreement Framework may be higher than anticipated, and we may experience additional difficulties in effecting such changes.
We are a “controlled company” within the meaning of the NYSE rules and, as a result, qualify for, and are relying on, exemptions from certain corporate governance requirements. As a result, our stockholders do not have the same protections afforded to stockholders of companies that are subject to such requirements. The interests of GE as a majority stockholder may differ from the interests of other stockholders of the Company. If we do not retain “controlled company” status in the event that GE sells additional equity in the future, we may during the phase-in period continue to rely on exemptions from certain corporate governance requirements that provide protection to stockholders of other companies.

Through its ownership of a majority of our voting power and the provisions set forth in our charter, our bylaws and the Stockholders Agreement, GE has the ability to designate and elect a majority of our directors until the later of July 3, 2019 and the first date on which it ceases to hold more than 50% of the voting power of our outstanding common stock (the Trigger Date). As a result of GE’s ownership of a majority of the voting power of our common stock, we are a “controlled company” as defined in NYSE listing rules and, therefore, are not subject to NYSE requirements that would otherwise require us to have (i) a majority of independent directors, (ii) a nominating committee composed solely of independent directors, (iii) the compensation of our executive officers determined by a majority of the independent directors or a compensation committee composed solely of independent directors, and (iv) director nominees selected, or recommended for the board’s selection, either by a majority of the independent directors or a nominating committee composed solely of independent directors. In connection with the Master Agreement Framework, the Stockholders Agreement was amended and restated to provide that, following the Trigger Date and until GE and its affiliates own less than 20% of the voting power of our outstanding common stock, GE shall be entitled to designate one person for nomination to our board of directors. See “Note 18. Related Party Transactions" of the Notes to Consolidated and Combined Financial Statements in Item 8 herein”

In the event that GE sells additional equity in the future, GE may cease to control a majority of our voting power. Accordingly, we may no longer be a “controlled company” as defined in NYSE listing rules. Under the listing rules, a company that ceases to be a controlled company must comply with the independent board committee requirements as they relate to the nominating and corporate governance and compensation committees on the following phase-in schedule: (1) one independent committee member at the time it ceases to be a controlled company, (2) a majority of independent committee members within 90 days of the date it ceases to be a controlled company and (3) all independent committee members within one year of the date it ceases to be a controlled company. Additionally, NYSE listing rules provide a 12-month phase-in period from the date a company ceases to be a controlled company to comply with the majority independent board requirement. Although we believe we would be able to modify the composition of our board in a timely manner, during these phase-in periods our stockholders may not have the same protections afforded to stockholders of companies of which the majority of directors are independent. Furthermore, a change in our board of directors and committee membership may result in a change in corporate strategy and operation philosophies, and may result in deviations from our current strategy.

The Company is a party to the tax matters agreement with GE (the Tax Matters Agreement) entered into at closing of the Transactions and amended under the Master Agreement Framework. Under the Tax Matters Agreement, the Company could, under certain circumstances, be entitled to receive tax benefits in connection with the sale by GE of its equity interests in the Company. However, there is no assurance that the Company will realize any such benefits.

GE also has control over certain matters submitted to stockholders for approval, including changes in capital structure, transactions requiring stockholder approval under Delaware law and corporate governance, subject to the terms of the Stockholders Agreement relating to GE’s agreement to vote in favor of director nominees not designated by GE and to proposals by GE to acquire all of the shares of Class A common stock held by non-GE stockholders. Even if GE sells additional equity in the future and is no longer a majority stockholder, GE may still exercise control or significant influence over matters submitted to our stockholders for approval. GE may also have influence over matters that do not require stockholder approval. GE may have different interests than other holders of Class A common stock on these and other matters which may affect our operational and financial decisions.

Among other things, GE’s control could delay, defer, or prevent a sale of the Company that other stockholders support, or, conversely, this control could result in the consummation of such a transaction that other stockholders do not support. This concentrated control could discourage a potential investor from seeking to acquire Class A common stock and, as a result, might harm the market price of that Class A common stock.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 20




Given GE’s ownership of the majority of our outstanding voting securities and the interactions that have taken place and will take place between us and GE, our success depends in part on the reputation and success of GE. In the event that we are no longer controlled by GE, our success will remain partially dependent on GE through, among other things, their participation in our business operations and strategy as described above, our reliance on the long-term agreements and transition services agreements between the Company and GE pursuant to the Master Agreement Framework and the public perception of our affiliation with GE.
If we were to cease being a majority-owned subsidiary of GE in the future, such a separation could adversely affect our business and profitability. Uncertainty about the likelihood of any such separation could also adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Following the Transactions, we market many of our products and services using the “GE” brand name and logo. Although we believe that the association with GE provides many benefits, including: a strong brand, broad research and development capabilities, elevated status with suppliers and customers, and established relationships with regulators, we may in the future determine to rebrand our business or pursue alternative marketing strategies, which could adversely affect our ability to attract new customers or maintain existing business relationships with customers, suppliers and other business partners, all of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Although GE has licensed to us the right to use certain “GE” marks in its corporate name and in the products and services of our business in connection with certain oil and gas activities and other discrete oil and gas segments, that right to use these marks would be lost if the license were to expire or otherwise terminate, which may occur, among other reasons, in the event we cease being a majority-owned subsidiary of GE (subject to certain phase-out provisions). As a consequence of such expiration or termination, we would need to remove the “GE” marks from our corporate name, products and services.
In addition, if we were to cease being a majority-owned subsidiary of GE, or there were otherwise a meaningful change in the relationships between GE and the Company beyond what is contemplated by the Master Agreement Framework, such an event or events could adversely affect, among other things, our ability to attract and retain customers. We may be required to provide more favorable pricing and other terms to our customers and take other action to maintain our relationship with existing, and attract new, customers, all of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. For example, although GE would be subject to certain non-compete restrictions for a period of time following the Company no longer being a majority-owned subsidiary of GE, in the absence of an agreement regulating the go-to-market strategy and the reciprocal commercial and technical support between GE and the Company, GE may attempt to compete with us with respect to certain technologies and customer projects where we have adjacent or overlapping presence (e.g., steam turbines and gas turbines).  Furthermore, we may lose cost synergies, joint investment and R&D opportunities, and access to customers, in fields where we and GE currently collaborate as per the terms of the Channel Agreement (e.g. additive manufacturing; digital).

The potential separation from GE has created, and may continue to create, uncertainty among our customers, suppliers, and other business partners. In addition, the Master Agreement Framework and related binding term sheets contemplate entering into a number of definitive agreements based on terms included therein. If we are unable to enter into definitive agreements with GE for any reason by certain specified deadlines, the business arrangements contemplated by the Master Agreement Framework may by their terms take effect in the absence of definitive agreements, which may lead to additional uncertainty and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. The potential uncertainty due to these or other factors may undermine our business and have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations, and may cause increased volatility and wide price fluctuations in our stock price.

The market price of our Class A common stock could be materially impacted due to the substantial number of shares of our capital stock eligible for sale in future secondary offerings by GE.

The large number of shares of our Class A common stock eligible for sale by GE in the future could cause the market price of our Class A common stock to substantially decrease. GE owned approximately 50.4% percent of our outstanding Class A common stock as of December 31, 2018 (assuming full exchange of our shares of Class B common stock pursuant to the Exchange Agreement). Future sales of a substantial number of shares of our Class


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 21



A common stock in the public market, or the perception that these sales could occur, could substantially decrease the market price of our Class A common stock.

The market price and trading volume of our Class A common stock may be volatile, which could result in rapid and substantial losses for our stockholders.

The market price of our Class A common stock may be highly volatile and could be subject to wide fluctuations. In addition, the trading volume in our Class A common stock may fluctuate and cause significant price variations to occur. If the market price of our Class A common stock declines significantly, you may be unable to sell your shares of our Class A common stock at or above your purchase price, if at all. We cannot assure you that the market price of our Class A common stock will not fluctuate or decline significantly in the future. Some of the factors that could negatively affect the price of our Class A common stock or result in fluctuations in the price or trading volume of our Class A common stock include: variations in our quarterly operating results; failure to meet our earnings estimates; publication of research reports about us or our industry or the failure of securities analysts to cover our Class A common stock after the offering; additions or departures of our executive officers and other key management personnel; adverse market reaction to any indebtedness we may incur or securities we may issue in the future; actions by stockholders; offerings of our Class A common stock by GE or the perceived possibility of such offerings; changes in market valuations of similar companies; speculation in the press or investment community; changes or proposed changes in laws or regulations or differing interpretations thereof affecting our business or enforcement of these laws and regulations, or announcements relating to these matters; adverse publicity about our industry generally or individual scandals, specifically; and general market and economic conditions.

Anti-takeover provisions in our organizational documents and Delaware law might discourage or delay acquisition attempts for us that you might consider favorable.

Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated bylaws may delay or prevent a merger or acquisition that a stockholder may consider favorable by permitting our board of directors to issue one or more series of preferred stock, requiring advance notice for stockholder proposals and nominations, and placing limitations on convening stockholder meetings. These provisions may also discourage acquisition proposals or delay or prevent a change in control, which could harm our stock price.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 22



ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
None.
ITEM 2. PROPERTIES
We own or lease numerous properties throughout the world. We consider our manufacturing plants, equipment assembly, maintenance and overhaul facilities, grinding plants, drilling fluids and chemical processing centers, and primary research and technology centers to be our principal properties. The following sets forth the location of our principal owned or leased facilities for our business segments as of December 31, 2018:
Oilfield Services:
 
Houston, Pasadena, and The Woodlands, Texas; Broken Arrow and Claremore, Oklahoma - all located in the United States; Leduc, Canada; Celle, Germany; Tananger, Norway; Aberdeen, Scotland; Liverpool, England; Macae, Brazil; Singapore, Singapore; Kakinada, India; Nimr, Oman; Abu Dhabi and Dubai, United Arab Emirates; Dhahran, Saudi Arabia; Luanda, Angola; Port Harcourt, Nigeria
 
 
 
Oilfield Equipment:
 
Houston and Humble, Texas - located in the United States; Montrose, Scotland; Nailsea, England; Niteroi, Brazil; Suzhou, China; Dammam, Saudi Arabia
 
 
 
Turbomachinery & Process Solutions:
 
Deer Park, Texas and Jacksonville, Florida - located in the United States; Florence and Massa, Italy; Le Creusot, France; Coimbatore, India
 
 
 
Digital Solutions:
 
Billerica, Massachusetts and Minden, Nevada - located in the United States; Groby, England; Shannon, Ireland; Hurth, Germany
We own or lease numerous other facilities such as service centers, blend plants, workshops and sales and administrative offices throughout the geographic regions in which we operate. We also have a significant investment in service vehicles, tools and manufacturing and other equipment. All of our owned properties are unencumbered. We believe that our facilities are well maintained and suitable for their intended purposes.
ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
The information with respect to Item 3. Legal Proceedings is contained in "Note 19. Commitment and Contingencies" of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 herein.
ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
Our barite mining operations, in support of our drilling fluids products and services business, are subject to regulation by the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration under the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. Information concerning mine safety violations or other regulatory matters required by Section 1503(a) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and Item 104 of Regulation S-K is included in Exhibit 95 to this annual report.
 


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 23



PART II

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
Our Class A common stock, $0.0001 par value per share, is traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol 'BHGE'. As of February 8, 2019, there were approximately 6,901 stockholders of record. All of our issued and outstanding Class B common stock, $0.0001 par value per share, is owned by GE and its affiliates.
The following table contains information about our purchases of Class A common stock equity securities during the fourth quarter of 2018.
Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Period
Total Number
of Shares
Purchased
(1)
 
Average
Price Paid
Per Share (2)
 
Total Number of
Shares Purchased as
Part of a Publicly
Announced Plan or Programs (3)
 
Maximum Dollar Value
of Shares that May Yet Be
Purchased Under the Plan or Programs (3)
October 1-31, 2018
15,371

 
$
31.49

 
 
$
563,438,373

November 1-30, 2018

 

 
 
$
18,690,655

December 1-31, 2018

 

 
 
$
18,690,655

Total
15,371

 
$
31.49

 
 
 
(1) 
Represents Class A common stock purchased from employees to satisfy the tax withholding obligations in connection with the vesting of restricted stock units.
(2) 
Average price paid for Class A common stock purchased from employees to satisfy the tax withholding obligations in connection with the vesting of restricted stock units.
(3) 
In November 2017, our board of directors authorized BHGE LLC to repurchase up to $3 billion of its common units from the Company and GE. The proceeds of any repurchase received by BHGE are to be used to repurchase Class A common stock of the Company on the open market. Any repurchase of Class B common stock of the Company, which is paired with repurchased common units owned by GE and its affiliates, would be repurchased by the Company at par value. We did not repurchase any shares of Class A common stock in the fourth quarter of 2018. However, on November 16, 2018, we repurchased and canceled 65 million shares of Class B common stock from GE and its affiliates that is paired with common units of BHGE LLC for $1,461 million. As of December 31, 2018, the stock repurchase program has been substantially completed.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 24



Corporate Performance Graph
The following graphs compare the change in our cumulative total stockholder return on our common stock (assuming reinvestment of dividends into common stock at the date of payment) with the cumulative total return on the published Standard & Poor's (S&P) 500 Stock Index and the cumulative total return on the S&P 500 Oil and Gas Equipment and Services Index over the preceding five-year period. The first graph below reflects total shareholder returns for Baker Hughes Incorporated (our predecessor issuer pursuant to Rule 12g-3(a) under the Securities Exchange Act) from December 31, 2013 to July 3, 2017, the date of consummation of the Transactions. The second graph below reflects the total shareholder returns for our common stock from July 5, 2017, the first business day following consummation of the Transactions, to December 31, 2018.
Comparison of Three Years and Six Months Cumulative Total Return
BHI; S&P 500 Index and S&P 500 Oil and Gas Equipment and Services Index
bhigraph.jpg
 
2013
 
2014
 
2015
 
2016
 
 
July 3,
2017
Baker Hughes Incorporated
$
100.00

 
$
102.54

 
$
85.37

 
$
121.92

 
 
$
108.86

S&P 500 Index
100.00

 
113.69

 
115.26

 
129.05

 
 
141.44

S&P 500 Oil and Gas Equipment and Services Index
100.00

 
92.20

 
74.91

 
98.83

 
 
116.03




BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 25



The following graph compares the change in cumulative total stockholder return on our common stock (assuming reinvestment of dividends into common stock at the date of payment) with the cumulative total return on the published S&P 500 Stock Index and the cumulative total return on the S&P 500 Oil and Gas Equipment and Services Index over the preceding 18 month period. The graph reflects total shareholder returns for BHGE from July 5, 2017, the first business day following consummation of the Transactions, to December 31, 2018.
Comparison of Eighteen Months Cumulative Total Return
BHGE; S&P 500 Index and S&P 500 Oil and Gas Equipment and Services Index
bhgegraph.jpg
 
 
July 5,
2017
 
December 31, 2017
 
2018
BHGE
 
$
100.00

 
$
85.84

 
$
59.73

S&P 500 Index
 
100.00

 
110.97

 
106.11

S&P 500 Oil and Gas Equipment and Services Index
 
100.00

 
106.02

 
62.06

The comparison of total return on investment (change in year-end stock price plus reinvested dividends) assumes that $100 was invested on December 31, 2013 and July 5, 2017, respectively, in BHI and BHGE common stock, the S&P 500 Index and the S&P 500 Oil and Gas Equipment and Services Index.
The corporate performance graph and related information shall not be deemed "soliciting material" or to be "filed" with the SEC, nor shall such information be incorporated by reference into any future filing under the Securities Act or the Exchange Act, except to the extent that BHGE specifically incorporates it by reference into such filing.



BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 26



ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
The Selected Financial Data should be read in conjunction with Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data, both contained herein.
 
Year Ended December 31,(1)
(In millions, except per share amounts)
2018
2017
2016
2015
2014
Revenue
$
22,877

$
17,179

$
13,082

$
16,688

$
19,191

 
 
 
 
 
 
Cost of revenue
18,891

14,143

10,150

12,193

14,256

Selling, general and administrative
2,699

2,535

1,926

2,115

2,288

Restructuring, impairment and other (2)
433

412

516

411

189

Goodwill impairment (3)



2,080


Merger and related costs (4)
153

373

33

27

67

Operating income (loss)
701

(284
)
457

(138
)
2,391

Other non operating income, net
202

80

3

100

124

Interest expense, net
(223
)
(131
)
(102
)
(120
)
(179
)
Income (loss) before income taxes and equity in loss of affiliate
680

(335
)
358

(158
)
2,336

Equity in loss of affiliate
(139
)
(11
)



Income tax provision
(258
)
(45
)
(173
)
(473
)
(484
)
Net income (loss)
283

(391
)
185

(631
)
1,852

Less: Net income (loss) attributable to GE O&G pre-merger

42

254

(606
)
1,840

Less: Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests
88

(330
)
(69
)
(25
)
12

Net income (loss) attributable to Baker Hughes, a GE company
$
195

$
(103
)
$

$

$

 
 
 
 
 
 
Per share of common stock:
 
 
 
 
 
Basic income (loss) per Class A common share
$
0.46

$
(0.24
)
 
 
 
Diluted income (loss) per Class A common share
0.45

(0.24
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dividend:
 
 
 
 
 
Cash dividend per Class A common share
0.72

0.35

 
 
 
Special dividend per Class A common share
 
17.50

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Balance Sheet Data:
 
 
 
 
 
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash (5)
$
3,723

$
7,030

$
981

$
1,432

$
1,390

Total assets
52,439

56,500

21,466

23,133

26,496

Long-term debt
6,285

6,312

38

13

14

Total equity
35,013

38,410

14,280

14,545

16,386

Notes to Selected Financial Data
(1) 
The current year results are not comparable to prior years as the results of Baker Hughes are included only from July 3, 2017. Additionally, we adopted FASB ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, and the related amendments with effect from January 1, 2016 on a full retrospective basis. Accordingly, the 2016, 2017 and 2018 fiscal year periods are presented under the new revenue standard and the 2014 and 2015 periods are not presented under the new revenue standard.
(2) 
See "Note 20. Restructuring, Impairment and Other" of the Notes to Consolidated and Combined Financial Statements in Item 8 herein for further discussion.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 27



(3) 
In performing the annual impairment test for goodwill in the third quarter of 2015 using data as of July 1 of that year, we determined that a step two test was required for a reporting unit within our OFS operating segment. As a consequence of the continued pressure on oil prices, the revised expected cash flows for this reporting unit resulted in a goodwill impairment charge of $2,080 million
(4) 
See "Note 3. Business Acquisition and Disposition" of the Notes to Consolidated and Combined Financial Statements in Item 8 herein for further discussion of merger and related costs.
(5) 
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash includes $747 million and $997 million of cash held on behalf of GE at December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 28



ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (MD&A) should be read in conjunction with the consolidated and combined financial statements included in Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data contained herein.
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
On July 3, 2017, we closed the Transactions to combine GE O&G and Baker Hughes, creating a fullstream oilfield technology provider that has a unique mix of integrated oilfield products, services and digital solutions. The Transactions were executed using a partnership structure, pursuant to which GE O&G and Baker Hughes each contributed their operating assets to a newly formed partnership, BHGE LLC. As of December 31, 2018, GE holds an approximate 50.4% controlling interest in this partnership and the Company holds an approximate 49.6% economic interest. The results of operations for the Company include the results of Baker Hughes from July 3, 2017, the date of acquisition, through December 31, 2018. The majority of the Baker Hughes business operations are included in the Oilfield Services segment. The Transactions were treated as a “reverse acquisition” for accounting purposes and, as such, the historical financial statements of the accounting acquirer, GE O&G, are the historical financial statements of the Company. The current year results may not be comparable to prior years as the prior years include the results of Baker Hughes only from July 3, 2017. We operate through our four business segments: Oilfield Services (OFS), Oilfield Equipment (OFE), Turbomachinery & Processing Solutions (TPS), and Digital Solutions (DS). As of December 31, 2018, BHGE employs approximately 66,000 employees and operates in more than 120 countries.
In June 2018, GE announced their intention to pursue an orderly separation from BHGE over time.  To that end, during the fourth quarter of 2018, certain equity transactions were completed and GE’s ownership of BHGE was reduced from approximately 62.5% to approximately 50.4%. At the same time, we completed the Master Agreement Framework designed to further solidify the commercial and technological collaboration between us and GE and to position us for the future. The Master Agreement Framework focuses on areas where we work most closely with GE on developing leading technology and executing for customers. First, we defined the parameters for long-term collaboration and partnership with GE on critical rotating equipment technology. Second, for our Digital software and technology business we will maintain the status quo as the exclusive supplier of GE Digital oil-and-gas applications. Finally, we reached agreements on a number of other areas including our Controls business, pension, taxes, and intercompany services. For further details on the Master Agreement Framework see "Note 18. Related Party Disclosures" of the Notes to Consolidated and Combined Financial Statements in Item 8 herein.

In aggregate, we anticipate that the net financial impact of the agreements contemplated by the Master Agreement Framework will have a slightly negative impact on our operating margin rates of approximately 20 to 40 basis points. In addition, we expect to incur one-time charges related to separation from GE of approximately $0.2 billion to $0.3 billion over the next three years. We expect these charges to be primarily related to the build-out of information technology infrastructure as well as customary transaction fees. For a discussion of certain risks associated with separation, including risks related to our business, financial condition and results of operations, see “Item 1A. Risk Factors-Risks Factors Related to the Transactions and Separation from GE.”
In 2018, we generated revenue of $22,877 million, compared to $17,179 million in 2017. The increase in revenue was driven primarily by OFS as 2018 included the full year results of Baker Hughes compared to only six months in 2017, and to a lesser extent, by DS partially offset by declines in TPS and OFE. Income before income taxes and equity in loss of affiliate was $680 million in 2018, and included restructuring and impairment charges of $433 million and merger and related costs of $153 million. These restructuring and impairment charges were recorded as a result of our continued actions to adjust our operations and cost structure to reflect reduced activity levels. In 2017, loss before income taxes and equity in loss of affiliate was $335 million, which also included restructuring and impairment charges of $412 million, and merger and related costs of $373 million.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 29



OUTLOOK
Our business is exposed to a number of different macro factors, which influence our expectations and outlook. All of our outlook expectations are purely based on the market as we see it today, and are subject to change given volatile conditions in the industry.

North America onshore activity: in 2018, we experienced an acceleration in rig count growth, as compared to 2017, driven by the increase in commodity prices for the first 10 months of the year. In the fourth quarter, WTI prices declined 38% driven by both increased supply and geo-political events. We expect the decline in commodity prices may have a negative impact on activity in North America in 2019.

International onshore activity: we have seen a moderate increase in rig count activity in 2018 and expect growth to continue into 2019, at a slightly increased rate. We have seen signs of improvement with the increase in commodity prices, but due to continued volatility, we remain cautious as to growth expectations.

Offshore projects: although commodity prices have been volatile, we have begun to see increasing customer activity on offshore projects and more final investment decisions being made. Subsea tree awards increased in 2018, and we expect tree awards to be roughly flat in 2019, though still at levels significantly below prior 2012 and 2013 peaks. We expect customers to continue to evaluate the timing of final investment decisions, and in light of increased commodity price volatility, there may be some project delays.

Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) projects: we remain optimistic on the LNG market. While currently oversupplied, we believe a significant number of final investment decisions are needed to fill the projected supply-demand imbalance in the early to middle part of the next decade. In 2018, we saw positive final investment decisions for new LNG capacity. We continue to view the long-term economics of the LNG industry as positive given our outlook for supply and demand.

Refinery, petrochemical and industrial projects: in refining, we believe large, complex refineries should gain advantage in a more competitive, oversupplied landscape in 2019 as the industry globalizes and refiners position to meet local demand and secure export potential. In petrochemicals, we continue to see healthy demand and cost-advantaged supply driving projects forward in 2019. The industrial market continues to grow as outdated infrastructure is replaced, policy changes come into effect and power is decentralized. We continue to see growing demand across these markets in 2019.
We have other segments in our portfolio that are more correlated with different industrial metrics such as our Digital Solutions business. Overall, we believe our portfolio is uniquely positioned to compete across the value chain, and deliver comprehensive solutions for our customers. We remain optimistic about the long-term economics of the industry, but are continuing to operate with flexibility given our expectations for volatility and changing assumptions in the near term.
Solar and wind net additions continued to exceed coal and gas throughout 2018.  Governments may change or may not continue incentives for renewable energy additions.  In the long term, renewables' cost decline may accelerate to compete with new-built fossil capacity. However, we do not anticipate any significant impacts to our business in the foreseeable future.
Despite the near-term volatility, the long-term outlook for our industry remains positive. We believe the world’s demand for energy will continue to rise, and the supply of energy will continue to increase in complexity, requiring greater service intensity and more advanced technology from oilfield service companies. As such, we remain focused on delivering innovative, cost-efficient solutions that deliver step changes in operating and economic performance for our customers.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 30



BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT
The following discussion and analysis summarizes the significant factors affecting our results of operations, financial condition and liquidity position as of and for the year ended December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016, and should be read in conjunction with the consolidated and combined financial statements and related notes of the Company.
We operate in more than 120 countries helping customers find, evaluate, drill, produce, transport and process hydrocarbon resources. Our revenue is predominately generated from the sale of products and services to major, national, and independent oil and natural gas companies worldwide, and is dependent on spending by our customers for oil and natural gas exploration, field development and production. This spending is driven by a number of factors, including our customers' forecasts of future energy demand and supply, their access to resources to develop and produce oil and natural gas, their ability to fund their capital programs, the impact of new government regulations and most importantly, their expectations for oil and natural gas prices as a key driver of their cash flows.
Oil and Natural Gas Prices
Oil and natural gas prices are summarized in the table below as averages of the daily closing prices during each of the periods indicated.
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016
Brent oil prices ($/Bbl) (1)
$
71.34

 
$
54.12

 
$
43.64

WTI oil prices ($/Bbl) (2)
65.23

 
50.80

 
43.29

Natural gas prices ($/mmBtu) (3)
3.15

 
2.99

 
2.52

(1) 
Energy Information Administration (EIA) Europe Brent Spot Price per Barrel
(2) 
EIA Cushing, OK WTI (West Texas Intermediate) spot price
(3) 
EIA Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price per million British Thermal Unit
2018 demonstrated the volatility of the oil and gas market. Through the first three quarters of 2018, we experienced stability in the North American and international markets. However, in the fourth quarter of 2018 commodity prices dropped nearly 40% resulting in increased customer uncertainty. From an offshore standpoint, through most of 2018, we saw multiple large offshore projects reach positive final investment decisions, and the LNG market and outlook improved throughout 2018, driven by increased demand globally. In 2018, the first large North American LNG positive final investment decision was reached.
Outside of North America, customer spending is highly driven by Brent oil prices, which increased on average throughout the year. Average Brent oil prices increased to $71.34/Bbl in 2018 from $54.12/Bbl in 2017, and ranged from a low of $50.57/Bbl in December 2018, to a high of $86.07/Bbl in October 2018. For the first three quarters of 2018, Brent oil prices increased sequentially. However, in the fourth quarter, Brent oil prices declined 39% versus the end of the third quarter, as a result of increased supply from the U.S., worries of a global economic slowdown, and lower than expected production cuts.
In North America, customer spending is highly driven by WTI oil prices, which similar to Brent oil prices, on average increased throughout the year. Average WTI oil prices increased to $65.23/Bbl in 2018 from $50.80/Bbl in 2017, and ranged from a low of $44.48/Bbl in December 2018, to a high of $77.41/Bbl in June 2018.
In North America, natural gas prices, as measured by the Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price, averaged $3.15/mmBtu in 2018, representing a 6% increase over the prior year. Throughout the year, Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Prices ranged from a high of $6.24/mmBtu in January 2018 to a low of $2.49/mmBtu in February 2018. According to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), working natural gas in storage at the end of 2018 was 2,705 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which was 15.6%, or 421 Bcf, below the corresponding week in 2017.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 31



Baker Hughes Rig Count
The Baker Hughes rig counts are an important business barometer for the drilling industry and its suppliers. When drilling rigs are active they consume products and services produced by the oil service industry. Rig count trends are driven by the exploration and development spending by oil and natural gas companies, which in turn is influenced by current and future price expectations for oil and natural gas. The counts may reflect the relative strength and stability of energy prices and overall market activity, however, these counts should not be solely relied on as other specific and pervasive conditions may exist that affect overall energy prices and market activity.
We have been providing rig counts to the public since 1944. We gather all relevant data through our field service personnel, who obtain the necessary data from routine visits to the various rigs, customers, contractors and other outside sources as necessary. We base the classification of a well as either oil or natural gas primarily upon filings made by operators in the relevant jurisdiction. This data is then compiled and distributed to various wire services and trade associations and is published on our website. We believe the counting process and resulting data is reliable, however, it is subject to our ability to obtain accurate and timely information. Rig counts are compiled weekly for the U.S. and Canada and monthly for all international rigs. Published international rig counts do not include rigs drilling in certain locations, such as Russia, the Caspian region and onshore China because this information is not readily available.
Rigs in the U.S. and Canada are counted as active if, on the day the count is taken, the well being drilled has been started but drilling has not been completed and the well is anticipated to be of sufficient depth to be a potential consumer of our drill bits. In international areas, rigs are counted on a weekly basis and deemed active if drilling activities occurred during the majority of the week. The weekly results are then averaged for the month and published accordingly. The rig count does not include rigs that are in transit from one location to another, rigging up, being used in non-drilling activities including production testing, completion and workover, and are not expected to be significant consumers of drill bits.
The rig counts are summarized in the table below as averages for each of the periods indicated.
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016
North America
1,223

 
1,082

 
642

International
988

 
948

 
956

Worldwide
2,211

 
2,030

 
1,598

2018 Compared to 2017
Overall the rig count was 2,211 in 2018, an increase of 9% as compared to 2017 due primarily to North American activity. The rig count in North America increased 13% in 2018 compared to 2017. Internationally, the rig count increased 4% in 2018 as compared to the same period last year.
Within North America, the increase was primarily driven by the U.S. rig count, which was up 18% on average versus 2017, partially offset with a decrease in the Canadian rig count, which was down 8% on average. Internationally, the improvement in the rig count was driven primarily by increases in the Africa region of 18%, the Asia-Pacific region and Latin America region, were also up by 9% and 3%, respectively, partially offset by the Europe region, which was down 8%.
2017 Compared to 2016
Overall the rig count was 2,030 in 2017, an increase of 27% as compared to 2016 due primarily to North American activity. The rig count in North America increased 69% in 2017 compared to 2016. Internationally, the rig count decreased 1% in 2017 as compared to the same period last year.
Within North America, the increase was primarily driven by the land rig count, which was up 72%, partially offset by a decrease in the offshore rig count of 16%. Internationally, the rig count decrease was driven primarily by decreases in Latin America of 7%, the Europe region and Africa region, which were down by 4% and 2%, respectively, partially offset by the Asia-Pacific region, which was up 8%.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 32



RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
The discussions below relating to significant line items from our consolidated and combined statements of income (loss) are based on available information and represent our analysis of significant changes or events that impact the comparability of reported amounts. Where appropriate, we have identified specific events and changes that affect comparability or trends and, where reasonably practicable, have quantified the impact of such items. In addition, the discussions below for revenue and cost of revenue are on a total basis as the business drivers for product sales and services are similar. All dollar amounts in tabulations in this section are in millions of dollars, unless otherwise stated. Certain columns and rows may not add due to the use of rounded numbers.
The results of operations for the Company include the results of Baker Hughes from July 3, 2017, the date of acquisition, through the year ended December 31, 2018. Our results of operations are evaluated by the Chief Executive Officer on a consolidated basis as well as at the segment level.
The performance of our operating segments is evaluated based on segment operating income (loss), which is defined as income (loss) before income taxes and equity in loss of affiliate and before the following: net interest expense, net other non operating income, corporate expenses, restructuring, impairment and other charges, inventory impairment, merger and related costs, and certain gains and losses not allocated to the operating segments.
In evaluating the segment performance, the Company uses the following:
Volume: Volume is the increase or decrease in products and/or services sold period-over-period excluding the impact of foreign exchange and price. The volume impact on profit is calculated by multiplying the prior period profit rate by the change in revenue volume between the current and prior period. It also includes price, defined as the change in sales price for a comparable product or service period-over-period and is calculated as the period-over-period change in sales prices of comparable products and services.
Foreign Exchange (FX): FX measures the translational foreign exchange impact, or the translation impact of the period-over-period change on sales and costs directly attributable to change in the foreign exchange rate compared to the US dollar. FX impact is calculated by multiplying the functional currency amounts (revenue or profit) with the period-over-period FX rate variance, using the average exchange rate for the respective period.
(Inflation)/Deflation: (Inflation)/deflation is defined as the increase or decrease in direct and indirect costs of the same type for an equal amount of volume. It is calculated as the year-over-year change in cost (i.e. price paid) of direct material, compensation & benefits and overhead costs.
Productivity: Productivity is measured by the remaining variance in profit, after adjusting for the period-over-period impact of volume & price, foreign exchange and (inflation)/deflation as defined above. Improved or lower period-over-period cost productivity is the result of cost efficiencies or inefficiencies, such as cost decreasing or increasing more than volume, or cost increasing or decreasing less than volume, or changes in sales mix among segments. This also includes the period-over-period variance of transactional foreign exchange, aside from those foreign currency devaluations that are reported separately for business evaluation purposes.
Orders and Remaining Performance Obligations
Orders: We recognized orders of $23,904 million, $17,159 million, and $11,066 million in 2018, 2017 and 2016, respectively. In 2018, service orders were up 36% and equipment orders were up 45%, compared to 2017. In 2017, service orders were up 39% and equipment orders were up 88%, compared to 2016. The increase in orders in 2018 and 2017 was driven primarily by the acquisition of Baker Hughes.
Remaining Performance Obligations (RPO): As of December 31, 2018 and 2017, the aggregate amount of the transaction price allocated to the unsatisfied (or partially unsatisfied) performance obligations was $21.0 billion in each year, respectively.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 33



Revenue and Segment Operating Income (Loss) Before Tax
Revenue and segment operating income (loss) for each of our four operating segments is provided below.
 
Year Ended December 31,
$ Change
 
2018
2017
2016
From 2017 to 2018
From 2016 to 2017
Revenue:
 
 
 
 
 
Oilfield Services
$
11,617

$
5,881

$
788

$
5,736

$
5,093

Oilfield Equipment
2,641

2,661

3,540

(20
)
(879
)
Turbomachinery & Process Solutions
6,015

6,295

6,668

(280
)
(373
)
Digital Solutions
2,604

2,342

2,086

262

256

Total
$
22,877

$
17,179

$
13,082

$
5,698

$
4,097

 
Year Ended December 31,
$ Change
 
2018
2017
2016
From 2017 to 2018
From 2016 to 2017
Segment operating income (loss):
 
 
 
 
 
Oilfield Services
$
785

$
67

$
(207
)
$
718

$
274

Oilfield Equipment

26

305

(26
)
(279
)
Turbomachinery & Process Solutions
621

665

1,058

(44
)
(393
)
Digital Solutions
390

357

363

33

(6
)
Total segment operating income
1,796

1,115

1,519

681

(404
)
Corporate
(405
)
(370
)
(375
)
(35
)
5

Inventory impairment and related charges (1)
(105
)
(244
)
(138
)
139

(106
)
Restructuring, impairment and other
(433
)
(412
)
(516
)
(21
)
104

Merger and related costs
(153
)
(373
)
(33
)
220

(340
)
Operating income (loss)
701

(284
)
457

985

(741
)
Other non operating income, net
202

80

3

122

77

Interest expense, net
(223
)
(131
)
(102
)
(92
)
(29
)
Income (loss) before income taxes and equity in loss of affiliate
680

(335
)
358

1,015

(693
)
Equity in loss of affiliate
(139
)
(11
)

(128
)
(11
)
Provision for income taxes
(258
)
(45
)
(173
)
(213
)
128

Net income (loss)
$
283

$
(391
)
$
185

$
674

$
(576
)
(1) 
Inventory impairments and related charges are reported in the "Cost of goods sold" caption of the consolidated and combined statements of income (loss). 2017 includes $87 million of adjustments to write-up the acquired inventory to its estimated fair value on acquisition of Baker Hughes as this inventory was used or sold in the six months ended December 31, 2017.
Fiscal Year 2018 to Fiscal Year 2017
Revenue in 2018 was $22,877 million, an increase of $5,698 million, or 33%, from 2017. This increase in revenue was largely a result of the incremental Baker Hughes revenue in 2018. OFS increased $5,736 million, DS increased $262 million, OFE decreased $20 million, and TPS decreased $280 million.
Total segment operating income in 2018 was $1,796 million, an increase of $681 million, or 61%, from 2017. The increase was primarily driven by OFS, which increased $718 million, and DS, which increased $33 million, partially offset by TPS, which decreased $44 million, and OFE, which decreased $26 million.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 34



Oilfield Services
OFS 2018 revenue was $11,617 million, an increase of $5,736 million from 2017, primarily as a result of having the full year of Baker Hughes revenue in 2018. In addition to the incremental revenue from Baker Hughes, the improvement in revenue was also due to increased activity in the North American and international markets compared to the prior year as evidenced by the 9% increase in the worldwide rig counts.
OFS 2018 segment operating income was $785 million, compared to $67 million in 2017. The additional contribution resulting from the acquisition of Baker Hughes, and to a lesser extent higher activity and synergy benefits, drove the increase in operating income.
Oilfield Equipment
OFE 2018 revenue was $2,641 million, a decrease of $20 million, or 1%, from 2017. The decrease was driven primarily by lower volume in the flexible pipe business. Additionally, the decrease was driven by lower opening RPO in the subsea production systems business, partially offset with higher volume in the surface pressure control and services businesses.
OFE 2018 segment operating income was breakeven, compared to $26 million in 2017. This decline in profitability was primarily driven by a negative mix of long-term projects, and to a lesser extent foreign exchange headwinds. Deflation savings and positive cost productivity only partially offset the decrease.
Turbomachinery & Process Solutions
TPS 2018 revenue was $6,015 million, a decrease of $280 million, or 4%, from 2017. The decrease was primarily driven by lower volume in the businesses that serve the upstream segments, and to a lesser extent by lower volume in the businesses that serve the downstream segments. Equipment revenue in 2018 represented 40% and Service revenue represented 60% of total revenue.
TPS 2018 segment operating income was $621 million, compared to $665 million in 2017. The decline in profitability was driven primarily by lower volume, and to a lesser extent by negative cost productivity. The decrease was partially offset by a favorable business mix and cost reduction actions implemented by the Company.
Digital Solutions
DS 2018 revenue was $2,604 million, an increase of $262 million, or 11%, from 2017, primarily as a result of the incremental Baker Hughes revenue in 2018. Outside of this contribution, a decrease in the controls business due to softness in the power end-market was more than offset by revenue increases across all other product lines.
DS 2018 segment operating income was $390 million, compared to $357 million in 2017. The increase in profitability was driven by positive cost productivity, including synergy benefits.
Corporate
In 2018, corporate expenses were $405 million, an increase of $35 million compared to 2017, primarily from the additional expenses related to the acquisition of Baker Hughes partially offset by realized synergies.
Restructuring, Impairment and Other
In 2018, we recognized $433 million in restructuring, impairment and other charges, an increase of $21 million compared to 2017. This increase was primarily due to costs driven by the implementation of our synergy plans.
Merger and Related Costs
We recorded $153 million of merger and related costs in 2018, a decrease of $220 million from the prior year. This decrease was primarily due to a decline in costs as we finalize our merger related activities partially offset by costs incurred in relation to the anticipated separation from GE.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 35



Interest Expense, Net
In 2018, we incurred net interest expense of $223 million, an increase of $92 million from the prior year, primarily driven by $3.95 billion of debt issued in the fourth quarter of 2017 and debt obtained in the Baker Hughes acquisition, partially offset by reduced interest expense associated with the retirement of debt of $615 million in January of 2018. In addition, interest expense declined as we ceased participation in the GE receivables monetization program.

Equity in Loss of Affiliate

In 2018, we recorded a loss of $139 million related to our equity method investment in BJ Services. As a result, we discontinued applying the equity method. We will resume application of the equity method only after our share of unrecognized net income equals our share of net loss not recognized during the period the equity method was suspended. There is no cash impact to BHGE.
Income Tax
In 2018, our income tax expense increased by $213 million, from $45 million in 2017 to $258 million in 2018. The increase was primarily due to higher foreign taxes related to increased foreign earnings and geographical mix of earnings.
Fiscal Year 2017 to Fiscal Year 2016
Revenue in 2017 was $17,179 million, an increase of $4,097 million, or 31%, from 2016. This increase was primarily driven by the acquisition of Baker Hughes. OFS increased $5,093 million, DS increased $256 million, OFE decreased $879 million, and TPS decreased $373 million.
Total segment operating income in 2017 was $1,115 million, a decrease of $404 million, or 27%, from 2016. The acquisition of Baker Hughes added $321 million of segment operating income, but was more than offset by the organic impact of lower productivity and pricing pressure. OFS increased $274 million, TPS decreased $393 million, OFE decreased $279 million and DS decreased $6 million.
Oilfield Services
OFS 2017 revenue was $5,881 million, an increase of $5,093 million from 2016, primarily as a result of the acquisition of Baker Hughes on July 3, 2017.
OFS 2017 segment operating income was $67 million, compared to a loss of $207 million in 2016. The acquisition of Baker Hughes added $327 million of segment operating income, which includes increased depreciation & amortization expense driven by purchase accounting, partially offset by pricing pressure.
Oilfield Equipment
OFE 2017 revenue was $2,661 million, a decrease of $879 million, or 25%, from 2016. The revenue decline was primarily due to continued volume pressures and to a lesser extent to negative pricing, driven by the delays in final investment decisions by our customers in prior years.
OFE 2017 segment operating income was $26 million, compared to $305 million in 2016. This decline in profitability was the result of negative productivity and volume, while strong deflation savings more than offset pricing pressures.
Turbomachinery & Process Solutions
TPS 2017 revenue was $6,295 million, a decrease of $373 million, or 6%, from 2016. The decline was primarily attributable to negative pricing and to a lesser extent to volume decreases, driven by lower equipment contracts being awarded in prior years and continued softness in the services market.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 36



TPS 2017 segment operating income was $665 million, compared to $1,058 million in 2016. This decline in profitability was primarily due to unfavorable cost productivity. Other factors were lower margin equipment backlog throughput and the impact of negative pricing.
Digital Solutions
DS 2017 revenue was $2,342 million, an increase of $256 million, or 12%, from 2016, driven by the acquisition of Baker Hughes which added $211 million of revenue versus the prior year.
DS 2017 segment operating income was $357 million, compared to $363 million in 2016. This decline in profitability was primarily driven by the Baker Hughes acquisition contributing a $5 million segment operating loss.
Corporate
In 2017, corporate expenses were $370 million, a decrease of $5 million compared to 2016. This was primarily due to selective decreases in R&D program investments and cost productivity.
Restructuring, Impairment and Other
In 2017, we recognized $412 million in restructuring, impairment and other charges, a decrease of $104 million compared to 2016. This decrease was driven by the absence of any significant currency devaluations in Angola and Nigeria that were experienced in 2016.
Merger and Related Costs
We recorded $373 million of merger and related costs in 2017, an increase of $340 million from the prior year, primarily related to the acquisition of Baker Hughes.
Interest Expense, Net
In 2017, we incurred net interest expense of $131 million, an increase of $29 million from the prior year, primarily driven by the debt acquired on the acquisition of Baker Hughes.
Income Tax
In 2017, our income tax expense decreased by $128 million, from $173 million in 2016 to $45 million in 2017. This decrease was primarily due to a benefit of $132 million related to recent U.S. tax reform and a decline in profit.
COMPLIANCE
We, in the conduct of all of our activities, are committed to maintaining the core values of our Company, as well as high safety, ethical and quality standards (Standards) as also reported in our Quality Management System (QMS). We believe such a commitment is integral to running a sound, successful, and sustainable business. To ensure that we live up to our high Standards, we devote significant resources to maintain a comprehensive global ethics and compliance program (Compliance Program) which is designed to prevent, detect, and appropriately respond in a timely fashion to any potential violations of law, our Code of Conduct (The Spirit & The Letter), and other Company policies and procedures.
Highlights of our Compliance Program include the following:
Comprehensive internal policies over such areas as anti-bribery; travel, entertainment, gifts and charitable donations connected to government officials; payments to commercial sales representatives; and, the use of non-U.S. police or military organizations for security purposes.  In addition, there are country-specific guidance for customs standards, visa processing, export and re-export controls, economic sanctions and antiboycott laws.
Global structure of Legal Compliance Counsel and Professionals providing compliance advice, customized training, investigations, and governance, across all regions and countries where we do business.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 37



Comprehensive employee compliance training program that combines instructor-led and web-based training modules tailored to the key risks that employees face on an ongoing basis.
Due diligence procedures for commercial sales agents, administrative service providers, and professional consultants, and an enhanced risk-based process for classifying channel partners and suppliers.
Due diligence procedures for merger and acquisition activities.
Specifically tailored compliance risk assessments focused on country and third party risk.
Compliance Review Board comprised of senior officers of the Company that meets quarterly to monitor effectiveness of the Compliance Program, as well as Product Company and regional compliance committees that meet quarterly.
Technology to monitor and report on compliance matters, including an internal investigations management system, a web-based antiboycott reporting tool and global trade management systems.
A compliance program designed to create an “Open Reporting Environment” where employees are encouraged to report any ethics or compliance matter without fear of retaliation, including a global network of trained employee ombudspersons, and a worldwide, 24-hour business helpline operated by a third party and available in 150 languages.
Centralized finance organization with company-wide policies. 
Anti-corruption audits of high-risk countries conducted by Legal Compliance and Internal Audit, as well as risk based compliance audits of third parties conducted by Legal Compliance.
A centralized human resources function, including locally compliant processes and procedures for management of HR related issues, including implementation of locally compliant standards for pre-hire screening of employees; a process to screen existing employees prior to promotion to select roles where they may be exposed to finance and/or corruption-related risks; and implementation of a global new hire compliance training module for all employees.
LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES
Our objective in financing our business is to maintain sufficient liquidity, adequate financial resources and financial flexibility in order to fund the requirements of our business. At December 31, 2018, we had cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash of $3,723 million compared to $7,030 million at December 31, 2017. Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash includes $747 million and $997 million of cash held on behalf of GE at December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

Excluding cash held on behalf of GE, our US subsidiaries held approximately $0.7 billion and $3.6 billion while our foreign subsidiaries held approximately $2.3 billion and $2.4 billion of our cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash as at December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. A substantial portion of the cash held by foreign subsidiaries at December 31, 2018 has been reinvested in active non-U.S. business operations. If we decide at a later date to repatriate those funds to the U.S., we may be required to provide taxes on certain of those funds, however, due to the enactment of U.S. tax reform, repatriations of foreign earnings will generally be free of U.S. federal tax but may incur other taxes such as withholding or state taxes.
We have a five-year $3 billion committed unsecured revolving credit facility (the 2017 Credit Agreement) with commercial banks maturing in July 2022. The 2017 Credit Agreement contains certain customary representations and warranties, certain affirmative covenants and no negative covenants. Upon the occurrence of certain events of default, our obligations under the 2017 Credit Agreement may be accelerated. Such events of default include payment defaults to lenders under the 2017 Credit Agreement, and other customary defaults. We were in compliance with all of the credit facility's covenants, and in 2018 there were no borrowings under the credit facility.
We have a commercial paper program under which we may issue from time to time up to $3 billion in commercial paper with maturities of no more than 397 days. At December 31, 2018, we had no borrowings


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 38



outstanding under the commercial paper program. The maximum combined borrowing at any time under both the 2017 Credit Agreement and the commercial paper program is $3 billion
If market conditions were to change and our revenue was reduced significantly or operating costs were to increase, our cash flows and liquidity could be reduced. Additionally, it could cause the rating agencies to lower our credit rating. There are no ratings triggers that would accelerate the maturity of any borrowings under our committed credit facility. However, a downgrade in our credit ratings could increase the cost of borrowings under the credit facility and could also limit or preclude our ability to issue commercial paper. Should this occur, we could seek alternative sources of funding, including borrowing under the credit facility.
During the year ended December 31, 2018, we used cash to fund a variety of activities including certain working capital needs and restructuring costs, capital expenditures, the repayment of debt, payment of dividends, distributions to GE and share repurchases. We believe that cash on hand, cash flows generated from operations and the available credit facility will provide sufficient liquidity to manage our global cash needs.
Cash Flows
Cash flows provided by (used in) each type of activity were as follows for the years ended December 31:
(In millions)
2018
2017
2016
Operating activities
$
1,762

$
(799
)
$
262

Investing activities
(578
)
(4,123
)
(472
)
Financing activities
(4,363
)
10,919

(102
)
Operating Activities

Our largest source of operating cash is payments from customers, of which the largest component is collecting cash related to product or services sales including advance payments or progress collections for work to be performed. The primary use of operating cash is to pay our suppliers, employees, tax authorities and others for a wide range of material and services.
Cash flows from operating activities generated cash of $1,762 million and used cash of $799 million for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Cash flows from operating activities increased $2,561 million in 2018 primarily driven by better operating performance. These cash inflows were supported by strong working capital cash flows, especially in the fourth quarter of 2018, including approximately $300 million for a progress collection payment from a customer. Included in our cash flows from operating activities for 2018 and 2017 are payments of $473 million and $612 million, respectively, made primarily for employee severance as a result of our restructuring activities and merger and related costs.
Cash flows from operating activities used $799 million and generated $262 million for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively. Cash flows from operating activities decreased $1,061 million in 2017 primarily driven by a $1,201 million negative impact from ending our receivables monetization program in the fourth quarter, and restructuring related payments throughout the year. These cash outflows were partially offset by strong working capital cash flows, especially in the fourth quarter of 2017. Included in our cash flows from operating activities for 2017 and 2016 are payments of $612 million and $177 million, respectively, made for employee severance as a result of our restructuring activities and merger and related costs.
Investing Activities
Cash flows from investing activities used cash of $578 million, $4,123 million and $472 million for the years ended December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016, respectively.
Our principal recurring investing activity is the funding of capital expenditures to ensure that we have the appropriate levels and types of machinery and equipment in place to generate revenue from operations. Expenditures for capital assets totaled $995 million, $665 million and $424 million for 2018, 2017 and 2016, respectively, partially offset by cash flows from the sale of property, plant and equipment of $458 million, $172 million and $20 million in 2018, 2017 and 2016, respectively. Proceeds from the disposal of assets related primarily


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 39



to equipment that was lost-in-hole, and to property, machinery and equipment no longer used in operations that was sold throughout the period. In 2018, the Company received $453 million from the sale of businesses primarily driven by the sale of its Natural Gas Solution (NGS) business for $375 million. Also in 2018, the Company and ADNOC signed a strategic partnership agreement under which the Company acquired a five percent stake in ADNOC Drilling for a cash consideration of $500 million.
In 2017, cash flows from investing activities also includes $7,498 million related to the special dividend paid to former Baker Hughes stockholders on the acquisition of Baker Hughes, net of $4,133 million of cash received from the acquisition.
Financing Activities
Cash flows from financing activities used cash of $4,363 million, generated cash of $10,919 million and used cash of $102 million for the years ended December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016, respectively.
During 2018, we returned $3.3 billion of cash to our shareholders through share buybacks, dividends to our Class A stockholders and distributions to GE. Specifically, as part of our $3 billion share buyback authorization, we used cash of $387 million and $638 million, respectively, to repurchase and cancel our shares of Class A and Class B common stock and corresponding paired Units in BHGE LLC, on a pro rata basis. Additionally, in November 2018, BHGE LLC repurchased 65 million Units from GE for a cash consideration of $1,461 million. As of December 31, 2018, the stock repurchase program has been substantially completed. Also, during 2018, we paid aggregate dividends of $315 million to our Class A stockholders, and BHGE LLC made a distribution of $495 million to GE.
We had net repayments of short-term debt of $376 million and $663 million in 2018 and 2017, respectively. Repayment of our long-term debt in 2018 consisted primarily of repayment of certain Senior Notes and capital leases for a total consideration of $684 million.
In 2017, our primary source of financing cash flows was a contribution of $7,400 million from GE to fund substantially all of the special dividend paid to former Baker Hughes stockholders. We also generated financing cash flows of $3,950 million from debt issued through a private placement offering in December 2017. We incurred issuance costs of $26 million related to this debt issuance.
In December 2017, we purchased $176 million of the aggregate outstanding principal amount associated with our long-term outstanding notes and debentures. Pursuant to a cash tender offer, the purchases resulted in the payment of an early-tender premium, including various fees of $28 million.
Additionally, in 2017, we paid total dividends of $155 million to our Class A stockholders, and BHGE LLC made a distribution of $251 million to GE. As part of our $3 billion share buyback authorization, we used cash of $174 million and $303 million, respectively, to repurchase and cancel our Class A and Class B common shares and corresponding paired Units in BHGE LLC, on a pro rata basis.
Cash flows from financing activities in 2017 also included net transfers from GE of $1,498 million primarily driven by the cash pooling activity with GE prior to the Transactions. Other financing items during the year included a payment of $193 million to complete the purchase of the noncontrolling interest in the Pipeline Inspection and Integrity business within Digital Solutions.
Cash Requirements
In 2019, we believe cash on hand, cash flows from operating activities, the available revolving credit facility and availability under our existing shelf registrations of debt will provide us with sufficient capital resources and liquidity to manage our working capital needs, meet contractual obligations, fund capital expenditures and dividends, and support the development of our short-term and long-term operating strategies. If necessary, we may issue commercial paper or other short-term debt to fund cash needs in the U.S. in excess of the cash generated in the U.S.
Our capital expenditures can be adjusted and managed by us to match market demand and activity levels. In light of the current market conditions, capital expenditures in 2019 will be made as appropriate at a rate that we


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 40



estimate would equal up to 5% of annual revenue. The expenditures are expected to be used primarily for normal, recurring items necessary to support our business. We also anticipate making income tax payments in the range of $425 million to $475 million in 2019.
Contractual Obligations
In the table below, we set forth our contractual obligations as of December 31, 2018. Certain amounts included in this table are based on our estimates and assumptions about these obligations, including their duration, anticipated actions by third parties and other factors. The contractual obligations we will actually pay in future periods may vary from those reflected in the table because the estimates and assumptions are subjective.
 
Payments Due by Period
(In millions)
Total
 
Less Than
1 Year
 
1 - 3
Years
 
4 - 5
Years
 
More Than
5 Years
Total debt and capital lease obligations (1)
$
6,989

 
$
942

 
$
562

 
$
1,272

 
$
4,213

Estimated interest payments (2)
3,716

 
239

 
473

 
404

 
2,600

Operating leases (3)
846

 
186

 
262

 
132

 
266

Purchase obligations (4)
1,507

 
1,388

 
86

 
25

 
8

Total
$
13,058

 
$
2,755

 
$
1,383

 
$
1,833

 
$
7,087

(1) 
Amounts represent the expected cash payments for the principal amounts related to our debt, including capital lease obligations. Amounts for debt do not include any deferred issuance costs or unamortized discounts or premiums including step up in the value of the debt on the acquisition of Baker Hughes. Expected cash payments for interest are excluded from these amounts. Total debt and capital lease obligations includes $896 million payable to GE and its affiliates. As there is no fixed payment schedule on the amount payable to GE and its affiliates we have classified it as payable in less than one year.
(2) 
Amounts represent the expected cash payments for interest on our long-term debt and capital lease obligations.
(3) 
Amounts represent the future minimum payments under noncancelable operating leases with initial or remaining terms of one year or more. We enter into operating leases, some of which include renewal options, however, we have excluded renewal options from the table above unless it is anticipated that we will exercise such renewals.
(4) 
Purchase obligations include expenditures for capital assets for 2019 as well as agreements to purchase goods or services that are enforceable and legally binding and that specify all significant terms, including: fixed or minimum quantities to be purchased; fixed, minimum or variable price provisions; and the approximate timing of the transaction.

Due to the uncertainty with respect to the timing of potential future cash outflows associated with our uncertain tax positions, we are unable to make reasonable estimates of the period of cash settlement, if any, to the respective taxing authorities. Therefore, $597 million in uncertain tax positions, including interest and penalties, have been excluded from the contractual obligations table above. See "Note 12. Income Taxes" of the Notes to Consolidated and Combined Financial Statements in Item 8 herein for further information.
We have certain defined benefit pension and other post-retirement benefit plans covering certain of our U.S. and international employees. During 2018, we made contributions and paid direct benefits of approximately $72 million in connection with those plans, and we anticipate funding approximately $41 million during 2019. Amounts for pension funding obligations are based on assumptions that are subject to change, therefore, we are currently not able to reasonably estimate our contribution figures after 2019. See "Note 11. Employee Benefit Plans" of the Notes to Consolidated and Combined Financial Statements in Item 8 herein for further information.
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
In the normal course of business with customers, vendors and others, we have entered into off-balance sheet arrangements, such as surety bonds for performance, letters of credit and other bank issued guarantees, which totaled approximately $3.6 billion at December 31, 2018. It is not practicable to estimate the fair value of these financial instruments. None of the off-balance sheet arrangements either has, or is likely to have, a material effect on our consolidated and combined financial statements.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 41



As of December 31, 2018, we had no material off-balance sheet financing arrangements other than normal operating leases, as discussed above. As such, we are not materially exposed to any financing, liquidity, market or credit risk that could arise if we had engaged in such financing arrangements.
Other factors affecting liquidity
Registration Statements: In November 2018, BHGE filed a universal shelf registration statement on Form S-3ASR (Automatic Shelf Registration) with the SEC to have the ability to sell various types of securities including debt securities, Class A common stock, preferred stock, guarantees of debt securities, purchase contracts and units.  The specific terms of any securities to be sold would be described in supplemental filings with the SEC. The registration statement will expire in 2021.
In December 2017, BHGE LLC and Baker Hughes Co-Obligor, Inc. filed a shelf registration statement on Form S-3 with the SEC to have the ability to sell up to $3 billion in debt securities in amounts to be determined at the time of an offering. Any such offering, if it does occur, may happen in one or more transactions. The specific terms of any debt securities to be sold would be described in supplemental filings with the SEC. The registration statement will expire in 2020.
Customer receivables: In line with industry practice, we may bill our customers for services provided in arrears dependent upon contractual terms. In a challenging economic environment, we may experience delays in the payment of our invoices due to customers' lower cash flow from operations or their more limited access to credit markets. While historically there have not been material non-payment events, we attempt to mitigate this risk through working with our customers to restructure their debts. A customer's failure or delay in payment could have a material adverse effect on our short-term liquidity and results from operations. As of December 31, 2018, 24% of our gross trade receivables were from customers in the United States. Other than the United States, no other country or single customer accounted for more than 10% of our gross trade receivables at this date. As of December 31, 2017, 20% of our gross trade receivables were from customers in the United States.
International operations: Our cash that is held outside the U.S., is 81% of the total cash balance as of December 31, 2018. We may not be able to use this cash quickly and efficiently due to exchange or cash controls that could make it challenging. As a result, our cash balance may not represent our ability to quickly and efficiently use this cash.
CRITICAL ACCOUNTING ESTIMATES
Accounting estimates and assumptions discussed in this section are those considered to be the most critical to an understanding of our financial statements because they involve significant judgments and uncertainties. Many of these estimates include determining fair value. These estimates reflect our best judgment about current, and for some estimates future, economic and market conditions and their potential effects based on information available as of the date of these financial statements. If these conditions change from those expected, it is reasonably possible that the judgments and estimates described below could change, which may result in future impairments of goodwill, intangibles and longlived assets, increases in reserves for contingencies, establishment of valuation allowances on deferred tax assets and increased tax liabilities, among other effects. Also, see "Note 1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies" of the Notes to Consolidated and Combined Financial Statements in Item 8 herein, which discusses our most significant accounting policies.
We have defined a critical accounting estimate as one that is both important to the portrayal of either our financial condition or results of operations and requires us to make difficult, subjective or complex judgments or estimates about matters that are uncertain. The Audit Committee of our Board of Directors has reviewed our critical accounting estimates and the disclosure presented below. During the past three fiscal years, we have not made any material changes in the methodology used to establish the critical accounting estimates, and we believe that the following are the critical accounting estimates used in the preparation of our consolidated and combined financial statements. There are other items within our consolidated and combined financial statements that require estimation and judgment but they are not deemed critical as defined above.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 42



Revenue Recognition on Long-Term Product Services Agreements

We have long-term service agreements with our customers predominately within our TPS segment. These agreements typically require us to maintain assets sold to the customer over a defined contract term. These agreements have average contract terms of 15 years. From time to time, these contract terms may be extended through contract modifications or amendments, which may result in revisions to future billing and cost estimates.

Revenue recognition on long-term product services agreements requires estimates of both customer payments and the costs to perform required maintenance services over the contract term. We recognize revenue on an overtime basis using input method to measure our progress toward completion at the estimated margin rate of the contract.

To develop our billings estimates, we consider the number of billable events that will occur based on estimated utilization of the asset under contract, over the life of the contract term. This estimated utilization will consider both historical and market conditions, asset retirements and new product introductions, if applicable.

To develop our cost estimates, we consider the timing and extent of maintenance and overhaul events, including the amount and cost of labor, spare parts and other resources required to perform the services. In developing our cost estimates, we utilize a combination of our historical cost experience and expected cost improvements. Cost improvements are only included in future cost estimates after savings have been observed in actual results or proven effective through an extensive regulatory or engineering approval process.

We routinely review the estimates used in our product services agreements and regularly revise them to adjust for changes. These revisions are based on objectively verifiable information that is available at the time of the review.

The difference between the timing of our revenue recognition and cash received from our customers results in either a contract asset (revenue in excess of billings) or a contract liability (billings in excess of revenue). See "Note 8. Contract and other deferred assets" and "Note 9. Progress collections and deferred income" of the Notes to Consolidated and Combined Financial Statements in Item 8 herein for further information.

We regularly assess customer credit risk inherent in the carrying amounts of receivables and contract assets and estimated earnings, including the risk that contractual penalties may not be sufficient to offset our accumulated investment in the event of customer termination. We gain insight into expected future utilization and cost trends, as well as credit risk, through our knowledge of the equipment installed and the close interaction with our customers through supplying critical services and parts over extended periods. Revisions to cost or billing estimates may affect a product services agreement’s total estimated profitability resulting in an adjustment of earnings; such adjustments generated earnings of $26 million, $44 million and $113 million for the three years ended December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016, respectively. We provide for probable losses when they become evident.

On December 31, 2018, our long-term product service agreements, net of related billings in excess of revenues, of $0.4 billion, represent approximately 4.3% of our total estimated life of contract billings of $10.3 billion.  Cash billings collected on these contracts were approximately $0.6 billion and $0.5 billion during the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.  Our contracts (on average) are approximately 16% complete based on costs incurred to date and our estimate of future costs. Revisions to our estimates of future revenue or costs that increase or decrease total estimated contract profitability by 1% would increase or decrease the long-term product service agreements balance by $0.04 billion.
Goodwill and Other Identified Intangible Assets
We test goodwill for impairment annually using data as of July 1 of that year. The impairment test consists of two different steps: in step one, the carrying value of the reporting unit is compared with its fair value, in step two, which is applied only when the carrying value is more than its fair value, the amount of goodwill impairment, if any, is derived by deducting the fair value of the reporting unit’s assets and liabilities from the fair value of its equity and comparing that amount with the carrying amount of goodwill. We determine fair values of each of the reporting units using the market approach, when available and appropriate, or the income approach, or a combination of both. We


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 43



assess the valuation methodology based upon the relevance and availability of the data at the time the valuation is performed.
Pension Assumptions
Pension benefits are calculated using significant inputs to the actuarial models that measure pension benefit obligations and related effects on operations. Two assumptions, discount rate and expected return on assets, are important elements of plan expense and asset/liability measurement. We evaluate these critical assumptions at least annually on a plan and country specific basis. We periodically evaluate other assumptions involving demographic factors such as retirement age, mortality and turnover, and update them to reflect its experience and expectations for the future. Actual results in any given year will often differ from actuarial assumptions because of economic and other factors.
Projected benefit obligations are measured as the present value of expected payments discounted using the weighted average of market observed yields for high quality fixed income securities with maturities that correspond to the payment of benefits, lower discount rates increase present values and subsequent year pension expense and higher discount rates decrease present values and subsequent year pension expense. The discount rates used to determine the benefit obligations for our principal pension plans at December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016 were 3.43%, 2.99% and 3.41%, respectively, reflecting market interest rates. Our expected return on assets at December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016 was 5.94%, 6.26% and 6.86%, respectively.
Income Taxes
We operate in more than 120 countries and our effective tax rate is based on our income, statutory tax rates and differences between tax laws and the GAAP in these various jurisdictions. Tax laws are complex and subject to different interpretations by the taxpayer and respective governmental taxing authorities. Our income tax rate is significantly affected by the tax rate on our global operations. In addition to local country tax laws and regulations, this rate depends on the extent earnings are indefinitely reinvested outside the U.S. Historically, U.S. taxes were due upon repatriation of foreign earnings. Due to the enactment of U.S. tax reform, repatriations of foreign earnings will generally be free of U.S. federal tax but may incur other taxes such as withholding or state taxes. Indefinite reinvestment is determined by management’s judgment about and intentions concerning the future operations of the Company. Most of these earnings have been reinvested in active non-U.S. business operations. However, as a result of U.S. tax reform, substantially all of our prior unrepatriated foreign earnings were subject to U.S. tax and accordingly we expect to have the ability to repatriate those earnings without incremental U.S. federal tax. As a result of U.S. tax reform, we changed our intent regarding certain cash repatriations and have accrued an additional $9 million of foreign withholding taxes. As of December 31, 2018, the cumulative amount of indefinitely reinvested foreign earnings is approximately $6.3 billion. Computation of the potential deferred tax liability associated with these undistributed earnings and any other basis differences is not practicable.
Deferred income tax assets represent amounts available to reduce income taxes payable in future years. We evaluate the recoverability of these future tax deductions and credits by assessing the adequacy of future taxable income from all sources, including reversal of taxable temporary differences, forecasted operating earnings and available tax planning strategies. These sources of income rely heavily on estimates. We use our historical experience and short and long range business forecasts to provide insight. We record a valuation allowance when it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.
On December 22, 2017, the U.S. enacted the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (U.S. tax reform) that lowers the statutory tax rate on U.S. earnings, taxes historic foreign earnings previously deferred from U.S. taxation at a reduced rate of tax (transition tax), establishes a territorial tax system and enacts new taxes associated with global operations.
The impact of U.S. tax reform was initially recorded on a provisional basis as the legislation provided for additional guidance to be issued by the U.S. Department of the Treasury on several provisions, including the computation of the transition tax. Based on guidance received to date, finalization of purchase accounting for the Baker Hughes acquisition and finalization of our 2017 U.S. income tax returns, we have recorded a $107 million tax benefit in 2018 for the impact of tax reform primarily related to the revaluation of deferred taxes.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 44



Additionally, as part of U.S. tax reform, the U.S. has enacted a tax on "base eroding" payments from the U.S. and a minimum tax on foreign earnings (global intangible low-taxed income). We have made an accounting policy election to account for these taxes as period costs.
Our tax filings routinely are subject to audit by the tax authorities in the jurisdictions where we conduct business. These audits may result in assessments of additional taxes that are resolved with the tax authorities or through the courts. We have provided for the amounts we believe will ultimately result from these proceedings, but settlements of issues raised in these audits may affect our tax rate. We have $472 million of gross unrecognized tax benefits, excluding interest and penalties, at December 31, 2018. We are not able to reasonably estimate in which future periods these amounts ultimately will be settled.
Other Loss Contingencies
Other loss contingencies are uncertain and unresolved matters that arise in the ordinary course of business and result from events or actions by others that have the potential to result in a future loss. Such contingencies include, but are not limited to, environmental obligations, litigation, regulatory proceedings, product quality and losses resulting from other events and developments.
The preparation of our consolidated and combined financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenue and expenses and related disclosures as well as disclosures about any contingent assets and liabilities. We base these estimates and judgments on historical experience and other assumptions and information that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. Estimates and assumptions about future events and their effects are subject to uncertainty and, accordingly, these estimates may change as new events occur, as more experience is acquired, as additional information is obtained and as the business environment in which we operate changes.
Allowance for Doubtful Accounts
The determination of the collectability of amounts due from our customers requires us to make judgments and estimates regarding our customers' ability to pay amounts due us in order to determine the amount of valuation allowances required for doubtful accounts. We monitor our customers' payment history and current credit worthiness to determine that collectability is reasonably assured. We also consider the overall business climate in which our customers operate. Provisions for doubtful accounts are recorded based on the aging status of the customer accounts or when it becomes evident that the customer will not make the required payments at either contractual due dates or in the future. At December 31, 2018 and 2017, the allowance for doubtful accounts totaled $327 million and $330 million of total gross accounts receivable, respectively. We believe that our allowance for doubtful accounts is adequate to cover potential bad debt losses under current conditions, however, uncertainties regarding changes in the financial condition of our customers, either adverse or positive, could impact the amount and timing of any additional provisions for doubtful accounts that may be required.
Inventory Reserves
Inventory is a significant component of current assets and is stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. This requires us to record provisions and maintain reserves for excess, slow moving and obsolete inventory. To determine these reserve amounts, we regularly review inventory quantities on hand and compare them to estimates of future product demand, market conditions, production requirements and technological developments. These estimates and forecasts inherently include uncertainties and require us to make judgments regarding potential future outcomes. At December 31, 2018 and 2017, inventory reserves totaled $430 million and $360 million of gross inventory, respectively. We believe that our reserves are adequate to properly value potential excess, slow moving and obsolete inventory under current conditions. Significant or unanticipated changes to our estimates and forecasts could impact the amount and timing of any additional provisions for excess, slow moving or obsolete inventory that may be required.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 45



Acquisitions-Purchase Price Allocation
We allocate the purchase price of an acquired business to its identifiable assets and liabilities based on estimated fair values. The excess of the purchase price over the amount allocated to the assets and liabilities, if any, is recorded as goodwill. We use all available information to estimate fair values, including quoted market prices, the carrying value of acquired assets and widely accepted valuation techniques such as discounted cash flows. We engage third-party appraisal firms to assist in fair value determination of inventories, identifiable intangible assets and any other significant assets or liabilities when appropriate. The judgments made in determining the estimated fair value assigned to each class of assets acquired and liabilities assumed, as well as asset lives, can materially impact our results of operations.
NEW ACCOUNTING STANDARDS TO BE ADOPTED
See "Note 1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies" of the Notes to Consolidated and Combined Financial Statements in Item 8 herein for further discussion of accounting standards to be adopted.
RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS
See "Note 18. Related Party Transactions" of the Notes to Consolidated and Combined Financial Statements in Item 8 herein for further discussion of related party transactions.
OTHER ITEMS
Brexit
In June 2016, UK voters approved the UK’s exit (Brexit) from the EU. The UK is currently negotiating the terms of its exit from the EU scheduled for March 29, 2019. There remains significant uncertainty as to whether the withdrawal agreement between the UK government and the EU will be approved, when, if and on what terms Brexit will happen. There is a range of outcomes possible, from no Brexit to an abrupt cut-off of the UK’s future trading relationship with the EU. The above withdrawal agreement contemplates a transition period from March 2019 through December 2020 to allow time for a future trade deal to be agreed.
Although our customer base is global with predominant exposure to the U.S. dollar, we have a manufacturing and service base in the UK with some euro procurement, thus we are exposed to fluctuations in value of the British pound versus the U.S. dollar, euro and other currencies. We have a hedging program which looks to accommodate this potential volatility.
Iran Threat Reduction And Syria Human Rights Act Of 2012
The Company is making the following disclosure pursuant to Section 13(r) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Under Section 13(r) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, enacted in 2012, we are required to disclose in our periodic reports if we or any of our affiliates knowingly engaged in business activities relating to Iran, even if those activities are conducted in accordance with authorizations subsequently issued by the U.S. Government. Reportable activities include investments that significantly enhance Iran’s ability to develop petroleum resources valued at $20 million or more in the aggregate during a twelve-month period. Reporting is also required for transactions related to Iran’s domestic production of refined petroleum products or Iran’s ability to import refined petroleum products valued at $5 million or more in the aggregate during a twelve-month period.
In January 2016, the U.S. Department of Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) issued General License H authorizing U.S.-owned or controlled foreign entities to engage in transactions with Iran if these entities meet the requirements of the general license. On May 8, 2018, President Trump announced that the United States will cease participation in the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) and begin re-imposing the U.S. nuclear-related sanctions. On June 27, 2018, OFAC revoked General License H and added Section 560.537 to the Iranian Transactions and Sanctions Regulations (ITSR), which authorized all transactions and activities that are ordinarily incident and necessary to the winding down of activities previously approved under General License H through November 4, 2018. Prior to May 8, 2018, certain non-U.S. BHGE affiliates conducted limited activities, as described below, in accordance with General License H. As of November 5, 2018, non-U.S. BHGE affiliates have concluded


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 46



all activity previously conducted under General License H in Iran. These activities were conducted in accordance with all applicable laws and regulations.
During the year ending December 31, 2018, but prior to the expiration of the wind down period for General License H, non-U.S. BHGE affiliates conducted the following reportable activities:
A non-U.S. affiliate of BHGE received five purchase orders and attributed €31.4 million ($36.0 million) in gross revenues and €8.6 million ($9.9 million) in net profits related to the sale of valves and parts for industrial machinery and equipment used in gas plants, petrochemical plants and gas production projects in Iran.
A second non-U.S. affiliate of BHGE received 12 purchase orders and attributed €0.1 million ($0.1 million) in gross revenues and less than €0.1 million ($0.1 million) in net profits to the sale of valves and other spare parts for use in the petrochemical industry in Iran.
A third non-U.S. affiliate of BHGE attributed €0.3 million ($0.3 million) in gross revenues and €0.1 million ($0.1 million) in net profits to transactions involving the sale of films used in the inspection of pipelines in Iran.
These non-U.S. affiliates do not intend to continue the activities described above. The Company has ended all of these activities in full compliance with U.S. sanctions and at this time does not intend to seek specific U.S. Government authorization to collect revenues associated with previously reported projects.
For additional information on business activities related to Iran, please refer to the Other Items section within MD&A in our quarterly report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2018.
FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
This Form 10-K, including MD&A and certain statements in the Notes to Consolidated and Combined Financial Statements, contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, (each a "forward-looking statement"). Forward-looking statements concern future circumstances and results and other statements that are not historical facts and are sometimes identified by the words "may," "will," "should," "potential," "intend," "expect," "endeavor," "seek," "anticipate," "estimate," "overestimate," "underestimate," "believe," "could," "project," "predict," "continue," "target" or other similar words or expressions. Forward-looking statements are based upon current plans, estimates and expectations that are subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions. Should one or more of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or should underlying assumptions prove incorrect, actual results may vary materially from those indicated or anticipated by such forward-looking statements. The inclusion of such statements should not be regarded as a representation that such plans, estimates or expectations will be achieved. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from such plans, estimates or expectations include, among others, the risk factors in the "Risk Factors" section of Part 1 of Item 1A of this Form 10-K and those set forth from time-to-time in other filings by the Company with the SEC. These documents are available through our website or through the SEC's Electronic Data Gathering and Analysis Retrieval (EDGAR) system at http://www.sec.gov.
In light of such risks and uncertainties, we caution you not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of this annual report, or if earlier, as of the date they were made. We do not intend to, and disclaim any obligation to, update or revise any forward-looking statements unless required by securities law.
ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
We are exposed to certain market risks that are inherent in our financial instruments and arise from changes in interest rates and foreign currency exchange rates. We may enter into derivative financial instrument transactions to manage or reduce market risk but do not enter into derivative financial instrument transactions for speculative purposes. A discussion of our primary market risk exposure in financial instruments is presented below.


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 47



INTEREST RATE RISK
All of our long-term debt is comprised of fixed rate instruments. We are subject to interest rate risk on our debt and investment portfolio. We may use interest rate swaps to manage the economic effect of fixed rate obligations associated with certain debt. There were no outstanding interest rate swap agreements as of December 31, 2018. The following table sets forth our fixed rate long-term debt, excluding capital leases, and the related weighted average interest rates by expected maturity dates.
(In millions)
2019
 
2020
 
2021
 
2022
 
2023
 
Thereafter
 
Total (2)
As of December 31, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Long-term debt (1)
$

 
$

 
$
513

 
$
1,250

 
$

 
$
4,188

 
$
5,951

Weighted average interest rates
%
 
%
 
2.49
%
 
2.88
%
 
%
 
3.90
%
 
3.57
%
(1) 
Fair market value of our fixed rate long-term debt, excluding capital leases, was $5.6 billion at December 31, 2018.
(2) 
Amounts represent the principal value of our long-term debt outstanding and related weighted average interest rates at the end of the respective period.
FOREIGN CURRENCY EXCHANGE RISK
We conduct our operations around the world in a number of different currencies, and we are exposed to market risks resulting from fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates. Many of our significant foreign subsidiaries have designated the local currency as their functional currency. As such, future earnings are subject to change due to fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates when transactions are denominated in currencies other than our functional currencies.
Additionally, we buy, manufacture and sell components and products across global markets. These activities expose us to changes in foreign currency exchange rates, commodity prices and interest rates which can adversely affect revenue earned and costs of our operating businesses. When the currency in which equipment is sold differs from the primary currency of the legal entity and the exchange rate fluctuates, it will affect the revenue earned on the sale. These sales and purchase transactions also create receivables and payables denominated in foreign currencies and exposure to foreign currency gains and losses based on changes in exchange rates. Changes in the price of raw materials used in manufacturing can affect the cost of manufacturing. We use derivatives to mitigate or eliminate these exposures, where appropriate.
We use cash flow hedging primarily to reduce or eliminate the effects of foreign currency exchange rate changes on purchase and sale contracts. Accordingly, most derivative activity in this category consists of currency exchange contracts. We had outstanding foreign currency forward contracts with net notional amounts aggregating $2.8 billion and $3.3 billion to hedge exposure to currency fluctuations in various foreign currencies at December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. As of December 31, 2018, the Company estimates that a 1% appreciation or depreciation in the U.S. dollar would result in an impact of less than $5 million to our pre-tax earnings, however, the Company is generally able to mitigate its foreign exchange exposure, where there are liquid financial markets, through use of foreign currency derivative transactions. Also, see "Note 16. Financial Instruments" of the Notes to Consolidated and Combined Financial Statements in Item 8 herein, which has additional details on our strategy.



BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 48



ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
Management's Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over our financial reporting, as such term is defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f). Our internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.
Under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, we assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting based on the 2013 framework in Internal Control - Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on our assessment, our principal executive officer and principal financial officer concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of December 31, 2018. This conclusion is based on the recognition that there are inherent limitations in all systems of internal control. Because of the inherent limitations of internal control over financial reporting, including the possibility of collusion or improper management override of controls, material misstatements due to error or fraud may not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
KPMG LLP, the Company's independent registered public accounting firm, has issued an attestation report on the effectiveness of the Company's internal control over financial reporting.

/s/ LORENZO SIMONELLI
Lorenzo Simonelli
Chairman, President and
Chief Executive Officer
  
/s/ BRIAN WORRELL
Brian Worrell
Chief Financial Officer

  
/s/ KURT CAMILLERI
Kurt Camilleri
Vice President, Controller and Chief Accounting Officer
Houston, Texas
February 19, 2019



BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 49



REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
To the Stockholders and Board of Directors
Baker Hughes, a GE company:
Opinion on the Consolidated and Combined Financial Statements
We have audited the accompanying consolidated and combined statement of financial position of Baker Hughes, a GE company and subsidiaries (the "Company") as of December 31, 2018 and 2017, the related consolidated and combined statements of income (loss), comprehensive income (loss), changes in equity, and cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended December 31, 2018, and the related notes (collectively, the "consolidated and combined financial statements"). In our opinion, the consolidated and combined financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2018 and 2017, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended December 31, 2018, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.
We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) ("PCAOB"), the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2018, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission, and our report dated February 19, 2019 expressed an unqualified opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.
Change in Accounting Principle
As discussed in Note 1 to the consolidated and combined financial statements, the Company has changed its method of accounting for revenue recognition in 2018 due to the adoption of Accounting Standards Codification 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers.
Basis for Opinion
These consolidated and combined financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated and combined financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the PCAOB and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated and combined financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated and combined financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated and combined financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated and combined financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

/s/ KPMG LLP

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2017.

Houston, Texas
February 19, 2019



BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 50



REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

To the Stockholders and Board of Directors
Baker Hughes, a GE Company:

We have audited the accompanying combined statements of income (loss), comprehensive income (loss), changes in equity, and cash flows of GE Oil & Gas (the "Company", a business within General Electric Company) for the year ended December 31, 2016. These combined financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these combined financial statements based on our audits.
We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) and in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
In our opinion, the combined financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the combined results of operations and cash flows for the Company for the year ended December 31, 2016, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.
Change in Accounting Principle
As discussed in Note 1 to the combined financial statements, the Company has changed its method of accounting for revenue recognition in 2018 due to the adoption of Accounting Standards Codification 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers.


/s/ KPMG S.p.A.
Florence, Italy
March 16, 2017, except as to Note 17 which is as of December 4, 2017, and Note 1 which is as of November 13, 2018.



BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 51



REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
To the Stockholders and Board of Directors
Baker Hughes, a GE company:
Opinion on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
We have audited Baker Hughes, a GE company and subsidiaries’ (the "Company") internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2018, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. In our opinion, the Company maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2018, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission.
We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) ("PCAOB"), the consolidated and combined statement of financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2018 and 2017, the related consolidated and combined statements of income (loss), comprehensive income (loss), changes in equity, and cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended December 31, 2018, and the related notes (collectively, the "consolidated and combined financial statements"), and our report dated February 19, 2019, expressed an unqualified opinion on those consolidated and combined financial statements.
Basis for Opinion
The Company’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit. We are a public accounting firm registered with the PCAOB and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.
We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit of internal control over financial reporting included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audit also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
Definition and Limitations of Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
/s/ KPMG LLP
Houston, Texas
February 19, 2019


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 52



BAKER HUGHES, A GE COMPANY
CONSOLIDATED AND COMBINED STATEMENTS OF INCOME (LOSS)



Year Ended December 31,
(In millions, except per share amounts)
2018
2017
2016
Revenue:




Sales of goods
$
13,113

$
11,062

$
9,462

Sales of services
9,764

6,117

3,620

Total revenue
22,877

17,179

13,082

Costs and expenses:




Cost of goods sold
11,524

9,486

7,829

Cost of services sold
7,367

4,657

2,321

Selling, general and administrative expenses
2,699

2,535

1,926

Restructuring, impairment and other
433

412

516

Merger and related costs
153

373

33

Total costs and expenses
22,176

17,463

12,625

Operating income (loss)
701

(284
)
457

Other non operating income, net
202

80

3

Interest expense, net
(223
)
(131
)
(102
)
Income (loss) before income taxes and equity in loss of affiliate
680

(335
)
358

Equity in loss of affiliate
(139
)
(11
)

Provision for income taxes
(258
)
(45
)
(173
)
Net income (loss)
283

(391
)
185

Less: Net income attributable to GE O&G pre-merger

42

254

Less: Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests
88

(330
)
(69
)
Net income (loss) attributable to Baker Hughes, a GE company
$
195

$
(103
)
$


 
 
 
Per share amounts:
 
 
 
Basic income (loss) per Class A common share
$
0.46

$
(0.24
)

Diluted income (loss) per Class A common share
$
0.45

$
(0.24
)
 

 
 
 
Cash dividend per Class A common share
$
0.72

$
0.35


Special dividend per Class A common share

$
17.50



See accompanying Notes to Consolidated and Combined Financial Statements



BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 53



BAKER HUGHES, A GE COMPANY
CONSOLIDATED AND COMBINED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)


 
Year Ended December 31,
(In millions)
2018
2017
2016
Net income (loss)
$
283

$
(391
)
$
185

Less: Net income attributable to GE O&G pre-merger

42

254

Less: Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests
88

(330
)
(69
)
Net income (loss) attributable to Baker Hughes, a GE company
195

(103
)

Other comprehensive income (loss):
 
 
 
Investment securities
(3
)
4


Foreign currency translation adjustments
(502
)
(14
)
(416
)
Cash flow hedges
(4
)
12

(8
)
Benefit plans
(64
)
55

54

Other comprehensive income (loss)
(573
)
57

(370
)
Less: Other comprehensive loss attributable to GE O&G pre-merger

(69
)
(356
)
Less: Other comprehensive income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests
(343
)
80

(14
)
Other comprehensive income (loss) attributable Baker Hughes, a GE company
(230
)
46


Comprehensive loss
(290
)
(334
)
(185
)
Less: Comprehensive loss attributable to GE O&G pre-merger

(27
)
(102
)
Less: Comprehensive loss attributable to noncontrolling interests
(255
)
(250
)
(83
)
Comprehensive loss attributable to Baker Hughes, a GE company
$
(35
)
$
(57
)
$


See accompanying Notes to Consolidated and Combined Financial Statements



BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 54



BAKER HUGHES, A GE COMPANY
CONSOLIDATED AND COMBINED STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL POSITION

 
December 31,
(In millions, except par value)
2018
2017
ASSETS
Current Assets:
 
 
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash (1)
$
3,723

$
7,030

Current receivables, net
5,969

6,015

Inventories, net
4,620

4,507

All other current assets
659

872

Total current assets
14,971

18,424

Property, plant and equipment, less accumulated depreciation
6,228

6,959

Goodwill
20,717

19,927

Other intangible assets, net
5,719

6,358

Contract and other deferred assets
1,894

2,044

All other assets
1,838

2,073

Deferred income taxes
1,072

715

Total assets (1)
$
52,439

$
56,500

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Current Liabilities:
 
 
Accounts payable
$
4,025

$
3,377

Short-term debt and current portion of long-term debt (1)
942

2,037

Progress collections and deferred income
1,765

1,775

All other current liabilities
2,288

2,038

Total current liabilities
9,020

9,227

Long-term debt
6,285

6,312

Deferred income taxes
143

490

Liabilities for pensions and other employee benefits
1,018

1,172

All other liabilities
960

889

Equity:
 
 
Class A common stock, $0.0001 par value - 2,000 authorized, 513 and 422 issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively


Class B common stock, $0.0001 par value - 1,250 authorized, 522 and 707 issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively


Capital in excess of par value
18,659

15,083

Retained earnings (loss)
25

(103
)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss
(1,219
)
(703
)
Baker Hughes, a GE company equity
17,465

14,277

Noncontrolling interests
17,548

24,133

Total equity
35,013

38,410

Total liabilities and equity
$
52,439

$
56,500

(1) 
Total assets include $896 million and $1,124 million of assets held on behalf of GE, of which $747 million and $997 million is cash and cash equivalents and $149 million and $127 million is investment securities at December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively, and a corresponding amount of liability is reported in short-term borrowings. See "Note 18. Related Party Transactions" for further details.
See accompanying Notes to Consolidated and Combined Financial Statements


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 55



BAKER HUGHES, A GE COMPANY
CONSOLIDATED AND COMBINED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
(In millions, except per share amounts)
Class A Common Stock
Class B Common Stock
Capital in Excess of Par Value
Parent's Net Investment
Retained Earnings (Loss)
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss
Non-controlling Interests
Total
Balance at December 31, 2015
$

$

$

$
15,920

$

$
(1,532
)
$
157

$
14,545

Effect of adoption of ASU 2014-09




(432
)



(432
)
Comprehensive income:










Net income (loss)




254





(69
)
185

Other comprehensive loss







(356
)
(14
)
(370
)
Changes in Parent's net investment




259





259

Net activity related to noncontrolling interests












93

93

Balance at December 31, 2016



16,001


(1,888
)
167

14,280

Comprehensive income:










Net income





42



4

46

Other comprehensive income (loss)







(69
)
3

(66
)
Changes in Parent's net investment





775


(13
)

762

Net activity related to noncontrolling interests








4

4

Cash contribution received from GE





7,400




7,400

Conversion of Parent's net investment into noncontrolling interest and issuance of Class B common stock





(24,218
)


24,218


Issuance of Class A common stock on acquisition of Baker Hughes




24,798




76

24,874

Special dividend ($17.5 per share)




(7,498
)




(7,498
)
Reallocation of equity based on ownership of GE and previous Baker Hughes stockholders




(1,850
)


1,234

616


Activity after business combination of July 3, 2017:










Net loss






(103
)

(334
)
(437
)
Other comprehensive income







46

77

123

Stock-based compensation cost




37





37

Cash dividends to Class A common stock ($0.35 per share)




(155
)




(155
)
Dividends and paired distributions to GE (1)








(251
)
(251
)
Net activity related to noncontrolling interests




(62
)


(13
)
(133
)
(208
)
Repurchase and cancellation of Class A and Class B common stock




(187
)



(314
)
(501
)
Balance at December 31, 2017


15,083


(103
)
(703
)
24,133

38,410

Effect of adoption of ASU 2016-16 on taxes






25


42

67

Comprehensive income (loss):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income






195


88

283

Other comprehensive loss







(230
)
(343
)
(573
)
Cash dividends to Class A common stock ($0.72 per share)




(224
)

(91
)


(315
)
Dividends and paired distributions to GE (1)








(495
)
(495
)
Effect of exchange of BHGE LLC Units
 
 
4,043

 
 
(282
)
(3,761
)

Repurchase and cancellation of BHGE LLC Units and Class B common stock
 
 
 
 
 
 
(2,087
)
(2,087
)
Repurchase and cancellation of Class A common stock




(374
)




(374
)
Stock-based compensation cost




121





121

Other




10


(1
)
(4
)
(29
)
(24
)
Balance at December 31, 2018
$

$

$
18,659

$

$
25

$
(1,219
)
$
17,548

$
35,013


(1) Cash payments made to GE for dividends on our class B common stock and paired distributions for BHGE LLC units.

See accompanying Notes to Consolidated and Combined Financial Statements


BHGE 2018 FORM 10-K | 56



BAKER HUGHES, A GE COMPANY
CONSOLIDATED AND COMBINED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
 
Year Ended December 31,
(In millions)
2018
2017
2016
Cash flows from operating activities:
 
 
 
Net income (loss)
$
283

$
(391
)
$
185

Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash flows from (used in) operating activities:



Depreciation and amortization
1,486

1,103

550

Provision for deferred income taxes
(249
)
(333
)
(38
)
Gain on sale of Natural Gas Solution business
(171
)


Equity in loss of affiliate
139

11


Changes in operating assets and liabilities:



Current receivables
(204
)
(1,190
)
278

Inventories
(339
)
418

367

Accounts payable
794

303

(256
)
Progress collections and deferred income
(27
)
(293
)
(719
)
Contract and other deferred assets
129

(439
)
(88
)
Other operating items, net
(79
)
12

(17
)
Net cash flows from (used in) operating activities
1,762

(799
)
262

 
 
 
 
Cash flows from investing activities:



Expenditures for capital assets
(995
)
(665
)
(424
)
Proceeds from disposal of assets
458

172

20

Proceeds from business dispositions
453

20


Net cash paid for acquisitions
(89
)
(3,365
)
(1
)
Net cash paid for business interests
(505
)
(10
)
(15
)
Other investing items, net
100

(275
)
(52
)
Net cash flows used in investing activities
(578
)
(4,123
)
(472
)
 
 
 
 
Cash flows from financing activities:



Net repayments of short-term borrowings
(376
)
(663
)
(156
)
Proceeds from the issuance of long-term debt

3,928


Repayments of long-term debt
(684
)
(177
)

Dividends paid
(315
)
(155
)

Dividends and paired distributions to GE
(495
)
(251
)

Repurchase of Class A common stock
(387
)
(174
)

Repurchase of common units from GE by BHGE LLC
(2,099
)
(303
)

Net transfer from Parent

1,498

191

Contribution received from GE

7,400


Other financing items, net
(7
)
(184
)
(137
)
Net cash flows from (used in) financing activities
(4,363
)
10,919

(102
)
Effect of currency exchange rate changes on cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash