Company Quick10K Filing
Quick10K
Health-Right Discoveries
10-Q 2019-06-30 Quarter: 2019-06-30
10-Q 2019-03-31 Quarter: 2019-03-31
10-K 2018-12-31 Annual: 2018-12-31
10-Q 2018-09-30 Quarter: 2018-09-30
10-Q 2018-06-30 Quarter: 2018-06-30
10-Q 2018-03-31 Quarter: 2018-03-31
10-K 2017-12-31 Annual: 2017-12-31
10-Q 2017-09-30 Quarter: 2017-09-30
10-Q 2017-06-30 Quarter: 2017-06-30
10-Q 2017-03-31 Quarter: 2017-03-31
10-K 2016-12-31 Annual: 2016-12-31
10-Q 2016-09-30 Quarter: 2016-09-30
10-Q 2016-06-30 Quarter: 2016-06-30
10-Q 2016-03-31 Quarter: 2016-03-31
10-K 2015-12-31 Annual: 2015-12-31
8-K 2019-05-31 Officers, Exhibits
8-K 2018-10-25 Accountant, Exhibits
8-K 2018-01-10 Officers, Exhibits
SIR Select Income REIT 2,027
BBOX Black Box 35
INIS International Isotopes 34
EXEO Exeo Entertainment 26
REMI Remedent 6
NGLS Targa Resources Partners 0
MAGAA Magna Lab 0
DREM Dream Homes & Development 0
VLP Valero Energy Partners 0
TFLG Trafalgar Resources 0
HRDV 2019-06-30
Part I - Financial Information
Item 1. Financial Statements.
Note 1 - Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Note 2 - Leases
Note 3 - Intangible Assets
Note 4 - Notes Payable
Note 5 - Related Party
Note 6 - Stockholders' Deficit
Note 7 - 2015 Incentive Stock Plan
Note 8 - Income Taxes
Note 9 - Business Segment Information
Note 10 - Litigation
Note 11 - Subsequent Events
Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
Item 3. Quantitative Disclosures About Market Risks.
Item 4. Controls and Procedures.
Part II - Other Information
Item 1. Legal Proceedings.
Item 1A. Risk Factors.
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.
Item 5. Other Information.
Item 6. Exhibits.
EX-31.1 f10q0619ex31-1_health.htm
EX-32.1 f10q0619ex32-1_health.htm

Health-Right Discoveries Earnings 2019-06-30

HRDV 10Q Quarterly Report

Balance SheetIncome StatementCash Flow

10-Q 1 f10q0619_healthrightdiscover.htm QUARTERLY REPORT

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTIONS 13 OR 15 (d) OF THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE
ACT OF 1934 FOR THE QUARTERLY PERIOD ENDED JUNE 30, 2019

 

Commission file number: 333-206839

 

HEALTH-RIGHT DISCOVERIES, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Florida   45-3588650
(State or Other Jurisdiction of   (I.R.S. Employer
Incorporation or Organization)   Identification No.)

 

18851 NE 29th Avenue, Suite 700, Aventura, Florida 33180

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

 

(305) 705-3247

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

 

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (ss.232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class   Trading Symbol(s)   Name of each exchange on which registered
None        

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large Accelerated Filer ☐ Accelerated Filer ☐
Non-accelerated Filer ☐ Smaller reporting company ☒
  Emerging growth company ☒

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐ No ☒

 

The number of shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock, $0.001 par value, as of August 8, 2019 was 22,869,191 shares.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

    Page
     
PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION 1
     
Item 1. Financial Statements. 1
     
  Consolidated Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018 (unaudited) 1
     
  Consolidated Statements of Operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018 (unaudited) 2
     
  Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ deficit for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018 (unaudited) 3
     
  Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018 (unaudited) 4
     
  Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (unaudited) 5
     
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations. 17
     
Item 3. Quantitative Disclosures About Market Risk. 22
     
Item 4. Controls and Procedures. 22
     
PART II - OTHER INFORMATION 23
     
Item 1. Legal Proceedings. 23
     
Item 1A. Risk Factors. 23
     
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds. 23
     
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities.  
     
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures. 23
     
Item 5. Other information. 23
     
Item 6. Exhibits. 23
     
SIGNATURES 24

 

i

 

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements.

 

HEALTH-RIGHT DISCOVERIES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

   June 30,
2019
   December 31,
2018
 
   (Unaudited)     
ASSETS    
         
CURRENT ASSETS:          
Cash and cash equivalents  $2,508,931   $2,149,738 
Accounts receivable, net   75,483    148,225 
Inventories   21,848    44,431 
Prepaid and other assets   8,769    4,000 
Total Current Assets   2,615,031    2,346,394 
           
Property and equipment, net   33,500    37,369 
Right of use asset   162,651    - 
Intangible assets, net   3,499,017    3,731,584 
Goodwill   3,313,226    3,313,226 
           
TOTAL ASSETS  $9,623,425   $9,428,573 
           
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT          
           
CURRENT LIABILITIES:          
Accounts payable and accrued expenses  $1,578,319   $1,100,005 
Income tax payable   -    80,000 
Salaries payable - related party   -    50,000 
Current portion of right of use liability   58,662    - 
Current portion - notes payable, net of discounts of $0 at June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively   2,500,000    2,500,000 
Total Current Liabilities   4,136,981    3,730,005 
           
LONG-TERM LIABILITIES:          
Right of use liability, net of current portion   120,694    - 
Notes payable, net of discounts of $205,561 and $287,785 at June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively   4,944,439    4,862,215 
Deferred tax liability   797,995    905,128 
Total Long-term Liabilities   5,863,128    5,767,343 
           
Total Liabilities   10,000,109    9,497,348 
           
STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT          
Preferred Stock, .001 par value, 5,000,000 shares authorized No shares issued and outstanding June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018   -    - 
Common Stock, .001 par value, 100,000,000 shares authorized 22,869,191 shares issued and outstanding, June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018   22,869    22,869 
Additional paid in capital   1,117,967    1,117,967 
Accumulated deficit   (1,517,520)   (1,209,611)
Total Stockholders’ Deficit   (376,684)   (68,775)
           
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT  $9,623,425   $9,428,573 

 

See accompanying notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

1

 

 

HEALTH-RIGHT DISCOVERIES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(Unaudited)

 

   FOR THE
THREE MONTHS ENDED
JUNE 30,
   FOR THE
SIX MONTHS ENDED
JUNE 30,
 
   2019   2018   2019   2018 
                 
Revenue  $917,251   $1,892,695   $1,961,260   $3,817,334 
                     
Cost of Revenue   136,913    281,647    303,441    657,743 
                     
Gross Profit   780,338    1,611,048    1,657,819    3,159,591 
                     
Operating Expenses                    
General and administrative   557,395    993,796    1,116,060    1,976,887 
Amortization and depreciation   121,121    120,692    242,256    240,870 
Total operating expenses   678,516    1,114,488    1,358,316    2,217,757 
                     
Income from operations   101,822    496,560    299,503    941,834 
                     
Other Expenses                    
Interest expenses   349,057    258,049    696,291    514,327 
Total other expenses   349,057    258,049    696,291    514,327 
                     
Income (loss) before income tax (provision) benefit   (247,235)   238,511    (396,788)   427,507 
                     
Income tax (provision) benefit   67,310    (64,712)   107,133    (115,741)
                     
NET INCOME (LOSS)  $(179,925)  $173,799   $(289,655)  $311,766 
                     
Income (loss) per common share   (0.01)   0.01    (0.01)   0.01 
                     
Weighted average common shares outstanding - basic and diluted   22,869,191    22,869,191    22,869,191    22,869,191 

 

See accompanying notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

2

 

 

HEALTH-RIGHT DISCOVERIES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

 CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)

FOR THE THREE AND SIX MONTHS ENDED JUNE 30, 2019 AND 2018

(Unaudited)

 

           Additional         
   COMMON STOCK   Paid-In   Accumulated     
   Shares   Amount   Capital   Deficit   Total 
                     
BALANCE – December 31, 2018   22,869,191   $22,869   $1,117,967   $(1,209,611)  $(68,775)
                          
Net (loss) for the three months ended March 31, 2019   -    -    -    (109,730)   (109,730)
Adoption of ASU 2016-02   -    -    -    (18,254)   (18,254)
                          
BALANCE – March 31, 2019   22,869,191    22,869    1,117,967    (1,337,595)   (196,759)
                          
Net (loss) for the three months ended June 30, 2019   -    -    -    (179,925)   (179,925)
                          
BALANCE – June 30, 2019   22,869,191   $22,869   $1,117,967   $(1,517,520)  $(376,684)
BALANCE – December 31, 2017   22,869,191   $22,869   $1,117,967   $(542,617)  $598,219 
                          
Net income for the three months ended March 31, 2018   -    -    -    137,967    137,967 
                          
BALANCE – March  31, 2018   22,869,191    22,869    1,117,967    (404,650)   736,186 
                          
Net income for three months ended June 30,2018   -    -    -    173,799    173,799 
                          
BALANCE – June 30, 2018   22,869,191   $22,869   $1,117,967   $(230,851)  $909,985 

 

See accompanying notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

3

 

 

HEALTH-RIGHT DISCOVERIES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

 CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

FOR THE SIX MONTHS ENDED JUNE 30, 2019 AND 2018

(Unaudited)

 

   2019   2018 
         
OPERATING ACTIVITIES:          
Net income (loss)  $(289,655)  $311,766 
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash (used in) provided by operating activities:          
Depreciation expense   3,869    2,484 
Amortization   232,567    232,566 
Right of use liability amortization   (1,549)   - 
Non-cash interest   82,224    199,626 
Deferred income tax benefit   (107,133)   115,741 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:          
Accounts receivable   72,742    96,291 
Inventories   22,583    (12,450)
Prepaid and other assets   (4,769)   - 
Accounts payable and accrued expenses   398,314    (52,223)
Accrued salary to related party   (50,000)   (75,000)
NET CASH PROVIDED BY OPERATING ACTIVITIES   359,193    818,801 
           
INVESTING ACTIVITIES:          
Purchase of property and equipment   -    (41,079)
NET CASH (USED IN) INVESTING ACTIVITIES   -    (41,079)
           
FINANCING ACTIVITIES:          
(Repayment of) loan from related parties   -    (33,512)
NET CASH (USED IN) FINANCING ACTIVITIES   -    (33,512)
           
INCREASE IN CASH   359,193    744,210 
           
CASH - BEGINNING OF PERIOD   2,149,738    1,458,942 
           
CASH - END OF PERIOD  $2,508,931   $2,203,152 
           
Supplemental disclosures of cash flow information:          
Cash paid for interest  $330,136   $375,416 
           
Cash paid for income taxes  $80,000   $- 

 

See accompanying notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

4

 

 

HEALTH-RIGHT DISCOVERIES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(Unaudited)

 

NOTE 1 – Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Health-Right Discoveries, Inc. (the “Company”) was formed under the laws of the State of Florida on October 12, 2011 under the name Four Plex Partners, Inc. and subsequently changed its name to Health-Right Discoveries, Inc. on March 22, 2012. The Company’s primary business was to develop and market an innovative portfolio of both prescription nutritional, OTC monograph and natural products that primarily focus on factors relating to stress-induced conditions and diseases.

 

On September 29, 2017, the Company acquired all the outstanding shares of common stock of Common Compounds, Inc. n/k/a CCI Billing Inc. d/b/a Complete Claim Management (“CCI”) and EZPharmaRx, LLC n/k/a Script Connection, LLC (“SCLLC”). The combined business offers physicians and medical clinics an ancillary program to treat their patients with topical prescription medicine to manage pain. The program is designed for patients with work related injuries managed under worker compensation claims. The program both delivers the topical medicine to the care provider for sale to the patient, as well as providing the care provider with insurance claim processing services on behalf of the patient.

 

The significant accounting policies of the Company were described in Note 1 to the audited consolidated financial statements included in the Company’s 2018 Annual Report on Form 10-K. There have been no significant changes in the Company’s significant accounting policies for the six months ended June 30, 2019.

 

Basis of Presentation

 

Principles of Consolidation 

 

The unaudited consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly-owned or controlled operating subsidiaries. All intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated.

 

The accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements of the Company have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”) for interim financial information and in accordance with the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Therefore, they do not include all information and footnotes normally included in annual consolidated financial statements and should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statement and notes thereto included in the 2018 Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018. In the opinion of the Company’s management, the accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements contain all the adjustments necessary (consisting only of normal recurring accruals) to present the financial position of the Company as of June 30, 2019 and the results of operations and cash flows for the periods presented. The results of operations for the six months ended June 30, 2019 are not necessarily indicative of the operating results for the full fiscal year or any future period. Certain prior period amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current presentation.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of the financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the dates of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting periods. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Certain of the Company’s estimates could be affected by external conditions, including those unique to its industry, and general economic conditions. It is possible that these external factors could have an effect on the Company’s estimates that could cause actual results to differ from its estimates. The Company re-evaluates all of its accounting estimates at least quarterly based on these conditions and record adjustments when necessary.

 

5

 

 

Accounts Receivable

 

Accounts receivable are stated at the amount the Company expects to collect from customers. The Company maintains an allowance for doubtful accounts for estimated losses resulting from the inability of its customers to make required payments. Management has rewarded an allowance for doubtful accounts in the amounts of $13,980 and $0 at June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018 respectively. Management considers the following factors when determining the collectability of specific customer accounts: customer credit-worthiness, past transaction history with the customer, current economic industry trends, and changes in customer payment terms. If the financial condition of the Company’s customers was to deteriorate and adversely affecting their ability to make payments, additional allowances would be required.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

Effective January 1, 2018, the Company adopted guidance issued by the FASB regarding recognizing revenue from contracts with customers. The revenue recognition policies as enumerated below reflect the Company’s accounting policies effective January 1, 2018, which did not have a materially different financial statement result than what the results would have been under the previous accounting policies for revenue recognition.

 

CCI’s revenue results from the consulting services agreements, which included providing services to physicians for billing insurance companies. The Company has determined the performance obligations in these consulting service agreements relate to the satisfaction of billing the insurance company on behalf of the physicians. CCI remits billings to insurance companies on behalf of the physicians, collect the proceeds and remits an agreed upon percentage amount to the physician. The amounts reported as revenue are recorded net of amounts remitted. The Company follows Staff Accounting Bulletin (“SAB”) No. 104, which states that the revenue is not earned until the company has been paid by the insurance company at which time it becomes realized or realizable.

 

Script’s revenue from the sale of products are recognized when the sale is consummated, and title is transferred. The Company and customer enter into an agreement which outlines the place and date of sale, purchase price, payment terms, and the assignment of rights and warranties from the Company to the customer. Management has identified the promise in the sale contract to be the transfer of ownership of the asset. Management believes the asset holds standalone value to the customer as it is not dependent on any other services for functionality purposes and therefore is distinct within the context of the contract and as described in ASC 606-10. The transaction price is set at a fixed dollar amount per fixed quantity (number of assets) and is explicitly stated in each contract. Sales revenue is based on a set price for a set number of assets, which is allocated to the performance obligation in its entirety. The Company has determined the date of transfer to the customer to be the date the customer obtains control and title over the asset and the date which revenue is to be recognized and payment is due. As such, there is no impact to the timing and amounts of revenue recognized for equipment sales related to the implementation of ASC 606.

 

Inventories

 

Inventories, which consist of the Company’s product held for resale, are stated at the lower of cost, determined using the first-in, first-out, or net realizable value. Net realizable value is the estimated selling price, in the ordinary course of business, less estimated costs to complete and dispose of the product.

 

If the Company identifies excess, obsolete or unsalable items, its inventories are written down to their net realizable value in the period in which the impairment is first identified. Shipping and handling costs incurred for inventory purchases and product shipments are recorded in cost of sales in the Company’s statements of operations. The Company recorded $0 loss due to management’s estimate of obsolete inventory, at June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018.

 

6

 

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are stated at cost. Expenditures for additions are capitalized, repairs and maintenance are expensed as incurred. Depreciation is provided using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets, which are as follows:

 

   June 30,
2019
   December 31,
2018
 
Machinery and equipment – 7 years  $52,934   $52,934 
Accumulated depreciation   (19.434)   (15,565)
Total property and equipment  $33,500   $37,369 

 

Intangible Assets

 

Intangible assets continue to be subject to amortization, and any impairment is determined in accordance with ASC 360, “Property, Plant, and Equipment,” intangible assets are stated at historical cost and amortized over their estimated useful lives. The Company uses a straight-line method of amortization, unless a method that better reflects the pattern in which the economic benefits of the intangible asset are consumed or otherwise used up can be reliably determined

 

Intangible assets are tested annually for impairment and are tested for impairment more frequently if events and circumstances indicate that the asset might be impaired. An impairment loss is recognized to the extent that the carrying amount of the asset group exceeds its fair value. Conditions that may indicate impairment include, but are not limited to, a significant adverse change in legal factors or business climate that could affect the value of an asset, a product recall, or an adverse action or assessment by a regulator. If an impairment indicator exists, we test the intangible asset for recoverability. For purposes of the recoverability test, we group our amortizable intangible assets with other assets and liabilities at the lowest level of identifiable cash flows if the intangible asset does not generate cash flows independent of other assets and liabilities. If the carrying value of the intangible asset (asset group) exceeds the undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use and eventual disposition of the intangible asset (asset group), the Company will write the carrying value down to the fair value in the period identified.

 

The Company calculates fair value of our intangible assets as the present value of estimated future cash flows the Company expects to generate from the asset using a risk-adjusted discount rate. In determining our estimated future cash flows associated with our intangible assets, The Company uses estimates and assumptions about future revenue contributions, cost structures and remaining useful lives of the asset (asset group).

 

Intangible assets that have indefinite useful lives are tested annually for impairment and are tested for impairment more frequently if events and circumstances indicate that the asset might be impaired. An impairment loss is recognized to the extent that the carrying amount of the asset group exceeds its fair value.

 

Goodwill

 

Goodwill is measured as the excess of consideration transferred and the net of the acquisition date fair value of assets acquired, and liabilities assumed in a business acquisition. In accordance with ASC 350, “Intangibles—Goodwill and Other,” goodwill and other intangible assets with indefinite lives are no longer subject to amortization but are tested for impairment annually or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the asset might be impaired.

 

The Company reviews the goodwill allocated to each of our reporting units for possible impairment annually as of December 31, 2018 and whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate carrying amount may not be recoverable. When assessing goodwill for impairment, the Company has the option to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether the existence of events or circumstances leads to a determination that it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount. If, after assessing the totality of events or circumstances, the Company determines it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, then the Company performs a two-step impairment test. If the Company concludes otherwise, then no further action is taken. The Company also has the option to bypass the qualitative assessment and only perform a quantitative assessment, which is the first step of the two-step impairment test. In the two-step impairment test, the Company measures the recoverability of goodwill by comparing a reporting unit’s carrying amount, including goodwill, to the estimated fair value of the reporting unit. There were no events or changes in circumstances that indicated potential impairment of intangible assets at June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018.

 

7

 

 

In assessing the qualitative factors, the Company assesses relevant events and circumstances that may impact the fair value and the carrying amount of the reporting unit. The identification of relevant events and circumstances, and how these may impact a reporting unit’s fair value or carrying amount involve significant judgments and assumptions. The judgment and assumptions include the identification of macroeconomic conditions, industry, and market considerations, cost factors, overall financial performance and share price trends, and making the assessment as to whether each relevant factor will impact the impairment test positively or negatively and the magnitude of any such impact.

 

The carrying amount of each reporting unit is determined based upon the assignment of our assets and liabilities, including existing goodwill and other intangible assets, to the identified reporting units. Where an acquisition benefits only one reporting unit, the Company allocates, as of the acquisition date, all goodwill for that acquisition to the reporting unit that will benefit. Where the Company has had an acquisition that benefited more than one reporting unit, The Company has assigned the goodwill to our reporting units as of the acquisition date such that the goodwill assigned to a reporting unit is the excess of the fair value of the acquired business, or portion thereof, to be included in that reporting unit over the fair value of the individual assets acquired and liabilities assumed that are assigned to the reporting unit.

 

If the carrying amount of a reporting unit is in excess of its fair value, an impairment may exist, and the Company must perform the second step of the impairment analysis to measure the amount of the impairment loss, by allocating the reporting unit’s fair value to its assets and liabilities other than goodwill, comparing the carrying amount of the goodwill to the resulting implied fair value of the goodwill, and recording an impairment charge for any excess.

 

Stock-based compensation

 

The Company recognizes compensation expense for stock-based compensation in accordance with ASC Topic 718. For employee stock-based awards, the fair value of the award is calculated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes method for stock options and the quoted price of our common stock for common shares; the expense is recognized over the service period for awards expected to vest. For non-employee stock-based awards, the fair value of the award on the date of grant is calculated in the same manner as employee awards. However, the awards are revalued at the end of each reporting period and the pro rata compensation expense is adjusted accordingly until such time the nonemployee award is fully vested, at which time the total compensation recognized to date equals the fair value of the stock-based award as calculated on the measurement date, which is the date at which the award recipient’s performance is complete. The estimation of stock-based awards that will ultimately vest requires judgment, and to the extent actual results or updated estimates differ from original estimates, such amounts are recorded as a cumulative adjustment in the period estimates are revised.

 

Income Taxes

 

The company uses the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes in accordance with ASC Topic 740, “Income Taxes.” Under this method, income tax expense is recognized for the amount of: (i) taxes payable or refundable for the current year and (ii) deferred tax consequences of temporary differences resulting from matters that have been recognized in an entity’s financial statements or tax returns. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in the results of operations in the period that includes the enactment date. A valuation allowance is provided to reduce the deferred tax assets reported if based on the weight of the available positive and negative evidence, it is more likely than not some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.

 

ASC Topic 740.10.30 clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in an enterprise’s financial statements and prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement attribute for the financial statement recognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. ASC Topic 740.10.40 provides guidance on de-recognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure, and transition. The Company has no material uncertain tax positions for any of the reporting periods presented.

 

8

 

 

Earnings (Loss) Per Share

 

Basic earnings (loss) per share is computed by dividing net income (loss) by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted earnings (loss) per share is computed by dividing net income (loss) by the weighted average number of shares outstanding, noted above.

 

Accounting for Business Combinations

 

In accordance with ASC Topic 805, “Business Combinations,” when accounting for business combinations we are required to recognize the assets acquired, liabilities assumed, contractual contingencies, noncontrolling interests and contingent consideration at their fair value as of the acquisition date. These items are recorded on our unaudited condensed consolidated balance sheets as of the respective acquisition dates based upon their estimated fair values at such dates. The results of operations of acquired businesses are included in the unaudited consolidated statements of income since their respective acquisition dates.

 

The purchase price allocation process requires management to make significant estimates and assumptions with respect to intangible assets, estimated contingent consideration payments and/or pre-acquisition contingencies, all of which ultimately affect the fair value of goodwill established as of the acquisition date. Goodwill acquired in business combinations is assigned to the reporting unit(s) expected to benefit from the combination as of the acquisition date and is then subsequently tested for impairment at least annually. If the fair value of the net assets acquired exceeds the purchase price consideration, we record a gain on bargain purchase. However, in such a case, before the measurement period closes, we perform a reassessment to reconfirm whether we have correctly identified all of the assets acquired and all of the liabilities assumed as of the acquisition date.

 

As part of our accounting for business combinations we are required to estimate the useful lives of identifiable intangible assets recognized separately from goodwill. The useful life of an intangible asset is the period over which the asset is expected to contribute directly or indirectly to the future cash flows of the acquired business. An intangible asset with a finite useful life shall be amortized; an intangible asset with an indefinite useful life shall not be amortized. We base the estimate of the useful life of an intangible asset on an analysis of all pertinent factors, in particular, all of the following factors with no one factor being more presumptive than the other:

 

  The expected use of the asset.

 

  The expected useful life of another asset or a group of assets to which the useful life of the intangible asset may relate.

 

  Any legal, regulatory, or contractual provisions that may limit the useful life.

 

  Our own historical experience in renewing or extending similar arrangements, consistent with our intended use of the asset, regardless of whether those arrangements have explicit renewal or extension provisions.

 

  The effects of obsolescence, demand, competition, and other economic factors.

 

  The level of maintenance expenditures required to obtain the expected future cash flows from the asset.

 

If no legal, regulatory, contractual, competitive, economic, or other factors limit the useful life of an intangible asset to the reporting entity, the useful life of the asset shall be considered to be indefinite. The term indefinite does not mean the same as infinite or indeterminate. The useful life of an intangible asset is indefinite if that life extends beyond the foreseeable horizon—that is, there is no foreseeable limit on the period of time over which it is expected to contribute to the cash flows of the acquired business.

 

9

 

 

Although we believe the assumptions and estimates we have made have been reasonable and appropriate, they are based in part on historical experience and information obtained from the management of the acquired entity and are inherently uncertain. Examples of critical estimates in accounting for acquisitions include but are not limited to:

 

  future expected cash flows from sales of products and services and related contracts and agreements;

 

  discount and long-term growth rates; and

 

  the estimated fair value of the acquisition-related contingent consideration, which is performed using a probability-weighted income approach based upon the forecasted achievement of post-acquisition pre-determined targets;

 

Accounting for Leases

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, “Leases (Topic 842)” (“ASC 842”) that amends the accounting guidance on leases for both lessees and lessors. The new standard establishes a right-of-use (“ROU”) model that requires a lessee to record a ROU asset and a lease liability on the balance sheet for all leases with terms longer than 12 months. Leases will be classified as either finance or operating, with classification affecting the pattern of expense recognition in the income statement. The FASB also subsequently issued amendments to the standard, including providing an additional and optional transition method to adopt the new standard, described below, as well as certain practical expedients related to land easements and lessor accounting. The amendments in this accounting standard update are effective for the Company on January 1, 2019, with early adoption permitted. The Company adopted this accounting standard update effective January 1, 2019.

 

The accounting standard update originally required the use of a modified retrospective approach reflecting the application of the standard to leases existing at, or entered into after, the beginning of the earliest comparative period presented in the financial statements with the option to elect certain practical expedients. A subsequent amendment to the standard provides an additional and optional transition method that allows entities to initially apply the new leases standard at the adoption date and recognize a cumulative effect adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings in the period of adoption. Consequently, an entity’s reporting for the comparative periods presented in the financial statements in which it adopts the new leases standard will continue to be in accordance with ASC Topic 840 if the optional transition method is elected. The Company plans to adopt the standard using the optional transition method with no restatement of comparative periods and a cumulative effect adjustment, if any, recognized as of the date of adoption. The Company does not expect that this standard to have a material effect on its consolidated financial statements due to the recognition of new ROU assets and lease liabilities for lessee activities.

 

As part of the implementation process, the Company assessed its lease arrangements and evaluated practical expedient and accounting policy elections to meet the reporting requirements of this standard. The Company has also evaluated the changes in controls and processes that are necessary to implement the new standard, and no material changes were required. The new standard provides a number of optional practical expedients in transition. The Company expects to elect the ‘package of practical expedients’ which permits us not to reassess under the new standard the prior conclusions about lease identification, lease classification, and initial direct costs. The Company does not expect to elect the use-of-hindsight or the practical expedient pertaining to land easements; the latter not being applicable to the Company. Consequently, on adoption, the Company expects to recognize additional operating liabilities ranging from $100,000 to $200,000, with corresponding ROU assets of approximately the same amount based on the present value of the remaining minimum rental payments under current leasing standards for existing operating leases.

 

The new standard also provides practical expedients for an entity’s ongoing accounting. The Company currently expects to elect the short-term lease recognition exemption for all leases that qualify. As a result, for those leases that qualify, the Company will not recognize ROU assets or lease liabilities, including for existing short-term leases of those assets in transition. The Company also currently expects to elect the practical expedient to not separate lease and non-lease components for the majority of its leases as both lessee and lessor. 

 

10

 

 

NOTE 2 – Leases

 

Adoption of ASC Topic 842, Leases

 

On January 1, 2019, the Company adopted ASC 842, Leases, using a modified retrospective method applied to all contracts as of January 1, 2019. Therefore, for reporting periods beginning after December 31, 2018, the financial statements are prepared in accordance with the current lease standard and the financial statements for all periods prior to January 1, 2019 are presented under the previous lease standard (“ASC 840”).

 

The Company determines if an arrangement is a lease, or contains a lease, when a contract is signed. The Company determines if a lease is an operating or financing lease and records a lease asset and a lease liability upon lease commencement,

 

The Company has operating leases for office space in Arkansas and South Carolina. The Company has no finance leases as of June 30, 2019. For office space, the Company has elected to combine the fixed payments to lease the asset and any fixed non-lease payments (such as maintenance or utility charges) when calculating the lease asset and lease liability.

 

The Company recognizes lease expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term. Certain of our lease agreements include rent payments which are adjusted periodically for inflation. Any change in payments due to changes in inflation rates are recognized as variable lease expense as they are incurred. Variable lease expense also includes costs for property taxes, insurance and services provided by the lessor which are charged based on usage or performance.

 

Most leases have one or more options to renew, with renewal terms that can initially extend the lease term for various periods up to 2 years. The exercise of renewal options for office space and data centers is at the Company’s discretion and are included if they are reasonably certain to be exercised. As of June 30, 2019, the Company’s weighted-average remaining lease term for all leases was approximately 3.04 years.

 

When the rate implicit in the lease is not readily determinable, the Company uses its incremental borrowing rate as its discount rate to determine the present value of its lease payments. The incremental borrowing rates approximate the rate the Company would pay to borrow in the currency of the lease payments on a collateralized basis for the weighted-average life of the lease. As of June 30, 2019, the Company’s weighted-average discount rate was approximately 5.0%.

 

In July 2019, the company decided to terminate its Arkansas lease and did so according to the terms in the Lease agreement.

 

The Company recognized the following related to leases in its Unaudited Consolidated Balance Sheet at June 30, 2019.

 

Leases  Classification in Consolidated Balance Sheet 

June 30,

2019

 
Operating lease assets  Right of use asset  $162,651 
Lease Liabilities:        
Current capital lease liabilities  Right of use liability  $58,662 
Long-term capital lease liabilities  Right of use liability   120,694 
Total capital lease liabilities     $179,356 

 

As of June 30, 2019, the operating lease liabilities will mature over the following periods: 

 

Remainder of 2019  $32,872 
2020   67,258 
2021   69,502 
2022   23,348 
Total remaining lease payments  $192,980 
Less: Imputed interest   (13,624)
Total capital lease liabilities  $179,356 

 

11

 

 

At December 31, 2018, minimum lease payments for operating leases having an initial term in excess of one year under ASC 840 were as follows: 

 

2019  $65,444 
2020   67,238 
2021   59,253 
2022   9,600 
2023   1,600 
Thereafter    
Total minimum lease payments  $203,135 

 

The Company recognized the following related to operating leases in its Unaudited Consolidated Statement of Operations:

 

      Three Months 
   Classification in Unaudited  Ended
June 30,
 
Leases  Consolidated Statement of Operations  2019 
Lease expense  General and administrative and Information technology  $16,303 
Total lease expense     $16,303 

 

      Six Months 
   Classification in Unaudited  Ended
June 30,
 
Leases  Consolidated Statement of Operations  2019 
Lease expense  General and administrative and Information technology  $31,787 
Total lease expense     $31,787 

 

Supplemental cash flow information related to capital leases are as follows:

 

   Six Months 
   Ended
June 30,
 
Leases  2019 
Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of lease liabilities:     
Operating cash flow from capital leases  $31,787 
Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for lease obligations:     
Capital Leases  $ 

 

“Operating lease amortization” presented in the operating activities section of the Unaudited Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows reflects the portion of the capital lease expense that amortized the capital lease asset.

 

NOTE 3 – Intangible Assets

 

Amortizing  Estimates  Gross
Carrying
 
Intangible Assets  Useful Life  Amount 
        
Customer Lists  10 years  $2,653,000 
Tradenames  15 years   377,000 
IP Technologies  10 years   819,000 
Non-compete  5 years   464,000 
       4,313,000 
Less: Accumulated Amortization      (813,983)
         
      $3,499,017 

 

12

 

 

The amortization expense related to the intangible assets was $116,284 and $232,567 for the three and six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018 respectively.

 

The valuation of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed in connection with this acquisition was based on fair values at the acquisition date. The assets purchased and liabilities assumed for these acquisitions have been reflected in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets.

 

NOTE 4 – Notes payable

 

The Company obtained a secured convertible note with a lender for $5 million, interest is payable monthly, at 12.75% per annum, the note matures on September 29, 2020. The note can be converted at any time in whole or in part at $0.44 per share. In addition, the lender received 3,584,279 shares of common stock valued at $0.10 per share along with a 2% original issue discount. The total amount of the discount is $493,345. The Company had incurred $34,917 in loan costs. Both the discount and loan costs are presented as a discount to the note payable. The Company recorded $150,000 of payment-in-kind interest which was added to the note as of December 31, 2018.

 

The Company, as part of consideration for the purchase of CCI and SCLLC, issued a $2.5 million promissory note to the seller. The note is non-interest bearing with five annual payments of $500,000 and matures on September 30, 2022. Interest has been imputed at 12.75% per annum. The note is in default as of September 30, 2018 due to the Company not making the required principal payment. The Company has expensed the unamortized discount of $470,054 and has accrued default interest for three months ended December 31, 2018 in the amount of $107,123 (17% per annum) along with $106,250 interest expense for both the three months ended March 31, 2019 and June 30, 2019. Upon each annual payment date (each, a “Due Date”), the holder may elect to convert the annual installment of the principal amount due into shares of common stock at a conversion price equal to 50% of “fair market value,” which is defined as the average closing price for the shares on the principal market on which they are traded during the thirty (30) trading days prior to the applicable Due Date, provided, further, that (a) the conversion price shall not be lower than $2.00 per share, subject to adjustment for stock splits, stock dividends and similar recapitalization events; and (b) in the event such conversion price as so adjusted is lower than $2.00 per share, the installment payable upon such Due Date may not be converted into shares without written agreement between the Company and the seller.

 

   June 30,
2019
   December 31,
2018
 
         
Note payable – monthly interest, 12.75% per annum, matures on September 29, 2020  $5,150,000   $5,150,000 
Less discounts   (205,561)   (287,785)
Note payable – monthly interest, 17.00% per annum, matures on September 30, 2022   2,500,000    2,500,000 
Less discounts        
Subtotal   7,444,439    7,362,215 
Less: current portion, net of discount $0 and $0   2,500,000    2,500,000 
Long- term portion  $4,944,439   $4,862,215 

 

Principal payments on the above notes mature as follows:

 

Six months ending June 30, 2019:    
2019  $2,500,000 
2020   5,150,000 
2021    
2022    
2023    
Thereafter  $7,650,000 

 

13

 

 

NOTE 5 – Related Party

 

As of June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, the Company has unpaid and accrued salary to its President in the amount of $0 and $50,000, respectively.

 

On January 10, 2018, the Company entered into employment agreement with David Hopkins, its President, effective as of January 1, 2018. Pursuant to the employment agreement, Mr. Hopkins assumed the additional position of Chief Executive Officer of the Company. The employment agreement is for an initial term of three (3) and automatically renews for additional three (3) year periods, provided that the Company achieves Adjusted EBITDA (as defined) of $3,500,000 for any calendar year during the initial term and any renewal term.

 

The employment agreement provides for an initial base salary of $175,000. In the event in any calendar year during the initial term or any renewal term, HRD achieves Adjusted EBITDA of $3,500,000, Mr. Hopkins’ annual base salary shall automatically increase to $250,000 and in the event in any calendar year during the initial term or any renewal term, the Company achieves Adjusted EBITDA of $5,000,000, his annual base salary shall automatically increase to $325,000. Mr. Hopkins will also receive a $600 per month car allowance while the employment agreement is in effect.

 

In addition to the foregoing, pursuant to the employment agreement, Mr. Hopkins was granted an option to purchase 525,000 shares of HRD common stock under the Company’s 2015 Stock Incentive Plan at an exercise price of $0.35 per share. The option vests in six equal semi-annual installments commencing June 30, 2018, expires ten (10) years from the date of grant and is otherwise subject to the terms of the Incentive Plan.

 

In consideration for David Hopkins, the Company’s Chief Executive Officer and President, assuming the additional duties of President of the Company’s two subsidiaries, CCI and SCLLC, on May 31, 2019, the Company entered into an amended and restated employment agreement with Mr. Hopkins, effective as of April 15, 2019 (the “Effective Date”), which superseded the January 2018 employment agreement between the Company and Mr. Hopkins. The amended and restated employment agreement is for an initial term of three (3) years from the Effective Date and automatically renews for additional three (3) year periods, provided that the subsidiaries achieve combined Adjusted EBITDA (as determined by the Company’s accountants from the subsidiaries’ financial statements used in preparing the Company’s audited financial statements) of $3,000,000 for any calendar year during the initial term and any renewal term.

 

The amended and restated employment agreement provides for an initial base salary of $250,000. In the event in any calendar year during the initial term or any renewal term, the Subsidiaries achieve combined Adjusted EBITDA (as determined by the Company’s accountants from the subsidiaries’ financial statements used in preparing the Company’s audited financial statements) of $3,000,000, Mr. Hopkins’ annual base salary shall automatically increase to $300,000 and in the event in any calendar year during the initial term or any renewal term, the subsidiaries achieve combined Adjusted EBITDA (as determined by the Company’s accountants from the subsidiaries’ financial statements used in preparing the Company’s audited financial statements) of $3,500,000, his annual base salary shall automatically increase to $350,000. Mr. Hopkins will also receive a $600 per month car allowance while the amended and restated employment agreement is in effect.

 

NOTE 6 – Stockholders’ Deficit

 

The Company has authorized 100,000,000 shares of common stock $.001 par value and 5,000,000 shares of preferred stock $.001 par value.

  

14

 

 

On September 29, 2017, the Company issued 1,751,580 shares of common stock for the purchase of CCI and SCLLC (see Note 3). Also, on September 29, 2017, the Company issued 3,584,279 shares of its common stock in connection with its $5 million note (see Note 4).

 

NOTE 7 – 2015 Incentive Stock Plan

 

Our 2015 Incentive Stock Plan (the “Incentive Plan”) provides for equity incentives to be granted to our employees, executive officers or directors or to key advisers or consultants. Equity incentives may be in the form of stock options with an exercise price not less than the fair market value of the underlying shares as determined pursuant to the Incentive Plan, restricted stock awards, other stock based awards, or any combination of the foregoing. The Incentive Plan is administered by the board of directors. 3,000,000 shares of our common stock are reserved for issuance pursuant to the exercise of awards under the Incentive Plan. The number of shares so reserved automatically adjusts upward on January 1 of each year, so that the number of shares covered by the Incentive Plan is equal to 15% of our issued and outstanding common stock. As of June 30, 2019, options to purchase 1,175,000 shares at an exercise price of $0.35 per share have been granted and are outstanding under the Incentive Plan.

 

NOTE 8 – Income Taxes

 

Income tax (provision) benefit for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018 was $107,133 and ($115,741), respectively. The effective tax rates for the periods were 27% respectively. The 2018 tax rate reflects the enactment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (the “Act”) which made significant changes to the Internal Revenue Code. Changes include, but are not limited to, a corporate tax rate decrease from 35% to 21% effective for tax years beginning after December 31, 2017.

 

As of June 30, 2019, the Company has approximately $542,500 of federal and state net operating loss carryovers (“NOLs”) which begin to expire in 2031.  

 

In assessing the realization of deferred tax assets, management considers whether it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will be realized.  The ultimate realization of deferred tax assets is dependent upon the generation of future taxable income during the periods in which those temporary differences become deductible.  Management considers the scheduled reversal of deferred tax liabilities, projected future taxable income and tax planning strategies in making this assessment.  Based on the assessment, management has established $0 valuation allowance against the deferred tax asset relating to NOLs because it is more likely than not that all of the deferred tax asset will be realized.

 

The Company files U.S. federal and state of Florida and Arkansas tax returns that are subject to audit by tax authorities beginning with the year ended December 31, 2013. The Company’s policy is to classify assessments, if any, for tax and related interest and penalties as tax expense.

  

NOTE 9 – Business Segment Information

 

The Company has two reportable segments (billing services and OTC and prescription medication) supported by a corporate group which conducts activities that are non-segment specific. The following table present selected financial information about the Company’s reportable segments for the three and six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2018.

 

For the three months ended June 30, 2019

  Consolidated   Billing Services   OTC and Prescription Medication   Corporate 
                 
Revenues  $917,251   $722,558   $194,693   $__ 
Cost of Revenue   136,913     __   136,913    __ 
Long-lived assets   6,865,177    5,990,423    874,754    __ 
Income (loss) before income tax   (247,235)   442,721    45,520    (735,176)
Identifiable assets   3,551,951    2,677,197    874,754    __ 
Depreciation and amortization   121,121    90,841    30,280    

__

 

 

15

 

 

For the six months ended June 30, 2019

  Consolidated   Billing Services   OTC and Prescription Medication   Corporate 
                 
Revenues  $1,961,260   $1,545,444   $415,816   $

__

Cost of Revenue   303,441     __   303,441    

__

Long-lived assets   6,865,177    5,990,423    874,754    

__

Income (loss) before income tax   (396,788)   961,810    85,335    (1,443,933)
Identifiable assets   3,551,951    2,677,197    874,754    

__

Depreciation and amortization   242,256    181,692    60,564    

__

 

For the three months ended June 30, 2018

  Consolidated   Billing Services   OTC and Prescription Medication   Corporate 
                 
Revenues  $1,892,695   $1,499,903   $392,792   $ 
Cost of Revenue   281,647        281,647     
Long-lived assets   7,326,563    6,335,526    991,037     
Income (loss) before income tax   238,511    746,454    77,002    (584,945)
Identifiable assets   4,013,337    3,022,300    991,037     
Depreciation and amortization   120,692    90,519    30,173     

 

For the six months ended June 30, 2018

  Consolidated   Billing Services   OTC and Prescription Medication   Corporate 
                 
Revenues  $3,817,334   $2,943,962   $873,372   $ 
Cost of Revenue   657,743        657,743     
Long-lived assets   7,326,563    6,335,526    991,037     
Income (loss) before income tax   427,507    1,418,351    172,526    (1,163,370)
Identifiable assets   4,013,337    3,022,300    991,037     
Depreciation and amortization   240,870    180,652    60,218     

 

NOTE 10 – Litigation

 

In August 2018, we were served with a complaint (which was amended in September 2018 to include David Hopkins, our CEO, as a defendant), filed in Miami-Dade County, Florida Circuit Court by the seller of CCI and Script. In the complaint, the seller alleges breach of contract and fraud in that we allegedly failed to pay him excess working capital as of the closing of the acquisition of approximately $381,000 and failed to reimburse him for certain credit card expenses. We believe that the seller’s claims are without merit, as his calculation of working capital does not follow the methodology provided for in the Securities Purchase Agreement for the transaction and that in fact, there was a working capital shortfall at closing of approximately $725,000 (for which we demanded payment in June 2018). Moreover, the seller has refused to submit the working capital dispute to the resolution process provided for in the Securities Purchase Agreement. We have answered the complaint denying the seller’s claims and have filed counterclaims against the seller for the sums we believe are due to us for the working capital shortfall and for damages arising from seller’s indemnification obligations under the Securities Purchase Agreement. The action is currently in the discovery and mediation stages.

 

In April 2018, Stephen Andrews, the former CEO of CCI, filed a wrongful termination arbitration claim seeking recovery in the amount in excess of $500,000. In addition to raising defenses, the Company has filed a counterclaim alleging violation of non-disclosure/non-compete agreements by Mr. Andrews and anticipates filing additional counterclaims prior to arbitration, which was originally scheduled to take place in June 2019, but which has been postponed with no new date set.

 

NOTE 11 – Subsequent Events

 

The Company has evaluated subsequent events through the date that the financial statements were issued and determined that there were no subsequent events requiring adjustment to or disclosure in the financial statements.

 

16

 

 

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

 

Unless the context otherwise requires, references in this report to “HRD,” “Health-Right,” “the Company,” “we,” “our” and “us” refers to Health-Right Discoveries, Inc. and its subsidiaries.

 

Forward-Looking Statements

 

Certain statements made in this report are “forward-looking statements” regarding the plans and objectives of management for future operations. Such statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements included herein are based on current expectations that involve numerous risks and uncertainties. Our plans and objectives are based, in part, on assumptions involving judgments with respect to, among other things, future economic, competitive and market conditions and future business decisions, all of which are difficult or impossible to predict accurately and many of which are beyond our control. Although we believe that our assumptions underlying the forward-looking statements are reasonable, any of the assumptions could prove inaccurate and, therefore, there can be no assurance that the forward-looking statements included in this report will prove to be accurate. In light of the significant uncertainties inherent in the forward-looking statements included herein particularly in view of the current state of our operations, the inclusion of such information should not be regarded as a statement by us or any other person that our objectives and plans will be achieved. We undertake no obligation to revise or update publicly any forward-looking statements for any reason.

 

Historical Background

 

Health-Right was founded as a natural biotech company that sought to combine science and nutrition to develop branded ingredients, formulations and products that seek to provide a better quality of life for consumers who primarily suffer from stress-induced viruses and diseases. The Company developed a formulation platform by utilizing and scientifically combining various natural ingredients to help positively influence the interrelationship between stress and the immune system. The Company initially applied the formulation platform to Advanced H-Plex Defense Formula 11, its first product (“H-Plex Defense”), an all-natural dietary supplement whose formulation sought to address less than optimal nutrition and nutritional deficiencies to aid persons afflicted with Herpes Simplex Virus 1. Despite test marketing H-Plex Defense through the end of 2014 and positive customer feedback, HRD was unable to raise sufficient capital to complete development of and commercialize H-Plex Defense.

 

Accordingly, during 2016, the Company shifted its focus to identifying and exploring various opportunities for growth and revenue generation through the acquisition of other products, technologies or companies in the natural biotech, healthcare, nutraceutical and related fields.

 

Business Overview

 

On September 29, 2017, pursuant to a Securities Purchase Agreement dated August 17, 2017, the Company acquired (the “Acquisition”) all the outstanding shares of Common Compounds, Inc., n/k/a CCI Billing, Inc. d/b/a Complete Claim Management (“CCI”) and EZPharmaRx, LLC n/k/a Script Connection, LLC (“SCLLC”). HRD, through its subsidiaries, CCI and SCLLC, along with licensed pharmaceutical wholesalers, offer and provide their respective services to physician practices that desire to prescribe and dispense certain pharmaceutical products and medications in the practice’s office to patients receiving treatment for work-related injuries (“In-Office Dispensing Services”).

 

CCI offers and provides administrative services and billing services to physician practices (each a “Practice” and collectively, the “Practices”) desiring to make certain over-the-counter products, including non-narcotic topical medications, patches, and creams (“OTC Products”) and certain prescription medications (“Prescription Medications”) available to patients in the physician practice’s office. Each participating Practice is responsible for obtaining and maintaining any necessary and appropriate licenses, permits, or other documentation required to order, receive, store, and dispense OTC Products or Prescription Medications in the Practice’s office in accordance with applicable federal and state law. Such services include, but are not limited to, assisting Practices with insurance claim processing, prior authorization, billing and collections, and recordkeeping. CCI offers its services to Practices participating in the OTC Program and the Full-Formulary Program. CCI also provides billing and collection services on behalf of SCLLC in connection with SCLLC’s sales and distribution of OTC Products to Practices participating in the OTC Program.

 

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SCLLC offers OTC Products to Practices that desire to make such products available to patients in the Practice’s office through participation in the OTC Program. SCLLC is not a compounding pharmacy, and neither CCI nor SCLLC is involved in creating topicals with compounding pharmacies.

 

Practices participating in the Full-Formulary Program may order and obtain certain Prescription Medications directly from licensed pharmaceutical wholesaler that oversees and manages the sale and distribution of Prescription Medications in connection with the Full-Formulary Program.

 

Since completion of the Acquisition, the Company has focused on restructuring CCI’s and SCLLC’s business operations and refining their business model to improve efficiency and profitability, as well as expanding those operations.

 

The Acquisition

 

The purchase price for the Acquisition (the “Purchase Price”) consisted of (a) $6,100,000 in cash (the “Cash Purchase Price”); and (b) 1,751,580 “restricted” shares of HRD’s common stock (the “Acquisition Shares”). The Purchase Price was paid at Closing by (a) payment by the Company to the seller of $3,600,000 of the Cash Purchase Price; (b) issuance by the Company to the seller of the Acquisition Shares; and (c) execution and delivery to the seller of a convertible promissory note for the $2,500,000 balance of the Cash Purchase Price (the “Purchase Price Note”).

 

The Purchase Price Note, which does not bear interest, is payable in five equal annual installments of $500,000 on the first, second, third, fourth and fifth anniversaries of the Closing (each a “Due Date”). Upon each Due Date, the seller, at his sole option, may elect to convert the annual installment then due under the Note, into shares of Health-Right’s common stock (the “HRD Shares”) at a conversion price equal to 50% of “fair market value,” which is defined as the average closing price for the HRD Shares on the principal market on which they are traded during the thirty (30) trading days prior to the applicable Due Date, provided, further, that (a) the conversion price shall not be lower than $2.00 per HRD Share, subject to adjustment for stock splits, stock dividends and similar recapitalization events; and (b) in the event such conversion price as so adjusted is lower than $2.00 per HRD Share, the installment payable upon such Due Date may not be converted into HRD Shares without written agreement between the Company and the seller. The Company is currently disputing payment of the Purchase Price Note in the pending litigation between the seller and HRD described in “Item 3. Legal Proceedings” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

In order to finance the Acquisition, we also entered into a securities purchase agreement with GPB Debt Holdings II, LLC (“GPB”) at Closing (the “GPB Purchase Agreement”). Pursuant to the GPB Purchase Agreement, we sold and issued to GPB a $5,000,000 principal amount senior secured convertible note (the “GPB Note”), for an aggregate purchase price of $4,900,000 (a 2.0% original issue discount). In addition, Health-Right issued to GPB 3,584,279 HRD Shares (the “GPB Shares”).

 

The GPB Note, which matures on the third anniversary of Closing (the “Maturity Date”), provides for monthly payments of interest only, which accrues at the rate of 12.75% per annum. In addition, the GPB Note also provides for an annual payment of paid in kind interest at the rate of 3.0% per annum.

 

The GPB Note (including accrued and unpaid interest) may be prepaid, in whole or in part, so long as a minimum of $500,000 is prepaid each time a repayment is made, at any time prior to the Maturity Date, upon thirty (30) days’ prior written notice; provided, however, that during such notice period, GPB may exercise its conversion rights described below with respect to the portion of the GPB Note to be repaid. Upon a prepayment, in whole or in part, the Company shall pay GPB an additional success fee equal to (a) 2% of any such payment if such payment is paid prior to the first anniversary of Closing; (b) 4% of any such payment if such amount is paid on or after the first anniversary of Closing; and (c) 6% of any such payment if such amount is paid on or after the second anniversary of Closing, but prior to the Maturity Date.

 

The GPB Note is convertible at any time, in whole or in part, at GPB’s option, into HRD Shares at a conversion price of $0.44 per GPB Share, with customary adjustments for stock splits, stock dividends and other recapitalization events and anti-dilution provisions set forth in the GPB Note, including adjustments in the event the Company sells HRD Shares or HRD Share equivalents at an effective purchase price lower than the conversion price then in effect.

 

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The GPB Note (a) provides for customary affirmative and negative covenants, including restrictions on Health-Right incurring subsequent debt, and (b) contains customary event of default provisions with a default interest rate of the lesser of 17.75% for the cash interest and 8.0% for the paid in-kind interest or the maximum rate permitted by law. Upon the occurrence of an event of default, GPB may require the Company to redeem the GPB Note at 120% of the then outstanding principal balance. The GPB Note is secured by a lien on all of the assets of the Company, including its intellectual property, pursuant to a security agreement entered into between the Company and GPB at Closing.

 

Corporate Information

 

The Company was incorporated in the state of Florida on October 11, 2011 under the name “Four Plex Partners, Inc.” and changed its name to “Health-Right Discoveries, Inc.” on March 22, 2012.

 

Our executive offices are located at 18851 NE 29th Avenue, Suite 700, Aventura, Florida 33180 and our telephone number is (305) 705-3247. Our corporate website is www.health-right.com. Information appearing on our corporate website is not part of this report.

 

Results of Operations

 

Three months ended June 30, 2019 compared to three months ended June 30, 2018

 

For the three months ended June 30, 2019, we had revenues of $917,251, as compared to $1,892,695 for the three months ended June 30, 2018. Cost of revenue was $136,913 for the three months ended June 30, 2019, as compared to $281,647 the 2018 quarter. The decline in revenues and cost of revenue from the 2018 quarter to the 2019 quarter, reflects the restructuring by the Company of CCI’s and SCLLC’s business operations and refinement of their business model to improve efficiency and profitability and allow for operational expansion.

 

General and administrative costs were $557,395 for the three months ended June 30, 2019, as compared to $993,796 for the three months ended June 30, 2018, with the decrease similarly attributable to the restructuring and refinement of business operations. Interest expense for the 2019 quarter increased approximately 26% to $349,057, from $258,049 for the 2018 quarter. Interest in both periods largely reflects interest on the issuance of notes to the seller and the lender on September 29, 2017, in connection with completing and financing the Acquisition. The increase in interest expense in the 2019 quarter was largely attributable to the accrual of interest on the Purchase Price Note under the default rate. The accrual resulted from the Company disputing payment of the Purchase Price Note in the pending litigation between the seller and HRD described in “Item 3. Legal Proceedings” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Income tax benefit for the three months ended June 30, 2019 was $67,310, as compared to income tax provision of $64,712 for the three months ended June 30, 2018.

 

The Company had a net loss for the three months ended June 30, 2019 of $179,925, as compared to net income of $173,799 for the three months ended June 30, 2018. The change from net income in the 2018 quarter to a net loss in the 2019 quarter, was attributable in large part to the accrual of interest on the Purchase Price Note at the default rate as set forth above.

 

Six months ended June 30, 2019 compared to six months ended June 30, 2018

 

For the six months ended June 30, 2019, we had revenues of $1,961,260, as compared to $3,817,334 for the six months ended June 30, 2018. Cost of revenue was $303,441 for the six months ended June 30, 2019, as compared to $657,743 the 2018 period. The decline in revenues and cost of revenue from the 2018 period to the 2019 period, reflects the restructuring by the Company of CCI’s and SCLLC’s business operations and refinement of their business model to improve efficiency and profitability and allow for operational expansion.

 

General and administrative costs were $1,116,060 for the six months ended June 30, 2019, as compared to $1,976,887 for the six months ended June 30, 2018, with the decrease similarly attributable to the restructuring and refinement of business operations. Interest expense for the 2019 period increased approximately 26% to $696,291, from $514,327 for the 2018 period. Interest in both periods largely reflects interest on the issuance of notes to the seller and the lender on September 29, 2017, in connection with completing and financing the Acquisition. The increase in interest expense in the 2019 period was largely attributable to the accrual of interest on the Purchase Price Note under the default rate. The accrual resulted from the Company disputing payment of the Purchase Price Note in the pending litigation between the seller and HRD described in “Item 3. Legal Proceedings” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

 

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Income tax benefit for the six months ended June 30, 2019 was $107,133, as compared to income tax provision of $115,741 for the six months ended June 30, 2018.

 

The Company had a net loss for the six months ended June 30, 2019 of $289,655, as compared to net income of $311,766 for the six months ended June 30, 2018. The change from net income in the 2018 period to a net loss in the 2019 period, was attributable in large part to the accrual of interest on the Purchase Price Note at the default rate as set forth above.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

As of June 30, 2019, total assets were $9,623,425, as compared to $9,428,573 on December 31, 2018, with the increase attributable to additional cash on hand from operations, offset by decreases in accounts receivable and inventories. Total current liabilities as of June 30, 2019 were $4,136,981, as compared to $3,730,005 as of December 31, 2018. As of June 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, the Company had long-term liabilities of $5,863,128 and $5,767,343 respectively, with such increase attributable in large part due to a right of use liability, net of current portion of $120,694, incurred during the first and second quarters of 2019.

 

After closing of the acquisition in September 2017, dispute arose between the seller of CCI and SCLLC and the Company, (which is the subject of pending litigation). Such dispute relates to amounts the Company believes are due it from the seller (a) as a result of a shortfall in working capital at closing of the Acquisition; and (b) pursuant to seller’s indemnification obligations under the Securities Purchase Agreement. We are seeking to set off certain of the sums we believe are due us against principal and interest payments under the CCI Note, and as such may be deemed to be technically in default thereunder, resulting in a reclassification of certain long-term liabilities to current liabilities effective December 31, 2018, pending resolution of the dispute.

 

Net cash provided by operating activities was to $359,193 for the six months ended June 30, 2019, as compared to net cash provided by operating activities of $818,801 for the 2018 period, reflecting the restructuring and refinement of our operations.

 

Net cash used in investing activities was $-0- for six months ended June 30, 2019, as compared to $41,079 for the six months ended June 30, 2018, reflecting purchases of property and equipment in the 2018 period.

 

Net cash used in financing activities was $-0- for the six months ended June 30, 2019, as compared to $33,512 for the six months ended June 30, 2018, representing the repayment of shareholder loans by the Company during the 2018 period.

 

The Company believes that its existing capital resources when combined with anticipated cash flow from operations, will allow it to fund its operations for at least twelve (12) months from the date of his report. However, there can be no assurance that the Company will not require additional financing to achieve sustained profitability. While we believe additional financing may available to us, if required, there can be no assurance that equity or debt financing will be available on commercially reasonable terms or otherwise, when, as and if needed. Moreover, any such additional financing may dilute the interests of existing shareholders. The absence of additional financing, when needed, could substantially harm the Company, its business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Revenue Recognition

 

As of January 1, 2018, the Company adopted ASU 2014-09 and all subsequent ASUs that modified ASC 606. As part of the implementation process the Company performed an analysis to identify accounting policies that needed to change and additional disclosures that are required. The Company considered factors such as customer contracts with unique revenue recognition considerations, the nature and type of goods and services offered, the degree to which contracts include multiple performance obligations or variable consideration, and the pattern in which revenue is currently recognized, among other things. All of the Company’s revenue streams were evaluated, and similar performance obligations resulted under the new standard. In addition, the Company considered recognition under the new standard and concluded the timing of the Company’s revenue recognition will remain the same. The Company has also evaluated the changes in controls and processes that are necessary to implement the new standard, and no material changes were required.

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CCI’s revenue predominantly represents consulting services agreements, which included providing services to physicians for billing insurance companies. The amounts reported as revenue are net of amounts remitted.

 

SCLLC’s revenue from the sale of products are recognized when the sale is consummated, and title is transferred. The Company and customer enter into an agreement which outlines the place and date of sale, purchase price, payment terms, and the assignment of rights and warranties from the Company to the customer. Management has identified the promise in the sale contract to be the transfer of ownership of the asset. Management believes the asset holds standalone value to the customer as it is not dependent on any other services for functionality purposes and therefore is distinct within the context of the contract and as described in ASC 606-10. As such, management has identified the transfer of the asset as the performance obligation. The transaction price is set at a fixed dollar amount per fixed quantity (number of assets) and is explicitly stated in each contract. Sales revenue is based on a set price for a set number of assets, which is allocated to the performance obligation discussed above, in its entirety. The Company has determined the date of transfer to the customer to be the date the customer obtains control and title over the asset and the date which revenue is to be recognized and payment is due. As such, there is no impact to the timing and amounts of revenue recognized for equipment sales related to the implementation of ASC 606.

 

Accounting for Leases

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, “Leases (Topic 842)” (“ASC 842”) that amends the accounting guidance on leases for both lessees and lessors. The new standard establishes a right-of-use (“ROU”) model that requires a lessee to record a ROU asset and a lease liability on the balance sheet for all leases with terms longer than twelve (12) months. Leases will be classified as either finance or operating, with classification affecting the pattern of expense recognition in the income statement. The FASB also subsequently issued amendments to the standard, including providing an additional and optional transition method to adopt the new standard, described below, as well as certain practical expedients related to land easements and lessor accounting. The amendments in this accounting standard update are effective for the Company on January 1, 2019, with early adoption permitted. The Company adopted this accounting standard update effective January 1, 2019.

 

The accounting standard update originally required the use of a modified retrospective approach reflecting the application of the standard to leases existing at, or entered into after, the beginning of the earliest comparative period presented in the financial statements with the option to elect certain practical expedients. A subsequent amendment to the standard provides an additional and optional transition method that allows entities to initially apply the new leases standard at the adoption date and recognize a cumulative effect adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings in the period of adoption. Consequently, an entity’s reporting for the comparative periods presented in the financial statements in which it adopts the new leases standard will continue to be in accordance with ASC Topic 840 if the optional transition method is elected. The Company plans to adopt the standard using the optional transition method with no restatement of comparative periods and a cumulative effect adjustment, if any, recognized as of the date of adoption. The Company does not expect that this standard to have a material effect on its consolidated financial statements due to the recognition of new ROU assets and lease liabilities for lessee activities.

 

As part of the implementation process, the Company assessed its lease arrangements and evaluated practical expedient and accounting policy elections to meet the reporting requirements of this standard. The Company has also evaluated the changes in controls and processes that are necessary to implement the new standard, and no material changes were required. The new standard provides a number of optional practical expedients in transition. The Company expects to elect the ‘package of practical expedients’ which permits us not to reassess under the new standard the prior conclusions about lease identification, lease classification, and initial direct costs. The Company does not expect to elect the use-of-hindsight or the practical expedient pertaining to land easements; the latter not being applicable to the Company. Adoption of the new standard resulted in the Company recognize additional operating liabilities in the amount of $207,058, with the corresponding recording of assets of $188,804 based on the present value of the remaining minimum rental payments under current leasing standards for existing operating leases. The cumulative effect adjustment to accumulate deficit as of January 1, 2019 was $18,254.

 

The new standard also provides practical expedients for an entity’s ongoing accounting. The Company currently expects to elect the short-term lease recognition exemption for all leases that qualify. As a result, for those leases that qualify, the Company will not recognize ROU assets or lease liabilities, including for existing short-term leases of those assets in transition. The Company also currently expects to elect the practical expedient to not separate lease and non-lease components for the majority of its leases as both lessee and lessor.

 

Intangible Assets

 

Intangible assets consist primarily of the Tradenames, IP Technologies, Customer list, and a Non-compete agreement resulting from the acquisition referred to in Note 3. These intangible assets have finite lives and are amortized over the periods in which they provide benefit. The Company assesses the impairment of long-lived assets, including identifiable intangible assets subject to amortization, whenever significant events or significant changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value may not be recoverable. Intangible assets with indefinite lives, are subject to impairment testing in accordance with accounting standards governing such on an annual basis, or more frequently if an event or change in circumstances indicates that the fair value of a reporting unit has been reduced below its carrying value. See Note 3 to the unaudited consolidated financial statements for disclosure on intangible assets.

 

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Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Significant estimates included deferred revenue, costs incurred related to deferred revenue, the useful lives of property and equipment, the useful lives of intangible assets and accounting for the business combination.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes in accordance with ASC 740, Accounting for Income Taxes, as clarified by ASC 740-10, Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes. Under this method, deferred income taxes are determined based on the estimated future tax effects of differences between the financial statement and tax basis of assets and liabilities given the provisions of enacted tax laws. Deferred income tax provisions and benefits are based on changes to the assets or liabilities from year to year. In providing for deferred taxes, the Company considers tax regulations of the jurisdictions in which the Company operates, estimates of future taxable income, and available tax planning strategies. If tax regulations, operating results or the ability to implement tax-planning strategies vary, adjustments to the carrying value of deferred tax assets and liabilities may be required. Valuation allowances are recorded related to deferred tax assets based on the “more likely than not” criteria of ASC 740.

 

ASC 740-10 requires that the Company recognize the financial statement benefit of a tax position only after determining that the relevant tax authority would more likely than not sustain the position following an audit. For tax positions meeting the “more-likely-than-not” threshold, the amount recognized in the financial statements is the largest benefit that has a greater than 50 percent likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement with the relevant tax authority.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

There are no off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that is material to investors.

 

Item 3. Quantitative Disclosures About Market Risks.

 

As a “smaller reporting company,” we are not required to provide the information required by this Item.

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures.

 

Management’s Report on Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

Our President and Chief Executive Officer, as our principal Executive, Financial and Accounting Officer, conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures, as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”), as amended, as of June 30, 2019, to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports filed or submitted by us under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the rules and forms adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”), including to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports filed or submitted by us under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our President, as our Principal Executive, Financial and Accounting Officer, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Based on that evaluation, our President has concluded that as of June 30, 2019, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective at the reasonable assurance level due to the material weaknesses identified and described in Item 9A(b) of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Our President and Chief Executive Officer, as our principal Executive, Financial and Accounting Officer, does not expect that our disclosure controls or internal controls will prevent all error and all fraud. Although our disclosure controls and procedures were designed to provide reasonable assurance of achieving their objectives and our principal executive officer has determined that our disclosure controls and procedures are effective at doing so, a control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute assurance that the objectives of the system are met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented if there exists in an individual a desire to do so. There can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions.

 

Changes in Internal Controls Over Financial Reporting

 

There were no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting that occurred during the period covered by this report that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

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PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings.

 

In addition to the legal proceeding described in response to “Item 3. Legal Proceedings” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018, from time to time, we may become party to litigation or other legal proceedings that we consider to be a part of the ordinary course of our business.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors.

 

As a “smaller reporting company,” we are not required to provide the information required by this Item.

 

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.

 

None.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.

 

Not applicable.

 

Item 5. Other Information.

 

None.

 

Item 6. Exhibits.

 

Exhibit
Number
  Description of Exhibit
31.1   Section 302 Certification
32.1   Section 906 Certification
101.INS   XBRL Instance Document
101.SCH   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
101.CAL   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
101.DEF   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
101.LAB   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
101.PRE   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

 

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

  HEALTH-RIGHT DISCOVERIES, INC.
   
Dated: August 9, 2019 By: /s/ David Hopkins
    David Hopkins, President and
Chief Executive Officer
    (Principal Executive, Financial and
Accounting Officer)

 

 

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